Science.gov

Sample records for channel maintenance activities

  1. Observations of the Behavior and Distribution of Fish in Relation to the Columbia River Navigation Channel and Channel Maintenance Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, R. L.; Mueller, Robert P.; Weiland, Mark A.; Johnson, P. N.

    2001-10-19

    This report is a compilation of 7 studies conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers between 1995 and 1998 which used hydroacoustic methods to study the behavior of migrating salmon in response to navigation channel maintenance activities in the lower Columbia River near river mile 45. Differences between daytime and nighttime behavior and fish densities were noted. Comparisons were made of fish distribution across the river (in the channel, channel margin or near shore) and fish depth upstream and downstream of dikes, dredges, and pile driving areas.

  2. Large Conductance Ca2+-Activated and Voltage-Activated K+ Channels Contribute to the Rise and Maintenance of Estrogen-Induced Uterine Vasodilation and Maintenance of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Uterine blood flow (UBF) increases greater than 4-fold 90 min after systemic estradiol-17β (E2β) in nonpregnant sheep and remains elevated longer than 6–8 h; mean arterial pressure (MAP) is unchanged. Large-conductance Ca+2-activated (BKCa) and voltage-activated (KV) K+ channels contribute to the acute rise in UBF; their role in maintaining UBF and MAP longer than 90 min is unknown. We examined this in five nonpregnant, ovariectomized ewes with uterine artery (UA) flow probes and catheters in a UA for infusion of K+ channel inhibitors and uterine vein to sample venous effluent. Animals received systemic E2β (1.0 μg/kg; control), E2β+UA tetraethylammonium (TEA; 0.4–0.8 mm, n = 4), and E2β+UA 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 0.01–0.08 mm, n = 4) to block BKCa and KV, respectively, while monitoring MAP, heart rate, and UBF. Uterine cGMP synthesis was measured. Ninety minutes after E2β, UBF rose 4.5-fold, uterine vascular resistance (UVR) fell greater than 5-fold and MAP was unchanged [78 ± 0.8 (sem) vs. 77 ± 1.5 mm Hg] in control studies and before UA inhibition with TEA and 4-AP. Between 90 and 120min, UBF, UVR, and MAP were unchanged after E2β alone. E2β+TEA dose dependently decreased ipsilateral UBF and increased UVR (24 ± 8.9 and 38 ± 16%, respectively, at 0.8 mm; P < 0.03); MAP was unchanged. Contralateral UBF/UVR were unaffected. E2β+4-AP also dose dependently decreased ipsilateral UBF and increased UVR (27 ± 5.3 and 76 ± 18%, respectively, at 0.08 mm; P < 0.001); however, MAP rose 27 ± 6.9% (P ≤ 0.006). E2β increased uterine cGMP synthesis greater than 3.5-fold and was unaffected by local K+ channel inhibition. BKCa and KV contribute to the rise and maintenance of E2β-induced uterine vasodilation, which is partially cGMP dependent. Systemic vascular KV also contributes to maintaining MAP after systemic E2β. PMID:23070547

  3. Proposed SOLCOST maintenance activities

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    This document provides a short description of work that has been accomplished to date and work in progress. A discussion of the program status as it is currently configured follows and finally proposed work by Solar Environmental Engineering Company (SEEC) in its most recently signed contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) is given. Early statements are designed to give the reader a good background so that the suggested SOLCOST maintenance activities will be more easily understood.

  4. Maintenance of large deltas through channelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giosan, L.; Constatinescu, S.; Filip, F.

    2013-12-01

    A new paradigm for delta restoration is currently taking shape using primarily Mississippi delta examples. Here we propose an alternative for delta maintenance primarily envisioned for wave-influenced deltas based on Danube delta experiences. Over the last half century, while the total sediment load of the Danube dramatically decreased due to dam construction on tributaries and its mainstem, a grand experiment was inadvertently run in the Danube delta: the construction of a dense network of canals, which almost tripled the water discharge toward the interior of the delta plain. We use core-based and chart-based sedimentation rates and patterns to explore the delta transition from the natural to an anthropogenic regime, to understand the effects of far-field damming and near-field channelization, and to construct a conceptual model for delta development as a function sediment partition between the delta plain and the delta coastal fringe. We show that sediment fluxes increased to the delta plain due to channelization, counteracting sea level rise. In turn, the delta coastal fringe was most impacted by the Danube's sediment load collapse. Furthermore, we show that morphodynamic feedbacks at the river mouth are crucial in trapping sediment near the coast and constructing wave-dominated deltas or lobes or delaying their destruction. As a general conclusion, we suggest that increased channelization that mimics and enhances natural processes may provide a simple solution for keeping delta plains above sea level and that abandonment of wave-dominated lobes may be the most long term efficient solution for protecting the internal fluvial regions of deltas and provide new coastal growth downcoast.

  5. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  6. Active maintenance of semantic representations.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Ryoji

    2014-12-01

    In research on verbal working memory, articulatory rehearsal, a maintenance mechanism for phonological representations, has undergone intensive and excellent study. Possible mechanisms for semantic representation have received less attention. However, several studies have reported a double dissociation in types of memory deficits (semantic memory difficulties vs. phonological memory difficulties). This suggests the separability of two maintenance mechanisms. The present study focused on this separability in individuals with normal memory abilities, using a dual-task interference paradigm. The results indicate a crossover interaction between memory and interference task effects: Preventing articulatory rehearsal more strongly disrupted the phonological memory task, whereas performing a tapping task that interfered with attentional control more strongly disrupted semantic memory. These results suggest that semantic representations are actively maintained by a mechanism other than phonological maintenance. PMID:24687734

  7. Predictive techniques for river channel evolution and maintenance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Predicting changes in alluvial channel morphology associated with anthropogenic and natural changes in flow and/or sediment supply is a critical part of the management of riverine systems. Over the past few years, advances in the understanding of the physics of sediment transport in conjunction with rapidly increasing capabilities in computational fluid dynamics have yielded now approaches to problems in river mechanics. Techniques appropriate for length scales ranging from reaches to bars and bedforms are described here. Examples of the use of these computational approaches are discussed for three cases: (1) the design of diversion scenarios that maintain channel morphology in steep cobble-bedded channels in Colorado, (2) determination of channel maintenance flows for the preservation of channel islands in the Snake River in Idaho, and (3) prediction of the temporal evolution of deposits in lateral separation zones for future assessment of the impacts of various dam release scenarios on lateral separation deposits in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. With continued development of their scientific and technical components, the methodologies described here can provide powerful tools for the management of river environments in the future.

  8. Cognitive Aging: Activity Patterns and Maintenance Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilhooly, K. J.; Gilhooly, M. L.; Phillips, L. H.; Harvey, D.; Murray, A.; Hanlon, P.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined relationships between cognitive functioning in older people and (1) levels of mental, physical and social activities, and (2) intentions regarding maintenance of cognitive functioning. Participants (N = 145) were 70-91 years of age, varied in health status and socio-economic backgrounds. Current cognitive functioning was…

  9. The Effect of Line Maintenance Activity on Airline Safety Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoades, Dawna L.; Reynolds, Rosemarie; Waguespack, Blaise, Jr.; Williams, Michael

    2005-01-01

    One of the arguments against deregulation of the airline industry has been the possibility that financially troubled carriers would be tempted to lower line maintenance spending, thus lowering maintenance quality and decreasing the overall safety of the carrier. Given the financial crisis triggered by the events of 9/11: it appears to be a good time to revisit this issue. This paper examines the quality of airline line maintenance activity and examines the impact of maintenance spending on maintenance quality and overall safety. Findings indicate that increased maintenance spending is associated with increased line maintenance activity and increased overall safety quality for the major U.S. carriers.

  10. Impacts of maintenance channel dredging in a northern Adriatic coastal lagoon. II: Effects on macrobenthic assemblages in channels and ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, Massimo; Pasteris, Andrea; Guerra, Roberta; Abbiati, Marco

    2009-10-01

    Coastal lagoons are ephemeral habitats whose conservation requires human intervention, such as maintenance dredging of inner channels. Dredging can reduce the abundance of benthic species due to the removal of individuals with the sediment, modify sediment properties, and resuspend fine sediment, nutrients and pollutants, which can lead to eutrophication, hypoxic events and increasing toxicity. Both direct effects in the dredged channel and possible indirect effects in surrounding shallow areas could be expected. This study assesses the effects of the channel maintenance dredging, performed between October 2004 and August 2005, on the invertebrate assemblages both in channels and adjacent ponds in the northern Adriatic coastal lagoon of Pialassa Baiona. The lagoon is affected by eutrophication, chemical and thermal pollution from wastewater treatment and power plants. Three impacted sites were located in the dredged channel and three in the adjacent interconnected shallow water ponds, while three non-impacted sites were located in a channel and in a pond far from the dredged area. Replicate samples were collected from each site one time before and one time after the dredging operations. Despite the extent of the intervention, effects of the dredging on macrobenthic assemblages were detected only within the dredged channel, while in the surrounding ponds no clear and unequivocal effects were found. In particular the dredging could have promoted the increase of the abundance of the polychaete Streblospio shrubsolii in the southern and central parts of the dredged channel and the increase in abundance of the amphipod Corophium insidiosum in the northern side, compared to the controls. Instead, species diversity was reduced in the central and northern parts of the dredged channel. These effects on the macrobenthic invertebrate assemblages could be related to the observed changes of sediment characteristics, contamination and toxicity. Overall, direct effects on benthic

  11. Thermally activated TRPV3 channels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jialie; Hu, Hongzhen

    2014-01-01

    TRPV3 is a temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel. The TRPV3 protein functions as a Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channel with six transmembrane domains forming a tetrameric complex. TRPV3 is known to be activated by warm temperatures, synthetic small-molecule chemicals, and natural compounds from plants. Its function is regulated by a variety of physiological factors including extracellular divalent cations and acidic pH, intracellular adenosine triphosphate, membrane voltage, and arachidonic acid. TRPV3 shows a broad expression pattern in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues including epidermal keratinocytes, epithelial cells in the gut, endothelial cells in blood vessels, and neurons in dorsal root ganglia and CNS. TRPV3 null mice exhibit abnormal hair morphogenesis and compromised skin barrier function. Recent advances suggest that TRPV3 may play critical roles in inflammatory skin disorders, itch, and pain sensation. Thus, identification of selective TRPV3 activators and inhibitors could potentially lead to beneficial pharmacological interventions in several diseases. The intent of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the tissue expression, structure, function, and mechanisms of activation of TRPV3. PMID:25366242

  12. 7 CFR 1470.23 - Conservation activity operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conservation activity operation and maintenance. 1470... CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM Contracts and Payments § 1470.23 Conservation activity operation and maintenance....

  13. 7 CFR 1470.23 - Conservation activity operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conservation activity operation and maintenance. 1470... CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM Contracts and Payments § 1470.23 Conservation activity operation and maintenance....

  14. 7 CFR 1470.23 - Conservation activity operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conservation activity operation and maintenance. 1470... CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM Contracts and Payments § 1470.23 Conservation activity operation and maintenance....

  15. 7 CFR 1470.23 - Conservation activity operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conservation activity operation and maintenance. 1470... CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM Contracts and Payments § 1470.23 Conservation activity operation and maintenance....

  16. 7 CFR 1470.23 - Conservation activity operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conservation activity operation and maintenance. 1470... CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM Contracts and Payments § 1470.23 Conservation activity operation and maintenance....

  17. 76 FR 26311 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Harbor Maintenance Fee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Harbor Maintenance... concerning the Harbor Maintenance Fee (CBP Forms 349 and 350). This request for comment is being made... keepers from the collection of information (a total capital/startup costs and operations and...

  18. BK channel activation: structural and functional insights

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Urvi S.; Cui, Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The voltage and Ca2+ activated K+ (BK) channels are involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Structurally, BK channels are homologous to voltage- and ligand-gated K+ channels, having a voltage sensor and pore as the membrane-spanning domain and a cytosolic domain containing metal binding sites. Recently published electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallographic structures of the BK channel provided the first look into the assembly of these domains, corroborating the close interactions among these domains during channel gating that have been suggested by functional studies. This review discusses these latest findings and an emerging new understanding about BK channel gating and implications for diseases such as epilepsy, in which mutations in BK channel genes have been associated. PMID:20663573

  19. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  20. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca(2+) activated BK channels, a K(+) channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate. PMID:25705194

  1. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca2+ activated BK channels, a K+ channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate. PMID:25705194

  2. Modulation of inferotemporal cortex activation during verbal working memory maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Fiebach, Christian J.; Rissman, Jesse; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regions of the left inferotemporal cortex are involved in visual word recognition and semantics. We utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging to localize an inferotemporal language area and to demonstrate that this area is involved in the active maintenance of visually presented words in working memory. Maintenance activity in this inferotemporal area showed an effect of memory load for words, but not pseudowords. The selective modulation of this language-related inferotemporal area for the maintenance of words, in the absence of visual input, is accompanied by an increased functional connectivity with left prefrontal cortex. These results are the first demonstration of an involvement of inferotemporal cortex in verbal working memory. They provide neurophysiological support for the notion that nonphonological language representations can be recruited in the service of verbal working memory. More generally, they suggest that verbal working memory should be conceptualized as the frontally-guided, sustained activation of pre-existing cortical language representations. PMID:16846859

  3. Active channel for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sobieszczyk, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban runoff and shows characteristic flashy streamflow and poor water quality commonly associated with urban streams. This data set represents the active, wetted channel as derived from light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and aerial photographic imagery. The wetted channel boundary is equivalent to the extent of water observed during a 2-yr high flow event.

  4. Determinants of uptake and maintenance of active commuting to school.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, Elaine M; Dempster, Martin; Murphy, Marie H

    2016-07-01

    The objective was to identify determinants of uptake and maintenance of active school travel (AST) over 4 years in children aged 9 at baseline. Data from wave 1 (n=8502) and 2 (n=7479) of the Growing Up in Ireland study were analysed. At 9- and 13-years 25% and 20% engaged in AST. Children were more likely to maintain or take-up AST if they lived in an urban area. Change in distance to school influenced both maintenance and adoption of AST, with a negative impact seen for increased distance between 9 and 13 years and a positive impact seen for decreased distance. Some factors which predict uptake and maintenance of AST are modifiable and can inform intervention development. PMID:27160529

  5. Modulation of bone remodeling via mechanically activated ion channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Randall L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the maintenance of bone mass is the physical forces imposed upon the skeleton. Removal of these forces, such as in a weightless environment, results in a rapid loss of bone, whereas application of exogenous mechanical strain has been shown to increase bone formation. Numerous flight and ground-based experiments indicate that the osteoblast is the key bone cell influenced by mechanical stimulation. Aside from early transient fluctuations in response to unloading, osteoclast number and activity seem unaffected by removal of strain. However, bone formation is drastically reduced in weightlessness and osteoblasts respond to mechanical strain with an increase in the activity of a number of second messenger pathways resulting in increased anabolic activity. Unfortunately, the mechanism by which the osteoblast converts physical stimuli into a biochemical message, a process we have termed biochemical coupling, remains elusive. Prior to the application of this grant, we had characterized a mechanosensitive, cation nonselective channel (SA-cat) in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells that we proposed is the initial signalling mechanism for mechanotransduction. During the execution of this grant, we have made considerable progress to further characterize this channel as well as to determine its role in the osteoblastic response to mechanical strain. To achieve these goals, we combined electrophysiologic techniques with cellular and molecular biology methods to examine the role of these channels in the normal function of the osteoblast in vitro.

  6. Postnatal requirement of the epithelial sodium channel for maintenance of epidermal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Charles, Roch-Philippe; Guitard, Marjorie; Leyvraz, Céline; Breiden, Bernadette; Haftek, Marek; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Sandhoff, Konrad; Hummler, Edith

    2008-02-01

    In skin, the physiological consequence of an epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) deficiency is not obvious directly at birth. Nevertheless, within hours after birth, mice deficient for the alpha-subunit of the highly amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (alphaENaC/Scnn1a) suffer from a significant increased dehydration. This is characterized by a loss of body weight (by 6% in 6 h) and an increased transepidermal water loss, which is accompanied by a higher skin surface pH in 1-day-old pups. Although early and late differentiation markers, as well as tight junction protein distribution and function, seem unaffected, deficiency of alphaENaC severely disturbs the stratum corneum lipid composition with decreased ceramide and cholesterol levels, and increased pro-barrier lipids, whereas covalently bound lipids are drastically reduced. Ultrastructural analysis revealed morphological changes in the formation of intercellular lamellar lipids and the lamellar body secretion. Extracellular formation of the lamellar lipids proved to be abnormal in the knockouts. In conclusion, ENaC deficiency results in progressive dehydration and, consequently, weight loss due to severe impairment of lipid formation and secretion. Our data demonstrate that ENaC expression is required for the postnatal maintenance of the epidermal barrier function but not for its generation. PMID:18039670

  7. Intervention Markers of Physical Activity Maintenance in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Floegel, Theresa A.; Giacobbi, Peter R.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Aiken-Morgan, Adrienne T.; Roberts, Beverly; McCrae, Christina S.; Marsiske, Michael; Buman, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify intervention components that may promote long-term changes of physical activity among older adults in a behavioral theory-based physical activity trial. Methods Participants (N = 24; aged 65±8.79 years) shared perceptions of intervention components at the end of the intervention and physical activity was assessed at 18 months. Mixed-methods analyses using a pragmatic content analysis of interview data were conducted. Results Active study participants (25%) cited more specific goals/actions to achieve goals and more social support from family/friends, and had significantly higher self-determined motivation mean scores at 18 months than insufficiently active study participants (75%). Conclusions Specific goal-setting behaviors and social support from family/friends may be key elements of physical activity maintenance in older adults. PMID:26018097

  8. Epithelial sodium channel modulates platelet collagen activation.

    PubMed

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Ortega, Arturo

    2014-03-01

    Activated platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelial extracellular matrix and undergo a rapid cytoskeletal rearrangement resulting in shape change and release of their intracellular dense and alpha granule contents to avoid hemorrhage. A central step in this process is the elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration through its release from intracellular stores and on throughout its influx from the extracellular space. The Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a highly selective Na(+) channel involved in mechanosensation, nociception, fluid volume homeostasis, and control of arterial blood pressure. The present study describes the expression, distribution, and participation of ENaC in platelet migration and granule secretion using pharmacological inhibition with amiloride. Our biochemical and confocal analysis in suspended and adhered platelets suggests that ENaC is associated with Intermediate filaments (IF) and with Dystrophin-associated proteins (DAP) via α-syntrophin and β-dystroglycan. Migration assays, quantification of soluble P-selectin, and serotonin release suggest that ENaC is dispensable for migration and alpha and dense granule secretion, whereas Na(+) influx through this channel is fundamental for platelet collagen activation. PMID:24679405

  9. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels: Potential Target for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, De-Li; Bai, Yun-Long; Cai, Ben-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCa) are classified into three subtypes: big conductance (BKCa), intermediate conductance (IKCa), and small conductance (SKCa) KCa channels. The three types of KCa channels have distinct physiological or pathological functions in cardiovascular system. BKCa channels are mainly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and inner mitochondrial membrane of cardiomyocytes, activation of BKCa channels in these locations results in vasodilation and cardioprotection against cardiac ischemia. IKCa channels are expressed in VSMCs, endothelial cells, and cardiac fibroblasts and involved in vascular smooth muscle proliferation, migration, vessel dilation, and cardiac fibrosis. SKCa channels are widely expressed in nervous and cardiovascular system, and activation of SKCa channels mainly contributes membrane hyperpolarization. In this chapter, we summarize the physiological and pathological roles of the three types of KCa channels in cardiovascular system and put forward the possibility of KCa channels as potential target for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27038376

  10. Human temporal cortical single neuron activity during working memory maintenance.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Leona; Corina, David; Ojemann, George

    2016-06-01

    The Working Memory model of human memory, first introduced by Baddeley and Hitch (1974), has been one of the most influential psychological constructs in cognitive psychology and human neuroscience. However the neuronal correlates of core components of this model have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we present data from two studies where human temporal cortical single neuron activity was recorded during tasks differentially affecting the maintenance component of verbal working memory. In Study One we vary the presence or absence of distracting items for the entire period of memory storage. In Study Two we vary the duration of storage so that distractors filled all, or only one-third of the time the memory was stored. Extracellular single neuron recordings were obtained from 36 subjects undergoing awake temporal lobe resections for epilepsy, 25 in Study one, 11 in Study two. Recordings were obtained from a total of 166 lateral temporal cortex neurons during performance of one of these two tasks, 86 study one, 80 study two. Significant changes in activity with distractor manipulation were present in 74 of these neurons (45%), 38 Study one, 36 Study two. In 48 (65%) of those there was increased activity during the period when distracting items were absent, 26 Study One, 22 Study Two. The magnitude of this increase was greater for Study One, 47.6%, than Study Two, 8.1%, paralleling the reduction in memory errors in the absence of distracters, for Study One of 70.3%, Study Two 26.3% These findings establish that human lateral temporal cortex is part of the neural system for working memory, with activity during maintenance of that memory that parallels performance, suggesting it represents active rehearsal. In 31 of these neurons (65%) this activity was an extension of that during working memory encoding that differed significantly from the neural processes recorded during overt and silent language tasks without a recent memory component, 17 Study one, 14 Study two

  11. Urinary Bladder-Relaxant Effect of Kurarinone Depending on Potentiation of Large-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sojung; Chae, Mee Ree; Lee, Byoung-Cheol; Kim, Yong-Chul; Choi, Jae Sue; Lee, Sung Won; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2016-08-01

    The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BKCa channel) plays critical roles in smooth muscle relaxation. In urinary bladder smooth muscle, BKCa channel activity underlies the maintenance of the resting membrane potential and repolarization of the spontaneous action potential triggering the phasic contraction. To identify novel BKCa channel activators, we screened a library of natural compounds using a cell-based fluorescence assay and a hyperactive mutant BKCa channel (Lee et al., 2013). From 794 natural compounds, kurarinone, a flavanone from Sophora flavescens, strongly potentiated BKCa channels. When treated from the extracellular side, this compound progressively shifted the conductance-voltage relationship of BKCa channels to more negative voltages and increased the maximum conductance in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas kurarinone strongly potentiated the homomeric BKCa channel composed of only the α subunit, its effects were much smaller on heteromeric channels coassembled with auxiliary β subunits. Although the activation kinetics was not altered significantly, the deactivation of BKCa channels was dramatically slowed by kurarinone treatment. At the single-channel level, kurarinone increased the open probability of the BKCa channel without affecting its single-channel conductance. Kurarinone potently relaxed acetylcholine-induced contraction of rat bladder smooth muscle and thus decreased the micturition frequency of rats with overactive bladder symptoms. These results indicate that kurarinone can directly potentiate BKCa channels and demonstrate the therapeutic potentials of kurarinone and its derivatives for developing antioveractive bladder medications and supplements. PMID:27251362

  12. Maintenance of Physical Activity among Faculty and Staff in University Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Kerry; Kinney, Judy; Kattenbraker, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have placed little emphasis on maintenance of healthy behaviors longer than six months. This study examined factors that contribute to maintenance of physical activity among faculty and staff in university settings. A 55-item survey on physical activity maintenance was used to assess attitudes towards exercise, exercise…

  13. Time Use Patterns between Maintenance, Subsistence and Leisure Activities: A Case Study in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hui-fen, Zhou; Zhen-shan, Li; Dong-qian, Xue; Yang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Chinese government conducted its first time use survey of the activities of Chinese individuals in 2008. Activities were classified into three broad types, maintenance activities, subsistence activities and leisure activities. Time use patterns were defined by an individuals' time spent on maintenance, subsistence and leisure activities each…

  14. Epilepsy-Related Slack Channel Mutants Lead to Channel Over-Activity by Two Different Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiong-Yao; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Jie; Wang, Ran; Chen, Jian; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Zhang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Twelve sodium-activated potassium channel (KCNT1, Slack) genetic mutants have been identified from severe early-onset epilepsy patients. The changes in biophysical properties of these mutants and the underlying mechanisms causing disease remain elusive. Here, we report that seven of the 12 mutations increase, whereas one mutation decreases, the channel's sodium sensitivity. Two of the mutants exhibit channel over-activity only when the intracellular Na(+) ([Na(+)]i) concentration is ∼80 mM. In contrast, single-channel data reveal that all 12 mutants increase the maximal open probability (Po). We conclude that these mutant channels lead to channel over-activity predominantly by increasing the ability of sodium binding to activate the channel, which is indicated by its maximal Po. The sodium sensitivity of these epilepsy causing mutants probably determines the [Na(+)]i concentration at which these mutants exert their pathological effects. PMID:26725113

  15. Regulated flushing in a gravel-bed river for channel habitat maintenance: A Trinity River fisheries case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. Wayne; Dwyer, John R.; Greenberg, Wendy E.

    1987-08-01

    The operation of Trinity and Lewiston Dams on the Trinity River in northern California in the United States, combined with severe watershed erosion, has jeopardized the existence of prime salmonid fisheries. Extreme streamflow depletion and stream sedimentation below Lewiston have resulted in heavy accumulation of coarse sediment on riffle gravel and filling of streambed pools, causing the destruction of spawning, nursery, and overwintering habitat for prized chinook salmon ( Salmo gairdnerii) and steelhead trout ( Oncorhynchus tschawytscha). Proposals to restore and maintain the degraded habitat include controlled one-time remedial peak flows or annual maintenance peak flows designed to flush the spawning gravel and scour the banks, deltas, and pools. The criteria for effective channel restoration or maintenance by streambed flushing and scouring are examined here, as well as the mechanics involved. The liabilities of releasing mammoth scouring-flushing flows approximating the magnitude that preceded reservoir construction make this option unviable. The resulting damage to fish habitat established under the postproject streamflow regime, as well as damage to human settlements in the floodplain, would be unacceptable, as would the opportunity costs to hydroelectric and irrigation water users. The technical feasibility of annual maintenance flushing flows depends upon associated mechanical and structural measures, particularly instream maintenance dredging of deep pools and construction of a sediment control dam on a tributary where watershed erosion is extreme. The cost effectiveness of a sediment dam with a limited useful economic life, combined with perpetual maintenance dredging, is questionable.

  16. Dendritic NMDA receptors activate axonal calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason M.; Jahr, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation can alter synaptic strength by regulating transmitter release from a variety of neurons in the CNS. As NMDARs are permeable to Ca2+ and monovalent cations, they could alter release directly by increasing presynaptic Ca2+ or indirectly by axonal depolarization sufficient to activate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Using two-photon microscopy to measure Ca2+ excursions, we found that somatic depolarization or focal activation of dendritic NMDARs elicited small Ca2+ transients in axon varicosities of cerebellar stellate cell interneurons. These axonal transients resulted from Ca2+ entry through VSCCs that were opened by the electrotonic spread of the NMDAR-mediated depolarization elicited in the dendrites. In contrast, we were unable to detect direct activation of NMDARs on axons indicating an exclusive somatodendritic expression of functional NMDARs. In cerebellar stellate cells, dendritic NMDAR activation masquerades as a presynaptic phenomenon and may influence Ca2+-dependent forms of presynaptic plasticity and release. PMID:18957221

  17. 15 CFR 908.11 - Maintenance of records of related activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS MAINTAINING RECORDS AND SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.11 Maintenance of records of related activities. (a) Persons whose activities relate to weather modification activities, other than persons engaged in weather modification activities, shall maintain records...

  18. 15 CFR 908.11 - Maintenance of records of related activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS MAINTAINING RECORDS AND SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.11 Maintenance of records of related activities. (a) Persons whose activities relate to weather modification activities, other than persons engaged in weather modification activities, shall maintain records...

  19. MYC Activation Is a Hallmark of Cancer Initiation and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, Meital; Li, Yulin; Felsher, Dean W.

    2014-01-01

    The MYC proto-oncogene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of most types of human tumors. MYC activation alone in many normal cells is restrained from causing tumorigenesis through multiple genetic and epigenetically controlled checkpoint mechanisms, including proliferative arrest, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. When pathologically activated in a permissive epigenetic and/or genetic context, MYC bypasses these mechanisms, enforcing many of the “hallmark” features of cancer, including relentless tumor growth associated with DNA replication and transcription, cellular proliferation and growth, protein synthesis, and altered cellular metabolism. MYC mandates tumor cell fate, by inducing stemness and blocking cellular senescence and differentiation. Additionally, MYC orchestrates changes in the tumor microenvironment, including the activation of angiogenesis and suppression of the host immune response. Provocatively, brief or even partial suppression of MYC back to its physiological levels of activation can result in the restoration of intrinsic checkpoint mechanisms, resulting in acute and sustained tumor regression, associated with tumor cells undergoing proliferative arrest, differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis, as well as remodeling of the tumor microenvironment, recruitment of an immune response, and shutdown of angiogenesis. Hence, tumors appear to be “addicted” to MYC because of both tumor cell–intrinsic, cell-autonomous and host-dependent, immune cell–dependent mechanisms. Both the trajectory and persistence of many human cancers require sustained MYC activation. Multiscale mathematical modeling may be useful to predict when tumors will be addicted to MYC. MYC is a hallmark molecular feature of both the initiation and maintenance of tumorigenesis. PMID:24890832

  20. Ion channels activated by light in Limulus ventral photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The light-activated conductance of Limulus ventral photoreceptors was studied using the patch-clamp technique. Channels (40 pS) were observed whose probability of opening was greatly increased by light. In some cells the latency of channel activation was nearly the same as that of the macroscopic response, while in other cells the channel latency was much greater. Like the macroscopic conductance, channel activity was reduced by light adaptation but enhanced by the intracellular injection of the calcium chelator EGTA. The latter observation indicates that channel activation was not a secondary result of the light-induced rise in intracellular calcium. A two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method was used to measure the voltage dependence of the light-activated macroscopic conductance. It was found that this conductance is constant over a wide voltage range more negative than zero, but it increases markedly at positive voltages. The single channel currents measured over this same voltage range show that the single channel conductance is independent of voltage, but that channel gating properties are dependent on voltage. Both the mean channel open time and the opening rate increase at positive voltages. These properties change in a manner consistent with the voltage dependence of the macroscopic conductance. The broad range of similarities between the macroscopic and single channel currents supports the conclusion that the 40-pS channel that we have observed is the principal channel underlying the response to light in these photoreceptors. PMID:2419481

  1. Revalidation of the Volatile Organic Analyzer Following a Major On-Orbit Maintenance Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; James, John T.

    2007-01-01

    The Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) contributes to the assessment of air quality aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by identifying and quantifying target airborne volatile organic contaminants in the module air. This on-orbit contaminant monitoring capability becomes particularly important during an air quality degradation event such as a system leak. During several ISS air quality degradations, the VOA has generated near real-time data that was used to make decisions or to better understand the contingency. The VOA was operational from January 2002 through June 2003, during which time it was validated by comparing VOA data to simultaneously acquired grab sample containers (GSCs). In January 2003, one of the two analytical channels of the VOA was shutdown because of a component failure, but a redundant channel continued to supply the necessary analytical data. In June 2003, the sole remaining channel was deactivated. Initial assessments of the channel shutdowns pointed to failed fuses or heaters, but neither was considered repairable on orbit. In 2005, it was determined that failed fuses could be replaced on orbit and the crew conducted a diagnostic procedure to identify the failed component. The crew discovered that both channels incurred failed fuses, which lead to a subsequent on orbit maintenance activity and return of the VOA to operational status in December 2005. The VOA has been providing data on the ISS atmosphere since its reactivation in 2005 and this paper will present the VOA data collected during 2006. Special emphasis will be placed upon the revalidation of the repaired VOA using GSCs as well as a summary of the diagnostic and repair procedures.

  2. Structure of Thermally Activated TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature sensation is important for adaptation and survival of organisms. While temperature has the potential to affect all biological macromolecules, organisms have evolved specific thermosensitive molecular detectors that are able to transduce temperature changes into physiologically relevant signals. Among these thermosensors are ion channels from the transient receptor potential (TRP) family. Prime candidates include TRPV1–4, TRPA1, and TRPM8 (the so-called “thermoTRP” channels), which are expressed in sensory neurons and gated at specific temperatures. Electrophysiological and thermodynamic approaches have been employed to determine the nature by which thermoTRPs detect temperature and couple temperature changes to channel gating. To further understand how thermoTRPs sense temperature, high-resolution structures of full-length thermoTRPs channels will be required. Here, we will discuss current progress in unraveling the structures of thermoTRP channels. PMID:25366237

  3. Slack sodium-activated potassium channel membrane expression requires p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Gururaj, Sushmitha; Fleites, John; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2016-04-01

    p38 MAPK has long been understood as an inducible kinase under conditions of cellular stress, but there is now increasing evidence to support its role in the regulation of neuronal function. Several phosphorylation targets have been identified, an appreciable number of which are ion channels, implicating the possible involvement of p38 MAPK in neuronal excitability. The KNa channel Slack is an important protein to be studied as it is highly and ubiquitously expressed in DRG neurons and is important in the maintenance of their firing accommodation. We sought to examine if the Slack channel could be a substrate of p38 MAPK activity. First, we found that the Slack C-terminus contains two putative p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites that are highly conserved across species. Second, we show via electrophysiology experiments that KNa currents and further, Slack currents, are subject to tonic modulation by p38 MAPK. Third, biochemical approaches revealed that Slack channel regulation by p38 MAPK occurs through direct phosphorylation at the two putative sites of interaction, and mutating both sites prevented surface expression of Slack channels. Based on these results, we conclude that p38 MAPK is an obligate regulator of Slack channel function via the trafficking of channels into the membrane. The present study identifies Slack KNa channels as p38 MAPK substrates. PMID:26721627

  4. Cumulative Activation of Voltage-Dependent KVS-1 Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Patricio; Garst-Orozco, Jonathan; Baban, Beravan; de Santiago-Castillo, Jose Antonio; Covarrubias, Manuel; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we reveal the existence of a novel use-dependent phenomenon in potassium channels, which we refer to as cumulative activation (CA). CA consists of an increase in current amplitude in response to repetitive depolarizing step pulses to the same potential. CA persists for up to 20 s and is similar to a phenomenon called “voltage-dependent facilitation” observed in some calcium channels. The KVS-1 K+ channel, which exhibits CA, is a rapidly activating and inactivating voltage-dependent potassium channel expressed in chemosensory and other neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. It is unusual in being most closely related to the Shab (Kv2) family of potassium channels, which typically behave like delayed rectifier K+ channels in other species. The magnitude of CA depends on the frequency, voltage, and duration of the depolarizing step pulse. CA also radically changes the activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel, suggesting that the channel may undergo a physical modification in a use-dependent manner; thus, a model that closely simulates the behavior of the channel postulates the existence of two populations of channels, unmodified and modified. Use-dependent changes in the behavior of potassium channels, such as CA observed in KVS-1, could be involved in functional mechanisms of cellular plasticity such as synaptic depression that represent the cellular basis of learning and memory. PMID:18199775

  5. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  6. Slack, Slick, and Sodium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    The Slack and Slick genes encode potassium channels that are very widely expressed in the central nervous system. These channels are activated by elevations in intracellular sodium, such as those that occur during trains of one or more action potentials, or following activation of nonselective cationic neurotransmitter receptors such as AMPA receptors. This review covers the cellular and molecular properties of Slack and Slick channels and compares them with findings on the properties of sodium-activated potassium currents (termed KNa currents) in native neurons. Human mutations in Slack channels produce extremely severe defects in learning and development, suggesting that KNa channels play a central role in neuronal plasticity and intellectual function. PMID:24319675

  7. SLO2 Channels Are Inhibited by All Divalent Cations That Activate SLO1 K+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Budelli, Gonzalo; Sun, Qi; Ferreira, Juan; Butler, Alice; Santi, Celia M; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Two members of the family of high conductance K(+)channels SLO1 and SLO2 are both activated by intracellular cations. However, SLO1 is activated by Ca(2+)and other divalent cations, while SLO2 (Slack or SLO2.2 from rat) is activated by Na(+) Curiously though, we found that SLO2.2 is inhibited by all divalent cations that activate SLO1, with Zn(2+)being the most effective inhibitor with an IC50of ∼8 μmin contrast to Mg(2+), the least effective, with an IC50of ∼ 1.5 mm Our results suggest that divalent cations are not SLO2 pore blockers, but rather inhibit channel activity by an allosteric modification of channel gating. By site-directed mutagenesis we show that a histidine residue (His-347) downstream of S6 reduces inhibition by divalent cations. An analogous His residue present in some CNG channels is an inhibitory cation binding site. To investigate whether inhibition by divalent cations is conserved in an invertebrate SLO2 channel we cloned the SLO2 channel fromDrosophila(dSLO2) and compared its properties to those of rat SLO2.2. We found that, like rat SLO2.2, dSLO2 was also activated by Na(+)and inhibited by divalent cations. Inhibition of SLO2 channels in mammals andDrosophilaby divalent cations that have second messenger functions may reflect the physiological regulation of these channels by one or more of these ions. PMID:26823461

  8. Tonic PKA Activity Regulates SK Channel Nanoclustering and Somatodendritic Distribution.

    PubMed

    Abiraman, Krithika; Sah, Megha; Walikonis, Randall S; Lykotrafitis, George; Tzingounis, Anastasios V

    2016-06-01

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels mediate a potassium conductance in the brain and are involved in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. SK channels show a distinct subcellular localization that is crucial for their neuronal functions. However, the mechanisms that control this spatial distribution are unknown. We imaged SK channels labeled with fluorophore-tagged apamin and monitored SK channel nanoclustering at the single molecule level by combining atomic force microscopy and toxin (i.e., apamin) pharmacology. Using these two complementary approaches, we found that native SK channel distribution in pyramidal neurons, across the somatodendritic domain, depends on ongoing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) levels, strongly limiting SK channel expression at the pyramidal neuron soma. Furthermore, tonic cAMP-PKA levels also controlled whether SK channels were expressed in nanodomains as single entities or as a group of multiple channels. Our study reveals a new level of regulation of SK channels by cAMP-PKA and suggests that ion channel topography and nanoclustering might be under the control of second messenger cascades. PMID:27107637

  9. 76 FR 50489 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Harbor Maintenance Fee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... previously published in the Federal Register (76 FR 26311) on May 6, 2011, allowing for a 60-day comment... Fee AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-Day Notice... approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Harbor Maintenance Fee (CBP Forms 349 and...

  10. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  11. Impacts of maintenance channel dredging in a northern Adriatic coastal lagoon. I: Effects on sediment properties, contamination and toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Roberta; Pasteris, Andrea; Ponti, Massimo

    2009-10-01

    Conservation and management of coastal lagoons envisage direct human intervention. To prevent siltation and to preserve the hydrodynamics features of the lagoon system, the inner channels undergo regular maintenance dredging. Sediment properties (RDP, organic matter, grain size), trace metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Hg, Ni, and Pb), and toxicity vs. the amphipod Corophium insidiosum and the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, were analysed before and after dredging operations in a coastal lagoon (Pialassa Baiona, Italy). To detect the actual impacts, disturbed sites were contrasted with multiple controls in two distinct times, i.e. before and after disturbance, according to a sampling design based on Beyond BACI principles. The integrated methodology here adopted suggests that dredging operations carried out are not likely to pose dramatic effects on environmental quality of the lagoon.

  12. Does proximity to physical activity infrastructures predict maintenance of organized and unorganized physical activities in youth?

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Jason; Brunet, Jennifer; Boudreau, Jonathan; Iancu, Horia-Daniel; Bélanger, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) infrastructures can provide youth chances to engage in PA. As determinants of organized and unorganized PA (OPA and UPA) may differ, we investigated if proximity to PA infrastructures (proximity) was associated with maintenance of OPA and UPA over 3 years. Youth from New Brunswick, Canada (n = 187; 10–12 years at baseline) reported participation in OPA and UPA every 4 months from 2011 to 2014 as part of the MATCH study. Proximity data were drawn from parent's questionnaires. Proximity scores were divided into tertiles. Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess associations between proximity and maintenance of OPA and UPA. There were no crude or adjusted differences in average maintenance of participation in OPA [mean number of survey cycle participation (95%CI) was 6.6 (5.7–7.5), 6.3 (5.5–7.1), and 5.8 (5.1–6.6)] or UPA [6.8 (6.2–7.4), 5.9 (5.3–6.5), and 6.6 (5.9–7.3)] across low, moderate, and high tertiles of proximity, respectively. Findings suggest that proximity does not affect maintenance of participation in OPA or UPA during adolescence. Other environmental aspects may have a greater effect. Further research is needed before conclusions can be made. PMID:26844149

  13. Voltage is a partial activator of rat thermosensitive TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Matta, José A; Ahern, Gerard P

    2007-01-01

    TRPV1 and TRPM8 are sensory nerve ion channels activated by heating and cooling, respectively. A variety of physical and chemical stimuli activate these receptors in a synergistic manner but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Both channels are voltage sensitive, and temperature and ligands modulate this voltage dependence. Thus, a voltage-sensing mechanism has become an attractive model to explain the generalized gating of these and other thermo-sensitive TRP channels. We show here using whole-cell and single channel measurements that voltage produces only a partial activation of TRPV1 and TRPM8. At room temperature (20–25°C) membrane depolarization evokes responses that saturate at ∼50–60% of the maximum open probability. Furthermore, high concentrations of capsaicin (10 μm), resiniferatoxin (5 μm) and menthol (6 mm) reveal voltage-independent gating. Similarly, other modes of TRPV1 regulation including heat, protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation, and protons enhance both the efficacy and sensitivity of voltage activation. In contrast, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine produces the opposite effects. These data can be explained by an allosteric model in which voltage, temperature, agonists and inverse agonists are independently coupled, either positively or negatively, to channel gating. Thus, voltage acts separately but in concert with other stimuli to regulate channel activation, and, therefore, a voltage-sensitive mechanism is unlikely to represent a final, gating mechanism for these channels. PMID:17932142

  14. Chloride dependence of hyperpolarization-activated chloride channel gates.

    PubMed

    Pusch, M; Jordt, S E; Stein, V; Jentsch, T J

    1999-03-01

    1. ClC proteins are a class of voltage-dependent Cl- channels with several members mutated in human diseases. The prototype ClC-0 Torpedo channel is a dimeric protein; each subunit forms a pore that can gate independently from the other one. A common slower gating mechanism acts on both pores simultaneously; slow gating activates ClC-0 at hyperpolarized voltages. The ClC-2 Cl- channel is also activated by hyperpolarization, as are some ClC-1 mutants (e.g. D136G) and wild-type (WT) ClC-1 at certain pH values. 2. We studied the dependence on internal Cl- ([Cl-]i) of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of several ClC channels (WT ClC-0, ClC-0 mutant P522G, ClC-1 mutant D136G and an N-terminal deletion mutant of ClC-2), by patch clamping channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 3. With all these channels, reducing [Cl-]i shifted activation to more negative voltages and reduced the maximal activation at most negative voltages. 4. We also investigated the external halide dependence of WT ClC-2 using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording. Reducing external Cl- ([Cl-]o) activated ClC-2 currents. Replacing [Cl-]o by the less permeant Br- reduced channel activity and accelerated deactivation. 5. Gating of the ClC-2 mutant K566Q in normal [Cl-]o resembled that of WT ClC-2 in low [Cl-]o, i.e. channels had a considerable open probability (Po) at resting membrane potential. Substituting external Cl- by Br- or I- led to a decrease in Po. 6. The [Cl-]i dependence of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of various ClC channels suggests a similar gating mechanism, and raises the possibility that the gating charge for the hyperpolarization-activated gate is provided by Cl-. 7. The external halide dependence of hyperpolarization-activated gating of ClC-2 suggests that it is mediated or modulated by anions as in other ClC channels. In contrast to the depolarization-activated fast gates of ClC-0 and ClC-1, the absence of Cl- favours channel opening. Lysine 556 may be important for the

  15. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  16. Non-specific activation of the epithelial sodium channel by the CFTR chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Georg; Szellas, Tanjef; Riordan, John R.; Friedrich, Thomas; Hartung, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis is caused by mutation of the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Controversial studies reported regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by CFTR. We found that uptake of 22Na+ through ENaC is modulated by activation of CFTR in oocytes, coexpressing CFTR and ENaC, depending on extracellular chloride concentration. Furthermore we found that the effect of CFTR activation could be mimicked by other chloride channels. Voltage– and patch–clamp measurements, however, showed neither stimulation nor inhibition of ENaC-mediated conductance by activated CFTR. We conclude that the observed modulation of 22Na+ uptake by activated CFTR is due to the effect of CFTR-mediated chloride conductance on the membrane potential. These findings argue against the notion of a specific influence of CFTR on ENaC and emphasize the chloride channel function of CFTR. PMID:11266369

  17. Non-specific activation of the epithelial sodium channel by the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Nagel, G; Szellas, T; Riordan, J R; Friedrich, T; Hartung, K

    2001-03-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis is caused by mutation of the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Controversial studies reported regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by CFTR. We found that uptake of (22)Na(+) through ENaC is modulated by activation of CFTR in oocytes, coexpressing CFTR and ENaC, depending on extracellular chloride concentration. Furthermore we found that the effect of CFTR activation could be mimicked by other chloride channels. Voltage- and patch-clamp measurements, however, showed neither stimulation nor inhibition of ENaC-mediated conductance by activated CFTR. We conclude that the observed modulation of (22)Na(+) uptake by activated CFTR is due to the effect of CFTR-mediated chloride conductance on the membrane potential. These findings argue against the notion of a specific influence of CFTR on ENaC and emphasize the chloride channel function of CFTR. PMID:11266369

  18. Curcumin stimulates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel activity.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Randak, Christoph O; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Karp, Philip H; Vermeer, Daniel W; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-02-18

    Compounds that enhance either the function or biosynthetic processing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel may be of value in developing new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF). Previous studies suggested that the herbal extract curcumin might affect the processing of a common CF mutant, CFTR-DeltaF508. Here, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin influences channel function. Curcumin increased CFTR channel activity in excised, inside-out membrane patches by reducing channel closed time and prolonging the time channels remained open. Stimulation was dose-dependent, reversible, and greater than that observed with genistein, another compound that stimulates CFTR. Curcumin-dependent stimulation required phosphorylated channels and the presence of ATP. We found that curcumin increased the activity of both wild-type and DeltaF508 channels. Adding curcumin also increased Cl(-) transport in differentiated non-CF airway epithelia but not in CF epithelia. These results suggest that curcumin may directly stimulate CFTR Cl(-) channels. PMID:15582996

  19. 15 CFR 908.11 - Maintenance of records of related activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS MAINTAINING REC-ORDS AND SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.11 Maintenance of records of related activities. (a) Persons whose activities relate to weather modification activities, other than persons engaged in weather modification activities, shall maintain records...

  20. 15 CFR 908.11 - Maintenance of records of related activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS MAINTAINING REC-ORDS AND SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.11 Maintenance of records of related activities. (a) Persons whose activities relate to weather modification activities, other than persons engaged in weather modification activities, shall maintain records...

  1. Activation of the epithelial Na+ channel in the collecting duct by vasopressin contributes to water reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, Vladislav; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Stockand, James D

    2009-11-01

    We used patch-clamp electrophysiology on isolated, split-open murine collecting ducts (CD) to test the hypothesis that regulation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity is a physiologically important effect of vasopressin. Surprisingly, this has not been tested directly before. We ask whether vasopressin affects ENaC activity distinguishing between acute and chronic effects, as well as, parsing the cellular signaling pathway and molecular mechanism of regulation. In addition, we quantified possible synergistic regulation of ENaC by vasopressin and aldosterone associating this with a requirement for distal nephron Na+ reabsorption during water conservation vs. maintenance of Na+ balance. We find that vasopressin significantly increases ENaC activity within 2-3 min by increasing open probability (P(o)). This activation was dependent on adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA. Water restriction (18-24 h) and pretreatment of isolated CD with vasopressin (approximately 30 min) resulted in a similar increase in P(o). In addition, this also increased the number (N) of active ENaC in the apical membrane. Similar to P(o), increases in N were sensitive to inhibitors of AC. Stressing animals with water and salt restriction separately and jointly revealed an important effect of vasopressin: conservation of water and Na+ each independently increased ENaC activity and jointly had a synergistic effect on channel activity. These results demonstrate a quantitatively important action of vasopressin on ENaC suggesting that distal nephron Na+ reabsorption mediated by this channel contributes to maintenance of water reabsorption. In addition, our results support that the combined actions of vasopressin and aldosterone are required to achieve maximally activated ENaC. PMID:19692483

  2. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition.

  3. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, M H; Spalding, E P

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition. PMID:8755616

  4. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed Central

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epithelial cells. We report that the alkaline phosphatase inhibitors bromotetramisole, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, and vanadate slow the rundown of CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches and reduce dephosphorylation of CFTR protein in isolated membranes. It was also found that in unstimulated cells, CFTR channels can be activated by exposure to phosphatase inhibitors alone. Most importantly, exposure of mammalian cells to phosphatase inhibitors alone activates CFTR channels that have disease-causing mutations, provided the mutant channels are present in the plasma membrane (R117H, G551D, and delta F508 after cooling). These results suggest that CFTR dephosphorylation is dynamic and that membrane-associated phosphatase activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7522329

  5. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-09-13

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epithelial cells. We report that the alkaline phosphatase inhibitors bromotetramisole, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, and vanadate slow the rundown of CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches and reduce dephosphorylation of CFTR protein in isolated membranes. It was also found that in unstimulated cells, CFTR channels can be activated by exposure to phosphatase inhibitors alone. Most importantly, exposure of mammalian cells to phosphatase inhibitors alone activates CFTR channels that have disease-causing mutations, provided the mutant channels are present in the plasma membrane (R117H, G551D, and delta F508 after cooling). These results suggest that CFTR dephosphorylation is dynamic and that membrane-associated phosphatase activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. PMID:7522329

  6. Ion permeation of AQP6 water channel protein. Single channel recordings after Hg2+ activation.

    PubMed

    Hazama, Akihiro; Kozono, David; Guggino, William B; Agre, Peter; Yasui, Masato

    2002-08-01

    Aquaporin-6 (AQP6) has recently been identified as an intracellular vesicle water channel with anion permeability that is activated by low pH or HgCl2. Here we present direct evidence of AQP6 channel gating using patch clamp techniques. Cell-attached patch recordings of AQP6 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes indicated that AQP6 is a gated channel with intermediate conductance (49 picosiemens in 100 mm NaCl) induced by 10 microm HgCl2. Current-voltage relationships were linear, and open probability was fairly constant at any given voltage, indicating that Hg2+-induced AQP6 conductance is voltage-independent. The excised outside-out patch recording revealed rapid activation of AQP6 channels immediately after application of 10 microm HgCl2. Reduction of both Na+ and Cl- concentrations from 100 to 30 mm did not shift the reversal potential of the Hg2+-induced AQP6 current, suggesting that Na+ is as permeable as Cl-. The Na+ permeability of Hg2+-induced AQP6 current was further demonstrated by 22Na+ influx measurements. Site-directed mutagenesis identified Cys-155 and Cys-190 residues as the sites of Hg2+ activation both for water permeability and ion conductance. The Hill coefficient from the concentration-response curve for Hg2+-induced conductance was 1.1 +/- 0.3. These data provide the first evidence of AQP6 channel gating at a single-channel level and suggest that each monomer contains the pore region for ions based on the number of Hg2+-binding sites and the kinetics of Hg2+-activation of the channel. PMID:12034750

  7. Multi-channel fiber photometry for population neuronal activity recording

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingchun; Zhou, Jingfeng; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Minmin; Fu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Fiber photometry has become increasingly popular among neuroscientists as a convenient tool for the recording of genetically defined neuronal population in behaving animals. Here, we report the development of the multi-channel fiber photometry system to simultaneously monitor neural activities in several brain areas of an animal or in different animals. In this system, a galvano-mirror modulates and cyclically couples the excitation light to individual multimode optical fiber bundles. A single photodetector collects excited light and the configuration of fiber bundle assembly and the scanner determines the total channel number. We demonstrated that the system exhibited negligible crosstalk between channels and optical signals could be sampled simultaneously with a sample rate of at least 100 Hz for each channel, which is sufficient for recording calcium signals. Using this system, we successfully recorded GCaMP6 fluorescent signals from the bilateral barrel cortices of a head-restrained mouse in a dual-channel mode, and the orbitofrontal cortices of multiple freely moving mice in a triple-channel mode. The multi-channel fiber photometry system would be a valuable tool for simultaneous recordings of population activities in different brain areas of a given animal and different interacting individuals. PMID:26504642

  8. Active Integrated Filters for RF-Photonic Channelizers

    PubMed Central

    Nagdi, Amr El; Liu, Ke; LaFave, Tim P.; Hunt, Louis R.; Ramakrishna, Viswanath; Dabkowski, Mieczyslaw; MacFarlane, Duncan L.; Christensen, Marc P.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study of RF-photonic channelizers using four architectures formed by active integrated filters with tunable gains is presented. The integrated filters are enabled by two- and four-port nano-photonic couplers (NPCs). Lossless and three individual manufacturing cases with high transmission, high reflection, and symmetric couplers are assumed in the work. NPCs behavior is dependent upon the phenomenon of frustrated total internal reflection. Experimentally, photonic channelizers are fabricated in one single semiconductor chip on multi-quantum well epitaxial InP wafers using conventional microelectronics processing techniques. A state space modeling approach is used to derive the transfer functions and analyze the stability of these filters. The ability of adapting using the gains is demonstrated. Our simulation results indicate that the characteristic bandpass and notch filter responses of each structure are the basis of channelizer architectures, and optical gain may be used to adjust filter parameters to obtain a desired frequency magnitude response, especially in the range of 1–5 GHz for the chip with a coupler separation of ∼9 mm. Preliminarily, the measurement of spectral response shows enhancement of quality factor by using higher optical gains. The present compact active filters on an InP-based integrated photonic circuit hold the potential for a variety of channelizer applications. Compared to a pure RF channelizer, photonic channelizers may perform both channelization and down-conversion in an optical domain. PMID:22319352

  9. The Ca2+-activated Cl- channel ANO1/TMEM16A regulates primary ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruppersburg, Chelsey Chandler; Hartzell, H Criss

    2014-06-01

    Many cells possess a single, nonmotile, primary cilium highly enriched in receptors and sensory transduction machinery that plays crucial roles in cellular morphogenesis. Although sensory transduction requires ion channels, relatively little is known about ion channels in the primary cilium (with the exception of TRPP2). Here we show that the Ca(2+)-activated Cl ((-)) channel anoctamin-1 (ANO1/TMEM16A) is located in the primary cilium and that blocking its channel function pharmacologically or knocking it down with short hairpin RNA interferes with ciliogenesis. Before ciliogenesis, the channel becomes organized into a torus-shaped structure ("the nimbus") enriched in proteins required for ciliogenesis, including the small GTPases Cdc42 and Arl13b and the exocyst complex component Sec6. The nimbus excludes F-actin and coincides with a ring of acetylated microtubules. The nimbus appears to form before, or independent of, apical docking of the mother centriole. Our data support a model in which the nimbus provides a scaffold for staging of ciliary components for assembly very early in ciliogenesis and chloride transport by ANO1/TMEM16A is required for the genesis or maintenance of primary cilia. PMID:24694595

  10. Hydrostatic and osmotic pressure activated channel in plant vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Joel; Lassalles, Jean-Paul

    1991-01-01

    The vacuolar membrane of red beet vacuoles contains a channel which was not gated by voltage or Ca2+ ions. Its unit conductance was 20 pS in 200 mM symmetrical KCl solutions. It was stretch activated: the conductance remained constant but the probability of opening was increased by suction or pressure applied to a membrane patch. A 1.5-kNm-2 suction applied to isolated patches or a 0.08-kNm-2 pressure applied to a 45-μm diameter vacuole induced an e-fold change in the mean current. A 75% inhibition of the channel current was obtained with 10 μM Gd3+ on the cytoplasmic side. The channel was more permeable for K+ than for Cl- (PK/PCl ∼ 3). A possible clustering for this channel was suggested by the recordings of the patch current. The channel properties were not significantly affected by a change in sorbitol osmolality in the solutions under isoosmotic conditions, between 0.6 and 1 mol/kg sorbitol. However, the channel was very sensitive to an osmotic gradient. A 0.2-mol/kg sorbitol gradient induced a two-fold increase in unit conductance and a thirty-fold increase in the mean patch current of the channel. A current was measured, when the osmotic gradient was the only driving force applied to the vacuolar membrane. The hydrostatic and osmotic pressure (HOP) activated channel described in this paper could be gated in vivo condition by a change in osmolality, without the need of a change in the turgor pressure in the cell. The HOP channel represents a possible example of an osmoreceptor for plant cells. PMID:19431814

  11. Cyclic nucleotide-activated channels in carp olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, S S; Kosolapov, A V

    1993-07-25

    When applied from the cytoplasmic side, cyclic 3',5'-adenosine and guanosine monophosphates reversibly increased the ion permeability of inside-out patches of carp olfactory neuron plasma membrane. The cAMP (cGMP)-induced permeability via cAMP (cGMP) concentration was fitted by Hill's equation with the exponents of 1.07 +/- 0.15 (1.12 +/- 0.05) and EC50 = 1.3 +/- 0.6 microM (0.9 +/- 0.3 microM). Substitution of NaCl in the bathing solution by chlorides of other alkali metals resulted in a slight shift of reversal potential of the cyclic nucleotide-dependent (CN) current, which indicates a weak selectivity of the channels. Permeability coefficients calculated by Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz's equation corresponded to the following relation: PNa/PK/PLi/PRb/PCs = 1:0.98:0.94:0.70:0.61. Ca2+ and Mg2+ in physiological concentrations blocked the channels activated by cyclic nucleotides (CN-channels). In the absence of divalent cations the conductance of single CN-channels was equal to 51 +/- 9 pS in 100 mM NaCl solution. Channel density did not exceed 1 micron-2. The maximal open state probability of the channel (Po) tended towards 1.0 at a high concentration of cAMP or cGMP. Dichlorobenzamil decreased Po without changing the single CN-channel' conductance. CN-channels exhibited burst activity. Mean open and closed times as well as the burst duration depended on agonist concentration. A kinetic model with four states (an inactivated, a closed and two open ones) is suggested to explain the regularities of CN-channel gating and dose-response relations. PMID:8334139

  12. Influence of malfunctions of the maintenance activities on the urban buses fuel consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Crişan; Nicolae, Filip

    2014-06-01

    Optimization of activities with the aim to provide quality service in conditions of high profitability, is one of the main objectives chased by managers in transportation companies. As a consequence, directing the attention towards monitoring of maintenance activities of vehicles fleet, can achieve desired results. Two of the most important issues related to the maintenance activity, is the increase of reliability and reduction of fuel consumption of the vehicles fleet. Aforementioned actions represents a way forward for raising the quality and profitability of services offered. In this paper, the main ways of monitoring the fuel consumption, in order to reduce it and increase the reliability of transportation vehicles fleet, are presented. For the evaluation of the maintenance system and the degree of influence of malfunctions recorded on the fuel consumption, using the Pareto -ABC method, following case study on a fleet of buses for urban public transport has been conducted. Results obtained highlights the deficiencies of the maintenance process carried out and constitutes a solid base for the reorganization of the maintenance activity, involving preventive maintenance activities, in order to contribute decisively to the results targeted by the management of transport companies.

  13. Novel Activation of Voltage-gated K+ Channels by Sevoflurane*

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Annika F.; Liang, Qiansheng; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are modulated by halogenated inhaled general anesthetics, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Alkanols and halogenated inhaled anesthetics such as halothane and isoflurane inhibit the archetypical voltage-gated Kv3 channel homolog K-Shaw2 by stabilizing the resting/closed states. By contrast, sevoflurane, a more heavily fluorinated ether commonly used in general anesthesia, specifically activates K-Shaw2 currents at relevant concentrations (0.05–1 mm) in a rapid and reversible manner. The concentration dependence of this modulation is consistent with the presence of high and low affinity interactions (KD = 0.06 and 4 mm, respectively). Sevoflurane (<1 mm) induces a negative shift in the conductance-voltage relation and increases the maximum conductance. Furthermore, suggesting possible roles in general anesthesia, mammalian Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 channels display similar changes. Quantitative description of the observations by an economical allosteric model indicates that sevoflurane binding favors activation gating and eliminates an unstable inactivated state outside the activation pathway. This study casts light on the mechanism of the novel sevoflurane-dependent activation of Kv channels, which helps explain how closely related inhaled anesthetics achieve specific actions and suggests strategies to develop novel Kv channel activators. PMID:23038249

  14. Stretch-activated cation channel from larval bullfrog skin.

    PubMed

    Hillyard, Stanley D; Willumsen, Niels J; Marrero, Mario B

    2010-05-01

    Cell-attached patches from isolated epithelial cells from larval bullfrog skin revealed a cation channel that was activated by applying suction (-1 kPa to -4.5 kPa) to the pipette. Activation was characterized by an initial large current spike that rapidly attenuated to a stable value and showed a variable pattern of opening and closing with continuing suction. Current-voltage plots demonstrated linear or inward rectification and single channel conductances of 44-56 pS with NaCl or KCl Ringer's solution as the pipette solution, and a reversal potential (-V(p)) of 20-40 mV. The conductance was markedly reduced with N-methyl-D-glucamide (NMDG)-Cl Ringer's solution in the pipette. Neither amiloride nor ATP, which are known to stimulate an apical cation channel in Ussing chamber preparations of larval frog skin, produced channel activation nor did these compounds affect the response to suction. Stretch activation was not affected by varying the pipette concentrations of Ca(2+) between 0 mmol l(-1) and 4 mmol l(-1) or by varying pH between 6.8 and 8.0. However, conductance was reduced with 4 mmol l(-1) Ca(2+). Western blot analysis of membrane homogenates from larval bullfrog and larval toad skin identified proteins that were immunoreactive with mammalian TRPC1 and TRPC5 (TRPC, canonical transient receptor potential channel) antibodies while homogenates of skin from newly metamorphosed bullfrogs were positive for TRPC1 and TRPC3/6/7 antibodies. The electrophysiological response of larval bullfrog skin resembles that of a stretch-activated cation channel characterized in Xenopus oocytes and proposed to be TRPC1. These results indicate this channel persists in all life stages of anurans and that TRP isoforms may be important for sensory functions of their skin. PMID:20435829

  15. 77 FR 70846 - Regulatory Guide 1.182, “Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... (Rev.) 0, ``Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear Power Plants... 1.160, ``Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants.'' ADDRESSES: Please... withdrawing RG 1.182, Rev. 0, ``Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear...

  16. Calcium-activated potassium channels and endothelial dysfunction: therapeutic options?

    PubMed Central

    Félétou, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The three subtypes of calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa) of large, intermediate and small conductance (BKCa, IKCa and SKCa) are present in the vascular wall. In healthy arteries, BKCa channels are preferentially expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, while IKCa and SKCa are preferentially located in endothelial cells. The activation of endothelial IKCa and SKCa contributes to nitric oxide (NO) generation and is required to elicit endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations. In the latter responses, the hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle cells is evoked either via electrical coupling through myo-endothelial gap junctions or by potassium ions, which by accumulating in the intercellular space activate the inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir2.1 and/or the Na+/K+-ATPase. Additionally, endothelium-derived factors such as cytochrome P450-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and under some circumstances NO, prostacyclin, lipoxygenase products and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) hyperpolarize and relax the underlying smooth muscle cells by activating BKCa. In contrast, cytochrome P450-derived 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and various endothelium-derived contracting factors inhibit BKCa. Aging and cardiovascular diseases are associated with endothelial dysfunctions that can involve a decrease in NO bioavailability, alterations of EDHF-mediated responses and/or enhanced production of endothelium-derived contracting factors. Because potassium channels are involved in these endothelium-dependent responses, activation of endothelial and/or smooth muscle KCa could prevent the occurrence of endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, direct activators of these potassium channels or compounds that regulate their activity or their expression may be of some therapeutic interest. Conversely, blockers of IKCa may prevent restenosis and that of BKCa channels sepsis-dependent hypotension. PMID:19187341

  17. [Polymethoxylated flavonoids activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel].

    PubMed

    Cao, Huan-Huan; Fang, Fang; Yu, Bo; Luan, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Hong

    2015-04-25

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent chloride channel, plays key roles in fluid secretion in serous epithelial cells. Previously, we identified two polymethoxylated flavonoids, 3',4',5,5',6,7-hexamethoxyflavone (HMF) and 5-hydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (HTF) which could potentiate CFTR chloride channel activities. The present study was aimed to investigate the potentiation effects of HMF and HTF on CFTR Cl(-) channel activities by using a cell-based fluorescence assay and the short circuit Ussing chamber assay. The results of cell-based fluorescence assay showed that both HMF and HTF could dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities in rapid and reversible ways, and the activations could be reversed by the CFTR blocker CFTRinh-172. Notably, HMF showed the highest affinity (EC50 = 2 μmol/L) to CFTR protein among the flavonoid CFTR activators identified so far. The activation of CFTR by HMF or HTF was forskolin (FSK) dependent. Both compounds showed additive effect with FSK and 3-Isobutyl-1-methylx (IBMX) in the activation of CFTR, while had no additive effect with genistein (GEN). In ex vivo studies, HMF and HTF could stimulate transepithelial Cl(-) secretion in rat colonic mucosa and enhance fluid secretion in mouse trachea submucosal glands. These results suggest that HMF and HTF may potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities through both elevation of cAMP level and binding to CFTR protein pathways. The results provide new clues in elucidating structure and activity relationship of flavonoid CFTR activators. HMF might be developed as a new drug in the therapy of CFTR-related diseases such as bronchiectasis and habitual constipation. PMID:25896054

  18. Activation of peripheral KCNQ channels relieves gout pain

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yueming; Xu, Haiyan; Zhan, Li; Zhou, Xindi; Chen, Xueqin; Gao, Zhaobing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intense inflammatory pain caused by urate crystals in joints and other tissues is a major symptom of gout. Among therapy drugs that lower urate, benzbromarone (BBR), an inhibitor of urate transporters, is widely used because it is well tolerated and highly effective. We demonstrate that BBR is also an activator of voltage-gated KCNQ potassium channels. In cultured recombinant cells, BBR exhibited significant potentiation effects on KCNQ channels comparable to previously reported classical activators. In native dorsal root ganglion neurons, BBR effectively overcame the suppression of KCNQ currents, and the resultant neuronal hyperexcitability caused by inflammatory mediators, such as bradykinin (BK). Benzbromarone consistently attenuates BK-, formalin-, or monosodium urate–induced inflammatory pain in rat and mouse models. Notably, the analgesic effects of BBR are largely mediated through peripheral and not through central KCNQ channels, an observation supported both by pharmacokinetic studies and in vivo experiments. Moreover, multiple residues in the superficial part of the voltage sensing domain of KCNQ channels were identified critical for the potentiation activity of BBR by a molecular determinant investigation. Our data indicate that activation of peripheral KCNQ channels mediates the pain relief effects of BBR, potentially providing a new strategy for the development of more effective therapies for gout. PMID:25735002

  19. Na(+) -Activated K(+) Channels in Rat Supraoptic Neurones.

    PubMed

    Bansal, V; Fisher, T E

    2016-06-01

    The magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) of the hypothalamus secrete the neurohormones vasopressin and oxytocin. The systemic release of these hormones depends on the rate and pattern of MNC firing and it is therefore important to identify the ion channels that contribute to the electrical behaviour of MNCs. In the present study, we report evidence for the presence of Na(+) -activated K(+) (KN a ) channels in rat MNCs. KN a channels mediate outwardly rectifying K(+) currents activated by the increases in intracellular Na(+) that occur during electrical activity. Although the molecular identity of native KN a channels is unclear, their biophysical properties are consistent with those of expressed Slick (slo 2.1) and Slack (slo 2.2) proteins. Using immunocytochemistry and Western blot experiments, we found that both Slick and Slack proteins are expressed in rat MNCs. Using whole cell voltage clamp techniques on acutely isolated rat MNCs, we found that inhibiting Na(+) influx by the addition of the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin or the replacement of Na(+) in the external solution with Li(+) caused a significant decrease in sustained outward currents. Furthermore, the evoked outward current density was significantly higher in rat MNCs using patch pipettes containing 60 mm Na(+) than it was when patch pipettes containing 0 mm Na(+) were used. Our data show that functional KN a channels are expressed in rat MNCs. These channels could contribute to the activity-dependent afterhyperpolarisations that have been identified in the MNCs and thereby play a role in the regulation of their electrical behaviour. PMID:27091544

  20. Use of Small Fluorescent Molecules to Monitor Channel Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sharon; Stringer, Sarah; Naik, Rajesh; Stone, Morley

    2001-03-01

    The Mechanosensitive channel of Large conductance (MscL) allows bacteria to rapidly adapt to changing environmental conditions such as osmolarity. The MscL channel opens in response to increases in membrane tension, which allows for the efflux of cytoplasmic constituents. Here we describe the cloning and expression of Salmonella typhimurium MscL (St-MscL). Using a fluorescence efflux assay, we demonstrate that efflux through the MscL channel during hypoosmotic shock can be monitored using endogenously produced fluorophores. In addition, we observe that thermal stimulation, i.e., heat shock, can also induce efflux through MscL. We present the first evidence of thermal activation of MscL efflux by heat shocking cells expressing the S. typhimurium protein variant. This finding has significant biosensor implications, especially for investigators exploring the use of channel proteins in biosensor applications. Thermal biosensors are relatively unexplored, but would have considerable commercial and military utility.

  1. Neuronal modulation of calcium channel activity in cultured rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Corvalan, V.; Cole, R.; De Vellis, J.; Hagiwara, Susumu )

    1990-06-01

    The patch-clamp technique was used to study whether cocultivation of neurons and astrocytes modulates the expression of calcium channel activity in astrocytes. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat brain astrocytes cocultured with rat embryonic neurons revealed two types of voltage-dependent inward currents carried by Ca{sup 2+} and blocked by either Cd{sup 2+} or Co{sup 2+} that otherwise were not detected in purified astrocytes. This expression of calcium channel activity in astrocytes was neuron dependent and was not observed when astrocytes were cocultured with purified oligodendrocytes.

  2. Sodium channel activation mechanisms. Insights from deuterium oxide substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Alicata, D.A.; Rayner, M.D.; Starkus, J.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Schauf and Bullock, using Myxicola giant axons, demonstrated that solvent substitution with deuterium oxide (D2O) significantly affects both sodium channel activation and inactivation kinetics without corresponding changes in gating current or tail current rates. They concluded that (a) no significant component of gating current derives from the final channel opening step, and (b) channels must deactivate (during tail currents) by a different pathway from that used in channel opening. By contrast, Oxford found in squid axons that when a depolarizing pulse is interrupted by a brief (approximately 100 microseconds) return to holding potential, subsequent reactivation (secondary activation) is very rapid and shows almost monoexponential kinetics. Increasing the interpulse interval resulted in secondary activation rate returning towards control, sigmoid (primary activation) kinetics. He concluded that channels open and close (deactivate) via the same pathway. We have repeated both sets of observations in crayfish axons, confirming the results obtained in both previous studies, despite the apparently contradictory conclusions reached by these authors. On the other hand, we find that secondary activation after a brief interpulse interval (50 microseconds) is insensitive to D2O, although reactivation after longer interpulse intervals (approximately 400 microseconds) returns towards a D2O sensitivity similar to that of primary activation. We conclude that D2O-sensitive primary activation and D2O-insensitive tail current deactivation involve separate pathways. However, D2O-insensitive secondary activation involves reversal of the D2O-insensitive deactivation step. These conclusions are consistent with parallel gate models, provided that one gating particle has a substantially reduced effective valence.

  3. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level. PMID:25778101

  4. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  5. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level. PMID:25778101

  6. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase regulates mast cell ion channel activity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Rebecca S; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Sobiesiak, Malgorzata; Lang, Camelia; Felder, Edward; Dietl, Paul; Huber, Stephan M; Lang, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Stimulation of the mast cell IgE-receptor (FcepsilonRI) by antigen leads to stimulation of Ca(2+) entry with subsequent mast cell degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. Ca(2+) further activates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, which in turn provide the electrical driving force for Ca(2+) entry. Since phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3-kinase has previously been shown to be required for mast cell activation and degranulation, we explored, whether mast cell Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels may be sensitive to PI3-kinase activity. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments and Fura-2 fluorescence measurements for determination of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration were performed in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells either treated or untreated with the PI3-kinase inhibitors LY-294002 (10 muM) and wortmannin (100 nM). Antigen-stimulated Ca(2+) entry but not Ca(2+) release from the intracellular stores was dramatically reduced upon PI3-kinase inhibition. Ca(2+) entry was further inhibited by TRPV blocker ruthenium red (10 muM). Ca(2+) entry following readdition after Ca(+)-store depletion with thapsigargin was again decreased by LY-294002, pointing to inhibition of store-operated channels (SOCs). Moreover, inhibition of PI3-kinase abrogated IgE-stimulated, but not ionomycin-induced stimulation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These observations disclose PI3-kinase-dependent regulation of Ca(2+) entry and Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-channels, which in turn participate in triggering mast cell degranulation. PMID:18769043

  7. TRPV3 channels mediate strontium-induced mouse egg activation

    PubMed Central

    Carvacho, Ingrid; Lee, Hoi Chang; Fissore, Rafael A.; Clapham, David E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In mammals, calcium influx is required for oocyte maturation and egg activation. The molecular identities of the calcium-permeant channels that underlie the initiation of embryonic development are not established. Here, we describe a Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channel current activated by TRP agonists that is absent in TrpV3−/− eggs. TRPV3 current is differentially expressed during oocyte maturation, reaching a peak of maximum density and activity at metaphase of meiosis II (MII), the stage of fertilization. Selective activation of TRPV3 channels provokes egg activation by mediating massive calcium entry. Widely used to activate eggs, strontium application is known to yield normal offspring in combination with somatic cell nuclear transfer. We show that TRPV3 is required for strontium influx, as TrpV3−/− eggs failed to permeate Sr2+ or undergo strontium-induced activation. We propose that TRPV3 is the major mediator of calcium influx in mouse eggs and is a putative target for artificial egg activation. PMID:24316078

  8. Physiological mechanisms for the modulation of pannexin 1 channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Sandilos, Joanna K; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2012-01-01

    It is widely recognized that ATP, along with other nucleotides, subserves important intercellular signalling processes. Among various nucleotide release mechanisms, the relatively recently identified pannexin 1 (Panx1) channel is gaining prominence by virtue of its ability to support nucleotide permeation and release in a variety of different tissues. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the factors that control Panx1 channel activity. By using electrophysiological and biochemical approaches, diverse mechanisms that dynamically regulate Panx1 channel function have been identified in various settings; these include, among others, activation by caspase-mediated channel cleavage in apoptotic immune cells, by G protein-coupled receptors in vascular smooth muscle, by low oxygen tension in erythrocytes and neurons, by high extracellular K+ in various cell types and by stretch/strain in airway epithelia. Delineating the distinct mechanisms of Panx1 modulation that prevail in different physiological contexts provides the possibility that these channels, and ATP release, could ultimately be targeted in a context-dependent manner. PMID:23070703

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Large-Conductance Ca2+-Activated Potassium Channel Activation by Ginseng Gintonin

    PubMed Central

    Choi, S. H.; Lee, B. H.; Hwang, S. H.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, H. C.; Rhim, H. W.; Nah, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Gintonin is a unique lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand found in Panax ginseng. Gintonin induces transient [Ca2+]i through G protein-coupled LPA receptors. Large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels are expressed in blood vessels and neurons and play important roles in blood vessel relaxation and attenuation of neuronal excitability. BKCa channels are activated by transient [Ca2+]i and are regulated by various Ca2+-dependent kinases. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of BKCa channel activation by gintonin. BKCa channels are heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Gintonin treatment induced BKCa channel activation in oocytes expressing the BKCa channel α subunit in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 0.71 ± 0.08 µg/mL). Gintonin-mediated BKCa channel activation was blocked by a PKC inhibitor, calphostin, and by the calmodulin inhibitor, calmidazolium. Site-directed mutations in BKCa channels targeting CaM kinase II or PKC phosphorylation sites but not PKA phosphorylation sites attenuated gintonin action. Mutations in the Ca2+ bowl and the regulator of K+ conductance (RCK) site also blocked gintonin action. These results indicate that gintonin-mediated BKCa channel activations are achieved through LPA1 receptor-phospholipase C-IP3-Ca2+-PKC-calmodulin-CaM kinase II pathways and calcium binding to the Ca2+ bowl and RCK domain. Gintonin could be a novel contributor against blood vessel constriction and over-excitation of neurons. PMID:23662129

  10. Light-Activated Ion Channels for Remote Control of Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, James J.; Kramer, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Light-activated ion channels provide a new opportunity to precisely and remotely control neuronal activity for experimental applications in neurobiology. In the past few years, several strategies have arisen that allow light to control ion channels and therefore neuronal function. Light-based triggers for ion channel control include caged compounds, which release active neurotransmitters when photolyzed with light, and natural photoreceptive proteins, which can be expressed exogenously in neurons. More recently, a third type of light trigger has been introduced: a photoisomerizable tethered ligand that directly controls ion channel activity in a light-dependent manner. Beyond the experimental applications for light-gated ion channels, there may be clinical applications in which these light-sensitive ion channels could prove advantageous over traditional methods. Electrodes for neural stimulation to control disease symptoms are invasive and often difficult to reposition between cells in tissue. Stimulation by chemical agents is difficult to constrain to individual cells and has limited temporal accuracy in tissue due to diffusional limitations. In contrast, ion channels that can be directly activated with light allow control with unparalleled spatial and temporal precision. The goal of this chapter is to describe light-regulated ion channels and how they have been tailored to control different aspects of neural activity, and how to use these channels to manipulate and better understand development, function, and plasticity of neurons and neural circuits. PMID:19195553

  11. Lipid bilayer array for simultaneous recording of ion channel activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Nasu, Tomohiro; Oshima, Azusa; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes an array of stable and reduced-solvent bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) formed in microfabricated silicon chips. BLMs were first vertically formed simultaneously and then turned 90° in order to realize a horizontal BLM array. Since the present BLMs are mechanically stable and robust, the BLMs survive this relatively tough process. Typically, a ˜60% yield in simultaneous BLM formation over 9 sites was obtained. Parallel recordings of gramicidin channel activities from different BLMs were demonstrated. The present system has great potential as a platform of BLM-based high throughput drug screening for ion channel proteins.

  12. Amphetamine activates calcium channels through dopamine transporter-mediated depolarization.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Solis, Ernesto; Ruchala, Iwona; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and its more potent enantiomer S(+)AMPH are psychostimulants used therapeutically to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and have significant abuse liability. AMPH is a dopamine transporter (DAT) substrate that inhibits dopamine (DA) uptake and is implicated in DA release. Furthermore, AMPH activates ionic currents through DAT that modify cell excitability presumably by modulating voltage-gated channel activity. Indeed, several studies suggest that monoamine transporter-induced depolarization opens voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV), which would constitute an additional AMPH mechanism of action. In this study we co-express human DAT (hDAT) with Ca(2+) channels that have decreasing sensitivity to membrane depolarization (CaV1.3, CaV1.2 or CaV2.2). Although S(+)AMPH is more potent than DA in transport-competition assays and inward-current generation, at saturating concentrations both substrates indirectly activate voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.3 and CaV1.2) but not the N-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.2). Furthermore, the potency to achieve hDAT-CaV electrical coupling is dominated by the substrate affinity on hDAT, with negligible influence of L-type channel voltage sensitivity. In contrast, the maximal coupling-strength (defined as Ca(2+) signal change per unit hDAT current) is influenced by CaV voltage sensitivity, which is greater in CaV1.3- than in CaV1.2-expressing cells. Moreover, relative to DA, S(+)AMPH showed greater coupling-strength at concentrations that induced relatively small hDAT-mediated currents. Therefore S(+)AMPH is not only more potent than DA at inducing hDAT-mediated L-type Ca(2+) channel currents but is a better depolarizing agent since it produces tighter electrical coupling between hDAT-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation. PMID:26162812

  13. Activation of peripheral KCNQ channels attenuates inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Refractory chronic pain dramatically reduces the quality of life of patients. Existing drugs cannot fully achieve effective chronic pain control because of their lower efficacy and/or accompanying side effects. Voltage-gated potassium channels (KCNQ) openers have demonstrated their analgesic effect in preclinical and clinical studies, and are thus considered to be a potential therapeutic target as analgesics. However, these drugs exhibit a narrow therapeutic window due to their imposed central nerve system (CNS) side effects. To clarify the analgesic effect by peripheral KCNQ channel activation, we investigated whether the analgesic effect of the KCNQ channel opener, retigabine, is inhibited by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the KCNQ channel blocker, 10, 10-bis (4-Pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H) -anthracenone dihydrochloride (XE-991) in rats. Results Oral administration (p.o.) of retigabine showed an anticonvulsant effect on maximal electronic seizures and an analgesic effect on complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced thermal hyperalgesia. However, impaired motor coordination and reduced exploratory behavior were also observed at the analgesic doses of retigabine. Administration (i.c.v.) of XE-991 reversed the retigabine-induced anticonvulsant effect, impaired motor coordination and reduced exploratory behavior but not the analgesic effect. Moreover, intraplantar administration of retigabine or an additional KCNQ channel opener, N-(6-Chloro-pyridin-3-yl)-3,4-difluoro-benzamide (ICA-27243), inhibited formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the peripheral sensory neuron is the main target for KCNQ channel openers to induce analgesia. Therefore, peripheral KCNQ channel openers that do not penetrate the CNS may be suitable analgesic drugs as they would prevent CNS side effects. PMID:24555569

  14. Surveillance and maintenance activities of waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.; Jones, R.G.

    1991-12-01

    Surveillance and maintenance (S M) of 75 sites were conductd by the Remedial Action Section for the Environmental Restoration Program for surplus facilities and sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals. S M activities on these sites were conducted from the end of their operating life until final facility disposal or site stabilization. The objectives of the Waste Area Grouping S M Program are met by maintaining a program of routine S M as well as by implementing interim corrective maintenance when deemed necessary as a result of site surveillance. This report briefly presents this program's activities and includes tables indicating tank levels and dry well data for FY 1991.

  15. Activation and inhibition of TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yu-Li; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) encoded by family members of transmembrane proteins of unknown function 16 (TMEM16) have recently been intensely studied for functional properties as well as their physiological roles as chloride channels in various tissues. One technical hurdle in studying these channels is the well-known channel rundown that frequently impairs the precision of electrophysiological measurements for the channels. Using experimental protocols that employ fast-solution exchange, we circumvented the problem of channel rundown by normalizing the Ca(2+)-induced current to the maximally-activated current obtained within a time period in which the channel rundown was negligible. We characterized the activation of the TMEM16A-encoded CaCC (also called ANO1) by Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+), and discovered that Mg(2+) competes with Ca(2+) in binding to the divalent-cation binding site without activating the channel. We also studied the permeability of the ANO1 pore for various anions and found that the anion occupancy in the pore-as revealed by the permeability ratios of these anions-appeared to be inversely correlated with the apparent affinity of the ANO1 inhibition by niflumic acid (NFA). On the other hand, the NFA inhibition was neither affected by the degree of the channel activation nor influenced by the types of divalent cations used for the channel activation. These results suggest that the NFA inhibition of ANO1 is likely mediated by altering the pore function but not through changing the channel gating. Our study provides a precise characterization of ANO1 and documents factors that can affect divalent cation activation and NFA inhibition of ANO1. PMID:24489780

  16. Zinc activates damage-sensing TRPA1 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongzhen; Bandell, Michael; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhu, Michael X.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is an essential biological trace element. It is required for the structure or function of over 300 proteins, and is increasingly recognized for its role in cell signaling. However, high concentrations of zinc have cytotoxic effects, and overexposure to zinc can cause pain and inflammation through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that zinc excites nociceptive somatosensory neurons and causes nociception in mice through TRPA1, a cation channel previously shown to mediate the pungency of wasabi and cinnamon through cysteine-modification. Zinc activates TRPA1 through a novel mechanism that requires zinc influx through TRPA1 channels and subsequent activation via specific intracellular cysteine and histidine residues. TRPA1 is highly sensitive to intracellular zinc, as low nanomolar concentrations activate TRPA1 and modulate its sensitivity. These findings identify TRPA1 as a major target for the sensory effects of zinc, and support an emerging role for zinc as a signaling molecule that can modulate sensory transmission. PMID:19202543

  17. Chemical activation of the mechanotransduction channel Piezo1

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Ruhma; Xu, Jie; Dubin, Adrienne E; Coste, Bertrand; Mathur, Jayanti; Huynh, Truc; Matzen, Jason; Lao, Jianmin; Tully, David C; Engels, Ingo H; Petrassi, H Michael; Schumacher, Andrew M; Montal, Mauricio; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Piezo ion channels are activated by various types of mechanical stimuli and function as biological pressure sensors in both vertebrates and invertebrates. To date, mechanical stimuli are the only means to activate Piezo ion channels and whether other modes of activation exist is not known. In this study, we screened ∼3.25 million compounds using a cell-based fluorescence assay and identified a synthetic small molecule we termed Yoda1 that acts as an agonist for both human and mouse Piezo1. Functional studies in cells revealed that Yoda1 affects the sensitivity and the inactivation kinetics of mechanically induced responses. Characterization of Yoda1 in artificial droplet lipid bilayers showed that Yoda1 activates purified Piezo1 channels in the absence of other cellular components. Our studies demonstrate that Piezo1 is amenable to chemical activation and raise the possibility that endogenous Piezo1 agonists might exist. Yoda1 will serve as a key tool compound to study Piezo1 regulation and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07369.001 PMID:26001275

  18. Atomic basis for therapeutic activation of neuronal potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Robin Y.; Yau, Michael C.; Galpin, Jason D.; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ahern, Christopher A.; Pless, Stephan A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-09-01

    Retigabine is a recently approved anticonvulsant that acts by potentiating neuronal M-current generated by KCNQ2-5 channels, interacting with a conserved Trp residue in the channel pore domain. Using unnatural amino-acid mutagenesis, we subtly altered the properties of this Trp to reveal specific chemical interactions required for retigabine action. Introduction of a non-natural isosteric H-bond-deficient Trp analogue abolishes channel potentiation, indicating that retigabine effects rely strongly on formation of a H-bond with the conserved pore Trp. Supporting this model, substitution with fluorinated Trp analogues, with increased H-bonding propensity, strengthens retigabine potency. In addition, potency of numerous retigabine analogues correlates with the negative electrostatic surface potential of a carbonyl/carbamate oxygen atom present in most KCNQ activators. These findings functionally pinpoint an atomic-scale interaction essential for effects of retigabine and provide stringent constraints that may guide rational improvement of the emerging drug class of KCNQ channel activators.

  19. Structural aspects of calcium-release activated calcium channel function

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry is the process by which molecules located on the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) respond to decreased luminal Ca2+ levels by signaling Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC) channels to open on the plasma membrane (PM). This activation of PM CRAC channels provides a sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevation associated with myriad physiological processes. The identities of the molecules which mediate SOCE include stromal interaction molecules (STIMs), functioning as the ER/SR luminal Ca2+ sensors, and Orai proteins, forming the PM CRAC channels. This review examines the current available high-resolution structural information on these CRAC molecular components with particular focus on the solution structures of the luminal STIM Ca2+ sensing domains, the crystal structures of cytosolic STIM fragments, a closed Orai hexameric crystal structure and a structure of an Orai1 N-terminal fragment in complex with calmodulin. The accessible structural data are discussed in terms of potential mechanisms of action and cohesiveness with functional observations. PMID:24213636

  20. Atomic basis for therapeutic activation of neuronal potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Robin Y.; Yau, Michael C.; Galpin, Jason D.; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ahern, Christopher A.; Pless, Stephan A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-01-01

    Retigabine is a recently approved anticonvulsant that acts by potentiating neuronal M-current generated by KCNQ2–5 channels, interacting with a conserved Trp residue in the channel pore domain. Using unnatural amino-acid mutagenesis, we subtly altered the properties of this Trp to reveal specific chemical interactions required for retigabine action. Introduction of a non-natural isosteric H-bond-deficient Trp analogue abolishes channel potentiation, indicating that retigabine effects rely strongly on formation of a H-bond with the conserved pore Trp. Supporting this model, substitution with fluorinated Trp analogues, with increased H-bonding propensity, strengthens retigabine potency. In addition, potency of numerous retigabine analogues correlates with the negative electrostatic surface potential of a carbonyl/carbamate oxygen atom present in most KCNQ activators. These findings functionally pinpoint an atomic-scale interaction essential for effects of retigabine and provide stringent constraints that may guide rational improvement of the emerging drug class of KCNQ channel activators. PMID:26333338

  1. Structure and activity of the acid-sensing ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Thomas W.; Frey, Erin N.

    2012-01-01

    The acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are a family of proton-sensing channels expressed throughout the nervous system. Their activity is linked to a variety of complex behaviors including fear, anxiety, pain, depression, learning, and memory. ASICs have also been implicated in neuronal degeneration accompanying ischemia and multiple sclerosis. As a whole, ASICs represent novel therapeutic targets for several clinically important disorders. An understanding of the correlation between ASIC structure and function will help to elucidate their mechanism of action and identify potential therapeutics that specifically target these ion channels. Despite the seemingly simple nature of proton binding, multiple studies have shown that proton-dependent gating of ASICs is quite complex, leading to activation and desensitization through distinct structural components. This review will focus on the structural aspects of ASIC gating in response to both protons and the newly discovered activators GMQ and MitTx. ASIC modulatory compounds and their action on proton-dependent gating will also be discussed. This review is dedicated to the memory of Dale Benos, who made a substantial contribution to our understanding of ASIC activity. PMID:22843794

  2. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  3. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. 35.1220 Section 35.1220 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance §...

  4. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1220 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  5. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  6. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1220 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  7. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1220 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  8. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  9. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  10. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1220 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  11. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  12. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  13. The formation and maintenance of single-thread tie channels entering floodplain lakes: observations from three diverse river systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Joel C; Dietrich, William E; Day, Geoff; Parker, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Tie channels connect rivers to floodplain lakes on many lowland rivers and thereby play a central role in floodplain sedimentology and ecology, yet they are generally unrecognized and little studied. here we report the results of field studies focused on tie channel origin and morphodynamics in three contrasting systems: the Middle Fly River, Papua New Guinea, the Lower Mississippi River, and Birch Creek in Alaska. Across these river systems, tie channels vary by an order of magnitude in size but exhibit the same characteristic morphology and appear to develop and evolve by a similar set of processes. In all three systems, the channels are characterized by a narrow, leveed single-thread morphology with maximum width approximately one tenth the width of the mainstem river. The channels typically have a V shaped cross-section, unlike most fluvial channels. These channels develop as lakes become isolated from the river by sedimentation. Narrowing of the connection between river and lake causes a sediment-laden jet to develop. Levees develop along the margins of the jet leading to channel emergence and eventual levee aggradation to the height of the mainstem levees. Bi-directional flow in these channels is common. Outflows from the lake scour sediment and prevent channel blockage. We propose that channel geometry and size are then controlled by a dynamic balance between channel narrowing by suspended sediment deposition and incision and widening by mass failure of banks during outflows. Tie channels are laterally stable and may convey flow for hundreds to a few thousand of years.

  14. Natural resources management activities and biodiversity maintenance. Progress report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, M.B.

    1994-05-01

    This progress report briefly outlines activities at the Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area. Thirty-nine days were spent administering hunts with 1524 people participating. Biological data was collected on 89 deer, 6 turkeys, 8 feral hogs, 40 ducks of two species, 24 bobwhite, 3 rabbits, 2 gray squirrels, and 313 fish of 8 species. Public relations, maintenance and hunt preparation activities are summarized as well.

  15. Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in rat thymic lymphocytes: activation by concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Mahaut-Smith, M P; Mason, M J

    1991-08-01

    1. The role of ion channels in the mitogenic response of rat thymic lymphocytes to concanavalin A (ConA) was studied using single-channel patch-clamp recordings and measurements of membrane potential with the fluorescent probe bis-oxonol. 2. ConA (20 micrograms ml-1) evoked a rapid membrane hyperpolarization; Indo-1 measurements indicated a concurrent increase in [Ca2+]i. The hyperpolarization was blocked by cytoplasmic loading with the Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (bis(O-amino-phenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid), or charybdotoxin, a component of scorpion venom known to block K+ channels in lymphocytes. 3. Cell-attached patch-clamp recordings showed that both ConA and the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin activated channels with high selectivity for K+. Two conductance levels were observed -6-7 pS and 17-18 pS-measured as inward chord conductance at 60 mV from reversal potential (Erev) with 140 mM-KCl in the pipette. The current-voltage relationship for the larger channel displayed inward rectification and channel open probability was weakly dependent upon membrane potential. 4. These experiments provide the first direct evidence for mitogen-activated Ca(2+)-gated K+ channels (IK(Ca)) in lymphocytes. This conductance is relatively inactive in unstimulated rat thymocytes but following the intracellular Ca2+ rises induced by ConA, IK(Ca) channels are activated and produce a significant hyperpolarization of the cell potential. PMID:1716678

  16. Anion Permeation in Ca2+-Activated Cl− Channels

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhiqiang; Hartzell, H. Criss

    2000-01-01

    Ca2+-activated Cl channels (ClCaCs) are an important class of anion channels that are opened by increases in cytosolic [Ca2+]. Here, we examine the mechanisms of anion permeation through ClCaCs from Xenopus oocytes in excised inside-out and outside-out patches. ClCaCs exhibited moderate selectivity for Cl over Na: PNa/PCl = 0.1. The apparent affinity of ClCaCs for Cl was low: Kd = 73 mM. The channel had an estimated pore diameter >0.6 nm. The relative permeabilities measured under bi-ionic conditions by changes in Erev were as follows: C(CN)3 > SCN > N(CN)2 > ClO4 > I > N3 > Br > Cl > formate > HCO3 > acetate = F > gluconate. The conductance sequence was as follows: N3 > Br > Cl > N(CN)2 > I > SCN > COOH > ClO4 > acetate > HCO3 = C(CN)3 > gluconate. Permeant anions block in a voltage-dependent manner with the following affinities: C(CN)3 > SCN = ClO4 > N(CN)2 > I > N3 > Br > HCO3 > Cl > gluconate > formate > acetate. Although these data suggest that anionic selectivity is determined by ionic hydration energy, other factors contribute, because the energy barrier for permeation is exponentially related to anion hydration energy. ClCaCs exhibit weak anomalous mole fraction behavior, implying that the channel may be a multi-ion pore, but that ions interact weakly in the pore. The affinity of the channel for Ca2+ depended on the permeant anion at low [Ca2+] (100–500 nM). Apparently, occupancy of the pore by a permeant anion increased the affinity of the channel for Ca2+. The current was strongly dependent on pH. Increasing pH on the cytoplasmic side decreased the inward current, whereas increasing pH on the external side decreased the outward current. In both cases, the apparent pKa was voltage-dependent with apparent pKa at 0 mV = ∼9.2. The channel may be blocked by OH− ions, or protons may titrate a site in the pore necessary for ion permeation. These data demonstrate that the permeation properties of ClCaCs are different from those of CFTR or ClC-1, and provide

  17. Brain activation during associative short-term memory maintenance is not predictive for subsequent retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Heiko C.; Daselaar, Sander M.; Beul, Sarah F.; Rijpkema, Mark; Fernández, Guillén; Kessels, Roy P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Performance on working memory (WM) tasks may partially be supported by long-term memory (LTM) processing. Hence, brain activation recently being implicated in WM may actually have been driven by (incidental) LTM formation. We examined which brain regions actually support successful WM processing, rather than being confounded by LTM processes, during the maintenance and probe phase of a WM task. We administered a four-pair (faces and houses) associative delayed-match-to-sample (WM) task using event-related functional MRI (fMRI) and a subsequent associative recognition LTM task, using the same stimuli. This enabled us to analyze subsequent memory effects for both the WM and the LTM test by contrasting correctly recognized pairs with incorrect pairs for either task. Critically, with respect to the subsequent WM effect, we computed this analysis exclusively for trials that were forgotten in the subsequent LTM recognition task. Hence, brain activity associated with successful WM processing was less likely to be confounded by incidental LTM formation. The subsequent LTM effect, in contrast, was analyzed exclusively for pairs that previously had been correctly recognized in the WM task, disclosing brain regions involved in successful LTM formation after successful WM processing. Results for the subsequent WM effect showed no significantly activated brain areas for WM maintenance, possibly due to an insensitivity of fMRI to mechanisms underlying active WM maintenance. In contrast, a correct decision at WM probe was linked to activation in the “retrieval success network” (anterior and posterior midline brain structures). The subsequent LTM analyses revealed greater activation in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex in the early phase of the maintenance stage. No supra-threshold activation was found during the WM probe. Together, we obtained clearer insights in which brain regions support successful WM and LTM without the potential confound

  18. Financial Motivation Undermines Maintenance in an Intensive Diet and Activity Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Moller, Arlen C.; McFadden, H. Gene; Hedeker, Donald; Spring, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    Financial incentives are widely used in health behavior interventions. However, self-determination theory posits that emphasizing financial incentives can have negative consequences if experienced as controlling. Feeling controlled into performing a behavior tends to reduce enjoyment and undermine maintenance after financial contingencies are removed (the undermining effect). We assessed participants' context-specific financial motivation to participate in the Make Better Choices trial—a trial testing four different strategies for improving four health risk behaviors: low fruit and vegetable intake, high saturated fat intake, low physical activity, and high sedentary screen time. The primary outcome was overall healthy lifestyle change; weight loss was a secondary outcome. Financial incentives were contingent upon meeting behavior goals for 3 weeks and became contingent upon merely providing data during the 4.5-month maintenance period. Financial motivation for participation was assessed at baseline using a 7-item scale (α = .97). Across conditions, a main effect of financial motivation predicted a steeper rate of weight regained during the maintenance period, t(165) = 2.15, P = .04. Furthermore, financial motivation and gender interacted significantly in predicting maintenance of healthy diet and activity changes, t(160) = 2.42, P = .016, such that financial motivation had a more deleterious influence among men. Implications for practice and future research on incentivized lifestyle and weight interventions are discussed. PMID:22548152

  19. Location of Release Sites and Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels Relative to Calcium Channels at the Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, A. J.; Rabl, K.; Riccardi, G. E.; Brecha, N. C.; Stella, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicle release from photoreceptor ribbon synapses is regulated by L-type Ca2+ channels, which are in turn regulated by Cl− moving through calcium-activated chloride [Cl(Ca)] channels. We assessed the proximity of Ca2+ channels to release sites and Cl(Ca) channels in synaptic terminals of salamander photoreceptors by comparing fast (BAPTA) and slow (EGTA) intracellular Ca2+ buffers. BAPTA did not fully block synaptic release, indicating some release sites are <100 nm from Ca2+ channels. Comparing Cl(Ca) currents with predicted Ca2+ diffusion profiles suggested that Cl(Ca) and Ca2+ channels average a few hundred nanometers apart, but the inability of BAPTA to block Cl(Ca) currents completely suggested some channels are much closer together. Diffuse immunolabeling of terminals with an antibody to the putative Cl(Ca) channel TMEM16A supports the idea that Cl(Ca) channels are dispersed throughout the presynaptic terminal, in contrast with clustering of Ca2+ channels near ribbons. Cl(Ca) currents evoked by intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation through flash photolysis of DM-nitrophen exhibited EC50 values of 556 and 377 nM with Hill slopes of 1.8 and 2.4 in rods and cones, respectively. These relationships were used to estimate average submembrane [Ca2+]i in photoreceptor terminals. Consistent with control of exocytosis by [Ca2+] nanodomains near Ca2+ channels, average submembrane [Ca2+]i remained below the vesicle release threshold (∼400 nM) over much of the physiological voltage range for cones. Positioning Ca2+ channels near release sites may improve fidelity in converting voltage changes to synaptic release. A diffuse distribution of Cl(Ca) channels may allow Ca2+ influx at one site to influence relatively distant Ca2+ channels. PMID:21084687

  20. Keeping active channels in their place: membrane phosphoinositides regulate TRPM channel activity in a compartment-selective manner.

    PubMed

    Braun, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    We have long appreciated that the controlled movement of ions and solutes across the cell surface or plasma membrane affects every aspect of cell function, ranging from membrane excitability to metabolism to secretion, and is also critical for the long-term maintenance of cell viability. Studies examining these physiological transport processes have revealed a vast array of ion channels, transporters and ATPase-driven pumps that underlie these transmembrane ionic movements and how acquired or genetic disruption of these processes are linked to disease. More recently, it has become evident that the ongoing function of intracellular organelles and subcellular compartments also depends heavily on the controlled movement of ions to establish distinct pH or ionic environments. However, limited experimental access to these subcellular domains/structures has hampered scientific progress in this area, due in large part to the difficulty of applying proven functional assays, such as patch clamp and radiotracer methodologies, to these specialized membrane locations. Using both functional and immune-labeling assays, we now know that the types and complement of channels, transporters and pumps located within intracellular membranes and organelles often differ from those present on the plasma membrane. Moreover, it appears that this differential distribution is due to the presence of discrete tags/signals present within these transport proteins that dictate their sorting/trafficking to spatially discrete membrane compartments, where they may also interact with scaffolding proteins that help maintain their localization. Such targeting signals may thus operate in a manner analogous to the way a postal code is used to direct the delivery of a letter. PMID:23151432

  1. Molecular candidates for cardiac stretch-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Alistair; Kohl, Peter; Peyronnet, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a mechanically-active organ that dynamically senses its own mechanical environment. This environment is constantly changing, on a beat-by-beat basis, with additional modulation by respiratory activity and changes in posture or physical activity, and further overlaid with more slowly occurring physiological (e.g. pregnancy, endurance training) or pathological challenges (e.g. pressure or volume overload). Far from being a simple pump, the heart detects changes in mechanical demand and adjusts its performance accordingly, both via heart rate and stroke volume alteration. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially, and are thus maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Over the last three decades, molecular substrates of cardiac mechanosensitivity have gained increasing recognition in the scientific and clinical communities. Nonetheless, the processes underlying this phenomenon are still poorly understood. Stretch-activated ion channels (SAC) have been identified as one contributor to mechanosensitive autoregulation of the heartbeat. They also appear to play important roles in the development of cardiac pathologies – most notably stretch-induced arrhythmias. As recently discovered, some established cardiac drugs act, in part at least, via mechanotransduction pathways suggesting SAC as potential therapeutic targets. Clearly, identification of the molecular substrate of cardiac SAC is of clinical importance and a number of candidate proteins have been identified. At the same time, experimental studies have revealed variable–and at times contrasting–results regarding their function. Further complication arises from the fact that many ion channels that are not classically defined as SAC, including voltage and ligand-gated ion channels, can respond to mechanical stimulation. Here, we summarise what is known about the molecular substrate of the main candidates for cardiac SAC, before identifying potential further

  2. Tissue kallikrein activation of the epithelial Na channel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankit B.; Chao, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial Na Channels (ENaC) are responsible for the apical entry of Na+ in a number of different epithelia including the renal connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct. Proteolytic cleavage of γ-ENaC by serine proteases, including trypsin, furin, elastase, and prostasin, has been shown to increase channel activity. Here, we investigate the ability of another serine protease, tissue kallikrein, to regulate ENaC. We show that excretion of tissue kallikrein, which is secreted into the lumen of the connecting tubule, is stimulated following 5 days of a high-K+ or low-Na+ diet in rats. Urinary proteins reconstituted in a low-Na buffer activated amiloride-sensitive currents (INa) in ENaC-expressing oocytes, suggesting an endogenous urinary protease can activate ENaC. We next tested whether tissue kallikrein can directly cleave and activate ENaC. When rat ENaC-expressing oocytes were exposed to purified tissue kallikrein from rat urine (RTK), ENaC currents increased threefold in both the presence and absence of a soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). RTK and trypsin both decreased the apparent molecular mass of cleaved cell-surface γ-ENaC, while immunodepleted RTK produced no shift in apparent molecular mass, demonstrating the specificity of the tissue kallikrein. A decreased effect of RTK on Xenopus ENaC, which has variations in the putative prostasin cleavage sites in γ-ENaC, suggests these sites are important in RTK activation of ENaC. Mutating the prostasin site in mouse γ-ENaC (γRKRK186QQQQ) abolished ENaC activation and cleavage by RTK while wild-type mouse ENaC was activated and cleaved similar to that of the rat. We conclude that tissue kallikrein can be a physiologically relevant regulator of ENaC activity. PMID:22622459

  3. Development and maintenance of a telescoping debris flow fan in response to human-induced fan surface channelization, Chalk Creek Valley Natural Debris Flow Laboratory, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasklewicz, T.; Scheinert, C.

    2016-01-01

    Channel change has been a constant theme throughout William L. Graf's research career. Graf's work has examined channel changes in the context of natural environmental fluctuations, but more often has focused on quantifying channel change in the context of anthropogenic modifications. Here, we consider how channelization of a debris flows along a bajada has perpetuated and sustained the development of 'telescoping' alluvial fan. Two-dimensional debris-flow modeling shows the importance of the deeply entrenched channelized flow in the development of a telescoping alluvial fan. GIS analyses of repeat (five different debris flows), high-resolution (5 cm) digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from repeat terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data elucidate sediment and topographic dynamics of the new telescoping portion of the alluvial fan (the embryonic fan). Flow constriction from channelization helps to perpetuate debris-flow runout and to maintain the embryonic fan and telescoping nature of the alluvial fan complex. Embryonic fan development, in response to five debris flows, proceeds with a major portion of the flows depositing on the southern portion of the embryonic fan. The third through the fifth debris flows also begin to shift some deposition to the northern portion of the embryonic. The transfer of sediment from a higher portion of the embryonic fan to a lower portion continues currently on the embryonic fan. While channelized flow has been shown to be critical to the maintenance of the telescoping fan, the flow constriction has led to higher than background levels of sediment deposition in Chalk Creek, a tributary of the Arkansas River. A majority of the sediment from each debris flow is incorporated into Chalk Creek as opposed to being stored on the embryonic fan.

  4. Mechanism of allosteric activation of TMEM16A/ANO1 channels by a commonly used chloride channel blocker

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Chau M; Adomaviciene, Aiste; Rorsman, Nils J G; Garnett, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Calcium‐activated chloride channels (CaCCs) play varied physiological roles and constitute potential therapeutic targets for conditions such as asthma and hypertension. TMEM16A encodes a CaCC. CaCC pharmacology is restricted to compounds with relatively low potency and poorly defined selectivity. Anthracene‐9‐carboxylic acid (A9C), an inhibitor of various chloride channel types, exhibits complex effects on native CaCCs and cloned TMEM16A channels providing both activation and inhibition. The mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully defined. Experimental Approach Patch‐clamp electrophysiology in conjunction with concentration jump experiments was employed to define the mode of interaction of A9C with TMEM16A channels. Key Results In the presence of high intracellular Ca2+, A9C inhibited TMEM16A currents in a voltage‐dependent manner by entering the channel from the outside. A9C activation, revealed in the presence of submaximal intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, was also voltage‐dependent. The electric distance of A9C inhibiting and activating binding site was ~0.6 in each case. Inhibition occurred according to an open‐channel block mechanism. Activation was due to a dramatic leftward shift in the steady‐state activation curve and slowed deactivation kinetics. Extracellular A9C competed with extracellular Cl−, suggesting that A9C binds deep in the channel's pore to exert both inhibiting and activating effects. Conclusions and Implications A9C is an open TMEM16A channel blocker and gating modifier. These effects require A9C to bind to a region within the pore that is accessible from the extracellular side of the membrane. These data will aid the future drug design of compounds that selectively activate or inhibit TMEM16A channels. PMID:26562072

  5. Relaxin stimulates myometrial calcium-activated potassium channel activity via protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Meera, P; Anwer, K; Monga, M; Oberti, C; Stefani, E; Toro, L; Sanborn, B M

    1995-08-01

    Relaxin, a hormone that is elevated during pregnancy, can suppress myometrial contractile activity. Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels (KCa) play a role in the modulation of uterine contractions and myometrial Ca2+ homeostasis and have been implicated in the control of smooth muscle excitability. We now show that relaxin stimulates KCa channels in cell-attached patches in a cell line derived from term pregnant human myometrium. This effect was prevented by the protein kinase A (PKA) antagonist, the Rp diastereomer of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate (Rp-cAMPS). After patch excision, the channel was activated by PKA and inhibited by alkaline phosphatase. These data suggest that relaxin may promote myometrial quiescence in part by stimulation of KCa channels via a PKA-mediated mechanism. PMID:7653512

  6. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels.

    PubMed

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M

    2016-08-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues-mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations-to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377720

  7. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels

    PubMed Central

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C.; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues—mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations—to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377720

  8. Phosphoinositide interacting regulator of TRP (Pirt) enhances TRPM8 channel activity in vitro via increasing channel conductance

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Min; Wu, Guang-yi; Dong, Xin-zhong; Tang, Zong-xiang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Pirt is a two-transmembrane domain protein that regulates the function of a variety of ion channels. Our previous study indicated that Pirt acts as a positive endogenous regulator of the TRPM8 channel. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the regulation of TRPM8 channel by Pirt. Methods: HEK293 cells were transfected with TRPM8+Pirt or TRPM8 alone. Menthol (1 mmol/L) was applied through perfusion to induce TRPM8-mediated voltage-dependent currents, which were recorded using a whole-cell recording technique. PIP2 (10 μmol/L) was added into the electrode pipettes (PI was taken as a control). Additionally, cell-attached single-channel recordings were conducted in CHO cells transfected with TRPM8+Pirt or TRPM8 alone, and menthol (1 mmol/L) was added into the pipette solution. Results: Either co-transfection with Pirt or intracellular application of PIP2 (but not PI) significantly enhanced menthol-induced TRPM8 currents. Furthermore, Pirt and PIP2 synergistically modulated menthol-induced TRPM8 currents. Single-channel recordings revealed that co-transfection with Pirt significantly increased the single channel conductance. Conclusion: Pirt and PIP2 synergistically enhance TRPM8 channel activity, and Pirt regulates TRPM8 channel activity by increasing the single channel conductance. PMID:26657057

  9. Curcumin inhibits activation of TRPM2 channels in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kheradpezhouh, E; Barritt, G J; Rychkov, G Y

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of many liver diseases including viral and drug-induced hepatitis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. One of the consequences of oxidative stress in the liver is deregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, resulting in a sustained elevation of the free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in hepatocytes, which leads to irreversible cellular damage. Recently it has been shown that liver damage induced by paracetamol and subsequent oxidative stress is, in large part, mediated by Ca(2+) entry through Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channels. Involvement of TRPM2 channels in hepatocellular damage induced by oxidative stress makes TRPM2 a potential therapeutic target for treatment of a range of oxidative stress-related liver diseases. We report here the identification of curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), a natural plant-derived polyphenol in turmeric spice, as a novel inhibitor of TRPM2 channel. Presence of 5µM curcumin in the incubation medium prevented the H2O2- and paracetamol-induced [Ca(2+)]c rise in rat hepatocytes. Furthermore, in patch clamping experiments incubation of hepatocytes with curcumin inhibited activation of TRPM2 current by intracellular ADPR with IC50 of approximately 50nM. These findings enhance understanding of the actions of curcumin and suggest that the known hepatoprotective properties of curcumin are, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of TRPM2 channels. PMID:26609559

  10. Curcumin inhibits activation of TRPM2 channels in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kheradpezhouh, E.; Barritt, G.J.; Rychkov, G.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of many liver diseases including viral and drug-induced hepatitis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. One of the consequences of oxidative stress in the liver is deregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis, resulting in a sustained elevation of the free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) in hepatocytes, which leads to irreversible cellular damage. Recently it has been shown that liver damage induced by paracetamol and subsequent oxidative stress is, in large part, mediated by Ca2+ entry through Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channels. Involvement of TRPM2 channels in hepatocellular damage induced by oxidative stress makes TRPM2 a potential therapeutic target for treatment of a range of oxidative stress-related liver diseases. We report here the identification of curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), a natural plant-derived polyphenol in turmeric spice, as a novel inhibitor of TRPM2 channel. Presence of 5 µM curcumin in the incubation medium prevented the H2O2- and paracetamol-induced [Ca2+]c rise in rat hepatocytes. Furthermore, in patch clamping experiments incubation of hepatocytes with curcumin inhibited activation of TRPM2 current by intracellular ADPR with IC50 of approximately 50 nM. These findings enhance understanding of the actions of curcumin and suggest that the known hepatoprotective properties of curcumin are, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of TRPM2 channels. PMID:26609559

  11. Persistent discharges in dentate gyrus perisoma-inhibiting interneurons require hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel activation.

    PubMed

    Elgueta, Claudio; Köhler, Johannes; Bartos, Marlene

    2015-03-11

    Parvalbumin (PV)-expressing perisoma-inhibiting interneurons (PIIs) of the dentate gyrus integrate rapidly correlated synaptic inputs and generate short-duration action potentials that propagate along the axon to their output synapses, supporting fast inhibitory signaling onto their target cells. Here we show that PV-PIIs in rat and mouse dentate gyrus (DG) integrate their intrinsic activity over time and can turn into a persistent firing mode characterized by the ability to generate long-lasting trains of action potentials at ∼50 Hz in the absence of additional inputs. Persistent firing emerges in the axons remote from the axon initial segment and markedly depends on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCNC) activation. Persistent firing properties are modulated by intracellular Ca(2+) levels and somatic membrane potential. Detailed computational single-cell PIIs models reveal that HCNC-mediated conductances can contribute to persistent firing during conditions of a shift in their voltage activation curve to more depolarized potentials. Paired recordings from PIIs and their target granule cells show that persistent firing supports strong inhibitory output signaling. Thus, persistent firing may emerge during conditions of intense activation of the network, thereby providing silencing to the circuitry and the maintenance of sparse activity in the dentate gyrus. PMID:25762660

  12. Photochemical activation of TRPA1 channels in neurons and animals

    PubMed Central

    Kokel, David; Cheung, Chung Yan J.; Mills, Robert; Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda; Huang, Liyi; Setola, Vincent; Sprague, Jared; Jin, Shan; Jin, Youngnam N.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Bruni, Giancarlo; Woolf, Clifford; Roth, Bryan L.; Hamblin, Michael R; Zylka, Mark J.; Milan, David J.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is a powerful research tool because it enables high-resolution optical control of neuronal activity. However, current optogenetic approaches are limited to transgenic systems expressing microbial opsins and other exogenous photoreceptors. Here, we identify optovin, a small molecule that enables repeated photoactivation of motor behaviors in wild type animals. Surprisingly, optovin's behavioral effects are not visually mediated. Rather, photodetection is performed by sensory neurons expressing the cation channel TRPA1. TRPA1 is both necessary and sufficient for the optovin response. Optovin activates human TRPA1 via structure-dependent photochemical reactions with redox-sensitive cysteine residues. In animals with severed spinal cords, optovin treatment enables control of motor activity in the paralyzed extremities by localized illumination. These studies identify a light-based strategy for controlling endogenous TRPA1 receptors in vivo, with potential clinical and research applications in non-transgenic animals, including humans. PMID:23396078

  13. STIM1 Protein Activates Store-Operated Calcium Channels in Cellular Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vigont, V. A.; Zimina, O. A.; Glushankova, L. N.; Kolobkova, J. A.; Ryazantseva, M. A.; Mozhayeva, G. N.; Kaznacheyeva, E. V.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that the expression of full-length mutated huntingtin in human neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) leads to an abnormal increase in calcium entry through store-operated channels. In this paper, the expression of the N-terminal fragment of mutated huntingtin (Htt138Q-1exon) is shown to be enough to provide an actual model for Huntington’s disease. We have shown that Htt138Q-1exon expression causes increased store-operated calcium entry, which is mediated by at least two types of channels in SK-N-SH cells with different reversal potentials. Calcium sensor, STIM1, is required for activation of store-operated calcium entry in these cells. The results provide grounds for considering the proteins responsible for the activation and maintenance of the store-operated calcium entry as promising targets for developing novel therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25558393

  14. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca2+, possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus.

  15. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca(2+), possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus. PMID:27445840

  16. NSAIDs attenuate hyperalgesia induced by TRP channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz; Tsagareli, Merab G.

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels have been extensively investigated as targets for analgesic drug discovery. Because some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are structural analogs of prostaglandins (mediators of inflammation) and NSAIDs attenuate heat nociception and mechanical allodynia in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, we examined three widely used NSAIDs (diclofenac, ketorolac, and xefocam) on the activation of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels using thermal paw withdrawal (Hargreaves) test and mechanical paw withdrawal (von Frey) test in male rats. Thermal withdrawal latencies and mechanical thresholds for both hind paws were obtained with 5, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min intraplantar post-injection of TRPA1 agonizts, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) (a natural compound of mustard oil) and cinnamaldehyde (CA), and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin or vehicle. Twenty minutes prior to the start of the experiment with TRP agonizts, diclofenac, ketorolac or xefocam were pre-injected in the same hindpaw and animals were examined by these two tests. After pretreatment of all three NSAIDs in the ipsilateral (injected) hindpaw that produced strong antinociceptive effects, AITC, CA, and capsaicin caused significant decreases in latency of the thermal withdrawal reflex compared with vehicle or the contralateral hindpaw. The same findings were observed for the paw withdrawal threshold. In approximately 30 min the effects of CA, AITC, and capsaicin returned to baseline. The data are different from our previous evidence, where TRPA1 agonizts AITC and CA and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin produced hyperalgesia for nearly 2 h and resulted in facilitation of these withdrawal reflexes (Tsagareli et al., 2010, 2013). Thus, our data showing that NSAIDs suppress thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia following TRP activation could presumably due to inactivation or desensitization of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels by NSAIDs. PMID:26909384

  17. NSAIDs attenuate hyperalgesia induced by TRP channel activation.

    PubMed

    Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz; Tsagareli, Merab G

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels have been extensively investigated as targets for analgesic drug discovery. Because some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are structural analogs of prostaglandins (mediators of inflammation) and NSAIDs attenuate heat nociception and mechanical allodynia in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, we examined three widely used NSAIDs (diclofenac, ketorolac, and xefocam) on the activation of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels using thermal paw withdrawal (Hargreaves) test and mechanical paw withdrawal (von Frey) test in male rats. Thermal withdrawal latencies and mechanical thresholds for both hind paws were obtained with 5, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min intraplantar post-injection of TRPA1 agonizts, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) (a natural compound of mustard oil) and cinnamaldehyde (CA), and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin or vehicle. Twenty minutes prior to the start of the experiment with TRP agonizts, diclofenac, ketorolac or xefocam were pre-injected in the same hindpaw and animals were examined by these two tests. After pretreatment of all three NSAIDs in the ipsilateral (injected) hindpaw that produced strong antinociceptive effects, AITC, CA, and capsaicin caused significant decreases in latency of the thermal withdrawal reflex compared with vehicle or the contralateral hindpaw. The same findings were observed for the paw withdrawal threshold. In approximately 30 min the effects of CA, AITC, and capsaicin returned to baseline. The data are different from our previous evidence, where TRPA1 agonizts AITC and CA and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin produced hyperalgesia for nearly 2 h and resulted in facilitation of these withdrawal reflexes (Tsagareli et al., 2010, 2013). Thus, our data showing that NSAIDs suppress thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia following TRP activation could presumably due to inactivation or desensitization of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels by NSAIDs. PMID:26909384

  18. Membrane stretch and cytoplasmic Ca2+ independently modulate stretch-activated BK channel activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hu-Cheng; Agula, Hasi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Fa; Sokabe, Masahiro; Li, Lu-Ming

    2010-11-16

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels are responsible for changes in chemical and physical signals such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and membrane potentials. Previously, we reported that a BK channel cloned from chick heart (SAKCaC) is activated by membrane stretch. Molecular cloning and subsequent functional characterization of SAKCaC have shown that both the membrane stretch and intracellular Ca(2+) signal allosterically regulate the channel activity via the linker of the gating ring complex. Here we investigate how these two gating principles interact with each other. We found that stretch force activated SAKCaC in the absence of cytoplasmic Ca(2+). Lack of Ca(2+) bowl (a calcium binding motif) in SAKCaC diminished the Ca(2+)-dependent activation, but the mechanosensitivity of channel was intact. We also found that the abrogation of STREX (a proposed mechanosensing apparatus) in SAKCaC abolished the mechanosensitivity without altering the Ca(2+) sensitivity of channels. These observations indicate that membrane stretch and intracellular Ca(2+) could independently modulate SAKCaC activity. PMID:20673577

  19. Optimal Medical Equipment Maintenance Service Proposal Decision Support System combining Activity Based Costing (ABC) and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP).

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Leticia; Sloane, Elliot; M Bassani, Jose

    2005-01-01

    This study describes a framework to support the choice of the maintenance service (in-house or third party contract) for each category of medical equipment based on: a) the real medical equipment maintenance management system currently used by the biomedical engineering group of the public health system of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas located in Brazil to control the medical equipment maintenance service, b) the Activity Based Costing (ABC) method, and c) the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method. Results show the cost and performance related to each type of maintenance service. Decision-makers can use these results to evaluate possible strategies for the categories of equipment. PMID:17281912

  20. Membrane stretching triggers mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel activation in Chara.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Naoya; Kikuyama, Munehiro

    2009-03-01

    In order to confirm that mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels are activated by membrane stretching, we stretched or compressed the plasma membrane of Chara by applying osmotic shrinkage or swelling of the cell by varying the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. Aequorin studies revealed that treatments causing membrane stretching induced a transient but large increase in cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) (Delta[Ca(2+)](c)). However, the observed Delta[Ca(2+)](c) decreased during the treatments, resulting in membrane compression. A second experiment was carried out to study the relationship between changes in membrane potential (DeltaE(m)) and stretching or compression of the plasma membrane. Significant DeltaE(m) values, often accompanied by an action potential, were observed during the initial exchange of the bathing medium from a hypotonic medium to a hypertonic one (plasmolysis). DeltaE(m) appears to be triggered by a partial stretching of the membrane as it was peeled from the cell wall. After plasmolysis, other exchanges from hypertonic to hypotonic media, with their accompanying membrane stretching, always induced large DeltaE(m) values and were often accompanied by an action potential. By contrast, action potentials were scarcely observed during other exchanges from hypotonic to hypertonic solutions (=membrane compression). Thus, we concluded that activation of the mechanosensitive channels is triggered by membrane stretching in Chara. PMID:19234734

  1. Flexibility within working memory and the focus of attention for sequential verbal information does not depend on active maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sandry, Joshua; Schwark, Jeremy D; MacDonald, Justin

    2014-10-01

    The focus of attention seems to be a static element within working memory when verbal information is serially presented, unless additional time is available for processing or active maintenance. Experiment 1 manipulated the reward associated with early and medial list positions in a probe recognition paradigm and found evidence that these nonterminal list positions could be retrieved faster and more accurately if participants were appropriately motivated-without additional time for processing or active maintenance. Experiment 2 used articulatory suppression and demonstrated that the underlying maintenance mechanism cannot be attributed to rehearsal, leaving attentional refreshing as the more likely mechanism. These findings suggest that the focus of attention within working memory can flexibly maintain nonterminal early and medial list representations at the expense of other list representations even when there is not additional time for processing or active maintenance. Maintenance seems to be accomplished through an attentional refreshing mechanism. PMID:24879637

  2. Environmental Resources in Maintenance of Physical Activity 6 Months Following Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adriana; Fleury, Julie; Belyea, Michael

    2016-08-01

    This study examined differences in weekly time spent in physical activity by level of perceived environmental resources, 6 months following graduation from cardiac rehabilitation. A descriptive, longitudinal design used standardized measures to evaluate perceived environmental resources and physical activity levels. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to examine mean differences in weekly time spent in physical activity by level of perceived environmental resources. Adults 51 to 86 years old (N = 150) diagnosed with coronary heart disease were included. There was a significant change over time in physical activity as measured by minutes per week, F(2, 148) = 7.915, p = .001, where activity increased between baseline and 3 months, and then dropped slightly at 6 months. This change over time differed by the level of perceived neighborhood resources, F(2, 148) = 3.545, p = .032. Home and neighborhood resources may positively influence physical activity maintenance following cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:26826141

  3. Natural resources management activities and biodiversity maintenance. Progress report, July 1, 1994--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, M.B.

    1995-05-01

    This progress report for the Natural Resources Management Activities and Biodiversity Maintenance for the time period July 1, 1994 - June 30, 1995 was submitted to the DOE by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The activities devoted to revitilization of wildlife areas and reintroduction of various animal species to wildlife areas (such as Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area) are described. Other information regarding site characterization, land use and resource management in South Carolina is provided. Also, a description of attendence to various meetings and certification seminars is covered.

  4. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of a swelling-activated cation channel in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Kizer, N.; Barry, E. L.; Friedman, P. A.; Hruska, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    By patch-clamp analysis, we have shown that chronic, intermittent mechanical strain (CMS) increases the activity of stretch-activated cation channels of osteoblast-like UMR-106.01 cells. CMS also produces a swelling-activated whole-cell conductance (Gm) regulated by varying strain levels. We questioned whether the swelling-activated conductance was produced by stretch-activated cation channel activity. We have identified a gene involved in the increase in conductance by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) derived from the alpha 1-subunit genes of calcium channels found in UMR-106.01 cells (alpha1S, alpha1C, and alpha1D). We demonstrate that alpha 1C antisense ODNs abolish the increase in Gm in response to hypotonic swelling following CMS. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S and alpha1D, sense ODNs to alpha1C, and sham permeabilization had no effect on the conductance increase. In addition, during cell-attached patch-clamp studies, antisense ODNs to alpha1c completely blocked the swelling-activated and stretch-activated nonselective cation channel response to strain. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S treatment produced no effect on either swelling-activated or stretch-activated cation channel activity. There were differences in the stretch-activated and swelling-activated cation channel activity, but whether they represent different channels could not be determined from our data. Our data indicate that the alpha1C gene product is involved in the Gm and the activation of the swelling-activated cation channels induced by CMS. The possibility that swelling-activated cation channel genes are members of the calcium channel superfamily exists, but if alpha1c is not the swelling-activated cation channel itself, then its expression is required for induction of swelling-activated cation channel activity by CMS.

  5. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of a swelling-activated cation channel in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, R L; Kizer, N; Barry, E L; Friedman, P A; Hruska, K A

    1996-01-01

    By patch-clamp analysis, we have shown that chronic, intermittent mechanical strain (CMS) increases the activity of stretch-activated cation channels of osteoblast-like UMR-106.01 cells. CMS also produces a swelling-activated whole-cell conductance (Gm) regulated by varying strain levels. We questioned whether the swelling-activated conductance was produced by stretch-activated cation channel activity. We have identified a gene involved in the increase in conductance by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) derived from the alpha 1-subunit genes of calcium channels found in UMR-106.01 cells (alpha1S, alpha1C, and alpha1D). We demonstrate that alpha 1C antisense ODNs abolish the increase in Gm in response to hypotonic swelling following CMS. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S and alpha1D, sense ODNs to alpha1C, and sham permeabilization had no effect on the conductance increase. In addition, during cell-attached patch-clamp studies, antisense ODNs to alpha1c completely blocked the swelling-activated and stretch-activated nonselective cation channel response to strain. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S treatment produced no effect on either swelling-activated or stretch-activated cation channel activity. There were differences in the stretch-activated and swelling-activated cation channel activity, but whether they represent different channels could not be determined from our data. Our data indicate that the alpha1C gene product is involved in the Gm and the activation of the swelling-activated cation channels induced by CMS. The possibility that swelling-activated cation channel genes are members of the calcium channel superfamily exists, but if alpha1c is not the swelling-activated cation channel itself, then its expression is required for induction of swelling-activated cation channel activity by CMS. PMID:8700850

  6. Activation and Regulation of Purinergic P2X Receptor Channels

    PubMed Central

    Coddou, Claudio; Yan, Zonghe; Obsil, Tomas; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian ATP-gated nonselective cation channels (P2XRs) can be composed of seven possible subunits, denoted P2X1 to P2X7. Each subunit contains a large ectodomain, two transmembrane domains, and intracellular N and C termini. Functional P2XRs are organized as homomeric and heteromeric trimers. This review focuses on the binding sites involved in the activation (orthosteric) and regulation (allosteric) of P2XRs. The ectodomains contain three ATP binding sites, presumably located between neighboring subunits and formed by highly conserved residues. The detection and coordination of three ATP phosphate residues by positively charged amino acids are likely to play a dominant role in determining agonist potency, whereas an AsnPheArg motif may contribute to binding by coordinating the adenine ring. Nonconserved ectodomain histidines provide the binding sites for trace metals, divalent cations, and protons. The transmembrane domains account not only for the formation of the channel pore but also for the binding of ivermectin (a specific P2X4R allosteric regulator) and alcohols. The N- and C- domains provide the structures that determine the kinetics of receptor desensitization and/or pore dilation and are critical for the regulation of receptor functions by intracellular messengers, kinases, reactive oxygen species and mercury. The recent publication of the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4.1R in a closed state provides a major advance in the understanding of this family of receptor channels. We will discuss data obtained from numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments accumulated during the last 15 years with reference to the crystal structure, allowing a structural interpretation of the molecular basis of orthosteric and allosteric ligand actions. PMID:21737531

  7. Effects of microgravity on liposome-reconstituted cardiac gap junction channeling activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claassen, D. E.; Spooner, B. S.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of microgravity on cardiac gap junction channeling activity were investigated aboard NASA zero-gravity aircraft. Liposome-reconstituted gap junctions were assayed for channel function during free-fall, and the data were compared with channeling at 1 g. Control experiments tested for 0 g effects on the structural stability of liposomes, and on the enzyme-substrate signalling system of the assay. The results demonstrate that short periods of microgravity do not perturb reconstituted cardiac gap junction channeling activity.

  8. Trypsin-Sensitive, Rapid Inactivation of a Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaro, Christopher R.; Lingle, Christopher J.

    1992-09-01

    Most calcium-activated potassium channels couple changes in intracellular calcium to membrane excitability by conducting a current with a probability that depends directly on submembrane calcium concentration. In rat adrenal chromaffin cells, however, a large conductance, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) undergoes rapid inactivation, suggesting that this channel has a physiological role different than that of other BK channels. The inactivation of the BK channel, like that of the voltage-gated Shaker B potassium channel, is removed by trypsin digestion and channels are blocked by the Shaker B amino-terminal inactivating domain. Thus, this BK channel shares functional and possibly structural homologies with other inactivating voltage-gated potassium channels.

  9. Impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on NMDA spikes in cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bock, Tobias; Stuart, Greg J

    2016-03-01

    Active electrical events play an important role in shaping signal processing in dendrites. As these events are usually associated with an increase in intracellular calcium, they are likely to be under the control of calcium-activated potassium channels. Here, we investigate the impact of calcium-activated potassium channels onN-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent spikes, or NMDA spikes, evoked by glutamate iontophoresis onto basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We found that small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) act to reduce NMDA spike amplitude but at the same time, also decrease the iontophoretic current required for their generation. This SK-mediated decrease in NMDA spike threshold was dependent on R-type voltage-gated calcium channels and indicates a counterintuitive, excitatory effect of SK channels on NMDA spike generation, whereas the capacity of SK channels to suppress NMDA spike amplitude is in line with the expected inhibitory action of potassium channels on dendritic excitability. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels had no significant impact on NMDA spikes, indicating that these channels are either absent from basal dendrites or not activated by NMDA spikes. These experiments reveal complex and opposing interactions among NMDA receptors, SK channels, and voltage-gated calcium channels in basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons during NMDA spike generation, which are likely to play an important role in regulating the way these neurons integrate the thousands of synaptic inputs they receive. PMID:26936985

  10. Two Salt Bridges Differentially Contribute to the Maintenance of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guiying; Freeman, Cody S.; Knotts, Taylor; Prince, Chengyu Z.; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two salt bridges in human CFTR chloride ion channels, Arg352-Asp993 and Arg347-Asp924, that are required for normal channel function. In the present study, we determined how the two salt bridges cooperate to maintain the open pore architecture of CFTR. Our data suggest that Arg347 not only interacts with Asp924 but also interacts with Asp993. The tripartite interaction Arg347-Asp924-Asp993 mainly contributes to maintaining a stable s2 open subconductance state. The Arg352-Asp993 salt bridge, in contrast, is involved in stabilizing both the s2 and full (f) open conductance states, with the main contribution being to the f state. The s1 subconductance state does not require either salt bridge. In confirmation of the role of Arg352 and Asp993, channels bearing cysteines at these sites could be latched into a full open state using the bifunctional cross-linker 1,2-ethanediyl bismethanethiosulfonate, but only when applied in the open state. Channels remained latched open even after washout of ATP. The results suggest that these interacting residues contribute differently to stabilizing the open pore in different phases of the gating cycle. PMID:23709221

  11. Two salt bridges differentially contribute to the maintenance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel function.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guiying; Freeman, Cody S; Knotts, Taylor; Prince, Chengyu Z; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A

    2013-07-12

    Previous studies have identified two salt bridges in human CFTR chloride ion channels, Arg(352)-Asp(993) and Arg(347)-Asp(924), that are required for normal channel function. In the present study, we determined how the two salt bridges cooperate to maintain the open pore architecture of CFTR. Our data suggest that Arg(347) not only interacts with Asp(924) but also interacts with Asp(993). The tripartite interaction Arg(347)-Asp(924)-Asp(993) mainly contributes to maintaining a stable s2 open subconductance state. The Arg(352)-Asp(993) salt bridge, in contrast, is involved in stabilizing both the s2 and full (f) open conductance states, with the main contribution being to the f state. The s1 subconductance state does not require either salt bridge. In confirmation of the role of Arg(352) and Asp(993), channels bearing cysteines at these sites could be latched into a full open state using the bifunctional cross-linker 1,2-ethanediyl bismethanethiosulfonate, but only when applied in the open state. Channels remained latched open even after washout of ATP. The results suggest that these interacting residues contribute differently to stabilizing the open pore in different phases of the gating cycle. PMID:23709221

  12. Bi-objective analysis of water-sediment regulation for channel scouring and delta maintenance: A study of the lower Yellow River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dongxian; Miao, Chiyuan; Wu, Jingwen; Jiang, Lin; Duan, Qingyun

    2015-10-01

    Long-term hydrological data and remotely-sensed satellite images were used to analyze the effects of the water-sediment regulation scheme (WSRS) implemented in the lower Yellow River (LYR), China, between 1983 and 2013. The WSRS aimed to control channel scouring in the LYR and maintain the Yellow River Delta (YRD). Channel erosion in the LYR has primarily depended on the incoming sediment concentration at Xiaolangdi, where the concentration must be lower than approximately 9.17 × 10- 3 t m- 3 to avoid rising of the riverbed. In 1996, an artificial diversion altered the evolution of the YRD. To maintain delta equilibrium, an average sediment load of about 441 × 106 t year- 1 was required before 1996, after which this value decreased to 167 × 106 t year- 1. We provide a preliminary estimate of the incoming water and sediment conditions required at the Xiaolangdi station to guarantee both LYR channel scouring and maintenance of the YRD. Our results show that it is feasible to transport sediment originally deposited in the LYR to the river mouth to maintain the delta, which is of great significance for the future management and environmental protection of the LYR.

  13. Calcium ions open a selectivity filter gate during activation of the MthK potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posson, David J.; Rusinova, Radda; Andersen, Olaf S.; Nimigean, Crina M.

    2015-09-01

    Ion channel opening and closing are fundamental to cellular signalling and homeostasis. Gates that control K+ channel activity were found both at an intracellular pore constriction and within the selectivity filter near the extracellular side but the specific location of the gate that opens Ca2+-activated K+ channels has remained elusive. Using the Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum homologue (MthK) and a stopped-flow fluorometric assay for fast channel activation, we show that intracellular quaternary ammonium blockers bind to closed MthK channels. Since the blockers are known to bind inside a central channel cavity, past the intracellular entryway, the gate must be within the selectivity filter. Furthermore, the blockers access the closed channel slower than the open channel, suggesting that the intracellular entryway narrows upon pore closure, without preventing access of either the blockers or the smaller K+. Thus, Ca2+-dependent gating in MthK occurs at the selectivity filter with coupled movement of the intracellular helices.

  14. Mechanisms of caffeine activation of single calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Sitsapesan, R; Williams, A J

    1990-01-01

    1. Calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum were incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers. Single-channel current fluctuations were recorded under voltage clamp conditions. 2. Channels incorporate into the bilayer with a fixed orientation and channel open probability is regulated by the calcium concentration at the cytosolic face of the membrane. 3. Addition of caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) to the cytosolic side of the membrane increased the open probability of the calcium-activated calcium-release channel by increasing the frequency of opening without significant alteration to the durations of open events. This effect was observed at both 0.1 and 10 microM-activating cytosolic calcium. 4. Caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) did not activate the channel at a subactivating cytosolic calcium concentration (80 pM). 5. At subactivating calcium concentrations, channels could be activated by higher concentrations of caffeine (greater than 5.0 mM) revealing a second, calcium-independent, mechanism for channel activation. Channel openings induced by these high concentrations of caffeine at subactivating calcium concentrations displayed different kinetics from those observed with calcium as the sole activating ligand or with combinations of calcium and low concentrations of caffeine. 6. Activation of channel opening by caffeine in the presence of calcium did not affect single-channel conductance. Channel openings produced by caffeine at subactivating cytosolic calcium concentrations had identical conductance and relative permeability to those seen on calcium activation. 7. Channels activated by caffeine at both activating and subactivating calcium concentrations were characteristically modified by ryanodine, Ruthenium Red, ATP and magnesium, implying that the same channel is involved under both conditions. PMID:2167363

  15. Regulation of epithelial sodium channels in urokinase plasminogen activator deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zaixing; Zhao, Runzhen; Zhao, Meimi; Liang, Xinrong; Bhattarai, Deepa; Dhiman, Rohan; Shetty, Sreerama; Idell, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) govern transepithelial salt and fluid homeostasis. ENaC contributes to polarization, apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transformation, etc. Fibrinolytic proteases play a crucial role in virtually all of these processes and are elaborated by the airway epithelium. We hypothesized that urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates ENaC function in airway epithelial cells and tested that possibility in primary murine tracheal epithelial cells (MTE). Both basal and cAMP-activated Na+ flow through ENaC were significantly reduced in monolayers of uPA-deficient cells. The reduction in ENaC activity was further confirmed in basolateral membrane-permeabilized cells. A decrease in the Na+-K+-ATPase activity in the basolateral membrane could contribute to the attenuation of ENaC function in intact monolayer cells. Dysfunctional fluid resolution was seen in uPA-disrupted cells. Administration of uPA and plasmin partially restores ENaC activity and fluid reabsorption by MTEs. ERK1/2, but not Akt, phosphorylation was observed in the cells and lungs of uPA-deficient mice. On the other hand, cleavage of γ ENaC is significantly depressed in the lungs of uPA knockout mice vs. those of wild-type controls. Expression of caspase 8, however, did not differ between wild-type and uPA−/− mice. In addition, uPA deficiency did not alter transepithelial resistance. Taken together, the mechanisms for the regulation of ENaC by uPA in MTEs include augmentation of Na+-K+-ATPase, proteolysis, and restriction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We demonstrate for the first time that ENaC may serve as a downstream signaling target by which uPA controls the biophysical profiles of airway fluid and epithelial function. PMID:25172911

  16. Food activities and identity maintenance in old age: a systematic review and meta-synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Plastow, Nicola Ann; Atwal, Anita; Gilhooly, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Services provided to older people should be developed based on active ageing policies. Nutrition is one aspect of active ageing, but little is known about how food activities contribute to psychological well-being in later life. This is a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative research that answers the question ‘What is known about the relationship between food activities and the maintenance of identities in old age?’. Methods: We followed the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines and used quality assessment parameters to complete a systematic review and narrative synthesis. Academic Search Premier, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, and PsycINFO databases were searched. Results: We initially identified 8016 articles, of which 167 full-text articles were screened for inclusion. Twenty-two articles were included in the review. There was moderate evidence from nine qualitative and two quantitative studies, of variable quality, that food activities contribute to the maintenance of women's gendered identities, the ethnic identities of men and women, and community identities. There was moderate evidence from 10 qualitative studies, of variable quality, that a change in food choice and deteriorating health changed food activity participation. These changes threatened identities. Most studies included both younger adults and older adults. Conclusion: In later life, there are many life experiences leading to change. Further research is needed to develop understanding of how identity and mental well-being are maintained, despite changes in everyday activities like cooking and eating. This may enable health care professionals to meet psychological needs alongside biological needs during nutritional interventions. PMID:25373998

  17. The Sodium-Activated Potassium Channel Slack Is Required for Optimal Cognitive Flexibility in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausch, Anne E.; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    "Kcnt1" encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual…

  18. Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03693 Channel

    This channel is located south of Iani Chaos.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -10.9N, Longitude 345.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Dual actions of procainamide on batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels: open channel block and prevention of inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, G W; Sui, X; Codding, P W; French, R J

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the action of procainamide on batrachotoxin (BTX)-activated sodium channels from bovine heart and rat skeletal muscle. When applied to the intracellular side, procainamide induced rapid, open-channel block. We estimated rate constants using amplitude distribution analysis (Yellen, G. 1984. J. Gen. Physiol. 84:157). Membrane depolarization increased the blocking rate and slowed unblock. The rate constants were similar in both magnitude and voltage dependence for cardiac and skeletal muscle channels. Qualitatively, this block resembled the fast open-channel block by lidocaine (Zamponi, G. W., D. D. Doyle, and R. J. French. 1993. Biophys. J. 65:80), but procainamide was about sevenfold less potent. Molecular modeling suggests that the difference in potency between procainamide and lidocaine might arise from the relative orientation of their aromatic rings, or from differences in the structure of the aryl-amine link. For the cardiac channels, procainamide reduced the frequency of transitions to a long-lived closed state which shows features characteristic of inactivation (Zamponi, G. W., D. D. Doyle, and R. J. French. 1993. Biophys J. 65:91). Mean durations of kinetically identified closed states were not affected. The degree of fast block and of inhibition of the slow closures were correlated. Internally applied QX-314, a lidocaine derivative and also a fast blocker, produced a similar effect. Thus, drug binding to the fast blocking site appears to inhibit inactivation in BTX-activated cardiac channels. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:8312472

  20. Arachidonic acid activation of a new family of K+ channels in cultured rat neuronal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, D; Sladek, C D; Aguado-Velasco, C; Mathiasen, J R

    1995-01-01

    1. The presence and properties of K+ channels activated by arachidonic acid were studied in neuronal cells cultured from the mesencephalic and hypothalamic areas of rat brain. 2. Arachidonic acid produced a concentration-dependent (5-50 microM) and reversible activation of whole-cell currents. 3. In excised membrane patches, arachidonic acid applied to the cytoplasmic or extracellular side of the membrane caused opening of three types of channels whose current-voltage relationships were slightly outwardly rectifying, inwardly rectifying and linear, and whose single channel slope conductances at +60 mV were 143, 45 and 52 pS, respectively. 4. All three currents were K+ selective and blocked by 2 mM Ba2+ but not by other K+ channel blockers such as tetraethylammonium chloride, 4-aminopyridine and quinidine. The outwardly and inwardly rectifying currents were slightly voltage dependent with higher channel activity at more depolarized potentials. 5. Arachidonic acid activated the K+ channels in cells treated with cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid), indicating that arachidonic acid itself can directly activate the channels. Alcohol and methyl ester derivatives of arachidonic acid failed to activate the K+ channels, indicating that the charged carboxyl group is important for activation. 6. Certain unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic, linolenic and docosahexaenoic acids), but not saturated fatty acids (myristic, palmitic, stearic acids), also reversibly activated all three types of K+ channel. 7. All three K+ channels were activated by pressure applied to the membrane (i.e. channels were stretch sensitive) with a half-maximal pressure of approximately 18 mmHg. The K+ channels were not blocked by 100 microM GdCl3. 8. A decrease in intracellular pH (over the range 5.6-7.2) caused a reversible, pH-dependent increase in channel activity whether the channel was initially activated by arachidonic acid or stretch. 9. Glutamate

  1. Activation and deactivation of vibronic channels in intact phycocyanin rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nganou, C.; David, L.; Meinke, R.; Adir, N.; Maultzsch, J.; Mkandawire, M.; Pouhè, D.; Thomsen, C.

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the excitation modes of the light-harvesting protein phycocyanin (PC) from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the crystalline state using UV and near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. The spectra revealed the absence of a hydrogen out-of-plane wagging (HOOP) mode in the PC trimer, which suggests that the HOOP mode is activated in the intact PC rod, while it is not active in the PC trimer. Furthermore, in the PC trimer an intense mode at 984 cm-1 is assigned to the C-C stretching vibration while the mode at 454 cm-1 is likely due to ethyl group torsion. In contrast, in the similar chromophore phytochromobilin the C5,10,15-D wag mode at 622 cm-1 does not come from a downshift of the HOOP. Additionally, the absence of modes between 1200 and 1300 cm-1 rules out functional monomerization. A correlation between phycocyanobilin (PCB) and phycoerythrobilin (PEB) suggests that the PCB cofactors of the PC trimer appear in a conformation similar to that of PEB. The conformation of the PC rod is consistent with that of the allophycocyanin (APC) trimer, and thus excitonic flow is facilitated between these two independent light-harvesting compounds. This excitonic flow from the PC rod to APC appears to be modulated by the vibration channels during HOOP wagging, C = C stretching, and the N-H rocking in-plan vibration.

  2. Abnormal medial temporal activity for bound information during working memory maintenance in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Luck, David; Danion, Jean-Marie; Marrer, Corrine; Pham, Bich-Tuy; Gounot, Daniel; Foucher, Jack

    2010-08-01

    Alterations of binding in long-term memory in schizophrenia are well established and occur as a result of aberrant activity in the medial temporal lobe (MTL). In working memory (WM), such a deficit is less clear and the pathophysiological bases remain unstudied. Seventeen patients with schizophrenia and 17 matched healthy controls performed a WM binding task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Binding was assessed by contrasting two conditions comprising an equal amount of verbal and spatial information (i.e., three letters and three spatial locations), but differing in the absence or presence of a link between them. In healthy controls, MTL activation was observed for encoding and maintenance of bound information but not for its retrieval. Between-group comparisons revealed that patients with schizophrenia showed MTL hypoactivation during the maintenance phase only. In addition, BOLD signals correlated with behavioral performance in controls but not in patients with schizophrenia. Our results confirm the major role that the MTL plays in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Short-term and long-term relational memory deficits in schizophrenia may share common cognitive and functional pathological bases. Our results provide additional information about the episodic buffer that represents an integrative interface between WM and long-term memory. PMID:19693783

  3. Maintenance of Stem Cell Niche Integrity by a Novel Activator of Integrin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joo Yeun; Chang, Karen T.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells depend critically on the surrounding microenvironment, or niche, for their maintenance and self-renewal. While much is known about how the niche regulates stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, mechanisms for how the niche is maintained over time are not well understood. At the apical tip of the Drosophila testes, germline stem cells (GSCs) and somatic stem cells share a common niche formed by hub cells. Here we demonstrate that a novel protein named Shriveled (Shv) is necessary for the maintenance of hub/niche integrity. Depletion of Shv protein results in age-dependent deterioration of the hub structure and loss of GSCs, whereas upregulation of Shv preserves the niche during aging. We find Shv is a secreted protein that modulates DE-cadherin levels through extracellular activation of integrin signaling. Our work identifies Shv as a novel activator of integrin signaling and suggests a new integration model in which crosstalk between integrin and DE-cadherin in niche cells promote their own preservation by maintaining the niche architecture. PMID:27191715

  4. GlialCAM, a CLC-2 Cl(-) channel subunit, activates the slow gate of CLC chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Jeworutzki, Elena; Lagostena, Laura; Elorza-Vidal, Xabier; López-Hernández, Tania; Estévez, Raúl; Pusch, Michael

    2014-09-01

    GlialCAM, a glial cell adhesion molecule mutated in megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts, targets the CLC-2 Cl(-) channel to cell contacts in glia and activates CLC-2 currents in vitro and in vivo. We found that GlialCAM clusters all CLC channels at cell contacts in vitro and thus studied GlialCAM interaction with CLC channels to investigate the mechanism of functional activation. GlialCAM slowed deactivation kinetics of CLC-Ka/barttin channels and increased CLC-0 currents opening the common gate and slowing its deactivation. No functional effect was seen for common gate deficient CLC-0 mutants. Similarly, GlialCAM targets the common gate deficient CLC-2 mutant E211V/H816A to cell contacts, without altering its function. Thus, GlialCAM is able to interact with all CLC channels tested, targeting them to cell junctions and activating them by stabilizing the open configuration of the common gate. These results are important to better understand the physiological role of GlialCAM/CLC-2 interaction. PMID:25185546

  5. GlialCAM, a CLC-2 Cl- Channel Subunit, Activates the Slow Gate of CLC Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jeworutzki, Elena; Lagostena, Laura; Elorza-Vidal, Xabier; López-Hernández, Tania; Estévez, Raúl; Pusch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    GlialCAM, a glial cell adhesion molecule mutated in megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts, targets the CLC-2 Cl- channel to cell contacts in glia and activates CLC-2 currents in vitro and in vivo. We found that GlialCAM clusters all CLC channels at cell contacts in vitro and thus studied GlialCAM interaction with CLC channels to investigate the mechanism of functional activation. GlialCAM slowed deactivation kinetics of CLC-Ka/barttin channels and increased CLC-0 currents opening the common gate and slowing its deactivation. No functional effect was seen for common gate deficient CLC-0 mutants. Similarly, GlialCAM targets the common gate deficient CLC-2 mutant E211V/H816A to cell contacts, without altering its function. Thus, GlialCAM is able to interact with all CLC channels tested, targeting them to cell junctions and activating them by stabilizing the open configuration of the common gate. These results are important to better understand the physiological role of GlialCAM/CLC-2 interaction. PMID:25185546

  6. Resting-state activity in development and maintenance of normal brain function

    PubMed Central

    Pizoli, Carolyn E.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Limbrick, David D.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.; Smyth, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most intriguing recent discoveries concerning brain function is that intrinsic neuronal activity manifests as spontaneous fluctuations of the blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) functional MRI signal. These BOLD fluctuations exhibit temporal synchrony within widely distributed brain regions known as resting-state networks. Resting-state networks are present in the waking state, during sleep, and under general anesthesia, suggesting that spontaneous neuronal activity plays a fundamental role in brain function. Despite its ubiquitous presence, the physiological role of correlated, spontaneous neuronal activity remains poorly understood. One hypothesis is that this activity is critical for the development of synaptic connections and maintenance of synaptic homeostasis. We had a unique opportunity to test this hypothesis in a 5-y-old boy with severe epileptic encephalopathy. The child developed marked neurologic dysfunction in association with a seizure disorder, resulting in a 1-y period of behavioral regression and progressive loss of developmental milestones. His EEG showed a markedly abnormal pattern of high-amplitude, disorganized slow activity with frequent generalized and multifocal epileptiform discharges. Resting-state functional connectivity MRI showed reduced BOLD fluctuations and a pervasive lack of normal connectivity. The child underwent successful corpus callosotomy surgery for treatment of drop seizures. Postoperatively, the patient's behavior returned to baseline, and he resumed development of new skills. The waking EEG revealed a normal background, and functional connectivity MRI demonstrated restoration of functional connectivity architecture. These results provide evidence that intrinsic, coherent neuronal signaling may be essential to the development and maintenance of the brain's functional organization. PMID:21709227

  7. Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels and transient receptor potential channels activates pathological hypertrophy signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Wang, Fang; Wang, Wei; Makarewich, Catherine A; Zhang, Hongyu; Kubo, Hajime; Berretta, Remus M; Barr, Larry A; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Houser, Steven R

    2012-11-01

    Common cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and myocardial infarction require that myocytes develop greater than normal force to maintain cardiac pump function. This requires increases in [Ca(2+)]. These diseases induce cardiac hypertrophy and increases in [Ca(2+)] are known to be an essential proximal signal for activation of hypertrophic genes. However, the source of "hypertrophic" [Ca(2+)] is not known and is the topic of this study. The role of Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCC), T-type Ca(2+) channels (TTCC) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels on the activation of calcineurin (Cn)-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling and myocyte hypertrophy was studied. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) and adult feline ventricular myocytes (AFVMs) were infected with an adenovirus containing NFAT-GFP, to determine factors that could induce NFAT nuclear translocation. Four millimolar Ca(2+) or pacing induced NFAT nuclear translocation. This effect was blocked by Cn inhibitors. In NRVMs Nifedipine (Nif, LTCC antagonist) blocked high Ca(2+)-induced NFAT nuclear translocation while SKF-96365 (TRP channel antagonist) and Nickel (Ni, TTCC antagonist) were less effective. The relative potency of these antagonists against Ca(2+) induced NFAT nuclear translocation (Nif>SKF-96365>Ni) was similar to their effects on Ca(2+) transients and the LTCC current. Infection of NRVM with viruses containing TRP channels also activated NFAT-GFP nuclear translocation and caused myocyte hypertrophy. TRP effects were reduced by SKF-96365, but were more effectively antagonized by Nif. These experiments suggest that Ca(2+) influx through LTCCs is the primary source of Ca(2+) to activate Cn-NFAT signaling in NRVMs and AFVMs. While TRP channels cause hypertrophy, they appear to do so through a mechanism involving Ca(2+) entry via LTCCs. PMID:22921230

  8. A new approach to physical activity maintenance: Rationale, design, and baseline data from the Keep Active Minnesota trial

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Nancy E; Martinson, Brian C; Crain, A Lauren; Hayes, Marcia G; Pronk, Nicolaas P; O'Connor, Patrick J

    2008-01-01

    Background Since many individuals who initiate physical activity programs are highly likely to return to a sedentary lifestyle, innovative strategies to efforts to increase the number of physically active older adults who successfully maintain beneficial levels of PA for a substantial length of time are needed. Methods/Design The Keep Active Minnesota Trial is a randomized controlled trial of an interactive phone- and mail-based intervention to help 50–70 year old adults who have recently increased their physical activity level, maintain that activity level over a 24-month period in comparison to usual care. Baseline, 6, 12, and 24 month measurement occurred via phone surveys with kilocalories expended per week in total and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (CHAMPS Questionnaire) as the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcomes include hypothesized mediators of physical activity change (e.g., physical activity enjoyment, self-efficacy, physical activity self-concept), body mass index, and depression. Seven day accelerometry data were collected on a sub-sample of participants at baseline and 24-month follow-up. Discussion The Keep Active Minnesota study offers an innovative approach to the perennial problem of physical activity relapse; by focusing explicitly on physical activity maintenance, the intervention holds considerable promise for modifying the typical relapse curve. Moreover, if shown to be efficacious, the use of phone- and mail-based intervention delivery offers potential for widespread dissemination. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00283452. PMID:18655709

  9. The role of exercise and physical activity in weight loss and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Swift, Damon L; Johannsen, Neil M; Lavie, Carl J; Earnest, Conrad P; Church, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    This review explores the role of physical activity (PA) and exercise training (ET) in the prevention of weight gain, initial weight loss, weight maintenance, and the obesity paradox. In particular, we will focus the discussion on the expected initial weight loss from different ET programs, and explore intensity/volume relationships. Based on the present literature, unless the overall volume of aerobic ET is very high, clinically significant weight loss is unlikely to occur. Also, ET also has an important role in weight regain after initial weight loss. Overall, aerobic ET programs consistent with public health recommendations may promote up to modest weight loss (~2 kg), however the weight loss on an individual level is highly heterogeneous. Clinicians should educate their patients on reasonable expectations of weight loss based on their physical activity program and emphasize that numerous health benefits occur from PA programs in the absence of weight loss. PMID:24438736

  10. Intrinsic disorder in the C-terminal domain of the Shaker voltage-activated K+ channel modulates its interaction with scaffold proteins

    PubMed Central

    Magidovich, Elhanan; Orr, Irit; Fass, Deborah; Abdu, Uri; Yifrach, Ofer

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of membrane-embedded voltage-activated potassium channels (Kv) with intracellular scaffold proteins, such as the postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) protein, is mediated by the channel C-terminal segment. This interaction underlies Kv channel clustering at unique membrane sites and is important for the proper assembly and functioning of the synapse. In the current study, we address the molecular mechanism underlying Kv/PSD-95 interaction. We provide experimental evidence, based on hydrodynamic and spectroscopic analyses, indicating that the isolated C-terminal segment of the archetypical Shaker Kv channel (ShB-C) is a random coil, suggesting that ShB-C belongs to the recently defined class of intrinsically disordered proteins. We show that isolated ShB-C is still able to bind its scaffold protein partner and support protein clustering in vivo, indicating that unfoldedness is compatible with ShB-C activity. Pulldown experiments involving C-terminal chains differing in flexibility or length further demonstrate that intrinsic disorder in the C-terminal segment of the Shaker channel modulates its interaction with the PSD-95 protein. Our results thus suggest that the C-terminal domain of the Shaker Kv channel behaves as an entropic chain and support a “fishing rod” molecular mechanism for Kv channel binding to scaffold proteins. The importance of intrinsically disordered protein segments to the complex processes of synapse assembly, maintenance, and function is discussed. PMID:17666528

  11. A structural view of ligand-dependent activation in thermoTRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ximena; Lespay-Rebolledo, Carolyne; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) proteins are a large family of ion channels, grouped into seven sub-families. Although great advances have been made regarding the activation and modulation of TRP channel activity, detailed molecular mechanisms governing TRP channel gating are still needed. Sensitive to electric, chemical, mechanical, and thermal cues, TRP channels are tightly associated with the detection and integration of sensory input, emerging as a model to study the polymodal activation of ion channel proteins. Among TRP channels, the temperature-activated kind constitute a subgroup by itself, formed by Vanilloid receptors 1–4, Melastatin receptors 2, 4, 5, and 8, TRPC5, and TRPA1. Some of the so-called “thermoTRP” channels participate in the detection of noxious stimuli making them an interesting pharmacological target for the treatment of pain. However, the poor specificity of the compounds available in the market represents an important obstacle to overcome. Understanding the molecular mechanics underlying ligand-dependent modulation of TRP channels may help with the rational design of novel synthetic analgesics. The present review focuses on the structural basis of ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 and TRPM8 channels. Special attention is drawn to the dissection of ligand-binding sites within TRPV1, PIP2-dependent modulation of TRP channels, and the structure of natural and synthetic ligands. PMID:24847275

  12. Effects of Active Subsidence Vs. Existing Basin Geometry on Fluviodeltaic Channels and Stratal Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Kim, W.; Passalacqua, P.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic subsidence and basin topography, both determining the accommodation, are fundamental controls on the basin filling processes. Their effects on the fluvial organization and the resultant subsurface patterns remain difficult to predict due to the lack of understanding about interaction between internal dynamics and external controls. Despite the intensive studies on tectonic steering effects on alluvial architecture, how the self-organization of deltaic channels, especially the distributary channel network, respond to tectonics and basin geometry is mostly unknown. Recently physical experiments and field studies have hinted dramatic differences in fluviodeltaic evolution between ones associated with active differential subsidence and existing basin depth. In this work we designed a series of numerical experiments using a reduced-complexity channel-resolving model for delta formation, and tested over a range of localized subsidence rates and topographic depression in basin geometry. We also used a set of robust delta metrics to analyze: i) shoreline planform asymmetry, ii) channel and lobe geometry, iii) channel network pattern, iv) autogenic timescales, and v) subsurface structure. The modeling results show that given a similar final thickness, active subsidence enhances channel branching with smaller channel sand bodies that are both laterally and vertically connected, whereas existing topographic depression causes more large-scale channel avulsions with larger channel sand bodies. In general, both subsidence and existing basin geometry could steer channels and/or lock channels in place but develop distinct channel patterns and thus stratal architecture.

  13. The activity of the TRP-like channel depends on its expression system

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Shaya; Katz, Ben; Minke, Baruch

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila light activated TRP and TRPL channels have been a model for TRPC channel gating. Several gating mechanisms have been proposed following experiments conducted on photoreceptor and tissue cultured cells. However, conclusive evidence for any mechanism is still lacking. Here, we show that the Drosophila TRPL channel expressed in tissue cultured cells is constitutively active in S2 cells but is silent in HEK cells. Modulations of TRPL channel activity in different expression system by pharmacology or specific enzymes, which change the lipid content of the plasma membrane, resulted in conflicting effects. These findings demonstrate the difficulty in elucidating TRPC gating, as channel behavior is expression system dependent. However, clues on the gating mechanism may arise from understanding how different expression systems affect TRPC channel activation. PMID:22627924

  14. 2011 Operations and Maintenance Activities in the East Region of UNAVCO's Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, T.; Feaux, K.; Kasmer, D.; Jenkins, F.; Mencin, D.

    2011-12-01

    2011 marked Year 3 of Operations and Maintenance of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). In the East Region of PBO, it was a year characterized by several major projects as well as scheduled ongoing maintenance activities. The most significant major project was a USGS/ARRA funded communications upgrade in Yellowstone National Park. This upgrade consisted of bringing 8 existing PBO stations within the Yellowstone volcanic region to near real-time communications. This work will be completed on time and in collaboration with the National Park Service. The upgrade promises to provide much faster latency for invaluable data being recorded for one of the most geodetically critical regions of the current PBO network. Another significant ongoing project in the East Region has been supporting the community that continues to use PBO data. In particular, support of Kristine Larson (Univ of CO) both in installing webcams at PBO sites for monitoring snow depth as well as supporting vegetative surveys at current PBO sites. Similarly, the East Region responded promptly to the community with requests for data quality issues that are station hardware related, including replacing GPS antennae and receivers. With regards to ongoing operations and maintenance projects, reasons for site visits in 2011 were dominated by two significant situations: battery replacement and CDMA modem swaps. 83 site visits were required as part of the Operations and Maintenance strategic battery plan of 5 year battery replacements. This proved to be a considerable challenge due to the scale and geography of the scheduled replacements- the sites were spread throughout the entire network, east to west and north to south. 20 station visits were required due to a Verizon upgrade of the older Alltel network purchased by Verizon. These stations are predominantly in the Rocky Mountain region, but often times had limited access to due weather. Overall, despite record snowfalls throughout the west, state of health

  15. Structural elements in the Girk1 subunit that potentiate G protein-gated potassium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Wydeven, Nicole; Young, Daniele; Mirkovic, Kelsey; Wickman, Kevin

    2012-12-26

    G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) (Girk/K(IR)3) channels mediate the inhibitory effect of many neurotransmitters on excitable cells. Girk channels are tetramers consisting of various combinations of four mammalian Girk subunits (Girk1 to -4). Although Girk1 is unable to form functional homomeric channels, its presence in cardiac and neuronal channel complexes correlates with robust channel activity. This study sought to better understand the potentiating influence of Girk1, using the GABA(B) receptor and Girk1/Girk2 heteromer as a model system. Girk1 did not increase the protein levels or alter the trafficking of Girk2-containing channels to the cell surface in transfected cells or hippocampal neurons, indicating that its potentiating influence involves enhancement of channel activity. Structural elements in both the distal carboxyl-terminal domain and channel core were identified as key determinants of robust channel activity. In the distal carboxyl-terminal domain, residue Q404 was identified as a key determinant of receptor-induced channel activity. In the Girk1 core, three unique residues in the pore (P) loop (F137, A142, Y150) were identified as a collective potentiating influence on both receptor-dependent and receptor-independent channel activity, exerting their influence, at least in part, by enhancing mean open time and single-channel conductance. Interestingly, the potentiating influence of the Girk1 P-loop is tempered by residue F162 in the second membrane-spanning domain. Thus, discontinuous and sometime opposing elements in Girk1 underlie the Girk1-dependent potentiation of receptor-dependent and receptor-independent heteromeric channel activity. PMID:23236146

  16. Working Memory Encoding and Maintenance Deficits in Schizophrenia: Neural Evidence for Activation and Deactivation Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Anticevic, Alan; Repovs, Grega; Barch, Deanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence implicates working memory (WM) as a core deficit in schizophrenia (SCZ), purportedly due to primary deficits in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex functioning. Recent findings suggest that SCZ is also associated with abnormalities in suppression of certain regions during cognitive engagement—namely the default mode system—that may further contribute to WM pathology. However, no study has systematically examined activation and suppression abnormalities across both encoding and maintenance phases of WM in SCZ. Twenty-eight patients and 24 demographically matched healthy subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T while performing a delayed match-to-sample WM task. Groups were accuracy matched to rule out performance effects. Encoding load was identical across subjects to facilitate comparisons across WM phases. We examined activation differences using an assumed model approach at the whole-brain level and within meta-analytically defined WM areas. Despite matched performance, we found regions showing less recruitment during encoding and maintenance for SCZ subjects. Furthermore, we identified 2 areas closely matching the default system, which SCZ subjects failed to deactivate across WM phases. Lastly, activation in prefrontal regions predicted the degree of deactivation for healthy but not SCZ subjects. Current results replicate and extend prefrontal recruitment abnormalities across WM phases in SCZ. Results also indicate deactivation abnormalities across WM phases, possibly due to inefficient prefrontal recruitment. Such regional deactivation may be critical for suppressing sources of interference during WM trace formation. Thus, deactivation deficits may constitute an additional source of impairments, which needs to be further characterized for a complete understanding of WM pathology in SCZ. PMID:21914644

  17. Guideline to good practices for types of maintenance activities at DOE nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of the Guideline to Good Practices for Types of Maintenance at DOE Nuclear Facilities is to provide contractor maintenance organizations with information that may be used for the development and implementation of a properly balanced corrective, preventive and predictive maintenance program at DOE nuclear facilities. This document is intended to be an example guideline for the implementation of DOE Order 4330.4A, Maintenance Management Program, Chapter II, Element 4. DOE contractors should not feel obligated to adopt all parts of this guide. Rather, they should use the information contained herein as a guide for developing maintenance programs that are applicable to their facility.

  18. Classical-quantum arbitrarily varying wiretap channel: Ahlswede dichotomy, positivity, resources, super-activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boche, Holger; Cai, Minglai; Deppe, Christian; Nötzel, Janis

    2016-08-01

    We establish the Ahlswede dichotomy for arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels, i.e., either the deterministic secrecy capacity of the channel is zero, or it equals its randomness-assisted secrecy capacity. We analyze the secrecy capacity of these channels when the sender and the receiver use various resources. It turns out that randomness, common randomness, and correlation as resources are very helpful for achieving a positive secrecy capacity. We prove the phenomenon "super-activation" for arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels, i.e., two channels, both with zero deterministic secrecy capacity, if used together allow perfect secure transmission.

  19. A Ca2+-activated channel from Xenopus laevis oocyte membranes reconstituted into planar bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Young, G P; Young, J D; Deshpande, A K; Goldstein, M; Koide, S S; Cohn, Z A

    1984-01-01

    Plasma membrane fractions from Xenopus laevis oocytes were incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. We show the existence of numerous Ca2+-activated nonspecific channels that are more permeable to anions. These channels are activated by Ca2+ at micromolar concentration but not by Mg2+, Zn2+, or Mn2+, even at millimolar concentrations. Decreasing Ca2+ concentration to less than 1 microM decreases the time of channel opening until channels close completely in the absence of Ca2+ and in the presence of EGTA. I- and Br- are more permeable through this channel than Cl-. The time during which the channels remain open is also voltage-dependent, with the channels switching off at higher voltages in both polarities. Single-channel activity shows a conductance of 380 pS in 1 M NaCl and 1 mM CaCl2, with an average open lifetime of 1.5 s at 40 mV. Similar channels are found in different stages of oocyte maturation. These observations support the hypothesis that an increase in oocyte-free Ca2+ activates directly these channels, and the resultant Cl- efflux forms the ionic basis for the fertilization potential in X. laevis. PMID:6089180

  20. Investigating neuronal activity by SPYCODE multi-channel data analyzer.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Luca Leonardo; Pasquale, Valentina; Garofalo, Matteo; Gandolfo, Mauro; Baljon, Pieter Laurens; Maccione, Alessandro; Martinoia, Sergio; Chiappalone, Michela

    2010-08-01

    Multi-channel acquisition from neuronal networks, either in vivo or in vitro, is becoming a standard in modern neuroscience in order to infer how cell assemblies communicate. In spite of the large diffusion of micro-electrode-array-based systems, researchers usually find it difficult to manage the huge quantity of data routinely recorded during the experimental sessions. In fact, many of the available open-source toolboxes still lack two fundamental requirements for treating multi-channel recordings: (i) a rich repertoire of algorithms for extracting information both at a single channel and at the whole network level; (ii) the capability of autonomously repeating the same set of computational operations to 'multiple' recording streams (also from different experiments) and without a manual intervention. The software package we are proposing, named SPYCODE, was mainly developed to respond to the above constraints and generally to offer the scientific community a 'smart' tool for multi-channel data processing. PMID:20554151

  1. Voltage-induced membrane displacement in patch pipettes activates mechanosensitive channels

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Ziv; Silberberg, Shai D.; Magleby, Karl L.

    1999-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique allows currents to be recorded through single ion channels in patches of cell membrane in the tips of glass pipettes. When recording, voltage is typically applied across the membrane patch to drive ions through open channels and to probe the voltage-sensitivity of channel activity. In this study, we used video microscopy and single-channel recording to show that prolonged depolarization of a membrane patch in borosilicate pipettes results in delayed slow displacement of the membrane into the pipette and that this displacement is associated with the activation of mechanosensitive (MS) channels in the same patch. The membrane displacement, ≈1 μm with each prolonged depolarization, occurs after variable delays ranging from tens of milliseconds to many seconds and is correlated in time with activation of MS channels. Increasing the voltage step shortens both the delay to membrane displacement and the delay to activation. Preventing depolarization-induced membrane displacement by applying positive pressure to the shank of the pipette or by coating the tips of the borosilicate pipettes with soft glass prevents the depolarization-induced activation of MS channels. The correlation between depolarization-induced membrane displacement and activation of MS channels indicates that the membrane displacement is associated with sufficient membrane tension to activate MS channels. Because membrane tension can modulate the activity of various ligand and voltage-activated ion channels as well as some transporters, an apparent voltage dependence of a channel or transporter in a membrane patch in a borosilicate pipette may result from voltage-induced tension rather than from direct modulation by voltage. PMID:10588750

  2. The Clinically Tested Gardos Channel Inhibitor Senicapoc Exhibits Antimalarial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tubman, Venée N.; Mejia, Pedro; Shmukler, Boris E.; Bei, Amy K.; Alper, Seth L.; Mitchell, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Senicapoc, a Gardos channel inhibitor, prevented erythrocyte dehydration in clinical trials of patients with sickle cell disease. We tested the hypothesis that senicapoc-induced blockade of the Gardos channel inhibits Plasmodium growth. Senicapoc inhibited in vitro growth of human and primate plasmodia during the clinical blood stage. Senicapoc treatment suppressed P. yoelii parasitemia in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. The reassuring safety and biochemical profile of senicapoc encourage its use in antimalarial development. PMID:26459896

  3. Oscillating activity of a calcium-activated K+ channel in normal and cancerous mammary cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, K; Furuya, K; Maeno, T; Edwards, C; Oka, T

    1991-01-01

    Calcium-activated potassium channels were the channels most frequently observed in primary cultured normal mammary cell and in the established mammary tumor cell, MMT060562. In both cells, single-channel and whole-cell clamp recordings sometimes showed slow oscillations of the Ca2(+)-gated K+ current. The characteristics of the Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels in normal and cancerous mammary cells were quite similar. The slope conductances changed from 8 to 70 pS depending on the mode of recording and the ionic composition in the patch electrode. The open probability of this channel increased between 0.1 to 1 microM of the intracellular Ca2+, but it was independent of the membrane potential. Charybdotoxin reduced the activity of the Ca2(+)-activated K+ channel and the oscillation of the membrane current, but apamin had no apparent effect. The application of tetraethylammonium (TEA) from outside and BaCl2 from inside of the cell diminished the activity of the channel. The properties of this channel were different from those of both the large conductance (BK or MAXI K) and small conductance (SK) type Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels. PMID:1710671

  4. Transcainide causes two modes of open-channel block with different voltage sensitivities in batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, G W; French, R J

    1994-01-01

    Transcainide, a complex derivative of lidocaine, blocks the open state of BTX-activated sodium channels from bovine heart and rat skeletal muscle in two distinct ways. When applied to either side of the membrane, transcainide caused discrete blocking events a few hundred milliseconds in duration (slow block), and a concomitant reduction in apparent single-channel amplitude, presumably because of rapid block beyond the temporal resolution of our recordings (fast block). We quantitatively analyzed block from the cytoplasmic side. Both modes of block occurred via binding of the drug to the open channel, approximately followed 1:1 stoichiometry, and were similar for both channel subtypes. For slow block, the blocking rate increased, and the unblocking rate decreased with depolarization, yielding an overall enhancement of block at positive potentials, and suggesting a blocking site at an apparent electrical distance about 45% of the way from the cytoplasmic end of the channel (z delta approximately 0.45). In contrast, the fast blocking mode was only slightly enhanced by depolarization (z delta approximately 0.15). Phenomenologically, the bulky and complex transcainide molecule combines the almost voltage-insensitive blocking action of phenylhydrazine (Zamponi and French, 1994a (companion paper)) with a slow open-channel blocking action that shows a voltage dependence typical of simpler amines. Only the slower blocking mode was sensitive to the removal of external sodium ions, suggesting that the two types of block occur at distinct sites. Dose-response relations were also consistent with independent binding of transcainide to two separate sites on the channel. PMID:7811913

  5. [Osmoregulatory reactions of frog erythrocytes under conditions of activation and blockade of Ca2+-channels].

    PubMed

    Skorkina, M Iu

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of cell osmoregulatory reactions under conditions of activation and blockade of Ca2+-channels was studied on a model of frog polyfunctional nuclear erythrocyte. Both activation and blockade of Ca2+-channels has been established to promote swelling of nuclei and an increase of the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios under conditions of hypotonic exposure. The osmoregulatory cell reactions after activation of Ca2+-channels are expressed as a decrease of the cell volume. The blockator of Ca2+-channels verapamil produces an alternated increase and decrease of the erythrocyte volume with time intervals of 30 and 60 s. The clearly expressed functional activity of the nuclear membrane in response to the hypotonic action under conditions of activation and blockade of Ca2+-channels indicates participation of Ca2+ ions in mechanisms of the nuclear-cytoplasmic transfer. PMID:22645976

  6. Regulation of Arterial Tone by Activation of Calcium-Dependent Potassium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brayden, Joseph E.; Nelson, Mark T.

    1992-04-01

    Blood pressure and tissue perfusion are controlled in part by the level of intrinsic (myogenic) vascular tone. However, many of the molecular determinants of this response are unknown. Evidence is now presented that the degree of myogenic tone is regulated in part by the activation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in arterial smooth muscle. Tetraethylammonium ion (TEA^+) and charybdotoxin (CTX), at concentrations that block calcium-activated potassium channels in smooth muscle cells isolated from cerebral arteries, depolarized and constricted pressurized cerebral arteries with myogenic tone. Both TEA^+ and CTX had little effect on arteries when intracellular calcium was reduced by lowering intravascular pressure or by blocking calcium channels. Elevation of intravascular pressure through membrane depolarization and an increase in intracellular calcium may activate calcium-activated potassium channels. Thus, these channels may serve as a negative feedback pathway to control the degree of membrane depolarization and vasoconstriction.

  7. Regulation of Proteome Maintenance Gene Expression by Activators of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is activated by a large number of xenobiotic and hypolipidemic compounds called peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC). One agonist of PPARa (WY-14,643) regulates responses in the mouse liver to chemic...

  8. Chemoselective tarantula toxins report voltage activation of wild-type ion channels in live cells.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Drew C; Eum, Kenneth S; Fletcher-Taylor, Sebastian; Austin, Daniel C; Dupré, Christophe; Patrón, Lilian A; Garcia, Rita L; Lam, Kit; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Cohen, Bruce E; Sack, Jon T

    2014-11-01

    Electrically excitable cells, such as neurons, exhibit tremendous diversity in their firing patterns, a consequence of the complex collection of ion channels present in any specific cell. Although numerous methods are capable of measuring cellular electrical signals, understanding which types of ion channels give rise to these signals remains a significant challenge. Here, we describe exogenous probes which use a novel mechanism to report activity of voltage-gated channels. We have synthesized chemoselective derivatives of the tarantula toxin guangxitoxin-1E (GxTX), an inhibitory cystine knot peptide that binds selectively to Kv2-type voltage gated potassium channels. We find that voltage activation of Kv2.1 channels triggers GxTX dissociation, and thus GxTX binding dynamically marks Kv2 activation. We identify GxTX residues that can be replaced by thiol- or alkyne-bearing amino acids, without disrupting toxin folding or activity, and chemoselectively ligate fluorophores or affinity probes to these sites. We find that GxTX-fluorophore conjugates colocalize with Kv2.1 clusters in live cells and are released from channels activated by voltage stimuli. Kv2.1 activation can be detected with concentrations of probe that have a trivial impact on cellular currents. Chemoselective GxTX mutants conjugated to dendrimeric beads likewise bind live cells expressing Kv2.1, and the beads are released by channel activation. These optical sensors of conformational change are prototype probes that can indicate when ion channels contribute to electrical signaling. PMID:25331865

  9. Low-dose photon irradiation alters cell differentiation via activation of hIK channels.

    PubMed

    Roth, Bastian; Gibhardt, Christine S; Becker, Patrick; Gebhardt, Manuela; Knoop, Jan; Fournier, Claudia; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    To understand the impact of ionizing irradiation from diagnostics and radiotherapy on cells, we examined K(+) channel activity before and immediately after exposing cells to X-rays. Already, low dose in the cGy range caused in adenocarcinoma A549 cells within minutes a hyperpolarization following activation of the human intermediate-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (hIK). The response was specific for cells, which functionally expressed hIK channels and in which hIK activity was low before irradiation. HEK293 cells, which do not respond to X-ray irradiation, accordingly develop a sensitivity to this stress after heterologous expression of hIK channels. The data suggest that hIK activation involves a Ca(2+)-mediated signaling cascade because channel activation is suppressed by a strong cytosolic Ca(2+) buffer. The finding that an elevation of H2O2 causes an increase in the concentration of cytosolic Ca(2+) suggests that radicals, which emerge early in response to irradiation, trigger this Ca(2+) signaling cascade. Inhibition of hIK channels by specific blockers clotrimazole and TRAM-34 slowed cell proliferation and migration in "wound" scratch assays; ionizing irradiation, in turn, stimulated the latter process presumably via its activation of the hIK channels. These data stress an indirect radiosensitivity of hIK channels with an impact on cell differentiation. PMID:25277267

  10. The synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin: purification and characterization of its channel activity.

    PubMed Central

    Gincel, Dan; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2002-01-01

    The synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin was solubilized from rat brain synaptosomes with a relatively low concentration of Triton X-100 (0.2%) and was highly purified (above 95%) using a rapid single chromatography step on hydroxyapatite/celite resin. Purified synaptophysin was reconstituted into a planar lipid bilayer and the channel activity of synaptophysin was characterized. In asymmetric KCl solutions (cis 300 mM/trans 100 mM), synaptophysin formed a fast-fluctuating channel with a conductance of 414 +/- 13 pS at +60 mV. The open probability of synaptophysin channels was decreased upon depolarization, and channels were found to be cation-selective. Synaptophysin channels showed higher selectivity for K(+) over Cl(-) (P(K(+))/P(Cl(-)) > 8) and preferred K(+) over Li(+), Na(+), Rb(+), Cs(+), or choline(+). The synaptophysin channel is impermeable to Ca(2+), which has no effect on its channel activity. This study is the second demonstration of purified synaptophysin channel activity, but the first biophysical characterization of its channel properties. The availability of large amounts of purified synaptophysin and of its characteristic channel properties might help to establish the role of synaptophysin in synaptic transmission. PMID:12496091

  11. Allosteric interactions and the modular nature of the voltage- and Ca2+-activated (BK) channel

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Ramon; Morera, Francisco J; Zaelzer, Cristian

    2010-01-01

    The high conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel is one of the most broadly expressed channels in mammals. This channel is named BK for ‘big K’ because of its single-channel conductance that can be as large as 250 pS in 100 mm symmetrical K+. BK channels increase their activity by membrane depolarization or an increase in cytosolic Ca2+. One of the key features that defines the behaviour of BK channels is that neither Ca2+ nor voltage is strictly necessary for channel activation. This and several other observations led to the idea that both Ca2+ and voltage increase the open probability by an allosteric mechanism. In this type of mechanism, the processes of voltage sensor displacement, Ca2+ binding and pore opening are independent equilibria that interact allosterically with each other. These allosteric interactions in BK channels reside in the structural characteristics of the BK channel in the sense that voltage and Ca2+ sensors and the pore need to be contained in different structures or ‘modules’. Through electrophysiological, mutagenesis, biochemical and fluorescence studies these modules have been identified and, more important, some of the interactions between them have been unveiled. In this review, we have covered the main advances achieved during the last few years in the elucidation of the structure of the BK channel and how this is related with its function as an allosteric protein. PMID:20603335

  12. Calcium-activated chloride channels in cultured embryonic Xenopus spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hussy, N

    1992-12-01

    1. Single-channel currents were recorded from Xenopus spinal neurons developing in vitro using the patch-clamp technique, to identify the channels underlying the large and small macroscopic Ca(2+)-activated Cl- currents (ICl(Ca)) present in these cells. 2. Channels of large (maxi-channels; 310 pS) and smaller conductance (mini-channels; 50-60 pS) are activated by elevation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration. Channel activity is not altered by subsequent removal of Ca2+ from the bath, arguing against a direct ligand-type Ca2+ dependence. The much higher incidence of channel activation in cell-attached patches from cells permeabilized with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 than in excised patches also suggests the involvement of some unidentified intracellular factor. 3. The reversal potential of maxi-Cl- channels is not altered by changes in Na+ concentration, but is shifted in the negative direction by the substitution of Cl- by methanesulfonate on the intracellular side of the patch, indicating their anionic selectivity. 4. Maxi-Cl- channels exhibited the presence of multiple probable subconductance states and showed marked voltage-dependent inactivation above and below +/- 20 mV. 5. Examination of maxi-Cl- channels at early times in culture (6-9 h) and 24 h later did not reveal any developmental change in the characteristics described above. However, the mean open duration of the channel was found to increase twofold during this period of time. 6. The simultaneous presence of maxi- and mini-Cl- channels prevented detailed characterization of the latter. The anionic selectivity of mini-Cl- channels is suggested by their reversal potential that lies close to the Cl- equilibrium potential.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1283407

  13. Selective disruption of high sensitivity heat activation but not capsaicin activation of TRPV1 channels by pore turret mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuanyuan; Yang, Fan; Cao, Xu; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 is a highly heat-sensitive ion channel. Although chemical activation and heat activation of TRPV1 elicit similar pungent, painful sensation, the molecular mechanism underlying synergistic activation remains mysterious. In particular, where the temperature sensor is located and whether heat and capsaicin share a common activation pathway are debated. To address these fundamental issues, we searched for channel mutations that selectively affected one form of activation. We found that deletion of the first 10 amino acids of the pore turret significantly reduced the heat response amplitude and shifted the heat activation threshold, whereas capsaicin activation remained unchanged. Removing larger portions of the turret disrupted channel function. Introducing an artificial sequence to replace the deleted region restored sensitive capsaicin activation in these nonfunctional channels. The heat activation, however, remained significantly impaired, with the current exhibiting diminishing heat sensitivity to a level indistinguishable from that of a voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv7.4. Our results demonstrate that heat and capsaicin activation of TRPV1 are structurally and mechanistically distinct processes, and the pore turret is an indispensible channel structure involved in the heat activation process but is not part of the capsaicin activation pathway. Synergistic effect of heat and capsaicin on TRPV1 activation may originate from convergence of the two pathways on a common activation gate. PMID:22412190

  14. Cryogenics maintenance strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzat, Fabiola

    2012-09-01

    ALMA is an interferometer composed of 66 independent systems, with specific maintenance requirements for each subsystem. To optimize the observation time and reduce downtime maintenance, requirements are very demanding. One subsystem with high maintenance efforts is cryogenics and vacuum. To organize the maintenance, the Cryogenic and Vacuum department is using and implementing different tools. These are monitoring and problem reporting systems and CMMS. This leads to different maintenance approaches: Preventive Maintenance, Corrective Maintenance and Condition Based Maintenance. In order to coordinate activities with other departments the preventive maintenance schedule is kept as flexible as systems allow. To cope with unavoidable failures, the team has to be prepared to work under any condition with the spares on time. Computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) will help to manage inventory control for reliable spare part handling, the correct record of work orders and traceability of maintenance activities. For an optimized approach the department is currently evaluating where preventive or condition based maintenance applies to comply with the individual system demand. Considering the change from maintenance contracts to in-house maintenance will help to minimize costs and increase availability of parts. Due to increased number of system and tasks the cryo team needs to grow. Training of all staff members is mandatory, in depth knowledge must be built up by doing complex maintenance activities in the Cryo group, use of advanced computerized metrology systems.

  15. Role of Calcium-activated Potassium Channels in Atrial Fibrillation Pathophysiology and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Diness, Jonas G.; Bentzen, Bo H.; Sørensen, Ulrik S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Small-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (SK) channels are relative newcomers within the field of cardiac electrophysiology. In recent years, an increased focus has been given to these channels because they might constitute a relatively atrial-selective target. This review will give a general introduction to SK channels followed by their proposed function in the heart under normal and pathophysiological conditions. It is revealed how antiarrhythmic effects can be obtained by SK channel inhibition in a number of species in situations of atrial fibrillation. On the contrary, the beneficial effects of SK channel inhibition in situations of heart failure are questionable and still needs investigation. The understanding of cardiac SK channels is rapidly increasing these years, and it is hoped that this will clarify whether SK channel inhibition has potential as a new anti–atrial fibrillation principle. PMID:25830485

  16. Role of Calcium-activated Potassium Channels in Atrial Fibrillation Pathophysiology and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Diness, Jonas G; Bentzen, Bo H; Sørensen, Ulrik S; Grunnet, Morten

    2015-11-01

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (SK) channels are relative newcomers within the field of cardiac electrophysiology. In recent years, an increased focus has been given to these channels because they might constitute a relatively atrial-selective target. This review will give a general introduction to SK channels followed by their proposed function in the heart under normal and pathophysiological conditions. It is revealed how antiarrhythmic effects can be obtained by SK channel inhibition in a number of species in situations of atrial fibrillation. On the contrary, the beneficial effects of SK channel inhibition in situations of heart failure are questionable and still needs investigation. The understanding of cardiac SK channels is rapidly increasing these years, and it is hoped that this will clarify whether SK channel inhibition has potential as a new anti-atrial fibrillation principle. PMID:25830485

  17. Tubular Unimolecular Transmembrane Channels: Construction Strategy and Transport Activities.

    PubMed

    Si, Wen; Xin, Pengyang; Li, Zhan-Ting; Hou, Jun-Li

    2015-06-16

    Lipid bilayer membranes separate living cells from their environment. Membrane proteins are responsible for the processing of ion and molecular inputs and exports, sensing stimuli and signals across the bilayers, which may operate in a channel or carrier mechanism. Inspired by these wide-ranging functions of membrane proteins, chemists have made great efforts in constructing synthetic mimics in order to understand the transport mechanisms, create materials for separation, and develop therapeutic agents. Since the report of an alkylated cyclodextrin for transporting Cu(2+) and Co(2+) by Tabushi and co-workers in 1982, chemists have constructed a variety of artificial transmembrane channels by making use of either the multimolecular self-assembly or unimolecular strategy. In the context of the design of unimolecular channels, important advances have been made, including, among others, the tethering of natural gramicidin A or alamethicin and the modification of various macrocycles such as crown ethers, cyclodextrins, calixarenes, and cucurbiturils. Many of these unimolecular channels exhibit high transport ability for metal ions, particularly K(+) and Na(+). Concerning the development of artificial channels based on macrocyclic frameworks, one straightforward and efficient approach is to introduce discrete chains to reinforce their capability to insert into bilayers. Currently, this approach has found the widest applications in the systems of crown ethers and calixarenes. We envisioned that for macrocycle-based unimolecular channels, control of the arrangement of the appended chains in the upward and/or downward direction would favor the insertion of the molecular systems into bilayers, while the introduction of additional interactions among the chains would further stabilize a tubular conformation. Both factors should be helpful for the formation of new efficient channels. In this Account, we discuss our efforts in designing new unimolecular artificial channels from

  18. γ-Band deficiency and abnormal thalamocortical activity in P/Q-type channel mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, Rodolfo R.; Choi, Soonwook; Urbano, Francisco J.; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2007-01-01

    Thalamocortical in vivo and in vitro function was studied in mice lacking P/Q-type calcium channels (CaV2.1), in which N-type calcium channels (CaV2.2) supported central synaptic transmission. Unexpectedly, in vitro patch recordings from thalamic neurons demonstrated no γ-band subthreshold oscillation, and voltage-sensitive dye imaging demonstrated an absence of cortical γ-band-dependent columnar activation involving cortical inhibitory interneuron activity. In vivo electroencephalogram recordings showed persistent absence status and a dramatic reduction of γ-band activity. Pharmacological block of T-type calcium channels (CaV3), although not noticeably affecting normal control animals, left the knockout mice in a coma-like state. Hence, although N-type calcium channels can rescue P/Q-dependent synaptic transmission, P/Q calcium channels are essential in the generation of γ-band activity and resultant cognitive function. PMID:17968008

  19. CNTF-Treated Astrocyte Conditioned Medium Enhances Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel Activity in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-08-01

    Seizure activity is linked to astrocyte activation as well as dysfunctional cortical neuron excitability produced from changes in calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channel function. Ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) can be used to investigate the peripheral effects of activated astrocytes upon cortical neurons. However, CNTF-ACM's effect upon KCa channel activity in cultured cortical neurons has not yet been investigated. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed in rat cortical neurons to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon charybdotoxin-sensitive large-conductance KCa (BK) channel currents and apamin-sensitive small-conductance KCa (SK) channel current. Biotinylation and RT-PCR were applied to assess CNTF-ACM's effects upon the protein and mRNA expression, respectively, of the SK channel subunits SK2 and SK3 and the BK channel subunits BKα1 and BKβ3. An anti-fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) monoclonal neutralizing antibody was used to assess the effects of the FGF-2 component of CNTF-ACM. CNTF-ACM significantly increased KCa channel current density, which was predominantly attributable to gains in BK channel activity (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM produced a significant increase in BKα1 and BKβ3 expression (p < 0.05) but had no significant effect upon SK2 or SK3 expression (p > 0.05). Blocking FGF-2 produced significant reductions in KCa channel current density (p > 0.05) as well as BKα1 and BKβ3 expression in CNTF-ACM-treated neurons (p > 0.05). CNTF-ACM significantly enhances BK channel activity in rat cortical neurons and that FGF-2 is partially responsible for these effects. CNTF-induced astrocyte activation results in secretion of neuroactive factors which may affect neuronal excitability and resultant seizure activity in mammalian cortical neurons. PMID:27097551

  20. Lifetime and conductance of acetylcholine-activated channels in normal and denervated toad sartorius muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gage, P W; Hamill, O P

    1980-01-01

    1. The average lifetime and conductance of acetylcholine-activated channels were measured in normal and denervated, voltage-clamped toad sartorius muscle fibres at 10 degrees C. 2. The null potential was -4 +/- 1 mV for subsynaptic channels in normal fibres and -6 +/- 3 mV for extrasynaptic channels in denervated fibres. 3. There was a linear relationship between variance of conductance fluctuations and mean conductance for acetylcholine-induced currents up to 50 nA, in denervated fibres clamped at -50 mV. The ratio gave a channel conductance of 14 pS. 4. At the same membrane potential, the average lifetime of extrasynaptic channels in denervated fibres was approximately double, whereas channel conductance was approximately half, that of subsynaptic channels in normal fibres: there was little difference in net charge transfer through the two types of channel under similar conditions. 5. Single channel conductance increased, whereas average channel lifetime decreased, as the membrane potential became more positive (depolarized). The effect of potential on channel lifetime and conductance was more pronounced in denervated than in normal fibres. PMID:6767026

  1. Regulation of Human Kv1.4 Channel Activity by the Antidepressant Metergoline.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Hye Duck; Lee, Jun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Metergoline is an ergot-derived psychoactive drug that is a ligand for various serotonin and dopamine receptors. Little is known about the effect of metergoline on different types of receptors and ion channels. Potassium channels are the most diverse group of ion channels. Kv1.4, a shaker family K channel alpha subunit, is one of a family of voltage gated K channels that mediates transient and rapid inactivating A-type currents and N-type inactivation. We demonstrated previously that metergoline inhibited the activity of neuronal voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes (Acta Pharmacol. Sin., 35, 2014, Lee et al.). In this study, we sought to elucidate the regulatory effects underlying metergoline-induced human Kv1.4 channel inhibition. We used the two electrode voltage-clamp (TEVC) technique to investigate the effect of metergoline on human Kv1.4 channel currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing human Kv1.4 alpha subunits. Interestingly, metergoline treatment also induced inhibition of peak currents in human Kv1.4 channels in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 of peak currents of hKv1.4 currents was 3.6±0.6 µM. These results indicate that metergoline might regulate the human Kv1.4 channel activity that is expressed in X. laevis oocytes. Further, this regulation of potassium currents by metergoline might be one of the pharmacological actions of metergoline-mediated psychoactivity. PMID:27251511

  2. Tremorgenic indole alkaloids potently inhibit smooth muscle high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Knaus, H G; McManus, O B; Lee, S H; Schmalhofer, W A; Garcia-Calvo, M; Helms, L M; Sanchez, M; Giangiacomo, K; Reuben, J P; Smith, A B

    1994-05-17

    Tremorgenic indole alkaloids produce neurological disorders (e.g., staggers syndromes) in ruminants. The mode of action of these fungal mycotoxins is not understood but may be related to their known effects on neurotransmitter release. To determine whether these effects could be due to inhibition of K+ channels, the interaction of various indole diterpenes with high-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ (maxi-K) channels was examined. Paspalitrem A, paspalitrem C, aflatrem, penitrem A, and paspalinine inhibit binding of [125I]charybdotoxin (ChTX) to maxi-K channels in bovine aortic smooth muscle sarcolemmal membranes. In contrast, three structurally related compounds, paxilline, verruculogen, and paspalicine, enhanced toxin binding. As predicted from the binding studies, covalent incorporation of [125I]ChTX into the 31-kDa subunit of the maxi-K channel was blocked by compounds that inhibit [125I]ChTX binding and enhanced by compounds that stimulate [125I]ChTX binding. Modulation of [125I]ChTX binding was due to allosteric mechanisms. Despite their different effects on binding of [125I]ChTX to maxi-K channels, all compounds potently inhibited maxi-K channels in electrophysiological experiments. Other types of voltage-dependent or Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels examined were not affected. Chemical modifications of paxilline indicate a defined structure-activity relationship for channel inhibition. Paspalicine, a deshydroxy analog of paspalinine lacking tremorgenic activity, also potently blocked maxi-K channels. Taken together, these data suggest that indole diterpenes are the most potent nonpeptidyl inhibitors of maxi-K channels identified to date. Some of their pharmacological properties could be explained by inhibition of maxi-K channels, although tremorgenicity may be unrelated to channel block. PMID:7514038

  3. The AQP-3 water channel is a pivotal modulator of glycerol-induced chloride channel activation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Deng, Zhiqin; Yang, Lili; Luo, Hai; Liu, Shanwen; Li, Yuan; Wei, Yan; Peng, Shuang; Zhu, Linyan; Wang, Liwei; Chen, Lixin

    2016-03-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) and chloride channels are ubiquitous in virtually all living cells, playing pivotal roles in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. We previously reported that AQP-3 aquaglyceroporin and ClC-3 chloride channels could form complexes to regulate cell volume in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. In this study, the roles of AQP-3 in their hetero-complexes were further investigated. Glycerol entered the cells via AQP-3 and induced two different Cl(-) currents through cell swelling-dependent or -independent pathways. The swelling-dependent Cl(-) current was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with CuCl2 and AQP-3-siRNA. After siRNA-induced AQP-3 knock-down, the 140 mM glycerol isoosmotic solution swelled cells by 22% (45% in AQP-3-intact cells) and induced a smaller Cl(-) current; this current was smaller than that activated by 8% cell volume swelling, which induced by the 140 mM glycerol hyperosmotic solution in AQP-3-intact cells. This suggests that the interaction between AQP-3 and ClC-3 plays an important role in cell volume regulation and that AQP-3 may be a modulator that opens volume-regulated chloride channels. The swelling-independent Cl(-) current, which was activated by extracellular glycerol, was reduced by CuCl2 and AQP-3-siRNA pretreatment. Dialyzing glycerol into cells via the pipette directly induced the swelling-independent Cl(-) current; however this current was blocked by AQP-3 down-regulation, suggesting AQP-3 is essential for the opening of chloride channels. In conclusion, AQP-3 is the pathway for water, glycerol and other small solutes to enter cells, and it may be an essential modulator for the gating of chloride channels. PMID:26794461

  4. Brain Activation Patterns Associated with the Effects of Emotional Distracters during Working Memory Maintenance in Patients with Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Il; Kim, Gwang-Won; Jeong, Gwang-Woo; Chung, Gyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the neural mechanisms of the effects of emotion on cognition in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients. In this functional MRI (fMRI), we investigated the effects of emotional interference on working memory (WM) maintenance in GAD patients. Fifteen patients with GAD participated in this study. Event-related fMRI data were obtained while the participants performed a WM task (face recognition) with neutral and anxiety-provoking distracters. The GAD patients showed impaired performance in WM task during emotional distracters and showed greater activation on brain regions such as DLPFC, VLPFC, amygdala, hippocampus which are responsible for the active maintenance of goal relevant information in WM and emotional processing. Although our results are not conclusive, our finding cautiously suggests the cognitive-affective interaction in GAD patients which shown interfering effect of emotional distracters on WM maintenance. PMID:26766958

  5. Brain Activation Patterns Associated with the Effects of Emotional Distracters during Working Memory Maintenance in Patients with Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Il; Kim, Gwang-Won; Jeong, Gwang-Woo; Chung, Gyung Ho; Yang, Jong-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the neural mechanisms of the effects of emotion on cognition in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients. In this functional MRI (fMRI), we investigated the effects of emotional interference on working memory (WM) maintenance in GAD patients. Fifteen patients with GAD participated in this study. Event-related fMRI data were obtained while the participants performed a WM task (face recognition) with neutral and anxiety-provoking distracters. The GAD patients showed impaired performance in WM task during emotional distracters and showed greater activation on brain regions such as DLPFC, VLPFC, amygdala, hippocampus which are responsible for the active maintenance of goal relevant information in WM and emotional processing. Although our results are not conclusive, our finding cautiously suggests the cognitive-affective interaction in GAD patients which shown interfering effect of emotional distracters on WM maintenance. PMID:26766958

  6. Maintenance of Efficacy and Continuing Safety of Golimumab for Active Ulcerative Colitis: PURSUIT-SC Maintenance Study Extension Through 1 Year

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Peter R; Feagan, Brian G; Sandborn, William J; Marano, Colleen; Strauss, Richard; Johanns, Jewel; Padgett, Lakshmi; Collins, Judith; Tarabar, Dino; Hebzda, Zbigniew; Rutgeerts, Paul; Reinisch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The safety and efficacy of subcutaneous golimumab through 2 years of maintenance therapy was evaluated in patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods: Patients completing treatment through week 52 (placebo, golimumab 50, 100, every-4-weeks (q4w)) and evaluations at week 54 were eligible for this long-term extension (LTE) trial. Patients receiving placebo or golimumab 50 mg with worsening disease during the LTE could receive golimumab 100 mg. Efficacy assessments included the Mayo physician's global assessment (PGA) subscore, inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ), and corticosteroid use. Patients who were randomized to golimumab at PURSUIT-Maintenance baseline and continued receiving golimumab during the LTE were analyzed for efficacy (using intention-to-treat and “as observed” analyses; N=195) and safety (N=200). Patients treated with golimumab at any time from induction baseline through week 104 (N=1240) constituted the overall safety population. Results: Baseline demographics and disease characteristics of patients entering the LTE receiving golimumab were similar to those of all patients randomized to golimumab maintenance at baseline. At week 104, 80.5% (157/195) of patients had a PGA=0/1 (range weeks 56–104: 80.5–91.8%) and 56.4% (110/195) had a PGA=0 (weeks 56–104: range: 53.8–58.5%). Through week 104, 86% of patients maintained inactive or mild disease activity. Among 174 corticosteroid-free patients at week 54, 88.5% remained corticosteroid-free at week 104. At week 104, 62.2% (120/193) had an IBDQ score ≥170. Tuberculosis, opportunistic infection, and malignancy rates were low, and the overall safety profile was similar to that reported through week 54. Two non-melanoma skin cancers, one metastatic colon cancer, and two deaths (biventricular heart dysfunction, sepsis) occurred between weeks 54 and 104. Conclusion: Subcutaneous golimumab q4w through 2 years maintained clinical benefit and reduced

  7. Calcium-mediated agonists activate an inwardly rectified K+ channel in colonic secretory cells.

    PubMed

    Devor, D C; Frizzell, R A

    1993-11-01

    Single-channel recording techniques were used to identify and characterize the K+ channel activated by Ca(2+)-mediated secretory agonists in T84 cells. Carbachol (CCh; 100 microM) and taurodeoxycholate (TDC; 0.75 mM) stimulated oscillatory outward K+ currents. With K gluconate in bath and pipette, cell-attached single-channel K+ currents stimulated by CCh and ionomycin (2 microM) were inwardly rectified and reversed at 0 mV. The single-channel chord conductance was 32 pS at -90 mV and 14 pS at +90 mV. Similar properties were observed in excised inside-out patches in symmetric K+, permitting further characterization of channel properties. Partial substitution of bath or pipette K+ with Na+ gave a K(+)-to-Na+ selectivity ratio of 5.5:1. Channel activity increased with increasing bath Ca2+ concentration in the physiological range of 50-800 nM. Maximal channel activity occurred at intracellular pH 7.2 and decreased at more acidic or alkaline pH values. Extracellular charybdotoxin (CTX; 50 nM) blocked inward but not outward currents. Extracellular tetraethylammonium (TEA; 10 mM) reduced single-channel amplitude at all voltages. No apparent block of the channel was observed with extracellular Ba2+ (1 mM), apamin (1 microM), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 4 mM), quinine (500 microM), or glyburide (10 microM). Cytosolic quinine and 4-AP blocked both inward and outward currents, whereas Ba2+ blocked only outward currents. Apamin, CTX, TEA, and glyburide did not affect channel activity. The agonist activation and pharmacological profile of this inwardly rectified K+ channel indicate that it is responsible for the increase in basolateral K+ conductance stimulated by Ca(2+)-mediated agonists in T84 cells. PMID:7694492

  8. Control of Inward Rectifier K Channel Activity by Lipid Tethering of Cytoplasmic Domains

    PubMed Central

    Enkvetchakul, Decha; Jeliazkova, Iana; Bhattacharyya, Jaya; Nichols, Colin G.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions between nontransmembrane domains and the lipid membrane are proposed to modulate activity of many ion channels. In Kir channels, the so-called “slide-helix” is proposed to interact with the lipid headgroups and control channel gating. We examined this possibility directly in a cell-free system consisting of KirBac1.1 reconstituted into pure lipid vesicles. Cysteine substitution of positively charged slide-helix residues (R49C and K57C) leads to loss of channel activity that is rescued by in situ restoration of charge following modification by MTSET+ or MTSEA+, but not MTSES− or neutral MMTS. Strikingly, activity is also rescued by modification with long-chain alkyl-MTS reagents. Such reagents are expected to partition into, and hence tether the side chain to, the membrane. Systematic scanning reveals additional slide-helix residues that are activated or inhibited following alkyl-MTS modification. A pattern emerges whereby lipid tethering of the N terminus, or C terminus, of the slide-helix, respectively inhibits, or activates, channel activity. This study establishes a critical role of the slide-helix in Kir channel gating, and directly demonstrates that physical interaction of soluble domains with the membrane can control ion channel activity. PMID:17698595

  9. Natural Bile Acids and Synthetic Analogues Modulate Large Conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) Channel Activity in Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alejandro M.; Walsh, John V.; Singer, Joshua J.

    2002-01-01

    Bile acids have been reported to produce relaxation of smooth muscle both in vitro and in vivo. The cellular mechanisms underlying bile acid–induced relaxation are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate, using patch-clamp techniques, that natural bile acids and synthetic analogues reversibly increase BKCa channel activity in rabbit mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells. In excised inside-out patches bile acid–induced increases in channel activity are characterized by a parallel leftward shift in the activity-voltage relationship. This increase in BKCa channel activity is not due to Ca2+-dependent mechanism(s) or changes in freely diffusible messengers, but to a direct action of the bile acid on the channel protein itself or some closely associated component in the cell membrane. For naturally occurring bile acids, the magnitude of bile acid–induced increase in BKCa channel activity is inversely related to the number of hydroxyl groups in the bile acid molecule. By using synthetic analogues, we demonstrate that such increase in activity is not affected by several chemical modifications in the lateral chain of the molecule, but is markedly favored by polar groups in the side of the steroid rings opposite to the side where the methyl groups are located, which stresses the importance of the planar polarity of the molecule. Bile acid–induced increases in BKCa channel activity are also observed in smooth muscle cells freshly dissociated from rabbit main pulmonary artery and gallbladder, raising the possibility that a direct activation of BKCa channels by these planar steroids is a widespread phenomenon in many smooth muscle cell types. Bile acid concentrations that increase BKCa channel activity in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells are found in the systemic circulation under a variety of human pathophysiological conditions, and their ability to enhance BKCa channel activity may explain their relaxing effect on smooth muscle. PMID:11865021

  10. Differential Activation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Kv7.4, Kv7.5, and Kv7.4/7.5 Channels by ML213 and ICA-069673

    PubMed Central

    Brueggemann, Lyubov I.; Haick, Jennifer M.; Cribbs, Leanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that smooth muscle cells express Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 voltage-activated potassium channels, which contribute to maintenance of their resting membrane voltage. New pharmacologic activators of Kv7 channels, ML213 (N-mesitybicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxamide) and ICA-069673 N-(6-chloropyridin-3-yl)-3,4-difluorobenzamide), have been reported to discriminate among channels formed from different Kv7 subtypes. We compared the effects of ML213 and ICA-069673 on homomeric human Kv7.4, Kv7.5, and heteromeric Kv7.4/7.5 channels exogenously expressed in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells. We found that, despite its previous description as a selective activator of Kv7.2 and Kv7.4, ML213 significantly increased the maximum conductance of homomeric Kv7.4 and Kv7.5, as well as heteromeric Kv7.4/7.5 channels, and induced a negative shift of their activation curves. Current deactivation rates decreased in the presence of the ML213 (10 μM) for all three channel combinations. Mutants of Kv7.4 (W242L) and Kv7.5 (W235L), previously found to be insensitive to another Kv7 channel activator, retigabine, were also insensitive to ML213 (10 μM). In contrast to ML213, ICA-069673 robustly activated Kv7.4 channels but was significantly less effective on homomeric Kv7.5 channels. Heteromeric Kv7.4/7.5 channels displayed intermediate responses to ICA-069673. In each case, ICA-069673 induced a negative shift of the activation curves without significantly increasing maximal conductance. Current deactivation rates decreased in the presence of ICA-069673 in a subunit-specific manner. Kv7.4 W242L responded to ICA-069673-like wild-type Kv7.4, but a Kv7.4 F143A mutant was much less sensitive to ICA-069673. Based on these results, ML213 and ICA-069673 likely bind to different sites and are differentially selective among Kv7.4, Kv7.5, and Kv7.4/7.5 channel subtypes. PMID:24944189

  11. The role of predicted solar activity in TOPEX/Poseidon orbit maintenance maneuver design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frauenholz, Raymond B.; Shapiro, Bruce E.

    1992-01-01

    Following launch in June 1992, the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite will be placed in a near-circular frozen orbit at an altitude of about 1336 km. Orbit maintenance maneuvers are planned to assure all nodes of the 127-orbit 10-day repeat ground track remain within a 2 km equatorial longitude bandwidth. Orbit determination, maneuver execution, and atmospheric drag prediction errors limit overall targeting performance. This paper focuses on the effects of drag modeling errors, with primary emphasis on the role of SESC solar activity predictions, especially the 27-day outlook of the 10.7 cm solar flux and geomagnetic index used by a simplified version of the Jacchia-Roberts density model developed for this TOPEX/Poseidon application. For data evaluated from 1983-90, the SESC outlook performed better than a simpler persistence strategy, especially during the first 7-10 days. A targeting example illustrates the use of ground track biasing to compensate for expected orbit predictions errors, emphasizing the role of solar activity prediction errors.

  12. Role of SUMO activating enzyme in cancer stem cell maintenance and self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Du, Li; Li, Yi-Jia; Fakih, Marwan; Wiatrek, Rebecca L.; Duldulao, Marjun; Chen, Zhenbin; Chu, Peiguo; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have key roles in treatment resistance, tumour metastasis and relapse. Using colorectal cancer (CC) cell lines, patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tissues and patient tissues, here we report that CC CSCs, which resist chemoradiation, have higher SUMO activating enzyme (E1) and global SUMOylation levels than non-CSCs. Knockdown of SUMO E1 or SUMO conjugating enzyme (E2) inhibits CC CSC maintenance and self-renewal, while overexpression of SUMO E1 or E2 increases CC cell stemness. We found that SUMOylation regulates CSCs through Oct-1, a transcription factor for aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs). ALDH activity is not only a marker for CSCs but also important in CSC biology. SUMO does not modify Oct-1 directly, but regulates the expression of TRIM21 that enhances Oct-1 ubiquitination and, consequently, reducing Oct-1 stability. In summary, our findings suggest that SUMOylation could be a target to inhibit CSCs and ultimately to reduce treatment resistance, tumour metastasis and relapse. PMID:27465491

  13. Evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for the selection and maintenance of behavioural activity

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Vincenzo G.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Strausfeld, Nicholas J.; Hirth, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Survival and reproduction entail the selection of adaptive behavioural repertoires. This selection manifests as phylogenetically acquired activities that depend on evolved nervous system circuitries. Lorenz and Tinbergen already postulated that heritable behaviours and their reliable performance are specified by genetically determined programs. Here we compare the functional anatomy of the insect central complex and vertebrate basal ganglia to illustrate their role in mediating selection and maintenance of adaptive behaviours. Comparative analyses reveal that central complex and basal ganglia circuitries share comparable lineage relationships within clusters of functionally integrated neurons. These clusters are specified by genetic mechanisms that link birth time and order to their neuronal identities and functions. Their subsequent connections and associated functions are characterized by similar mechanisms that implement dimensionality reduction and transition through attractor states, whereby spatially organized parallel-projecting loops integrate and convey sensorimotor representations that select and maintain behavioural activity. In both taxa, these neural systems are modulated by dopamine signalling that also mediates memory-like processes. The multiplicity of similarities between central complex and basal ganglia suggests evolutionarily conserved computational mechanisms for action selection. We speculate that these may have originated from ancestral ground pattern circuitries present in the brain of the last common ancestor of insects and vertebrates. PMID:26554043

  14. Using Visual Methods to Understand Physical Activity Maintenance following Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Sarah J; McNamara, Keira; Tritton, Larette

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have explored the factors associated with long-term maintenance of exercise following cardiac rehabilitation. The present study used auto-photography and interviews to explore the factors that influence motivation and continued participation in physical activity among post cardiac rehabilitation patients. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted alongside participant-selected photographs or drawings with participants that had continued participation in physical activity for at least two years following the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Participants were recruited from circuit training classes in East Sussex in the UK. Thematic content analysis revealed seven main themes: fear of death and ill health avoidance, critical incidents, overcoming aging, social influences, being able to enjoy life, provision of routine and structure, enjoyment and psychological well-being. Fear of death, illness avoidance, overcoming aging, and being able to enjoy life were powerful motives for continued participation in exercise. The social nature of the exercise class was also identified as a key facilitator of continued participation. Group-based exercise suited those that continued exercise participation post cardiac rehabilitation and fostered adherence. PMID:26381147

  15. Evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for the selection and maintenance of behavioural activity.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Vincenzo G; Dolan, Raymond J; Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2015-12-19

    Survival and reproduction entail the selection of adaptive behavioural repertoires. This selection manifests as phylogenetically acquired activities that depend on evolved nervous system circuitries. Lorenz and Tinbergen already postulated that heritable behaviours and their reliable performance are specified by genetically determined programs. Here we compare the functional anatomy of the insect central complex and vertebrate basal ganglia to illustrate their role in mediating selection and maintenance of adaptive behaviours. Comparative analyses reveal that central complex and basal ganglia circuitries share comparable lineage relationships within clusters of functionally integrated neurons. These clusters are specified by genetic mechanisms that link birth time and order to their neuronal identities and functions. Their subsequent connections and associated functions are characterized by similar mechanisms that implement dimensionality reduction and transition through attractor states, whereby spatially organized parallel-projecting loops integrate and convey sensorimotor representations that select and maintain behavioural activity. In both taxa, these neural systems are modulated by dopamine signalling that also mediates memory-like processes. The multiplicity of similarities between central complex and basal ganglia suggests evolutionarily conserved computational mechanisms for action selection. We speculate that these may have originated from ancestral ground pattern circuitries present in the brain of the last common ancestor of insects and vertebrates. PMID:26554043

  16. Active Immunotherapy Used Alone for Maintenance of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Charles B.; Harris, Rodney; Geary, Colin G.; Leyland, Michael J.; MaCiver, John E.; Delamore, Irvine W.

    1973-01-01

    A total of 32 patients suffering from acute myeloid leukaemia were initially treated with daunorubicin and cytosine arabinoside, and eight who achieved full remission were given a brief cytoreduction course of cyclophosphamide and thioguanine. Of these eight patients seven were then actively immunized with 10 irradiated allogeneic acute myeloid leukaemia cells and B.C.G. at weekly intervals. Six of these patients have survived in apparent good health for more than one year. Bone marrow changes suggestive of relapse were used as an indication for further short courses of chemotherapy, and except on single occasions in two different patients clinical relapse has been prevented. The average duration of first (bone marrow) remission appears to be comparable with the best achieved in trials using regular chemotherapy for maintenance, though criteria for determining relapse may be different. The rate of reinduction of remissions (bone marrow) in this series was high, with a subsequent increase in overall survival time. Possible explanations for the high rate of reinduction include, firstly, the effects of active immunization with specific leukaemia antigen; secondly, non-specific adjuvant effect; thirdly, avoidance of drug resistance; and, fourthly, early diagnosis of relapse by frequent bone marrow examinations. PMID:4519012

  17. Using Visual Methods to Understand Physical Activity Maintenance following Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hardcastle, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have explored the factors associated with long-term maintenance of exercise following cardiac rehabilitation. The present study used auto-photography and interviews to explore the factors that influence motivation and continued participation in physical activity among post cardiac rehabilitation patients. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted alongside participant-selected photographs or drawings with participants that had continued participation in physical activity for at least two years following the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Participants were recruited from circuit training classes in East Sussex in the UK. Thematic content analysis revealed seven main themes: fear of death and ill health avoidance, critical incidents, overcoming aging, social influences, being able to enjoy life, provision of routine and structure, enjoyment and psychological well-being. Fear of death, illness avoidance, overcoming aging, and being able to enjoy life were powerful motives for continued participation in exercise. The social nature of the exercise class was also identified as a key facilitator of continued participation. Group-based exercise suited those that continued exercise participation post cardiac rehabilitation and fostered adherence. PMID:26381147

  18. A synthetic prostone activates apical chloride channels in A6 epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hui Fang; Liu, Lian; Self, Julie; Duke, Billie Jeanne; Ueno, Ryuji; Eaton, Douglas C.

    2008-01-01

    The bicyclic fatty acid lubiprostone (formerly known as SPI-0211) activates two types of anion channels in A6 cells. Both channel types are rarely, if ever, observed in untreated cells. The first channel type was activated at low concentrations of lubiprostone (<100 nM) in >80% of cell-attached patches and had a unit conductance of ∼3–4 pS. The second channel type required higher concentrations (>100 nM) of lubiprostone to activate, was observed in ∼30% of patches, and had a unit conductance of 8–9 pS. The properties of the first type of channel were consistent with ClC-2 and the second with CFTR. ClC-2's unit current strongly inwardly rectified that could be best fit by models of the channel with multiple energy barrier and multiple anion binding sites in the conductance pore. The open probability and mean open time of ClC-2 was voltage dependent, decreasing dramatically as the patches were depolarized. The order of anion selectivity for ClC-2 was Cl > Br > NO3 > I > SCN, where SCN is thiocyanate. ClC-2 was a “double-barreled” channel favoring even numbers of levels over odd numbers as if the channel protein had two conductance pathways that opened independently of one another. The channel could be, at least, partially blocked by glibenclamide. The properties of the channel in A6 cells were indistinguishable from ClC-2 channels stably transfected in HEK293 cells. CFTR in the patches had a selectivity of Cl > Br ≫ NO3 ≅ SCN ≅ I. It outwardly rectified as expected for a single-site anion channel. Because of its properties, ClC-2 is uniquely suitable to promote anion secretion with little anion reabsorption. CFTR, on the other hand, could promote either reabsorption or secretion depending on the anion driving forces. PMID:18511742

  19. Endogenous KCNE Subunits Govern Kv2.1 K+ Channel Activation Kinetics in Xenopus Oocyte Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Earl; Roepke, Torsten K.; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2006-01-01

    Kv2.1 is a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel that generates delayed rectifier currents in mammalian heart and brain. The biophysical properties of Kv2.1 and other ion channels have been characterized by functional expression in heterologous systems, and most commonly in Xenopus laevis oocytes. A number of previous oocyte-based studies of mammalian potassium channels have revealed expression-level-dependent changes in channel properties, leading to the suggestion that endogenous oocyte factors regulate channel gating. Here, we show that endogenous oocyte potassium channel KCNE ancillary subunits xMinK and xMiRP2 slow the activation of oocyte-expressed mammalian Kv2.1 channels two-to-fourfold. This produces a sigmoidal relationship between Kv2.1 current density and activation rate in oocyte-based two-electrode voltage clamp studies. The effect of endogenous xMiRP2 and xMinK on Kv2.1 activation is diluted at high Kv2.1 expression levels, or by RNAi knockdown of either endogenous subunit. RNAi knockdown of both xMiRP2 and xMinK eliminates the correlation between Kv2.1 expression level and activation kinetics. The data demonstrate a molecular basis for expression-level-dependent changes in Kv channel gating observed in heterologous expression studies. PMID:16326911

  20. Let It Go and Open Up, an Ensemble of Ion Channel Active States.

    PubMed

    Minor, Daniel L

    2016-02-11

    Ligand binding usually moves the target protein from an ensemble of inactive states to a well-defined active conformation. Matthies et al. flip this scheme around, finding that, for the magnesium channel CorA, loss of ligand binding induces an ensemble of conformations that turn the channel on. PMID:26871624

  1. Importance of the Maintenance Pathway in the Regulation of the Activity of Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase†

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. The Escherichia coli class Ia RNR is composed of α and β subunits that form an α2β2 active complex. β contains the diferric tyrosyl radical (Y•) cofactor that is essential for the reduction process that occurs on α. [Y•] in vitro is proportional to RNR activity, and its regulation in vivo potentially represents a mechanism for controlling RNR activity. To examine this thesis, N- and C-terminal StrepII-tagged β under the control of an l-arabinose promoter were constructed. Using these constructs and with [l-arabinose] varying from 0 to 0.5 mM in the growth medium, [β] could be varied from 4 to 3300 µM. [Y•] in vivo and on affinity-purified Strep-β in vitro was determined by EPR spectroscopy and Western analysis. In both cases, there was 0.1–0.3 Y• radical per β. To determine if the substoichiometric Y• level was associated with apo β or diferric β, titrations of crude cell extracts from these growths were carried out with reduced YfaE, a 2Fe2S ferredoxin involved in cofactor maintenance and assembly. Each titration, followed by addition of O2 to assemble the cofactor and EPR analysis to quantitate Y•, revealed that β is completely loaded with a diferric cluster even when its concentration in vivo is 244 µM. These titrations, furthermore, resulted in 1 Y• radical per β, the highest levels reported. Whole cell Mössbauer analysis on cells induced with 0.5 mM arabinose supports high iron loading in β. These results suggest that modulation of the level of Y• in vivo in E. coli is a mechanism of regulating RNR activity. PMID:18314964

  2. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca2+/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca2+/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca2+ concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca2+ range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca2+ signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca2+ regulation in anoctamin Cl− channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types. PMID:24081981

  3. Ion channel modifying agents influence the electrical activity generated by canine intrinsic cardiac neurons in situ.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G W; Horackova, M; Armour, J A

    2000-04-01

    This study was designed to establish whether agents known to modify neuronal ion channels influence the behavior of mammalian intrinsic cardiac neurons in situ and, if so, in a manner consistent with that found previously in vitro. The activity generated by right atrial neurons was recorded extracellularly in varying numbers of anesthetized dogs before and during continuous local arterial infusion of several neuronal ion channel modifying agents. Veratridine (7.5 microM), the specific modifier of Na+-selective channels, increased neuronal activity (95% above control) in 80% of dogs tested (n = 25). The membrane depolarizing agent potassium chloride (40 mM) reduced neuronal activity (43% below control) in 84% of dogs tested (n = 19). The inhibitor of voltage-sensitive K+ channels, tetraethylammonium (10 mM), decreased neuronal activity (42% below control) in 73% of dogs tested (n = 11). The nonspecific potassium channel inhibitor barium chloride (5 mM) excited neurons (47% above control) in 13 of 19 animals tested. Cadmium chloride (200 microM), which inhibits Ca2+-selective channels and Ca2+-dependent K+ channels, increased neuronal activity (65% above control) in 79% of dogs tested (n = 14). The specific L-type Ca2+ channel blocking agent nifedipine (5 microM) reduced neuronal activity (52% blow control in 72% of 11 dogs tested), as did the nonspecific inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channels, nickel chloride (5 mM) (36% below control in 69% of 13 dogs tested). Each agent induced either excitatory or inhibitory responses, depending on the agent tested. It is concluded that specific ion channels (I(Na), I(CaL), I(Kv), and I(KCa)) that have been associated with intrinsic cardiac neurons in vitro are involved in their capacity to generate action potentials in situ. PMID:10772056

  4. Neutron field for activation experiments in horizontal channel of training reactor VR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanik, Milan; Katovsky, Karel; Vins, Miroslav; Soltes, Jaroslav; Zavorka, Lukas

    2014-11-01

    The experimental channels of nuclear reactors often serve for nuclear data measurement and validation. The dosimetry-foils activation technique was employed to measure neutron field parameters in the horizontal radial channel of the training reactor VR-1, and to test the possibility of using the reactor for scientific purposes. The reaction rates, energy spectral indexes, and neutron spectrum at several irradiation positions of the experimental channel were determined. The experimental results show the feasibility of the radial channel for irradiating experiments and open new possibilities for data validation by using this nuclear facility.

  5. Fe(2+) substrate transport through ferritin protein cage ion channels influences enzyme activity and biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Behera, Rabindra K; Torres, Rodrigo; Tosha, Takehiko; Bradley, Justin M; Goulding, Celia W; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2015-09-01

    Ferritins, complex protein nanocages, form internal iron-oxy minerals (Fe2O3·H2O), by moving cytoplasmic Fe(2+) through intracage ion channels to cage-embedded enzyme (2Fe(2+)/O2 oxidoreductase) sites where ferritin biomineralization is initiated. The products of ferritin enzyme activity are diferric oxy complexes that are mineral precursors. Conserved, carboxylate amino acid side chains of D127 from each of three cage subunits project into ferritin ion channels near the interior ion channel exits and, thus, could direct Fe(2+) movement to the internal enzyme sites. Ferritin D127E was designed and analyzed to probe properties of ion channel size and carboxylate crowding near the internal ion channel opening. Glu side chains are chemically equivalent to, but longer by one -CH2 than Asp, side chains. Ferritin D127E assembled into normal protein cages, but diferric peroxo formation (enzyme activity) was not observed, when measured at 650 nm (DFP λ max). The caged biomineral formation, measured at 350 nm in the middle of the broad, nonspecific Fe(3+)-O absorption band, was slower. Structural differences (protein X-ray crystallography), between ion channels in wild type and ferritin D127E, which correlate with the inhibition of ferritin D127E enzyme activity include: (1) narrower interior ion channel openings/pores; (2) increased numbers of ion channel protein-metal binding sites, and (3) a change in ion channel electrostatics due to carboxylate crowding. The contributions of ion channel size and structure to ferritin activity reflect metal ion transport in ion channels are precisely regulated both in ferritin protein nanocages and membranes of living cells. PMID:26202907

  6. Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Stimulated Mouse Gonadotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Dennis W.; Turgeon, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    GnRH receptor activation elicits release of intracellular Ca2+, which leads to secretion and also activates Ca2+-activated ion channels underlying membrane voltage changes. The predominant Ca2+-activated ion channels in rat and mouse gonadotrophs are Ca2+-activated K+ channels. To establish the temporal relationship between GnRH-induced changes in intracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) and membrane current (Im), and to identify specific Ca2+-activated K+ channels linking GnRH-induced increase in [Ca2+]i to changes in plasma membrane electrical activity, we used single female mouse gonadotrophs in the perforated patch configuration of the patch-clamp technique, which preserves signaling pathways. Simultaneous measurement of [Ca2+]i and Im in voltage-clamped gonadotrophs revealed that GnRH stimulates an increase in [Ca2+]i that precedes outward Im, and that activates two kinetically distinct currents identified, using specific toxin inhibitors, as small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) current (ISK) and large (big) conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) current (IBK). We show that the apamin-sensitive current has an IC50 of 69 pM, consistent with the SK2 channel subtype and confirmed by immunocytochemistry. The magnitude of the SK current response to GnRH was attenuated by 17β-estradiol (E2) pretreatment. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of BK channels, completely blocked the residual apamin-insensitive outward Im, substantiating that IBK is a component of the GnRH-induced outward Im. In contrast to its suppression of ISK, E2 pretreatment augmented peak IBK. SK or BK channel inhibition modulated GnRH-stimulated LH secretion, implicating a role for these channels in gonadotroph function. In summary, in mouse gonadotrophs the GnRH-stimulated increase in [Ca2+]i activates ISK and IBK, which are differentially regulated by E2 and which may be targets for E2 positive feedback in LH secretion. PMID:19106218

  7. Tamoxifen inhibits BK channels in chick cochlea without alterations in voltage-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Mingjie; Duncan, R Keith

    2009-07-01

    Large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated, and voltage-gated potassium channels (BK, BK(Ca), or Maxi-K) play an important role in electrical tuning in nonmammalian vertebrate hair cells. Systematic changes in tuning frequency along the tonotopic axis largely result from variations in BK channel kinetics, but the molecular changes underpinning these functional variations remain unknown. Auxiliary beta(1) have been implicated in low-frequency tuning at the cochlear apex because these subunits dramatically slow channel kinetics. Tamoxifen (Tx), a (xeno)estrogen compound known to activate BK channels through the beta-subunit, was used to test for the functional presence of beta(1). The hypotheses were that Tx would activate the majority of BK channels in hair cells from the cochlear apex due to the presence of beta(1) and that the level of activation would exhibit a tonotopic gradient following the expression profile of beta(1). Outside-out patches of BK channels were excised from tall hair cells along the apical half of the chicken basilar papilla. In low-density patches, single-channel conductance was reduced and the averaged open probability was unaffected by Tx. In high-density patches, the amplitude of ensemble-averaged BK current was inhibited, whereas half-activation potential and activation kinetics were unaffected by Tx. In both cases, no tonotopic Tx-dependent activation of channel activity was observed. Therefore, contrary to the hypotheses, electrophysiological assessment suggests that molecular mechanisms other than auxiliary beta-subunits are involved in generating a tonotopic distribution of BK channel kinetics and electric tuning in chick basilar papilla. PMID:19439526

  8. Deletion of phenylalanine 508 causes attenuated phosphorylation-dependent activation of CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Zeltwanger, S; Hu, S; Hwang, T C

    2000-05-01

    In cell-attached patches stimulated with cAMP agonists, the single-channel open probability (Po) of the phenylalanine 508-deleted cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (DeltaF508-CFTR) channel, the most common disease-associated mutation in cystic fibrosis, was abnormally low (a functional defect). To investigate the mechanism for the poor response of DeltaF508-CFTR to cAMP stimulation, we examined, in excised inside-out patches, protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation activation and ATP-dependent gating of wild-type (WT) and DeltaF508-CFTR channels expressed in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts. For WT-CFTR, the activation time course of CFTR channel current upon addition of PKA and ATP followed a sigmoidal function with time constants that decreased as [PKA] was increased. The curvilinear relationship between [PKA] and the apparent activation rate suggests an incremental phosphorylation-dependent activation of CFTR at multiple phosphorylation sites. The time course of PKA-dependent activation of DeltaF508-CFTR channel current also followed a sigmoidal function, but the rate of activation was at least 7-fold slower than that with WT channels. This result suggests that deletion of phenylalanine 508 causes attenuated PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the CFTR chloride channel. Once DeltaF508-CFTR channels were maximally activated with PKA, the mutant channel and WT channel had indistinguishable steady-state Po values, ATP dose-response relationships and single-channel kinetics, indicating that DeltaF508-CFTR is not defective in ATP-dependent gating. By measuring whole-cell current density, we compared the number of functional channels in WT- and DeltaF508-CFTR cell membrane. Our data showed that the estimated channel density for DeltaF508-CFTR was approximately 10-fold lower than that for WT-CFTR, but the cAMP-dependent whole-cell current density differed by approximately 200-fold. We thus conclude that the functional defect (a decrease in Po) of Delta

  9. Deletion of phenylalanine 508 causes attenuated phosphorylation-dependent activation of CFTR chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zeltwanger, Shawn; Hu, Shenghui; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2000-01-01

    In cell-attached patches stimulated with cAMP agonists, the single-channel open probability (Po) of the phenylalanine 508-deleted cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ΔF508-CFTR) channel, the most common disease-associated mutation in cystic fibrosis, was abnormally low (a functional defect). To investigate the mechanism for the poor response of ΔF508-CFTR to cAMP stimulation, we examined, in excised inside-out patches, protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation activation and ATP-dependent gating of wild-type (WT) and ΔF508-CFTR channels expressed in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts.For WT-CFTR, the activation time course of CFTR channel current upon addition of PKA and ATP followed a sigmoidal function with time constants that decreased as [PKA] was increased. The curvilinear relationship between [PKA] and the apparent activation rate suggests an incremental phosphorylation-dependent activation of CFTR at multiple phosphorylation sites.The time course of PKA-dependent activation of ΔF508-CFTR channel current also followed a sigmoidal function, but the rate of activation was at least 7-fold slower than that with WT channels. This result suggests that deletion of phenylalanine 508 causes attenuated PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the CFTR chloride channel.Once ΔF508-CFTR channels were maximally activated with PKA, the mutant channel and WT channel had indistinguishable steady-state Po values, ATP dose-response relationships and single-channel kinetics, indicating that ΔF508-CFTR is not defective in ATP-dependent gating.By measuring whole-cell current density, we compared the number of functional channels in WT- and ΔF508-CFTR cell membrane. Our data showed that the estimated channel density for ΔF508-CFTR was ∼10-fold lower than that for WT-CFTR, but the cAMP-dependent whole-cell current density differed by ∼200-fold. We thus conclude that the functional defect (a decrease in Po) of ΔF508-CFTR is as important as the trafficking defect (a

  10. Stretch-activated channels in single early distal tubule cells of the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, A M; Hunter, M

    1990-01-01

    1. Single stretch-activated channels have been studied in cell-attached and excised patches from single early distal tubule (diluting segment) cells of Rana temporaria. 2. The channels can be reversibly activated, in both cell-attached and excised patches, by the application of negative pressure to the pipette causing mechanical stretching of the cell membrane. In cell-attached patches, application of 14.8 cmH2O negative pressure to the patch pipette increased reversibly the open probably from 0.11 to 0.87. 3. The channel conductance in the cell-attached configuration with standard Ringer solution in the pipette is 21.3 pS. 4. The channel is non-specific. In excised inside-out patches ion substitution experiments show that the channel does not discriminate between sodium and potassium ions, nor does it appear to select for cations over anions. 5. The channel is voltage sensitive such that depolarizing the cell opens the channel. The open probability at the resting membrane potential, 0.89, was reduced to 0.26 at a hyperpolarizing potential of 100 mV (holding pressure of -20.1 cmH2O or -206 Pa). 6. The sensitivity of the channel to mechanical stretching suggests that the channel may be involved in cell volume regulation. PMID:1707964

  11. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning.

    PubMed

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor. PMID:27094086

  12. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning

    PubMed Central

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor. PMID:27094086

  13. pH regulation of amphotericin B channels activity in the bilayer lipid membrane

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradi, Tahereh; Sepehry, Hamid; Ashrafpour, Manuchehr

    2016-01-01

    Background: Amphotericin B (AmB) is a polyene antibiotic frequently applied in the treatment of systemic fungal infections in spite of its secondary effects. The pH plays a crucial role in modulating biophysical features of ion channels in the bilayer lipid membranes. Aim: In this study, the role of pH in the regulation of AmB channel was assessed by single channel recording of ion channel incorporated in the artificial membrane. Materials and Methods: Bilayer lipid membrane was formed by phosphatidylcholine in a 350 μm diameter aperture between two chambers, cis and trans contained 200/50 mMKCl solutions, respectively; then AmB was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single channel recordings were used to indicate the effects of pH changes on AmB channels activity. The records were analyzed by Clamp fit 10 software. Results: A kinetic analysis of single channel currents indicated a cation ion channel with 500 pS conductance and voltage-dependence of the open probability of the AmB channel (Po). A reduction of cis pH to 6 decreased Po and conductance. This effect was also voltage-dependent, being greater at a more positive above −40. The pH changes in the range of 6-8 had no effect on the reversal potential and ion selectivity. Conclusion: Our data indicated that extracellular acidity can reduce AmB activity. PMID:27003977

  14. The regulation of BK channel activity by pre- and post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Barry D.; Braun, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels represent an important pathway for the outward flux of K+ ions from the intracellular compartment in response to membrane depolarization, and/or an elevation in cytosolic free [Ca2+]. They are functionally expressed in a range of mammalian tissues (e.g., nerve and smooth muscles), where they can either enhance or dampen membrane excitability. The diversity of BK channel activity results from the considerable alternative mRNA splicing and post-translational modification (e.g., phosphorylation) of key domains within the pore-forming α subunit of the channel complex. Most of these modifications are regulated by distinct upstream cell signaling pathways that influence the structure and/or gating properties of the holo-channel and ultimately, cellular function. The channel complex may also contain auxiliary subunits that further affect channel gating and behavior, often in a tissue-specific manner. Recent studies in human and animal models have provided strong evidence that abnormal BK channel expression/function contributes to a range of pathologies in nerve and smooth muscle. By targeting the upstream regulatory events modulating BK channel behavior, it may be possible to therapeutically intervene and alter BK channel expression/function in a beneficial manner. PMID:25202279

  15. [Cooperative phenomena in the activity of single ion channels].

    PubMed

    Geletiuk, V I; Kazachenko, V N

    1989-01-01

    Using the patch-voltage-clamp method kinetics of the fast potential-dependent K+-channels in molluscan neurones was investigated. It was found that under given experimental conditions the amplitudes of single current impulses have a wide spectrum. The amplitudes are proportional to a number of the current substates involved. Averaged fronts of the current impulses are S-shaped, and have duration greater than 1 ms. Averaged duration of the current impulses increases (from 0.25 to 30-40 ms) with the impulse amplitude (or with the number of the substates involved). There is a sharp bend of the dependence at the impulse amplitude 0.6-0.7 of maximal value. The phenomena investigated reflect, probably, cooperativity of the channel transitions between the substates. The degree of the cooperativity depends on the membrane potential value. PMID:2804147

  16. Ion Channels in Regulation of Neuronal Regenerative Activities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongdong; Yu, Shan Ping; Wei, Ling

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of the nervous system is achieved by the regrowth of damaged neuronal axons, the restoration of damaged nerve cells, and the generation of new neurons to replace those that have been lost. In the central nervous system the regenerative ability is limited by various factors including damaged oligodendrocytes that are essential for neuronal axon myelination, an emerging glial scar, and secondary injury in the surrounding areas. Stem cell transplantation therapy has been shown to be a promising approach to treating neurodegenerative diseases because of the regenerative capability of stem cells that secrete neurotrophic factors and give rise to differentiated progeny. However, some issues of stem cell transplantation, such as survival, homing, and efficiency of neural differentiation after transplantation, still need to be improved. Ion channels allow for the exchange of ions between the intra- and extracellular spaces or between the cytoplasm and organelles. These ion channels maintain the ion homeostasis in the brain and play a key role in regulating the physiological function of the nervous system and allowing the processing of neuronal signals. In seeking a potential strategy to enhance the efficacy of stem cell therapy in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, this review briefly summarizes the roles of ion channels in cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, chemotropic axon guidance of growth cones and axon outgrowth after injury. PMID:24399572

  17. Requirement for PLK1 kinase activity in the maintenance of a robust spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Aisling; Maffini, Stefano; Rainey, Michael D.; Kaczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Gaboriau, David; Musacchio, Andrea; Santocanale, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During mitotic arrest induced by microtubule targeting drugs, the weakening of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) allows cells to progress through the cell cycle without chromosome segregation occurring. PLK1 kinase plays a major role in mitosis and emerging evidence indicates that PLK1 is also involved in establishing the checkpoint and maintaining SAC signalling. However, mechanistically, the role of PLK1 in the SAC is not fully understood, with several recent reports indicating that it can cooperate with either one of the major checkpoint kinases, Aurora B or MPS1. In this study, we assess the role of PLK1 in SAC maintenance. We find that in nocodazole-arrested U2OS cells, PLK1 activity is continuously required for maintaining Aurora B protein localisation and activity at kinetochores. Consistent with published data we find that upon PLK1 inhibition, phosphoThr3-H3, a marker of Haspin activity, is reduced. Intriguingly, Aurora B inhibition causes PLK1 to relocalise from kinetochores into fewer and much larger foci, possibly due to incomplete recruitment of outer kinetochore proteins. Importantly, PLK1 inhibition, together with partial inhibition of Aurora B, allows efficient SAC override to occur. This phenotype is more pronounced than the phenotype observed by combining the same PLK1 inhibitors with partial MPS1 inhibition. We also find that PLK1 inhibition does not obviously cooperate with Haspin inhibition to promote SAC override. These results indicate that PLK1 is directly involved in maintaining efficient SAC signalling, possibly by cooperating in a positive feedback loop with Aurora B, and that partially redundant mechanisms exist which reinforce the SAC. PMID:26685311

  18. Fast and slow activation kinetics of voltage-gated sodium channels in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Gilly, W F; Gillette, R; McFarlane, M

    1997-05-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp recordings of Na current (I(Na)) were made under identical experimental conditions from isolated neurons from cephalopod (Loligo, Octopus) and gastropod (Aplysia, Pleurobranchaea, Doriopsilla) species to compare properties of activation gating. Voltage dependence of peak Na conductance (gNa) is very similar in all cases, but activation kinetics in the gastropod neurons studied are markedly slower. Kinetic differences are very pronounced only over the voltage range spanned by the gNa-voltage relation. At positive and negative extremes of voltage, activation and deactivation kinetics of I(Na) are practically indistinguishable in all species studied. Voltage-dependent rate constants underlying activation of the slow type of Na channel found in gastropods thus appear to be much more voltage dependent than are the equivalent rates in the universally fast type of channel that predominates in cephalopods. Voltage dependence of inactivation kinetics shows a similar pattern and is representative of activation kinetics for the two types of Na channels. Neurons with fast Na channels can thus make much more rapid adjustments in the number of open Na channels at physiologically relevant voltages than would be possible with only slow Na channels. This capability appears to be an adaptation that is highly evolved in cephalopods, which are well known for their high-speed swimming behaviors. Similarities in slow and fast Na channel subtypes in molluscan and mammalian neurons are discussed. PMID:9163364

  19. Regulation of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels by S-palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Shipston, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    BK (large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium) channels are important determinants of physiological control in the nervous, endocrine and vascular systems with channel dysfunction associated with major disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. Thus the mechanisms that control channel surface expression and/or activity are important determinants of their (patho)physiological function. BK channels are S-acylated (palmitoylated) at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus of the pore-forming α-subunit. Palmitoylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas palmitoylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. Recent studies are beginning to reveal mechanistic insights into how palmitoylation controls channel trafficking and cross-talk with phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways. Intriguingly, each site of palmitoylation is regulated by distinct zDHHCs (palmitoyl acyltransferases) and APTs (acyl thioesterases). This supports that different mechanisms may control substrate specificity by zDHHCs and APTs even within the same target protein. As palmitoylation is dynamically regulated, this fundamental post-translational modification represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease. PMID:23356260

  20. Human monocytes kill M-CSF-expressing glioma cells by BK channel activation.

    PubMed

    Hoa, Neil T; Zhang, Jian Gang; Delgado, Christina L; Myers, Michael P; Callahan, Linda L; Vandeusen, Gerald; Schiltz, Patric M; Wepsic, H Terry; Jadus, Martin R

    2007-02-01

    In this study, human monocytes/macrophages were observed to kill human U251 glioma cells expressing membrane macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mM-CSF) via a swelling and vacuolization process called paraptosis. Human monocytes responded to the mM-CSF-transduced U251 glioma cells, but not to viral vector control U251 glioma cells (U251-VV), by producing a respiratory burst within 20 min. Using patch clamp techniques, functional big potassium (BK) channels were observed on the membrane of the U251 glioma cell. It has been previously reported that oxygen indirectly regulates BK channel function. In this study, it was demonstrated that prolonged BK channel activation in response to the respiratory burst induced by monocytes initiates paraptosis in selected glioma cells. Forced BK channel opening within the glioma cells by BK channel activators (phloretin or pimaric acid) induced U251 glioma cell swelling and vacuolization occurred within 30 min. U251 glioma cell cytotoxicity, induced by using BK channel activators, required between 8 and 12 h. Swelling and vacuolization induced by phloretin and pimaric acid was prevented by iberiotoxin, a specific BK channel inhibitor. Confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated BK channels co-localized with the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, the two targeted organelles affected in paraptosis. Iberiotoxin prevented monocytes from producing death in mM-CSF-expressing U251glioma cells in a 24 h assay. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism whereby monocytes can induce paraptosis via the disruption of internal potassium ion homeostasis. PMID:17318194

  1. Potent KCNQ2/3-Specific Channel Activator Suppresses In Vivo Epileptic Activity and Prevents the Development of Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Kalappa, Bopanna I.; Soh, Heun; Duignan, Kevin M.; Furuya, Takeru; Edwards, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv7 (KCNQ) channels are voltage-dependent potassium channels that are activated at resting membrane potentials and therefore provide a powerful brake on neuronal excitability. Genetic or experience-dependent reduction of KCNQ2/3 channel activity is linked with disorders that are characterized by neuronal hyperexcitability, such as epilepsy and tinnitus. Retigabine, a small molecule that activates KCNQ2–5 channels by shifting their voltage-dependent opening to more negative voltages, is an US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved anti-epileptic drug. However, recently identified side effects have limited its clinical use. As a result, the development of improved KCNQ2/3 channel activators is crucial for the treatment of hyperexcitability-related disorders. By incorporating a fluorine substituent in the 3-position of the tri-aminophenyl ring of retigabine, we synthesized a small-molecule activator (SF0034) with novel properties. Heterologous expression of KCNQ2/3 channels in HEK293T cells showed that SF0034 was five times more potent than retigabine at shifting the voltage dependence of KCNQ2/3 channels to more negative voltages. Moreover, unlike retigabine, SF0034 did not shift the voltage dependence of either KCNQ4 or KCNQ5 homomeric channels. Conditional deletion of Kcnq2 from cerebral cortical pyramidal neurons showed that SF0034 requires the expression of KCNQ2/3 channels for reducing the excitability of CA1 hippocampal neurons. Behavioral studies demonstrated that SF0034 was a more potent and less toxic anticonvulsant than retigabine in rodents. Furthermore, SF0034 prevented the development of tinnitus in mice. We propose that SF0034 provides, not only a powerful tool for investigating ion channel properties, but, most importantly, it provides a clinical candidate for treating epilepsy and preventing tinnitus. PMID:26063916

  2. NODULES WITH ACTIVATED DEFENSE 1 is required for maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Haixiang; Luo, Li; Duan, Liujian; Cai, Liuyang; He, Xinxing; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Li, Guoliang; Xiao, Aifang; Duanmu, Deqiang; Cao, Yangrong; Hong, Zonglie; Zhang, Zhongming

    2016-10-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legume plants and rhizobia results in the formation of root nodules, in which symbiotic plant cells host and harbor thousands of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. Here, a Medicago truncatula nodules with activated defense 1 (nad1) mutant was identified using reverse genetics methods. The mutant phenotype was characterized using cell and molecular biology approaches. An RNA-sequencing technique was used to analyze the transcriptomic reprogramming of nad1 mutant nodules. In the nad1 mutant plants, rhizobial infection and propagation in infection threads are normal, whereas rhizobia and their symbiotic plant cells become necrotic immediately after rhizobia are released from infection threads into symbiotic cells of nodules. Defense-associated responses were detected in nad1 nodules. NAD1 is specifically present in root nodule symbiosis plants with the exception of Morus notabilis, and the transcript is highly induced in nodules. NAD1 encodes a small uncharacterized protein with two predicted transmembrane helices and is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Our data demonstrate a positive role for NAD1 in the maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis during nodulation. PMID:27245091

  3. Ethanol effect on activation and maintenance of cold stress response in immature rats.

    PubMed

    Spiers, D E; Kelleher, S A; Eichen, P A

    1996-07-01

    Rats at thermoneutral ambient temperature (Ta) exhibit change in thermoregulatory response to ethanol (EtOH) from 2 to 15 days of age. In the present study, rats at 2-3, 8-9, and 14-15 days of age were administered either saline or EtOH (4 g/kg b.wt.;IP) using two different routines to determine EtOH effect on specific cold defense mechanisms. Injection of EtOH in the first routine occurred after exposure to cold Ta, to determine effect on maintenance of cold thermogenesis. EtOH-induced metabolic depression increased from 3 to 8 days of age, with little change after this time. Injection of EtOH in the second routine was at thermoneutral Ta, followed at 20 min postinjection by rapid exposure to cold Ta to determine effect on activation of cold thermogenesis. EtOH-treatment delayed onset of cold thermogenesis at 2-3 and 14-15 days of age, and completely eliminated 8-9-day-old response to cold Ta. Rats exposed to cold Ta at 2-3 days of age exhibited a slower rate of EtOH absorption and lower blood EtOH concentration than rats in the older groups, to explain some age differences in EtOH response. PMID:8743629

  4. Screening of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Channel Activators Identifies Novel Neurotrophic Piperazine Compounds.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Seishiro; Hatano, Masahiko; Takada, Yoshinori; Hino, Kyosuke; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Tanikawa, Jun; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Hase, Hideharu; Nakao, Akito; Hirano, Mitsuru; Rotrattanadumrong, Rachapun; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Mori, Masayuki X; Nishida, Motohiro; Hu, Yaopeng; Inoue, Ryuji; Nagata, Ryu; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) proteins form Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels activated upon stimulation of metabotropic receptors coupled to phospholipase C. Among the TRPC subfamily, TRPC3 and TRPC6 channels activated directly by diacylglycerol (DAG) play important roles in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, promoting neuronal development and survival. In various disease models, BDNF restores neurologic deficits, but its therapeutic potential is limited by its poor pharmacokinetic profile. Elucidation of a framework for designing small molecules, which elicit BDNF-like activity via TRPC3 and TRPC6, establishes a solid basis to overcome this limitation. We discovered, through library screening, a group of piperazine-derived compounds that activate DAG-activated TRPC3/TRPC6/TRPC7 channels. The compounds [4-(5-chloro-2-methylphenyl)piperazin-1-yl](3-fluorophenyl)methanone (PPZ1) and 2-[4-(2,3-dimethylphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-N-(2-ethoxyphenyl)acetamide (PPZ2) activated, in a dose-dependent manner, recombinant TRPC3/TRPC6/TRPC7 channels, but not other TRPCs, in human embryonic kidney cells. PPZ2 activated native TRPC6-like channels in smooth muscle cells isolated from rabbit portal vein. Also, PPZ2 evoked cation currents and Ca(2+) influx in rat cultured central neurons. Strikingly, both compounds induced BDNF-like neurite growth and neuroprotection, which were abolished by a knockdown or inhibition of TRPC3/TRPC6/TRPC7 in cultured neurons. Inhibitors of Ca(2+) signaling pathways, except calcineurin, impaired neurite outgrowth promotion induced by PPZ compounds. PPZ2 increased activation of the Ca(2+)-dependent transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein. These findings suggest that Ca(2+) signaling mediated by activation of DAG-activated TRPC channels underlies neurotrophic effects of PPZ compounds. Thus, piperazine-derived activators of DAG-activated TRPC channels provide important insights for future development of a

  5. BK channel activation by tungstate requires the β1 subunit extracellular loop residues essential to modulate voltage sensor function and channel gating.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mariño, Ana I; Valverde, Miguel A; Fernández-Fernández, José M

    2014-07-01

    Tungstate, a compound with antidiabetic, antiobesity, and antihypertensive properties, activates the large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) (BK) channel containing either β1 or β4 subunits. The BK activation by tungstate is Mg(2+)-dependent and promotes arterial vasodilation, but only in precontracted mouse arteries expressing β1. In this study, we further explored how the β1 subunit participates in tungstate activation of BK channels. Activation of heterologously expressed human BKαβ1 channels in inside-out patches is fully dependent on the Mg(2+) sensitivity of the BK α channel subunit even at high (10 μM) cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Alanine mutagenesis of β1 extracellular residues Y74 or S104, which destabilize the active voltage sensor, greatly decreased the tungstate-induced left-shift of the BKαβ1 G-V curves in either the absence or presence of physiologically relevant cytosolic Ca(2+) levels (10 μM). The weakened tungstate activation of the BKαβ1Y74A and BKαβ1S104A mutant channels was not related to decreased Mg(2+) sensitivity. These results, together with previously published reports, support the idea that the putative binding site for tungstate-mediated BK channel activation is located in the pore-forming α channel subunit, around the Mg(2+) binding site. The role of β1 in tungstate-induced channel activation seems to rely on its interaction with the BK α subunit to modulate channel activity. Loop residues that are essential for the regulation of voltage sensor activation and gating of the BK channel are also relevant for BK activation by tungstate. PMID:24158430

  6. Methyl p-hydroxybenzoate causes pain sensation through activation of TRPA1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, F; Moriyama, T; Higashi, T; Shima, A; Tominaga, M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Parabens are commonly added in pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food products because of their wide antibacterial properties, low toxicity, inertness and chemical stability, although the molecular mechanism of their antibacterial effect is not fully understood. Some agonists of the transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 channels are known to have strong antibacterial activities. Therefore, a series of experiments was conducted to find out the effects of parabens on TRP channels expressed in sensory neurons, particularly the TRPA1 channels. Experimental approach: Effects of parabens, especially of methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (methyl paraben) on TRP channel activities were examined using Ca2+-imaging and patch-clamp methods. In addition, an involvement of methyl paraben in the development of pain-related behavior in mice was investigated. Key results: Methyl paraben specifically activated TRPA1 in both HEK293 cells expressing TRPA1 and in mouse sensory neurons with an EC50 value of 4.4 mM, an attainable concentration in methyl paraben-containing products. Methyl paraben caused pain-related behavior in mice similar to that caused by allyl isothiocyanate, which was blocked by the TRP channel blocker, ruthenium red. Conclusions and implications: Our data indicate that methyl paraben is able to activate TRPA1 channels and can cause pain sensation. As such, methyl paraben provides a useful tool for investigating TRPA1 function and development of antinociceptive agents acting on TRPA1 channels. PMID:17351650

  7. Toward the rational design of constitutively active KCa3.1 mutant channels.

    PubMed

    Garneau, Line; Klein, Hélène; Parent, Lucie; Sauvé, Rémy

    2010-01-01

    The Ca²+ activated potassium channel of intermediate conductance KCa3.1 is now emerging as a therapeutic target for a large variety of health disorders. KCa3.1 is a tetrameric membrane protein with each subunit formed of six transmembrane helices (S1-S6). Ca²+ sensitivity is conferred by the Ca²+ binding protein calmodulin (CaM), with the CaM C-lobe constitutively bound to an intracellular domain of the channel C-terminus, located proximal to the membrane and connected to the S6 transmembrane segment. Patch clamp single channel recordings have demonstrated that binding of Ca²+ to CaM allows the channel to transit dose dependently from a nonconducting to an ion-conducting configuration. Here we present a general strategy to generate KCa3.1 mutant channels that remain in an ion-conducting state in the absence of Ca²+. Our strategy is first based on the production of a 3D model of the channel pore region, followed by SCAM experiments to confirm that residues along each of the channel S6 transmembrane helix form the channel pore lumen as predicted. In a simple model, constitutive activity can be obtained by removing the steric hindrances inside the channel pore susceptible to prevent ion flow when the channel is in the closed configuration. Using charged MTS reagents and Ag+ ions as probes acting on Cys residues engineered in the pore lumen, we found that the S6 transmembrane helices of KCa3.1 cannot form a pore constriction tight enough to prevent ion flow for channels in the closed state. These observations ruled out experimental strategies where constitutive activity would be generated by producing a "leaky" closed channel. A more successful approach consisted however in perturbing the channel open/closed state equilibrium free energy. In particular, we found that substituting the hydrophobic residue V282 in S6 by hydrophilic amino acids could lock the channel in an open-like state, resulting in channels that were ion conducting in the absence of Ca²+. PMID

  8. Differential distribution of the sodium-activated potassium channels slick and slack in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Sandra; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    The sodium-activated potassium channels Slick (Slo2.1, KCNT2) and Slack (Slo2.2, KCNT1) are high-conductance potassium channels of the Slo family. In neurons, Slick and Slack channels are involved in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization, in the regulation of firing patterns, and in setting and stabilizing the resting membrane potential. The distribution and subcellular localization of Slick and Slack channels in the mouse brain have not yet been established in detail. The present study addresses this issue through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Both channels were widely distributed and exhibited distinct distribution patterns. However, in some brain regions, their expression overlapped. Intense Slick channel immunoreactivity was observed in processes, varicosities, and neuronal cell bodies of the olfactory bulb, granular zones of cortical regions, hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septal nuclei, certain hypothalamic and midbrain nuclei, and several regions of the brainstem. The Slack channel showed primarily a diffuse immunostaining pattern, and labeling of cell somata and processes was observed only occasionally. The highest Slack channel expression was detected in the olfactory bulb, lateral septal nuclei, basal ganglia, and distinct areas of the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellar cortex. In addition, comparing our data obtained from mouse brain with a previously published study on rat brain revealed some differences in the expression and distribution of Slick and Slack channels in these species. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2093-2116, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26587966

  9. Control of Ca2+ Influx and Calmodulin Activation by SK-Channels in Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Thom; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    The key trigger for Hebbian synaptic plasticity is influx of Ca2+ into postsynaptic dendritic spines. The magnitude of [Ca2+] increase caused by NMDA-receptor (NMDAR) and voltage-gated Ca2+ -channel (VGCC) activation is thought to determine both the amplitude and direction of synaptic plasticity by differential activation of Ca2+ -sensitive enzymes such as calmodulin. Ca2+ influx is negatively regulated by Ca2+ -activated K+ channels (SK-channels) which are in turn inhibited by neuromodulators such as acetylcholine. However, the precise mechanisms by which SK-channels control the induction of synaptic plasticity remain unclear. Using a 3-dimensional model of Ca2+ and calmodulin dynamics within an idealised, but biophysically-plausible, dendritic spine, we show that SK-channels regulate calmodulin activation specifically during neuron-firing patterns associated with induction of spike timing-dependent plasticity. SK-channel activation and the subsequent reduction in Ca2+ influx through NMDARs and L-type VGCCs results in an order of magnitude decrease in calmodulin (CaM) activation, providing a mechanism for the effective gating of synaptic plasticity induction. This provides a common mechanism for the regulation of synaptic plasticity by neuromodulators. PMID:27232631

  10. Paradoxical contribution of SK3 and GIRK channels to the activation of mouse vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Kim, SangSeong; Ma, Limei; Jensen, Kristi L; Kim, Michelle M; Bond, Chris T; Adelman, John P; Yu, C Ron

    2012-09-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is essential for intraspecies communication in many terrestrial vertebrates. The ionic mechanisms of VNO activation remain unclear. We found that the calcium-activated potassium channel SK3 and the G protein-activated potassium channel GIRK are part of an independent pathway for VNO activation. In slice preparations, the potassium channels attenuated inward currents carried by TRPC2 and calcium-activated chloride channels (CACCs). In intact tissue preparations, paradoxically, the potassium channels enhanced urine-evoked inward currents. This discrepancy resulted from the loss of a high concentration of lumenal potassium, which enabled the influx of potassium ions to depolarize the VNO neurons in vivo. Both Sk3 (also known as Kcnn3) and Girk1 (also known as Kcnj3) homozygous null mice showed deficits in mating and aggressive behaviors, and the deficiencies in Sk3(-/-) mice were exacerbated by Trpc2 knockout. Our results suggest that VNO activation is mediated by TRPC2, CACCs and two potassium channels, all of which contributed to the in vivo depolarization of VNO neurons. PMID:22842147