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Sample records for characterizing co2 seepage

  1. The role of optimality in characterizing CO2 seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-09-15

    Storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep geological formations for greenhouse gas mitigation is gaining momentum and moving from its conceptual and testing stages towards widespread application. In this work we explore various optimization strategies for characterizing surface leakage (seepage) using near-surface measurement approaches such as accumulation chambers and eddy covariance towers. Seepage characterization objectives and limitations need to be defined carefully from the outset especially in light of large natural background variations that can mask seepage. The cost and sensitivity of seepage detection are related to four critical length scales pertaining to the size of the: (1) region that needs to be monitored; (2) footprint of the measurement approach, and (3) main seepage zone; and (4) region in which concentrations or fluxes are influenced by seepage. Seepage characterization objectives may include one or all of the tasks of detecting, locating, and quantifying seepage. Each of these tasks has its own optimal strategy. Detecting and locating seepage in a region in which there is no expected or preferred location for seepage nor existing evidence for seepage requires monitoring on a fixed grid, e.g., using eddy covariance towers. The fixed-grid approaches needed to detect seepage are expected to require large numbers of eddy covariance towers for large-scale geologic CO{sub 2} storage. Once seepage has been detected and roughly located, seepage zones and features can be optimally pinpointed through a dynamic search strategy, e.g., employing accumulation chambers and/or soil-gas sampling. Quantification of seepage rates can be done through measurements on a localized fixed grid once the seepage is pinpointed. Background measurements are essential for seepage detection in natural ecosystems. Artificial neural networks are considered as regression models useful for distinguishing natural system behavior from anomalous behavior

  2. Modeling of Near-Surface Leakage and Seepage of CO2 for Risk Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre A.J.

    2004-02-18

    The injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into deep geologic carbon sequestration sites entails risk that CO2 will leak away from the primary storage formation and migrate upwards to the unsaturated zone from which it can seep out of the ground. We have developed a coupled modeling framework called T2CA for simulating CO2 leakage and seepage in the subsurface and in the atmospheric surface layer. The results of model simulations can be used to calculate the two key health, safety, and environmental (HSE) risk drivers, namely CO2 seepage flux and nearsurface CO2 concentrations. Sensitivity studies for a subsurface system with a thick unsaturated zone show limited leakage attenuation resulting in correspondingly large CO2 concentrations in the shallow subsurface. Large CO2 concentrations in the shallow subsurface present a risk to plant and tree roots, and to humans and other animals in subsurface structures such as basements or utility vaults. Whereas CO2 concentrations in the subsurface can be high, surfacelayer winds reduce CO2 concentrations to low levels for the fluxes investigated. We recommend more verification and case studies be carried out with T2CA, along with the development of extensions to handle additional scenarios such as calm conditions, topographic effects, and catastrophic surface-layer discharge events.

  3. On Leakage andSeepage of CO2 from Geologic Storage Sites intoSurface Water

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.

    2005-10-14

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture ofanthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) and its storage in deep geologicformations. The processes of CO2 seepage into surface water aftermigration through water-saturated sediments are reviewed. Natural CO2 andCH4 fluxes are pervasive in surface-water environments and are goodanalogues to potential leakage and seepage of CO2. Buoyancy-driven bubblerise in surface water reaches a maximum velocity of approximately 30 cms-1. CO2 rise in saturated porous media tends to occur as channel flowrather than bubble flow. A comparison of ebullition versus dispersive gastransport for CO2 and CH4 shows that bubble flow will dominate overdispersion in surface water. Gaseous CO2 solubility in variable-salinitywaters decreases as pressure decreases leading to greater likelihood ofebullition and bubble flow in surface water as CO2 migratesupward.

  4. An Experimental Study of Effects in Soils by Potential CO2 Seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Caramanna, G.; Nathanail, P.; Steven, M.; Maroto-Valer, M.

    2011-12-01

    Potential CO2 seepage during a CCS project will not only reduce its performing efficiency, but can also impact the local environment. Though scientists announce with confidence that CCS is a safe technology to store CO2 deep underground, it is essential to study the effects of CO2 seepage, to avoid any possible influences on soils. As a simplified environment, laboratory experiments can easily be controlled and vital to be studied to be compared with more complex natural analogues and modelling works. Recent research focuses on the effects on ecosystems of CO2 leakage. However, the impacts of long-term, low level exposure for both surface and subsurface ecosystems, as well as soil geochemistry changes are currently not clear. Moreover, previous work has focussed on pure CO2 leakage only and its impacts on the ecosystem. However, in a more realistic scenario the gas coming from a capture process may contain impurities, such as SO2, which are more dangerous than pure CO2 and could cause more severe consequences. Therefore, it is critical to assess the potential additional risks caused by CO2 leakage with impurities. Accordingly, both a batch and a continuous flow reactor were designed and used to study potential impacts caused by the CO2 seepage, focusing on soil geochemistry changes, due to different concentrations of CO2/SO2 mixtures. Stage 1- Batch experiments. In this stage, a soil sample was collected from the field and exposed to a controlled CO2/SO2 gas mixtures (100% CO2 and CO2:SO2=99:1). The water soluble fractions were measured before and after incubation. With 100% CO2 incubation it was found that: 1) the pH in the soil sample did not change significantly; 2) for soils with different moisture levels, greater moisture in the soil results in higher CO2 uptake during incubation; and 3) for sandy soils, small changes in CaCl2-exchangeable metal concentration, were observed after CO2 incubation. However, the increased concentration of toxic elements is still

  5. Using Subsurface CO2 Concentrations and Isotopologues to Identify CO2 Seepage from CCS/CO2-EOR Projects: A Signal-to-Noise Based Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickerson, N. R.; Risk, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    In order to fulfill a role in demonstrating containment, surface monitoring for Carbon Capture and Geologic Storage (CCS) sites must be able to clearly discriminate between natural, and leakage-source CO2. The CCS community lacks a clear metric for quantifying the degree of discrimination, for successful inter-comparison of monitoring approaches. This study illustrates the utility of Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) to compare the relative performance of three commonly used soil gas monitoring approaches, including bulk CO2, δ13CO2, and Δ14CO2. For inter-comparisons, we used a simulated northern temperate landscape similar to that of Weyburn, Saskatchewan (home of the IEAGHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project), in which realistic spatial and temporal CO2 and isotopic variation is simulated for periods of one year or more. Results indicate, that, for this particular ecosystem, Δ14C signatures have the best overall SNR at all simulated seepage rates, and for all points across the synthetic landscape. We then apply this same SNR based approach to data collected during a 6-month sampling campaign at three locations on the Weyburn oil field. This study emphasizes both the importance of developing clear metrics for monitoring performance, and the benefit of modeling for decision support in CCS monitoring design.

  6. Testing surface gas monitoring methods at sites of natural and man-made CO2 seepage in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Lister, R.; Barkwith, A.; Barlow, T.; Shaw, R.; Strutt, M.; Lombardi, S.; Beaubien, S.; Annunziatellis, A.; Graziani, S.

    2011-12-01

    Useful lessons for monitoring techniques and strategies can be learned at natural CO2 seepage sites. Existing methods and new developments can be tested at such sites to assess how useful they would be at geological CO2 storage sites. Such testing is not possible at actual storage sites where there is no leakage. Experience has been gained at the natural CO2 seepage sites near Latera in Italy, the Laacher See in Germany and Florina in Greece. Studies have also been carried out at experimental CO2 injection sites in the UK and Norway and at landfill sites in the UK. The sites have been used as a testing ground for existing and new techniques including open path lasers, eddy covariance, CO2 monitoring stations, flux chambers and in situ and laboratory soil gas analysis. Natural CO2 seepage at the sites tends to occur at gas vents of restricted surface extent. Typically such vents have a diameter of metres to tens of metres. Whilst the vents may align along faults or fractures they occur at small discrete points on such features where permeability is higher. These appear commonly to be associated with fracture intersections. Venting therefore occurs over only a small fraction of the total area of the sites. By analogy this suggests that a surface monitoring strategy for a CO2 storage site needs to include cost effective screening methods that can cover large areas quickly but which are capable of finding small leakage targets. Soil gas concentrations and fluxes vary with time in response to factors such as temperature, pressure, wind speed and soil moisture. This gives rise to diurnal, seasonal and weather system related cycles. Seepage of CO2 can therefore vary over time and this implies the need for continuous monitoring techniques to avoid missing transient releases. Developing legislation for CO2 storage sites (such as the European Union Storage Directive) also requires the quantification of any detected CO2 leakage and this will require an understanding of

  7. Development of monitoring techniques for potential seepage of CO2 from sub-seafloor storage sites: Field studies at Sleipner, North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. H.; Connelly, D. P.; Bull, J. M.; Lichtschlag, A.; Cevatoglu, M.; Le Bas, T.; Wright, I. C.

    2012-12-01

    Although CO2 has been stored at the Sleipner site in the North Sea for over 15 years, and a number of other sub-seafloor storage sites are now either in operation or planned, almost nothing is known about the effect of potential seepage on marine ecosystems. To address this, we will undertake a comprehensive field campaign to Sleipner (RRS James Cook Cruise 77) in September 2012 that aims to: (i) Constrain the potential pathways of seepage from the storage site. (ii) Test methods for the detection of seepage, including formation fluids, natural gas and CO2, as it passes through the sedimentary overburden and into the water column. (iii) Develop a monitoring strategy suitable for all offshore carbon capture and storage projects. To this end, we will conduct an extensive AUV survey in the vicinity of the sub-seafloor CO2 plume, using our novel, long-range AUTOSUB system. AUTOSUB will be equipped with a variety of instrumentation, including sidescan sonar and an EM2000 multibeam systems, as well as a CHIRP profiler capable of inspecting the architecture of the sedimentary overburden at unprecedented spatial resolution. Other instrumentation will include a series of sensors (including a pH sensor), to detect and monitor the dispersion of potential seepage, and a new colour camera. Areas of interest, revealed by the AUV surveys, will be inspected and sampled using a hybrid remotely operated vehicle, equipped with high resolution video cameras, a grab sampling device, and instrumentation for the collection of precisely-located water samples. Further water samples will be collected using the ship-based CTD system. Fluid and gas seeps will be sampled using a vibrocoring system, and analyses of the porefluid chemistry will be used to quantify fluxes across the sediment-seawater interface, and the source, transformation, and fate of dissolved constituents. Longer-term monitoring will be addressed by deployment of a seafloor lander, that is equipped with a flow meter, a

  8. Characterizing CO2 storage reservoir for above-zone monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, K. M.; Hovorka, S. D.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) provides an excellent opportunity for commercial sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Fluvial, strand plain, and deltaic sandstones of Oligocene and Miocene formations that extend across the Gulf Coast Basin were prolific oil producers for many decades and are also considered to be effective reservoirs for large scale carbon storage. A deep-seated salt dome, faulted anticlinal structure from Gulf coastal region is currently under investigation to develop a monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) plan as coordinated with commercial surveillance of an EOR site for injecting large volume (>1 Million ton/year) of CO2. Geophysical logs have been used to characterize the injection zone reservoir and overburden. One novel MVA element in design is above-zone pressure and geochemical monitoring for out-of-zone migration. Initial characterization with wireline logs demonstrates the extent and areal continuity of reservoir sands and geometries of faults that cut the reservoir. To develop the monitoring plan, we focus characterization on several elements: (1) input data for quick-look dynamic model of the extent of CO2 plume and amount and extent of accompanying pressure elevation, (2) characterization of the zones above the top-reservoir seal for above-zone pressure monitoring, and (3) intersection of faults with well-bores in intervals above the top-reservoir seal for thermal monitoring. Other uncertainties addressed during characterization are the upper extent of faults and juxtaposition of layers to assess the potential for cross-fault fluid migration. Such detail characterization will allow realistic assessment of the sensitivity of monitoring techniques such as temperature logging for tracking up-fault fluid migration and pressure change for out-of zone fluid migration. Successful use of such geophysical techniques for MVA based on uniting elements of existing regulatory monitoring expectations with commercial best practices will be

  9. Characterization of CO2 leakage into the freshwater body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashok; Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Shao, Habing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2013-04-01

    Current research into Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is dominated by improving the CO2 storage capacity. However, potential leakage of CO2 can cause environmental problems, particularly if freshwater resources are nearby. In this regards, it is important to understand the chemistry of CO2 and the water system. CO2 leakage across the fluid interface (CO2 and water) is controlled by the difference in the partial pressure of CO2 in the storage and in the freshwater body. Once the CO2 is in solution, it equilibrates with the bicarbonate and carbonate ions. According to Millero (1994)such a system can be characterized by two parameters out of the four: total alkalinity (TA), total carbonate (TCO2), fugacity of CO2(fCO2) and pH. In the present modeling study, we are interested in the (i) CO2 leakage into a freshwater body (while injecting CO2 for storage) through an inclined fracture and (ii) characterization of the system by measuring fugacity of CO2 and pH. According to work presented by Singh et al. (2012), about 31% of injected CO2 leaks into the freshwater body. Solubility of CO2 in water follows Henry's law, while the Henry constant, K0 is calculated by an empirical relation developed by Murray and Riley (1971), which is a function of salinity and temperature. According to our results, pH and fugacity both appear to be a linear function of temperature. To simulate the discussed problem, a corresponding numerical module has been developed for multi-component fluid flow coupled with heat and mass transport processes. Governing equations and Volume Translated Peng-Robinson equations of state are implemented within the object-oriented finite element code OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012; www.opengeosys.org). Primary variables are pressure, temperature and salinity which are obtained by solving the governing equations in a monolithic way The governing equations are discretized spatially within the context of a Galerkin approach, whereas the temporal

  10. Characterization of CO2 reservoir rock in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Stefano; Madonna, Claudio; Zappone, Alba

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) are one of the key drivers regarding global climate change (IPCC, 2007). Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is one valuable technology to mitigate current climate change with an immediate impact. The IPCC special report on CCS predicted a potential capture range of 4.7 to 37.5 Gt of CO2 by 2050. Among several countries, Switzerland has started to investigate its potential for CO2 storage (Chevalier et al., 2010) and is currently performing research on the characterization of the most promising reservoir/seal rocks for CO2 sequestration. For Switzerland, the most feasible option is to store CO2 in saline aquifers, sealed by impermeable formations. One aquifer of regional scale in the Swiss Molasse Basin is a carbonate sequence consisting of reworked shallow marine limestones and accumulations of shell fragments. The upper part of the formation presents the most promising permeability values and storage properties. The storage potential has been estimated of 706 Mt of CO2, based on the specific ranking scheme proposed by Chevalier et al. 2010. In this study, key parameters such as porosity, permeability and acoustic velocities in compressional and shear mode have been measured in laboratory at pressures and temperatures simulating in situ conditions. Reservoir rock samples have been investigated. Permeability has been estimated before and after CO2 injection in supercritical state. The simulation of typical reservoir conditions allows us to go one step further towards a significant evaluation of the reservoir's true capacities for CO2 sequestration. It seems of major importance to notice that the permeability crucially depends on confining pressure, temperature and pore pressure conditions of the sample. Especially at in situ conditions with CO2 being at supercritical state, a substantial loss in permeability have to be taken into consideration when it comes to the calculation of potential injection rates. The

  11. Synthesis and characterization of Co2FeAl nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Gyawali, Parshu; Forbes, Andrew; Pegg, Ian L.; Philip, John

    2012-06-01

    We report the growth and characterization of Co2FeAl nanowires. Nanowires are grown using electrospinning method and the diameters range from 50 to 500 nm. These nanowires exhibit cubic crystal structure with a lattice constant of a =5.639 Å. The nanowires exhibit ferromagnetic behavior with a very high Curie temperature. The temperature dependent magnetization behavior displays an anomaly in the temperature range 600-850 K, which disappears at higher external magnetic fields.

  12. Characterization of Co2FeAl nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Pegg, I. L.; Philip, J.

    2011-03-01

    Heusler alloy, Co 2 FeAl (CFA) is a potentially useful material in the field of spintronics due to its high spin polarization. The CFA nanowires are grown for the first time by the electrospinning method. The diameters of the wires formed are ranging from 80 -- 100 nm. The structural characterization of the nanowires is done using X-Ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The nanowires exhibit cubic structure with a lattice constant, a = 2.44 Å. Parallel arrays of nanowires are grown for magnetic characterization using electric field applied at the collector plate. The nanowires exhibit ferromagnetic behavior with a Curie temperature higher than 400 K. Nanoscale devices are fabricated with single CFA nanowire to understand the magnetotransport properties. This work has been supported by funding from NSF under CAREER Grant No. ECCS-0845501 and NSF-MRI, DMR-0922997.

  13. Characterization of seepage in the exploratory studies facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oliver, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Following a 5-month period of above-average precipitation during the winter of 2004-2005, water was observed seeping into the South Ramp section of the Exploratory Studies Facility of the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Samples of the seepage were collected and analyzed for major ions, trace metals, and delta deuterium and delta oxygen-18 values in an effort to characterize the water and assess the interaction of seepage with anthropogenic materials used in the construction of the proposed repository. As demonstrated by the changes in the chemistry of water dripping from a rock bolt, interaction of seepage with construction materials can alter solution chemistry and oxidation state.

  14. Characterizing submarine groundwater discharge: A seepage meter study in Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Holly A.; Lubetsky, Jonathan S.; Harvey, Charles F.

    2003-03-01

    A seepage meter study was performed in Waquoit Bay on Cape Cod, Massachusetts to characterize the amount, pattern, and origin of submarine groundwater discharge. Measurements from grids of 40 seepage meters provide a detailed representation of groundwater flux in both space and time. At the head of the bay, a distinct band of high, saline discharge was observed between 25 and 45 m from the shoreline. Slug tests indicated no pattern of permeability to explain the band of discharge, and the band was not observed offshore of an island where freshwater discharge is negligible. Experiments using clusters of seepage meters showed large variability in discharge at the meter scale and similar temporal variation throughout the domain, reflecting tidal influence primarily near shore. The small-scale variability challenges the assumption of locally homogeneous flow used in many models, and the band of discharge contradicts predictions that total outflow is largely fresh and decreases monotonically from shore.

  15. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-23

    Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and application of alkanolamidines and alkanolguanidines in CO(2) capture

    SciTech Connect

    Koech, Phillip K; Heldebrant, David J; Lee, Suh-Jane; Rainbolt, James E; Smurthwaite, Tricia D

    2011-03-01

    Global carbon dioxide (CO2) emission to the atmosphere is partly responsible for climate change. In order to mitigate these environmental effects CO2 capture and storage is required. Solvents currently used for this application are the energy intensive aqueous amines. Here we present the synthesis, characterization and CO2 uptake of new advanced solvents called alkanolamidines and alkanolguanidines otherwise known as CO2-binding organic Liquids (CO2BOLs). These solvents have been designed to have decreased vapor pressure and low viscosity in order to increase the CO2 uptake capacity while minimizing evaporative losses. Alkanolamidines were synthesized in 1-3 steps from commercially available materials. These compounds bind CO2 chemically via the alcohol moiety forming zwitterionic alkylcarbonates. The alkanolamidines can be regenerated thermally by heating the alkylcarbonate to 75 °C. CO2 binding capacities up to 10 wt% were achieved using these compounds. These compounds have the potential to be energy efficient CO2 capture solvents.

  17. Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-17

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM is developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA (see upcoming REV 02 of CRWMS M&O 2000 [153314]), which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model (see BSC 2003 [161530]). The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross Drift to obtain the permeability structure for the seepage model; (3) to use inverse modeling to calibrate the SCM and to estimate seepage-relevant, model-related parameters on the drift scale; (4) to estimate the epistemic uncertainty of the derived parameters, based on the goodness-of-fit to the observed data and the sensitivity of calculated seepage with respect to the parameters of interest; (5) to characterize the aleatory uncertainty of

  18. Enhanced lipid accumulation of photoautotrophic microalgae by high-dose CO2 mimics a heterotrophic characterization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhilan; Dou, Xiao; Wu, Jun; He, Bing; Wang, Yuancong; Chen, Yi-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae possess higher photosynthetic efficiency and accumulate more neutral lipids when supplied with high-dose CO2. However, the nature of lipid accumulation under conditions of elevated CO2 has not been fully elucidated so far. We now revealed that the enhanced lipid accumulation of Chlorella in high-dose CO2 was as efficient as under heterotrophic conditions and this may be attributed to the driving of enlarged carbon source. Both photoautotrophic and heterotrophic cultures were established by using Chlorella sorokiniana CS-1. A series of changes in the carbon fixation, lipid accumulation, energy conversion, and carbon-lipid conversion under high-dose CO2 (1-10%) treatment were characterized subsequently. The daily carbon fixation rate of C. sorokiniana LS-2 in 10% CO2 aeration was significantly increased compared with air CO2. Correspondingly, double oil content (28%) was observed in 10% CO2 aeration, close to 32.3% produced under heterotrophic conditions. In addition, with 10% CO2 aeration, the overall energy yield (Ψ) in Chlorella reached 12.4 from 7.3% (with air aeration) because of the enhanced daily carbon fixation rates. This treatment also improved the energetic lipid yield (Ylipid/Es) with 4.7-fold, tending to the heterotrophic parameters. More significantly, 2.2 times of carbon-lipid conversion efficiency (ηClipid/Ctotal, 42.4%) was observed in 10% CO2 aeration, towards to 53.7% in heterotrophic cultures, suggesting that more fixed carbon might flow into lipid synthesis under both 10% CO2 aeration and heterotrophic conditions. Taken together, all our evidence showed that 10% CO2 may push photoautotrophic Chlorella to display heterotrophic-like efficiency at least in lipid production. It might bring us an efficient model of lipid production based on microalgal cells with high-dose CO2, which is essential to sustain biodiesel production at large scales. PMID:26712624

  19. Characterization of CO2 and mixed methane/CO2 hydrates intercalated in smectites by means of atomistic calculations.

    PubMed

    Martos-Villa, Rubén; Mata, M Pilar; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio

    2014-04-01

    The recent increase in anthropogenic CO2 gas released to the atmosphere and its contribution to global warming make necessary to investigate new ways of CO2 storage. Injecting CO2 into subsurface CH4 hydrate reservoirs would displace some of the CH4 in the hydrate crystal lattice, converting simple CH4 hydrates into either simple CO2 hydrates or mixed CH4CO2 hydrates. Molecular simulations were performed to determine the structure and behavior of CO2 and mixed hydrate complexes in the interlayer of Na-rich montmorillonite and beidellite smectite. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations used NPT ensembles in a 4×4×1 supercell comprised of montmorillonite or beidellite with CO2 or mixed CH4/CO2 hydrate complexes in the interlayer. The smectite 2:1 layer surface helps provide a stabilizing influence on the formation of gas hydrate complexes. The type of smectite affects the stability of the smectite-hydrate complexes, where high charge located on the tetrahedral layer of the smectites disfavor the formation of hydrate complexes. PMID:24569124

  20. Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data

    SciTech Connect

    S. Finsterle

    2004-09-02

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM was developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). This Model Report has been revised in response to a comprehensive, regulatory-focused evaluation performed by the Regulatory Integration Team [''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Evaluation of Analysis and Model Reports Supporting the TSPA-LA'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169653])]. The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross-Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA [''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167652])], which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model [see ''Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170338])]. The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross-Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross-Drift to obtain the permeability structure for the seepage model

  1. Preparation and characterization of aminated graphite oxide for CO2 capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunxia; Ding, Huiling; Zhong, Qin

    2012-03-01

    Adsorption with solid sorbents is one of the most promising options for postcombustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. In this study, aminated graphite oxide used for CO2 adsorption was synthesized, based on the intercalation reaction of graphite oxide (GO) with amines, including ethylenediamine (EDA), diethylenetriamine (DETA) and triethylene tetramine (TETA). The structural information, surface chemistry and thermal behavior of the adsorbent samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), elemental analysis, particle size analysis, nitrogen adsorption as well as differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (DSC-TGA). CO2 capture was investigated by dynamic adsorption experiments with N2sbnd CO2 mixed gases at 30 °C. The three kinds of graphite oxide samples modified by excess EDA, DETA and TETA showed similar adsorption behaviors seen from their breakthrough curves. Among them, the sample aminated by EDA exhibited the highest adsorption capacity with the longest breakthrough time of CO2. Before saturation, its adsorption capacity was up to 53.62 mg CO2/g sample. In addition, graphite oxide samples modified by different amount of EDA (EDA/GO raw ratio 10 wt%, 50 wt% and 100 wt%) were prepared in the ethanol. Their CO2 adsorption performance was investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that graphite oxide with 50 wt% EDA had the largest adsorption capacity 46.55 mg CO2/g sample.

  2. Characterization of CO2 behavior on rutile TiO2 (110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Yeohoon

    2013-06-03

    The dynamic behavior of carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbed on the rutile TiO2 (110) surface is studied by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) and combined ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD). Understanding he behavior of CO2 is important regarding possible applications for treating CO2 in current environmental problems along with the consideration as a renewable energy source. Concerning the ability as a redusible support of TiO2 surface, a fundamental understanding of the interaction between CO2 and TiO2 surface will help extending the possibile applications. In the current study, CO2 interaction and dynamics behavior on the TiO2 surface is characterized including he effect of the oxygen vacancy (OV) defect. Also the coverage dependence of CO2 behavior is investigated since more contribution of the intermolecular interaction among CO2 molecules can be expected as the coverage increasing. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosicences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. A portion of the research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  3. Spatial and temporal characterization of CO2 storage sites using magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, J.; Queralt, P.; Marcuello, A.; Roca, E.; Rubinat, M.

    2009-04-01

    Integration of different geophysical, geological and geochemical methods will play a key role for the spatial and temporal characterization of underground CO2 storage sites. Among the geophysical techniques the magnetotelluric method (MT) may help on both, site characterization and monitoring of the CO2 plume, mainly on deep saline reservoirs. In this work we present the characterization of a salt diapir in southern Spain using MT data. This diaper does not satisfy the conditions to be a future reservoir due to the absence of a good lithological seal, but can be use as a natural analog to determine the validity of different geophysical methods. In total 34 MT sites were acquired along a 15 km profile. Once the data has been analyzed, inverted and integrated with surface geological data a simulated investigation for monitoring the CO2 has been carried out. In this simulation the CO2 has been located at the base of the Jurassic to Turonnian carbonates and marls increasing the resistivity of the model. Several tests varying the resistivity and the amount of the CO2 as well as the number of MT sites used will be show.

  4. Utilizing geophysical methods for asessment and characterization of canal seepage in El Paso's lower valley irrigation delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegon, Amanda Brooke

    El Paso County Water Improvement District No. 1 (EPCWID No.1) delivers the Rio Grande water for agricultural production and urban uses through numerous networked irrigation canals. Of the nearly 86 billion gallons of water released annually for irrigation uses in Texas, billions are lost due to evaporation and seepage in unlined canals with 56 million gallons of the billions are lost in Franklin Canal annually due to improper lining and sediment variation of the canals. To characterize seepage patterns and identify areas of high seepage, Electrical Resistivity, Ground Truthing via soil sample analysis were used along three, half-mile long sectioned canals during irrigation and non-irrigation seasons. The data lines acquired were processed in EARTHIMAGER 2D to create 2D vertical resistivity inversion profiles to locate potential areas of high seepage/high resistivity. The research results will help El Paso County Water Improvement District No. 1 to develop management strategies to conserve water and improve the delivery efficiency systems which leads to economic growth in the Rio Grande Basin.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of MOF-aminated graphite oxide composites for CO2 capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunxia; Ding, Huiling; Zhong, Qin

    2013-11-01

    A kind of metal-organic frameworks (MOF-5) and aminated graphite oxide (AGO) composites were prepared for CO2 capture to mitigate global warming. MOF-5, MOF-5/GO (composite of MOF-5 and graphite oxide) and MOF-5/AGO samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), nitrogen adsorption as well as thermogravimetric analysis to figure out their chemistry and structure information. Three types of samples with suitable specific surface area and pore diameter were chosen to test CO2 adsorption performance and stability under humidity conditions. The results indicate that high surface area and pore volume, pore similar in size to the size of gas adsorbate, and extra reactive sites modified in the composites contributes to the high CO2 capacity. Besides, the composites involved by GO or AGO show better anti-moisture performance than the parent MOF.

  6. Large-scale characterization of geologic formations for CO2 injection using Compressed State Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinaki, A.; Li, J. Y.; Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in deep geologic formations is gaining ground as a potential measure for climate change mitigation. Such storage projects typically operate at large scales (~km), but their performance is often governed by smaller-scale (~m) heterogeneities. The large domain sizes prohibit detailed site characterization and dense monitoring networks, leading to predictions of CO2 migration and trapping based on rough geologic models that cannot capture preferential flow. Kalman Filtering can be used to improve these prior models by assimilating available monitoring data, thereby tracking system performance and reducing prediction uncertainty. However, for large systems with fine discretization, the number of unknowns is in the order of tens of thousands or more, in which case the textbook version of the Kalman Filter has prohibitively expensive computation and storage costs. We present the Compressed State Kalman Filter (CSKF) that can be effectively used for systems with a large number of unknowns to estimate the underlying heterogeneity and to predict the state of interest (e.g., pressure and CO2 saturation). The algorithm's computational efficiency is achieved by using a low-rank approximation of the covariance matrix, as well as a Jacobian-free approach. We demonstrate the estimation and computational performance of our method in a typical CO2 storage scenario with a spatially sparse monitoring network, but with multiple datasets obtained before and during CO2 injection. Our data assimilation framework provides an efficient and practical way to characterize geological formations intended for CO2 injection and storage using monitoring data commonly collected in field applications, as well as to quantify the reduction in uncertainty brought by different types of monitoring data.

  7. Rapid detection and characterization of surface CO2 leakage through the real-time measurement of δ13C signatures in CO2 flux from the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krevor, S.; Perrin, J.; Esposito, A.; Rella, C.; Benson, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    A portable stable carbon isotope ratio analyzer for carbon dioxide, based on wavelength scanned cavity ringdown spectroscopy, has been used to detect and characterize an intentional leakage of CO2 from an underground pipeline at the ZERT experimental facility in Bozeman, Montana. Rapid (~1 hour) walking surveys of the entire 100m x 100m site were collected using this mobile, real-time instrument. The resulting concentration and 13C isotopic abundance maps were processed using simple yet powerful analysis techniques, permitting not only the identification of specific leakage locations, but providing the ability to distinguish petrogenic sources of CO2 from biogenic sources. At the site an approximately 100-meter horizontal well has been drilled below an alfalfa field at a depth between 1-3 meters below the surface. The well has perforations along the central 70 meters of the well. The overlying strata are highly permeable sand, silt, and topsoil. The flora consists generally of long grasses and was cut to a height of less than 6 inches before the start of the experiment. For 30 days starting July 15, 2009, CO2 was injected at a rate of 0.2 tonnes per day. The injection rate is designed to simulate leakage from a mature storage reservoir at an annual rate of between .001 and .01%. The isotopic composition of the gas from the tank is at δ13C signature of approximately -52‰, far more negative than either atmospheric (approx. -8‰) or CO2 from soil respiration (approx. -26‰) at the site. The CO2 isotopic and concentration measurements were taken with a Picarro WS-CRDS analyzer with 1/8” tubing connected to a sampling inlet. Simultaneous with CO2 concentrations (including 13C), position data was logged using a GPS receiver. Datapoints are taken around every second. The analyzer was powered using batteries and housed in a conventional garden cart. The surveys consisted of traverses of the site along the length of the pipeline and extending out 100 meters on either

  8. CO2 Field Laboratory at Svelvik Ridge: Site characterization after the first injection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddensiek, M. L.; Lindeberg, E.; Mørk, A.; Jones, D.; Girard, J. F.; Kuras, O.; Barrio, M.; Royse, K.; Gal, F.; Meldrum, P.; Pezard, P.; Levannier, A.; Desroches, J.; Neyens, D.; Paris, J.; Henry, G.; Bakk, A.; Wertz, F.; Aker, E.; Børresen, M.

    2012-04-01

    The safety and acceptance of CO2 storage will depend on the ability to detect and quantify CO2 within and outside the storage complex. To determine sensitivity of CO2 monitoring systems with respect to CO2 distribution and leakage detection, the CO2 Field Lab project comprises two controlled CO2 injection tests in the shallow (100-300 m) and very shallow (20 m) subsurface of the glacial deposit that forms Svelvik ridge, 50 km south of Oslo. The CO2 displacement in the subsurface and at the surface has and will be monitored with an exhaustive set of techniques. Iteratively, observations and flow modeling will provide frequent updates of the CO2 distribution. The results will be upscaled to assess monitoring systems and requirements with the ultimate objective to provide guidelines to regulators, operators and technology providers for monitoring systems. The formation that comprises the laboratory is a glaciofluvial-glaciomarine terminal deposit formed during the Ski stage of the Holocene deglaciation. Nearby outcrops show that the formation is channeled and variably laminated with a significant variation in grain size and structure. Prior to the injection experiments, the site was characterized including 2D seismic and electric surveys, the drilling, logging and sampling of a 330 m deep appraisal well, core and flow line sample analyses, ground penetrating radar (GPR), a hydrodynamic appraisal, and geochemical and soil gas baseline surveys. These data were used to populate a geomodel. Flow modeling of the plume development included some variability in permeability and anisotropy, and various injection scenarios. Accordingly, the 20 m injection experiment was conducted in fall 2011 with a monitoring plan designed to spatially and temporally monitor the expected plume development. The monitoring equipment was thus distributed around the 20 m deep injection point of an inclined well. It included seven 6 m deep monitoring wells equipped with resistivity, sonic and

  9. Rapid detection and characterization of surface CO2 leakage through the real-time measurement of δ13C signatures in CO2 flux from the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krevor, Samuel; Benson, Sally; Rella, Chris; Perrin, Jean-Christophe; Esposito, Ariel; Crosson, Eric

    2010-05-01

    characterize an intentional leakage of CO2 from an underground pipeline at the ZERT experimental facility in Bozeman, Montana. Rapid ( 1 hour) walking surveys of the entire 100m x 100m site were collected using this mobile, real-time instrument. The resulting concentration and 13C isotopic abundance maps were processed using simple yet powerful analysis techniques, permitting not only the identification of specific leakage locations, but providing the ability to distinguish petrogenic sources of CO2 from biogenic sources. At the site an approximately 100-meter horizontal well has been drilled below an alfalfa field at a depth between 1-3 meters below the surface. The well has perforations along the central 70 meters of the well. The overlying strata are highly permeable sand, silt, and topsoil. For 30 days starting July 15, 2009, CO2 was injected at a rate of 0.2 tonnes per day. The injection rate is designed to simulate leakage from a mature storage reservoir at an annual rate of between .001 and .01%. The isotopic composition of the gas from the tank is at δ13C signature of approximately -52 parts per thousand (per mil), far more negative than either atmospheric (approx. -8 per mil) or CO2 from soil respiration (approx. -26 per mil) at the site. The CO2 isotopic and concentration measurements were taken with a Picarro WS-CRDS analyzer with 1/8' tubing connected to a sampling inlet. Simultaneous with CO2 concentrations (including 13C), position data was logged using a GPS receiver. Datapoints are taken around every second. The analyzer was powered using batteries and housed in a mobile cart. The surveys consisted of traverses of the site along the length of the pipeline and extending out 100 meters on either side of the pipeline with the end of the gas inlet tube approximate 9 cm above the ground at a speed of 1-2m/sec. This simulates the type of survey that could be easily performed if the actual or potential site of a leak was known to within an area on the order of 100

  10. Site Characterization for CO2 Geologic Storage and Vice Versa -The Frio Brine Pilot as a Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-02-14

    Careful site characterization is critical for successfulgeologic sequestration of CO2, especially for sequestration inbrine-bearing formations that have not been previously used for otherpurposes. Traditional site characterization techniques such asgeophysical imaging, well logging, core analyses, interference welltesting, and tracer testing are all valuable. However, the injection andmonitoring of CO2 itself provides a wealth of additional information.Rather than considering a rigid chronology in which CO2 sequestrationoccurs only after site characterization is complete, we recommend thatCO2 injection and monitoring be an integral part of thesite-characterization process. The advantages of this approach arenumerous. The obvious benefit of CO2 injection is to provide informationon multi-phase flow properties, which cannot be obtained from traditionalsitecharacterization techniques that examine single-phase conditions.Additionally, the low density and viscosity of CO2 compared to brinecauses the two components to flow through the subsurface differently,potentially revealing distinct features of the geology. Finally, tounderstand sequestered CO2 behavior in the subsurface, there is nosubstitute for studying the movement of CO2 directly. Making CO2injection part of site characterization has practical benefits as well.The infrastructure for surface handling of CO2 (compression, heating,local storage) can be developed, the CO2 injection process can bedebugged, and monitoring techniques can be field-tested. Prior to actualsequestration, small amounts of CO2 may be trucked in. Later, monitoringaccompanying the actual sequestration operations may be used tocontinually refine and improve understanding of CO2 behavior in thesubsurface.

  11. Gilbert damping parameter characterization in perpendicular magnetized Co2FeAl films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yishen; Lu, Jiwei; Khodadadi, Behrouz; Schäfer, Sebastian; Mewes, Tim; Wolf, Stuart

    2013-03-01

    Materials with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy(PMA) have gotten extensive recent attention because of their potential application in spintronic devices such as spin transfer torque random access memory (STT-RAM). It was shown that a much lower switching current density(JC) is required to write STT-RAM tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy ferromagnetic electrodes (p-MTJ). Additionally Heusler alloy Co2FeAl is expected to further reduce JC due to its ultra low Gilbert damping parameter. In our study, Heusler alloy Co2FeAl films were prepared using a Biased Target Ion Beam Deposition (BTIBD) technique. We demonstrated a low Gilbert damping parameter achieved in thick B2-Co2FeAl films. Besides, we achieved an interfacial PMA in ultra thin Co2FeAl films by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) with no external field presented. Annealing conditions were carefully adjusted to maximize the interfacial PMA. However it was noticed that a higher annealing temperature was required for a low damping parameter which to some extent sacrificed the interfacial PMA. We also deposited ultra thin CoFeB films and characterized their damping parameters for comparison. We acknowledge the financial support from DARPA.

  12. Characterization of a novel dissolved CO2 sensor for utilization in environmental monitoring and aquaculture industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, K.; Jesus, João. M.; Gouveia, C.; Domingues, Jorge O.; Markovics, A.; Baptista, J. M.; Kovacs, B.; Pereira, Carlos M.; Borges, Maria-Teresa; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2013-11-01

    A novel optical fiber sensor is presented for measuring dissolved CO2 for water quality monitoring applications, where the optical signal is based either on refractive index changes or on color change. The sensing chemistry is based on the acid-basic equilibrium of 4-nitrophenol, that is converted into the anionic form by addition quaternary ammonium hydroxide. The CO2 sensitive layer was characterized and tested by using simple absorbance/reflectance measurement setups where the sensor was connected to a fiber optic CCD spectrometer. A prototype simulating a real shallow raceway aquaculture system was developed and its hydraulic behavior characterized. A commercially available partial-pressure- NDIR sensor was used as a reference for dissolved CO2 tests with the new optical fiber sensor under development. Preliminary tests allowed verifying the suitability of the new optical sensor for accurately tracking the dissolved carbon dioxide concentration in a suitable operation range. Direct comparison of the new sensor and the reference sensor system allowed to demonstrate the suitability of the new technology but also to identify some fragilities there are presently being addressed.

  13. Synthesis, fine structural characterization, and CO2 adsorption capacity of metal organic frameworks-74.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Abhijit Krishna; Lin, Kuen-Song

    2014-04-01

    Two metal organic frameworks of MOF-74 group (zinc and copper-based) were successfully synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for CO2 adsorption. The both samples such as MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) were characterized with FE-SEM for morphology and particle size, XRD patterns for phase structure, FTIR for organic functional groups, nitrogen adsorption for pore textural properties, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for fine structural parameters and oxidation states of central metal atoms. CO2 adsorption isotherms of MOF-74 samples were measured in a volumetric adsorption unit at 273 K and pressure up to 1.1 bar. The MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) adsorbents have the pore widths of 8.58 and 8.04 angstroms with the BET specific surface areas of 1,474 and 1,345 m2 g(-1), respectively. CO2 adsorption capacities of MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) were 4.10 and 3.38 mmol x g(-1), respectively measured at 273 K and 1.1 bar. The oxidation state of central atoms in MOF-74(Zn) was Zn(II) confirmed by XANES spectra while MOF-74(Cu) was composed of Cu(I) and Cu(II) central atoms. The bond distances of Zn--O and Cu--O were 1.98 and 1.94 angstroms, respectively. PMID:24734683

  14. Geomechanical Applications to the Characterization of a Deep Saline Reservoir for CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucier, A. M.; Zoback, M. D.; Gupta, N.; Ramakrishnan, T.

    2005-12-01

    The Ohio River Valley CO2 Storage Project is an ongoing characterization of deep saline formations as a potential site for CO2 sequestration. In this study, we characterize the geomechanical constraints on CO2 sequestration at the American Electric Power's 1.3 GW Mountaineer Power Plant in New Haven, West Virginia. Using data collected at this site, we carried out a geomechanical analysis of a potential injection zone, the Rose Run sandstone, and adjacent formations to assess the suitability of this site for long-term storage of anthropogenic CO2. Due to the low to moderate porosity and permeability of the potential injection zones, it is likely that hydraulic fracturing of the injection zones and/or utilization of horizontal injection wells will be necessary to increase injectivity and capacity and allow for a more effective sequestration. The results of the geomechanical analysis are applied to three key investigations. First, the results of the geomechanical analysis were used to examine the increased injectivity that would result from the implementation of hydraulic fracture stimulation in the Rose Run injection zone. We determined the injection pressure needed to create a hydraulic fracture in the Rose Run and the azimuth at which this fracture would propagate. Using local and regional data and geostatistical methods, we examined the uncertainty associated with modeling aquifer properties with the limited data available for the deep formations in the Appalachian Basin. We then incorporated the results of the geomechanical analysis with the aquifer model in CO2 injection flow simulations. With multiple geostatistical realizations of reservoir flow parameters, we investigated the benefits of introducing a hydraulic fracture to increase injectivity at the site. Second, we examined the feasibility of incorporating horizontal wells by investigating stability as a function of well orientation given the state of stress determined from the geomechanical analysis

  15. Vibro-acoustic characterization of flexible hose in CO2 car air conditioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, F.; Bergami, A.; Martarelli, M.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2008-06-01

    Following the EU directive 2006/40/EC proscribing from 2011 that refrigerant fluids must have a global warming potential not higher than 150, it will not be allowed anymore to employ the current R134a on car air conditioning systems. Maflow s.p.a (automotive hose maker) is developing products for each possible new refrigerant. This paper is focused on hoses for CO2 refrigerants operating in the worst conditions because of the high pressures and temperatures at which they are working (with R134a the high pressure is 18 bar and low pressure is 3 bar; with CO2 the high pressure is 100 bar and low pressure is 35 bar). Therefore the noise emission control of the CO2 air conditioning systems is very important. The aim of this study is to develop a standard measurement method for the vibro - acoustic characterization of High Pressure (HP - Shark F4) and Low Pressure (LP - ULEV) hoses to reduce noise emission and raise car passenger comfort; in particular deep research on high pressure hose. The method is based on the measurement of the vibration level of the hoses in a standard test bench by means of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) and its acoustic emission by a sound intensity probe.

  16. Deep microbial life in the Altmark natural gas reservoir: baseline characterization prior CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Daria; Shaheed, Mina; Vieth, Andrea; Krüger, Martin; Kock, Dagmar; Würdemann, Hilke

    2010-05-01

    Within the framework of the CLEAN project (CO2 Largescale Enhanced gas recovery in the Altmark Natural gas field) technical basics with special emphasis on process monitoring are explored by injecting CO2 into a gas reservoir. Our study focuses on the investigation of the in-situ microbial community of the Rotliegend natural gas reservoir in the Altmark, located south of the city Salzwedel, Germany. In order to characterize the microbial life in the extreme habitat we aim to localize and identify microbes including their metabolism influencing the creation and dissolution of minerals. The ability of microorganisms to speed up dissolution and formation of minerals might result in changes of the local permeability and the long-term safety of CO2 storage. However, geology, structure and chemistry of the reservoir rock and the cap rock as well as interaction with saline formation water and natural gases and the injected CO2 affect the microbial community composition and activity. The reservoir located at the depth of about 3500m, is characterised by high salinity fluid and temperatures up to 127° C. It represents an extreme environment for microbial life and therefore the main focus is on hyperthermophilic, halophilic anaerobic microorganisms. In consequence of the injection of large amounts of CO2 in the course of a commercial EGR (Enhanced Gas Recovery) the environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, pressure and solubility of minerals) for the autochthonous microorganisms will change. Genetic profiling of amplified 16S rRNA genes are applied for detecting structural changes in the community by using PCR- SSCP (PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism) and DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). First results of the baseline survey indicate the presence of microorganisms similar to representatives from other saline, hot, anoxic, deep environments. However, due to the hypersaline and hyperthermophilic reservoir conditions, cell numbers are low, so that

  17. CO2-induced dissolution of low permeability carbonates. Part I: Characterization and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Megan M.; Sholokhova, Yelena; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of elevated dissolved CO2 concentrations on compositionally and structurally distinct carbonate sample cores from the Weyburn-Midale CO2-enhanced oil recovery and storage site (Canada) was measured from analysis of 3-D sample characterization and fluid chemistry data from core-flood experiments. Experimental conditions (60 °C; 24.8 MPa confining pressure) and brine composition were chosen to mimic in situ reservoir conditions. Mineralogy and pore space distributions within the eight individual cores were characterized with X-ray computed microtomography and scanning electron microscopy both before and after exposure to brine with 0.5 ⩽ pCO2 ⩽ 3 MPa, while solution chemistry and differential fluid pressures were monitored during experiments. Our experimental study aimed to quantify the relationship between fluid flow, heterogeneity, and reaction specific to carbon storage at the Weyburn-Midale field by integrating characterization imaging, pressure data, and solution chemistry. Through the use of non-invasive microtomographic imaging, a variety of dissolution behaviors were observed, with variable effects on the evolution of solution chemistry and permeability as a result of heterogeneity within these two relatively low permeability carbonate samples. Similar-sized, evenly distributed pores, and steadily advancing dissolution fronts suggested that uniform flow velocities were maintained throughout the duration of the higher permeability “Marly” dolostone core experiments. The development of unstable dissolution fronts and fast pathways occurred in the “Vuggy” sample experiments when fluid velocities varied widely within the sample (as a result of increased pore structure heterogeneity). The overall effect of fast pathway development was to increase bulk permeability values by several orders of magnitude, allowing CO2-acidified fluids to travel through the cores largely unmodified by carbonate mineral reaction, as indicated by a lack of change

  18. InGaAsSb Detectors' Characterization for 2-Micron CO2 Lidar/DIAL Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2003-01-01

    Recent interest in monitoring atmospheric CO2 focuses attention on infrared remote sensing using the 2-micron lidar/differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. Quantum detectors are critical components in this technique, and many research efforts concentrate on developing such devices for the 2-micron wavelength. Characterization results of InGaAsSb quantum detectors for the 2-micron wavelength range are presented, including experimental setup and procedure. Detectors are prototype devices manufactured by using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) structures. Characterization experiments include V-I measurements, spectral response and its variation with bias voltage and temperature, noise measurements, noise-equivalent-power (NEP) and detectivity calculations, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation. A slight increase in the output signal occurred with increased bias voltage and was associated with a noise level increase. Cooling down the detectors reduces noise and shifts the cutoff wavelength to shorter values. Further improvement in the design and manufacturing process, by increasing the device gain and lowering its noise level, is necessary to meet the required CO2 lidar/DIAL specifications.

  19. Characterization of microbe-mineral interaction under supercritical CO2: Possible roles for bacteria during geologic carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, A. J.; Peet, K. C.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Ajo-Franklin, C.; Cappuccio, J. A.; Thompson, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into geological formations at quantities necessary to significantly reduce CO2 emissions will represent an environmental perturbation on a continental scale. Evaluation of potential impacts at and below the surface requires a multifaceted approach that includes accurate prediction of how the CO2 behaves after injection. Microbial activity can significantly catalyze dissolution and nucleation of minerals in subsurface environments. However, the extent to which biogeochemical processes may play a role in the fate and transport of CO2 injected into geological formations has remained an open question due to the fact that at temperatures and pressures associated with reservoirs targeted for sequestration CO2 exists as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), which has generally been regarded as a sterilizing agent. To investigate whether microbial activity may mediate mineral trapping of CO2 on post-injection timescales we have developed a model system for incubating the scCO2 tolerant strain Bacillus MIT0214 (Hernandez, et al.) with minerals under scCO2 using a novel CO2 delivery apparatus. Growth of Bacillus strain MIT0214 under scCO2 (37°C at 120 atm) with a suite of index and accessory minerals associated with sandstone injection zone formations occurred at the same rate as cultures that were not exposed to mineral preparations (i.e. albite, quartz, calcite, biotite, bytownite feldspar, olivine and diopside - identified and characterized by XRD and BET). Further characterization of interactions between MIT0214 and each mineral by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDAX) sheds light on the nature of microbe-mineral contacts under scCO2 and the extent to which heterotrophic microbial activity can transform minerals under the high pCO2 conditions associated with geologic CO2 sequestration. The ability to study the dynamics of biocatalyzed mineral dissolution, alteration and nucleation (e.g. silicate weathering

  20. Characterization and use of a CO2 infrared laser for ignition of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, Jeremy; Tersine, Edward; Morgan, Brent; Ostrowski, Peter

    2007-06-01

    This abstract reports on the characterization and use of a 200W, 10.6 μm CO2 laser for nonresonant ignition of explosives. To characterize the laser, we measured its risetime with a detector whose response time is approximately 125 ns. We also measured the beam's spatial profile with a scanning pinhole setup. Next, we used the laser for testing of explosives for fundamental research and CAD/PAD (cartridge-actuated devices/propellant actuated devices) applications. Specifically, we determined energy-to-ignition values for TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) and the novel primary KDNP (4,6-dinitro-7-hydroxybenzofuroxan). Ignition was judged to begin at first light, which occurs when the laser-induced reaction first emits light as detected by a visible photodiode. To determine the energy to ignition accurately, we corrected the laser power for reflections. We used a high-speed camera to monitor the reaction progress from ignition to explosive consumption.

  1. F/H seepage basin groundwater influent, effluent, precipitated sludge characterization task technical plan

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, J.L.

    1993-10-29

    A treatability study to support the development of a remediation system which would reduce the contaminant levels in groundwater removed from the aquifers in the vicinity of the F/H seepage basins and southwest of the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River facility was conducted. Proposed changes in the remediation system require an additional study to determine whether precipitated sludge generated from the proposed remediation system will be hazardous as defined by RCRA. Several contaminants, such as lead and mercury, are above the groundwater protection standards. The presence of radionuclides and other contaminants in the sludge does not present a problem provided that the sludge can pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. The study has been developed in such a manner as to cover the possible range of treatment options that may be used.

  2. Supercritical CO2 extract of Cinnamomum zeylanicum: chemical characterization and antityrosinase activity.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Bruno; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Tuveri, Enrica; Sanjust, Enrico; Meli, Massimo; Sollai, Francesca; Zucca, Paolo; Rescigno, Antonio

    2007-11-28

    The volatile oil of the bark of Cinnamomum zeylanicum was extracted by means of supercritical CO2 fluid extraction in different conditions of pressure and temperature. Its chemical composition was characterized by GC-MS analysis. Nineteen compounds, which in the supercritical extract represented >95% of the oil, were identified. (E)-Cinnamaldehyde (77.1%), (E)-beta-caryophyllene (6.0%), alpha-terpineol (4.4%), and eugenol (3.0%) were found to be the major constituents. The SFE oil of cinnamon was screened for its biological activity about the formation of melanin in vitro. The extract showed antityrosinase activity and was able to reduce the formation of insoluble flakes of melanin from tyrosine. The oil also delayed the browning effect in apple homogenate. (E)-Cinnamaldehyde and eugenol were found to be mainly responsible of this inhibition effect. PMID:17966976

  3. Characterization of the Spatial and Temporal Variations of Submarine Groundwater Discharge Using Electrical Resistivity and Seepage Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Josephine Miryam Kalyanie

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) encompasses all fluids crossing the sediment/ocean interface, regardless of their origin, composition or driving forces. SGD provides a pathway for terrestrial contaminants that can significantly impact coastal ecosystems. Overexploitation of groundwater resources can decrease SGD which favors seawater intrusion at depth. Understanding SGD is therefore crucial for water quality and resource management. Quantifying SGD is challenging due to its diffuse and heterogeneous nature, in addition to significant spatio-temporal variations at multiple scales. In this thesis, an integrated approach combining electrical resistivity (ER) surveys, conductivity and temperature point measurements, seepage rates using manual and ultrasonic seepage meters, and pore fluid salinities was used to characterize SGD spatio-temporal variations and their implications for contaminant transport at several locations on Long Island, NY. The influence of surficial sediments on SGD distribution was investigated in Stony Brook Harbor. A low-permeability mud layer, actively depositing in the harbor, limits SGD at the shoreline, prevents mixing with seawater and channels a significant volume of freshwater offshore. SGD measured at locations without mud is high and indicates significant mixing between porewater and seawater. A 2D steady-state density-difference numerical model of the harbor was developed using SEAWAT and was validated by our field observations. Temporal variations of SGD due to semi-diurnal tidal forcing were studied in West Neck Bay, Shelter Island, using a 12-hr time-lapse ER survey together with continuous salinity and seepage measurements in the intertidal zone. The observed dynamic patterns of groundwater flux and salinity distribution disagree with published standard transient state numerical models, suggesting the need for developing more specific models of non-homogeneous anisotropic aquifers. SGD distribution and composition were

  4. A characterization study of the new TNX seepage basin at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Two seepage basins have been used to treat waste water generated by the TNX facilities. The old seepage basin was constructed in 1958 for the treatment and disposal of both low-level radioactive wastes and non-radioactive hazardous waste chemicals. The old basin was closed out in 1980 and waste flows were diverted to a new seepage basin. This report describes soil sample acquisition, field laboratory procedures, water sample acquisition, quality assurance and control procedures, and safety and health protection procedures in the pollution monitoring of the new seepage basin. Four appendices contain laboratory data. To date, no significant groundwater contamination has been detected.

  5. Preliminary Geophysical Characterization of a CO2-Driven Geyser in the Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feucht, D. W.; Jensen, K. J.; Kelly, C.; Ryan, J. C.; Ferriz, H.; Kanjorski, N.; Ferguson, J. F.; McPhee, D. K.; Pellerin, L.

    2009-12-01

    As part of the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) a preliminary geophysical investigation was conducted in the vicinity of a cold CO2-driven geyser located at Chimayó, NM, along the eastern margin of the Rio Grand Rift. This geyser is of interest as a possible analog for CO2 leakage from deep saline-aquifer carbon sequestration projects. Observed water chemistry variations can be explained by mixing of a CO2-rich, high salinity brine rising into, and mixing with a shallow freshwater aquifer. Several large, basin bounding faults and numerous smaller normal faults cut the area of the well and may constitute the necessary conduit for the deep water. Geophysical methods were used to characterize the subsurface properties at the Chimayó geyser as well as regional structures that may influence groundwater flow in the area. Shallow transient electromagnetic (TEM) data and capactively-coupled resistivity (CCR) data were acquired in close proximity to the geyser. The CCR shows a near-surface resistive feature, possibly hematite-cemented Tesuque formation sediment, in close proximity to the geyser. A shallow, highly conductive layer delineated through modeling of the TEM data is postulated to be a fluid consistent with high levels of Total Dissolved Solid (TDS) content. The well is located almost directly on the Roberts fault, which is antithetic to the basin bounding Chimayó fault 1.5 km to the east. Previously published hydrogeochemical studies associate this fault with high CO2 and TDS water along its strike. Deeper sounding TEM and audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) data were acquired along the Alamo Arroyo, 3 km to the southwest of the well. The Kelley Federal #1 Well located in this arroyo provides deep stratigraphic control to Pennsylvanian carbonate basement at 740 m. Tesuque formation conglomeritic alluvial fan deposits occur between 230 and 708 m and are overlain by finer grained basin floor deposits. The deep, coarse grained unit is thought to be a good

  6. Characterizing near-surface CO2 conditions before injection - Perspectives from a CCS project in the Illinois Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, R.A., II; Krapac, I.G.; Lewicki, J.L.; Curtis-Robinson, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium is conducting a large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) project in Decatur, Illinois, USA to demonstrate the ability of a deep saline formation to store one million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) from an ethanol facility. Beginning in early 2011, CO2 will be injected at a rate of 1,000 tonnes/day for three years into the Mount Simon Sandstone at a depth of approximately 2,100 meters. An extensive Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) program has been undertaken for the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) and is focused on the 0.65 km2 project site. Goals include establishing baseline conditions to evaluate potential impacts from CO2 injection, demonstrating that project activities are protective of human health and the environment, and providing an accurate accounting of stored CO2. MVA efforts are being conducted pre-, during, and post- CO2 injection. Soil and net CO2 flux monitoring has been conducted for more than one year to characterize near-surface CO2 conditions. More than 2,200 soil CO2 flux measurements have been manually collected from a network of 118 soil rings since June 2009. Three ring types have been evaluated to determine which type may be the most effective in detecting potential CO 2 leakage. Bare soil, shallow-depth rings were driven 8 cm into the ground and were prepared to minimize surface vegetation in and near the rings. Bare soil, deep-depth rings were prepared similarly, but were driven 46 cm. Natural-vegetation, shallow-depth rings were driven 8 cm and are most representative of typical vegetation conditions. Bare-soil, shallow-depth rings had the smallest observed mean flux (1.78 ??mol m-2 s-1) versus natural-vegetation, shallow-depth rings (3.38 ??mol m-2 s-1). Current data suggest bare ring types would be more sensitive to small CO2 leak signatures than natural ring types because of higher signal to noise ratios. An eddy covariance (EC) system has been in use since June

  7. Workflow Integrating Fracture Permeability Characterization and Multiphase Flow Modeling for CO2 Storage and Risk Assessments in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, G.; Pashin, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ensuring safe and permanent storage of sequestered CO2in naturally fractured geological media is vital for the success of geologic storage projects. Critical needs exist to develop advanced techniques to characterize and model fluid transport in naturally fractured reservoirs and seals. We have developed a scale-independent 3-D stochastic fracture permeability characterization workflow that employs multiple discrete fracture network (DFN) realizations. The workflow deploys a multidirectional flux-based upwind weighting scheme that is capable of modeling multiphase flow in highly heterogeneous fractured media. The techniques employed herein show great promise for increasing the accuracy of capacity determinations and the prediction of pressure footprints associated with injected CO2 plumes. The proposed workflow has been conducted in a simulation study of flow transport and risk assessment of CO2 injection into a deep fractured saline formation using geological parameters from Knox Group carbonate and Red Mountain shale rocks in central Alabama. A 3-D fracture permeability map was generated from multiple realizations of DFN models. A multiphase flow model composed of supercritical CO2 and saline water was applied to simulate CO2 plume evolution during and after injection. Injection simulation reveals significant permeability anisotropy that favors development of northeast-elongate CO2 plumes. The spreading front of the CO2 plume shows strong viscous fingering effects. Post-injection simulation indicates significant lateral spreading of CO2 near the top of the fractured formations because of the buoyancy of injectate in rock matrix and strata-bound vertical fractures. Risk assessment shows that although pressure drops faster in the fractured formations than in those lacking fractures, lateral movement of CO2 along natural fractures necessitates that the injectate be confined by widespread seals with high integrity.

  8. Characterization of the CO2 optical properties at typically planetary condition: measures and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Grassi, D.; Adriani, A.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we describe an experimental setup able to characterize the optical properties of gases at typically planetary conditions, in particular CO2, the main constituent of the venusian atmosphere, at high pressure and high temperature. We prefixed two scientific objectives: to measure CO2 absorption coefficients in order to expand the available spectroscopic databases to better match the broadening and line mixing effect; to update the commonly used tools of radiative transfer calculation in order to improve the accuracy of remote sensing data analysis. Our experimental setup consist of a Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IT) interferometer able to work in a wide spectral range, from 350 to 25000 cm-1 (0.4 to 29 μm ) with a relatively high spectral resolution, from 10 to 0.07 cm-1. A special customized gas cell, designed to support pressure up to 350 bar and temperature up to 300 ° C has been integrated inside the interferometer. To recreate the same conditions found in the deep atmosphere of Venus, we varied the pressure and temperature according to a vertical profile measured by the Venera probes. The CO2 absorption coefficients recorded with a resolution of 2 cm-1 and obtained varying the P and T from1 to 50 bar and 294 to 600K, give us chemical and physical information from an altitude of 50 Km down to 16 km. The measurements have been compared with synthetic spectra obtained using at tools, named Line Mixing Model (LMM), which take into account the line mixing effect. The comparison between measured and simulated leads us to conclude that The LMM reproduces the data with an integral deviation better than 6% on the full range presently explored of the venusian deep atmosphere. Contrary to the widely used Lorentz shape, the LMM leads to have a good agreement with the experimental data in the central and near wing regions of the vibrational bands. Models that do not take into account the line mixing and far wings effects have shown to be inadequate to

  9. Characterization, Monitoring, and Risk Assessment at the IEA GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project, Saskatchewan, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, R.; Chalaturnyk, R.; Gardner, C.; Hawkes, C.; Johnson, J.; White, D.; Whittaker, S.

    2008-12-01

    In July 2000, a major research project was initiated to study the geological storage of CO2 as part of a 5000 tonnes/day EOR project planned for the Weyburn Field in Saskatchewan, Canada. Major objectives of the IEA GHG Weyburn CO2 monitoring and storage project included: assessing the integrity of the geosphere encompassing the Weyburn oil pool for effective long-term storage of CO2; monitoring the movement of the injected CO2, and assessing the risk of migration of CO2 from the injection zone (approximately 1500 metres depth) to the surface. Over the period 2000-2004, a diverse group of 80+ researchers worked on: geological, geophysical, and hydrogeological characterizations at both the regional (100 km beyond the field) and detailed scale (10 km around the field); conducted time-lapse geophysical surveys; carried out surface and subsurface geochemical surveys; and undertook numerical reservoir simulations. Results of the characterization were used for a performance assessment that concluded the risk of CO2 movement to the biosphere was very small. By September 2007, more than 14 Mtonnes of CO2 had been injected into the Weyburn reservoir, including approximately 3 Mtonnes recycled from oil production. A "Final Phase" research project was initiated (2007- 2011) to contribute to a "Best Practices" guide for long-term CO2 storage in EOR settings. Research objectives include: improving the geoscience characterization; further detailed analysis and data collection on the role of wellbores; additional geochemical and geophysical monitoring activities; and an emphasis on quantitative risk assessments using multiple analysis techniques. In this talk a review of results from Phase I will be presented followed by plans and initial results for the Final Phase.

  10. Characterizing Microbial Diversity and Function in Natural Subsurface CO2 Reservoir Systems for Applied Use in Geologic Carbon Sequestration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, A. J.; Thompson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into geological formations at quantities necessary to significantly reduce CO2 emissions will represent an environmental perturbation on a continental scale. The extent to which biological processes may play a role in the fate and transport of CO2 injected into geological formations has remained an open question due to the fact that at temperatures and pressures associated with reservoirs targeted for sequestration CO2 exists as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), which has generally been regarded as a sterilizing agent. Natural subsurface accumulations of CO2 serve as an excellent analogue for studying the long-term effects, implications and benefits of CO2 capture and storage (CCS). While several geologic formations bearing significant volumes of nearly pure scCO2 phases have been identified in the western United States, no study has attempted to characterize the microbial community present in these systems. Because the CO2 in the region is thought to have first accumulated millions of years ago, it is reasonable to assume that native microbial populations have undergone extensive and unique physiological and behavioral adaptations to adjust to the exceedingly high scCO2 content. Our study focuses on the microbial communities associated with the dolomite limestone McElmo Dome scCO2 Field in the Colorado Plateau region, approximately 1,000 m below the surface. Fluid samples were collected from 10 wells at an industrial CO2 production facility outside Cortez, CO. Subsamples preserved on site in 3.7% formaldehyde were treated in the lab with Syto 9 green-fluorescent nucleic acid stain, revealing 3.2E6 to 1.4E8 microbial cells per liter of produced fluid and 8.0E9 cells per liter of local pond water used in well drilling fluids. Extracted DNAs from sterivex 0.22 um filters containing 20 L of sample biomass were used as templates for PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. 16S rRNA amplicons from these samples were cloned, sequenced and subjected to microbial

  11. Utilizing Continuous Resistivity Profiling for Assessment and Characterization of Canal Seepage in El Paso's Lower Valley Irrigation Network System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. A.; Sheng, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Annually, billions of gallons of water are lost through seepage along sections of the irrigation network. To conserve water, El Paso County Water Improvement District has been assessing seepage losses and investigating measures for reducing such losses. Resistivity techniques were used to identify areas of high seepage and provide information on locations along canals that need to be structurally modified in an effort to curb water lost through seepage. Several half mile sections were selected along canals with varying seepage rates to conduct electric resistivity surveys in order generate soil profiles during the non-irrigation and irrigation seasons. Two different multiple channel resistivity meters (The“OhmMapper and the Super Sting R8”) were used, which both allow a vertical resistivity profile to be collected using a single current transmission. The results presented are preliminary and we believe that upon completion findings will serve multiple purposes. Firstly, a better understanding of seepage patterns, seepage rate and its spatial variation can be obtained. Secondly, our findings could be used to produce geological profiles associated with seepage areas which will enable the irrigation district to develop guidelines for improving delivery efficiency, especially during drought. And thirdly, our results will be transferable to other areas of the state and will have a positive impact on the environment and the overall quality of life.

  12. Characterization of the physicochemical properties of phospholipid vesicles prepared in CO2/water systems at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidemi; Taguchi, Shogo; Suga, Keishi; Hayashi, Keita; Jung, Ho-Sup; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipid vesicles were prepared by the nonsolvent method using high-pressure CO2/water systems. The membrane properties of vesicles prepared at different pressures and temperatures were mainly characterized based on analysis of the membrane fluidity and membrane polarity, using the fluorescent probes 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene and 6-dodecanoyl-N,N-dimethyl-2-naphthylamine, respectively. The CO2(liquid)/water(liquid) and the CO2(supercritical)/water(liquid) two-phase (heterogeneous) systems resulted in the formation of vesicles with high yield (ca. 85%-88%). The membrane fluidity and polarity of the vesicles were similar to those of liposomes prepared by the conventional method. It is suggested that high-pressure CO2 can be used to form an appropriate hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface where phospholipid molecules as a self-assembled membrane. PMID:26296356

  13. Geophysical Characterization for a CO2 Sequestration Potential in the Ohio River Valley Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; Jagucki, P.; Meggyesy, D.; Janosy, R.; Sminchak, J.; Ramakrishan, T.; Boyd, A.

    2003-12-01

    A site at the American Electric Power's (AEP) Mountaineer Power Plant, WV in the Ohio River Valley in the Midwestern U.S., a region with the economy heavily dependent on fossil fuels, such as coal, oil, and gas, is being evaluated to determine the potential for geologic sequestration. The project is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Battelle, AEP, BP, The Ohio Air Quality Development Office, and Schlumberger. The major objective of the current phase is to characterize the reservoir at the plant site. Future decisions with regard to CO2 injection will be subject to the evaluated reservoir properties. The effort includes acquisition of 2-dimensional seismic data, assessment of regional geology, drilling to PreCambrian rocks and formation analysis and testing in a 2,800 meters deep well, reservoir simulations, risk assessment, and stakeholder outreach. The test well reached total depth in summer 2003. Wireline logging and reservoir testing was performed for each section of the borehole, including extensive tests in the lowermost 885 meters to estimate formation properties and pressure gradients. The logs included gamma-ray, neutron and density, and array resistivity, magnetic resonance relaxation for permeability information, elemental composition via capture spectroscopy, and resistivity based formation image. The seismic survey was conducted over approximately 11 miles along 2 lines: one along strike and one along dip. The results of the geophysical surveys combined with the field observations provide an integrated assessment of the major injection parameters for the two main injection reservoirs of interest, the Rose Run Formation and the Lower Maryville formation. In addition, the properties of the potential caprock formations overlying the candidate injection zones were also determined. The results of this characterization will be presented with emphasis on geophysical testing and seismic survey. These results are also being used to conduct reservoir

  14. Synthesis and characterization of Co2FeAl Heusler alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arvind; Srivastava, P. C.

    2013-10-01

    Heusler alloy Co2FeAl (CFA) nanoparticles have been synthesized by reducing a mixture of the precursors: CoCl2·6H2O, Fe(NO3)3·9H2O and AlCl3·6H2O under H2 atmosphere. XRD, SEM and TEM techniques have been used for the characterization of the prepared material. XRD and SAED data from TEM show the formation of mixed phases of L21, B2 and A2 type crystal structure of the alloy. The estimated particle size from XRD data and TEM micrograph has been found in the range of 10 nm to 50 nm. The saturation magnetization has been found of 115 emu/g from M-H characteristics which is close to its bulk value of saturation magnetization. Chemical composition of the elements has also been estimated from EDAX, which shows a ratio of Co:Fe:Al as 2.12:1.06:0.81.

  15. Characterization of CO2 flow in a hypersonic impulse facility using DLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, J. M.; Paris, S.; Fletcher, D. G.

    2016-02-01

    This work documents diode laser absorption measurements of CO2 flow in the free stream of the Longshot hypersonic impulse facility at Mach numbers ranging from 10 to 12. The diode laser sensor was designed to measure absorption of the P12 (30013) ← (00001) transition near 1.6 \\upmum, which yields relatively weak direct absorption levels (3.5 % per meter at peak Longshot free-stream conditions). Despite this weak absorption, measurements yielded valuable flow property information during the first 20 ms of facility runs. Simultaneous measurements of static temperature, pressure, and velocity were acquired in the inviscid core flow region using a laser wavelength scanning frequency of 600 Hz. The free-stream values obtained from DLAS measurements were then compared to Longshot probe-derived values determined from settling chamber and probe measurements. This comparison enabled an assessment of the traditional method of flow characterization in the facility, which indicated negligible influence from possible vibrational freezing of reservoir gases.

  16. EM Methods Applied for the Characterization and Monitoring of the Hontomin (Spain) CO2 Storage Pilot Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Ogaya, Xenia; Vilamajo, Eloi; Bosch, David; Escalas, Lena; Piña, Perla

    2013-04-01

    The work presented here correspond to an on-going project in the frame of the development of a pilot plant for CO2 storage in a deep saline aquifer funded by Fundación Ciudad de la Energía-CIUDEN (http://www.ciuden.es/) on behalf of the Spanish Government. The main objective of the research Project is to monitor the CO2 migration within the reservoir during and after the injection as well as testing and evaluating different EM monitoring methods. In this way, a good characterization of the zone is imperative to perceive and quantify, as soon as possible, any change owing to the CO2 injection. Among all geophysical techniques, electrical and electromagnetic methods are especially useful and meaningful to monitor the CO2 plume since these methods are sensitive to the electrical conductivity of the pore fluid. The presence of CO2 inside the pore will replace a fraction of saline fluid within the storage aquifer, reducing the effective volume available for ionic transport. As a consequence, the bulk electrical resistivity of the rock is expected to increase significantly. The proposed EM techniques are the following: 1- Magnetotelluric method, 2-Cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography, 3- Control source electromagnetics. Moreover laboratory experiments are being carried out to monitor the CO2 flux inside sample cores using ERT.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a CO2-tolerant Lactobacillus strain from Crystal Geyser, Utah, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, Eugenio Felipe; Shanahan, Timothy; Omelon, Christopher; Major, Jonathan; Bennett, Philip

    2015-07-01

    When CO2 is sequestered into the deep subsurface, changes to the subsurface microbial community will occur. Capnophiles, microorganisms that grow in CO2-rich environments, are some organisms that may be selected for under the new environmental conditions. To determine whether capnophiles comprise an important part of CO2-rich environments, an isolate from Crystal Geyser, Utah, U.S.A., a CO2- rich spring considered a carbon sequestration analogue, was characterized. The isolate was cultured under varying CO2, pH, salinity, and temperature, as well as different carbon substrates and terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) to elucidate growth conditions and metabolic activity. Designated CG-1, the isolate is related (99%) to Lactobacillus casei in 16S rRNA gene identity, growing at PCO2 between 0 to 1.0 MPa. Growth is inhibited at 2.5 MPa, but stationary phase cultures exposed to this pressure survive beyond 5 days. At 5.0 MPa, survival is at least 24 hours. CG-1 grows in neutral pH, 0.25 M NaCl, and between 25° to 45°C andconsumes glucose, lactose, sucrose, or crude oil, likely performing lactic acid fermentation. Fatty acid profiles between 0.1 MPa to 1.0 MPa suggests decreases in cell size and increases in membrane rigidity. Transmission electron microscopy reveals rod shaped bacteria at 0.1 MPa. At 1.0 MPa, cells are smaller, amorphous, and produce abundant capsular material. Its ability to grow in environments regardless of the presence of CO2 suggests we have isolated an organism that is more capnotolerant than capnophilic. Results also show that microorganisms are capable of surviving the stressful conditions created by the introduction of CO2 for sequestration. Furthermore, our ability to culture an environmental isolate indicates that organisms found in CO2 environments from previous genomic and metagenomics studies are viable, metabolizing, and potentially affecting the surrounding environment.

  18. Preparation and characterization of amine-functionalized sugarcane bagasse for CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shihe; Chen, Siyu; Chen, Shuixia; Zhuang, Linzhou; Ma, Nianfang; Xu, Teng; Li, Qihan; Hou, Xunan

    2016-03-01

    A low-cost solid amine adsorbent for CO2 capture was prepared by using sugarcane bagasse (SB), a dominant agro-industrial residue in the sugar and alcohol industry as raw materials. In this preparation process, acrylamide was grafted on SB, and the grafted fiber was then aminated with different type of amine reagents to introduce primary and secondary amine groups onto the surface of SB fibers. The graft and amination conditions were optimized. The prepared solid amine adsorbent showed remarkable CO2 adsorption capacity and the adsorption capacity of the solid amine adsorbent could reach 5.01 mmol CO2/g at room temperature. The comparison of adsorption capacities of amine fibers aminated with various amination agents demonstrated that fibers aminated with triethylenetetramine would obtain higher adsorption capacities and higher amine efficiency. These adsorbents also showed good regeneration performance, the regenerated adsorbent could maintain almost the same adsorption capacity for CO2 after 10 recycles. PMID:26706226

  19. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO2 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

    2002-07-26

    The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This provides results of the final year of the six-year project for each of the four areas.

  20. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO2 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Paul; Schechter, David S.

    1999-11-01

    The overall goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective was accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. Additionally, a ten (10) acre field demonstration pilot project is part of this project. This report discusses the activity, during the third calendar quarter (July through September) of 1998 (fourth quarter of the projects fiscal year).

  1. Characterizing Microbial Diversity and Function in Natural Subsurface CO2 Reservoir Systems for Applied Use in Geologic Carbon Sequestration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, A.; Thompson, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into geological formations at quantities necessary to significantly reduce CO2 emissions will represent an environmental perturbation on a continental scale. The extent to which biological processes may play a role in the fate and transport of CO2 injected into geological formations has remained an open question due to the fact that at temperatures and pressures associated with reservoirs targeted for sequestration CO2 exists as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), which has generally been regarded as a sterilizing agent. Natural subsurface accumulations of CO2 serve as an excellent analogue for studying the long-term effects, implications and benefits of CO2 capture and storage (CCS). While several geologic formations bearing significant volumes of nearly pure scCO2 phases have been identified in the western United States, no study has attempted to characterize the microbial community present in these systems. Because the CO2 in the region is thought to have first accumulated millions of years ago, it is reasonable to assume that native microbial populations have undergone extensive and unique physiological and behavioral adaptations to adjust to the exceedingly high scCO2 content. Our study focuses on the microbial communities associated with the dolomite limestone McElmo Dome scCO2 Field in the Colorado Plateau region, approximately 1,000 m below the surface. Fluid samples were collected from 10 wells at an industrial CO2 production facility outside Cortez, CO. Subsamples preserved on site in 3.7% formaldehyde were treated in the lab with Syto 9 green-fluorescent nucleic acid stain, revealing 3.2E6 to 1.4E8 microbial cells per liter of produced fluid and 8.0E9 cells per liter of local pond water used in well drilling fluids. Extracted DNAs from sterivex 0.22 um filters containing 20 L of sample biomass were used as templates for PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. 16S rRNA amplicons from these samples were cloned, sequenced and subjected to microbial

  2. Hydrogeological characterization of the Heletz Sands Reservoir, Heletz (Israel) as a preliminary step towards CO2 injection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensabat, Jacob; Niemi, Auli; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Sharma, Prabhakar; Carrera, Jesus; Sauter, Martin; Tatomir, Alexandru; Ghergut, Julia; Pezard, Philippe; Edlman, Katriona; Brauchler, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogeological characterization of the Heletz Sands Reservoir, Heletz (Israel) as a preliminary step towards CO2 injection experiments One the major components of the EU-FP7 funded MUSTANG project is to conduct a highly controlled series of CO2 injection experiments, aimed at determining field values of key CO2 trapping mechanisms such as dissolution and residual trapping and to establish a comprehensive and consistent dataset for model validation. Prior to injecting CO2 there is a need to achieve a sufficient degree of hydrogeological characterization of the reservoir. In what follows we present a sequence of hydrologic tests to be conducted at Heletz and their expected contribution to the understanding relevant hydrogeology. These include: 1) Chemical characterization of the formation fluid; 2) Flowing Fluid Electrical Conductivity log, aimed at determining the vertical variability of the reservoir permeability in the near well vicinity; 3) Water pulse and pumping tests, aimed at determining the reservoir scale hydraulic properties; 4) Thermal test, aimed at determining the value of the heat transfer coefficient from the reservoir to the borehole fluid, which is responsible for the heating of injected fluid in the borehole; 5) two-well injection and pumping of water and tracers test, in order to determine the impact of heterogeneity on the hydraulic parameters and to identify preferential flow paths in the reservoir. This paper presents the design and planning of the experiments, the results obtained in field and a preliminary interpretation.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous spinel NiCo2O4 using surfactant-assembled dispersion for asymmetric supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chun-Tsung; Hu, Chi-Chang

    2013-11-01

    A simple and scalable process has been developed for synthesizing spinel NiCo2O4 nanocrystals through a thermal decomposition method. The introduction of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB, (C16H33)N(CH3)3Br) into precursor solutions significantly enhances the homogeneity and porosity of spinel NiCo2O4. The porosity and high specific surface area of NiCo2O4 preserves the brilliant pseudo-capacitive performances due to providing smooth paths for electrolyte penetration and ion diffusion into inner active sites. Morphologies and microstructures of the active materials are examined by transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is used to evaluate the thermal properties of precursor solutions. The electrochemical performances of NiCo2O4 are systematically characterized by cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge tests. Asymmetric supercapacitors are assembled with these brilliant binary oxides as the positive electrode and activated carbon as the negative electrode. The highly porous NiCo2O4 exhibits superior capacitive performances, i.e., high specific capacitance (764 F g-1 at 2 mV s-1) and long cycle life.

  4. Improved characterization of soil organic matter by thermal analysis using CO2/H2O evolved gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José M; Peltre, Clément; Craine, Joseph M; Plante, Alain F

    2012-08-21

    Simultaneous thermal analysis [i.e., thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)] is frequently used in materials science applications and is increasingly being used to study soil organic matter (SOM) stability. Yet, important questions remain, especially with respect to how the soil mineral matrix affects TG-DSC results, which could confound the interpretation of relationships between thermal and biogeochemical SOM stability. The objective of this study was to explore the viability of using infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) based CO(2)/H(2)O evolved gas analysis (EGA) as a supplement or alternative to TG-DSC to improve the characterization of SOM. Here, we subjected reference samples and a set of 28 diverse soil samples from across the U.S. to TG-DSC coupled with IRGA-based EGA. The results showed the technical validity of coupling TG-DSC and CO(2)-EGA, with more than 80% of the theoretically evolved CO(2)-C recovered during pure cellulose and CaCO(3) analysis. CO(2)-EGA and DSC thermal profiles were highly similar, with correlation coefficients generally >0.90. Additionally, CO(2)/H(2)O-EGA proved useful to improve the accuracy of baseline correction, detect the presence of CaCO(3) in soils, and identify SOM oxidative reactions normally hidden in DSC analysis by simultaneous endothermic reactions of soil minerals. Overall, this study demonstrated that IRGA-based CO(2)/H(2)O-EGA constitutes a valuable complement to conventional TG-DSC analysis for SOM characterization. PMID:22809165

  5. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel CO2-Tolerant Lactobacillus Strain from Crystal Geyser, UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, E. U.; Major, J. R.; Omelon, C. R.; Shanahan, T. M.; Bennett, P.

    2013-12-01

    Capnophiles are microbes that grow in CO2 enriched environments. Cultured capnophiles generally, grow in 2 to 25% CO2, or 0.02 to 0.25 atm. When CO2 is sequestered in deep saline aquifers, the newly created high CO2 environment may select for capnophlic organisms. In this study, a capnophile was isolated from Crystal Geyser, a CO2 spring along the Little Grand Wash Fault, UT, a site being investigated as an analogue to CO2 sequestration. Crystal Geyser periodically erupts with CO2 charged water, indicating the presence of very high CO2 pressures below the subsurface, similar to sequestration conditions. Biomass was sampled by pumping springwater from approximately 10 m below the surface through filters. Filters were immediately placed in selective media within pressure vessels where they were pressurized to 10 atm in the field. Subsequent recultures produced an isolate, designated CG-1, that is most closely (99%) related to Lactobacillus casei on the strain level. CG-1 grows in tryptic soy broth, in PCO2 ranging from 0 atm to 10 atm, 40 times higher than pressures of previously cultured capnophiles. At 25 atm, growth is inhibited though survival can be as long as 5 days. At 50 atm, survival is poor, with sterilization occurring by 24 hours. Growth is optimal between pH values of 6 to 8, though sluggish if no CO2 is present. Its optimal salinity is 0.25 M NaCl though growth is observed ranging from 0 to 1 M NaCl. Growth is observed between 25o to 45o C, but optimal at 25oC. It consumes long-chained carbon molecules such as glucose, sucrose, and crude oil, and exhibits poor growth when supplied with lactate, acetate, formate, and pyruvate. The organism likely performs lactic acid fermentation as it requires no electron acceptors for growth and produces no acid, gas, and sulfide in triple sugar iron agar slants. CG-1 also expresses a variety of lipids, most notably cyclopropyl C19 (cycC19), or lactobacillic acid, characteristic of organisms belonging to the

  6. Methane production from formate, acetate and H2/CO2; focusing on kinetics and microbial characterization.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaofang; Angelidaki, Irini; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Liu, Houguang; Liu, Yuhong; Huang, Xu; Zhu, Gefu

    2016-10-01

    For evaluating the methanogenesis from typical methanogenic precursors (formate, acetate and H2/CO2), CH4 production kinetics were investigated at 37±1°C in batch anaerobic digestion tests and stimulated by modified Gompertz model. The results showed that maximum methanation rate from formate, acetate and H2/CO2 were 19.58±0.49, 42.65±1.17 and 314.64±3.58NmL/gVS/d in digested manure system and 6.53±0.31, 132.04±3.96 and 640.16±19.92NmL/gVS/d in sewage sludge system during second generation incubation. Meanwhile the model could not fit well in granular sludge system, while the rate of formate methanation was faster than from H2/CO2 and acetate. Considering both the kinetic results and microbial assay we could conclude that H2/CO2 methanation was the fastest methanogenic step in digested manure and sewage sludge system with Methanomicrobiales as dominant methanogens, while granular sludge with Methanobacteriales as dominant methanogens contributed to the fastest formate methanation. PMID:27423547

  7. Characterization of the intercalate C60(CO2)x by powder neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M.; Kennedy, S. J.; Elcombe, M. M.; Gadd, G. E.

    1998-12-01

    The intercalate compound C60(CO2)x has been synthesized by hot isostatically pressing C60 under 170 MPa of CO2 and 350 °C. Neutron powder diffraction studies conducted on C60(CO2)x between room temperature and 5 K have been analyzed using Rietveld techniques and reveal a structural transition between a high-temperature (>~250 K) face-centered cubic phase [Fm3¯m, a=14.224(2) Å (293 K)] and a low-temperature (<~150 K) monoclinic phase [P21/n, a=9.7438(9) Å, b=9.7473(9) Å, c=14.6121(11) Å, β=90.390(6)° (5 K)]. The CO2 molecules occupy the octahedral interstices between the C60 molecules and are oriented along the body diagonal of the high-temperature phase. In the low-temperature phase they are tilted slightly away from the c axis so as to place the oxygen atoms adjacent to the center of a pentagonal face on the C60 molecules.

  8. Characterization of carbonic anhydrase II from Chlorella vulgaris in bio-CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Fu, Ming-Lai; Zhao, Yong-Hao; Zhu, Yun-Tian

    2012-11-01

    Carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) can catalyze the reversible hydration reaction of CO(2) at a maximum of 1.4 × 10(6) molecules of CO(2) per second. The crude intracellular enzyme extract containing CA II was derived from Chlorella vulgaris. A successful CO(2) capture experiment with the presence of calcium had been conducted on the premise that the temperature was conditioned at a scope of 30-40 °C, that the biocatalyst-nurtured algal growth period lasted 3 days, and that pH ranged from7.5 to 8.5. Ions of K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), and Zn(2+) at 0.01, 0.1, and 0.5 M were found to exhibit no more than 30 % inhibition on the residual activity of the biocatalyst. It is reasonable to expect that calcification catalyzed by microalgae presents an alternative to geological carbon capture and sequestration through a chain of fundamental researches carried on under the guidance of sequestration technology. PMID:22821342

  9. Characterization of a reservoir-type capillary optical microsensor for pCO(2) measurements.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Kadriye; Klimant, Ingo; Neurauter, Gerhard; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2003-02-01

    A reservoir type of capillary microsensor for pCO(2) measurements is presented. The sensor is based on the measurement of the fluorescence intensity of the anionic form of the pH indicator 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrenetrisulfonate in the form of its ion pair with a quaternary ammonium base in an ethyl cellulose matrix. The glass capillary containing the reservoir sensor was prepared by immersing the tip of the optical fiber into the sensing agent very close to the sensor tip thus providing a very small volume for the sensing reaction. The purpose of the sensing approach is to regenerate the dye/buffer system by diffusion, which may be poisoned by interfering acids, or bleach by photolysis. The fresh cocktail from the reservoir takes the place of protonated form of the dye. The internal buffer system also makes the protonation-deprotonation equilibria reversible. The distal tip of the internal buffer containing reservoir is coated with a gas-permeable but ion-impermeable teflon membrane. The dynamic range for the detection of pCO(2) is between 1 and 20 hPa, which corresponds to the range of dissolved CO(2) in water. The response time is 15 s and the detection limit is 1 hPa of pCO(2.) The recovery performance of this sensor can be improved by means of mechanical adjustment of the sensor tip in a micrometric scale. PMID:18968907

  10. Characterization of carbonate reservoir property changes due to dissolution for far-field conditions of CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangane, P. O.; Gouze, P.; Luquot, L.

    2012-12-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in reservoir pore fluid (e.g. deep saline aquifers), is one of the diverse technologies being explored for deacreasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. After injecting the CO2 as a supercritical fluid at depth, it will slowly dissolve into the pore water producing low pH fluids with a high capacity for dissolving carbonates and consequently changing irreversibly the hydrodynamical properties of the reservoir. Characterizing these changes is essential for modelling flow and CO2 transport during and after the CO2 injection. Here we report experimental results from the injection of the CO2-saturated brine into two distinct limestone cores (a bioclastic carbonate and an oolitic carbonate) of 9 mm diameter, 18 mm length. 3D high-resolution X-ray microtomography (XRMT) of the rock sample have been performed before and after the experiments. The experiments were performed using in-situ sequestration conditions (P = 12MPa and T = 100°C), and notably, under chemical conditions given at the position far away from the well injection site (i.e area where the volume of dissolved CO2 into the brine is low, due to CO2 consumption by the dissolution processes occured during its transport from the well injection site). Permeability k is calculated from the pressure drop across the sample and porosity Φ is deduced from chemical concentration of the outlet fluid. The change of the pore structure is analysed in terms of connectivity, tortuosity and fluid-rock interface from processing the XRMT images. These experiments show that far from the well injection site, dissolution processes are characterized by slow mass tranfer including, in the case of carbonate rock, transport of fine particles, which locally clog the porous space. Then, that leads to the damage of the carbonate reservoir both in terms of connectivity of the porous space and CO2 hydrodynamical storage capacity. In fact, the results of the two experiments show that the porosity decreased locally

  11. Hydraulic fracture characterization resulting from low-viscosity fluid injection: Implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, T. J.; Zhou, X.

    2013-12-01

    The initiation of hydraulic fractures during CO2 sequestration can be either engineered or induced unintentionally. Some fractures may be desirable such as horizontal fractures that can facilitate fluid injection and migration; whereas some fractures may be unfavorable if the fractures tend to extend vertically above a certain limit, thus creating a potential leaking condition. Historically, carbon dioxide as a liquefied gas has been used in oil and gas field stimulation since the early1960s because it eliminates formation damage and residual fluids. Carbon dioxide injection is considered to be one of the most effective technologies for improving oil recovery from hard-to-extract oil reserves because CO2 is effective in penetrating the formation due to its high diffusivity, while the rock associated with petroleum-containing formations is generally porous. However, low viscosity and high compressibility fluids such as CO2 exhibit different effects on the hydraulic fracture initiation/propagation behavior in comparison with high viscosity and low compressibility fluids. Laboratory tests show that viscous fluids tend to generate thick and planar cracks with few branches, while low viscosity fluids tend to generate narrow and wavelike cracks with many secondary branches. A numerical comparison between water and supercritical CO2-like fluid has been made to investigate the influence of fluids to fracture propagation behavior. Simulation results indicate that the pore pressure fields are very different for different pore fluids even when the initial field conditions and injection schemes (rate and time) are kept the same. Thin fluids with properties of supercritical CO2 will create relatively thin and much shorter fractures in comparison to fluids exhibiting properties of water under similar injection schemes. Two significant times are recognized during fracture propagation. One is the time at which a crack ceases opening, and he other is the time at which a crack

  12. Geological characterization of Italian reservoirs and numerical 3D modelling of CO2 storage scenarios into saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, S.; Moia, F.; Guandalini, R.; Cappelletti, F.

    2012-04-01

    The research activities carried out by the Environment and Sustainable Development Department of RSE S.p.A. aim to evaluate the feasibility of CO2 geological sequestration in Italy, with particular reference to the storage into saline aquifers. The identification and geological characterization of the Italian potential storage sites, together with the study of the temporal and spatial evolution of the CO2 plume within the caprock-reservoir system, are performed using different modelling tools available in the Integrated Analysis Modelling System (SIAM) entirely powered in RSE. The numerical modelling approach is the only one that allows to investigate the behaviour of the injected CO2 regarding the fluid dynamic, geochemical and geomechanical aspects and effects due to its spread, in order to verify the safety of the process. The SIAM tools allow: - Selection of potential Italian storage sites through geological and geophysical data collected in the GIS-CO2 web database; - Characterization of caprock and aquifer parameters, seismic risk and environmental link for the selected site; - Creation of the 3D simulation model for the selected domain, using the modeller METHODRdS powered by RSE and the mesh generator GMSH; - Simulation of the injection and the displacement of CO2: multiphase fluid 3D dynamics is based on the modified version of TOUGH2 model; - Evaluation of geochemical reaction effects; - Evaluation of geomechanic effects, using the coupled 3D CANT-SD finite elements code; - Detailed local analysis through the use of open source auxiliary tools, such as SHEMAT and FEHM. - 3D graphic analysis of the results. These numerical tools have been successfully used for simulating the injection and the spread of CO2 into several real Italian reservoirs and have allowed to achieve accurate results in terms of effective storage capacity and safety analysis. The 3D geological models represent the high geological complexity of the Italian subsoil, where reservoirs are

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and CO(2) adsorptive behavior of mesoporous AlOOH-supported layered hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yen-Po; Chen, Yu-Chun; Chang, Po-Hsueh; Chen, San-Yuan

    2012-07-01

    A novel CO(2) solid sorbent was prepared by synthesizing and modifying AlOOH-supported CaAl layered double hydroxides (CaAl LDHs), which were prepared by using mesoporous alumina (γ-Al(2)O(3)) and calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) in a hydrothermal urea reaction. The nanostructured CaAl LDHs with nanosized platelets (3-30 nm) formed and dispersed inside the crystalline framework of mesoporous AlOOH (boehmite). By calcination of AlOOH-supported LDHs at 700 °C, the mesoporous CaAl metal oxides exhibited ordered hexagonal mesoporous arrays or uniform nanotubes with a large surface area of 273 m(2) g(-1) , a narrow pore size distribution of 6.2 nm, and highly crystalline frameworks. The crystal structure of the calcined mesoporous CaAl metal oxides was multiphasic, consisting of CaO/Ca(OH)(2), Al(2)O(3), and CaAlO mixed oxides. The mesoporous metal oxides were used as a solid sorbent for CO(2) adsorption at high temperatures and displayed a maximum CO(2) capture capacity (≈45 wt %) of the sorbent at 650 °C. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the mesoporous CaAl oxides showed a more rapid adsorption rate (for 1-2 min) and longer cycle life (weight change retention: 80 % for 30 cycles) of the sorbent because of the greater surface area and increased number of activated sites in the mesostructures. A simple model for the formation mechanism of mesoporous metal oxides is tentatively proposed to account for the synergetic effect of CaAl LDHs on the adsorption of CO(2) at high temperature. PMID:22488944

  14. Seismic dynamic monitoring in CO2 flooding based on characterization of frequency-dependent velocity factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Hua; Li, Jun; Xiao, Wen; Tan, Ming-You; Zhang, Yun-Ying; Cui, Shi-Ling; Qu, Zhi-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The phase velocity of seismic waves varies with the propagation frequency, and thus frequency-dependent phenomena appear when CO2 gas is injected into a reservoir. By dynamically considering these phenomena with reservoir conditions it is thus feasible to extract the frequency-dependent velocity factor with the aim of monitoring changes in the reservoir both before and after CO2 injection. In the paper, we derive a quantitative expression for the frequency-dependent factor based on the Robinson seismic convolution model. In addition, an inversion equation with a frequency-dependent velocity factor is constructed, and a procedure is implemented using the following four processing steps: decomposition of the spectrum by generalized S transform, wavelet extraction of cross-well seismic traces, spectrum equalization processing, and an extraction method for frequency-dependent velocity factor based on the damped least-square algorithm. An attenuation layered model is then established based on changes in the Q value of the viscoelastic medium, and spectra of migration profiles from forward modeling are obtained and analyzed. Frequency-dependent factors are extracted and compared, and the effectiveness of the method is then verified using a synthetic data. The frequency-dependent velocity factor is finally applied to target processing and oil displacement monitoring based on real seismic data obtained before and after CO2 injection in the G89 well block within Shengli oilfield. Profiles and slices of the frequency-dependent factor determine its ability to indicate differences in CO2 flooding, and the predicting results are highly consistent with those of practical investigations within the well block.

  15. Characterization of the Axial Jet Separator with a CO2/Helium Mixture: Toward GC-AMS Hyphenation.

    PubMed

    Salazar, G; Agrios, K; Eichler, R; Szidat, S

    2016-02-01

    Development of interfaces for sample introduction from high pressures is important for real-time online hyphenation of chromatographic and other separation devices with mass spectrometry (MS) or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Momentum separators can reduce unwanted low-density gases and introduce the analyte into the vacuum. In this work, the axial jet separator, a new momentum interface, is characterized by theory and empirical optimization. The mathematical model describes the different axial penetration of the components of a jet-gas mixture and explains the empirical results for injections of CO2 in helium into MS and AMS instruments. We show that the performance of the new interface is sensitive to the nozzle size, showing good qualitative agreement with the mathematical model. Smaller nozzle sizes are more preferable due to their higher inflow capacity. The CO2 transmission efficiency of the interface into a MS instrument is ∼ 14% (CO2/helium separation factor of 2.7). The interface receives and delivers flows of ∼ 17.5 mL/min and ∼ 0.9 mL/min, respectively. For the interfaced AMS instrument, the ionization and overall efficiencies are 0.7-3% and 0.1-0.4%, respectively, for CO2 amounts of 4-0.6 μg C, which is only slightly lower compared to conventional systems using intermediate trapping. The ionization efficiency depends on to the carbon mass flow in the injected pulse and is suppressed at high CO2 flows. Relative to a conventional jet separator, the transmission efficiency of the axial jet separator is lower, but its performance is less sensitive to misalignments. PMID:26652049

  16. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Ronald; Wicks, John; Perry, Christopher

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian “Clinton” sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test (“Huff-n-Puff”) was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a “Clinton”-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day “soak” period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the “Clinton” sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent

  17. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Riley; John Wicks; Christopher Perry

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian 'Clinton' sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test ('Huff-n-Puff') was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a 'Clinton'-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day 'soak' period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the 'Clinton' sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of

  18. Prototype Near-Field/GIS Model for Sequestered-CO2 Risk Characterization and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K T; Homann, S G; Gouveia, F J; Neher, L A

    2006-02-10

    Detecting unmapped abandoned wells thus remains a major carbon sequestration (CS) technology gap. Many (>10{sup 5}) abandoned wells are thought to lie in potential sequestration sites. For such wells, risk analysis to date has focused on aggregate long-term future impacts of seepage at rates < or << {approx}1 g m{sup 2} d{sup -1} on storage goals as sequestered plumes encroach upon wells with assumed distributions of seal ineffectiveness (Oldenburg and Unger, 2003; Saripali et al. 2003; Celia, 2005). However, unmapped abandoned wells include an unknown number without any effective seal at all, venting through which may dominate CO{sub 2}-loss scenarios. A model of such a well is Crystal Geyser (CG), a prospective oil well abandoned in the 1930s with no barrier installed after it encountered a natural CO{sub 2} reservoir rather than oil (Baer and Rigby, 1978; Rinehart, 1980). CG demonstrates how an unimpeded conduit to the surface now regularly vents from 10{sup 3} to >10{sup 4} kg of CO{sub 2} gas to the terrestrial surface (Figure 1). Unique field data recently gathered from Crystal Geyser (CG) in Utah (Gouveia et al. 2005) confirm that, although resulting surface CO{sub 2} concentrations resulting from CG-like eruptions would likely be safe in general, they could accumulate to pose lethal hazards under relatively rare meteorological and topographic (MT) conditions. This source of foreseeable risk needs to be managed if carbon sequestration is to be publicly accepted. To address this concern, we used CG field data to estimate the source term for a prototype model that identifies zones at relatively highly elevated risk for sequestered-CO{sub 2} casualties. Such a model could be applied both to design and comply with future regulatory requirements to survey high-risk zones in each proposed sequestration site for improperly sealed wells.

  19. Preparation and characterization of Co2TiO4 and doped Co2- x M x TiO4 (M = Zn2+, Ni2+)-coated mica composite pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuting; Ye, Mingquan; Han, Aijun; Liu, Chunlan

    2016-07-01

    Green composite pearlescent pigments were prepared by coating Co2TiO4 and doped Co2- x M x TiO4 nanoparticles on mica. The effects of calcination temperature, Ti/Co mole ratio and doped ions Ni2+ and Zn2+ on the crystal structure of mica/Co2- x M x TiO4 were studied. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique were employed to characterize the morphology and crystal features of the composite particles. TG-DSC analysis and XRD patterns analysis showed that the appropriate calcination temperature for mica/Co2TiO4 pigments was about 1000 °C. UV-Vis spectroscopy and CIE L* a* b* parameters revealed that the composite pigments were yellow-green, and the color and colorimetric parameters changed with the particle size of mica, types of coated pigments and coating amount of pigments on mica. Moreover, the lightness L* of mica/Co2- x M x TiO4 pigments was larger than that of undoped mica/Co2TiO4, and it increased with increasing doped Zn2+ and Ni2+ content.

  20. The Synthesis and Characterization of Multifunctional Titania-based Materials for the Photo/Thermal Catalytic Reduction of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzenberg, Kevin

    The work presented in this dissertation is aimed at improving our understanding of the fundamental processes required for the photocatalytic reduction of CO2. A QCM reactor system for measuring CO2 adsorption under a range of conditions was designed, constructed, and characterized. Measurements on catalyst films revealed sufficient sensitivity to detect CO2 adsorption on the order of 0.1 molecules/nm2. Adsorption experiments were repeatable across multiple measurements for the same film. However, variation across multiple films prepared using the same mass of catalyst highlights the large contribution of surface roughness to frequency response and the importance of uniform, reproducible film preparation. The design of a multifunctional photo/thermal catalyst was explored through the concept of MnOx-TiO2 composites with thermally generated oxygen vacancies as the active sites for CO2 activation. MnOx-TiO 2 were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of titania supports with one of two Mn precursors, and were characterized and screened for catalytic activity. The results were compared with predictions from theoretical modeling studies. Through TPR, UV-vis spectroscopy, and XANES, it was observed that a Mn(NO 3)2•4H2O precursor led to bulk-like domains of MnOx whereas a Mn(CH3COO)2•4H2O precursor led to a dispersed surface oxide. This precursor effect was less pronounced on rutile than on anatase support. As predicted by theory, the MnOx-TiO 2 exhibited the reversible generation of oxygen vacancies at mild temperatures (< 300°C) and a red shift in the band gap for anatase-supported composites. A similar red shift was not observed for rutile-supported materials. In screening reactions, however, neither CO nor other products were detected by GC. In-situ FTIR experiments also failed to show evidence of nonvolatile CO2 reduction products. However, several carbonate, bicarbonate, and carboxylate species were observed, confirming the interaction of CO 2 with oxygen

  1. Synthesis and characterization of NiCo2O4 nanoplates as efficient electrode materials for electrochemical supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehyun; Ramadoss, Ananthakumar; Saravanakumar, Balasubramaniam; Veerasubramani, Ganesh Kumar; Kim, Sang Jae

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, NiCo2O4 nanoplates were prepared by a facile, low temperature, hydrothermal method, followed by thermal annealing and used supercapacitor applications. The physico-chemical characterization of as-prepared materials were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the NiCo2O4 nanoplates electrode (NC-5) exhibits a high specific capacitance of 332 F g-1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s-1 and also retained about 86% of the initial specific capacitance value even after 2000 cycles at a current density of 2.5 A g-1. These results suggest that the fabricated electrode material has huge potential as a novel electrode material for electrochemical capacitors.

  2. Characterization of deep saline aquifers for CO2 storage capacity assessment, Bécancour area, Québec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TRAN NGOC, T.; Konstantinovskaya, E. A.; Lefebvre, R.; Malo, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Cambrian-Ordovician St. Lawrence Lowlands basin of southern Québec has been assessed the most prospective for CO2 storage potential according to geological and practical criteria. Such a demonstration requires the assessment of numerous aspects: storing, injectivity, containment and adequate long-term monitoring. To do so, the characterisation stage of potential sites has to be comprehensive. We provide a case study of the CO2 storage capacity assessment in the deep saline aquifers of the Bécancour region (between Montréal and Québec City) through characterizing in term of hydrogeology and rock petrophysics. The analysed data include stratigraphy and lithology, drill stem tests, hydraulic well tests, well logging, fluid sampling and core analyses. The saline aquifers of the Bécancour region are found at depths between 800 and 2400 m in sandstones of the Potsdam Gp., dolomites of the Beekmantown Gp, and limestones of the Trenton Gp. The caprock consists of at least 800 m of siltstone and shale. The reservoir units are compartmentalized at depth into two distinct blocks by the Yamaska regional normal fault trending SW-NE. Hydrostatic pressure measurements from different intervals and locations show different pressure gradients ΔP with the average value of 12.17 kPa/m, varying from 10.78 kPa/m in the northeastern part of the region and to 15.60 kPa/m in its southwestern part. We observed also different in situ artesian rates of brine-producing boreholes: Q=0, 0< Q <10 and Q=13 l/min which is correlated to ΔP magnitudes. This indicates that the site reservoir is partially overpressurized and non-homogeneous at the regional scale. Permeability anisotropy from core analyses (k_h/k_v = O(10^2)) is indicative of dominant horizontal hydraulic connectivity. Average salinity profiles differing from S=109 g/l to 242 g/l in separate reservoir units confirms this lateral connectivity preponderance and a vertical discontinuity between the aquifers. An average

  3. Characterization of seepage surfaces from Space-borne radar interferometry stacking techniques, Southern Dead Sea area, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessari, Giulia; Closson, Damien; Abou Karaki, Najib; Atzori, Simone; Fiaschi, Simone; Floris, Mario; Pasquali, Paolo; Riccardi, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The Dead Sea is a terminal lake located in a pull-apart basin of the Dead Sea Transform fault zone. It is the lowest emerged place on Earth at about -428 m bsl. Since the 1960s, the over-pumping of its tributaries leads to a decrease in the water level. Eventually, it became more pronounced decades after decades. In 2014, it is more than 1m/year. The overall drop is around 33 m. With salinity ten times greater than the ocean water one, the lake body and its underground lateral extensions act as a high density layer over which the fresh ground waters are in hydrostatic equilibrium. The slope of the interface between saline and fresh waters is ten times shallower than normally expected near the ocean. According to a number of wells along the Jordanian Dead Sea coast, the water table level does not drop at the same speed than the Dead Sea. An increasingly important gradient is constantly being created along the coastal zone. In many places, the fresh ground waters move very rapidly towards the base level to compensate for the imbalance. This statement is supported by a body of observations: a) appearance of vegetation (Tamarisk) in arid areas (precipitation: 50 to 70 mm/year) dominated by salt deposits such as the Lisan peninsula; b) presence of submarine circular collapses visible along the coast. Their diameters decreasing with distance from the shore line; c) appearances of springs and recurring landslides along the coast. With the exception of the submarine features, all these elements are located in the land strip that emerged progressively from the 1960s, 33 m in elevation, ranging from a few decameters up to several kilometers wide. In many places, the surface is characterized by superficial seepages causing subtle to very pronounced subsidence, and sinkholes. In this contribution, we show that advanced differential radar interferometry techniques applied to ERS, ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed images stacks are able to underscore the most affected places. The mapping

  4. Preliminary seismic characterization of parts of the island of Gotland in preparation for a potential CO2 storage test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lydersen, Ida; Sopher, Daniel; Juhlin, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Geological storage of CO2 is one of the available options to reduce CO2-emissions from large point sources. Previous work in the Baltic Sea Basin has inferred a large storage potential in several stratigraphic units. The most promising of these is the Faludden sandstone, exhibiting favorable reservoir properties and forming a regional stratigraphic trap. A potential location for a pilot CO2 injection site, to explore the suitability of the Faludden reservoir is onshore Gotland, Sweden. In this study onshore and offshore data have been digitized and interpreted, along with well data, to provide a detailed characterization of the Faludden reservoir below parts of Gotland. Maps and regional seismic profiles describing the extent and top structure of the Faludden sandstone are presented. The study area covers large parts of the island of Gotland, and extends about 50-70km offshore. The seismic data presented is part of a larger dataset acquired by Oljeprospektering AB (OPAB) between 1970 and 1990. The dataset is to this date largely unpublished, therefore re-processing and interpretation of these data provide improved insight into the subsurface of the study area. Two longer seismic profiles crossing Gotland ENE-WSW have been interpreted to give a large scale, regional control of the Faludden sandstone. A relatively tight grid of land seismic following the extent of the Faludden sandstone along the eastern coast to the southernmost point has been interpreted to better understand the actual distribution and geometry of the Faludden sandstone beneath Gotland. The maps from this study help to identify the most suitable area for a potential test injection site for CO2-storage, and to further the geological understanding of the area in general.

  5. Rock Physics Analysis for the Characterization of the Geological CO2 Storage Prospect in Southwestern Ulleung Basin, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, G.; Han, J.; Lee, M.; Keehm, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We performed rock physical analysis for the characterization of the CO2 storage site in Ulleung basin, Korea. We obtained the characteristics of target formation from the previous work, which contains comprehensive analyses on key horizons and stratigraphy. After verifying the previous work with well-log data, we performed rock physics modeling to obtain the interrelations between reservoir properties and seismic property for key units, such as shale volume-impedance and porosity-impedance relations. We applied the relations to inverted acoustic impedance from 3D seismic data, and obtained 3D distribution maps for shale volume and porosity. We found around 10-meter-thick cap rock unit (Unit 2-3) and two reservoir units (Unit 3-1 & 3-2) with thickness of a few hundred meters. Unit 2-3 has consistently high shale volume throughout the study area, which implies that it can be a good cap rock. Unit 3-1 and 3-2 seem to be good reservoir layers and their average sand thicknesses are 60 m and 150 m, respectively. From this preliminary analysis, the pore volume of the sand intervals of two reservoirs units is estimated to be 20 billion cubic meters. If we assume that one percent of sand pore volume can be replaced by injected CO2, the injectable amount of CO2 would be 136 million metric tonne. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine Geological Storage" funded by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, Korea (No. 20052004), and "Energy Efficiency & Resources of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant" funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry & energy (No. 20132010201760).

  6. Exploring the effects of data quality, data worth, and redundancy of CO2 gas pressure and saturation data on reservoir characterization through PEST Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhufeng; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Engel, David W.; Fang, Yilin; Eslinger, Paul W.

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the impacts of reservoir properties on CO2 migration after subsurface injection and evaluated the possibility of characterizing reservoir properties using CO2 monitoring data such as saturation distribution. The injection reservoir was assumed to be located 1400-1500 m below the ground surface such that CO2 remained in the supercritical state. The reservoir was assumed to contain layers with alternating conductive and resistive properties, which is analogous to actual geological formations such as the Mount Simon Sandstone unit. The CO2 injection simulation used a cylindrical grid setting in which the injection well was situated at the center of the domain, which extended up to 8000 m from the injection well. The CO2 migration was simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). We adopted a nonlinear parameter estimation and optimization modeling software package, PEST, for automated reservoir parameter estimation. We explored the effects of data quality, data worth, and data redundancy on the detectability of reservoir parameters using CO2 saturation monitoring data, by comparing PEST inversion results using data with different levels of noises, various numbers of monitoring wells and locations, and different data collection spacing and temporal sampling intervals. This study yielded insight into the use of CO2 saturation monitoring data for reservoir characterization and how to design the monitoring system to optimize data worth and reduce data redundancy.

  7. Surface modification and characterization of functional oxide ceramics using CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okutomi, Mamoru; Nomura, Haruhiko; Tsukamoto, Takeyo; Dahotre, N. B.; Shen, Honglie

    2000-06-01

    Surface of powder-sintered oxides such as superconductor and ferroelectric barium titanate ceramics were recrystallized using scanned CO 2 laser irradiation. Conventionally, the ceramic is sintered at high temperature, to increase adhesive forces between powdered ceramic grain. During such process, however, many micro-pores and -cracks are produced owing to large shrinkage of fine aggregate grains into the surface layer. Superconductor surface does not allow the flow of superconductor current uniformly and the flow is concentrated on the surface. Thus properties of superconductor are so sensitive to their surface condition that some substantial modifications of the material are necessary. To clarify this issues, both sample of the powder-sintered superconductor YBa xSr 2- xCu 3O 7- y and the BaTiO 3 ceramic film were modified by laser irradiation to recrystallize only the surface layer. Their microstructural features in the surface, the characteristic of superconducting and ferroelectric have been investigated. Thus laser-scanning process appears to be suited to generating large grains with preferred orientation by changing of irradiation condition.

  8. Efficient Data Assimilation Tool For Real Time CO2 Reservoir Monitoring and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. Y.; Ambikasaran, S.; Kokkinaki, A.; Darve, E. F.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoir forecasting and management are increasingly relying on a data-driven approach, which involves data assimilation to calibrate and keep up to date the complex model of multi-phase flow and transport in the geologic formation and to evaluate its uncertainty using monitoring data of different types and temporal resolution. The numbers of unknowns and measurements are usually very large, which represents a major computational challenge. Kalman filter (KF), the archetypical recursive filter, provides the framework to assimilate reservoir monitoring data into a dynamic system but the cost of implementing the original algorithm to large systems is computationally prohibitive. In our work, we have developed several Kalman-filter based approaches that reduce the computational and storage cost of standard KF from O (m2) to O (m), where m is the number of unknowns, and have the potential to be applied to field-scale problems. HiKF, a linear filter based on the hierarchical matrix approach, takes advantage of the informative high-frequency data acquired quasi-continuously and uses a random-walk model in the state forecast step when the a state evolution model is unavailable. A more general-purpose nonlinear filter CSKF achieves computational efficiency by exploiting the fact that the state covariance matrix for most dynamical systems can be approximated adequately through a low-rank matrix, and it allows using a forward simulator as a black-box for nonlinear error propagation. We will demonstrate both methods using synthetic CO2 injection cases and compare with the standard ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF).

  9. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of CO-oxidation catalysts for high repetition rate CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, Thomas P.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely active class of noble metal catalysts supported on titania was developed and fabricated at Hughes for the recombination of oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) in closed-cycle CO2 TEA lasers. The incipient wetness technique was used to impregnate titania and alumina pellets with precious metals including platinum and palladium. In particular, the addition of cerium (used as an oxygen storage promoter) produced an extremely active Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst. By comparison, the complementary Pt/Ce/ gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was considerably less active. In general, chloride-free catalyst precursors proved critical in obtaining an active catalyst while also providing uniform metal distributions throughout the support structure. Detailed characterization of the Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst demonstrated uniform dendritic crystal growth of the metals throughout the support. Electron spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) analysis was used to characterize the oxidation states of Pt, Ce and Ti. The performance of the catalysts was evaluated with an integral flow reactor system incorporating real time analysis of O2 and CO. With this system, the transient and steady-state behavior of the catalysts were evaluated. The kinetic evaluation was complemented by tests in a compact, closed-cycle Hughes CO2 TEA laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz with a catalyst temperature of 75 to 95 C. The Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst was compatible with a C(13)O(16)2 gas fill.

  10. Characterization of Corrosion Product Layers from CO2 Corrosion of 13Cr Stainless Steel in Simulated Oilfield Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Z. F.; Wang, X. Z.; Liu, L.; Wu, J. Q.; Zhang, Y. Q.

    2011-10-01

    The influence of temperature and flow rate on the characterization and mechanisms of corrosion product layers from CO2 corrosion of 13Cr stainless steel was carried out in simulated oilfield solution. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method as well as weight loss tests in autoclave were utilized to investigate pitting corrosion behavior at various temperatures. Weight loss tests were performed at 100 and 160 °C under dynamic and static flow conditions. At the same time, the significant pitting parameters such as E corr, E pit, E pp, ∆ E, and I pass in cyclic polarization curves at various temperatures were analyzed and compared for revealing the pitting behavior of 13Cr stainless steel. The surface measurement techniques such as SEM, XRD, and XPS were used to detect the corrosion product layers. The results showed that both temperature and flow rate had significant effects on characterization of corrosion product layers or passive films formed on 13Cr stainless steel in CO2 corrosion system. At high temperature, lots of pits were formed at the localized corrosion areas of metal surfaces. Corrosion rates under the condition of 5 m/s were higher than those under the static condition regardless of the test temperatures.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and enhanced gas sensing performance of porous ZnCo2O4 nano/microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie; Liu, Jingyuan; Liu, Qi; Song, Dalei; Zhang, Hongseng; Zhang, Hongquan; Wang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, spinel-type compounds have attracted great interest because of their gem-like qualities. However, little is known of their gas sensing properties. We report, in this paper, on a self-assembly method to prepare porous ZnCo2O4 (ZCO) nano/microspheres by a facile one-step solvothermal process and subsequent annealing. Abundant techniques were used to characterize the morphology and structure of the as-obtained compounds. Our data indicate that the hierarchical nano/microspheres are constructed from numerous nanoparticles primarily, which have a higher specific surface area (ca. 77.3 m2 g-1) and are of uniform diameter (ca. 1 μm). To demonstrate their potential application, gas sensors based on the as-synthesized ZCO nano/microspheres were fabricated to test their sensing performance, whose sensing behaviours correspond to p-type semiconductors. The test results also indicate that porous spinel-type compounds have an excellent kinetic response to ethanol at an operating temperature of 175 °C and a superior selectivity. As such, hierarchical porous ZnCo2O4 nano/microspheres will hold promising potential in the gas sensor field.In recent years, spinel-type compounds have attracted great interest because of their gem-like qualities. However, little is known of their gas sensing properties. We report, in this paper, on a self-assembly method to prepare porous ZnCo2O4 (ZCO) nano/microspheres by a facile one-step solvothermal process and subsequent annealing. Abundant techniques were used to characterize the morphology and structure of the as-obtained compounds. Our data indicate that the hierarchical nano/microspheres are constructed from numerous nanoparticles primarily, which have a higher specific surface area (ca. 77.3 m2 g-1) and are of uniform diameter (ca. 1 μm). To demonstrate their potential application, gas sensors based on the as-synthesized ZCO nano/microspheres were fabricated to test their sensing performance, whose sensing behaviours

  12. Reactive Flow Experiments to Characterize Porosity and Permeability Evolution during CO2 Transport in Weyburn-Midale Carbonate Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. M.; Sholokhova, Y.; Hao, Y.; Carroll, S.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the relative effects of CO2-induced disequilibrium and pre-existing mineralogy and void space heterogeneity on permeability development in carbonate core samples from the Weyburn-Midale hydrocarbon reservoir (Canada). The aim of our work was to use detailed pre- and post-experimental x-ray computed tomography (XCMT) imaging, as well as geochemical data, to constrain reactive transport models that predict the evolution of pore space and permeability for geologic storage of CO2 in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) fields. A total of nine core-flooding experiments were completed, using three distinct rock types (tight limestone, porous dolostone, and evaporite caprock) to represent the range of natural reservoir physical and chemical heterogeneity. Experiments were conducted under 25 MPa confining pressure, 60C temperature, and elevated salinity conditions, with pCO2 levels from 0.5-3 MPa. The coupling of intensive characterization with pressure/permeability and solution chemistry measurements provided powerful tools for interpreting and correlating mineral reactions and stability with pre-existing features and heterogeneities. We observed increased carbonate mass transfer rates, stable dissolution fronts, and greater volumes of dissolved minerals for cores with relatively homogeneous pore networks. Samples with more heterogeneous pore size distributions responded with variable mass transfer rates and development of fast transport pathways in regions with preexisting fractures. We infer that the breakthrough of these preferential fluid pathways leads to reductions in available reactive surface area, allowing undersaturated fluids to be transported through the cores despite relatively fast carbonate dissolution kinetics.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and enhanced gas sensing performance of porous ZnCo2O4 nano/microspheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tie; Liu, Jingyuan; Liu, Qi; Song, Dalei; Zhang, Hongseng; Zhang, Hongquan; Wang, Jun

    2015-12-14

    In recent years, spinel-type compounds have attracted great interest because of their gem-like qualities. However, little is known of their gas sensing properties. We report, in this paper, on a self-assembly method to prepare porous ZnCo2O4 (ZCO) nano/microspheres by a facile one-step solvothermal process and subsequent annealing. Abundant techniques were used to characterize the morphology and structure of the as-obtained compounds. Our data indicate that the hierarchical nano/microspheres are constructed from numerous nanoparticles primarily, which have a higher specific surface area (ca. 77.3 m(2) g(-1)) and are of uniform diameter (ca. 1 μm). To demonstrate their potential application, gas sensors based on the as-synthesized ZCO nano/microspheres were fabricated to test their sensing performance, whose sensing behaviours correspond to p-type semiconductors. The test results also indicate that porous spinel-type compounds have an excellent kinetic response to ethanol at an operating temperature of 175 °C and a superior selectivity. As such, hierarchical porous ZnCo2O4 nano/microspheres will hold promising potential in the gas sensor field. PMID:26554344

  14. Growth, structural, and magnetic characterization of epitaxial Co2MnSi films deposited on MgO and Cr seed layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, G.; García-García, A.; Biziere, N.; Boust, F.; Bobo, J. F.; Snoeck, E.

    2013-01-01

    We report detailed structural characterization and magneto-optical Kerr magnetometry measurements at room temperature in epitaxial Co2MnSi thin films grown on MgO(001) and Cr(001) buffered MgO single crystals prepared by sputtering. While Co2MnSi/Cr//MgO(001) films display the expected cubic anisotropy, the magnetization curves obtained for Co2MnSi//MgO(001) samples exhibit a superimposed in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. The evolution of magnetization with film thickness points to a relevant interfacial Co2MnSi-buffer layer (Cr or MgO) contribution which competes with magnetic properties of bulk Co2MnSi, resulting in a drastic change in the magnetism of the whole sample. The origin of this interfacial magnetic anisotropy is discussed and correlated with our structural studies.

  15. An integrated petrophysical-geophysical approach for the characterization of a potential caprock-reservoir system for CO2 storage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fais, Silvana; Ligas, Paola; Cuccuru, Francesco; Casula, Giuseppe; Giovanna Bianchi, Maria; Maggio, Enrico; Plaisant, Alberto; Pettinau, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The selection of a CO2 geologic storage site requires the choice of a study site suitable for the characterization in order to create a robust experimental database especially regarding the spatial petrophysical heterogeneities and elasto-mechanical properties of the rocks that make up a potential caprock-reservoir system. In our study the petrophysical and elasto-mechanical characterization began in a previously well drilled area in the northern part of the Sulcis coal basin (Nuraxi Figus area - SW Sardinia - Italy) where crucial geologic data were recovered from high-quality samples from stratigraphic wells and from mining galleries. The basin represents one of the most important Italian carbon reserves characterized by a great mining potential. In the study area, the Middle Eocene - Lower Oligocene Cixerri Fm. made up of terrigeneous continental rocks and the Upper Thanetian - Lower Ypresian Miliolitico Carbonate Complex in the Sulcis coal basin have been identified respectively as potential caprock and reservoir for CO2 storage. Petrophysical and geophysical investigations were carried out by a great number of laboratory tests on the core samples and in situ measurements on a mining gallery in order to characterize the potential caprock-reservoir system and to substantially reduce geologic uncertainty in the storage site characterization and in the geological and numerical modelling for the evaluation of CO2 storage capacity. In order to better define the spatial distribution of the petrophysical heterogeneity, the seismic responses from the caprock-reservoir system formations were also analysed and correlated with the petrophysical and elasto-mechanical properties In a second step of this work, we also analysed the tectonic stability of the study area by the integrated application of remote-sensing monitoring spatial geodetic techniques. In particular, the global positioning system (GPS) and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (inSAR) were considered

  16. Synthesis and characterization of ferrite materials for thermochemical CO2 splitting using concentrated solar energy.

    SciTech Connect

    Stechel, Ellen Beth; Ambrosini, Andrea; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Miller, James Edward; Evans, Lindsey R.; Livers, Stephanie

    2010-07-01

    The Sunshine to Petrol effort at Sandia aims to convert carbon dioxide and water to precursors for liquid hydrocarbon fuels using concentrated solar power. Significant advances have been made in the field of solar thermochemical CO{sub 2}-splitting technologies utilizing yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-supported ferrite composites. Conceptually, such materials work via the basic redox reactions: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} {yields} 3FeO + 0.5O{sub 2} (Thermal reduction, >1350 C) and 3FeO + CO{sub 2} {yields} Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} + CO (CO{sub 2}-splitting oxidation, <1200 C). There has been limited fundamental characterization of the ferrite-based materials at the high temperatures and conditions present in these cycles. A systematic study of these composites is underway in an effort to begin to elucidate microstructure, structure-property relationships, and the role of the support on redox behavior under high-temperature reducing and oxidizing environments. In this paper the synthesis, structural characterization (including scanning electron microscopy and room temperature and in-situ x-ray diffraction), and thermogravimetric analysis of YSZ-supported ferrites will be reported.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of metal oxide materials for thermochemical CO2 splitting using concentrated solar energy.

    SciTech Connect

    Stechel, Ellen Beth; Ambrosini, Andrea; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Miller, James Edward; Evans, Lindsey R.; Livers, Stephanie

    2010-07-01

    The Sunshine to Petrol effort at Sandia aims to convert carbon dioxide and water to precursors for liquid hydrocarbon fuels using concentrated solar power. Significant advances have been made in the field of solar thermochemical CO{sub 2}-splitting technologies utilizing yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-supported ferrite composites. Conceptually, such materials work via the basic redox reactions: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} {yields} 3FeO + 0.5O{sub 2} (Thermal reduction, >1350 C) and 3FeO + CO{sub 2} {yields} Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} + CO (CO{sub 2}-splitting oxidation, <1200 C). There has been limited fundamental characterization of the ferrite-based materials at the high temperatures and conditions present in these cycles. A systematic study of these composites is underway in an effort to begin to elucidate microstructure, structure-property relationships, and the role of the support on redox behavior under high-temperature reducing and oxidizing environments. In this paper the synthesis, structural characterization (including scanning electron microscopy and room temperature and in-situ x-ray diffraction), and thermogravimetric analysis of YSZ-supported ferrites will be reported.

  18. Organic geochemical characterization of reservoir rocks, cap rocks and formation fluids from the CO2 storage site at Ketzin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherf, A.-K.; Morozova, D.; Wandrey, M.; Mangelsdorf, K.; Würdemann, H.; Vieth, A.

    2009-04-01

    The European project CO2SINK (CO2 Storage by Injection into a natural saline Aquifer at Ketzin) is the first project on the on-shore underground storage of carbon dioxide in Europe. Near the city Ketzin (north-east Germany) a geological formation of the younger Triassic (Stuttgart Formation) was chosen as reservoir for the long-term storage of the carbon dioxide. Within the scope of the Ketzin project we will analyse the organic matter in core rock and fluid samples to investigate the biogeochemical effects and changes on the geological formation caused by the injection of carbon dioxide. These investigations will help to evaluate the efficiency and reliability of the long-term storage of CO2 in such a geological system. Organic geochemical analyses will be performed on core rock samples drilled in 2007 at the Ketzin CO2 storage site in Germany. In total, three bore holes were constructed: one injection well and two observation wells. In addition to the molecular analysis of the microbial community we will investigate rock samples from different depths for total, dissolved and extractable organic carbon including lipid biomarkers, such as organic acids and intact polar lipids as well as the isotopic analysis of individual organic compounds. With the analysis of intact phospholipids (IPL) we will be able to further characterize the indigenous microbial community. Intact phospholipids are found in all living cells as membrane components (Zelles, 1999). Their interpretation is based on the premise that different microorganisms contain different phospholipids with ester- and/or ether-bound fatty acids (White et al., 1979) and thus, the distribution of IPLs and PLFAs (phospholipids fatty acid) can be applied to characterise and compare microbial communities. The data obtained from these analyses will provide valuable information on the active microorganisms as well as shifts in community composition. The characterization of the organic matter in the reservoir rock

  19. Synthesis and structural characterization of Co2+ ions doped ZnO nanopowders by solid state reaction through sonication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, B.; Rama Krishna, Ch.; Venkata Reddy, Ch.; Pushpa Manjari, V.; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.

    2013-05-01

    Cobalt ions doped zinc oxide nanopowder was prepared at room temperature by a novel and simple one step solid-state reaction method through sonication in the presence of a suitable surfactant Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (SLS). The prepared powder was characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. Powder XRD data revealed that the crystal structure belongs to hexagonal and its average crystallite size was evaluated. From optical absorption data, crystal fields (Dq), inter-electronic repulsion parameters (B, C) were evaluated. By correlating optical and EPR spectral data, the site symmetry of Co2+ ion in the host lattice was determined as octahedral. Photoluminescence spectra exhibited the emission bands in ultraviolet and blue regions. The CIE chromaticity coordinates are also evaluated from the emission spectrum. FT-IR spectra showed the characteristic vibrational bands of Znsbnd O.

  20. Characterization of Structural Motifs for CO_{2} Accommodation by Ionic Species Relevant to Photoelectrocatalysis Using Cryogenic Vibrational Predissociation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Wolke, Conrad T.; Wolk, Arron B.; Leavitt, Christopher M.; Breen, Kristen J.; Johnson, Mark A.

    2013-06-01

    Two aspects of catalytic CO_{2} conversion to transportable fuels involve understanding the local interactions between CO_{2} and the solvent mediating the reduction and the coordination of CO_{2} onto the organometallic framework that executes the chemical transformation. To address why ionic liquids are emerging as the solvents of choice for the catalysis, we first explore how CO_{2} attaches to two archetypal ionic liquid components: imidazole (Im) and acetate (Ac^{-}). Im was seeded in a CO_{2} pulsed free jet expansion forming Im(CO_{2}^{-})(CO_{2})_{m} (m=1-2) clusters. Previous studies with pyridine revealed C-N bond formation between CO_{2}^{-} and pyridine with m=5 or 7, evidenced by the observation of a C-N stretch in the vibrational spectra. No such C-N bond formation is observed with Im; the CO_{2}^{-} appears to be hydrogen bonded to the Im N-H in an ion-molecule complex. Attachment to Ac^{-} was studied by predissociation of the Ac^{-}(CO_{2})_{m} (m=1-4) clusters and, for m=1-3, a single peak assigned to the CO_{2} asymmetric stretch is observed near that of bare CO_{2}, suggesting that the CO_{2} molecules are weakly bound adducts. However, the combination bands 2νb{2} + νb{3} and νb{1} + νb{3} in the 3600-3750wn region reveal two distinct binding sites: a neutral site and a red-shifted, more perturbed site. For m=4, a red-shifted CO_{2} asymmetric stretch is observed, perhaps indicating the beginning of solvent mediated activation of a CO_{2} adduct. Finally, the CO_{2} reduction catalyst Ni(cyclam)^{2+} has been investigated using an electrospray ionization source coupled to a cryogenically cooled ion trap. By adding CO_{2} to the He buffer gas used to collisionally cool the ions in the trap, we have been able to condense up to five CO_{2} molecules onto Ni(cyclam)^{2+} at a trap temperature of 100K. The cryogenic ion vibrational predissociation (CIVP) spectra show the CO_{2} molecules to be acting as neutral adducts. We are now working to

  1. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport.

  2. Groundwater-Seepage Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, Harry G.; Reay, William G.

    1993-01-01

    Instrument measures seepage of groundwater into inland or coastal body of water. Positioned at depth as great as 40 meters, and measures flow at low rate and low pressure differential. Auxiliary pressure meter provides data for correlation of flow of groundwater with tides and sea states. Seepage meter operates independently for several weeks. Its sampling rate adjusted to suit hydrologic conditions; to measure more frequently when conditions changing rapidly. Used in water-quality management and for biological and geological research. Potential industrial uses include measurement of seepage of caustic and corrosive liquids.

  3. Teapot Dome: Site Characterization of a CO2- Enhanced Oil Recovery Site in Eastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, S J; Stamp, V

    2005-11-01

    Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), better known as the Teapot Dome oil field, is the last U.S. federally-owned and -operated oil field. This provides a unique opportunity for experiments to provide scientific and technical insight into CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and other topics involving subsurface fluid behavior. Towards that end, a combination of federal, academic, and industrial support has produced outstanding characterizations of important oil- and brine-bearing reservoirs there. This effort provides an unparalleled opportunity for industry and others to use the site. Data sets include geological, geophysical, geochemical, geomechanical, and operational data over a wide range of geological boundary conditions. Importantly, these data, many in digital form, are available in the public domain due to NPR-3's federal status. Many institutions are already using portions of the Teapot Dome data set as the basis for a variety of geoscience, modeling, and other research efforts. Fifteen units, 9 oil-bearing and 6 brine-bearing, have been studied to varying degrees. Over 1200 wells in the field are active or accessible, and over 400 of these penetrate 11 formations located below the depth that corresponds to the supercritical point for CO{sub 2}. Studies include siliciclastic and carbonate reservoirs; shale, carbonate, and anhydrite cap rocks; fractured and unfractured units; and over-pressured and under-pressured zones. Geophysical data include 3D seismic and vertical seismic profiles. Reservoir data include stratigraphic, sedimentological, petrologic, petrographic, porosity, and permeability data. These have served as the basis for preliminary 3D flow simulations. Geomechanical data include fractures (natural and drilling induced), in-situ stress determination, pressure, and production history. Geochemical data include soil gas, noble gas, organic, and other measures. The conditions of these reservoirs directly or indirectly represent many reservoirs

  4. Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

    2002-11-18

    The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

  5. Characterization of Preferential Ground-Water Seepage From a Chlorinated Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer to West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 2002-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majcher, Emily H.; Phelan, Daniel J.; Lorah, Michelle M.; McGinty, Angela L.

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands act as natural transition zones between ground water and surface water, characterized by the complex interdependency of hydrology, chemical and physical properties, and biotic effects. Although field and laboratory demonstrations have shown efficient natural attenuation processes in the non-seep wetland areas and stream bottom sediments of West Branch Canal Creek, chlorinated volatile organic compounds are present in a freshwater tidal creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volatile organic compound concentrations in surface water indicate that in some areas of the wetland, preferential flow paths or seeps allow transport of organic compounds from the contaminated sand aquifer to the overlying surface water without undergoing natural attenuation. From 2002 through 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division of the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, characterized preferential ground-water seepage as part of an ongoing investigation of contaminant distribution and natural attenuation processes in wetlands at this site. Seep areas were discrete and spatially consistent during thermal infrared surveys in 2002, 2003, and 2004 throughout West Branch Canal Creek wetlands. In these seep areas, temperature measurements in shallow pore water and sediment more closely resembled those in ground water than those in nearby surface water. Generally, pore water in seep areas contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds had lower methane and greater volatile organic compound concentrations than pore water in non-seep wetland sediments. The volatile organic compounds detected in shallow pore water in seeps were spatially similar to the dominant volatile organic compounds in the underlying Canal Creek aquifer, with both parent and anaerobic daughter compounds detected. Seep locations characterized as focused seeps contained the highest concentrations of chlorinated parent compounds

  6. Raman spectroscopic characterization of gas mixtures. II. Quantitative composition and pressure determination of the CO2-CH4 system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seitz, J.C.; Pasteris, J.D.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1996-01-01

    Raman spectral parameters were determined for the v1 band of CH4 and the v1 and 2v2 bands (Fermi diad) of CO2 in pure CO2 and CO2-CH4 mixtures at pressures up to 700 bars and room temperature. Peak position, area, height, and width were investigated as functions of pressure and composition. The peak positions of the CH4 and CO2 bands shift to lower relative wavenumbers as fluid pressure is increased. The peak position of the lower-wavenumber member of the Fermi diad for CO2 is sensitive to fluid composition, whereas the peak positions of the CH4 band and the upper Fermi diad member for CO2 are relatively insensitive in the CO2-CH4 system. The magnitude of the shifts in each of the three peak positions (as a function of pressure) is sufficient to be useful as a monitor of fluid pressure. The relative molar proportions in a CO2-CH4 mixture may be determined from the peak areas: the ratio of the peak areas of the CH4 band and the CO2 upper Fermi diad member is very sensitive to composition, whereas above about 100 bars, it is insensitive to pressure. Likewise, the peak height ratio is very sensitive to composition but also to fluid pressure. The individual peak widths of CO2 and CH4, as well as the ratios of the widths of the CH4 peak to the CO2 peaks are a sensitive function of pressure and, to a lesser extent, composition. Thus, upon determination of fluid composition, the peak width ratios may be used as a monitor of fluid pressure. The application of these spectral parameters to a suite of natural CO2-CH4 inclusions has yielded internally-consistent, quantitative determinations of the fluid composition and density.

  7. sRecovery Act: Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO2 Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Waddell, Michael

    2014-09-30

    This study focuses on evaluating the feasibility and suitability of using the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sediments of the South Georgia Rift basin (SGR) for CO2 storage in southern South Carolina and southern Georgia The SGR basin in South Carolina (SC), prior to this project, was one of the least understood rift basin along the east coast of the U.S. In the SC part of the basin there was only one well (Norris Lightsey #1) the penetrated into J/TR. Because of the scarcity of data, a scaled approach used to evaluate the feasibility of storing CO2 in the SGR basin. In the SGR basin, 240 km (~149 mi) of 2-D seismic and 2.6 km2 3-D (1 mi2) seismic data was collected, process, and interpreted in SC. In southern Georgia 81.3 km (~50.5 mi) consisting of two 2-D seismic lines were acquired, process, and interpreted. Seismic analysis revealed that the SGR basin in SC has had a very complex structural history resulting the J/TR section being highly faulted. The seismic data is southern Georgia suggest SGR basin has not gone through a complex structural history as the study area in SC. The project drilled one characterization borehole (Rizer # 1) in SC. The Rizer #1 was drilled but due to geologic problems, the project team was only able to drill to 1890 meters (6200 feet) instead of the proposed final depth 2744 meters (9002 feet). The drilling goals outlined in the original scope of work were not met. The project was only able to obtain 18 meters (59 feet) of conventional core and 106 rotary sidewall cores. All the conventional core and sidewall cores were in sandstone. We were unable to core any potential igneous caprock. Petrographic analysis of the conventional core and sidewall cores determined that the average porosity of the sedimentary material was 3.4% and the average permeability was 0.065 millidarcy. Compaction and diagenetic studies of the samples determined there would not be any porosity or permeability at depth in SC. In Georgia there appears to be porosity in

  8. Characterization of CO2-induced (?) bleaching phenomena in German red bed sediments by combined geochemical and evolved gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilse, Ulrike; Goepel, Andreas; Pudlo, Dieter; Heide, Klaus; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2010-05-01

    sulphates. DEGAS pattern show no obvious systematic differences between the varied coloured zones of this specimen. Sample A1 consists of totally bleached medium grained, lithoclast rich Rotliegend sandstone which was deposited on a flood plain with braided rivers and aeolian dunes. Subsamples of A1 are grouped into three zones - all are bleached, with colours ranging from white to dark grey. Grey and dark grey zones (A1-1 to A1-6, A1-15) are cemented by Ca-rich carbonates and contain microscopically identified bitumina. In contrast the pore space of white zones (A1-7 to A1-14) is filled by anhydrite. These mineralogical differences are also reflected in the bulk rock geochemistry. In comparison to grey rocks white subsamples are depleted in iron and related elements as well as in REEs. Moreover, correlations between rock colour and degassing behavior exist. White samples display typical degassing signatures of sulphates, whereas dark grey zones reveal minor sulphate content, but also the presence of an additional S-species (sulphide) and CO2 (carbonate). Similar features were obtained regarding the specification and abundance of hydrocarbon components. In all samples of A1 methane, ethane and carbonylsulphide were detected, with higher contents in the more whitish parts. In grey rocks an additional, long-chained hydrocarbon component occurs. The relevance of this species is not yet resolved and will be investigated further in more detail. Mass spectrometric gas analytical and related geochemical data confirm major differences in rock composition of Buntsandstein and Rotliegend samples, mainly caused by primary rock composition and by the involvement of variable fluid composition during burial diagenetic alteration. In this study DEGAS was applied for the first time to characterize sandstone geochemistry. Our results constrain that this method might be a complementary analytical tool appropriate for petrological sedimentary research.

  9. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, Pasquale R.; Cooney, John; Fong, Bill; Julander, Dale; Marasigan, Aleks; Morea, Mike; Piceno, Deborah; Stone, Bill; Emanuele, Mark; Sheffield, Jon; Wells, Jeff; Westbrook, Bill; Karnes, Karl; Pearson, Matt; Heisler, Stuart

    2000-04-24

    The primary objective of this project was to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale of the Bureau Vista Hills Field. Work was subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project focused on a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work would then be used to evaluate how the reservoir would respond to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes such as of CO2 flooding. The second phase of the project would be to implement and evaluate a CO2 in the Buena Vista Hills Field. A successful project would demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley.

  10. Ar + CO2 and He + CO2 Plasmas in ASTRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Gardner, A.; Munoz, J.; Kamar, O.; Loch, S.

    2007-11-01

    Spectroscopy study of the ASTRAL helicon plasma source running Ar + CO2 and He + CO2 gas mixes is presented. ASTRAL produces plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 - 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 - 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 - 0.5 eV, B-field <= 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. A 0.33 m scanning monochromator is used for this study. Using Ar + CO2 gas mixes, very different plasmas are observed as the concentration of CO2 is changed. At low CO2 concentration, the bluish plasma is essentially atomic and argon transitions dominate the spectra. Weak C I and O I lines are present in the 750 - 1000 nm range. At higher CO2 concentration, the plasma becomes essentially molecular and is characterized by intense, white plasma columns. Here, spectra are filled with molecular bands (CO2, CO2^+, CO and CO^+). Limited molecular dissociative excitation processes associated with the production of C I and O I emission are also observed. On the other hand, He + CO2 plasmas are different. Here, rf matches are only possible at low CO2 concentration. Under these conditions, the spectra are characterized by strong C I and O I transitions with little or no molecular bands. Strong dissociative processes observed in these plasmas can be link to the high Te associated with He plasmas. An analysis of the spectra with possible scientific and industrial applications will be presented.

  11. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect

    Morea, Michael F.

    1999-11-01

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO2 project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: (1) Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; (2) Fracture characterization; (3) reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and (4) CO2 Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  12. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect

    Morea, Michael F.

    1999-11-08

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO2 project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: (1) Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; (2) Fracture characterization; (3) reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and (4) CO2 Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  13. Preparation and characterization of genipin cross-linked porous chitosan-collagen-gelatin scaffolds using chitosan-CO2 solution.

    PubMed

    Gorczyca, Grzegorz; Tylingo, Robert; Szweda, Piotr; Augustin, Ewa; Sadowska, Maria; Milewski, Sławomir

    2014-02-15

    Novel porous scaffolds composed of chitosan, collagen and gelatin were prepared by the multistep procedure involving final freeze-drying and characterized. To eliminate the need for residual acid removal from the material after drying, carbon dioxide saturation process was used for chitosan blend formulation. The use of CO2 for chitosan dissolution made the scaffold preparation process more reproducible and economically sustainable. Genipin was applied to stabilize the structure of the scaffolds and those crosslinked at a level of 7.3% exhibited a homogenous porous structure (33.1%), high swelling capacity (27.6g/g for wound exudate like medium; 62.5 g/g for water), and were stable under cyclic compression. The values of other investigated parameters: dissolution degree (30%), lysozyme-induced degradation (5% after 168 h), good antioxidant properties (DPPH, ABTS, Fe(2+) assays) and especially very low in vitro cytotoxicity against fibroblasts (103%, MTT assay), were highly advantageous for possible biomedical applications of the novel materials. PMID:24507362

  14. Encapsulation of CO2 into amorphous and crystalline α-cyclodextrin powders and the characterization of the complexes formed.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thao M; Howes, Tony; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2015-11-15

    Carbon dioxide complexation was undertaken into solid matrices of amorphous and crystalline α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) powders, under various pressures (0.4-1.6 MPa) and time periods (4-96 h). The results show that the encapsulation capacity of crystalline α-CD was significantly lower than that of amorphous α-CD at low pressure and short time (0.4-0.8 MPa and 4-24 h), but was markedly enhanced with an increase of pressure and prolongation of encapsulation time. For each pressure level tested, the time required to reach a near equilibrium encapsulation capacity of the crystalline powder was around 48 h, which was much longer than that of the amorphous one, which only required about 8h. The inclusion complex formation of both types of α-CD powders was confirmed by the appearance of a CO2 peak on the FTIR and NMR spectra. Moreover, inclusion complexes were also characterized by DSC, TGA, SEM and X-ray analyses. PMID:25977044

  15. Characterization of Activated Carbons from Oil-Palm Shell by CO2 Activation with No Holding Carbonization Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Herawan, S. G.; Hadi, M. S.; Ayob, Md. R.; Putra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbons can be produced from different precursors, including coals of different ranks, and lignocellulosic materials, by physical or chemical activation processes. The objective of this paper is to characterize oil-palm shells, as a biomass byproduct from palm-oil mills which were converted into activated carbons by nitrogen pyrolysis followed by CO2 activation. The effects of no holding peak pyrolysis temperature on the physical characteristics of the activated carbons are studied. The BET surface area of the activated carbon is investigated using N2 adsorption at 77 K with selected temperatures of 500, 600, and 700°C. These pyrolysis conditions for preparing the activated carbons are found to yield higher BET surface area at a pyrolysis temperature of 700°C compared to selected commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons thus result in well-developed porosities and predominantly microporosities. By using this activation method, significant improvement can be obtained in the surface characteristics of the activated carbons. Thus this study shows that the preparation time can be shortened while better results of activated carbon can be produced. PMID:23737721

  16. Encapsulation of CO2 into amorphous alpha-cyclodextrin powder at different moisture contents - Part 2: Characterization of complexed powders and determination of crystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thao M; Howes, Tony; Jack, Kevin S; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to characterize CO2-α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) inclusion complexes produced from amorphous α-CD powder at moisture contents (MC) close to or higher than the critical level of crystallization (e.g. 13, 15 and 17% MC on wet basis, w.b.) at 0.4 and 1.6MPa pressure for 72h. The results of (13)C NMR, SEM, DSC and X-ray analyses showed that these MC levels were high enough to induce crystallization of CO2-α-CD complexed powders during encapsulation, by which amount of CO2 encapsulated by amorphous α-CD powder was significantly increased. The formation of inclusion complexes were well confirmed by results of FTIR and (13)C NMR analyses through an appearance of a peak associated with CO2 on the FTIR (2334cm(-1)) and NMR (125.3ppm) spectra. Determination of crystal packing patterns of CO2-α-CD complexed powders showed that during crystallization, α-CD molecules were arranged in cage-type structure in which CO2 molecules were entrapped in isolated cavities. PMID:27041303

  17. Characterizing water and CO2 fluxes and their driving impact factors by using a hierarchical diagnostic geophysical monitoring concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Uta; Schütze, Claudia; Dietrich, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Processes in soil, plants and near surface atmosphere interact with each other in a complex way. Soil is an environmental component and important part of our ecosystems. Parent material of soils determines the original supply of nutrients. However, environmental parameters such as meteorological and land use have also an influence to the soil conditions. The objective of our research work is the development of a hierarchical diagnostic monitoring concept for the characterization of water and CO2 fluxes and their driving impact factors to provide information on structures and fluxes in the soil-vegetation- atmosphere system. As part of this hierarchical diagnostic monitoring concept, several methods and technologies from different disciplines (such as chemistry, hydrogeology, and geophysics) will either be combined or used complementary to one another. Our approach will allow large spatial areas to be consistently covered, for efficient monitoring of increases in spatial and temporal resolutions. Firstly, remote sensing monitoring methods for large-scale application (more than 1km2) are used to obtain information about energy and matter fluxes in the atmosphere. A common spectroscopic method for analysis is FTIR spectroscopy, where chemical anorganic and organic compounds can be detected through their characteristic infra-red absorption frequencies or wavelengths. Open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometry is a sensitive and non-invasive method to detect and quantify a wide range of gases simultaneously. Subsequently, meso-scale methods (0.01-1km2) can be employed which investigate subsurface characteristics to describe geological and soil structures and dynamics. Various soil parameters can be mapped using rapid, nearly non-destructive methods (e.g. geophysics, spectroscopy), for quasi-continuous 2D as well as 3D mapping of soil physical and hydrological properties. Finally, point measurements at plot scale (less than 0.01km2) enable high

  18. 3D Seismic Characterization of the Research Facility for Geological Storage of CO2: Hontomín (Burgos, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalde, J.; Martí, D.; Calahorrano, A.; Marzan, I.; Ayarza, P.; Carbonell, R.; Perez-Estaun, A.

    2011-12-01

    A technological research facility dedicated to the underground geological storage of CO2 is currently being developed by the Spanish research program on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in Hontomin (Burgos, North of the Iberian Peninsula) This research program is being developed by the CIUDEN Foundation. CIUDEN is an initiative of 3 Spanish state departments (Science & Innovation, Environment and Industry). An extensive multidisciplinary site characterization phase has been carried out, including a multi-seismic data acquisition experiment. Within this effort a 36 km2 academic-oriented 3D seismic reflection survey was acquired in summer 2010. The aim of data acquisition effort are to provide high resolution images of the subsurface of the storage complex, constrain a baseline model for all the disciplines involved in the project. The main acquisition characteristics of this survey included: a mixed source (Vibroseis & explosive , 74% and 26% of the source points, respectively); 5000 shot points, distributed along 22 source lines (separated 250 m), 22 lines of receivers (separated 275 m); shot and receiver spacing along the source and receiver lines was of 25 m; this resulted in a nominal CDP-fold of 36 traces, with 13 m2 bins. This 3D-data was fully processed until migration. The main features within the processing sequence include static correction calculation, frequency filtering, trace amplitude equalization, rms velocity modeling, FK-domain filtering, 3D deconvolution, dip move-out corrections, residual static calculation and pre and post stack migration. The final high-resolution 3D-volume allowed to characterize the main tectonic structure of the dome complex, the fault system of the area and the feasibility of the reservoir for the storage. The target reservoir is a saline aquifer placed at 1400, approximately, within Lower Jurassic carbonates (Lias); the main seal is formed by inter-layered marls and marly limestones from Early to Middle Jurassic (Dogger

  19. Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-09-30

    The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska's North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska's interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009

  20. Whole-Genome Sequence of Filimonas lacunae, a Bacterium of the Family Chitinophagaceae Characterized by Marked Colony Growth under a High-CO2 Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Shiratori-Takano, Hatsumi; Takano, Hideaki; Ueda, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of Filimonas lacunae, a bacterium of the family Chitinophagaceae characterized by high-CO2-dependent growth. The 7.81-Mb circular genome harbors many genes involved in carbohydrate degradation and related genetic regulation, suggesting the role of the bacterium as a carbohydrate degrader in diverse environments. PMID:27417842

  1. Whole-Genome Sequence of Filimonas lacunae, a Bacterium of the Family Chitinophagaceae Characterized by Marked Colony Growth under a High-CO2 Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Shiratori-Takano, Hatsumi; Takano, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of Filimonas lacunae, a bacterium of the family Chitinophagaceae characterized by high-CO2-dependent growth. The 7.81-Mb circular genome harbors many genes involved in carbohydrate degradation and related genetic regulation, suggesting the role of the bacterium as a carbohydrate degrader in diverse environments. PMID:27417842

  2. Application of the top specified boundary layer (TSBL) approximation to initial characterization of an inland aquifer mineralization: 2. Seepage of saltwater through semi-confining layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a generalized basic study that addresses practical needs for an understanding of the major mechanisms involved in the mineralization of groundwater in the Great Bend Prairie aquifer in south- central Kansas. This Quaternary alluvial aquifer and associated surface waters are subject to contamination by saltwater, which in some areas seeps from the deeper Permian bedrock formation into the overlying freshwater aquifer through semiconfining layers. A simplified conceptual model is adopted. It incorporates the freshwater aquifer whose bottom is comprised of a semiconfining layer through which a hydrologically minor but geochemically important saline water discharge seeps into the aquifer. A hierarchy of approximate approaches is considered to analyze the mineralization processes taking place in the aquifer. The recently developed top specified boundary layer (TSBL) approach is very convenient to use for the initial characterization of these processes, and is further adapted to characterization of head-driven seepage through semi-confining layers. TSBL calculations indicate that the seeping saline water may create two distinct new zones in the aquifer: (1) a completely saline zone (CSZ) adjacent to the semiconfining bottom of the aquifer, and (2) a transition zone (TZ) which develops between the CSZ and the freshwater zone. Some possible scenarios associated with the various mineralization patterns are analyzed and discussed.

  3. Thermal Characterization and Effect of Deposited hbox {CO}2 on a Cryogenic Insulation System Based on a Spherical Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, M.; Ebert, H.-P.

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work is to study the effect of deposited hbox {CO}2 on the solid thermal conductivity of a cryogenic insulation system. Therefore, measurements were performed using a guarded hot plate apparatus at temperatures in the range from 80 K to 290 K in combination with a bellow acting as the sample containment. The unique experimental setup and sample preparation are described in detail. Furthermore, existing thermal models which are based on a superposition of thermal transfer due to radiation and solid thermal conductivity were modified to account for the thermal effects of deposited gases and the consequently increased solid thermal conductivity for a spherical powder. Measurements showed a significant increase of the solid thermal conductivity depending on the amount of hbox {CO}2 that was provided for deposition-evacuation. 2.77 Vol-‰hbox {CO}2 resulted in an increase of 5.5 % in the overall solid thermal conductivity. Twice this amount (5.54 Vol-‰hbox {CO}2) and four times this amount (11.1 Vol-‰hbox {CO}2) resulted in an increase of 8.8 % and 14.1 % in the overall solid thermal conductivity, respectively. Due to additional temperature sensors, it was possible to measure the effective thermal conductivity in different layers of the insulation material. Thus, a significant change in the innermost layer of 75 % was measured for the solid thermal conductivity comparing the evacuated sample with the hbox {CO}2-loaded (11.1 Vol-‰hbox { CO}2) sample.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy's site screening, site selection, and initial characterization for storage of CO2 in deep geological formations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodosta, T.D.; Litynski, J.T.; Plasynski, S.I.; Hickman, S.; Frailey, S.; Myer, L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead Federal agency for the development and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. As part of its mission to facilitate technology transfer and develop guidelines from lessons learned, DOE is developing a series of best practice manuals (BPMs) for carbon capture and storage (CCS). The "Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations" BPM is a compilation of best practices and includes flowchart diagrams illustrating the general decision making process for Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization. The BPM integrates the knowledge gained from various programmatic efforts, with particular emphasis on the Characterization Phase through pilot-scale CO2 injection testing of the Validation Phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Initiative. Key geologic and surface elements that suitable candidate storage sites should possess are identified, along with example Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization protocols for large-scale geologic storage projects located across diverse geologic and regional settings. This manual has been written as a working document, establishing a framework and methodology for proper site selection for CO2 geologic storage. This will be useful for future CO2 emitters, transporters, and storage providers. It will also be of use in informing local, regional, state, and national governmental agencies of best practices in proper sequestration site selection. Furthermore, it will educate the inquisitive general public on options and processes for geologic CO2 storage. In addition to providing best practices, the manual presents a geologic storage resource and capacity classification system. The system provides a "standard" to communicate storage and capacity estimates, uncertainty and project development risk, data guidelines and analyses for adequate site characterization, and

  5. Geoelectrical characterization of carbonate and silicate porous media in the presence of supercritical CO2-water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidoye, Luqman Kolawole; Das, Diganta Bhusan

    2015-10-01

    The relative permittivity (εr) and the electrical conductivity (σ) of porous media are known to be functions of water saturation (S). As such, their measurements can be useful in effective characterisations and monitoring of geological carbon sequestration using geoelectrical measurement techniques. In this work, the effects of pressure, temperature and salt concentration on bulk εr-S and σ-S relationships were investigated for carbonate (limestone) and silicate porous media (both unconsolidated domains) under dynamic and quasi-static supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-brine/water flow. In the silica sand sample, the bulk εr (εb) for scCO2-water decreases as the temperature increases. On the contrary, slight increase was seen in the εb with temperature in the carbonate sample for the scCO2-water system. These trends are more conspicuous at high water saturation. The εb-S curves for the scCO2-water flow in the silica sand also show clear dependency on the domain pressure, where εb increases as the domain pressure increases. Furthermore, the bulk σ (σb), at any particular saturation for the scCO2-brine system rises as the temperature increases with more significant increase found at very high water saturation. Both εb and σb values are found to be greater in the limestone than silica sand porous samples for similar porosity values. Based on different injection rates investigated, we do not find significant dynamic effects in the εb-S and σb-S relationships for the scCO2-brine/water system. As such, geoelectrical characteristics can be taken as reliable in the monitoring of two-phase flow system in the porous media. It can be inferred from the results that the geoelectrical techniques are highly dependent on water saturation. This dependence is more conspicuous at higher water saturation. Different mathematical models examined show their reliability at different water saturation ranges. The polynomial fit developed in this work takes into consideration the fluid

  6. Characterization of the Hontomín Research Facility for Geological Storage of CO2: 3D Seismic Imaging Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalde, J.; Martí, D.; Juhlin, C.; Malehmir, A.; Calahorrano, A.; Ayarza, P.; Pérez-Estaún, A.; Carbonell, R.

    2012-04-01

    A technological research facility dedicated to the underground geological storage of CO2 is currently being developed by the Spanish research program on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in Hontomin (Burgos). This research program is being developed by the CIUDEN Foundation, an initiative launched by 3 Spanish state departments (Science & Innovation, Environment and Industry). An extensive multidisciplinary site characterization phase has been carried out, including a multiseismic data acquisition experiment. Within this effort, a 36 km2 3D seismic reflection survey was acquired in the summer of 2010. Its aim was to provide high resolution images of the subsurface of the storage complex, as well as to provide a baseline model for all the disciplines involved in the project. The target reservoir is a saline aquifer located at 1400 m, approximately, within Lower Jurassic carbonates (Lias). The main seal is formed by inter-layered marls and marly limestones of Early to Middle Jurassic age (Dogger and Lias). The main acquisition characteristics of the survey included (1) a mixed source of vibroseis and explosives with 74% and 26% of each used, respectively, (2) 5000 source points distributed along 22 source lines (separated 250 m) and (3) 22 lines of receivers (separated 275 m). Shot and receiver spacing along the source and receiver lines was 25 m, resulting in a nominal CDP-fold of 36 for 13 m2 bins. The 3D-data have been fully processed to post stack migration. The most critical processing steps included static correction calculations, time variant frequency filtering, rms velocity analysis, F-XY deconvolution, dip move-out correction, residual statics calculations and post stack migration. The final high-resolution 3D-volume shows the shape and depth of the primary reservoir-seal system, the main faults of the area and the secondary reservoir-seal sequence. It allows us to characterize the main tectonic structure of the dome complex, the fault system of the area and

  7. Discovery of an algal mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase: molecular cloning and characterization of a low-CO2-induced polypeptide in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, M; Karlsson, J; Ramazanov, Z; Gardeström, P; Samuelsson, G

    1996-10-15

    In green unicellular algae, several polypeptides are induced upon exposure to limiting CO2. We report here on the localization and characterization of one of these, a 22-kDa polypeptide in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This nuclear-encoded polypeptide is induced in the mitochondria by a lowering of the partial pressure of CO2 in the growth medium from 5% to air CO2 levels. Sequencing of two different cDNA clones coding for the polypeptide identified it as a 20.7-kDa beta-type carbonic anhydrase (CA; carbonate dehydratase, carbonate hydro-lyase, EC 4.2.1.1). The two clones differ in their nucleotide sequences but code for identical proteins, showing that this CA is encoded by at least two genes. Northern blot hybridization reveals that mRNA transcripts are only present in cells transferred to air CO2 levels. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with those of other beta-CAs shows the largest degree of similarity with CA from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis (50% identity and 66% similarity). To our knowledge, this is the first identification and characterization of a mitochondrial CA from a photosynthetic organism. PMID:8876257

  8. Microgravity Characterization of the Hontomín CO2 Storage Site (Spain). Integration with 3D Seismic Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayarza, P.; Andres, J.; Alcalde, J.; Martí, D.; Marzán, I.; Martinez-Catalan, J. R.; Carbonell, R.; García Lobón, J. L.; Pérez Estaún, A.

    2014-12-01

    Hontomín hosts the first Spanish CO2storage Technology Development Plant. The area, located in the southern part of Mesozoic Basque-Cantabrian Basin, presents E-W and ESE-WNW faults formed during a Permian-Triassic extensional event. The latter were reactivated during the opening of the Bay of Biscay, while a new set of NNE-SSW faults developed. Fractures were reactivated again during the Alpine compression. The resulting configuration is a dome-like structure that includes the Mesozoic succession (Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous) and is crowned by Upper Cretaceous and Eocene rocks lying unconformably. The target injection pointis located at 1500 m depth, within a Jurassic carbonate saline formation. Several multidisciplinary studies have been carried out in Hontomín aiming to obtain a thorough geological characterization. Among these, a microgravity survey, acquired under the umbrella of the CIUDEN foundation, has provided us with a complete 3D image of the site. A 4x4 km2area, coincident with that surveyed by 3D seismic reflection, has been sampled using a dense grid with a station spacing of 100 m. The result is a high resolution Bouguer anomaly gravity map capable of offering insights into the subsurface geology down to the depth of the injection point. The application of mathematical procedures to the data has further enhanced its potential for interpretation. The calculated regional anomaly indicates that the dome structure strikes E-W to ENE-WSW, sub-parallel to a major fault: the South Fault, part of the Ubierna fault system. The resulting residual anomaly enhances a number of NW-SE features that have also been interpreted as faults and that can be observed after performing vertical and horizontal derivatives to the data. Calculation of the Euler solutions confirms the previous results and brings out a new NNW-SSE feature, namely the East Fault. Integration with 3D seismic data suggests that faults affect different levels of the sedimentary sequence

  9. Characterization of an urban-rural CO 2 /temperature gradient and associated changes in initial plant productivity during secondary succession

    SciTech Connect

    Ziska, L. H.; Bunce, J. A.; Goins, E. W.

    2004-05-01

    To examine the impact of climate change on vegetative productivity, we exposed fallow agricultural soil to an in situ temperature and CO2 gradient between urban, suburban and rural areas in 2002. Along the gradient, average daytime CO2 concentration increased by 21% and maximum (daytime) and minimum (nighttime) daily temperatures increased by 1.6 and 3.3°C, respectively in an urban relative to a rural location. Consistent location differences in soil temperature were also ascertained. No other consistent differences in meteorological variables (e.g. wind speed, humidity, PAR, tropospheric ozone) as a function of urbanization were documented. The urban-induced environmental changes that were observed were consistent with most short-term (~50 year) global change scenarios regarding CO2 concentration and air temperature. Productivity, determined as final above-ground biomass, and maximum plant height were positively affected by daytime and soil temperatures as well as enhanced [CO2], increasing 60 and 115% for the suburban and urban sites, respectively, relative to the rural site. While long-term data are needed, these initial results suggest that urban environments may act as a reasonable surrogate for investigating future climatic change in vegetative communities.

  10. Insights into bacterial CO2 metabolism revealed by the characterization of four carbonic anhydrases in Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes catalyze the interconversion of CO2 and bicarbonate. These enzymes play important roles in cellular metabolism, CO2 transport, ion transport, and internal pH regulation. Understanding the metabolic role of CAs in the chemolithoautotropic bacterium Ralstonia eutropha is important for the development of high performance fermentation processes based on the bacterium’s capability to fix carbon using the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle. Analysis of the R. eutropha H16 genome sequence revealed the presence of four CA genes: can, can2, caa and cag. We evaluated the importance of each of the CAs in the metabolism of R. eutropha by examination of growth and enzyme activity in gene deletion, complementation, and overexpression strains. All four purified CAs were capable of performing the interconversion of CO2 and HCO3–, although the equilibrium towards the formation of CO2 or HCO3– differs with each CA. Deletion of can, encoding a β-CA, affected the growth of R. eutropha; however the growth defect could be compensated by adding CO2 to the culture. Deletion of the caa, encoding an α-CA, had the strongest deleterious influence on cell growth. Strains with deletion or overexpression of can2 or cag genes exhibited similar behavior to wild type under most of the conditions tested. In this work, Caa was studied in greater detail using microscopy and complementation experiments, which helped confirm its periplasmic localization and determine its importance for robust growth of R. eutropha. A hypothesis for the coordinated role of these four enzymes in the metabolism of R. eutropha is proposed. PMID:24410804

  11. Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Czirr, Kirk

    1999-10-28

    The first project objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO2) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second project objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work during the fourth quarter falls within the demonstration project.

  12. Characterization of a Mixture of CO2 Adsorption Products in Hyperbranched Aminosilica Adsorbents by (13)C Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Mehta, Anil K; Conradi, Mark S; Jones, Christopher W; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-11-17

    Hyperbranched amine polymers (HAS) grown from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 (hereafter "SBA-15-HAS") exhibit large capacities for CO2 adsorption. We have used static in situ and magic-angle spinning (MAS) ex situ (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the adsorption of CO2 by SBA-15-HAS. (13)C NMR distinguishes the signal of gas-phase (13)CO2 from that of the chemisorbed species. HAS polymers possess primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, leading to multiple chemisorption reaction outcomes, including carbamate (RnNCOO(-)), carbamic acid (RnNCOOH), and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) moieties. Carbamates and bicarbonate fall within a small (13)C chemical shift range (162-166 ppm), and a mixture was observed including carbamic acid and carbamate, the former disappearing upon evacuation of the sample. By examining the (13)C-(14)N dipolar coupling through low-field (B0 = 3 T) (13)C{(1)H} cross-polarization MAS NMR, carbamate is confirmed through splitting of the (13)C resonance. A third species that is either bicarbonate or a second carbamate is evident from bimodal T2 decay times of the ∼163 ppm peak, indicating the presence of two species comprising that single resonance. The mixture of products suggests that (1) the presence of amines and water leads to bicarbonate being present and/or (2) the multiple types of amine sites in HAS permit formation of chemically distinct carbamates. PMID:26477882

  13. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  14. Multiband electronic characterization of the complex intermetallic cage system Y1 -xGdxCo2Zn20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Baez, M.; Naranjo-Uribe, A.; Osorio-Guillén, J. M.; Rettori, C.; Avila, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A detailed microscopic and quantitative description of the electronic and magnetic properties of Gd3 +-doped YCo2Zn20 single crystals (Y1 -xGdxCo2Zn20 ,0.002 ≲x ≤ 1.00 ) is reported through a combination of temperature-dependent electron spin resonance (ESR), heat capacity, and d c magnetic susceptibility experiments, plus first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The ESR results indicate that this system features an exchange bottleneck scenario wherein various channels for the spin-lattice relaxation mechanism of the Gd3 + ions can be identified via exchange interactions with different types of conduction electrons at the Fermi level. Quantitative support from the other techniques allows us to extract the exchange interaction parameters between the localized magnetic moments of the Gd3 + ions and the different types of conduction electrons present at the Fermi level (Jf s,Jf p, and Jf d). Despite the complexity of the crystal structure, our combination of experimental and electronic structure data establish GdCo2Zn20 as a model RKKY system by predicting a Curie-Weiss temperature θC=-1.2 (2 ) K directly from microscopic parameters, in very good agreement with the bulk value from magnetization data. The successful microscopic understanding of the electronic structure and behavior for the two end compounds YCo2Zn20 and GdCo2Zn20 means they can be used as references to help describe the more complex electronic properties of related materials.

  15. Estimation of continuous anthropogenic CO2 using CO2, CO, δ13C(CO2) and Δ14C(CO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardag, S. N.; Gerbig, C.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Levin, I.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate different methods for estimating anthropogenic CO2 using modelled continuous atmospheric concentrations of CO2 alone, as well as CO2 in combination with the surrogate tracers CO, δ13C(CO2) and Δ14C(CO2). These methods are applied at three hypothetical stations representing rural, urban and polluted conditions. We find that independent of the tracer used, an observation-based estimate of continuous anthropogenic CO2 is not feasible at rural measurement sites due to the low signal to noise ratio of anthropogenic CO2 estimates at such settings. At urban and polluted sites, potential future continuous Δ14C(CO2) measurements with a precision of 5 ‰ or better are most promising for anthropogenic CO2 determination (precision ca. 10-20%), but the insensitivity against CO2 contributions from biofuel emissions may reduce its accuracy in the future. Other tracers, such as δ13C(CO2) and CO could provide an accurate and already available alternative if all CO2 sources in the catchment area are well characterized with respect to their isotopic signature and CO to anthropogenic CO2 ratio. We suggest a strategy for calibrating these source characteristics on an annual basis using precise Δ14C(CO2) measurements on grab samples. The precision of anthropogenic CO2 determination using δ13C(CO2) is largely determined by the measurement precision of δ13C(CO2) and CO2. The precision when using the CO-method is mainly limited by the variation of natural CO sources and CO sinks. At present, continuous anthropogenic CO2 could be determined using the tracers δ13C(CO2) and/or CO with a precision of about 30 %, a mean bias of about 10 % and without significant diurnal discrepancies. This allows significant improvement, validation and bias reduction of highly resolved emission inventories using atmospheric observation and regional modelling.

  16. Petrophysical characterization of first ever drilled core samples from an active CO2 storage site, the German Ketzin Pilot Site - Comparison with long term experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemke, Kornelia; Liebscher, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Stuttgart Formation it is difficult to estimate definite CO2 induced changes from petrophysical measurements. The observed changes are only minor. Several batch experiments on Ketzin samples drilled prior injection confirm the results from investigation of the in-situ rock cores. Core samples of the pre-injection wells were exposed to CO2 and brine in autoclaves over various time periods. Samples were characterized prior to and after the experiments by NMR and Mercury Injection Porosimetry (MIP). The results are consistent with the logging data and show only minor change. Unfortunately, also in these experiments observed mineralogical and petrophysical changes were within the natural heterogeneity of the Ketzin reservoir and precluded unequivocal conclusions. However, given the only minor differences between post-injection well and pre-injection well, it is reasonable to assume that the potential dissolution-precipitation processes appear to have no severe consequences on reservoir and cap rock integrity or on the injection behaviour. This is also in line with the continuously recorded injection operation parameter. These do not point to any changes in reservoir injectivity.|

  17. Integrating seepage heterogeneity with the use of ganged seepage meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.

    2005-01-01

    The usefulness of standard half-barrel seepage meters for measurement of fluxes between groundwater, and surface water is limited by the small bed area that each measurement represents and the relatively large associated labor costs. Standard half-barrel cylinders were ganged together to allow one measurement of the summed seepage through all of the meters, reducing labor cost and increasing the representative area of measurement. Comparisons of ganged versus individual-meter measurements at two lakes, under both inseepage and outseepage conditions, indicate little loss of efficiency resulting from routing seepage water through the ganging system. Differences between summed and ganged seepage rates were not significant for all but the fastest rates of seepage. At flow rates greater than about 250 mL min-1, ganged values were as low as 80% of summed values. Ganged-meter head losses also were calculated to determine their significance relative to hydraulic-head gradients measured at the field sites. The calculated reduction in hydraulic gradient beneath the seepage meters was significant only for the largest measured seepage rates. A calibration tank was used to determine single-meter and ganged-meter efficiencies compared to known seepage rates. Single-cylinder seepage meters required an average correction factor of 1.05 to convert measured to actual values, whereas the ganged measurements made in the tank required a larger correction factor of 1.14. Although manual measurements were used in these tests, the concept of ganging seepage cylinders also would be useful when used in conjunction with automated flowmeters. ?? 2005, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  18. SEEPAGE/BACKFILL INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Mariner

    2000-04-14

    As directed by written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a sub-model of seepage/backfill interactions is developed and presented in this document to support the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Physical and Chemical Environment Model. The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift. In this analysis, a conceptual model is developed to provide PAO a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The development plan calls for a sub-model that evaluates the effect on water chemistry of chemical reactions between water that enters the drift and backfill materials in the drift. The development plan specifically requests an evaluation of the following important chemical reaction processes: dissolution-precipitation, aqueous complexation, and oxidation-reduction. The development plan also requests the evaluation of the effects of varying seepage and drainage fluxes, varying temperature, and varying evaporation and condensation fluxes. Many of these effects are evaluated in a separate Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''Precipitates Salts Analysis AMR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000), so the results of that AMR are referenced throughout this AMR.

  19. Inverse and predictive modeling of seepage into underground openings.

    PubMed

    Finsterle, S; Ahlers, C F; Trautz, R C; Cook, P J

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the development and calibration of a model for predicting seepage into underground openings. Seepage is a key factor affecting the performance of the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Three-dimensional numerical models were developed to simulate field tests in which water was released from boreholes above excavated niches. Data from air-injection tests were geostatistically analyzed to infer the heterogeneous structure of the fracture permeability field. The heterogeneous continuum model was then calibrated against the measured amount of water that seeped into the opening. This approach resulted in the estimation of model-related, seepage-specific parameters on the scale of interest. The ability of the calibrated model to predict seepage was examined by comparing calculated with measured seepage rates from additional experiments conducted in different portions of the fracture network. We conclude that an effective capillary strength parameter is suitable to characterize seepage-related features and processes for use in a prediction model of average seepage into potential waste-emplacement drifts. PMID:12714286

  20. Characterization and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with fine crystallinity prepared by CO2 laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuge, Ryota; Toyama, Kiyohiko; Ichihashi, Toshinari; Ohkawa, Tetsuya; Aoki, Yasushi; Manako, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were synthesized by irradiating of a CO2 laser in continuous wave mode onto a boron-containing graphite target at room temperature. The pressure of Ar atmosphere was controlled in 50, 150, 400, or 760 Torr. The diameter of obtained MWNTs was in the range of 5-40 nm. The quantity and degree of graphitization of synthesized MWNTs increased with the Ar gas pressure. A large quantity of MWNTs with fine crystalline structure has been synthesized preferentially at the condition of 760 Torr. The MWNTs with the fine crystalinity indicated highly oxidative stability in O2. We also found that a large area field emission device with MWNT cathodes indicated good β value of 3.6 × 104 cm-1, and sufficient reliability for long term operations over 150 h, suggesting promising application to field emission devices.

  1. Spatial characterization of the laser-induced plasma plumes generated by IR CO2 pulsed laser on carbon targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, J. J.; Santos, M.; Díaz, L.; Poyato, J. M. L.

    2009-02-01

    Spatially resolved optical emission analysis was carried out for the plasma plume, produced by high-power tunable IR CO2 pulsed laser ablation of graphite, at λ=9.621 μm and with laser fluence of 342 J cm-2. Wavelength-dispersed spectra of the plume, at medium vacuum conditions ( P air=4 Pa) and concentrated close to the target, reveal C, C+, C2+, C3+, C4+, N, H, O, and molecular emissions between different electronic states of C2, CN, OH, CH, and NH. The characteristics of the spectral emission intensities from different species have been investigated as functions of the distance (up to 20 cm) from the sample surface. Vibrational temperatures in the laser-induced plasma have been estimated at various distances from the target surface.

  2. Construction and characterization of Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, and Co2+ modified-DNA crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Dugasani, Sreekantha; Kim, Myoungsoon; Lee, In-yeal; Kim, Jang Ah; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Lee, Keun Woo; Kim, Taesung; Huh, Nam; Kim, Gil-Ho; Park, Sang Chul; Park, Sung Ha

    2015-07-01

    We studied the physical characteristics of modified-DNA (M-DNA) double crossover crystals fabricated via substrate-assisted growth with various concentrations of four different divalent metallic ions, Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, and Co2+. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to test the stability of the M-DNA crystals with different metal ion concentrations. The AFM images show that M-DNA crystals formed without deformation at up to the critical concentrations of 6 mM of [Cu2+], 1.5 mM of [Ni2+], 1 mM of [Zn2+], and 1 mM of [Co2+]. Above these critical concentrations, the M-DNA crystals exhibited deformed, amorphous structures. Raman spectroscopy was then used to identify the preference of the metal ion coordinate sites. The intensities of the Raman bands gradually decreased as the concentration of the metal ions increased, and when the metal ion concentrations increased beyond the critical values, the Raman band of the amorphous M-DNA was significantly suppressed. The metal ions had a preferential binding order in the DNA molecules with G-C and A-T base pairs followed by the phosphate backbone. A two-probe station was used to measure the electrical current-voltage properties of the crystals which indicated that the maximum currents of the M-DNA complexes could be achieved at around the critical concentration of each ion. We expect that the functionalized ion-doped M-DNA crystals will allow for efficient devices and sensors to be fabricated in the near future.

  3. Synthesis and structural characterization of novel amidinolithium compounds by the insertion reaction of CO2 into the Li-N bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qi; Guo, Zhiqiang; Wei, Xuehong

    2016-06-01

    Insertion of CO2 into the Li-N bond of two amidinolithium compounds [{LiN(2,6-Me2C6H3)C(H)N(2,6- Me2C6H3)}2(THF)3] and [{LiN(4-CH3C6H4)C(H)N(4-CH3C6H4)}2(THF)3] have been studied, and two lithium carbamate compounds [Li{O2C(N(2,6-Me2C6H3)C(H)N(2,6-Me2C6H3))}·THF]4 (1) and [Li{O2C(N(4-CH3C6H4)C(H)N(4-CH3C6H4))}·THF]6 (2) were obtained. The molecular structure of 1 shows a novel cage structure containing four eight-membered (LiOCOLiOCO) rings and two four-membered (LiOLiO) rings with the [Li4(CO2)4]4+ cluster in central. And an unusual and novel structure of 2 was obtained with a "wheel" cage structure including six six-membered (LiOLiOCO) rings surrounding the [Li6(CO2)6]6+ cluster. Both of 1 and 2 were fully characterized by elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray structural determinations.

  4. Characterization of nanocrystalline CuCo2O4 spinel prepared by sol-gel technique applicable to the SOFC interconnect coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknahad, Pouyan; Askari, Masoud; Ghorbanzadeh, Milad

    2015-05-01

    CuCo2O4 spinel nanopowders were synthesized by sol-gel method. The optimal values of pH and molar ratio of citric acid to metal ions (RC), and the influence of the calcination temperature and time were investigated. As-prepared materials were characterized by XRD, TGA, DSC, FE-SEM and electrical and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) measurements. It was found that pH = 4.5 and RC = 1 are the optimum conditions to produce pure CuCo2O4 nanopowders. The electrical conductivity was increased remarkably from 15.2 to 27.5 S cm-1 with an increase in temperature from 500 to 800 °C. Over the temperature range of 25-800 °C, the CTE of CuCo2O4 was 11.4 × 10-6 K-1 which is very close to the CTE of ferritic stainless steel (~12 × 10-6 K-1) used as solid oxide fuel cell interconnect.

  5. CO2 laser preionisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    The final report for work done during the reporting period of January 25, 1990 to January 24, 1991 is presented. A literature survey was conducted to identify the required parameters for effective preionization in TEA CO2 lasers and the methods and techniques for characterizing preionizers are reviewed. A numerical model of the LP-140 cavity was used to determine the cause of the transverse mode stability improvement obtained when the cavity was lengthened. The measurement of the voltage and current discharge pulses on the LP-140 were obtained and their subsequent analysis resulted in an explanation for the low efficiency of the laser. An assortment of items relating to the development of high-voltage power supplies is also provided. A program for analyzing the frequency chirp data files obtained with the HP time and frequency analyzer is included. A program to calculate the theoretical LIMP chirp is also included and a comparison between experiment and theory is made. A program for calculating the CO2 linewidth and its dependence on gas composition and pressure is presented. The program also calculates the number of axial modes under the FWHM of the line for a given resonator length. A graphical plot of the results is plotted.

  6. Preliminary Evaluation of Drift Seepage Model Using SeepageInformation from the ESF South Ramp at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan; Seol, Yongkoo

    2005-09-30

    The overall objective of this study is to examine whether the modeling approach employed to estimate seepage into waste emplacement drifts yields results that are consistent with the observed seepage in the ESF South Ramp. It is important to realize that the modeling study reported here is not an attempt to predict, reproduce, or analyze the South Ramp seepage data. Such an effort would require the development of a specific model and a specific characterization and analysis approach best suited for capturing the hydrogeologic conditions in the South Ramp as they prevailed before and during the period of the seepage observations. Instead, the conceptual framework and analysis approach developed for the estimation of long-term seepage into waste emplacement drifts in the Topopah Spring unit is used with minimal adjustments to examine whether the results of the probabilistic approach employed in the TSPA-LA (which considers uncertainty and spatial variability in fracture permeability, capillary strength, and local percolation flux) would provide reasonable seepage estimates, even if applied to the conditions in the South Ramp. If so, confidence can be gained that the TSPA-LA approach captures the processes relevant for the prediction of natural seepage into large underground openings.

  7. CO2 laser modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  8. Measuring Streambank Erosion Due to Groundwater Seepage: Correlation to Bank Pore Water Pressure, Precipitation and Stream Stage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There exists a lack of information on one of the basic mechanisms governing sediment input to streams: streambank erosion by ground water flow or seepage erosion. The objective of this research was to characterize a streambank undergoing seepage erosion and quantify subsurface flows and seepage ero...

  9. Characterization of the flow of the CO/CO 2 gases through carbon nanotube junctions using molecular dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzyan, Hassan; Tavangar, Zahra

    2009-08-01

    A detailed study of the gas flow in carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanotube junctions (CNTJ) can open the way towards the study of the reaction mixture flow in prospective nano-reactors. In this work, flow of the pure and mixed CO/CO 2 gases through some selected CNTs and three types of CNT1- J-CNT2 CNTJs, ( 12, 12)- J-( 3, 8), ( 12, 8)- J-( 8, 12) and ( 8, 8)- J-( 13, 0), are studied using molecular dynamic simulations. Results of this study show that regardless of the diameter and helicity type of the CNT1 and CNT2, when the flow starts with the molecules in the CNT1, the number density of molecules in the CNT2 is higher than that in the CNT1. Projected radial distribution of the molecules are calculated and analyzed in terms of the molecule-molecule and molecule-wall interactions. The well-structured projected radial distribution results show that the CNT radius and helicity as well as the type of molecules determine the lateral distribution of the gas molecules along the flow.

  10. Rock formation characterization for CO2-EOR and carbon geosequestration; 3D seismic amplitude and coherency anomalies, Wellington Field, Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohl, D.; Raef, A.; Watnef, L.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a workflow for a Mississipian carbonates characterization case-study integrating post-stack seismic attributes, well-logs porosities, and seismic modeling to explore relating changes in small-scale "lithofacies" properties and/or sub-seismic resolution faulting to key amplitude and coherency 3D seismic attributes. The main objective of this study is to put emphasis on reservoir characterization that is both optimized for and subsequently benefiting from pilot tertiary CO2-EOR in preparation for future carbon geosequestration in a depleting reservoir and a deep saline aquifer. The extracted 3D seismic coherency attribute indicated anomalous features that can be interpreted as a lithofacies change or a sub-seismic resolution faulting. A 2D finite difference modeling has been undertaken to understand and potentially build discriminant attributes to map structural and/or lithofacies anomalies of interest especially when embarking upon CO2-EOR and/or carbon sequestration monitoring and management projects. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  11. A natural analogue for CO2 leakage: The release and fate of CO2 at the Jan Mayen vent fields (AMOR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, T.; Lilley, M. D.; Pedersen, R. B.; Thorseth, I. H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is seen as a new possible technique for reducing the emission of industrial CO2 to the atmosphere. To evaluate the risks of sub-seabed CO2 storage, the European Commission is supporting the international and multi-disciplinary ECO2 project. Among other objectives, this project is dealing with evaluating the likelihood of leakage and the resulting possible impacts on marine ecosystems. In the framework of the ECO2 project, the release and dispersal of CO2 have been studied at several natural seep sites. In this study, we present geochemical data collected at the natural CO2 leakage analogue, Jan Mayen vent fields (JMVF). The basalt-hosted JMVF are located at 71° N on the southern end of the ultra-slow spreading Mohns Ridge, which is part of the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) system. The JMVF are composed of several venting sites, spread over a large area. These venting areas include focused high-temperature venting and diffuse low-temperature fluid flow vents as well as areas where free gas bubbles are released. Over the past few years, we have repeatedly visited and extensively sampled these vent fields to study the release and fate of CO2 in this natural seep area. One of our main objectives was to constrain the CO2 content of the widely emitted gas and to study its dispersion and fate in the water column. We have also investigated hydrate formation, which is observed at various locations. The venting fluids are chemically characterized by CO2 concentrations of up to 110 mmol/kg, having an associated isotopic composition representing a mantle carbon source. Thus, the CO2 concentrations measured at the JMVF represent the high-end compared to the concentration range of most other basalt-hosted hydrothermal mid-ocean ridge systems. Even though the concentrations of the emitted CO2 vary over time and with the type of venting (focused flow, diffuse flow or bubbles), the overall release is continuously high. The dispersion of the

  12. Langmuir-Blodgett Films of the Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr): Preparation, Characterization, and CO2 Adsorption Study Using a QCM-Based Setup.

    PubMed

    Benito, Javier; Sorribas, Sara; Lucas, Irene; Coronas, Joaquin; Gascon, Ignacio

    2016-06-29

    This work reports the fabrication and characterization of Langmuir-Blodgett films of nanoparticles (size 51 ± 10 nm) of the metal organic framework MIL-101(Cr). LB film characterization by SEM, UV-vis, GIXRD, and QCM has shown that the addition of 1 wt % of behenic acid to MOF dispersion allows obtaining dense monolayers at the air-water interface that can be deposited onto solid substrates of different nature with transfer ratios close to 1. Moreover, a QCM-based setup has been built and used for the first time to measure CO2 adsorption isotherms at 303 K on MOF LB films, proving that LB films with MOF masses between 1.2 (1 layer) and 2.3 (2 layers) μg can be used to obtain accurate adsorption values at 100 kPa, similar to those obtained by conventional adsorption methods that require much larger MOF quantities (tens of milligrams). PMID:27268426

  13. Structural and biophysical characterization of the α-carbonic anhydrase from the gammaproteobacterium Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2: insights into engineering thermostable enzymes for CO2 sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Torres, Natalia A.; Mahon, Brian P.; Boone, Christopher D.; Pinard, Melissa A.; Tu, Chingkuang; Ng, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Silverman, David; Scott, Kathleen; McKenna, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalytic CO2 sequestration to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from industrial processes is an active area of research. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are attractive enzymes for this process. However, the most active CAs display limited thermal and pH stability, making them less than ideal. As a result, there is an ongoing effort to engineer and/or find a thermostable CA to fulfill these needs. Here, the kinetic and thermal characterization is presented of an α-CA recently discovered in the mesophilic hydrothermal vent-isolate extremophile Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 (TcruCA), which has a significantly higher thermostability compared with human CA II (melting temperature of 71.9°C versus 59.5°C, respectively) but with a tenfold decrease in the catalytic efficiency. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the dimeric TcruCA shows that it has a highly conserved yet compact structure compared with other α-CAs. In addition, TcruCA contains an intramolecular disulfide bond that stabilizes the enzyme. These features are thought to contribute significantly to the thermostability and pH stability of the enzyme and may be exploited to engineer α-CAs for applications in industrial CO2 sequestration. PMID:26249355

  14. Characterization of mid-infrared emissions from C2H2, CO, CO2, and HCN-filled hollow fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. M.; Fourcade-Dutin, C.; Mao, C.; Baumgart, B.; Nampoothiri, A. V. V.; Campbell, N.; Wang, Y.; Benabid, F.; Rudolph, W.; Washburn, B. R.; Corwin, K. L.

    2012-02-01

    We have now demonstrated and characterized gas-filled hollow-core fiber lasers based on population inversion from acetylene (12C2H2) and HCN gas contained within the core of a kagome-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The gases are optically pumped via first order rotational-vibrational overtones near 1.5 μm using 1-ns pulses from an optical parametric amplifier. Transitions from the pumped overtone modes to fundamental C-H stretching modes in both molecules create narrow-band laser emissions near 3 μm. High gain resulting from tight confinement of the pump and laser light together with the active gas permits us to operate these lasers in a single pass configuration, without the use of any external resonator structure. A delay between the emitted laser pulse and the incident pump pulse has been observed and is shown to vary with pump pulse energy and gas pressure. Furthermore, we have demonstrated lasing beyond 4 μm from CO and CO2 using silver-coated glass capillaries, since fused silica based fibers do not transmit in this spectral region and chalcogenide fibers are not yet readily available. Studies of the laser pulse energy as functions of the pump pulse energy and gas pressure were performed. Efficiencies reaching ~ 20% are observed for both acetylene and CO2.

  15. Structural and Spectral Characterization of Co2+- and Ni2+-DOPED CdO Powder Prepared From Solution at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, C. V.; Rao, L. V. Krishna; Satish, D. V.; Shim, J.; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.

    2015-11-01

    The mild and simple solution method was used for the synthesis of Co2+- and Ni2+-doped CdO powders at room temperature. The prepared powders were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), optical absorption, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). From the powder X-ray diffraction patterns, it has been observed that the prepared Co2+ and Ni2+ ion-doped CdO powders belong to the cubic phase, and the evaluated average crystalline sizes of the powders are 20 and 14 nm, respectively. The SEM images and the EDS spectra show that the prepared powders are distributed over different sizes in the grain boundaries. Optical absorption studies allow determination of site symmetry of the metal ion with its ligands. The crystal field (Dq) and inter-electronic repulsion (B and C) parameters have been evaluated from the optical absorption spectra. The FTIR spectra show the characteristic fundamental vibrations of the metal oxide and CdO.

  16. Structural and biophysical characterization of the α-carbonic anhydrase from the gammaproteobacterium Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2: insights into engineering thermostable enzymes for CO2 sequestration.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Torres, Natalia A; Mahon, Brian P; Boone, Christopher D; Pinard, Melissa A; Tu, Chingkuang; Ng, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Silverman, David; Scott, Kathleen; McKenna, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Biocatalytic CO2 sequestration to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from industrial processes is an active area of research. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are attractive enzymes for this process. However, the most active CAs display limited thermal and pH stability, making them less than ideal. As a result, there is an ongoing effort to engineer and/or find a thermostable CA to fulfill these needs. Here, the kinetic and thermal characterization is presented of an α-CA recently discovered in the mesophilic hydrothermal vent-isolate extremophile Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 (TcruCA), which has a significantly higher thermostability compared with human CA II (melting temperature of 71.9°C versus 59.5°C, respectively) but with a tenfold decrease in the catalytic efficiency. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the dimeric TcruCA shows that it has a highly conserved yet compact structure compared with other α-CAs. In addition, TcruCA contains an intramolecular disulfide bond that stabilizes the enzyme. These features are thought to contribute significantly to the thermostability and pH stability of the enzyme and may be exploited to engineer α-CAs for applications in industrial CO2 sequestration. PMID:26249355

  17. CO2 blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  18. Geochemical characterization of tarballs on beaches along the California coast. Part I - Shallow seepage impacting the Santa Barbara Channel Islands, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and San Miguel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostettler, F.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Lorenson, T.D.; Dougherty, J.

    2004-01-01

    Tarballs are common along the southern California coastline. This study investigates tarballs from beaches along this coastline, with a focus on Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, and San Miquel Islands in the Santa Barbara Channel. The tarballs were fingerprinted using biomarker and stable carbon isotope parameters, and then grouped according to genetic similarities. The data show that the tarballs are of natural and not anthropogenic origin and that all originate from source rock within the Miocene Monterey Formation via shallow seeps offshore. Sterane biomarker parameters were found to vary widely in the sample set. Biodegradation, especially of the regular steranes, is the primary process impacting the biomarker distributions in a large group of samples. The most common tarball occurrences appear to come from offshore seepage near the west end of Santa Cruz Island. Another major group most likely was transported north from near Santa Monica Bay. Several individual occurrences of some of these tarball groups also were found on beaches as far north as Pt. Reyes and as far south as San Diego, indicating significant long-distance dispersal by ocean currents. This study begins a library of tarball fingerprints to be used as a database to help distinguish between natural and anthropogenic tar occurrences all along the California coast, and to compare shallow seepage with future samples of deeper production oils from the same area.

  19. Leveraging Characterization Data to Develop a Comprehensive Monitoring Plan for CO2 Storage at an Industrial Injection Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerst, J. L.; Gupta, N.; Jagucki, P.; Sminchak, J.

    2007-12-01

    In the current validation stage of geologic storage technology, the development of a monitoring, mitigation and verification (MMV) plan for an industrial carbon sequestration project requires consideration of both the implementation and research goals, within the practical site constraints. In this presentation, we integrate data from the drilling of a characterization well and 2D surface seismic to develop an MMV plan for the proposed injection and monitoring phase at AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in New Haven, West Virginia. The Mountaineer plant has specific challenges for MMV design such as the presence of the Ohio River, relatively rough terrain and injection targets of varying thickness. In addition, there is limited space at the surface so any monitoring must be carefully designed to best utilize the area. For example, we present our evaluation the applicability of seismic monitoring techniques. This includes the possibility of using crosswell seismic or vertical seismic profiling to help reduce signal attenuation at the surface and increase resolution to allow the imaging of smaller units within the injection reservoir. Also, we evaluate using downhole, point measurements such as reservoir fluid sampling and other wireline tools in monitoring wells. The use of these tools may be the key element in evaluating dissolution and reservoir behavior. This results in an MMV plan that allows for plume location identification and reservoir assessment while keeping costs realistic for an industrial site. This work is supported by DOE-NETL, AEP, Ohio Coal Development Office, BP, Battelle, and Schlumberger.

  20. Characterization of complexation of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) thermoresponsive cationic nanogels with salmon sperm DNA

    PubMed Central

    Moselhy, Jim; Vira, Tasnim; Liu, Fei-Fei; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2009-01-01

    Thermoresponsive cationic nanogel (TCNG) networks based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM), 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and quaternary alkyl ammonium halide salts of DMAEMA (DMAEMAQ) were synthesized by dispersion polymerization technique. The thermoresponsive properties of TCNGs and TCNG-salmon sperm DNA (sasDNA) polyplexes were characterized in aqueous media of various pH and ionic strength. P[NIPAM] and P[NIPAM/DMAEMA] TCNGs exhibited sharp volume phase transition (VPT) in water at critical temperatures (Tc) of 32 °C and 36 °C, respectively. Quaternized P[NIPAM/DMAEMAQ] TCNGs did not undergo sharp VPT up to 50 °C. The VPT of uncomplexed TCNGs were sensitive to the ionic composition and ionic strength of salts in solution, but were insensitive to pH in the range 5.0 to 7.4. The VPT of P[NIPAM/DMAEMAQ]/sasDNA diminished in magnitude with increasing Wp/Wd suggesting greater compaction of the polyplexes. The distinct phase-transition properties of P[NIPAM/DMAEMA]/sasDNA and P[NIPAM/DMAEMAQ]/sasDNA polyplexes were attributed to the condensing capability of polycations and to differences in the spatial distribution of structural charges in quaternized and nonquaternized networks. The findings demonstrate that stable TCNGs can be prepared with controllable responsive properties determined by the nature of the cationic charge incorporated and may have potential as vehicles for DNA delivery. PMID:19774114

  1. Characterization of the temporal dynamics of soil CO2 and N gas production (NO, N2O, N2) under varying environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Zheng, Xunhua

    2010-05-01

    The characterization of environmental drivers of soil N gas losses remains largely uncertain, since our ability to measure and follow temporal dynamics of N2 production via denitrification as well simultaneous gaseous losses of NO, N2O and CO2 is still limited. To overcome this problem we further developed the gas flow soil core technique (e.g Butterbach-Bahl et al., 2002; Dannenmann et al., 2008) in such a way that simultaneous measurements of gaseous losses of CO2, NO, N2O and N2 can be done. Since measurements of N2 production with this technique requires the establishment of an N2 free atmosphere, i.e. exchange of the soil atmosphere with a N2-free gas mixture, we also investigated different pre-incubation conditions (temperature, O2 content) to minimize the effect of the atmosphere exchange process on the target parameters N gas production and fluxes. Finally we tested our experimental setup and determined the dynamic of CO2 and N gas production for varying environmental conditions (temperature, nitrate content, C availability) and for agricultural soils with different properties (SOC, texture, pH). For this we followed N and C gas fluxes over a period of up to three weeks and supplemented these measurements with observation of changes in soil microbial biomass and concentrations of dissolved organic and inorganic nitrogen. This allowed us to establish full nitrogen balances and to trace the sources for N gas production, i.e. changes in inorganic and organic N pools. Our experiments e.g. show that following a switch from aerobic to anaerobic soil incubation conditions, N2O as well as NO production can outweigh N2 production in the first few hours, whereas CO2 production remains largely unaffected. After approx. 1-2 day N2 production peaked, whereas production of N2O and NO as well as CO2 was already starting to decline. Depending on incubation conditions and investigated soils, N2O and NO production ceased after 5-10 days, whereas N2 production continued

  2. Characterization of Pd/c-Al2O3 Catalysts Prepared Using [Pd(hfac)2] in Liquid CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, M.; Kim, J; Roberts, G; Lamb, H

    2008-01-01

    A series of Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts was prepared from (Pd(hfac){sub 2}) (hfac = hexafluoroacetylacetonate) in liquid carbon dioxide using the method reported by Kim et al. (Chem Mater 18:4710 (2006)). The catalysts were characterized using CO pulse chemisorption, diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron microscopy. The catalysts were reduced initially in the high-pressure CO{sub 2} reaction cell using H{sub 2} at 75 C. Samples were removed, stored in a desiccator, and re-reduced in situ at 250 C prior to pulse chemisorption, DRIFTS and XAFS. CO pulse chemisorption evidenced that the Pd dispersion decreased from 55% to 5% as the Pd loading increased from 0.58 to 3.94 wt.%. The as-prepared 0.58 and 1.77 wt.% Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts (after air exposure) contained oxidized Pd species that were converted after in situ reduction to supported Pd particles. The average Pd particle sizes of these two catalysts (16 and 23 {angstrom}, respectively) estimated from the first-shell Pd-Pd coordination numbers are in good agreement with the CO chemisorption results. DRIFTS evidenced a prevalence of weakly bound linear CO (CO = 2083 cm{sup -1}) adsorbed on the 0.58 wt.% Pd catalyst. A 2.95 wt% Pd catalyst (49 {angstrom} average particle size) also exhibited a strong linear CO band (CO = 2093 cm{sup -1}). In contrast, CO chemisorption on a commercial 1 wt.% Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst (37 {angstrom} average particle size) gave predominantly 2-fold bridging CO species. We infer that the supported Pd particles prepared from (Pd(hfac){sub 2}) are rougher on the atomic scale (with a higher percentage of edge and corner atoms) than equivalently sized particles in conventionally prepared Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts.

  3. Dynamics of CO2 fluxes and concentrations during a shallow subsurface CO2 release

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2009-09-01

    A field facility located in Bozeman, Montana provides the opportunity to test methods to detect, locate, and quantify potential CO2 leakage from geologic storage sites. From 9 July to 7 August 2008, 0.3 t CO2 d{sup -1} were injected from a 100-m long, {approx}2.5 m deep horizontal well. Repeated measurements of soil CO2 fluxes on a grid characterized the spatio-temporal evolution of the surface leakage signal and quantified the surface leakage rate. Infrared CO2 concentration sensors installed in the soil at 30 cm depth at 0 to 10 m from the well and at 4 cm above the ground at 0 and 5 m from the well recorded surface breakthrough of CO2 leakage and migration of CO2 leakage through the soil. Temporal variations in CO2 concentrations were correlated with atmospheric and soil temperature, wind speed, atmospheric pressure, rainfall, and CO2 injection rate.

  4. Preliminary results of the 3D magnetotelluric characterization of the Research Laboratory on Geological Storage of CO2 in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaya, X.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J.; Marcuello, A.; Jones, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    The work presented here is a component of an on-going project in the framework of establishing a Technical Development Plant (PDT) for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in a deep saline aquifer. The Research Laboratory is located at the Spanish town of Hontomín, and the project is funded by Fundación Ciudad de la Energía-CIUDEN (http://www.ciuden.es) on behalf of the Spanish Government. In this setting, magnetotelluric (MT) data are providing a baseline model for estimating CO2 plume distribution after injection. The bulk electrical resistivity of rocks is expected to increase significantly due to the presence of CO2 inside the pores of the reservoir rock since the effective volume available for the ionic transport will be reduced. We present the preliminary results of the electromagnetic characterization of the Hontomín site. In total, 109 broadband magnetotelluric (BBMT) soundings were acquired in the area covering an extent of 3 x 4 km2. The data are organized mainly along five north-south profiles, each of around 4 km in length, in the period range of 15 to 4096 Hz. The stations were deployed at approximately 200 m intervals, recording data during 24 to 48 hours, and the average distance between profiles was 500 m. The instrumentation consisted of Metronix ADU06, Metronix ADU07 and Phoenix V8. A remote reference station was permanently placed around 20 km away from the study area. Different robust processing codes using remote reference methods have been tested and used at all stations to derive optimal MT responses. The 3D electrical resistivity model of the subsurface is being computed using different 3D inversion codes: commercial 3D inversion of Winglink® (Mackie and Madden, 1993), WSINV3DMT (Siripunvaraporn et al., 2005) and modEM (Egbert and Kelbert, 2012). The model is discretized on 73 x 114 x 113-layer grid and the inversions were undertaken using the 4 elements of the impedance tensor (8 responses) and more than 16 periods in the range of 0.001 to 10

  5. A finite element code for modelling tracer transport in a non-isothermal two-phase flow system for CO2 geological storage characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, F.; Niemi, A. P.; Yang, Z.; Fagerlund, F.; Licha, T.; Sauter, M.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a new finite element method (FEM) code for modeling tracer transport in a non-isothermal two-phase flow system. The main intended application is simulation of the movement of so-called novel tracers for the purpose of characterization of geologically stored CO2 and its phase partitioning and migration in deep saline formations. The governing equations are based on the conservation of mass and energy. Among the phenomena accounted for are liquid-phase flow, gas flow, heat transport and the movement of the novel tracers. The movement of tracers includes diffusion and the advection associated with the gas and liquid flow. The temperature, gas pressure, suction, concentration of tracer in liquid phase and concentration of tracer in gas phase are chosen as the five primary variables. Parameters such as the density, viscosity, thermal expansion coefficient are expressed in terms of the primary variables. The governing equations are discretized in space using the Galerkin finite element formulation, and are discretized in time by one-dimensional finite difference scheme. This leads to an ill-conditioned FEM equation that has many small entries along the diagonal of the non-symmetric coefficient matrix. In order to deal with the problem of non-symmetric ill-conditioned matrix equation, special techniques are introduced . Firstly, only nonzero elements of the matrix need to be stored. Secondly, it is avoided to directly solve the whole large matrix. Thirdly, a strategy has been used to keep the diversity of solution methods in the calculation process. Additionally, an efficient adaptive mesh technique is included in the code in order to track the wetting front. The code has been validated against several classical analytical solutions, and will be applied for simulating the CO2 injection experiment to be carried out at the Heletz site, Israel, as part of the EU FP7 project MUSTANG.

  6. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, Pasquale R.

    2001-04-04

    This report describes the evaluation, design, and implementation of a DOE funded CO2 pilot project in the Lost Hills Field, Kern County, California. The pilot consists of four inverted (injector-centered) 5-spot patterns covering approximately 10 acres, and is located in a portion of the field, which has been under waterflood since early 1992. The target reservoir for the CO2 pilot is the Belridge Diatomite. The pilot location was selected based on geology, reservoir quality and reservoir performance during the waterflood. A CO2 pilot was chosen, rather than full-field implementation, to investigate uncertainties associated with CO2 utilization rate and premature CO2 breakthrough, and overall uncertainty in the unproven CO2 flood process in the San Joaquin Valley.

  7. Geochronology, geochemistry, and tectonic characterization of Quaternary large-volume travertine deposits in the southwestern United States and their implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priewisch, Alexandra

    Travertines are freshwater carbonates that precipitate from carbonic groundwater due to the degassing of CO2. Travertine deposits are often situated along faults that serve as conduits for CO2-charged groundwater and their geochemistry often records mixing of deeply-derived fluids and volatiles with shallow meteoric water. Travertines are surface expressions of dynamic mantle processes related to the tectonic setting. This dissertation includes four chapters that focus on different aspects of travertine formation and their scientific value. They are excellent, although underestimated, diagnostic tools for climatology, hydrology, tectonics, geochemistry, geomicrobiology, and they can inform carbon sequestration models. Quaternary large-volume travertine deposits in New Mexico and Arizona occur in an extensional tectonic stress regime on the southeastern Colorado Plateau and along the Rio Grande rift. They accumulated above fault systems during episodes of high hydraulic head in confined aquifers, increased regional volcanic activity, and high input of mantle-derived volatiles such as CO 2 and He. Stable isotope and trace element geochemistry of travertines is controlled by groundwater geochemistry as well as the degassing of CO 2. The geochemical composition allows for distinguishing different travertine facies and evaluating past groundwater flow. The travertine deposits in New Mexico are interpreted to be extinct CO2 fields due to the large volumes that accumulated and in analogy to the travertine deposits in Arizona that are associated with an active CO2-gas field. Travertines are natural analogues for CO2 leakage along fault systems that bypassed regional cap rocks and they provide important insight into the migration of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface. The volume of travertine can be used to infer the integrated CO2 leakage along a fault system over geologic time. This leakage is estimated as: (1) CO2 that becomes fixed in CaCO3/travertine (tons of carbon

  8. Seepage meters and Bernoulli's revenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Reich, C.D.; Hickey, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of seepage data from a network of 50 permanently deployed submarine seepage meters, specially constructed from fiberglass, indicates that the devices artificially advect (Bernoulli effect) shallow ground water. Reverse flow into the rock was not observed even when adjacent piezometers installed 2-m to 20-m below the rock-water interface indicated negative groundwater heads. Quantitative testing of five different designs, including conventional end-of-oil-drum designs, indicates that meters presenting positive relief on the sea floor are subject to the Bernoulli effect when placed in areas where there are waves and/or currents. Advection does not appear to be caused by flexing of the collection bags.

  9. H-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  10. (Salen)tin complexes: syntheses, characterization, crystal structures, and catalytic activity in the formation of propylene carbonate from CO(2) and propylene oxide.

    PubMed

    Jing, Huanwang; Edulji, Smita K; Gibbs, Julianne M; Stern, Charlotte L; Zhou, Hongying; Nguyen, SonBinh T

    2004-07-12

    A series of (salen)tin(II) and (salen)tin(IV) complexes was synthesized. The (salen)tin(IV) complexes, (salen)SnX(2) (X = Br and I), were prepared in good yields via the direct oxidation reaction of (salen)tin(II) complexes with Br(2) or I(2). (Salen)SnX(2) successfully underwent the anion-exchange reaction with AgOTf (OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate) to form (salen)Sn(OTf)(2) and (salen)Sn(X)(OTf) (X = Br). The (salen)Sn(OTf)(2) complex was easily converted to any of the dihalide (salen)SnX(2) compounds using halide salts. All complexes were fully characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and elemental analysis, while some were characterized by (13)C, (19)F, and (119)Sn NMR spectroscopy. Several crystal structures of (salen)tin(II) and (salen)tin(IV) were also determined. Finally, both (salen)tin(II) and (salen)tin(IV) complexes were shown to efficiently catalyze the formation of propylene carbonate from propylene oxide and CO(2). Of the series, (3,3',5,5'-Br(4)-salen)SnBr(2), 3i, was found to be the most effective catalyst (TOF = 524 h(-)(1)). PMID:15236545

  11. Geomechanical Characterization and Reservoir Simulation of a CO2-EOR and Sequestration Project in a Mature Oil Field, Teapot Dome, WY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaramonte, L.; Zoback, M. D.; Friedmann, J.; Stamp, V.

    2008-12-01

    Mature oil and gas reservoirs are attractive targets for geological sequestration of CO2 because of their potential storage capacities and the possible cost offsets from enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In this work we develop a 3D reservoir model and fluid flow simulation of the Tensleep Formation using geomechanical constraints in advance of a proposed CO2-EOR injection experiment at Teapot Dome Oil Field, WY. The objective of this work is to model the migration of the injected CO2 as well as to obtain limits on the rates and volumes of CO2 that can be injected without compromising seal integrity. In the present work we combine our previous geomechanical analysis, geostatistical reservoir modeling and fluid flow simulations to investigate critical questions regarding the feasibility of a CO2-EOR project in the Tensleep Fm. The analysis takes in consideration the initial trapping and sealing mechanisms of the reservoir, the consequences of past and present oil production on these mechanisms, and the potential effect of the CO2 injection on the reservoir and the seal. Finally we also want to assess the long-term recovery of the injection site and what will happen in the system once the oil production stops. The CO2-EOR injection pilot will consist of the injection of 1 MMcfd of supercritical CO2 for six weeks. The preliminary simulation results indicate that the injected CO2 will rapidly rise to the top layers, above the main producing interval, and will accumulate in the fractures (almost none will get into the matrix). Design optimization will be needed to ensure adequate spatial distribution of the CO2 and sufficient time for CO2 miscibility.

  12. Saturated CO2 inhibits microbial processes in CO2-vented deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Beer, D.; Haeckel, M.; Neumann, J.; Wegener, G.; Inagaki, F.; Boetius, A.

    2013-08-01

    This study focused on biogeochemical processes and microbial activity in sediments of a natural deep-sea CO2 seepage area (Yonaguni Knoll IV hydrothermal system, Japan). The aim was to assess the influence of the geochemical conditions occurring in highly acidic and CO2 saturated sediments on sulfate reduction (SR) and anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM). Porewater chemistry was investigated from retrieved sediment cores and in situ by microsensor profiling. The sites sampled around a sediment-hosted hydrothermal CO2 vent were very heterogeneous in porewater chemistry, indicating a complex leakage pattern. Near the vents, droplets of liquid CO2 were observed emanating from the sediments, and the pH reached approximately 4.5 in a sediment depth > 6 cm, as determined in situ by microsensors. Methane and sulfate co-occurred in most sediment samples from the vicinity of the vents down to a depth of 3 m. However, SR and AOM were restricted to the upper 7-15 cm below seafloor, although neither temperature, low pH, nor the availability of methane and sulfate could be limiting microbial activity. We argue that the extremely high subsurface concentrations of dissolved CO2 (1000-1700 mM), which disrupt the cellular pH homeostasis, and lead to end-product inhibition. This limits life to the surface sediment horizons above the liquid CO2 phase, where less extreme conditions prevail. Our results may have to be taken into consideration in assessing the consequences of deep-sea CO2 sequestration on benthic element cycling and on the local ecosystem state.

  13. Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Czirr, K.L.; Gaddis, M.P.; Moshell, M.K.

    2002-02-21

    The principle objective of this project is to demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of an innovative reservoir management and carbon dioxide (CO2) flood project development approach for improving CO2 flood project economics in shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs.

  14. Capnography: monitoring CO2.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-10-01

    MONITORING RESPIRATORY and metabolic function by using capnography to measure end tidal carbon dioxide is standard practice in anaesthesia. It is also becoming more common in intensive care units and during procedural sedation. End tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) monitoring may also be used to assess effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Capnography is now emerging in general medical and surgical wards to monitor respiratory depression in patients using opioid analgesics. Using EtCO2 to monitor respiratory function offers many benefits over pulse oximetry. It is important to understand the differences between these two monitoring methods, and why capnography is increasingly favoured in many situations. An understanding of the physiological processes involved in CO2 excretion allows nurses to use capnography in a safe and meaningful way, while monitoring at-risk patients in acute care. PMID:26638570

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a novel semi-IPN hydrogel based on Salecan and poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate).

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyu; Feng, Liandong; Wei, Wei; Xie, Aming; Wang, Shiming; Zhang, Jianfa; Dong, Wei

    2014-05-25

    Salecan is a novel water-soluble, high molecular mass extracellular β-glucan produced by Agrobacterium sp. ZX09. Salecan has excellent physicochemical and biological properties, making it very suitable for hydrogel preparation. In this study, a series of novel semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) hydrogels containing Salecan and poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (poly(DMAA-co-HEMA)) were synthesized by radical polymerization and semi-IPN technology. Structure and morphology of the hydrogels were characterized by FTIR, XRD, TGA and SEM. The semi-IPNs had a well-interconnected porous structure with tunable pore size ranging from 6 to 41μm. Swelling capability of the hydrogels was improved by introducing the hydrophilic Salecan. Rheological results indicated that the incorporation of poly(DMAA-co-HEMA) into hydrogels enhanced the storage modulus. Compression tests revealed that these semi-IPNs were robust materials with compressive modulus between 13.3 and 90.5kPa, the addition of Salecan increased the fracture strain from 71.1% to 88.8%. Degradation and cytotoxicity tests demonstrated that semi-IPNs were degradable and non-toxic. PMID:24708962

  16. Methane Seepage at Hyperalkaline Springs in the Ronda Peridotite Massif (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etiope, G.; Vadillo, I.; Whiticar, M. J.; Marques, J. M.; Carreira, P. M.; Tiago, I.; Benavente, J.; Jimenez, P.; Urresti, B.

    2014-12-01

    Methane-rich, hyperalkaline spring waters and bubbling pools have been sampled in the Ronda peridotite massif in southern Spain. Water chemistry (T: 17.1-21.5 ºC; pH: 10.7-11.7; DO: <2 mg/L; Ca-OH facies) is characteristic of present-day serpentinization. Dissolved CH4 concentrations range from 0.1 to 3.2 mg/L. CH4 stable C and H isotope ratios suggest a dominant abiotic origin in two natural spring sites (delta13C: -13 to -29 ‰ VPDB; delta2H: -309 to -333 ‰ VSMOW) and a mixed biotic-abiotic origin in springs with artificial water delivery systems (i.e., pipes or fountains; delta13C: -44 to -69 ‰; delta2H: -180 to -319 ‰). At the natural springs, gas is mainly released through bubbles close to the water outlet (CH4 flux ~1 kg/day by individual bubble trains), and subordinately by microseepage from the ground, even at distances of ~100 m from the bubble-spring site (flux of 10's, up to 97, mg CH4 m-2day-1). Gas seepage is strictly controlled by faults. Under-saturation of CH4 in water, bubbling and seepage location suggest that CH4 is not exclusively transported to the surface by hyperalkaline water, but it follows autonomous migration pathways along faults. Similar 'dry' seepage of abiotic gas was observed in the Philippines, New Zealand, Turkey and Italy. Like other land-based serpentinization systems, the Ronda peridotite massif is characterized by low heat flow (<40 mW/m2), with temperatures <60°C at depths of 1.5 km. At these low T and high pH conditions, CO32- is the only available carbon source dissolved in the water, and unlikely contributes to catalysed Fischer-Tropsch Type reactions. Methane production from CO2 hydrogenation in a gas phase system (unsaturated fractured rocks) cannot be excluded. The presence of ruthenium-enriched chromitites in the Ronda peridotites may support the hypothesis that CH4 is produced by CO2 hydrogenation catalyzed by Ru minerals, even at temperatures below 100°C, as demonstrated in recent laboratory experiments

  17. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  18. Characterization of the CO2 fluid adsorption in coal as a function of pressure using neutron scattering techniques (SANS and USANS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melnichenko, Y.B.; Radlinski, A.P.; Mastalerz, Maria; Cheng, G.; Rupp, J.

    2009-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering techniques have been applied to investigate the phase behavior of CO2 injected into coal and possible changes in the coal pore structure that may result from this injection. Three coals were selected for this study: the Seelyville coal from the Illinois Basin (Ro = 0.53%), Baralaba coal from the Bowen Basin (Ro = 0.67%), and Bulli 4 coal from the Sydney Basin (Ro = 1.42%). The coals were selected from different depths to represent the range of the underground CO2 conditions (from subcritical to supercritical) which may be realized in the deep subsurface environment. The experiments were conducted in a high pressure cell and CO2 was injected under a range of pressure conditions, including those corresponding to in-situ hydrostatic subsurface conditions for each coal. Our experiments indicate that the porous matrix of all coals remains essentially unchanged after exposure to CO2 at pressures up to 200??bar (1??bar = 105??Pa). Each coal responds differently to the CO2 exposure and this response appears to be different in pores of various sizes within the same coal. For the Seelyville coal at reservoir conditions (16????C, 50??bar), CO2 condenses from a gas into liquid, which leads to increased average fluid density in the pores (??pore) with sizes (r) 1 ?? 105 ??? r ??? 1 ?? 104???? (??pore ??? 0.489??g/cm3) as well as in small pores with size between 30 and 300???? (??pore ??? 0.671??g/cm3). These values are by a factor of three to four higher than the density of bulk CO2 (??CO2) under similar thermodynamic conditions (??CO2 ??? 0.15??g/cm3). At the same time, in the intermediate size pores with r ??? 1000???? the average fluid density is similar to the density of bulk fluid, which indicates that adsorption does not occur in these pores. At in situ conditions for the Baralaba coal (35 OC, 100??bar), the average fluid density of CO2 in all pores is lower than that of the bulk fluid (??pore / ??CO2 ??? 0.6). Neutron scattering from the

  19. Lake Okeechobee seepage monitoring network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Donald J.

    1973-01-01

    This report summarizes the data collected at the five original monitoring sites along the south shore of Lake Okeechobee from January 29, 1970 to June 28, 1972. In order to use the hydrographs in this report to full advantage, they should be studied in conjunction with Meyer's graphs and text (1971). During steady-state conditions, water seeps from the lake through the filtercake and through the aquifers beneath the dike. At those sites where the filtercake is missing, or has about the same permeability as the aquifers, the seepage from the lake is about equivalent to the flow through the aquifers. Present data are insufficient to determine whether or not filtercake buildup has reduced seepage. No appreciable change in drainage occurred during the observed period.

  20. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jennifer J.; Wood, Rachel A.; Haszeldine, R. Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO2 onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO2 leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO2 seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO2 stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO2 degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO2 poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO2 seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO2 flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO2 seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less that Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized. PMID:21911398

  1. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer J; Wood, Rachel A; Haszeldine, R Stuart

    2011-10-01

    Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO(2) onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO(2) leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO(2) seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO(2) stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO(2) degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO(2) poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO(2) seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO(2) flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO(2) seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less that Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized. PMID:21911398

  2. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.J.; Wood, R.A.; Haszeldine, R.S.

    2011-10-04

    Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO2 onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO2 leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO2 seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO2 stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO2 degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/ flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO2 poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO2 seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO2 flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO2 seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less than Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized.

  3. Synthesis, structure and physical characterization of the dimer {[(bpy)2Co]2(TPOA)}4+ (bpy = 2,2‧-dipyridyl; H2TPOA = N,N‧,N‧‧,N‧‧‧-tetraphenyl oxalamidine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Gastaldo, Carlos; Qu, Zhi-Rong; Tatay, Sergio; Ruben, Mario; Galán-Mascarós, Jose R.

    2008-11-01

    The reaction between CoCl 2, 2,2'-dipyridyl (bpy) and N, N', N'', N'''-tetraphenyl oxalamidine (H 2TPOA) in a water/ethanol mixture yields the {[(bpy) 2Co] 2(TPOA)} 2+ dimer, that is immediately oxidized in aerobic conditions leading to the Co III species {[(bpy) 2Co] 2(TPOA)} 4+. This cation was isolated as the {[(bpy) 2Co] 2(TPOA)}(PF6) 4 ( 1) salt, that was characterized by X-ray diffraction on single crystals. The dimer is formed by two Co III ions in octahedral coordination bridged by a deprotonated μ 2-TPOA ligand. The Co III ions appear in its low spin configuration. Thus, the dimers are essentially diamagnetic, as shown by 1H NMR and magnetic measurements.

  4. NaSrCo2F7, a Co(2+) pyrochlore antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Krizan, J W; Cava, R J

    2015-07-29

    We report the crystal growth, by the Bridgeman-Stockbarger method, and the basic magnetic properties of a new cobalt-based pyrochlore, NaSrCo2F7. Single-crystal structure determination shows that Na and Sr are completely disordered on the non-magnetic large atom A sites, while magnetic [Formula: see text] Co(2+) fully occupies the pyrochlore lattice B sites. NaSrCo2F7 displays strong antiferromagnetic interactions ([Formula: see text]), a large effective moment ([Formula: see text]), and no spin freezing until 3 K. Thus, NaSrCo2F7 is a geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet with a frustration index [Formula: see text]. Ac susceptibility, dc susceptibility, and heat capacity are utilized to characterize the spin freezing. We argue that NaSrCo2F7 and the related material NaCaCo2F7 are examples of frustrated pyrochlore antiferromagnets with weak bond disorder. PMID:26154596

  5. CO2 laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; Callan, R.; Constant, G.; Davies, P. H.; Foord, R.

    CO2 laser-based radars operating at 10 microns are both highly energy-efficient and eye-safe, as well as compact and rugged; they also furnish covertness-enhancing fine pointing accuracy, and are difficult to jam or otherwise confuse. Two modes of operation are generally employed: incoherent, in which the laser is simply used as a high power illumination source, and in the presently elaborated coherent or heterodyne mode. Applications encompass terrain-following and obstacle avoidance, Doppler discrimination of missile and aircraft targets, pollutant gas detection, wind measurement for weapons-aiming, and global wind field monitoring.

  6. A seepage erosion sediment transport function and geometric headcut relationships for predicting seepage erosion undercutting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage erosion is an important factor in hillslope instability and failure. However, predicting erosion by subsurface flow or seepage and incorporating its effects into stability models remain a challenge. Limitations exist with all existing seepage erosion sediment transport functions, including n...

  7. Drift natural convection and seepage at the Yucca Mountain repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock, from the hot drift center to the cool drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water- induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of self-assembled c-axis oriented Bi2Sr3Co2O(y) thin films by the sol-gel method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuebin; Tang, Xianwu; Shi, Dongqi; Jian, Hongbin; Lei, Hechang; Yeoh, Wai Kong; Zhao, Bangchuan; Yang, Jie; Li, Qi; Zheng, Rongkun; Dou, Shixue; Sun, Yuping

    2011-10-01

    Bi(2)Sr(3)Co(2)O(y) thin films are prepared on SrTiO(3) (100), (110) and (111) single crystal substrates using the sol-gel method. All the thin films are c-axis oriented regardless of the orientation of the substrate suggesting self-assembled c-axis orientation, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results give evidence of coexistence of Co(3+) and Co(2+) ions in the derived films. Transmission electronic microscopy observations reveal that all samples are c-axis oriented with no obvious differences for different samples, and the c-axis lattice constant is determined as ~15 Å suggesting the misfit structure. A phenomenological thermodynamic phase diagram for self-assembled c-axis orientation is established for misfit cobaltate-based films using chemical solution deposition. All samples behave like semiconductors due to the coexistence of Co(3+)/Co(2+) ions, and the resistivity at 350 K is ~47, 39 and 17 mΩ cm for the thin films on SrTiO(3) (100), (110) and (111), respectively, whereas the Seebeck coefficient at 300 K is 97, 89 and 77 μV K(-1). The successful attainment of Bi(2)Sr(3)Co(2)O(y) thin films with self-assembled c-axis orientation will provide an effective prototype for investigation of growth mechanisms in complex oxide thin films with a misfit structure. PMID:21850346

  9. Ability of the 4-D-Var analysis of the GOSAT BESD XCO2 retrievals to characterize atmospheric CO2 at large and synoptic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massart, Sébastien; Agustí-Panareda, Anna; Heymann, Jens; Buchwitz, Michael; Chevallier, Frédéric; Reuter, Maximilian; Hilker, Michael; Burrows, John P.; Deutscher, Nicholas M.; Feist, Dietrich G.; Hase, Frank; Sussmann, Ralf; Desmet, Filip; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Griffith, David W. T.; Kivi, Rigel; Petri, Christof; Schneider, Matthias; Velazco, Voltaire A.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents results from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) carbon dioxide (CO2) analysis system where the atmospheric CO2 is controlled through the assimilation of column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of CO2 (XCO2) from the Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). The analysis is compared to a free-run simulation (without assimilation of XCO2), and they are both evaluated against XCO2 data from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). We show that the assimilation of the GOSAT XCO2 product from the Bremen Optimal Estimation Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (BESD) algorithm during the year 2013 provides XCO2 fields with an improved mean absolute error of 0.6 parts per million (ppm) and an improved station-to-station bias deviation of 0.7 ppm compared to the free run (1.1 and 1.4 ppm, respectively) and an improved estimated precision of 1 ppm compared to the GOSAT BESD data (3.3 ppm). We also show that the analysis has skill for synoptic situations in the vicinity of frontal systems, where the GOSAT retrievals are sparse due to cloud contamination. We finally computed the 10-day forecast from each analysis at 00:00 UTC, and we demonstrate that the CO2 forecast shows synoptic skill for the largest-scale weather patterns (of the order of 1000 km) even up to day 5 compared to its own analysis.

  10. Ability of the 4-D-Var analysis of the GOSAT BESD XCO2 retrievals to characterize atmospheric CO2 at large and synoptic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massart, S.; Agustí-Panareda, A.; Heymann, J.; Buchwitz, M.; Chevallier, F.; Reuter, M.; Hilker, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Hase, F.; Desmet, F.; Feist, D. G.; Kivi, R.

    2015-09-01

    This study presents results from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) carbon dioxide (CO2) analysis system where the atmospheric CO2 is controlled through the assimilation of column-average dry-air mole fractions of CO2 (XCO2) from the Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). The analysis is compared to a free run simulation and they are both evaluated against XCO2 data from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). We show that the assimilation of the GOSAT XCO2 product from the Bremen Optimal Estimation DOAS (BESD) algorithm during the year 2013 provides XCO2 fields with an improved station-to-station bias deviation of 0.7 parts per million (ppm) compared to the free run (1.4 ppm) and an improved estimated precision of ~ 1 ppm compared to the used GOSAT data (3.4 ppm). We also show that the analysis has skill for synoptic situations in the vicinity of frontal systems where the GOSAT retrievals are sparse due to cloud contamination. We finally computed the 10 day forecast from each analysis at 00:00 UTC. Compared to its own analysis the CO2 forecast shows synoptic skill for the largest scale weather patterns even up to day 5 according to the anomaly correlation coefficient.

  11. The potential of near-surface geophysical methods in a hierarchical monitoring approach for the detection of shallow CO2 seeps at geological storage sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, U.; Schuetze, C.; Dietrich, P.

    2013-12-01

    The MONACO project (Monitoring approach for geological CO2 storage sites using a hierarchic observation concept) aims to find reliable monitoring tools that work on different spatial and temporal scales at geological CO2 storage sites. This integrative hierarchical monitoring approach based on different levels of coverage and resolutions is proposed as a means of reliably detecting CO2 degassing areas at ground surface level and for identifying CO2 leakages from storage formations into the shallow subsurface, as well as CO2 releases into the atmosphere. As part of this integrative hierarchical monitoring concept, several methods and technologies from ground-based remote sensing (Open-path Fourier-transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy), regional measurements (near-surface geophysics, chamber-based soil CO2 flux measurement) and local in-situ measurements (using shallow boreholes) will either be combined or used complementary to one another. The proposed combination is a suitable concept for investigating CO2 release sites. This also presents the possibility of adopting a modular monitoring concept whereby our monitoring approach can be expanded to incorporate other methods in various coverage scales at any temporal resolution. The link between information obtained from large-scale surveys and local in-situ monitoring can be realized by sufficient geophysical techniques for meso-scale monitoring, such as geoelectrical and self-potential (SP) surveys. These methods are useful for characterizing fluid flow and transport processes in permeable near-surface sedimentary layers and can yield important information concerning CO2-affected subsurface structures. Results of measurements carried out a natural analogue site in the Czech Republic indicate that the hierarchical monitoring approach represents a successful multidisciplinary modular concept that can be used to monitor both physical and chemical processes taking place during CO2 migration and seepage. The

  12. Reservoir Characterization and CO2 Plume Migration Modeling Based on Bottom-hole Pressure Data: An Example from the AEP Mountaineer Geological Storage Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Srikanta; Kelley, Mark; Oruganti, YagnaDeepika; Bhattacharya, Indra; Spitznogle, Gary

    2014-05-01

    We present an integrated approach for formation permeability estimation, front tracking, reservoir model calibration, and plume migration modeling based on injection rate and down-hole pressure data from CO2 geologic sequestration projects. The data are taken from the 20 MW CO2 capture and storage project at American Electric Power's Mountaineer Plant in West Virginia, USA. The Mountaineer CO2 injection system consists of two injection wells - one in the Copper Ridge Dolomite formation and one in the Rose Run sandstone formation, and three deep observation wells that were operational between October 2009 and May 2011. Approximately 27000 MT and 10000 MT were injected into the Copper Ridge dolomite formation and Rose Run sandstone formation, respectively. A wealth of pressure and rate data from injection and observation wells is available covering a series of injection and pressure falloff events. The methodology developed and applied for interpreting and integrating the data during reservoir analysis and modeling from the Rose Run formation is the subject of this paper. For the analysis of transient pressure data at the injection and observation wells, the CO2 storage reservoir is conceptualized as a radial composite system, where the inner (invaded) zone consists of both supercritical CO2 and brine, and the outer (uninvaded) zone consists of undisturbed brine. Using established analytical solutions for analyzing fluid injection problems in the petroleum reservoir engineering literature, we show how the late-time pressure derivative response from both injection and observation wells will be identical - reflecting the permeability-thickness product of the undisturbed brine-filled formation. We also show how the expanding CO2 plume affects the "effective" compressibility that can be estimated by history matching injection-falloff data and how this can be used to develop a relationship between the plume radius and "effective" compressibility. This provides a novel non

  13. Our trial to develop a risk assessment tool for CO2 geological storage (GERAS-CO2GS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.; Sakamoto, Y.; Komai, T.

    2012-12-01

    We will introduce our researches about to develop a risk assessment tool named 'GERAS-CO2GS' (Geo-environmental Risk Assessment System, CO2 Geological Storage Risk Assessment System) for 'Carbon Dioxide Geological Storage (Geological CCS)'. It aims to facilitate understanding of size of impact of risks related with upper migration of injected CO2. For gaining public recognition about feasibility of Geological CCS, quantitative estimation of risks is essential, to let public knows the level of the risk: whether it is negligible or not. Generally, in preliminary hazard analysis procedure, potential hazards could be identified within Geological CCS's various facilities such as: reservoir, cap rock, upper layers, CO2 injection well, CO2 injection plant and CO2 transport facilities. Among them, hazard of leakage of injected C02 is crucial, because it is the clue to estimate risks around a specific injection plan in terms of safety, environmental protection effect and economy. Our risk assessment tool named GERAS-CO2GS evaluates volume and rate of retention and leakage of injected CO2 in relation with fractures and/or faults, and then it estimates impact of seepages on the surface of the earth. GERAS-CO2GS has four major processing segments: (a) calculation of CO2 retention and leakage volume and rate, (b) data processing of CO2 dispersion on the surface and ambient air, (c) risk data definition and (d) evaluation of risk. Concerning to the injection site, we defined a model, which is consisted from an injection well and a geological strata model: which involves a reservoir, a cap rock, an upper layer, faults, seabed, sea, the surface of the earth and the surface of the sea. For retention rate of each element of CO2 injection site model, we use results of our experimental and numerical studies on CO2 migration within reservoirs and faults with specific lithological conditions. For given CO2 injection rate, GERAS-CO2GS calculates CO2 retention and leakage of each segment

  14. Ca-rich Ca-Al-oxide, high-temperature-stable sorbents prepared from hydrotalcite precursors: synthesis, characterization, and CO2 capture capacity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Hsueh; Chang, Yen-Po; Chen, San-Yuan; Yu, Ching-Tsung; Chyou, Yau-Pin

    2011-12-16

    We present the design and synthesis of Ca-rich Ca-Al-O oxides, with Ca(2+)/Al(3+) ratios of 1:1, 3:1, 5:1, and 7:1, which were prepared by hydrothermal decomposition of coprecipitated hydrotalcite-like Ca-Al-CO(3) precursors, for high-temperature CO(2) adsorption at 500-700 °C. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that the coprecipitated, Ca-rich, hydrotalcite-like powders with Ca(2+)/Al(3+) ratios of 5:1 and 7:1 contained Ca(OH)(2) and layered double hydroxide (LDH) phases. Upon annealing, LDH was first destroyed at approximately 200 °C to form an amorphous matrix, and then at 450-550 °C, the Ca(OH)(2) phase was converted into a CaO matrix with incorporated Al(3+) to form a homogeneous solid solution without a disrupted lattice structure. CaO nanocrystals were grown by thermal treatment of the weakly crystalline Ca-Al-O oxide matrix. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates that a CO(2) adsorption capacity of approximately 51 wt. % can be obtained from Ca-rich Ca-Al-O oxides prepared by calcination of 7:1 Ca-Al-CO(3) LDH phases at 600-700 °C. Furthermore, a relatively high CO(2) capture capability can be achieved, even with gas flows containing very low CO(2) concentrations (CO(2)/N(2) = 10 %). Approximately 95.6 % of the initial CO(2) adsorption capacity of the adsorbent is retained after 30 cycles of carbonation-calcination. TEM analysis indicates that carbonation-promoted CaCO(3) formation in the Ca-Al-O oxide matrix at 600 °C, but a subsequent desorption in N(2) at 700 °C, caused the formation CaO nanocrystals of approximately 10 nm. The CaO nanocrystals are widely distributed in the weakly crystalline Ca-Al-O oxide matrix and are present during the carbonation-calcination cycles. This demonstrates that Ca-Al-O sorbents that developed through the synthesis and calcination of Ca-rich Ca-Al LDH phases are suitable for long-term cyclic operation in severe temperature environments. PMID:22072595

  15. CO2 Laser Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsson, Samuel

    1989-03-01

    It gives me a great deal of pleasure to introduce our final speaker of this morning's session for two reasons: First of all, his company has been very much in the news not only in our own community but in the pages of Wall Street Journal and in the world economic press. And, secondly, we would like to welcome him to our shores. He is a temporary resident of the United States, for a few months, forsaking his home in Germany to come here and help with the start up of a new company which we believe, probably, ranks #1 as the world supplier of CO2 lasers now, through the combination of former Spectra Physics Industrial Laser Division and Rofin-Sinar GMBH. Samuel Simonsson is the Chairman of the Board of Rofin-Sinar, Inc., here in the U.S. and managing director of Rofin-Sinar GMBH. It is a pleasure to welcome him.

  16. Interpretation of Gas Seepage on Seismic Data: Example from Malaysian offshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathiyah Jamaludin, S. N.; Latiff, Abdul Halim Abdul; Kadir, Askury A.

    2016-02-01

    Gas seepage is one of the geological hazard in the subsurface exploration. Migration of gas usually originated from the deeper reservoir due to poor sealing properties of the cap-rock as well as existence of faults or fractures within the reservoir. In order for us to get familiar with the existence of gas seepage on seismic data, we need to know their characteristics and how do they look like. This paper present several features of gas seepages as viewed on seismic data and how to straight away recognize them at the first time viewing the data. Detailed observation of the seismic data affected by gas leakage shows that the top of the gas leakage always exhibit bright amplitude with notable wipe-out zone within the gas chamber. The seismic reflections within the gas seepage also gives chaotic reflection and give difficulties in interpreting the structure within the gas seepage. Use of seismic attributes in characterizing the gas seepage is also presented in this paper as an aid to improve the interpretation in the area/zone affected by the seepage.

  17. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in

  18. Simulation procedure of unconfined seepage with an inner seepage face in a heterogeneous field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, MengXi; Yang, LianZhi; Yu, Ting

    2013-06-01

    An inner seepage face phenomenon is given and a numerical simulation procedure has been developed. It may appear at the interface of two materials when an unconfined seepage flows from a porous media to a coarser porous media with a higher permeability. Inaccuracy and divergent problems may arise both in a saturated-only and in a variably saturated analysis while an inner seepage face is not simulated with a special procedure. The position of the seepage face is determined during the nonlinear iteration process and the flux of the inner seepage face nodes is transferred to the downstream side nodes. Validity and efficiency of the procedure are illustrated by the simulation of two dimensional steady state seepage examples of heterogeneous zoned dams which is usually used to validate algorithms. An analysis of a three-dimensional earth core rockfill dam is also presented here. The procedure can also be applied to general transient seepage problems.

  19. Production and characterization of thin a-C:(H) films for gas permeation barrier functionality against He, CO(2), N(2), O(2) and H(2)O.

    PubMed

    Laidani, N; Bartali, R; Gottardi, G; Anderle, M; Chuste, G; Bellachioma, C

    2006-07-01

    This work reports on (i) the gas barrier properties of a-C:H films rf-sputtered in Ar-H(2) plasmas from a graphite target on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and (ii) the influence of the film chemical structure and defect properties on the gas permeability. The intrinsic permeabilities of the films to He, CO(2), O(2), N(2) gases and H(2)O vapour were determined and found to be orders of magnitude lower than that of the bare PET. Indirect evidence was given to a solubility-diffusion process as the more probable permeation mechanism, over a gas flow through microdefects or gas transport through nanodefects by a Knudsen diffusion mechanism. The barrier capability of the films was found to scale as the gas molecular diameter within the He, CO(2), O(2) and N(2) series, and inversely with the gas critical temperature for the CO(2), O(2), N(2) and H(2)O series. A correlation between the film Urbach energy, E(u), and the gas permeability was established, except for H(2)O. Such findings further favour a bulk diffusion contributing mechanism to permeation over the gas state transport. Conversely, this E(u)-permeability relation shed more light on the origin of the valence band tailing of the amorphous carbon electron structure. PMID:21690810

  20. Production and characterization of thin a-C:(H) films for gas permeation barrier functionality against He, CO2, N2, O2 and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laidani, N.; Bartali, R.; Gottardi, G.; Anderle, M.; Chuste, G.; Bellachioma, C.

    2006-07-01

    This work reports on (i) the gas barrier properties of a-C:H films rf-sputtered in Ar-H2 plasmas from a graphite target on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and (ii) the influence of the film chemical structure and defect properties on the gas permeability. The intrinsic permeabilities of the films to He, CO2, O2, N2 gases and H2O vapour were determined and found to be orders of magnitude lower than that of the bare PET. Indirect evidence was given to a solubility-diffusion process as the more probable permeation mechanism, over a gas flow through microdefects or gas transport through nanodefects by a Knudsen diffusion mechanism. The barrier capability of the films was found to scale as the gas molecular diameter within the He, CO2, O2 and N2 series, and inversely with the gas critical temperature for the CO2, O2, N2 and H2O series. A correlation between the film Urbach energy, Eu, and the gas permeability was established, except for H2O. Such findings further favour a bulk diffusion contributing mechanism to permeation over the gas state transport. Conversely, this Eu-permeability relation shed more light on the origin of the valence band tailing of the amorphous carbon electron structure.

  1. The spectroscopic foundation of CO2 climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Daniels, T.; Kratz, D. P.; Collins, W.; Feldman, D.; Lawler, J. E.; Anderson, L. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Hunt, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The radiative forcing (RF) of carbon dioxide (CO2) is the leading contribution to climate change from anthropogenic activities. Calculating CO2 RF requires detailed knowledge of spectral line parameters and lineshape functions for thousands of infrared absorption lines. A reliable spectroscopic characterization of CO2 forcing is therefore a critical input to scientific and policy-oriented assessments of present climate and future climate change. Our study is partly motivated by a recent assertion that CO2 RF values, and hence predictions of climate sensitivity to elevated CO2, have a significant high bias because the CO2 spectroscopic parameters being used are incorrect. Our results show that CO2 RF in a variety of atmospheres is remarkably insensitive to known uncertainties in the three main CO2 spectroscopic parameters: the line strengths, half widths, and line shapes. We demonstrate that this is due largely to the definition of CO2 RF, which is the difference between the CO2 longwave net flux at the tropopause for doubled CO2 concentrations from the preindustrial era. We also assess the effects of sub-Lorentzian wings of CO2 lines and find that the computed RF is largely insensitive to the spectral lineshape function. Overall, the spectroscopic uncertainty in present-day CO2 RF is less than a few percent. Our study highlights the basics and subtleties of RF calculations, addressing interests of the expert and non-expert.

  2. Isolation of microorganisms from CO2 sequestration sites through enrichments under high pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peet, K. C.; Freedman, A. J.; Boreham, C.; Thompson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in geologic formations has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel processing and combustion. However, little is known about the effects that CO2 may have on biological activity in deep earth environments. To understand microorganisms associated with these environments, we have developed a simple high-pressure enrichment methodology to cultivate organisms capable of growth under supercritical CO2 (scCO2). Growth media targeting different subsurface functional metabolic groups is added to sterilized 316 stainless steel tubing sealed with quarter turn plug valves values and pressurized to 120-136 atm using a helium-padded CO2 tank, followed by incubation at 37 °C to achieve the scCO2 state. Repeated passages of crushed subsurface rock samples and growth media under supercritical CO2 headspaces are assessed for growth via microscopic enumeration. We have utilized this method to survey sandstone cores for microbes capable of growth under scCO2 from two different geologic sites targeted for carbon sequestration activities. Reproducible growth of microbial biomass under high pCO2 has been sustained from each site. Cell morphologies consist of primarily 1-2 μm rods and oval spores, with densities from 1E5-1E7 cells per ml of culture. We have purified and characterized a bacterial strain most closely related to Bacillus subterraneus (99% 16S rRNA identity) capable of growth under scCO2. Preliminary physiological characterization of this strain indicates it is a spore-forming facultative anaerobe able to grow in 0.5 to 50 ppt salinity. Genome sequencing and analysis currently in progress will help reveal genetic mechanisms of acclimation to high pCO2 conditions associated with geologic carbon sequestration.

  3. Estimation of continuous anthropogenic CO2: model-based evaluation of CO2, CO, δ13C(CO2) and Δ14C(CO2) tracer methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardag, S. N.; Gerbig, C.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Levin, I.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate different methods for estimating anthropogenic CO2 using modeled continuous atmospheric concentrations of CO2 alone, as well as CO2 in combination with the surrogate tracers CO, δ13C(CO2) and Δ14C(CO2). These methods are applied at three hypothetical stations representing rural, urban and polluted conditions. We find that, independent of the tracer used, an observation-based estimate of continuous anthropogenic CO2 is not yet feasible at rural measurement sites due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of anthropogenic CO2 estimates at such settings. The tracers δ13C(CO2) and CO provide an accurate possibility to determine anthropogenic CO2 continuously, only if all CO2 sources in the catchment area are well characterized or calibrated with respect to their isotopic signature and CO to anthropogenic CO2 ratio. We test different calibration strategies for the mean isotopic signature and CO to CO2 ratio using precise Δ14C(CO2) measurements on monthly integrated as well as on grab samples. For δ13C(CO2), a calibration with annually averaged 14C(CO2) grab samples is most promising, since integrated sampling introduces large biases into anthropogenic CO2 estimates. For CO, these biases are smaller. The precision of continuous anthropogenic CO2 determination using δ13C(CO2) depends on measurement precision of δ13C(CO2) and CO2, while the CO method is mainly limited by the variation in natural CO sources and sinks. At present, continuous anthropogenic CO2 could be determined using the tracers δ13C(CO2) and/or CO with a precision of about 30 %, a mean bias of about 10 % and without significant diurnal discrepancies. Hypothetical future measurements of continuous Δ14C(CO2) with a precision of 5 ‰ are promising for anthropogenic CO2 determination (precision ca. 10-20 %) but are not yet available. The investigated tracer-based approaches open the door to improving, validating and reducing biases of highly resolved emission inventories using atmospheric

  4. Geological and geophysical properties of cap rock in a natural CO2 occurrence, Mihályi-Répcelak area, Western Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Csilla; Szamosfalvi, Ágnes; Sendula, Eszter; Páles, Mariann; Kovács, István; Kónya, Péter; Falus, György; Szabó, Csaba

    2015-04-01

    The physical and geochemical consistency of the cap rock is primarily important for safe geological storage of CO2.. As a consequence of CO2 injection reactions took place between the minerals of the reservoir, the cap rock and CO2 saturated pore water. These reactions may change the mineral composition and petrophysical properties of the storage reservoir as well as the cap rock that provides the only physical barrier that retains carbon dioxide in the target reservoir formation. Study of the natural CO2 occurrences delivers information to understand which properties of a cap rock provide the sustainable closure and retainment. Knowledge of the long term effect of CO2 on the behavior of the cap rock is an important input in the selection procedure of a potential CO2 injection site. Yet, very few data exist on geochemical properties and reactivity of the cap rocks. During normal commercial operations the reservoir is typically cored, but not the cap rock. This study may enhance our knowledge about possible mineralogical reactions, which can occur in clayey-aleuritic cap rocks. The Mihályi-Répcelak natural CO2 occurrence is believed to be leakage safe. There is no known seepage on the surface. It is suggested that the aleuritic clay rich cap rock occurring at the natural reservoir can stop CO2 migration into other reservoirs or to the surface. The most important characteristics of cap rocks that they have low permeability (<0.1 mD) and porosity (eff.por. = 4%) and high clayeyness (approx. 80%). However, we demonstrate that in addition to these parameters the geochemical properties of cap rock is also important. In order to characterize the natural CO2 occurrence, we applied the following analysis, like XRD, FTIR, SEM. The petrophysical properties are determined from the interpretation of geophysical well-logs and grain size distribution. The most important result of this study that adequate petrophysical properties do not completely define the suitability of a cap

  5. CO2 Virtual Science Data Environment: Providing Streamlined Access to CO2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H.; Cinquini, L.; Davidoff, S.; Duran, B.; Eldering, A.; Granat, R. A.; Gunson, M. R.; Hofman, J.; Knosp, B.; Murphy, E.; Osterman, G. B.; Zimdars, P.

    2014-12-01

    CO2 is an important greenhouse gas and therefore characterizing and understanding its global distribution is crucial for the study of Earth's changing climate. Currently, satellite remote sensing measurements of CO2 are available from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2), and Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). Traditionally, data from these different missions are distributed separately from one another and they each possess different data formats, making it cumbersome for researchers to access, analyze, and perform inter-comparison. We present an effort at JPL to design a web-based science data environment (co2.jpl.nasa.gov) that allows users to access and utilize CO2 data from GOSAT, AIRS, OCO-2, TES, and the ground-based Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) in a single user-friendly interface. The features of the data environment include the ability to download full mission-specific CO2-related Level 2 data files or to customize them based on location, time, data variable, version, and format. An important feature of the JPL CO2 data environment is that it allows generation of customized Level 3 products and provides detailed documentation on the mission specifications along with technical data information. These tools are designed to allow users streamlined access to relevant remote sensing and ground-based CO2 datasets in order to facilitate research on atmospheric CO2.

  6. CO2 Fixation into Novel CO2 Storage Materials Composed of 1,2-Ethanediamine and Ethylene Glycol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianxiang; Guo, Bo; Han, Limin; Zhu, Ning; Gao, Fei; Li, Qiang; Li, Lihua; Zhang, Jianbin

    2015-07-20

    A new CO2 fixation process into solid CO2 -storage materials (CO2 SMs) under mild conditions has been developed. The novel application of amine-glycol systems to the capture, storage, and utilization of CO2 with readily available 1,2-ethanediamine (EDA) and ethylene glycol derivatives (EGs) was demonstrated. Typically, the CO2 SMs were isolated in 28.9-47.5 % yields, followed by extensive characterization using (13) C NMR, XRD, and FTIR. We found that especially the resulting poly-ethylene-glycol-300-based CO2 SM (PCO2 SM) product could be processed into stable tablets for CO2 storage; the aqueous PCO2 SM solution exhibited remarkable CO2 capturing and releasing capabilities after multiple cycles. Most importantly, the EDA and PEG 300 released from PCO2 SM were found to act as facilitative surfactants for the multiple preparation of CaCO3 microparticles with nano-layer structure. PMID:25952008

  7. Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    G. Li; C. Tsang

    2000-12-20

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to

  8. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of the Arbuckle aquifer with laboratory flow cell experiments under supercritical conditions: Implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, R. L.; Watney, W. L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Strazisar, B. R.; Kelly, L.; Ford, S. K.; Datta, S.

    2011-12-01

    The deep saline aquifer in south-central Kansas has been proposed as a potential site for geologic storage for CO2. Two wells (KGS 1-32 and 1-28) have been drilled to the basement to provide data for a site specific determination of the storage potential of the Arbuckle. The entirety of the Arbuckle (~4100-5100 ft) was cored to provide rock samples for description and flow cell experiments. Initial examination of the formation rocks show heterogeneity throughout the core samples that makes evident the need for careful examination of the formation to ensure accurate geochemical modeling in determining the storage capacity and extent of mineralization within injection rocks. The dominant mineralogy in the proposed CO2 injection zone is dolomitic limestone with sporadic large cherty nodules. Presence of extensive vugs and micro fractures are common at some depths. Thin section and XRD data have provided the specific mineral assemblage of each core plug. Drill stem test water samples were collected from 8 depths throughout the aquifer to describe the changing chemistry of water with depth. Initial chemical analysis show a hyper saline brine (range~50,000 - 190,000 TDS) dominated by Cl, Na and Ca. Elemental ratios of Cl:Br, Na:Cl and Ca:Sr are what is expected of a typical saline aquifer system. The swabbed water from 4995 to 5020 ft gave a constant pH of 4.76 for the entire period of pumping and field results show high sulfate concentrations (>200 mg/L). Laboratory experiments carried out at the National Energy Technology Laboratory at formation temperatures and pressures using formation core plugs and collected brine to identify the major reaction that can be anticipated when supercritical CO2 is in place. Formation brine is injected into the core plugs and supercritical CO2 is added thereafter. The effluent is collected as a time series of 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 32, 48 and 72 hours and analyzed for major, trace elements and anions by ICP-OES and IC to see the chemical

  9. Seepage into drifts with mechanical degradation.

    PubMed

    Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2003-01-01

    Seepage into drifts in unsaturated tuff is an important issue for the long-term performance of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Drifts in which waste packages will be emplaced are subject to degradation in the form of rockfall from the drift ceiling, induced by stress-relief, seismic, or thermal effects. The objective of this study is to calculate seepage rates, for various drift-degradation scenarios and for different values of percolation flux, in the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and the Topopah Spring lower lithophysal (Tptpll) units at Yucca Mountain. Seepage calculations are conducted by (1) defining a heterogeneous drift-scale permeability model with field data, (2) selecting calibrated parameters associated with the Tptpmn and Tptpll units, and (3) simulating seepage, based on detailed degraded-drift profiles obtained from a separate rock mechanics engineering analysis. The simulation results indicate (1) that the seepage threshold (i.e., the percolation flux at which seepage first occurs) is not significantly changed by drift degradation and (2) the degradation-induced increase in seepage above the threshold is influenced probably more by the shape of the cavity created by rockfall than by rockfall volume. PMID:12714289

  10. Characterization of growth and photosynthesis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cultures under reduced atmospheric pressures and enhanced CO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanervo, Eira; Lehto, Kirsi; Ståhle, Kurt; Lehto, Harry; Mäenpää, Pirkko

    2005-01-01

    Efficient life support systems are needed to maintain adequate oxygen, water and food for humans in extraterrestrial conditions. On the near-Earth missions, these are supplied by transport from the Earth, and by physical and chemical cleaning and recycling, but on long-term missions to far-away destinations, such as Mars, on-site production of the consumables may be required. Molecular oxygen and organic biomass can be most efficiently produced biologically, i.e. by photosynthesis. The conditions on Mars are distinctly harsh, and they strictly limit the growth and survival of any photosynthetic organisms to artificially maintained containments. For obtaining most economical growth conditions, minimal parameters need to be determined which still allow efficient growth of photosynthetic organisms. In this work we are testing how reduced air pressures (hypobaria) and increased CO2 concentrations, i.e. features typical for Martian conditions, affect the durability, growth and photosynthesis of laboratory strains of cyanobacteria, a group of prokaryotic organisms capable of plant-like photosynthesis. Our preliminary results show that air pressures down to 0.1 atm or CO2 concentrations up to 20% have no harmful effect on the photosynthetic oxygen production or growth rate of the cyanobacterial model species, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  11. Porous Hexacyanometalates for CO2 capture applications

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2013-07-30

    Prussian blue analogues of M3[Fe(CN)6]2 x H2O (where M=Fe, Mn and Ni) were synthesized, characterized and tested for their gas sorption capabilities. The sorption studies reveal that, these Prussian blue materials preferentially sorb CO2 over N2 and CH4 at low pressure (1bar).

  12. ANL-W 779 pond seepage test

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.R.

    1992-11-01

    The ANL-W 779 sanitary wastewater treatment ponds are located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), north of the Argonne National Laboratory -- West (ANL-W) site A seepage test was performed for two Argonne National Laboratory -- West (ANL-W) sanitary wastewater treatment ponds, Facility 779. Seepage rates were measured to determine if the ponds are a wastewater land application facility. The common industry standard for wastewater land application facilities is a field-measured seepage rate of one quarter inch per day or greater.

  13. Effects of dissolved CO2 on Shallow Freshwater Microbial Communities simulating a CO2 Leakage Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliver, D. M.; Lowry, G. V.; Gregory, K.

    2013-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration is likely to be part of a comprehensive strategy to minimize the atmospheric release of greenhouse gasses, establishing a concern of sequestered CO2 leakage into overlying potable aquifers. Leaking CO2 may affect existing biogeochemical processes and therefore water quality. There is a critical need to understand the evolution of CO2 exposed microbial communities that influence the biogeochemistry in these freshwater aquifers. The evolution of microbial ecology for different CO2 exposure concentrations was investigated using fluid-slurry samples obtained from a shallow freshwater aquifer (55 m depth, 0.5 MPa, 22 °C, Escatawpa, MS). The microbial community of well samples upstream and downstream of CO2 injection was characterized. In addition, batch vessel experiments were conducted with the upstream aquifer samples exposed to varying pCO2 from 0% to 100% under reservoir temperature and pressure for up to 56 days. The microbial community of the in situ experiment and the batch reactor experiment were analyzed with 16S rRNA clone libraries and qPCR. In both the in situ experiment and the batch reactor experiment, DNA concentration did not correlate with CO2 exposure. Both the in situ experiment and the batch reactors displayed a changing microbial community with increased CO2 exposure. The well water isolate, Curvibacter, appeared to be the most tolerant genus to high CO2 concentrations in the in situ experiments and to mid-CO2 concentrations in the batch reactors. In batch reactors with pCO2 concentrations higher than experienced in situ (pCO2 = 0.5 MPa), Pseudomonas appeared to be the most tolerant genus. Findings provide insight into a dynamic biogeochemical system that will alter with CO2 exposure. Adapted microbial populations will eventually give rise to the community that will impact the metal mobility and water quality. Knowledge of the surviving microbial populations will enable improved models for predicting the fate of CO2

  14. Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Fauth, D.J.; Filburn, T.P.; Gray, M.L.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.; Pennline, H.W.; Filburn, T.

    2007-06-01

    Capturing CO2 emissions generated from fossil fuel-based power plants has received widespread attention and is considered a vital course of action for CO2 emission abatement. Efforts are underway at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop viable energy technologies enabling the CO2 capture from large stationary point sources. Solid, immobilized amine sorbents (IAS) formulated by impregnation of liquid amines within porous substrates are reactive towards CO2 and offer an alternative means for cyclic capture of CO2 eliminating, to some degree, inadequacies related to chemical absorption by aqueous alkanolamine solutions. This paper describes synthesis, characterization, and CO2 adsorption properties for IAS materials previously tested to bind and release CO2 and water vapor in a closed loop life support system. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), acrylonitrile-modified tetraethylenepentamine (TEPAN), and a single formulation consisting of TEPAN and N, N’-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (BED) were individually supported on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate and examined. CO2 adsorption profiles leading to reversible CO2 adsorption capacities were obtained using thermogravimetry. Under 10% CO2 in nitrogen at 25°C and 1 atm, TEPA supported on PMMA over 60 minutes adsorbed ~3.2 mmol/g{sorbent} whereas, TEPAN supported on PMMA along with TEPAN and BED supported on PMMA adsorbed ~1.7 mmol/g{sorbent} and ~2.3 mmol/g{sorbent} respectively. Cyclic experiments with a 1:1 weight ratio of TEPAN and BED supported on poly (methyl methacrylate) beads utilizing a fixed-bed flow system with 9% CO2, 3.5% O2, nitrogen balance with trace gas constituents were studied. CO2 adsorption capacity was ~ 3 mmols CO2/g{sorbent} at 40°C and 1.4 atm. No beneficial effect on IAS performance was found using a moisture-laden flue gas mixture. Tests with 750 ppmv NO in a humidified gas stream revealed negligible NO sorption onto the IAS. A high SO2

  15. Incorporating seepage processes into a streambank stability model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage processes are usually neglected in bank stability analyses although they can become a prominent failure mechanism under certain field conditions. This study incorporated the effects of seepage (i.e., seepage gradient forces and seepage erosion undercutting) into the Bank Stability and Toe Er...

  16. Co2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu

    2004-11-18

    Human activities are increasingly altering the Earth's climate. A particular concern is that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may be rising fast because of increased industrialization. CO{sub 2} is a so-called ''greenhouse gas'' that traps infrared radiation and may contribute to global warming. Scientists project that greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} will make the arctic warmer, which would melt glaciers and raise sea levels. Evidence suggests that climate change may already have begun to affect ecosystems and wildlife around the world. Some animal species are moving from one habitat to another to adapt to warmer temperatures. Future warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust. Human production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuels (such as at coal-fired power plants) is not likely to slow down soon. It is urgent to find somewhere besides the atmosphere to put these increased levels of CO{sub 2}. Sequestration in the ocean and in soils and forests are possibilities, but another option, sequestration in geological formations, may also be an important solution. Such formations could include depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. In many cases, injection of CO2 into a geological formation can enhance the recovery of hydrocarbons, providing value-added byproducts that can offset the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Before CO{sub 2} gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured. CO{sub 2} is also routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H{sub 2} production, and limestone calcination. Then CO{sub 2} must be compressed into liquid form and transported to the geological sequestration site. Many power plants and other large emitters of CO{sub 2} are located near geological formations that are amenable to CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  17. Comparison between mechanisms of CO2 degassing from El Chichon volcanic lake, México, and Specchio di Venere lake, Pantelleria, Italia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jácome Paz, M. P.; Taran, Y.; Inguaggiato, S.; Collard, N.; Vita, F.; Pecoraino, G.

    2014-12-01

    We present results of the CO2 diffuse emission from the surface of two volcanic lakes: El Chichón (EC) in Mexico and Specchio di Venere (SV) on Pantelleria Island, Italy. Both lakes are drainless, have similar sizes (~2x105 m2) and similar input-output dynamics. However, they are drastically different in water chemistry. The SV lake is alkaline (pH >9) and of a high near constant salinity, whereas EC lake is acidic (pH 2.3) and of a low variable salinity. In the vicinity of both lakes there are thermal grounds with steam vents and hot springs and a high CO2 soil flux. The SV lake has high alkalinity (~70 meq/L), whereas the EC lake is characterized by high concentration of dissolved CO2. CO2 flux measurements from the surface of both lakes were made with the "floating" accumulation chamber. During the flux measuring, gas samples were taken for carbon isotopic analysis. Soil flux measurements were also made in the crater of El Chichon volcano and on the area adjacent to the SV lake. The preliminary results of CO2 fluxes indicate EC lake has a high CO2 flux with a mean value of 3500 g m-2 d-1, with the highest values alignment across NW-SE and NE-SW faults and a high degassing by bubbling gases, especially near the strongest NE fumarolic field. While SV has a mean value of the CO2 flux ~ 10 g m-2 d-1 and limited bubbling on the lake surface. High CO2 flux was measured from the soil near the lake at the Mofeta place. A net mean diffusion flux (without bubbles) from EC lake is about 350 times higher than that from SV lake (3500 g m-2 d-1 vs 10 g m-2 d-1). SV has the total CO2 flux by diffusion of ~3 ton d-1 from an area of 0.3 km2 and the total flux of 0.44 ton d-1 by bubbling areas at SW and S zones. The EC lake has the total CO2 flux of 840 ton d-1 from an area of 0.24 km2. The total CO2 output from SV is nevertheless about two times higher taking into account the seepage from the lake (~ 8 kg s-1) of highly carbonated water.

  18. CO2 interaction with geomaterials.

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, George D.; Al-Saidi, Wissam A.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; Voora, Vamsee, K.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.; Lopano, Christina L; Myshakin, Eugene M.; Hur, Tae Bong; Warzinski, Robert P.; Lynn, Ronald J.; Howard, Bret H.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-09-01

    This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas No.3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or 'geopolymer') theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2

  19. Sequestration of CO2 by concrete carbonation.

    PubMed

    Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Mora, Pedro; Sanjuan, Miguel A

    2010-04-15

    Carbonation of reinforced concrete is one of the causes of corrosion, but it is also a way to sequester CO2. The characteristics of the concrete cover should ensure alkaline protection for the steel bars but should also be able to combine CO2 to a certain depth. This work attempts to advance the knowledge of the carbon footprint of cement. As it is one of the most commonly used materials worldwide, it is very important to assess its impact on the environment. In order to quantify the capacity of cement based materials to combine CO2 by means of the reaction with hydrated phases to produce calcium carbonate, Thermogravimetry and the phenolphthalein indicator have been used to characterize several cement pastes and concretes exposed to different environments. The combined effect of the main variables involved in this process is discussed. The moisture content of the concrete seems to be the most influential parameter. PMID:20225850

  20. Leaves: Elevated CO2 levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Burning fossil fuels and land use changes such as deforestation and urbanization have led to a dramatic rise in the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere since the onset of the Industrial Revolution. The highly dilute CO2 from the atmosphere enters plant leaves where it is concentr...

  1. Use of geophysical methods to map subsurface features at levee seepage locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackett, Thomas C.

    The Great Flood of 2011 caused moderate to severe seepage and piping along the Mississippi River levees in Northwest Mississippi. The aim of this thesis was to implement geophysical techniques at two seepage locations in order to give a better understanding of the causes of underseepage and information on how to mitigate the problem. Sites near Rena Lara in Coahoma County and near Francis in Bolivar County were chosen to conduct this survey. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Electromagnetic Induction (EM) surveys were conducted on and adjacent to levees to identify seepage pathways and any dominant geological features at the sites. Results from geophysical surveys revealed that Francis and Rena Laura each had a prominent geomorphologic feature that was attributing to underseepage. Seepage at Francis was the result of a sand filled channel capped by a clay overburden. Permeable materials at the base of the channel served as a conduit for transporting river water beneath the levee. The seepage surfaced as sand boils where the overlying clay overburden was thin or non-existent. Investigations at the Rena Lara site revealed a large, clay-filled swale extending beneath the levee. The clay within the swale has relatively low horizontal permeability, and concentrated the seepage flow towards more permeable zones on the flanks of the swale. This resulted in the formation of sand boils at the base of the levee. Both geomorphic features at Francis and Rena Lara were identified as surface drainages using remote sensing data. With the assistance of borehole and elevation data, geophysics was successfully used to characterize the features at each site. Properties such as permeability and clay content were derived from responses in electrical conductivity and used to build seepage models at each site. These models will hopefully be considered when determining seepage conditions and mitigation techniques at other sites along the levee.

  2. CO2 Sequestration short course

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald J.; Cole, David R; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Bourg, Ian C

    2014-12-08

    Given the public’s interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

  3. R Reactor seepage basins soil moisture and resistivity field investigation using cone penetrometer technology, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.K.

    2000-02-17

    The focus of this report is the summer 1999 investigation of the shallow groundwater system using cone penetrometer technology characterization methods to determine if the water table is perched beneath the R Reactor Seepage Basins (RRSBs).

  4. Flow rate logging seepage meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reay, William G. (Inventor); Walthall, Harry G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely measuring and logging the flow rate of groundwater seepage into surface water bodies. As groundwater seeps into a cavity created by a bottomless housing, it displaces water through an inlet and into a waterproof sealed upper compartment, at which point, the water is collected by a collection bag, which is contained in a bag chamber. A magnet on the collection bag approaches a proximity switch as the collection bag fills, and eventually enables the proximity switch to activate a control circuit. The control circuit then rotates a three-way valve from the collection path to a discharge path, enables a data logger to record the time, and enables a pump, which discharges the water from the collection bag, through the three-way valve and pump, and into the sea. As the collection bag empties, the magnet leaves the proximity of the proximity switch, and the control circuit turns off the pump, resets the valve to provide a collection path, and restarts the collection cycle.

  5. Removable Tensor Strainmeter and Vector Tiltmeter System for Use With Forward and Inverse Methods for Characterizing Deformation During CO2 Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWolf, S.; Murdoch, L. C.; Moysey, S. M.; Germanovich, L. N.; Hanna, A.; Smith, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Injecting fluids into a well deforms the enveloping rocks in a complex pattern that increases in magnitude and expands outward with time. While this evolving strain field creates space needed to store these fluids, it can also signal problems. Fault slip occurs when stresses caused by injection reach a critical value, and maintaining stresses below a critical stress state is important for limiting the risk of faulting and subsequent leakage. Since it is impossible to measure stresses directly, the approach is to measure displacement or strain, and then calculate stress change. The geodetic research community has developed borehole strainmeters capable of measuring the horizontal strain tensor with high resolution (>1 nanostrain), but these require permanent installation and are too expensive to be abandoned after short term studies. A far less expensive, removable instrument capable of measuring four components of strain and two components of tilt has been developed. Each sensing component employs non-contact eddy current transducers capable of measuring nanometer displacements. While not as precise as permanent borehole instruments, this new removable system should be able to resolve ground deformations associated with 0.5 to 1 microstrain per day rates expected at a proposed CO2 injection site. This system should also be well-suited for aquifer monitoring as well as for some geophysical signals. Finite element techniques are used to simulate a field injection test within the Bartlesville sandstone reservoir at the Avant field CO2 storage analog site, Oklahoma. These models suggest that measuring strain change at shallow depths, on the scale of 100s of ft, can be used to monitor the proposed water injection during a water flooding operation at a depth of approximately 1700 ft. A set of stochastic optimization algorithms are then used to iteratively generate a sequence of parameter estimates, and a high performance cluster computer efficiently evaluates this

  6. A cadmium hydroxide complex of a N3S-donor ligand containing two hydrogen bond donors: synthesis, characterization, and CO2 reactivity.

    PubMed

    Allred, Russell A; Huefner, Sara A; Rudzka, Katarzyna; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2007-01-21

    Treatment of the ebnpa (N-2-(ethylthio)ethyl-N,N-bis((6-neopentylamino-2-pyridyl)methyl)amine) ligand with a molar equivalent amount of Cd(ClO(4))(2).5H(2)O in CH(3)CN followed by the addition of [Me(4)N]OH.5H(2)O yielded the cadmium hydroxide complex [(ebnpaCd)(2)(mu-OH)(2)](ClO(4))(2) (1). Complex 1 has a binuclear cation in the solid-state with secondary hydrogen-bonding and CH/pi interactions involving the ebnpa ligand. In acetonitrile, 1 forms a binuclear/mononuclear equilibrium mixture. The formation of a mononuclear species has been confirmed by conductance measurements of 1 at low concentrations. Variable temperature studies of the binuclear/mononuclear equilibrium provided the standard enthalpy and entropy associated with the formation of the monomer as DeltaH degrees = +31(2) kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS degrees = +108(8) J mol(-1) K(-1), respectively. Enhanced secondary hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the terminal Cd-OH moiety may help to stabilize the mononuclear complex. Treatment of 1 with CO(2) in acetonitrile results in the formation of a binuclear cadmium carbonate complex, [(ebnpaCd)(2)(mu-CO(3))](ClO(4))(2) (2). PMID:17200755

  7. Frozen Frozen CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    2 October 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of frozen carbon dioxide in the south polar residual cap of Mars. Much of the south polar residual cap exhibits terrain that resembles stacks of sliced Swiss cheese, but this portion of the cap lacks the typical, circular depressions that characterize much of the region. Carbon dioxide on Mars freezes at a temperature of around 148 Kelvins, which is -125oC or about -193oF.

    Location near: 87.2oS, 28.4oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  8. Molecular Behavior CO2 and CO2-H2O Mixtures at Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, D. R.; Chialvo, A.; Rother, G.; Vlcek, L.

    2010-12-01

    (2.3 mol % CO2) at a silica surfaces and within silica 1 nm slit pores at 45oC and 200 b. For the case of a silica plate we observed significant layering within 10 Å from the mineral surface, promotion of CO2 co-sorption with H2O on hydroxylated surfaces and stronger H2O adsorption at non-hydroxylated surfaces. In the 1 nm slit pore case, nano-confinement strongly influences the sorption behavior wherein for hydroxylated surfaces H2O is preferentially enriched in the pore but for non-hydroxylated surfaces, H2O dewetting occurs with enhanced capillary uptake of CO2. Structural and dynamic behavior for supercritical CO2 interaction with muscovite (was assessed by classical molecular dynamics (CMD). These results indicate the development of distinct layers of CO2 within slit pores, reduced mobility by one to two orders of magnitudes compared to bulk CO2 depending on pore size and formation of bonds between CO2oxygens and H from muscovite hydroxyls. Analysis of simple, well-characterized fluid-substrate systems can provide details on the thermodynamic, structural and dynamic properties of CO2 and CO2-H2O mixtures at conditions relevant to sequestration.

  9. Seepage erosion mechanisms of bank collapse: three-dimensional seepage particle mobilization and undercutting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage flow initiates undercutting, similar to development and headward migration of internal gullies, by liquefaction of soil particles, followed by mass wasting of the bank. Although seepage erosion has three-dimensional characteristics, two-dimensional lysimeters have been used in previous resea...

  10. CO2 sequestration in basalts: laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otheim, L. T.; Adam, L.; van Wijk, K.; McLing, T. L.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is proposed as the only promising large-scale method to help reduce CO2 gas emission by its capture at large point sources and subsequent long-term storage in deep geologic formations. Reliable and cost-effective monitoring will be important aspect of ensuring geological sequestration is a safe, effective, and acceptable method for CO2 emissions mitigation. Once CO2 injection starts, seismic methods can be used to monitor the migration of the carbon dioxide plume. To calibrate changes in rock properties from field observations, we propose to first analyze changes in elastic properties on basalt cores. Carbon dioxide sequestration in basalt rocks results in fluid substitution and mixing of CO2 with water and rock mineralizations. Carbon dioxide sequestration in mafic rocks creates reactions such as Mg2SiO 4 + CaMgSi2O 6 + 4CO2 = Mg 3Ca(CO 3) 4 + 3SiO2 whereby primary silicate minerals within the basalt react with carbonic acid laden water to creating secondary carbonate minerals and silicates. Using time-lapse laboratory scale experiments, such as laser generated ultrasonic wave propagation; it is possible to observe small changes in the physical properties of a rock. We will show velocity and modulus measurements on three basalt core samples for different saturation. The ultimate goal of the project is to track seismic changes due to fluid substitution and mineralization. The porosity of our basalts ranges from 8% to 12%, and the P-wave velocity increases by 20% to 40% from dry to water saturated conditions. Petrographic analysis (CT-scans, thin sections, XRF, XRf) will aid in the characterization of the mineral structure in these basalts and its correlation to seismic properties changes resulting from fluid substitution and mineralization.

  11. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. Tsang

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  12. Characterizing the potential for fault reactivation related to CO2 injection through subsurface structural mapping and stress field analysis, Wellington Field, Sumner County, KS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, D.; Bidgoli, T.; Taylor, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    South-central Kansas has experienced an unprecedented increase in seismic activity since 2013. The spatial and temporal relationship of the seismicity with brine disposal operations has renewed interest in the role of fluids in fault reactivation. This study focuses on determining the suitability of CO2 injection into a Cambro-Ordovician reservoir for long-term storage and a Mississippian reservoir for enhanced oil recovery in Wellington Field, Sumner County, Kansas. Our approach for determining the potential for induced seismicity has been to (1) map subsurface faults and estimate in-situ stresses, (2) perform slip and dilation tendency analysis to identify optimally-oriented faults relative to the estimated stress field, and (3) monitor surface deformation through cGPS data and InSAR imaging. Through the use of 3D seismic reflection data, 60 near vertical, NNE-striking faults have been identified. The faults range in length from 140-410 m and have vertical separations of 3-32m. A number of faults appear to be restricted to shallow intervals, while others clearly cut the top basement reflector. Drilling-induced tensile fractures (N=78) identified from image logs and inversion of earthquake focal mechanism solutions (N=54) are consistent with the maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) oriented ~E-W. Both strike-slip and normal-slip fault plane solutions for earthquakes near the study area suggest that SHmax and Sv may be similar in magnitude. Estimates of stress magnitudes using step rate tests (Shmin = 2666 psi), density logs (Sv = 5308 psi), and calculations from wells with drilling induced tensile fractures (SHmax = 4547-6655 psi) are determined at the gauge depth of 4869ft. Preliminary slip and dilation tendency analysis indicates that faults striking 0°-20° are stable, whereas faults striking 26°-44° may have a moderate risk for reactivation with increasing pore-fluid pressure.

  13. CO2 permeability of fractured cap rocks - experiments and numerical simulations (CO2Seals)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Draeger), Ines Rick; Clauser, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    for this purpose including generic structural geological faults and comprising Mesozoic and Cenozoic formations of the Northern German Basin. The mass of CO2 retained by a multi-barrier system including reservoirs and cap rocks is estimated by taking into account hydraulic property values of known fault systems and predicted or measured leakage rates, also from natural analogues. As a result, we provide conclusions with respect to the stability and tightness of cap rocks exposed to CO2 for long periods. Furthermore, potential CO2 leakage scenarios on different size- and time-scales are generated in addition to the characterization of the CO2 sealing efficiency of low-permeable cap rocks. The CO2Seals project is funded by the R&D program GEOTECHNOLOGIEN of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). It is a joint research project of RWTH Aachen University and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The project is co-funded and accompanied scientifically by the industry partner Shell International Exploration and Production, Netherlands.

  14. POST-PROCESSING ANALYSIS FOR THC SEEPAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Y. SUN

    2004-09-29

    This report describes the selection of water compositions for the total system performance assessment (TSPA) model of results from the thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) seepage model documented in ''Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169856]). The selection has been conducted in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171334]). This technical work plan (TWP) was prepared in accordance with AP-2.27Q, ''Planning for Science Activities''. Section 1.2.3 of the TWP describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The post-processing analysis for THC seepage (THC-PPA) documented in this report provides a methodology for evaluating the near-field compositions of water and gas around a typical waste emplacement drift as these relate to the chemistry of seepage, if any, into the drift. The THC-PPA inherits the conceptual basis of the THC seepage model, but is an independently developed process. The relationship between the post-processing analysis and other closely related models, together with their main functions in providing seepage chemistry information for the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA), are illustrated in Figure 1-1. The THC-PPA provides a data selection concept and direct input to the physical and chemical environment (P&CE) report that supports the TSPA model. The purpose of the THC-PPA is further discussed in Section 1.2. The data selection methodology of the post-processing analysis (Section 6.2.1) was initially applied to results of the THC seepage model as presented in ''Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169856]). Other outputs from the THC seepage model (DTN: LB0302DSCPTHCS.002 [DIRS 161976]) used in the P&CE (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860

  15. Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO2 gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Annual report, September 1, 1996--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, P.

    1998-06-01

    The objective of the Spraberry CO{sub 2} pilot project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of continuous CO{sub 2} injection in the naturally fractured reservoirs of the Spraberry Trend. In order to describe, understand, and model CO{sub 2} flooding in the naturally fractured Spraberry reservoirs, characterization of the fracture system is a must. Additional reservoir characterization was based on horizontal coring in the second year of the project. In addition to characterization of natural fractures, horizontal coring has confirmed a previously developed rock model for describing the Spraberry Trend shaly sands. A better method for identifying Spraberry pay zones has been verified. The authors have completed the reservoir characterization, which includes matrix description and detection (from core-log integration) and fracture characterization. This information is found in Section 1. The authors have completed extensive imbibition experiments that strongly indicate that the weakly water-wet behavior of the reservoir rock may be responsible for poor waterflood response observed in many Spraberry fields. The authors have also made significant progress in analytical and numerical simulation of performance in Spraberry reservoirs as seen in Section 3. They have completed several suites of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry and Berea whole cores at reservoir conditions and reported in Section 4. The results of these experiments have been useful in developing a model for free-fall gravity drainage and have validated the premise that CO{sub 2} will recover oil from tight, unconfined Spraberry matrix.

  16. The study of a potential CO2 repository: Integrating laboratory and field geophysical experiments to characterize the upper Muschelkalk aquifer (northern Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, B.; Zappone, A. S.; Misra, S.; Diamond, L.

    2011-12-01

    The upper Muschelkalk saline aquifer consists of partly dolomitized to completely dolomitized carbonate rocks of mid Triassic age (~230 Ma). This aquifer is present throughout the Swiss Molasse Basin (SMB), north of the Alps. A regional appraisal of the SMB indicates that this Formation is a potential host aquifer for sequestered CO2. However, the spatial distribution and heterogeneity of the porosity, permeability and other relevant physical and mechanical properties of the upper Muschelkalk are still poorly known. The uncertainty in this knowledge stems mainly from the weakly developed oil and gas exploration industry in Switzerland. We use an integrated approach to better constrain the aquifer physical properties, which couples field scale geophysical surveys (borehole logging and seismic reflection profiles) with laboratory analytical data. Here we focus on a set of boreholes from northern Switzerland, where geophysical data and drill core useable for laboratory measurements are available. Two sub-units comprise the upper Muschelkalk Formation. The stratigraphically higher part is a fossiliferous dolomite (>90 vol% CaMg(CO3)2; Trigodonusdolomit). The underlying unit, is composed of micritic calcite and dolomite layers interbedded with fossil-rich layers (Hauptmuschelkalk). Although both units are part of the aquifer formation, they appear to have distinctly different physical properties. The transition from Trigodonusdolomit to the Hauptmuschelkalk is marked by an increase in the sonic velocity, density and acoustic impedance. The magnitude of increase in sonic velocity can be up to 500 m/s, accompanied by an increase in acoustic impedance from 8500 to 15500 (m/s*g/cm3), but varies between the different boreholes. Poisson's ratio, determined from a single borehole, show sharp decrease at the transition. The origin of the changes in the geophysical data is likely reflecting differences in porosity and mineral composition in the Trigodonusdolomit and

  17. An obsession with CO2.

    PubMed

    Jones, Norman L

    2008-08-01

    The concept that underlies this paper is that carbon dioxide (CO2) removal is at least as important as the delivery of oxygen for maximum performance during exercise. Increases in CO2 pressure and reductions in the pH of muscle influence muscle contractile properties and muscle metabolism (via effects on rate-limiting enzymes), and contribute to limiting symptoms. The approach of Barcroft exemplified the importance of integrative physiology, in describing the adaptive responses of the circulatory and respiratory systems to the demands of CO2 production during exercise. The extent to which failure in the response of one system may be countered by adaptation in another is also explained by this approach. A key factor in these linked systems is the transport of CO2 in the circulation. CO2 is mainly (90%) transported as bicarbonate ions--as such, transport of CO2 is critically related to acid-base homeostasis. Understanding in this field has been facilitated by the approach of Peter Stewart. Rooted in classical physico-chemical relationships, the approach identifies the independent variables contributing to homeostasis--the strong ion difference ([SID]), ionization of weak acids (buffers, Atot) and CO2 pressure (PCO2). The independent variables may be reliably measured or estimated in muscle, plasma, and whole blood. Equilibrium conditions are calculated to derive the dependent variables--the most important being the concentrations of bicarbonate and hydrogen ions. During heavy exercise, muscle [H+] can exceed 300 nEq.L-1 (pH 6.5), mainly due to a greatly elevated PCO2 and fall in [SID] as a result of increased lactate (La-) production. As blood flows through active muscle, [La-] increase in plasma is reduced by uptake of La- and Cl- by red blood cells, with a resultant increase in plasma [HCO3-]. Inactive muscle contributes to homeostasis through transfer of La- and Cl- into the muscle from both plasma and red blood cells; this results in a large increase in [HCO3

  18. Impact of atmospheric CO2 levels on continental silicate weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, E.; GoddéRis, Y.; Labat, D.; Roelandt, C.; Oliva, P.; Guerrero, B.

    2010-07-01

    Anthropogenic sources are widely accepted as the dominant cause for the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Here we use the B-WITCH model to quantify the impact of increased CO2 concentrations on CO2 consumption by weathering of continental surfaces. B-WITCH couples a dynamic biogeochemistry model (LPJ) and a process-based numerical model of continental weathering (WITCH). It allows simultaneous calculations of the different components of continental weathering fluxes, terrestrial vegetation dynamics, and carbon and water fluxes. The CO2 consumption rates are estimated at four different atmospheric CO2 concentrations, from 280 up to 1120 ppmv, for 22 sites characterized by silicate lithologies (basalt, granite, or sandstones). The sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 variations is explored, while temperature and rainfall are held constant. First, we show that under 355 ppmv of atmospheric CO2, B-WITCH is able to reproduce the global pattern of weathering rates as a function of annual runoff, mean annual temperature, or latitude for silicate lithologies. When atmospheric CO2 increases, evapotranspiration generally decreases due to progressive stomatal closure, and the soil CO2 pressure increases due to enhanced biospheric productivity. As a result, vertical drainage and soil acidity increase, promoting CO2 consumption by mineral weathering. We calculate an increase of about 3% of the CO2 consumption through silicate weathering (mol ha-1 yr-1) for 100 ppmv rise in CO2. Importantly, the sensitivity of the weathering system to the CO2 rise is not uniform and heavily depends on the climatic, lithologic, pedologic, and biospheric settings.

  19. Total (fumarolic + diffuse soil) CO2 output from Furnas volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, M.; Viveiros, F.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Grassa, F.; Gagliano, A. L.; Francofonte, V.; Ferreira, T.

    2015-10-01

    Furnas volcano, in São Miguel island (Azores), being the surface expression of rising hydrothermal steam, is the site of intense carbon dioxide (CO2) release by diffuse degassing and fumaroles. While the diffusive CO2 output has long (since the early 1990s) been characterized by soil CO2 surveys, no information is presently available on the fumarolic CO2 output. Here, we performed (in August 2014) a study in which soil CO2 degassing survey was combined for the first time with the measurement of the fumarolic CO2 flux. The results were achieved by using a GasFinder 2.0 tunable diode laser. Our measurements were performed in two degassing sites at Furnas volcano (Furnas Lake and Furnas Village), with the aim of quantifying the total (fumarolic + soil diffuse) CO2 output. We show that, within the main degassing (fumarolic) areas, the soil CO2 flux contribution (9.2 t day-1) represents a minor (~15 %) fraction of the total CO2 output (59 t day-1), which is dominated by the fumaroles (~50 t day-1). The same fumaroles contribute to ~0.25 t day-1 of H2S, based on a fumarole CO2/H2S ratio of 150 to 353 (measured with a portable Multi-GAS). However, we also find that the soil CO2 contribution from a more distal wider degassing structure dominates the total Furnas volcano CO2 budget, which we evaluate (summing up the CO2 flux contributions for degassing soils, fumarolic emissions and springs) at ~1030 t day-1.

  20. A Tube Seepage Meter for In Situ Measurement of Seepage Rate and Groundwater Sampling.

    PubMed

    Solder, John E; Gilmore, Troy E; Genereux, David P; Solomon, D Kip

    2016-07-01

    We designed and evaluated a "tube seepage meter" for point measurements of vertical seepage rates (q), collecting groundwater samples, and estimating vertical hydraulic conductivity (K) in streambeds. Laboratory testing in artificial streambeds show that seepage rates from the tube seepage meter agreed well with expected values. Results of field testing of the tube seepage meter in a sandy-bottom stream with a mean seepage rate of about 0.5 m/day agreed well with Darcian estimates (vertical hydraulic conductivity times head gradient) when averaged over multiple measurements. The uncertainties in q and K were evaluated with a Monte Carlo method and are typically 20% and 60%, respectively, for field data, and depend on the magnitude of the hydraulic gradient and the uncertainty in head measurements. The primary advantages of the tube seepage meter are its small footprint, concurrent and colocated assessments of q and K, and that it can also be configured as a self-purging groundwater-sampling device. PMID:26683886

  1. Use of an Electromagnetic Seepage Meter to Investigate Temporal Variability in Lake Seepage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Morin, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    A commercially available electromagnetic flowmeter is attached to a seepage cylinder to create an electromagnetic seepage meter (ESM) for automating measurement of fluxes across the sediment/water interface between ground water and surface water. The ESM is evaluated through its application at two lakes in New England, one where water seeps into the lake and one where water seeps out of the lake. The electromagnetic flowmeter replaces the seepage-meter bag and provides a continuous series of measurements from which temporal seepage processes can be investigated. It provides flow measurements over a range of three orders of magnitude, and contains no protruding components or moving parts. The ESM was used to evaluate duration of seepage disturbance following meter installation and indicated natural seepage rates resumed approximately one hour following meter insertion in a sandy lakebed. Lakebed seepage also varied considerably in response to lakebed disturbances, near-shore waves, and rain-falls, indicating hydrologic processes are occurring in shallow lakebed settings at time scales that have largely gone unobserved.

  2. Design and Implementation of a CO(2) Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Harpole, K.J.; Dollens, K.B.; Durrett, E.G.; Bles, J.S

    1997-10-31

    The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work this quarter falls within the demonstration project.

  3. Demonstration of a Novel, Integrated, Multi-Scale Procedure for High-Resolution 3D Reservoir Characterization and Improved CO2-EOR/Sequestration Management, SACROC Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Scott R. Reeves

    2007-09-30

    The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate a new and novel approach for high resolution, 3D reservoir characterization that can enable better management of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects and, looking to the future, carbon sequestration projects. The approach adopted has been the subject of previous research by the DOE and others, and relies primarily upon data-mining and advanced pattern recognition approaches. This approach honors all reservoir characterization data collected, but accepts that our understanding of how these measurements relate to the information of most interest, such as how porosity and permeability vary over a reservoir volume, is imperfect. Ideally the data needed for such an approach includes surface seismic to provide the greatest amount of data over the entire reservoir volume of interest, crosswell seismic to fill the resolution gap between surface seismic and wellbore-scale measurements, geophysical well logs to provide the vertical resolution sought, and core data to provide the tie to the information of most interest. These data are combined via a series of one or more relational models to enable, in its most successful application, the prediction of porosity and permeability on a vertical resolution similar to logs at each surface seismic trace location. In this project, the procedure was applied to the giant (and highly complex) SACROC unit of the Permian basin in West Texas, one of the world's largest CO{sub 2}-EOR projects and a potentially world-class geologic sequestration site. Due to operational scheduling considerations on the part of the operator of the field, the crosswell data was not obtained during the period of project performance (it is currently being collected however as part of another DOE project). This compromised the utility of the surface seismic data for the project due to the resolution gap between it and the geophysical well logs. An alternative approach was adopted that utilized a

  4. Microfluidic studies of CO2 sequestration by frustrated Lewis pairs.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Dan; Abolhasani, Milad; Choueiri, Rachelle; Lestari, Gabriella; Seiler, Caroline; Menard, Gabriel; Greener, Jesse; Guenther, Axel; Stephan, Douglas W; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2014-03-12

    Frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) comprising sterically hindered Lewis acids and bases offer the capability to reversibly capture CO2 under mild reaction conditions. The determination of equilibrium constants and thermodynamic properties of these reactions should enable assessment of the efficiency of a particular FLP system for CO2 sequestration and provide insights for design of new, efficient formulations of FLP catalysts for CO2 capture. We have developed a microfluidic approach to studies of FLP-CO2 reactions, which provides their thermodynamic characterization that is not accessible otherwise. The approach enables the determination of the equilibrium reaction constants at different temperatures, the enthalpy, the entropy, and the Gibbs energy of these reactions, as well as the enhancement factor. The microfluidic methodology has been validated by applying it to the well-characterized reaction of CO2 with a secondary amine. The microfluidic approach can be applied for fundamental thermodynamic studies of other gas-liquid reactions. PMID:24555752

  5. Homopolymers and Micelles in Supercritical CO2 : a SANS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillura-Martino, D.; McClain, J. B.; Canelas, D.; Betts, D.; Samulski, E. T.; Desimone, J. M.; Wignall, G. D.; Londono, J. D.; Triolo, R.

    1996-03-01

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (SC-CO_2) is becoming an attractive alternative to the liquid solvents traditionally used as polymerization media. We have applied small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to characterize homopolymers and micellar systems in SC-CO_2. Although polymerizations are carried out at high pressures, the penetrating power of the neutron beam means that typical cell windows are virtually transparent. Homopolymers studied include polyfluoro-octyl acrylate (PFOA), hexafluoro-polypropylene oxide and Polydimethyl-siloxane. Also, copolymers of amphiphilic character in CO_2, were characterized via SANS. Systems studied were PFOA-polystyrene diblocks and PFOA-polyethyleneoxide (PFOA-PEO) graft copolymers, which swell as the CO2 medium is saturated with water. This work illustrates the utility of SANS to measure molecular dimensions, thermodynamic variables, molecular weights, micelle structures etc. in supercritical CO_2.

  6. ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2008-10-01

    Are the carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors in your demand controlled ventilation systems sufficiently accurate? The data from these sensors are used to automatically modulate minimum rates of outdoor air ventilation. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements while adjusting the ventilation rate with changes in occupancy in order to save energy. Studies of energy savings from demand controlled ventilation and of the relationship of indoor CO2 concentrations with health and work performance provide a strong rationale for use of indoor CO2 data to control minimum ventilation rates1-7. However, this strategy will only be effective if, in practice, the CO2 sensors have a reasonable accuracy. The objective of this study was; therefore, to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. This article provides a summary of study methods and findings ? additional details are available in a paper in the proceedings of the ASHRAE IAQ?2007 Conference8.

  7. CO2 Sequestration Crosswell Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Luo, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2, a green house gas, represents an effort to reduce the large amount of CO2 generated as a by-product of fossil fuels combustion and emitted into the atmosphere. This process of sequestration involves CO2 storage deep underground into highly permeable porous media sealed by caprock. "4D seismics" is a natural non-intrusive monitoring technique which involves 3D time-lapse seismic surveys. The success of monitoring CO2 movement relies upon a proper description of the physics of the problem. We realize time-lapse migrations comparing acoustic, elastic (with or without Gassmann's formulae), and poroelastic simulations of 4D seismic imaging. This approach highlights the influence of using different physical theories on interpreting seismic data, and, more importantly, on extracting the CO2 signature from the seismic wave field. We investigate various types of inversions using (1) P-wave traveltimes, (2) P- & S-wave traveltimes and (3) P- & S-wave traveltimes and amplitudes. Simulations are performed using a spectral-element method, and finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, used in the non-linear iterative inversions, are calculated based on an adjoint method. Biot's equations are implemented in the forward and adjoint simulations to account for poroelastic effects.

  8. Multi-scale modeling of CO2 dispersion leaked from seafloor off the Japanese coast.

    PubMed

    Kano, Yuki; Sato, Toru; Kita, Jun; Hirabayashi, Shinichiro; Tabeta, Shigeru

    2010-02-01

    A numerical simulation was conducted to predict the change of pCO(2) in the ocean caused by CO(2) leaked from an underground aquifer, in which CO(2) is purposefully stored. The target space of the present model was the ocean above the seafloor. The behavior of CO(2) bubbles, their dissolution, and the advection-diffusion of dissolved CO(2) were numerically simulated. Here, two cases for the leakage rate were studied: an extreme case, 94,600 t/y, which assumed that a large fault accidentally connects the CO(2) reservoir and the seafloor; and a reasonable case, 3800 t/y, based on the seepage rate of an existing EOR site. In the extreme case, the calculated increase in DeltapCO(2) experienced by floating organisms was less than 300 ppm, while that for immobile organisms directly over the fault surface periodically exceeded 1000 ppm, if momentarily. In the reasonable case, the calculated DeltapCO(2) and pH were within the range of natural fluctuation. PMID:19853873

  9. Method for tracing simulated CO2 leak in terrestrial environment with a 13CO2 tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni, Christophe; Rasse, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Facilities for the geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes will be designed to prevent any leakage from the defined 'storage complex'. However, developing regulations and guidance throughout the world (e.g. the EC Directive and the USEPA Vulnerability Evaluation Framework) recognize the importance of assessing the potential for environmental impacts from CO2 storage. RISCS, a European (FP7) project, aims to improve understanding of those impacts that could plausibly occur in the hypothetical case that unexpected leakage occurs. As part of the RISCS project the potential impacts that an unexpected CO2 leaks might have on a cropland ecosystems was investigated. A CO2 exposure field experiment based on CO2 injection at 85 cm depth under an oats culture was designed. To facilitate the characterization of the simulated leaking zone the gas used for injection was produced from natural gas and had a δ13C of -46‰. The aim of the present communication is to depict how the injected gas was traced within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum using 13CO2 continuous cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS). Four subsurface experimental injection plots (6m x 3m) were set up. In order to test the effects of different intensity of leakage, the field experiment was designed as to create a longitudinal CO2 gradient for each plot. For this purpose gas supply pipes were inserted at one extremity of each plot at the base of a 45 cm thick layer of sand buried 40 cm below the surface under the clayey plough layer of Norwegian moraine soils. Soil CO2 concentration and isotopic signature were punctually recorded: 1) in the soil at 20 cm depth at 6 positions distributed on the central transect, 2) at the surface following a (50x50 cm) grid sampling pattern, and 3) in the canopy atmosphere at 10, 20, 30 cm along three longitudinal transects (seven sampling point per transect). Soil CO2 fluxes and isotopic signature were finally

  10. Update on CO2 emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedingstein, P.; Houghton, R.A.; Marland, Gregg; Hackler, J.; Boden, Thomas A; Conway, T.J.; Canadell, J.G.; Raupach, Mike; Ciais, Philippe; Le Quere, Corrine

    2010-12-01

    Emissions of CO2 are the main contributor to anthropogenic climate change. Here we present updated information on their present and near-future estimates. We calculate that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning decreased by 1.3% in 2009 owing to the global financial and economic crisis that started in 2008; this is half the decrease anticipated a year ago1. If economic growth proceeds as expected2, emissions are projected to increase by more than 3% in 2010, approaching the high emissions growth rates that were observed from 2000 to 20081, 3, 4. We estimate that recent CO2 emissions from deforestation and other land-use changes (LUCs) have declined compared with the 1990s, primarily because of reduced rates of deforestation in the tropics5 and a smaller contribution owing to forest regrowth elsewhere.

  11. Potential of Microbes to Increase Geologic CO2 Storage Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, R.; Mitchell, A. C.; Ebigbo, A.; Phillips, A.; Cunningham, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into underground formations such as brine aquifers where microbe-rock-fluid interactions will occur. These interactions may be important for the long-term fate of the injected CO2. Concepts and results will be presented from bench to meso-scale experiments focusing on the utility of attached microorganisms and biofilms to enhance storage security of injected CO2, via mineral-trapping, solubility trapping, formation trapping, and leakage reduction. Batch and flow experiments at atmospheric and geologic CO2 storage-relevant pressures have demonstrated the ability of microbial biofilms to decrease the permeability of natural and artificial porous media, survive the exposure to scCO2, and facilitate the conversion of CO2 into long-term stable carbonate phases as well as increase the solubility of CO2 in brines. Recent work has focused on small and large scale (75 cm diameter, 38 cm high sandstone) radial flow systems as well as the molecular characterization and isolation of microbes from geologic carbon sequestration-relevant environments. Methods for microscopic and macroscopic visualization of relevant processes from the pore to the bulk scale are being developed and have been proven to be essential tools in establishing the necessary understanding to increase CO2 storage security. As a result, reactive transport models describing the influence of biological processes on CO2 storage security have been developed and are continuously being modified to include relevant processes.

  12. Hazardous indoor CO2 concentrations in volcanic environments.

    PubMed

    Viveiros, Fátima; Gaspar, João L; Ferreira, Teresa; Silva, Catarina

    2016-07-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the main soil gases released silently and permanently in diffuse degassing areas, both in volcanic and non-volcanic zones. In the volcanic islands of the Azores (Portugal) several villages are located over diffuse degassing areas. Lethal indoor CO2 concentrations (higher than 10 vol %) were measured in a shelter located at Furnas village, inside the caldera of the quiescent Furnas Volcano (S. Miguel Island). Hazardous CO2 concentrations were detected not only underground, but also at the ground floor level. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to the CO2 and environmental time series recorded between April 2008 and March 2010 at Furnas village. The results show that about 30% of the indoor CO2 variation is explained by environmental variables, namely barometric pressure, soil water content and wind speed. The highest indoor CO2 concentrations were recorded during bad weather conditions, characterized by low barometric pressure together with rainfall periods and high wind speed. In addition to the spike-like changes observed on the CO2 time series, long-term oscillations were also identified and appeared to represent seasonal variations. In fact, indoor CO2 concentrations were higher during winter period when compared to the dry summer months. Considering the permanent emission of CO2 in various volcanic regions of the world, CO2 hazard maps are crucial and need to be accounted by the land-use planners and authorities. PMID:27155095

  13. The CO2nnect activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is one of the biggest challenges we face today. A first step is the understanding the problem, more exactly what is the challenge and the differences people can make. Pupils need a wide competencies to meet the challenges of sustainable development - including climate change. The CO2nnect activities are designed to support learning which can provide pupils the abilities, skills, attitudes and awareness as well as knowledge and understanding of the issues. The project "Together for a clean and healthy world" is part of "The Global Educational Campaign CO2nnect- CO2 on the way to school" and it was held in our school in the period between February and October 2009. It contained a variety of curricular and extra-curricular activities, adapted to students aged from 11 to 15. These activities aimed to develop in students the necessary skills to understanding man's active role in improving the quality of the environment, putting an end to its degrading process and to reducing the effects of climate changes caused by the human intervention in nature, including transport- a source of CO2 pollution. The activity which I propose can be easily adapted to a wide range of age groups and linked to the curricula of many subjects: - Investigate CO2 emissions from travel to school -Share the findings using an international database -Compare and discuss CO2 emissions -Submit questions to a climate- and transport expert -Partner with other schools -Meet with people in your community to discuss emissions from transport Intended learning outcomes for pupils who participate in the CO2nnect campaign are: Understanding of the interconnected mobility- and climate change issue climate change, its causes and consequences greenhouse-gas emissions from transport and mobility the interlinking of social, environmental, cultural and economic aspects of the local transport system how individual choices and participation can contribute to creating a more sustainable development

  14. A seepage meter designed for use in flowing water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.

    2008-01-01

    Seepage meters provide one of the most direct means to measure exchange of water across the sediment-water interface, but they generally have been unsuitable for use in fluvial settings. Although the seepage bag can be placed inside a rigid container to minimize velocity head concerns, the seepage cylinder installed in the sediment bed projects into and disrupts the flow field, altering both the local-scale fluid exchange as well as measurement of that exchange. A low-profile seepage meter designed for use in moving water was tested in a seepage meter flux tank where both current velocity and seepage velocity could be controlled. The conical seepage cylinder protrudes only slightly above the sediment bed and is connected via tubing to a seepage bag or flowmeter positioned inside a rigid shelter that is located nearby where current velocity is much slower. Laboratory and field tests indicate that the net effect of the small protrusion of the seepage cylinder into the surface water flow field is inconsequentially small for surface water currents up to 65 cm s-1. Current velocity affects the variability of seepage measurements; seepage standard deviation increased from ???2 to ???6 cm d-1 as current velocity increased from 9 to 65 cm s-1. Substantial bias can result if the shelter is not placed to minimize hydraulic gradient between the bag and the seepage cylinder.

  15. Turbulent flow statistics of vegetative channel with seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Thokchom Bebina; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2015-12-01

    The present study is carried out for studying the impact of submerged, flexible vegetation in a channel where downward seepage occurs. Laboratory experiments on artificial vegetation of two different heights, 8 cm and 6 cm, were conducted for no-seepage, 10% seepage and 15% seepage cases. Vegetation height is an important parameter in influencing the flow characteristics in a vegetated channel, where velocity is reduced near the top of the vegetation. Results show that velocity measured at upstream vegetation section is always higher than the downstream section even with the application of downward seepage. The maximum value of Reynolds stress occurs near the top of the vegetation. When the flow enters the vegetation section, the local effect of the presence of vegetation on sediment transport is more at the upstream vegetation section and then decreases which is shown by higher Reynolds stress at the upstream as compared to downstream vegetation section highlighting the importance of vegetation in providing as an erosion control. The maximum Reynolds stress at no seepage is increased by a percentage of 17% for 10% seepage and average of 30.5% for 15% seepage. The turbulence intensities at no seepage are increased by an average value of 15% for 10% seepage and 25% for 15% seepage. The reduction of Reynolds stress and turbulent intensities along the longitudinal direction implies the importance of using vegetation as a river restoration measure providing considerable stability to channels. Third order moments highlight that downward seepage increases the streamwise flux and decreases the upward flux.

  16. Characterizing a Mississippian Carbonate Reservoir for CO2-EOR and Carbon Geosequestration: Applicability of Existing Rock Physics Models and Implications to Feasibility of a Time Lapse Monitoring Program in the Wellington Oil Field, Sumner County, Kansas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueck, A. J.; Raef, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    This study will focus on characterizing subsurface rock formations of the Wellington Field, in Sumner County, Kansas, for both geosequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the saline Arbuckle formation and enhanced oil recovery of a depleting Mississippian oil reservoir. Multi-scale data including lithofacies core samples, X-ray diffraction, digital rock physics scans, scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, well log data including sonic and dipole sonic, and surface 3D seismic reflection data will be integrated to establish and/or validate a new or existing rock physics model that best represents our reservoir rock types and characteristics. We will acquire compressional wave velocity and shear wave velocity data from Mississippian and Arbuckle cores by running ultrasonic tests using an Ult 100 Ultrasonic System and a 12 ton hydraulic jack located in the geophysics lab in Thompson Hall at Kansas State University. The elastic constants Young's Modulus, Bulk Modulus, Shear (Rigidity) Modulus and Poisson's Ratio will be extracted from these velocity data. Ultrasonic velocities will also be compared to sonic and dipole sonic log data from the Wellington 1-32 well. These data will be integrated to validate a lithofacies classification statistical model, which will be and partially has been applied to the largely unknown saline Arbuckle formation, with hopes for a connection, perhaps via Poisson's ratio, allowing a time-lapse seismic feasibility assessment and potentially developing a transformation of compressional wave sonic velocities to shear wave sonic for all wells, where compressional wave sonic is available. We will also be testing our rock physics model by predicting effects of changing effective (brine + CO2 +hydrocarbon) fluid composition on seismic properties and the implications on feasibility of seismic monitoring. Lessons learned from characterizing the Mississippian are essential to understanding the potential of utilizing similar workflows for the

  17. DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A CO2 FLOOD UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL INJECTION WELLS IN A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE APPROACHING WATERFLOOD DEPLETION

    SciTech Connect

    K.J. Harpole; Ed G. Durrett; Susan Snow; J.S. Bles; Carlon Robertson; C.D. Caldwell; D.J. Harms; R.L. King; B.A. Baldwin; D. Wegener; M. Navarrette

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO{sub 2} horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields. The Unit was a mature waterflood with water cut exceeding 95%. Oil must be mobilized through the use of a miscible or near-miscible fluid to recover significant additional reserves. Also, because the unit was relatively small, it did not have the benefit of economies of scale inherent in normal larger scale projects. Thus, new and innovative methods were required to reduce investment and operating costs. Two primary methods used to accomplish improved economics were use of reservoir characterization to restrict the flood to the higher quality rock in the unit and use of horizontal injection wells to cut investment and operating costs. The project consisted of two budget phases. Budget Phase I started in June 1994 and ended late June 1996. In this phase Reservoir Analysis, Characterization Tasks and Advanced Technology Definition Tasks were completed. Completion enabled the project to be designed, evaluated, and an Authority for Expenditure (AFE) for project implementation submitted to working interest owners for approval. Budget Phase II consisted of the implementation and execution of the project in the field. Phase II was completed in July 2001. Performance monitoring, during Phase II, by mid 1998 identified the majority of producing wells which under performed their anticipated withdrawal rates. Newly drilled and re-activated wells had lower offtake rates than originally forecasted. As a result of poor offtake, higher reservoir pressure was a concern

  18. Modeling streambank instability by seepage undercutting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predicting bank collapse due to undercutting brought about by seepage erosion has not been fully studied or modeled, albeit its role in streambank erosion may be important. The limitation originates from the limited field measurements or laboratory experiments that successfully measure or simulate s...

  19. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC submodel uses a drift

  20. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  1. Eddy Covariance Method for CO2 Emission Measurements: CCS Applications, Principles, Instrumentation and Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, George; Madsen, Rod; Feese, Kristin

    2013-04-01

    The Eddy Covariance method is a micrometeorological technique for direct high-speed measurements of the transport of gases, heat, and momentum between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. Gas fluxes, emission and exchange rates are carefully characterized from single-point in-situ measurements using permanent or mobile towers, or moving platforms such as automobiles, helicopters, airplanes, etc. Since the early 1990s, this technique has been widely used by micrometeorologists across the globe for quantifying CO2 emission rates from various natural, urban and agricultural ecosystems [1,2], including areas of agricultural carbon sequestration. Presently, over 600 eddy covariance stations are in operation in over 120 countries. In the last 3-5 years, advancements in instrumentation and software have reached the point when they can be effectively used outside the area of micrometeorology, and can prove valuable for geological carbon capture and sequestration, landfill emission measurements, high-precision agriculture and other non-micrometeorological industrial and regulatory applications. In the field of geological carbon capture and sequestration, the magnitude of CO2 seepage fluxes depends on a variety of factors. Emerging projects utilize eddy covariance measurement to monitor large areas where CO2 may escape from the subsurface, to detect and quantify CO2 leakage, and to assure the efficiency of CO2 geological storage [3,4,5,6,7,8]. Although Eddy Covariance is one of the most direct and defensible ways to measure and calculate turbulent fluxes, the method is mathematically complex, and requires careful setup, execution and data processing tailor-fit to a specific site and a project. With this in mind, step-by-step instructions were created to introduce a novice to the conventional Eddy Covariance technique [9], and to assist in further understanding the method through more advanced references such as graduate-level textbooks, flux networks guidelines, journals

  2. Controls on the CO2 seasonal cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Forget, F.; Haberle, Robert M.; Schaeffer, J.; Lee, H.

    1993-01-01

    Surface pressure measurement performed by the Viking landers show substantial variations in pressure on seasonal timescales that are characterized by two local minima and two local maxima. These variations have widely been attributed to the seasonal condensation and sublimation of CO2 in the two polar regions. It has been somewhat of a surprise that the amplitude of the minimum and maximum that is dominated by the CO2 cycle in the north was much weaker than the corresponding amplitude of the south-dominated extrema. Another surprise was that the seasonal pressure cycle during years 2 and 3 of the Viking mission was so similar to that for year 1, despite the occurrence of two global dust storms during year 1 and none during years 2 and 3. An energy balance model that incorporates dynamical factors from general circulation model (GCM) runs in which the atmospheric dust opacity and seasonal date were systematically varied was used to model the observed seasonal pressure variations. The energy balance takes account of the following processes in determining the rates of CO2 condensation and sublimation at each longitudinal and latitudinal grid point: solar radiation, infrared radiation from the atmosphere and surface, subsurface heat conduction, and atmospheric heat advection. Condensation rates are calculated both at the surface and in the atmosphere. In addition, the energy balance model also incorporates information from the GCM runs on seasonal redistribution of surface pressure across the globe. Estimates of surface temperature of the seasonal CO2 caps were used to define the infrared radiative losses from the seasonal polar caps. The seasonal pressure variations measured at the Viking lander sites were closely reproduced.

  3. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.; Way, J. Douglas; Vlasse, Marcus

    2003-01-01

    The objective of CAM is to develop, test, and analyze thin film membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The membranes are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications that will operate in extraterrestrial environments and support future unmanned and human space missions. A primary application is the Sabatier Electrolysis process that uses Mars atmosphere CO2 as raw material for producing water, oxygen, and methane for rocket fuel and habitat support. Other applications include use as an inlet filter to collect and concentrate Mars atmospheric argon and nitrogen gases for habitat pressurization, and to remove CO2 from breathing gases in Closed Environment Life Support Systems (CELSS). CAM membrane materials include crystalline faujasite (FAU) zeolite and rubbery polymers such as silicone rubber (PDMS) that have been shown in the literature and via molecular simulation to favor adsorption and permeation of CO2 over nitrogen and argon. Pure gas permeation tests using commercial PDMS membranes have shown that both CO2 permeance and the separation factor relative to other gases increase as the temperature decreases, and low (Delta)P(Sub CO2) favors higher separation factors. The ideal CO2/N2 separation factor increases from 7.5 to 17.5 as temperature decreases from 22 C to -30 C. For gas mixtures containing CO2, N2, and Ar, plasticization decreased the separation factors from 4.5 to 6 over the same temperature range. We currently synthesize and test our own Na(+) FAU zeolite membranes using standard formulations and secondary growth methods on porous alumina. Preliminary tests with a Na(+) FAU membrane at 22 C show a He/SF6 ideal separation factor of 62, exceeding the Knudsen diffusion selectivity by an order of magnitude. This shows that the membrane is relatively free from large defects and associated non-selective (viscous flow) transport

  4. Numerical Simulation of CO2 Flooding of Coalbed Methane Considering the Fluid-Solid Coupling Effect

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianjun; Li, Guang; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    CO2 flooding of coalbed methane (CO2-ECBM) not only stores CO2 underground and reduces greenhouse gas emissions but also enhances the gas production ratio. This coupled process involves multi-phase fluid flow and coal-rock deformation, as well as processes such as competitive gas adsorption and diffusion from the coal matrix into fractures. A dual-porosity medium that consists of a matrix and fractures was built to simulate the flooding process, and a mathematical model was used to consider the competitive adsorption, diffusion and seepage processes and the interaction between flow and deformation. Due to the effects of the initial pressure and the differences in pressure variation during the production process, permeability changes caused by matrix shrinkage were spatially variable in the reservoir. The maximum value of permeability appeared near the production well, and the degree of rebound decreased with increasing distance from the production well. PMID:27031096

  5. Numerical Simulation of CO2 Flooding of Coalbed Methane Considering the Fluid-Solid Coupling Effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianjun; Li, Guang; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    CO2 flooding of coalbed methane (CO2-ECBM) not only stores CO2 underground and reduces greenhouse gas emissions but also enhances the gas production ratio. This coupled process involves multi-phase fluid flow and coal-rock deformation, as well as processes such as competitive gas adsorption and diffusion from the coal matrix into fractures. A dual-porosity medium that consists of a matrix and fractures was built to simulate the flooding process, and a mathematical model was used to consider the competitive adsorption, diffusion and seepage processes and the interaction between flow and deformation. Due to the effects of the initial pressure and the differences in pressure variation during the production process, permeability changes caused by matrix shrinkage were spatially variable in the reservoir. The maximum value of permeability appeared near the production well, and the degree of rebound decreased with increasing distance from the production well. PMID:27031096

  6. Leakage and Seepage in the Near-Surface Environment: An Integrated Approach to Monitoring and Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2003-12-18

    Monitoring and detection of leakage and seepage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the near-surface environment is needed to ensure the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration. Large leakage fluxes, e.g., through leaking wells, will be easier to detect and monitor than slow and diffuse leakage and seepage. The challenge of detecting slow leakage and seepage is discerning a leakage or seepage signal from within the natural background variations in CO{sub 2} concentration and flux that are controlled by a variety of coupled processes in soil. Although there are no direct examples of leaking geologic carbon sequestration sites on which to base a proposed verification approach, we have been guided by our prior simulation studies of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage, which showed that large CO{sub 2} concentrations can develop in the shallow subsurface even for relatively small CO{sub 2} leakage fluxes. A variety of monitoring technologies exists for measuring CO{sub 2} concentration and flux, but there is a gap between instrument performance and the detection of a leakage or seepage signal from within large natural background variability. We propose an integrated approach to monitoring and verification. The first part of our proposed approach is to characterize and understand the natural ecosystem before CO{sub 2} injection occurs so that future anomalies can be recognized. Measurements of natural CO{sub 2} fluxes using accumulation chamber (AC) and eddy correlation (EC) approaches, soil CO{sub 2} concentration profiles with depth, and carbon isotope compositions of CO{sub 2} are needed to characterize the natural state of the system prior to CO{sub 2} injection. From this information, modeling needs to be carried out to enhance understanding of carbon sources and sinks so that anomalies can be recognized and subject to closer scrutiny as potential leakage or seepage signals. Long-term monitoring using AC, EC, and soil-gas analyses along with ecosystem and

  7. Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-01-19

    ''Hidden'' geothermal systems are systems devoid of obvious surface hydrothermal manifestations. Emissions of moderate-to-low solubility gases may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. We investigate the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring below and above ground in the near-surface environment as an approach to exploration targeting hidden geothermal systems. We focus on CO2 because it is the dominant noncondensible gas species in most geothermal systems and has moderate solubility in water. We carried out numerical simulations of a CO2 migration scenario to calculate the magnitude of expected fluxes and concentrations. Our results show that CO2 concentrations can reach high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are predominantly controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include the infrared gas analyzer, the accumulation chamber method, the eddy covariance method, hyperspectral imaging, and light detection and ranging. To meet the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring techniques with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. The proposed monitoring plan initially focuses on rapid, economical, reliable measurements of CO2 subsurface concentrations and surface fluxes and statistical analysis of the collected data. Based on this analysis, are as with a high probability

  8. Spectral analysis of chemisorbed CO2 on Mars analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Roush, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this work is to estimate the mass of CO2 that may have been removed to a quasi-stable reservoir on the Martian surface by chemisorption and to estimate the spectral effects of chemisorbed CO2 in remotely-sensed Martian spectra. Our approach is to characterize the conditions most favorable for the formation of carbonate on common terrestrial oxide minerals and to search for infrared spectral bands that result from chemisorption of CO2 molecules onto oxide and other Mars analog materials.

  9. Damage evaluation for crops exposed to a simulated leakage of geologically stored CO2 using hyperspectral imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burud, Ingunn; Moni, Christophe; Flø, Andreas; Rolstad Denby, Cecilie; Rasse, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    simulated CO2 leak might have on the hyperspectral signature of a Norwegian oats crop. In order to test the effects of different intensity of leakage, a CO2 exposure field experiment was designed to create a longitudinal CO2 gradient. For this purpose a gas supply pipe was inserted at one end of a 6m by 3m experimental plot at the base of a 45 cm thick layer of sand buried 40 cm below the surface under a silt loam plough layer. CO2 was then injected at a rate of 2l.min-1 just after the oats had germinated at the end of June, and continued until it was harvested at the end of August. Then soil CO2 fluxes were recorded at the surface using a (60 x 60 cm) grid sampling pattern. Hyperspectral images of the experimental plot were taken at different dates during the gassing period using a SPECIM camera with 800 spectral bands, covering the wavelength range 400 - 1000 nm. The change in the reflectance spectra were characterized over time within the plot by the computation of various hyperspectral vegetation indices for small discretized spatial units (i.e. 10 cm by 10 cm square). The results showed that one month after injection, reduced plant growth, yellowing of the leaves and purple discoloration of the stems were observed just above the injection points were high CO2 fluxes had been identified. These high CO2 flux zones were further associated with an increase of the reflectance that occurred in the red region of the spectra indicating a decrease of the chlorophyll content in the plants. To conclude, plant health, as indicated by the hyperspectral signature, was closely related to the leakage pattern, indicating that hyperspectral imaging could be used to identify a CO2 seepage in an agricultural field. Acknowledgments This work is part of the RISCS project (Research into Impacts and Safety in CO2 Storage), funded by the EC 7th Framework Programme and by industry partners ENEL I&I, Statoil, Vattenfall AB, E.ON and RWE. R&D partners are BGS, CERTH, IMARES, OGS, PML, SINTEF

  10. Mapping methane from marine and terrestrial hydrocarbon seepage using AVIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, A. K.; Bradley, E. S.; Funk, C.; Roberts, D. A.; Leifer, I.; Dennison, P. E.; Margolis, J.

    2010-12-01

    Concentrations of atmospheric methane (CH4), a greenhouse gas at least 20 times more potent per molecule than carbon dioxide (CO2), have more than doubled in the last two centuries. Due to a lack of direct measurements of sources and sinks, the global methane budget is poorly constrained and emissions of this important greenhouse gas are often underestimated in climate models. The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) recently mapped methane emissions from the Coal Oil Point (COP) marine seep fields, a concentrated geologic methane source (0.015 Tg yr-1 from ~3 km2) located offshore from Santa Barbara, CA using a residual-based approach (Roberts et al. 2010) and short-wave infrared band ratios (Bradley et al. submitted). In this study, an additional cluster-tuned matched filter technique adapted from Funk et al. 2001 detected methane anomalies for COP that closely matched previous results and were in agreement with sonar-based seep surveys and flux buoy data. This technique was also applied to AVIRIS data acquired over the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, CA, a region known for natural oil and methane seepage. Significant anomalies were identified for known methane sources close to the tar pits where pipes have been established to prevent dangerous methane buildup. Therefore, imaging spectrometry using sensors like AVIRIS and planned satellite sensors like HyspIRI has the potential to greatly improve high spatial resolution mapping of methane emissions, thereby better constraining regional methane sources.

  11. Inertial (non-Darcian) channeled seepage flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foda, Mostafa A.

    1994-10-01

    A slow wave solution is identified for an infinite elastic medium intersected by a two-dimensional fluid channel. Because the wave speed is much slower than the medium's elastic shear wave, the response in the elastic medium is governed by elastostatics. The inertia of the wave is essentially focused in the fluid channel. Furthermore, wave damping is caused by fluid viscous friction on the channel in an elastic solid. It is proposed that these solutions may also be used in the case of a granular porous medium. The seepage channels would then represent a network of preferential flow paths. Therefore we would allow, in this case, the channel porosity to be different from the average granular porosity. For a strongly channel seepage flow or for a low channel porosity the solution is shown to approach that of a single-channel solution, giving rise to a slow propagating wave mode. On the other hand, for weak channeling or nearly `homogeneous' seepage flow the solution is shown to reproduce Biot's (1956) critically damped wave of the second kind. It is proposed that the resonance observed by Foda and Tzang (1994) are in the form of these strongly channeled wave modes.

  12. Surface Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Owen, Antionette T.; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-02-11

    The fundamental adsorption behavior of gaseous and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) onto poorly crystalline kaolinite (KGa-2) at conditions relevant to geologic sequestration has been investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and density functional theory (DFT) methods. The QCM data indicated linear adsorption of CO2 (0-0.3 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) onto the kaolinite surface up through the gaseous state (0.186 g/cm3). However in the supercritical region, CO2 adsorption increases dramatically, reaching a peak (0.9-1.0 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) near 0.43 g/cm3, before declining rapidly to surface adsorption values equivalent or below gaseous CO2. This adsorption profile was not observed with He or N2. Comparative density functional studies of CO2 interactions with kaolinite surface models rule out CO2 intercalation and confirm that surface adsorption is favored up to approximately 0.35 g/cm3 of CO2, showing distorted T-shaped CO2-CO2 clustering, typical of supercritical CO2 aggregation over the surface as the density increases. Beyond this point, the adsorption energy gain for any additional CO2 becomes less than the CO2 interaction energy (~0.2 eV) in the supercritical medium resulting in overall desorption of CO2 from the kaolinite surface.

  13. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Diskin, G. S.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Gorham, K.; Huey, L. G.; Meinardi, S.; Rowland, F. S.; Vay, S. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Yang, M.; Blake, D. R.

    2010-08-01

    Oil sands comprise 30% of the world's oil reserves and the crude oil reserves in Canada's oil sands deposits are second only to Saudi Arabia. The extraction and processing of oil sands is much more challenging than for light sweet crude oils because of the high viscosity of the bitumen contained within the oil sands and because the bitumen is mixed with sand and contains chemical impurities such as sulphur. Despite these challenges, the importance of oil sands is increasing in the energy market. To our best knowledge this is the first peer-reviewed study to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from Alberta's oil sands mining sites. We present high-precision gas chromatography measurements of 76 speciated C2-C10 VOCs (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, monoterpenes, oxygenates, halocarbons, and sulphur compounds) in 17 boundary layer air samples collected over surface mining operations in northeast Alberta on 10 July 2008, using the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory as a research platform. In addition to the VOCs, we present simultaneous measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2, which were measured in situ aboard the DC-8. Methane, CO, CO2, NO, NO2, NOy, SO2 and 53 VOCs (e.g., halocarbons, sulphur species, NMHCs) showed clear statistical enhancements (up to 1.1-397×) over the oil sands compared to local background values and, with the exception of CO, were higher over the oil sands than at any other time during the flight. Twenty halocarbons (e.g., CFCs, HFCs, halons, brominated species) either were not enhanced or were minimally enhanced (< 10%) over the oil sands. Ozone levels remained low because of titration by NO, and three VOCs (propyne, furan, MTBE) remained below their 3 pptv detection limit throughout the flight. Based on their mutual correlations, the compounds emitted by the oil sands industry fell into two groups: (1) evaporative emissions from the oil sands and its products and/or from the diluent used to

  14. Outsourcing CO2 within China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kuishuang; Davis, Steven J.; Sun, Laixiang; Li, Xin; Guan, Dabo; Liu, Weidong; Liu, Zhu; Hubacek, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the high standard of living enjoyed by people in the richest countries often comes at the expense of CO2 emissions produced with technologies of low efficiency in less affluent, developing countries. Less apparent is that this relationship between developed and developing can exist within a single country’s borders, with rich regions consuming and exporting high-value goods and services that depend upon production of low-cost and emission-intensive goods and services from poorer regions in the same country. As the world’s largest emitter of CO2, China is a prominent and important example, struggling to balance rapid economic growth and environmental sustainability across provinces that are in very different stages of development. In this study, we track CO2 emissions embodied in products traded among Chinese provinces and internationally. We find that 57% of China’s emissions are related to goods that are consumed outside of the province where they are produced. For instance, up to 80% of the emissions related to goods consumed in the highly developed coastal provinces are imported from less developed provinces in central and western China where many low–value-added but high–carbon-intensive goods are produced. Without policy attention to this sort of interprovincial carbon leakage, the less developed provinces will struggle to meet their emissions intensity targets, whereas the more developed provinces might achieve their own targets by further outsourcing. Consumption-based accounting of emissions can thus inform effective and equitable climate policy within China. PMID:23754377

  15. Intelligent CO 2 beam guiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Stimpfl, Joffrey; Emonts, Michael

    The Fraunhofer IPT has recently developed a self-diagnosing laser system technology which can monitor the process parameters of all laser system components and supports the adjustment of the beam guidance of CO2 laser production systems with large ranges of travel. The intelligent system furthermore interprets the correlated laser beam parameter responses and proposes appropriate measures for preventive maintenance. The new assisted beam guidance adjustment bases upon active reflector modules adjusting with a large angular range of average ±0.8∘ at maximum resolution and a position-sensitive detector for the position of the pilot laser.

  16. Damage evaluation for crops exposed to a simulated leakage of geologically stored CO2 using hyperspectral imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burud, Ingunn; Moni, Christophe; Flø, Andreas; Rolstad Denby, Cecilie; Rasse, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    simulated CO2 leak might have on the hyperspectral signature of a Norwegian oats crop. In order to test the effects of different intensity of leakage, a CO2 exposure field experiment was designed to create a longitudinal CO2 gradient. For this purpose a gas supply pipe was inserted at one end of a 6m by 3m experimental plot at the base of a 45 cm thick layer of sand buried 40 cm below the surface under a silt loam plough layer. CO2 was then injected at a rate of 2l.min-1 just after the oats had germinated at the end of June, and continued until it was harvested at the end of August. Then soil CO2 fluxes were recorded at the surface using a (60 x 60 cm) grid sampling pattern. Hyperspectral images of the experimental plot were taken at different dates during the gassing period using a SPECIM camera with 800 spectral bands, covering the wavelength range 400 - 1000 nm. The change in the reflectance spectra were characterized over time within the plot by the computation of various hyperspectral vegetation indices for small discretized spatial units (i.e. 10 cm by 10 cm square). The results showed that one month after injection, reduced plant growth, yellowing of the leaves and purple discoloration of the stems were observed just above the injection points were high CO2 fluxes had been identified. These high CO2 flux zones were further associated with an increase of the reflectance that occurred in the red region of the spectra indicating a decrease of the chlorophyll content in the plants. To conclude, plant health, as indicated by the hyperspectral signature, was closely related to the leakage pattern, indicating that hyperspectral imaging could be used to identify a CO2 seepage in an agricultural field. Acknowledgments This work is part of the RISCS project (Research into Impacts and Safety in CO2 Storage), funded by the EC 7th Framework Programme and by industry partners ENEL I&I, Statoil, Vattenfall AB, E.ON and RWE. R&D partners are BGS, CERTH, IMARES, OGS, PML, SINTEF

  17. A comparative synthesis and physicochemical characterizations of Ni/Al2O3-MgO nanocatalyst via sequential impregnation and sol-gel methods used for CO2 reforming of methane.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadi, Sogand; Haghighi, Mohammad; Karimipour, Samira

    2013-07-01

    Carbon dioxide reforming of methane is an interesting route for synthesis gas production especially over nano-sized catalysts. The present research deals with catalyst development for dry reforming of methane with the aim of reaching the most stable catalyst. Effect of preparation method, one of the most significant variables, on the properties of the catalysts was taken in to account. The Ni/Al2O3-MgO catalysts were prepared via sol-gel and sequential impregnation methods and characterized with XRD, FESEM, EDAX, BET and FTIR techniques. The reforming reactions were carried out using different feed ratios, gas hourly space velocities (GHSV) and reaction temperatures to identify the influence of operational variables. FESEM images indicate uniform particle size distribution for the sample synthesized with sol-gel method. It has been found that the sol-gel method has the potential to improve catalyst desired properties especially metal surface enrichment resulting in catalytic performance enhancement. The highest yield of products was obtained at 850 degrees C for both of the catalysts. During the 10 h stability test, CH4 and CO2 conversions gained higher values in the case of sol-gel made catalyst compared to impregnated one. PMID:23901507

  18. Sono-synthesis and characterization of bimetallic Ni-Co/Al2O3-MgO nanocatalyst: Effects of metal content on catalytic properties and activity for hydrogen production via CO2 reforming of CH4.

    PubMed

    Abdollahifar, Mozaffar; Haghighi, Mohammad; Babaluo, Ali Akbar; Talkhoncheh, Saeed Khajeh

    2016-07-01

    Sono-dispersion of Ni, Co and Ni-Co over Al2O3-MgO with Al/Mg ratio of 1.5 was prepared and tested for dry reforming of methane. The samples were characterized by XRD, FESEM, PSD, EDX, TEM, BET and FTIR analyses. In order to assess the effect of ultrasound irradiation, Ni-Co/Al2O3-MgO with Co content of 8% prepared via sonochemistry and impregnation methods. The sono-synthesized sample showed better textural properties and higher activity than that of impregnated one. Comparison of XRD patterns indicated that the NiO peaks became broader by increasing Co content over the support. The FESEM images displayed the particles are small and well-dispersed as a result of sonochemistry method. Also, EDX analysis demonstrated better dispersion of Ni and Co as a result of sonochemistry method in confirmation of XRD analysis. The sono-synthesized Ni-Co/Al2O3-MgO as a superior nanocatalyst with Co content of 3% illustrates much higher conversions (97.5% and 99% for CH4 and CO2 at 850 °C), yields (94% and 96% for H2 and CO at 850 °C) and 0.97 of H2/CO molar ratio in all samples using an equimolar feed ratio at 850 °C. During the 1200 min stability test, H2/CO molar ratio remained constant for the superior nanocatalyst. PMID:26964938

  19. Characterization of Leaf Blade- and Leaf Sheath-Associated Bacterial Communities and Assessment of Their Responses to Environmental Changes in CO2, Temperature, and Nitrogen Levels under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Seishi; Tokida, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Usui, Yasuhiro; Okubo, Takashi; Tago, Kanako; Hayashi, Kentaro; Sekiyama, Yasuyo; Ono, Hiroshi; Tomita, Satoru; Hayatsu, Masahito; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    Rice shoot-associated bacterial communities at the panicle initiation stage were characterized and their responses to elevated surface water-soil temperature (ET), low nitrogen (LN), and free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) were assessed by clone library analyses of the 16S rRNA gene. Principal coordinate analyses combining all sequence data for leaf blade- and leaf sheath-associated bacteria revealed that each bacterial community had a distinct structure, as supported by PC1 (61.5%), that was mainly attributed to the high abundance of Planctomycetes in leaf sheaths. Our results also indicated that the community structures of leaf blade-associated bacteria were more sensitive than those of leaf sheath-associated bacteria to the environmental factors examined. Among these environmental factors, LN strongly affected the community structures of leaf blade-associated bacteria by increasing the relative abundance of Bacilli. The most significant effect of FACE was also observed on leaf blade-associated bacteria under the LN condition, which was explained by decreases and increases in Agrobacterium and Pantoea, respectively. The community structures of leaf blade-associated bacteria under the combination of FACE and ET were more similar to those of the control than to those under ET or FACE. Thus, the combined effects of environmental factors need to be considered in order to realistically assess the effects of environmental changes on microbial community structures. PMID:25740174

  20. Functional Response of a Near-Surface Soil Microbial Community to a Simulated Underground CO2 Storage Leak

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Sergio E.; Holben, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the impacts of leaks from geologic carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, is key to developing effective strategies for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions management and mitigation of potential negative effects. Here, we provide the first report on the potential effects of leaks from carbon capture and storage sites on microbial functional groups in surface and near-surface soils. Using a simulated subsurface CO2 storage leak scenario, we demonstrate how CO2 flow upward through the soil column altered both the abundance (DNA) and activity (mRNA) of microbial functional groups mediating carbon and nitrogen transformations. These microbial responses were found to be seasonally dependent and correlated to shifts in atmospheric conditions. While both DNA and mRNA levels were affected by elevated CO2, they did not react equally, suggesting two separate mechanisms for soil microbial community response to high CO2 levels. The results did not always agree with previous studies on elevated atmospheric (rather than subsurface) CO2 using FACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) systems, suggesting that microbial community response to CO2 seepage from the subsurface might differ from its response to atmospheric CO2 increases. PMID:24303067

  1. Functional response of a near-surface soil microbial community to a simulated underground CO2 storage leak.

    PubMed

    Morales, Sergio E; Holben, William E

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the impacts of leaks from geologic carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, is key to developing effective strategies for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions management and mitigation of potential negative effects. Here, we provide the first report on the potential effects of leaks from carbon capture and storage sites on microbial functional groups in surface and near-surface soils. Using a simulated subsurface CO2 storage leak scenario, we demonstrate how CO2 flow upward through the soil column altered both the abundance (DNA) and activity (mRNA) of microbial functional groups mediating carbon and nitrogen transformations. These microbial responses were found to be seasonally dependent and correlated to shifts in atmospheric conditions. While both DNA and mRNA levels were affected by elevated CO2, they did not react equally, suggesting two separate mechanisms for soil microbial community response to high CO2 levels. The results did not always agree with previous studies on elevated atmospheric (rather than subsurface) CO2 using FACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) systems, suggesting that microbial community response to CO2 seepage from the subsurface might differ from its response to atmospheric CO2 increases. PMID:24303067

  2. High pressure studies on extended phases of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Javier A.; Lee, Mal-Soon; Scandolo, Sandro

    2010-03-01

    Recent findings have shown that the chemistry of CO2 at high pressure and temperature is richer than previously thought and that the activation of the C=O bond that can give origin to different forms of non-molecular CO2. Such findings may have important implications for the understanding of the Earth's deep carbon cycle and CO2 sequestration technologies. First principles simulations of CO2's electronic properties under different pressure and temperature conditions can constrain the thermodynamic phase diagram of CO2 and explore P-T conditions necessary for the C=O bond activation. We have shown that at about 50 GPa molecular CO2 can transform to a metastable amorphous form characterized by an almost equal proportion of three- and four-fold coordinated carbon atoms [1], while higher carbon coordination does not take place up to at least 900 GPa [2-3]. We have also found that doping with transition metals can reduce the activation barrier and transition pressure for the C=O bond activation in CO2 [4]. Our results suggest that pressure can radically alter the oxidation chemistry of carbon. [1] J. A. Montoya et al., PRL 100, 163002 (2008) [2] J. Sun et al., PNAS 106, 6077 (2009) [3] M-S. Lee, J. A. Montoya and S. Scandolo, PRB 79, 144102 (2009) [4] J. A. Montoya, R. Rousseau, and S. Scandolo, unpublished.

  3. The Nanoscale Basis of CO2 Trapping for Geologic Storage.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Beckingham, Lauren E; DePaolo, Donald J

    2015-09-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is likely to be a critical technology to achieve large reductions in global carbon emissions over the next century. Research on the subsurface storage of CO2 is aimed at reducing uncertainties in the efficacy of CO2 storage in sedimentary rock formations. Three key parameters that have a nanoscale basis and that contribute uncertainty to predictions of CO2 trapping are the vertical permeability kv of seals, the residual CO2 saturation Sg,r in reservoir rocks, and the reactive surface area ar of silicate minerals. This review summarizes recent progress and identifies outstanding research needs in these areas. Available data suggest that the permeability of shale and mudstone seals is heavily dependent on clay fraction and can be extremely low even in the presence of fractures. Investigations of residual CO2 trapping indicate that CO2-induced alteration in the wettability of mineral surfaces may significantly influence Sg,r. Ultimately, the rate and extent of CO2 conversion to mineral phases are uncertain due to a poor understanding of the kinetics of slow reactions between minerals and fluids. Rapidly improving characterization techniques using X-rays and neutrons, and computing capability for simulating chemical interactions, provide promise for important advances. PMID:26266820

  4. CO2 fluxes near a forest edge: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, Monique Y; Zhang, Gengsheng; Rannik, Ullar; Vesala, Timo

    2008-09-01

    In contrast with recent advances on the dynamics of the flow at a forest edge, few studies have considered its role on scalar transport and, in particular, on CO2 transfer. The present study addresses the influence of the abrupt roughness change on forest atmosphere CO2 exchange and contrasts the concentration and flux fields against those of a uniform forested surface. We use an atmospheric boundary layer two-equation closure model that accounts for the flow dynamics and vertical divergence of CO2 sources/sinks within a plant canopy. This paper characterizes the spatial variation of CO2 fluxes as a function of both sources/sinks distribution and the vertical structure of the canopy. Results suggest that the ground source plays a major role in the formation of wave-like vertical CO2 flux behavior downwind of a forest edge, despite the fact that the contribution of foliage sources/sinks changes monotonously. Such a variation is caused by scalar advection in the trunk space and reveals itself as a decrease or increase in vertical fluxes over the forest relative to carbon dioxide exchange of the underlying forest. The effect was more pronounced in model forests where the leaf area is concentrated in the upper part of the canopy. These results can be useful both for interpretation of existing measurements of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) from flux towers in limited fetch conditions and in planning future CO2 transport experiments. PMID:18767622

  5. CO2-storage assessment and effective capacity in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Aktouf, Abdelouahab; Bentellis, Abdelhakim

    2016-01-01

    Deep saline aquifers widely distributed deep in the earth offer the greatest CO2 storage potential in all current geological CO2 storage approaches. The western region of the Saharan platform in Algeria includes several sedimentary basins characterized by a large production of dry gas with high CO2 rates sometimes exceeding 9 %. To reduce CO2 emissions, these basins were analyzed to identify those with the largest potential for the geological sequestration of CO2 (GSC). The evaluation methodology applied to determine the basin potential is based on qualitative geological and practical criteria to which we have assigned normalized numerical values. This evaluation method allows us to quantitatively compare and evaluate the basins in Algeria. Estimations of the CO2 storage capacities of several structures in the sedimentary Ahnet-Gourara Basin, which has the greatest potential for GSC, vary from 1 Gt to over 5 Gt. Based on cautious estimations, these geologic structures should be able to contain the entire volume of the CO2 emitted over the next three decades at least. PMID:27462486

  6. Controls on CO2 Mineralization in Volcanogenic Sandstone Reservoir Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; DePaolo, D. J.; Xu, T.; Voltolini, M.

    2013-12-01

    We proposed to use volcanogenic sandstones for CO2 sequestration. Such sandstones with a relatively high percentage of volcanic rock fragments (VRF) could be a promising target for CO2 sequestration in that they have a sufficient percentage of reactive minerals to allow substantial mineralization of injected scCO2, which provides the most secure form of CO2 storage, but can also be porous and permeable enough to allow injection at acceptable rates. Modeling results from reactive transport code TOUGHREACT show that as much as 80% CO2 mineralization could occur in 1000 years in rocks with 10-20% volcanic rock fragments and still allow sufficient injectivity so that ca. 1 megaton of CO2 can be injected per year per well. The key to estimating how much CO2 can be injected and mineralized is the relationship between permeability (or injectivity) and reactive mineral content. We have sampled examples of volcanogenic sandstones from Miocene Etchegoin Formation, central California to examine these relationships. Characterizations of these samples by SEM, XRF and XRD show that they are rich in reactive minerals with around 32% plagioclase, 10% clinopyroxene, 2% diopside, and 1% ilmenite. Porosities range from 10% to 20%, and permeabilities range from 10 mD to 1000 mD. Batch experiments are also in progress to obtain realistic reactivity estimates. Figure 1. Outcrop photo and photomicrograph showing volcanic mineralogy and abundant pore space from Miocene Etchegoin Formation, central California

  7. Savannah River Laboratory Seepage Basins: Waste site assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Haselow, J.S.; Looney, B.B.; Nichols, R.L.

    1989-09-05

    This Waste Site Assessment for the SRL Seepage Basins is the second in a series of documents being prepared to support development of an appropriate closure plan for these basins. The closure of these basins will be designed to provide protection to human health and the environment and to meet the provisions of the Consent Decree. A Technical Data Summary for these basins has already been submitted as part of the Consent Decree. This Site Assessment Report includes a waste site characterization, and a discussion of closure options for the basins. A closure option is recommended in this report, but details of the recommended closure are not provided in this report since they will be provided in a subsequent closure plan. The closure plan is the third document required under the Consent Decree. 18 refs., 16 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. CO2-PENS: A CO2 Sequestration Systems Model Supporting Risk-Based Decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, P. H.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Guthrie, G. D.; Pawar, R. J.; Kaszuba, J. P.; Carey, J. W.; Lichtner, P. C.; Ziock, H. J.; Dubey, M. K.; Olsen, S. C.; Chipera, S. J.; Fessenden-Rahn, J. E.

    2005-12-01

    The Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is studying the injection of CO2 into geologic repositories. We are formulating the problem as science based decision framework that can address issues of risk, cost, and technical requirements at all stages of the sequestration process. The framework is implemented in a system model that is capable of performing stochastic simulations to address uncertainty in different geologic sequestration scenarios, including injection into poorly characterized brine aquifers. Processes level laboratory experiments, field experiments, modeling, economic data, and risk theory are used to support the system level model that will be the basis for decision making. The current system model, CO2-PENS, is already proving to be useful in showing complex interactions between the different components of the framework. The system model also provides a consistent platform to document decisions made during the site selection, implementation, and closure periods.

  9. Passive CO2 concentration in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Khoshravesh, Roxana

    2016-06-01

    Photorespiratory limitations on C3 photosynthesis are substantial in warm, low CO2 conditions. To compensate, certain plants evolved mechanisms to actively concentrate CO2 around Rubisco using ATP-supported CO2 pumps such as C4 photosynthesis. Plants can also passively accumulate CO2 without additional ATP expenditure by localizing the release of photorespired and respired CO2 around Rubisco that is diffusively isolated from peripheral air spaces. Passive accumulation of photorespired CO2 occurs when glycine decarboxylase is localized to vascular sheath cells in what is termed C2 photosynthesis, and through forming sheaths of chloroplasts around the periphery of mesophyll cells. The peripheral sheaths require photorespired CO2 to re-enter chloroplasts where it can be refixed. Passive accumulation of respiratory CO2 is common in organs such as stems, fruits and flowers, due to abundant heterotrophic tissues and high diffusive resistance along the organ periphery. Chloroplasts within these organs are able to exploit this high CO2 to reduce photorespiration. CO2 concentration can also be enhanced passively by channeling respired CO2 from roots and rhizomes into photosynthetic cells of stems and leaves via lacunae, aerenchyma and the xylem stream. Through passive CO2 concentration, C3 species likely improved their carbon economy and maintained fitness during episodes of low atmospheric CO2. PMID:27058940

  10. Molecular simulations of CO2 and mixed CH4-CO2 hydrates intercalated on smectites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martos-Villa, Rubén; Sainz-Díaz, C. Ignacio; Mata Campo, M. Pilar

    2013-04-01

    and behavior of hydrate-smectite complex. Characterization and better understanding of those deposits are necessary to develop CO2 storage as hydrates by methane replacement. Swelling clays usually contains multiple planes of weakly bonded H2O in the interlayer between the 2:1 (silicate) layers. Koster van Groos et al. (2009) synthesized a smectite-methane hydrate intercalate with d(001)=2.2 nm indicating the presence of one unit cell of methane hydrate crystal intercalated between the 2:1 layers of smectite. Due to the complexity of experimental studies with hydrates, Computational Mineralogy can be very helpful. In this study we compare the behavior of CO2 and mixed CH4-CO2 hydrates intercalated in montmorillonite and beidellite. Our results are in agreement with the d(001)=2.2 nm in both hydrates intercalated as crystal lattice. However, comparing mean square displacement (MSD) profiles from molecular dynamics simulations of H2O molecules in the hydrates, we found that hydrate crystal MSD show a typical solid profile without diffusion, while in the intercalates there is more diffusion of water molecules, hence CO2 and mixed CH4-CO2 hydrate structure is more flexible and stable in the smectite-hydrate complex. Authors are thankful to RNM-3581 CADHYS Project.

  11. CO2 capture using zeolite 13X prepared from bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Park, Dong-Wha; Ahn, Wha-Seung

    2014-02-01

    Zeolite 13X was prepared using bentonite as the raw material by alkaline fusion followed by a hydrothermal treatment without adding any extra silica or alumina sources. The prepared zeolite 13X was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, N2-adsorption-desorption measurements, and scanning electron microscopy. The CO2 capture performance of the prepared zeolite 13X was examined under both static and flow conditions. The prepared zeolite 13X showed a high BET surface area of 688 m2/g with a high micropore volume (0.30 cm3/g), and exhibited high CO2 capture capacity (211 mg/g) and selectivity to N2 (CO2/N2 = 37) at 25 °C and 1 bar. In addition, the material showed fast adsorption kinetics, and stable CO2 adsorption-desorption recycling performance at both 25 and 200 °C.

  12. Natural convection in tunnels at Yucca Mountain and impact on drift seepage

    SciTech Connect

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson, P.

    2010-04-15

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock in the drift center to the drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water-induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  13. Optical properties of heusler alloys Co2FeSi, Co2FeAl, Co2CrAl, and Co2CrGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shreder, E. I.; Svyazhin, A. D.; Belozerova, K. A.

    2013-11-01

    The results of an investigation of optical properties and the calculations of the electronic structure of Co2FeSi, Co2FeAl, Co2CrAl, and Co2CrGa Heusler alloys are presented. The main focus of our attention is the study of the spectral dependence of the real part (ɛ1) and imaginary part (ɛ2) of the dielectric constant in the range of wavelengths λ = 0.3-13 μm using the ellipsometric method. An anomalous behavior of the optical conductivity σ(ω) has been found in the infrared range in the Co2CrAl and Co2CrGa alloys, which differs substantially from that in the Co2FeSi and Co2FeAl alloys. The results obtained are discussed based on the calculations of the electronic structure.

  14. CO2 laser frequency multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The duration of the mode-locked CO(2) laser pulses was measured to be 0.9 + or - nsec by the technique of (second harmonic) autocorrelation. Knowing the pulse duration, the spot size, and the harmonic conversion efficiency, a detailed fit of experiment to theory gave an estimate of the nonlinear coefficient of AgGaSe(2). d36 = 31 + or - V(1), in agreement with the most accurate literature values. A number of experiments were made with longer pulse trains in which the highest harmonic energy conversion reached 78%. The damage threshold was measured and it turned out to be related much more strongly to fluence than intensity. The shorter pulse trains had peak intensities of close to 300 MW 1/cm squared whereas the longer trains (3 usec) had intensities up to 40 MW 1/cm squared.

  15. Modeling Atmospheric CO2 Processes to Constrain the Missing Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Denning, A. S.; Erickson, D. J.; Collatz, J. C.; Pawson, S.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a NASA supported modeling effort to reduce uncertainty in carbon cycle processes that create the so-called missing sink of atmospheric CO2. Our overall objective is to improve characterization of CO2 source/sink processes globally with improved formulations for atmospheric transport, terrestrial uptake and release, biomass and fossil fuel burning, and observational data analysis. The motivation for this study follows from the perspective that progress in determining CO2 sources and sinks beyond the current state of the art will rely on utilization of more extensive and intensive CO2 and related observations including those from satellite remote sensing. The major components of this effort are: 1) Continued development of the chemistry and transport model using analyzed meteorological fields from the Goddard Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, with comparison to real time data in both forward and inverse modes; 2) An advanced biosphere model, constrained by remote sensing data, coupled to the global transport model to produce distributions of CO2 fluxes and concentrations that are consistent with actual meteorological variability; 3) Improved remote sensing estimates for biomass burning emission fluxes to better characterize interannual variability in the atmospheric CO2 budget and to better constrain the land use change source; 4) Evaluating the impact of temporally resolved fossil fuel emission distributions on atmospheric CO2 gradients and variability. 5) Testing the impact of existing and planned remote sensing data sources (e.g., AIRS, MODIS, OCO) on inference of CO2 sources and sinks, and use the model to help establish measurement requirements for future remote sensing instruments. The results will help to prepare for the use of OCO and other satellite data in a multi-disciplinary carbon data assimilation system for analysis and prediction of carbon cycle changes and carbodclimate interactions.

  16. Uncertainty in gridded CO2 emissions estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, Susannah; Marland, Eric; Andres, Robert J.; Marland, Gregg; Woodard, Dawn

    2016-05-01

    We are interested in the spatial distribution of fossil-fuel-related emissions of CO2 for both geochemical and geopolitical reasons, but it is important to understand the uncertainty that exists in spatially explicit emissions estimates. Working from one of the widely used gridded data sets of CO2 emissions, we examine the elements of uncertainty, focusing on gridded data for the United States at the scale of 1° latitude by 1° longitude. Uncertainty is introduced in the magnitude of total United States emissions, the magnitude and location of large point sources, the magnitude and distribution of non-point sources, and from the use of proxy data to characterize emissions. For the United States, we develop estimates of the contribution of each component of uncertainty. At 1° resolution, in most grid cells, the largest contribution to uncertainty comes from how well the distribution of the proxy (in this case population density) represents the distribution of emissions. In other grid cells, the magnitude and location of large point sources make the major contribution to uncertainty. Uncertainty in population density can be important where a large gradient in population density occurs near a grid cell boundary. Uncertainty is strongly scale-dependent with uncertainty increasing as grid size decreases. Uncertainty for our data set with 1° grid cells for the United States is typically on the order of ±150%, but this is perhaps not excessive in a data set where emissions per grid cell vary over 8 orders of magnitude.

  17. Seepage Reduction from Unlined Irrigation Canals: Water Quality and Seepage Reduction Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susfalk, R. B.; Epstein, B. J.; Schmidt, M.; Goreham, J.; Fitzgerald, B.; Young, M. H.; Martin, C.; Swihart, J.; Smith, D.

    2006-12-01

    Polyacrylamide is a class of long-chain synthetic polymers that is used extensively in food packaging, paper manufacturing, wastewater treatment, and as a soil amendment to reduce erosion. More recently, linear, anionic polyacrylamides (LA-PAM) have been used to reduce seepage from unlined irrigation canals in the western United States. A diverse set of experiments spanning multiple scales has been initiated to understand the efficacy of LA-PAM usage in canal environments. The physical application of granular LA-PAM to flowing canals is straightforward. However, granular PAM requires time to hydrate and react with sediment suspended in the water column, complicating the targeting of a specific canal reach for treatment. Factors that influence PAM's ability to reduce seepage will be discussed, and can include: water temperature, water velocity, and the cation balance and suspended sediment concentration in the canal water. The application method and mass of PAM that are applied are also important considerations. If the ability of PAM to form flocs with suspended sediment is overestimated, PAM will travel further downstream, potentially having an adverse impact on water quality and/or ecology. Negative impacts include livestock drinking out of the canal, the unintentional reduction of seepage water feeding adjacent wetlands or sensitive areas, and impacts on receiving waters. A combination of results from working canals and small scale, artificial Test Troughs will be used to address the impacts that different LA-PAM applications can have on water quality and seepage reduction effectiveness.

  18. Sequestration of CO2 by halotolerant algae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The potential of halotolerant algae isolated from natural resources was used to study CO2 fixation and algal lipid production. Biological fixation of CO2 in photobioreactor in presence of salinity is exploited. The CO2 concentration 1060 ppm gave the highest biomass yield (700 mg dry wt/l), the highest total lipid content (10.33%) with 80% of CO2 removal. PMID:24847439

  19. Reduction of CO2 by Pyridine Monoimine Molybdenum Carbonyl Complexes: Cooperative Metal-Ligand Binding of CO2.

    PubMed

    Sieh, Daniel; Lacy, David C; Peters, Jonas C; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2015-06-01

    [((Ar) PMI)Mo(CO)4 ] complexes (PMI=pyridine monoimine; Ar=Ph, 2,6-di-iso-propylphenyl) were synthesized and their electrochemical properties were probed with cyclic voltammetry and infrared spectroelectrochemistry (IR-SEC). The complexes undergo a reduction at more positive potentials than the related [(bipyridine)Mo(CO)4 ] complex, which is ligand based according to IR-SEC and DFT data. To probe the reaction product in more detail, stoichiometric chemical reduction and subsequent treatment with CO2 resulted in the formation of a new product that is assigned as a ligand-bound carboxylate, [( iPr 2PhPMI)Mo(CO)3 (CO2 )](2-) , by NMR spectroscopic methods. The CO2 adduct [( iPr 2PhPMI)Mo(CO)3 (CO2 )](2-) could not be isolated and fully characterized. However, the C-C coupling between the CO2 molecule and the PDI ligand was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic characterization of one of the decomposition products of [( iPr 2PhPMI)Mo(CO)3 (CO2 )](2-) . PMID:25924730

  20. CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Knauss, K.G.; Langer, W.H.; Caldeira, K.

    2004-01-01

    The climate and environmental impacts of the current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. A discussion on CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering covers limestone and seawater availability and cost; reaction rates and densities; effectiveness in CO2 sequestration; and environmental impacts and benefits.

  1. Recent Trends in Atmospheric 14CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Rayner, P.; Bousquet, P.; Cozic, A.; Miller, J. B.; Lehman, S. J.; Peters, W.; Tans, P. P.; Ciais, P.

    2007-12-01

    The radiocarbon content of atmospheric CO2 (14CO2) varies due to a number of factors. After the near-doubling of the 14CO2 loading in the early 1960s (due to atmospheric nuclear weapons testing), many studies examined the fate of this 'bomb 14C' to understand exchange processes of CO2 with the surface reservoirs. Today, however, the atmosphere and surface reservoirs are close to equilibrium with respect to bomb 14C, and instead, changes in 14CO2 more strongly reflect the response to the addition of 14C-free fossil fuel CO2 to the atmosphere. We use an atmospheric transport model to simulate recent atmospheric 14CO2, and compare this to observations at several sites over the Northern Hemisphere continents. We show that, in the Northern Hemisphere, 14CO2 variability is dominated by the effect of fossil fuel CO2 emissions. The model simulates the time trends quite well, including both the overall secular trend and the seasonal cycle. A seasonal cycle in 14CO2 is observed at the high altitude sites of Niwot Ridge, Colorado, and Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, but the magnitude varies from year to year. Our modeling studies demonstrate that this inter-annual variability can be explained by differences in atmospheric transport. This is in contrast to CO2 concentration seasonal cycles, which are dominated by seasonal changes in CO2 source strengths.

  2. Photosynthesis in a CO2 rich atmosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentration of CO2 ([CO2]) in the atmosphere is projected to reach ~550 ppm by 2050. C3 plants respond directly to growth at elevated [CO2] via stimulated photosynthesis and reduced stomatal conductance. The enhancement of photosynthesis is the result of increased velocity of carboxylation of ...

  3. Empirical sediment transport function predicting seepage erosion undercutting for cohesive bank failure prediction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage erosion is an important factor in hillslope instability and failure. However, predicting erosion by subsurface flow or seepage and incorporating its effects into stability models remains a challenge. Limitations exist with all existing seepage erosion sediment transport functions, including ...

  4. Borehole Seismic Monitoring of Injected CO2 at the Frio Site

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Hoversten, G.M.; Peterson, JohnE.; Korneev, Valeri A.

    2006-04-21

    As part of a small scale sequestration test (about 1500 tonsof CO2) in a saline aquifer, time-lapse borehole seismic surveys wereconducted to aid in characterization of subsurface CO2 distribution andmaterial property changes induced by the injected CO2. A VSP surveydemonstrated a large increase (about 75 percent) in seismic reflectivitydue to CO2 injection and allowed estimation of the spatial extent of CO2induced changes. A crosswell survey imaged a large seismic velocitydecrease (up to 500 m/s) within the injection interval and provided ahigh resolution image of this velocity change which maps the subsurfacedistribution of CO2 between two wells. Numerical modeling of the seismicresponse uses the crosswell measurements to show that this small CO2volume causes a large response in the seismic reflectivity. This resultdemonstrates that seismic detection of small CO2 volumes in salineaquifers is feasible and realistic.

  5. The Wettability of Shale by CO2 and Its Impact on Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiltinan, E. J.; Cardenas, M. B.; Espinoza, D. N.; Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    The geologic sequestration of CO2 is widely considered as a potential solution for decreasing anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 emissions. Wettability of fluids within reservoir materials is a critical factor in determining the efficiency of structural and residual trapping, two major mechanisms of geologic sequestration. Individual reservoir minerals are often targeted for wettability studies. Current practice applies these results, recorded under laboratory conditions, to in-situ reservoir rock; however the wide variety of measured contact angles reported in the literature calls this practice into question. To address these issues and to study the wettability of shale caprock, resedimentation techniques are employed. These techniques allow for the creation of synthetic shales with controlled, homogeneous mineralogies. In addition, the systematic variation of the mineralogy allows for the characterization of shale wettability as a function of mineralogical composition. A novel design has been developed and used to conduct wettability experiments at reservoir conditions using high resolution X-ray computer tomography. Using this technique the wettability of resedimented shales and natural shales are compared at different reservoir conditions. Next, Lattice Boltzmann modelling methods are used to simulate capillary entry pressure into a shale capillary. Adhesion parameters along the wall are tuned to the results of the synthetic shales and heterogeneity is incorporated to estimate the capillary entry pressure into a natural shale. Understanding the mineralogical components of shale wetting allows for the prediction of capillary entry pressure based on shale mineralogy which can be used to help select secure CO2 storage sites.

  6. Enhanced Molecular Sieve CO2 Removal Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Susan; ElSherif, Dina; MacKnight, Allen

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to quantitatively characterize the performance of two major types of molecular sieves for two-bed regenerative carbon dioxide removal at the conditions compatible with both a spacesuit and station application. One sorbent is a zeolite-based molecular sieve that has been substantially improved over the materials used in Skylab. The second sorbent is a recently developed carbon-based molecular sieve. Both molecular sieves offer the potential of high payoff for future manned missions by reducing system complexity, weight (including consumables), and power consumption in comparison with competing concepts. The research reported here provides the technical data required to improve CO2 removal systems for regenerative life support systems for future IVA and EVA missions.

  7. Isotopic CO2 Instrumentation for UAV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A.; Silver, J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is the largest component of anthroprogenic green house gas emissions. Knowing atmospheric 13CO2/12CO2 ratios precisely is important for understanding biogenic and anthroprogenic sources and sinks for carbon. Instrumentation mounted on UAV aircraft would enable important spatial isotopic CO2 information. However, current isotopic CO2 instrumentation have unfavorable attributes for UAV use, such as high power requirements, high cost, high weight, and large size. Here we present the early development of a compact isotopic CO2 instrument that is designed to nullify effects of pressure, temperature and moisture, and will ultimately be suitable for UAV deployment.

  8. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  9. Greenhouse gases generated from the anaerobic biodegradation of natural offshore asphalt seepages in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; Wong, Florence L.; Dartnell, Peter; Sliter, Ray W.

    2014-01-01

    Significant offshore asphaltic deposits with active seepage occur in the Santa Barbara Channel offshore southern California. The composition and isotopic signatures of gases sampled from the oil and gas seeps reveal that the coexisting oil in the shallow subsurface is anaerobically biodegraded, generating CO2 with secondary CH4 production. Biomineralization can result in the consumption of as much as 60% by weight of the original oil, with 13C enrichment of CO2. Analyses of gas emitted from asphaltic accumulations or seeps on the seafloor indicate up to 11% CO2 with 13C enrichment reaching +24.8‰. Methane concentrations range from less than 30% up to 98% with isotopic compositions of –34.9 to –66.1‰. Higher molecular weight hydrocarbon gases are present in strongly varying concentrations reflecting both oil-associated gas and biodegradation; propane is preferentially biodegraded, resulting in an enriched 13C isotopic composition as enriched as –19.5‰. Assuming the 132 million barrels of asphaltic residues on the seafloor represent ~40% of the original oil volume and mass, the estimated gas generated is 5.0×1010 kg (~76×109 m3) CH4 and/or 1.4×1011 kg CO2 over the lifetime of seepage needed to produce the volume of these deposits. Geologic relationships and oil weathering inferences suggest the deposits are of early Holocene age or even younger. Assuming an age of ~1,000 years, annual fluxes are on the order of 5.0×107 kg (~76×106 m3) and/or 1.4×108 kg for CH4 and CO2, respectively. The daily volumetric emission rate (2.1×105 m3) is comparable to current CH4 emission from Coal Oil Point seeps (1.5×105 m3/day), and may be a significant source of both CH4 and CO2 to the atmosphere provided that the gas can be transported through the water column.

  10. Mine seepage problems in drift mine operations

    SciTech Connect

    DeRossett, C.; Johnson, D.E.; Bradshaw, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    Extensive mining in the Eastern Kentucky Coal Region has occurred in coal deposits located above valley floors. Underground mines present unique stability problems resulting from the creation of mine pools in abandoned works. {open_quotes}Blowouts{close_quotes} occur when hydrostatic pressures result in the cataclysmic failure of an outcrop-barrier. Additionally, seepage from flooded works results in saturation of colluvium, which may ultimately mobilize as landslides. Several case studies of both landslides and blowouts illustrate that considerations should be taken into account to control or prevent these problems. Underground mine maps and seepage conditions at the individual sites were examined to determine the mine layouts, outcrop-barrier widths, and structure of the mine floors. Discharge monitoring points were established in and near the landslides. These studies depict how mine layout, operation, and geology influence drainage conditions. The authors suggest that mine designs should incorporate drainage control to insure long-term stability and limit liability. The goal of the post-mining drainage plan is control of the mine drainage, which will reduce the size of mine pools and lower the hydrostatic pressure. Recommendations are made as to several methods that may be useful in controlling mine drainage.

  11. Analysis of seepage from a pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Govinda C.; Saha, Amitava; Kansal, Mitthan L.; Gupta, Ravi P.

    2011-05-01

    A semi-analytical solution has been derived for predicting the time of emptying a pond due to seepage. The time for the seeping water to reach the water table since the pond was initially filled has been calculated applying the Green-Ampt infiltration theory. The recharge rate after the wetting front joins the water table has been computed using a non-linear relationship between seepage head and recharge rate proposed by earlier investigators. The maximum rise in the water table beneath the center of the pond consequent to the time-varying recharge is calculated applying kernel coefficients obtained from solution of the linearized Boussinesq equation. It was observed that a pond with 50-m initial diameter at the water surface and 3-m maximum depth of water is dry after 168 days, where the subsoil is sandy clay. If the subsoil happens to be clay, the depth of water in the pond at the end of 9 months, i.e., after completion of the non-monsoon period, is 0.62 m. The maximum mound heights beneath the pond for constant recharge rate and uniform recharging area calculated from the present solution compare well with existing numerical as well as analytical solutions.

  12. Selecting CO2 Sources for CO2 Utilization by Environmental-Merit-Order Curves.

    PubMed

    von der Assen, Niklas; Müller, Leonard J; Steingrube, Annette; Voll, Philip; Bardow, André

    2016-02-01

    Capture and utilization of CO2 as alternative carbon feedstock for fuels, chemicals, and materials aims at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil resource use. For capture of CO2, a large variety of CO2 sources exists. Since they emit much more CO2 than the expected demand for CO2 utilization, the environmentally most favorable CO2 sources should be selected. For this purpose, we introduce the environmental-merit-order (EMO) curve to rank CO2 sources according to their environmental impacts over the available CO2 supply. To determine the environmental impacts of CO2 capture, compression and transport, we conducted a comprehensive literature study for the energy demands of CO2 supply, and constructed a database for CO2 sources in Europe. Mapping these CO2 sources reveals that CO2 transport distances are usually small. Thus, neglecting transport in a first step, we find that environmental impacts are minimized by capturing CO2 first from chemical plants and natural gas processing, then from paper mills, power plants, and iron and steel plants. In a second step, we computed regional EMO curves considering transport and country-specific impacts for energy supply. Building upon regional EMO curves, we identify favorable locations for CO2 utilization with lowest environmental impacts of CO2 supply, so-called CO2 oases. PMID:26752014

  13. Microbial Growth under Supercritical CO2

    PubMed Central

    Peet, Kyle C.; Freedman, Adam J. E.; Hernandez, Hector H.; Britto, Vanya; Boreham, Chris; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    Growth of microorganisms in environments containing CO2 above its critical point is unexpected due to a combination of deleterious effects, including cytoplasmic acidification and membrane destabilization. Thus, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is generally regarded as a sterilizing agent. We report isolation of bacteria from three sites targeted for geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) that are capable of growth in pressurized bioreactors containing scCO2. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes from scCO2 enrichment cultures revealed microbial assemblages of varied complexity, including representatives of the genus Bacillus. Propagation of enrichment cultures under scCO2 headspace led to isolation of six strains corresponding to Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subterraneus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus safensis, and Bacillus megaterium. Isolates are spore-forming, facultative anaerobes and capable of germination and growth under an scCO2 headspace. In addition to these isolates, several Bacillus type strains grew under scCO2, suggesting that this may be a shared feature of spore-forming Bacillus spp. Our results provide direct evidence of microbial activity at the interface between scCO2 and an aqueous phase. Since microbial activity can influence the key mechanisms for permanent storage of sequestered CO2 (i.e., structural, residual, solubility, and mineral trapping), our work suggests that during GCS microorganisms may grow and catalyze biological reactions that influence the fate and transport of CO2 in the deep subsurface. PMID:25681188

  14. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    PubMed

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers. PMID:23167314

  15. Seepage Erosion Impacts on Edge-of-Field Gully Erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have found that the dominant source of sediment in streams can be from bank erosion. Subsurface flow contributes directly to bank failure by seepage erosion and soil-pipe erosion and indirectly by the impact of increased soil water pressures on loss of soil shear strength. Seepage erosion in...

  16. Field Evaluation of Seepage Meters in the Coastal Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, J. E.; Burnett, W. C.; Chanton, J. P.; Corbett, D. R.; Cable, P. H.

    1997-09-01

    The response of seepage meters was evaluated in a nearshore marine environment where water motion effects are more pronounced than in lake settings, where these meters have been used traditionally. Temporal and spatial variations of seepage, as well as potential artifacts, were evaluated using empty and 1000-ml pre-filled bag measurements. Time-series measurements confirmed earlier observations that anomalously high fluxes occur during the early stages (≤10 min) of collection. As deployment times increased (30-60 min), measured flow rates stabilized at a level thought to represent the actual seepage flux. Pre-filling the plastic measurement bags effectively alleviated this anomalous, short-term influx. Reliable seepage measurements required deployment times sufficient to allow a net volume of at least 150 ml into the collection bag. Control experiments, designed by placing seepage meters inside sand-filled plastic swimming pools, served as indicators of external effects on these measurements, i.e. they served as seepage meter blanks. When winds were under 15 knots, little evidence was found that water motion caused artifacts in the seepage measurements. Tidal cycle influences on seepage rates were negligible in the present study area, but long-term temporal variations (weeks to months) proved substantial. Observed long-term changes in groundwater flux into the Gulf of Mexico correlated with water table elevation at a nearby monitoring well.

  17. Groundwater seepage mechanisms of streambank erosion and failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of groundwater seepage and pipeflow is unknown with respect to other fundamental processes of streambank erosion and failure, although seepage and pipeflow features are observed on streambanks throughout the world that span a range of geomorphologic conditions. Previous field and labo...

  18. Model Simulations of CO2 Transport Using Assimilated Meteorological Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaea, S. R.; Zhu, Z.; Erickson, D. J.; Pawson, S.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The numerical simulation of CO2 transport (and other tracers such as CO, CH4, and biomass burning tracers) in the atmosphere is required to determine the fate of anthropogenic source gases. Estimation of the CO2 exchange between the ocean surface, the terrestrial biosphere, and the atmosphere is of first-order importance to understanding the global carbon cycle and the processes that are most crucial in determining the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Forward transport simulations have been conducted using two-dimensional, time-dependent grids of average surface fluxes (from TRANSCOM) and three-dimensional wind data from a prototype data assimilation system (FV-DAS) run by the Goddard Data Assimilation Office. The objective is to better understand the contribution of meteorological variability to changes in CO2 and other constituents, By accurately accounting for meteorological variability, through use of assimilated winds, we hope to better characterize the distribution of surface sources and sinks (and chemistry where applicable). With assimilated meteorology such chemistry/transport runs provide the basic framework to analyze existing (and proposed) measurement data on a point-by-point, real-time basis. We compare with measured CO2 concentration gradients on a daily, seasonal, regional, and interhemispheric basis to examine the consistency of sources, sinks, and transport formulation. We will also examine the inter-annual variability of atmospheric CO2 due to atmospheric circulation changes using longer runs with assimilated winds.

  19. Background error covariance estimation for atmospheric CO2 data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Engelen, Richard J.; Kawa, Stephan R.; Sweeney, Colm; Michalak, Anna M.

    2013-09-01

    any data assimilation framework, the background error covariance statistics play the critical role of filtering the observed information and determining the quality of the analysis. For atmospheric CO2 data assimilation, however, the background errors cannot be prescribed via traditional forecast or ensemble-based techniques as these fail to account for the uncertainties in the carbon emissions and uptake, or for the errors associated with the CO2 transport model. We propose an approach where the differences between two modeled CO2 concentration fields, based on different but plausible CO2 flux distributions and atmospheric transport models, are used as a proxy for the statistics of the background errors. The resulting error statistics: (1) vary regionally and seasonally to better capture the uncertainty in the background CO2 field, and (2) have a positive impact on the analysis estimates by allowing observations to adjust predictions over large areas. A state-of-the-art four-dimensional variational (4D-VAR) system developed at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is used to illustrate the impact of the proposed approach for characterizing background error statistics on atmospheric CO2 concentration estimates. Observations from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite "IBUKI" (GOSAT) are assimilated into the ECMWF 4D-VAR system along with meteorological variables, using both the new error statistics and those based on a traditional forecast-based technique. Evaluation of the four-dimensional CO2 fields against independent CO2 observations confirms that the performance of the data assimilation system improves substantially in the summer, when significant variability and uncertainty in the fluxes are present.

  20. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectra of CO{2}-ETHYLENE Sulfide, CO{2}-ETHYLENE Oxide and CO{2}-PROPYLENE Oxide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orita, Yukari; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Hirota, Eizi

    2010-06-01

    We have previously examined the difference in roles of O and S in structure and dynamics of the CO-ethylene oxide (EO) and CO-ethylene sulfide (ES) complexes. We have extended the investigation to CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES for comparison. We have also observed the CO{2}-propylene oxide (PO) complex, which is an important intermediate in the reaction of PO with CO{2} leading to polycarbonate. Both a-type and b-type transitions were observed for the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES, but no c-type transitions were observed at all. We also detected the {34}S and {13}C isotopic species in natural abundance and the species containing {18}OCO and C{18}O% {2}, which were synthesized by burning paper in an {18}O{2} and{% 16}O{2} mixture. By analyzing the observed spectra we concluded the CO{2} moiety of CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES located in a plane % prependicular to the three-membered ring and bisecting the COC or CSC angle of EO or ES, respectively, as in the case of CO-EO and CO-ES complexes. An % ab initio MO calculation at the level of MP2/6-311G(d, p) yielded an optimized structure in good agreement with the experimental result. We have derived from the observed spectra the distance, the stretching force constant, and the binding energy of the bonds between the constituents of the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES complexes and have found that the distances of the two complexes were shorter by 0.2Å than those in CO-EO and CO-ES, respectively, and that the intermolecular bonds were two times stronger in the CO{2} complexes than in the corresponding CO complexes. We have concluded from the observed spectra that the CO{2} moiety in CO{2}-PO is located on the PO three-membered ring plane opposite to the methyl group. The constituents in CO{2}-PO were more weakly bound than those in CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES. S. Sato, Y. Kawashima, Y. Tatamitani, and E. Hirota, 63rd International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, WF05 (2008).

  1. Reduction of CO2 by pyridine monoimine molybdenum carbonyl complexes: Cooperative metal-ligand binding of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Sieh, Daniel; Lacy, David C.; Peters, Jonas C.

    2015-01-01

    ArPMI-Mo(CO)4 complexes (PMI = pyridine monoimine; Ar = Ph, 2,6-di-iso-propylphenyl) were synthesized and their electrochemical properties were probed with cyclic voltammetry and infrared spectroelectrochemistry (IR-SEC). The complexes exhibit a reduction at more positive potentials than the related bipyridine-Mo(CO)4 complex, which is ligand based according to IR-SEC and DFT data. To probe the reaction product in more detail, stoichiometric chemical reduction and subsequent treatment with CO2 resulted in the formation of a new product that is assigned as a ligand-bound carboxylate, [iPr2PhPMI-Mo(CO)3(CO2)]2−, by NMR spectroscopic methods. The CO2 adduct [iPr2PhPMI-Mo(CO)3(CO2)]2− could not be isolated and fully characterized. However, the assignment of the C-C coupling between the CO2 molecule and the PDI ligand was confirmed by X-ray crystallography of one of the decomposition products of [iPr2PhPMI-Mo(CO)3(CO2)]2−. PMID:25924730

  2. Energyless CO2 Absorption, Generation, and Fixation Using Atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Okada, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Yamada, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Kenta; Mukai, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    From an economic and ecological perspective, the efficient utilization of atmospheric CO2 as a carbon resource should be a much more important goal than reducing CO2 emissions. However, no strategy to harvest CO2 using atmospheric CO2 at room temperature currently exists, which is presumably due to the extremely low concentration of CO2 in ambient air (approximately 400 ppm=0.04 vol%). We discovered that monoethanolamine (MEA) and its derivatives efficiently absorbed atmospheric CO2 without requiring an energy source. We also found that the absorbed CO2 could be easily liberated with acid. Furthermore, a novel CO2 generator enabled us to synthesize a high value-added material (i.e., 2-oxazolidinone derivatives based on the metal catalyzed CO2-fixation at room temperature) from atmospheric CO2. PMID:26596773

  3. Exogenously produced CO2 doubles the CO2 efflux from three north temperate lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Grace M.; Buelo, Cal D.; Cole, Jonathan J.; Pace, Michael L.

    2016-03-01

    It is well established that lakes are typically sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. However, it remains unclear what portion of CO2 efflux is from endogenously processed organic carbon or from exogenously produced CO2 transported into lakes. We estimated high-frequency CO2 and O2 efflux from three north temperate lakes in summer to determine the proportion of the total CO2 efflux that was exogenously produced. Two of the lakes were amended with nutrients to experimentally enhance endogenous CO2 uptake. In the unfertilized lake, 50% of CO2 efflux was from exogenous sources and hydrology had a large influence on efflux. In the fertilized lakes, endogenous CO2 efflux was negative (into the lake) yet exogenous CO2 made the lakes net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Shifts in hydrologic regimes and nutrient loading have the potential to change whether small lakes act primarily as reactors or vents in the watershed.

  4. CO2 transport over complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Burns, Sean P.; Delany, A.C.; Oncley, S.P.; Turnipseed, A.A.; Stephens, B.B.; Lenschow, D.H.; LeMone, M.A.; Monson, Russell K.; Anderson, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    CO2 transport processes relevant for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site in the front range of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, USA, were investigated during a pilot experiment. We found that cold, moist, and CO2-rich air was transported downslope at night and upslope in the early morning at this forest site situated on a ???5% east-facing slope. We found that CO2 advection dominated the total CO2 transport in the NEE estimate at night although there are large uncertainties because of partial cancellation of horizontal and vertical advection. The horizontal CO2 advection captured not only the CO2 loss at night, but also the CO2 uptake during daytime. We found that horizontal CO2 advection was significant even during daytime especially when turbulent mixing was not significant, such as in early morning and evening transition periods and within the canopy. Similar processes can occur anywhere regardless of whether flow is generated by orography, synoptic pressure gradients, or surface heterogeneity as long as CO2 concentration is not well mixed by turbulence. The long-term net effect of all the CO2 budget terms on estimates of NEE needs to be investigated. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Covalent Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yongfei; Zou, Ruqiang; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-04-01

    As an emerging class of porous crystalline materials, covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are excellent candidates for various applications. In particular, they can serve as ideal platforms for capturing CO2 to mitigate the dilemma caused by the greenhouse effect. Recent research achievements using COFs for CO2 capture are highlighted. A background overview is provided, consisting of a brief statement on the current CO2 issue, a summary of representative materials utilized for CO2 capture, and an introduction to COFs. Research progresses on: i) experimental CO2 capture using different COFs synthesized based on different covalent bond formations, and ii) computational simulation results of such porous materials on CO2 capture are summarized. Based on these experimental and theoretical studies, careful analyses and discussions in terms of the COF stability, low- and high-pressure CO2 uptake, CO2 selectivity, breakthrough performance, and CO2 capture conditions are provided. Finally, a perspective and conclusion section of COFs for CO2 capture is presented. Recent advancements in the field are highlighted and the strategies and principals involved are discussed. PMID:26924720

  6. Radiocarbon in Tree STEM CO2 Efflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhr, J.; Czimczik, C. I.; Angert, A.; Trumbore, S.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon dioxide efflux from tree stems can be a significant component of the stand-level carbon balance. Recent studies have demonstrated that tree stem CO2 efflux may reflect more than just in-situ respiration but also transport from other locations and it has been suggested that it may also include C originally respired in roots or even uptake of soil CO2. We report measurements of the radiocarbon signature of carbon emitted from a range of mature tree stems in tropical and temperate forest ecosystems. Comparison of the radiocarbon signature of respired CO2 with the observed rate of decline in atmsopheric 14C-CO2 provides a measure of the time elapsed between C fixation by the plant and its return to the atmosphere as stem CO2 efflux. In all investigated trees, we observed that stem CO2 efflux had higher radiocarbon signatures than the contemporary atmospheric 14C-CO2, and therefore was derived from C fixed one to several years earlier. In tropical forest trees, we found that the 14C signature of CO2 within the stem (~4-5 cm depth) had even higher radiocarbon signatures than the stem CO2 efflux. In one of the investigated tree species, the in-stem CO2 was derived from C sources fixed on average ~20 years previously. These results confirm observations of root-respired CO2 that also have shown contributions of C substrates older than recent photosynthetic products, and the presence of extracable C reserves in wood that reflect the presence of older C sources. Our results imply that stem CO2 efflux is not only derived from respiration of recent photosynthetic products but includes contributions from older, stored C pools. Ongoing investigations will enable us to compare CO2 efflux for trees subjected to experimental drought, and using different life strategies (deciduous versus evergreen oaks) to determine if the use of these older C stores varies with stress.

  7. The NASA OCO-2 CO2 Directed Satellite Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) was designed to provide the measurements needed to estimate the atmospheric CO2 dry air mole fraction (XCO2) with the sensitivity, accuracy, and sampling density needed to quantify regional scale carbon sources and sinks over the globe and characterize their behavior over the annual cycle.

  8. Ecosystem Warming Affects CO2 Flux in an Agricultural Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global warming seems likely based on present-day climate predictions. Our objective was to characterize and quantify the interactive effects of ecosystem warming (i.e., canopy temperature, TS), soil moisture content ('S) and microbial biomass (BM: bacteria, fungi) on the intra-row soil CO2 flux (FS)...

  9. Global CO2 Emission from Volcanic Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, N.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Padilla, G.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Padron, E.; Barrancos, J.; Calvo, D.; Kusukabe, M.; Mori, T.; Nolasco, D.

    2009-12-01

    During the last two decades, scientists have paid attention to CO2 volcanic emissions and its contribution to the global C budget. Excluding MORBs as a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere, the global CO2 discharge from subaerial volcanism has been estimated about 300 Mt y-1 and this rate accounts for both visible (plume & fumaroles) and non-visible (diffuse) volcanic gas emanations (Mörner & Etíope, 2002). However, CO2 emissions from volcanic lakes have not been considered to estimate the global CO2 discharge from subaerial volcanoes. In order to improve this global CO2 emission rate and estimate the global CO2 emission from volcanic lakes, an extensive research on CO2 emission of volcanic lakes from Phillipines, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Mexico, Indonesia, Germany, France, Cameroon, Costa Rica, El Salvador and Ecuador had been recently carried out. In-situ measurements of CO2 efflux from the surface environment of volcanic lakes were performed by means of a modified floating device of the accumulation chamber method. To quantify the total CO2 emission from each volcanic lake, CO2 efflux maps were constructed using sequential Gaussian simulations (sGs). CO2 emission rates were normalized by the lake area (km2), and volcanic lakes were grouped following classification in acid, alkaline and neutral lakes. The observed average normalized CO2 emission rate values increase from alkaline (5.5 t km-2 d-1), neutral (210.0 t km-2 d-1), to acid (676.8 t km-2 d-1) volcanic lakes. Taking into account (i) these normalized CO2 emission rates from 31 volcanic lakes, (ii) the number of volcanic lakes in the world (~ 1100), (iii) the fraction of the investigated alkaline (45%), neutral (39%), and acid (16%) volcanic lakes, and (iv) the average areas of the investigated alkaline (36,8 km2), neutral (3,7 km2), and acid (0,5 km2) volcanic lakes; the global CO2 emission from volcanic lakes is about ~ 182 Mt year-1. This estimated value is about ~ 50% of the actual estimated global CO2

  10. Soft Approaches to CO2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Bobbink, Felix D; Gopakumar, Aswin; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of CO(2) as a C1 synthon is becoming increasingly important as a feedstock derived from carbon capture and storage technologies. Herein, we describe some of our recent research on carbon dioxide valorization, notably, using organocatalysts to convert CO(2) into carboxylic acid, ester, formyl and methyl groups on various organic molecules. We describe these studies within the broader context of CO(2) capture and valorization and suggest approaches for future research. PMID:26842327

  11. CO2 sequestration: Storage capacity guideline needed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Finley, R.J.; Hickman, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Petroleum reserves are classified for the assessment of available supplies by governmental agencies, management of business processes for achieving exploration and production efficiency, and documentation of the value of reserves and resources in financial statements. Up to the present however, the storage capacity determinations made by some organizations in the initial CO2 resource assessment are incorrect technically. New publications should thus cover differences in mineral adsorption of CO2 and dissolution of CO2 in various brine waters.

  12. Quantitative evaluation of thin-layer thickness and CO2 mass utilizing seismic complex decomposition at the Ketzin CO2 storage site, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei; Juhlin, Christopher; Han, Li; Kempka, Thomas; Lüth, Stefan; Zhang, Fengjiao

    2016-07-01

    Determining thin layer thickness is very important for reservoir characterization and CO2 quantification. Given its high time-frequency resolution and robustness, the complex spectral decomposition method was applied on time-lapse 3D seismic data from the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage to evaluate the frequency-dependent characteristics of thin layers at the injection level. Higher temporal resolution and more stratigraphic details are seen in the all-frequency and monochromatic reflectivity amplitude sections obtained by complex spectral decomposition compared to the stacked sections. The mapped geologic discontinuities within the reservoir are consistent with the preferred orientation of CO2 propagation. Tuning frequency mapping shows the thicknesses of the reservoir sandstone and gaseous CO2 is consistent with the measured thickness of the sandstone unit from well logging. An attempt to discriminate between pressure effects and CO2 saturation using the extracted tuning frequency indicates that CO2 saturation is the main contributor to the amplitude anomaly at the Ketzin site. On the basis of determined thickness of gaseous CO2 in the reservoir, quantitative analysis of the amount of CO2 was performed and shows a discrepancy between the injected and calculated CO2 mass. This may be explained by several uncertainties, like structural reservoir heterogeneity, a limited understanding of the complex subsurface conditions, error of determined tuning frequency, the presence of ambient noise and ongoing CO2 dissolution.

  13. Global Mapping of CO2 on Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, T. B.; Combe, J. P.; Matson, D.; Johnson, T. V.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first global map of CO2 on Enceladus. The purpose is to determine whether CO2 is associated to fractures and eruptions, and if it formed recently. Cassini observed tectonic features and plumes on Enceladus, which could be caused by a warm subsurface ocean containing dissolved gases. CO2 should be one of these gases (Postberg F. et al., Nature, 2009), and some of it should be erupted and condensed onto the surface (Matson et al., Icarus, 2012). Validation of this hypothesis could be done by determining the amount, location and molecular state of the CO2. Free CO2 ice and complexed CO2 were reported on Enceladus (Brown et al., Science, 2006; Hansen, LPSC, 2010) from analysis of Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data, and on other Saturn icy satellites (Cruikshank et al., Icarus, 2010 ; Filacchione et al., Icarus, 2010). Complexed CO2 has also been found from Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) spectra on the icy Galilean satellites (McCord et al., Science, 1997 and JGR, 1998), apparently due to both interior outgassing and radiation processing. CO2 has an asymmetric stretching mode that creates an absorption band, the wavelength position of which is sensitive to the nature of molecular associations between CO2 and their neighbors. Free CO2 ice absorbs at 4.268 μm for (Sandford and Allamandola, 1990) and CO2 complexed with other molecules absorbs at shorter wavelengths, around 4.25 μm or shorter (Chaban et al., Icarus, 2007). In VIMS spectra of Enceladus, this stretching mode absorption band is near the instrument detection limit. We utilized all VIMS data sets available that had significant spatial resolution to increase the statistics of the observations for any given location and improve the signal to noise. CO2 has also a smaller absorption at 2.7 μm, although it occurs in a range of wavelength that has higher signal-to-noise ratio by several magnitudes, because the surface of Enceladus (mostly H2O ice) has

  14. CO2 MITIGATION VIA ACCELERATED LIMESTONE WEATHERING

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K G

    2004-02-27

    The climate and environmental impacts of our current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. As part of this effort, various means of capturing and storing CO2 generated from fossil-fuel-based energy production are being investigated. One of the proposed methods involves a geochemistry-based capture and sequestration process that hydrates point-source, waste CO2 with water to produce a carbonic acid solution. This in turn is reacted and neutralized with limestone, thus converting the original CO2 gas to calcium bicarbonate in solution, the overall reaction being:

  15. R&D100: CO2 Memzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, Susan; Brinker, Jeff; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Vanegas, Juan

    2015-11-19

    By combining a water droplet loaded with CO2 enzymes in an ultrathin nanopore on a flexible substrate, researchers at Sandia National Laboratories realized the first technology that meets and exceeds DOE targets for cost-effective CO2 capture. When compared with the nearest membrane competitor, this technology delivers a three times permeation rate, twenty times higher selectivity, and ten time lower fabrication cost. The CO2 Memzyme has the potential to remove 90% of CO2 emissions and is forecasted to save the U.S. coal industry $90 billion a year compared to conventional technology.

  16. Environmental considerations for subseabed geological storage of CO2: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, A. G.; Przeslawski, R.; Radke, L. C.; Black, J. R.; Picard, K.; Moreau, J. W.; Haese, R. R.; Nichol, S.

    2014-07-01

    Many countries are now using or investigating offshore geological storage of CO2 as a means to reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions. Although associated research often focuses on deep-basin geology (e.g. seismic, geomagnetics), environmental data on the seabed and shallow subseabed is also crucial to (1) detect and characterise potential indicators of fluid seeps and their potential connectivity to targeted storage reserves, (2) obtain baseline environmental data for use in future monitoring, and (3) acquire information to facilitate an improved understanding of ecosystem processes for use in impact prediction. This study reviews the environmental considerations, including potential ecological impacts, associated with subseabed geological storage of CO2. Due to natural variations in CO2 levels in seafloor sediments, baseline CO2 measurements and knowledge of physical-chemical processes affecting the regional distribution of CO2 and pH are critical for the design of appropriate monitoring strategies to assess potential impacts of CO2 seepage from subseabed storage reservoirs. Surficial geological and geophysical information, such as that acquired from multibeam sonar and sub-bottom profiling, can be used to investigate the connectivity between the deep reservoirs and the surface, which is essential in establishing the reservoir containment properties. CO2 leakage can have a pronounced effect on sediments and rocks which in turn can have carryover effects to biogeochemical cycles. The effects of elevated CO2 on marine organisms are variable and species-specific but can also have cascading effects on communities and ecosystems, with marine benthic communities at some natural analogue sites (e.g. volcanic vents) showing decreased diversity, biomass, and trophic complexity. Despite their potential applications, environmental surveys and data are still not a standard and integral part of subseabed CO2 storage projects. However, the habitat mapping and seabed characterisation

  17. Development of optical MEMS CO2 sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeal, Mark P.; Moelders, Nicholas; Pralle, Martin U.; Puscasu, Irina; Last, Lisa; Ho, William; Greenwald, Anton C.; Daly, James T.; Johnson, Edward A.; George, Thomas

    2002-09-01

    Inexpensive optical MEMS gas and chemical sensors offer chip-level solutions to environmental monitoring, industrial health and safety, indoor air quality, and automobile exhaust emissions monitoring. Previously, Ion Optics, Inc. reported on a new design concept exploiting Si-based suspended micro-bridge structures. The devices are fabricated using conventional CMOS compatible processes. The use of photonic bandgap (PBG) crystals enables narrow band IR emission for high chemical selectivity and sensitivity. Spectral tuning was accomplished by controlling symmetry and lattice spacing of the PBG structures. IR spectroscopic studies were used to characterize transmission, absorption and emission spectra in the 2 to 20 micrometers wavelength range. Prototype designs explored suspension architectures and filament geometries. Device characterization studies measured drive and emission power, temperature uniformity, and black body detectivity. Gas detection was achieved using non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) spectroscopic techniques, whereby target gas species were determined from comparison to referenced spectra. A sensor system employing the emitter/detector sensor-chip with gas cell and reflective optics is demonstrated and CO2 gas sensitivity limits are reported.

  18. Sub-seabed CO2 Storage: Impact on Marine Ecosystems (ECO2) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmann, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    The European collaborative project ECO2 sets out to assess the environmental risks associated with storage of CO2 below the seabed (http://www.eco2-project.eu). It includes 28 partners from 7 European nations assessing the likelihood of leakage and impact of leakage on marine ecosystems. ECO2 studies the sedimentary cover and the overlying water column at active CO2 storage sites (Sleipner, Snøhvit) to look for any leakage pathways through the overburden and locate any seep sites at the seabed. High-resolution seismic data have been interpreted to feature a large number of vertical pipes and chimney structure cutting through parts of the sedimentary overburden at both storage sites. Formation waters are released through a 3 km long fracture 25 km north to the Sleipner platform while both natural gas and formation water are seeping through three abandoned wells located in the Sleipner area, as through many other old wells in the North Sea. The currently available data indicate that gases and fluids seeping at the seabed in the vicinity of the storage complex originate from the shallow overburden while CO2 stored at Sleipner and Snøhvit is fully retained in the storage formation. However, the observed geological features pose a number of important questions that are currently addressed by ECO2 via field work, data evaluation and numerical modelling: Are there any high permeability pathways for gas and fluid flow cutting through the overburden and linking the storage formation to the seep sites discovered at the seabed? Are seepage rates amplified by the ongoing storage operation at Sleipner? May CO2 stored at Sleipner and elsewhere ultimately leak through the overburden via seismic pipe and chimney structures, fractures and abandoned wells? CO2 release at the seabed was studied at three natural seep sites (Salt Dome Juist, Jan Mayen vent fields, Panarea) and via deliberate CO2 release experiments conducted in the vicinity of the Sleipner storage complex. The field

  19. Semianalytical solution for CO2 leakage through an abandoned well.

    PubMed

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin; Celia, Michael A; Bachu, Stefan; Dahle, Helge K

    2005-01-15

    Capture and subsequent injection of carbon dioxide into deep geological formations is being considered as a means to reduce anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. If such a strategy is to be successful, the injected CO2 must remain within the injection formation for long periods of time, at least several hundred years. Because mature continental sedimentary basins have a century-long history of oil and gas exploration and production, they are characterized by large numbers of existing oil and gas wells. For example, more than 1 million such wells have been drilled in the state of Texas in the United States. These existing wells represent potential leakage pathways for injected CO2. To analyze leakage potential, modeling tools are needed that predict leakage rates and patterns in systems with injection and potentially leaky wells. A new semianalytical solution framework allows simple and efficient prediction of leakage rates for the case of injection of supercritical CO2 into a brine-saturated deep aquifer. The solution predicts the extent of the injected CO2 plume, provides leakage rates through an abandoned well located at an arbitrary distance from the injection well, and estimates the CO2 plume extent in the overlying aquifer into which the fluid leaks. Comparison to results from a numerical multiphase flow simulator show excellent agreement. Example calculations show the importance of outer boundary conditions, the influence of both density and viscosity contrasts in the resulting solutions, and the potential importance of local upconing around the leaky well. While several important limiting assumptions are required, the new semianalytical solution provides a simple and efficient procedure for estimation of CO2 leakage for problems involving one injection well, one leaky well, and multiple aquifers separated by impermeable aquitards. PMID:15707061

  20. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Diskin, G. S.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Gorham, K.; Huey, L. G.; Meinardi, S.; Rowland, F. S.; Vay, S. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Yang, M.; Blake, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Oil sands comprise 30% of the world's oil reserves and the crude oil reserves in Canada's oil sands deposits are second only to Saudi Arabia. The extraction and processing of oil sands is much more challenging than for light sweet crude oils because of the high viscosity of the bitumen contained within the oil sands and because the bitumen is mixed with sand and contains chemical impurities such as sulphur. Despite these challenges, the importance of oil sands is increasing in the energy market. To our best knowledge this is the first peer-reviewed study to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from Alberta's oil sands mining sites. We present high-precision gas chromatography measurements of 76 speciated C2-C10 VOCs (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, monoterpenes, oxygenated hydrocarbons, halocarbons and sulphur compounds) in 17 boundary layer air samples collected over surface mining operations in northeast Alberta on 10 July 2008, using the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory as a research platform. In addition to the VOCs, we present simultaneous measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2, which were measured in situ aboard the DC-8. Carbon dioxide, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, SO2 and 53 VOCs (e.g., non-methane hydrocarbons, halocarbons, sulphur species) showed clear statistical enhancements (1.1-397×) over the oil sands compared to local background values and, with the exception of CO, were greater over the oil sands than at any other time during the flight. Twenty halocarbons (e.g., CFCs, HFCs, halons, brominated species) either were not enhanced or were minimally enhanced (<10%) over the oil sands. Ozone levels remained low because of titration by NO, and three VOCs (propyne, furan, MTBE) remained below their 3 pptv detection limit throughout the flight. Based on their correlations with one another, the compounds emitted by the oil sands industry fell into two groups: (1) evaporative emissions from the oil sands and its

  1. Experimental Ion Mobility measurements in Ne-CO2 and CO2-N2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encarnação, P. M. C. C.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Trindade, A. M. F.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results for the mobility, K0, of ions in neon-carbon dioxide (Ne-CO2) and carbon dioxide-nitrogen (CO2-N2) gaseous mixtures for total pressures ranging from 8–12 Torr, reduced electric fields in the 10–25 Td range, at room temperature. Regarding the Ne-CO2 mixture only one peak was observed for CO2 concentrations above 25%, which has been identified as an ion originated in CO2, while below 25% of CO2 a second-small peak appears at the left side of the main peak, which has been attributed to impurities. The mobility values for the main peak range between 3.51 ± 0.05 and 1.07 ± 0.01 cm2V‑1s‑1 in the 10%-99% interval of CO2, and from 4.61 ± 0.19 to 3.00 ± 0.09 cm2V‑1s‑1 for the second peak observed (10%–25% of CO2). For the CO2-N2, the time-of-arrival spectra displayed only one peak for CO2 concentrations above 10%, which was attributed to ions originated in CO2, namely CO2+(CO2), with a second peak appearing for CO2 concentrations below 10%. This second peak, with higher mobility, was attributed to CO2+ ions. The mobility values of the main peak range between 2.11 ± 0.04 and 1.10 ± 0.03 cm2V‑1s‑1 in the 1%–99% interval of CO2, while the second peak's from 2.26 ± 0.02 and 1.95 ± 0.04 cm2V‑1s‑1 (1%–10% of CO2). The inverse of the mobility displays an aproximately linear dependence on the CO2 concentration in the mixture.

  2. Natural Gas Seepage Along the Edge of the Aquitaine Shelf (France): Origin and Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Battani, A.; Bignon, L.; Croguennec, C.; Caprais, J. C.; Birot, D.; Bayon, G.; Lantéri, N.; Levaché, D.; Dupré, S.

    2014-12-01

    A newly discovered and highly active seepage area has been acoustically mapped at the western edge of the Aquitaine Shelf in the Bay of Biscay [Dupré et al., 2014]. Three selected seeping sites have been investigated with a Remotely Operated Vehicle. All sites were characterized by vigorous gas emissions, and the occurrence of massive carbonate crusts and bacterial mats at the seafloor. Nine seeps have been sampled with the PEGAZ sampler. The latter allowed gas-bubble sampling and preservation at in situpressure, together with gas-flux measurement through its graduated transparent cone. The C2+ fraction of the gas samples accounts for less than 0.06 %-mol of the total composition. Both the abundance of methane and dD and d13C isotopic analyses of the hydrocarbons indicate a biogenic source generated by microbial reduction of carbon dioxide [Whiticar et al., 1986]. The analyses of the associated noble gases also provide further support for a shallow-depth generation. While sharing the same origin, the collected samples are different in other respects, such as the measured d13C values for carbon dioxide and the hydrocarbons. This is the case in particular for methane, with displays values in between -66.1 and -72.7 ‰. We hypothesized that such variations are the result of multiple gas-transport processes along with the occurrence of hydrocarbon oxidation at different rates within the sedimentary column. The measured gas fluxes are extremely heterogeneous from one seep to another, ranging from 18 to 193 m3.yr-1. These values will be discussed in detail by comparing them with values obtained from different measurement techniques at other gas-seeping sites. The GAZCOGNE study is co-funded by TOTAL and IFREMER as part of the PAMELA (Passive Margin Exploration Laboratories) scientific project. References:Dupré, S., L. Berger, N. Le Bouffant, C. Scalabrin, and J. F. Bourillet (2014), Fluid emissions at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay, France): a biogenic origin or

  3. Unique magnetic structure of YbCo2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufti, N.; Kaneko, K.; Hoser, A.; Gutmann, M.; Geibel, C.; Krellner, C.; Stockert, O.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the results of powder and single-crystal neutron diffraction to investigate the magnetic order in YbCo2Si2 below the Néel temperature TN=1.7 K in detail. Two different magnetically ordered phases can clearly be distinguished. At lowest temperatures a commensurate magnetic structure with a propagation vector k1=(0.25 0.25 1 ) is found, while the intermediate phase (T >0.9 K) is characterized by an incommensurate magnetic structure with k2=(0.25 0.086 1 ) . The magnetic structure in YbCo2Si2 is in marked contrast to all other known R Co2Si2 compounds (R = rare earth element) likely due to some itineracy of the Yb 4 f states being responsible for the magnetism.

  4. Photolytically Generated CO2 on Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Eric; Brown, R. H.

    2007-10-01

    The leading edge of Iapetus is covered with a dark material that is carbon rich, suggested to be either a carbonaceous layer (Smith el al 1982), CH4 and NH3 embedded in water ice (Squyres et al 1983), or nitrogen-rich tholin and amorphous carbon (Buratti et al 2005). Laboratory experiments have shown that CO2 can be generated from such material both by photolysis (Allamandola, Sandford & Valero 1988) and radiolysis (Strazzulla & Palumbo 1998). We consider the accumulation of CO2 that could be photolytically generated and sequestered in the polar regions of Iapetus. The polar regions provide only a temporary cold trap for CO2, and any polar cap is expected to be seasonal in nature. Using a numerical model to track the movement of CO2, we find that as CO2 moves between poles, 10% of it would reach escape velocity and be lost from the system every solar orbit (29.46 years). CO2 would accumulate until its loss rate equaled its production rate; thus, the quantity of CO2 in a polar cap would be 10 times the amount produced in a single solar orbit. Provided that the generation of CO2 is large enough, Cassini VIMS would be able to detect a seasonal CO2 polar cap. Since the polar regions are comprised of water ice and do not have the same coating of carbon rich dark material as the dark side, any 4.26 micron band absorption would be CO2 frost rather than complexed CO2.

  5. Optimization geological sequestration of CO2 by capillary trapping mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildenschild, D.; Harper, E.; Herring, A. L.; Armstrong, R. T.

    2012-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration, as a method of atmospheric greenhouse gas reduction, is at the technological forefront of the climate change movement. Sequestration is achieved by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) gas effluent from coal fired power plants and injecting it into saline aquifers. In an effort to fully understand and optimize CO2 trapping efficiency, the capillary trapping mechanisms that immobilize subsurface CO2 were analyzed at the pore scale. Pairs of analogous fluids representing the range of in situ supercritical CO2 and brine conditions were used during experimentation. The two fluids (identified as wetting and non wetting) were imbibed and drained from a flow cell apparatus containing a sintered glass bead column. Experimental and fluid parameters, such as interfacial tension, non-wetting fluid viscosity, and flow rate, were altered to characterize their impact on capillary trapping. Through the use of computed x-ray microtomography (CMT), we were able to quantify distinct differences between initial (post NW phase imbibition) and residual (post wetting fluid flood) non-wetting phase saturations. Alterations to the viscosity of the non-wetting and wetting fluid phases were made during experimentation; results indicate that the viscosity of the non-wetting fluid is the parameter of interest as residual saturations increased with increasing viscosity. These observed trends will be used to identify optimal conditions for trapping CO2 during subsurface sequestration.

  6. Role of Rective Mineral Surface Area on the CO2 Mineralisation of CO2 Under Natural Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuddas, P.; Rillard, J.

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of complex reactions between CO2 rich fluids and rock is fundamental to secured, long-term CO2 storage in geological reservoirs. A natural hydrothermal field is considered to be a useful analogue of carbon dioxide mineralization because it integrates the long-term interaction signal. The hydrothermal field of Galicia (Spain) is characterized by co-genetic fluids resulting from a mostly homogeneous granite reservoir with pCO2 partial pressure ranging from 104 to105 Pa and pH from 10 to 6. Fluids are characterized by an increase of major elements (Ca, Mg, K and Na) and alkalinity, both correlated to pCO2. We evaluated the effects of deep CO2 perturbation on the fluid-rock interaction system. Mineral reactivity which produces changes in the fluid mineral composition is mainly dependent on the 'real' reactive surface area. The mineral surface area participating in reactions resulting from this pCO2 gradient was estimated by an inverse model approach. Input data was based on the chemical composition of the fluids we sampled. The rate of mineral dissolution was estimated by the observed pH and equilibrium conditions. Moreover, the major elemental concentrations allowed us to quantify the variation of the reactive surface area of minerals involved with the overall water-rock interaction. The irreversible mass transfer process, ruled by the continuum equilibrium condition, was defined by the overall degree of reaction advancement, using a set of polynomial equations solved independently of time scale. We found that reactive surface area of calcite, albite and K-feldspar increases by 2 orders of magnitude over the entire CO2 fluid-rock interaction process, while the reactive surface area of biotite increases by 4 orders of magnitude. This shows that fluid neutralisation and consequent CO2 mineralization under the form of carbonate species is greatly dependent on the behaviour of the reactive surface area of the mineral association in this geological

  7. Two-phase gravity currents in geological CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, J. A.; Golding, M.; Hesse, M. A.; Huppert, H. E.

    2010-12-01

    -phase flows, we then use the saturation profile in combination with the relative permeability to determine the dynamics of the two-phase current. The two-phase model that results is attractive because the formalism captures many of the features of the simpler single-phase models while providing an integrated physical and mathematical framework for the modeling of geological CO2 sequestration. In particular, by resolving the saturation profile, or capillary fringe, we are better able to estimate the extent and depth of the two-phase current, thus providing more robust estimates of residual CO2. Such two-phase models lay the groundwork to effective and efficient characterization of storage reservoirs and promise to illuminate the underlying physical processes governing the propagation of sequestered CO2 in the subsurface.

  8. Two-phase gravity currents in CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, Jerome; Golding, Madeleine; Hesse, Marc

    2010-05-01

    single-phase flows, we then use the saturation profile in combination with the relative permeability to determine the dynamics of the two-phase current. The two-phase model that results is attractive because the formalism captures many of the features of the simpler single-phase models while providing an integrated physical and mathematical framework for the modeling of geological CO2 sequestration. In particular, by resolving the saturation profile, or capillary fringe, we are better able to estimate the extent and depth of the two-phase current, thus providing more robust estimates of residual CO2. Such two-phase models lay the groundwork to effective and efficient characterization of storage reservoirs and promise to illuminate the underlying physical processes governing the propagation of sequestered CO2 in the subsurface.

  9. Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z; Dong, J. H.

    2008-10-01

    This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team member's expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

  10. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  11. Mars South Pole CO2 Paleoatmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneck, T.

    2004-03-01

    Seasonal asymmetry in the CO mixing ratio is explained by condensation of CO_2. High levels of deuteration can be obtained if the gas phase is depleted of CO. UV limbs measurements found intense Cameron band emissions of CO from 1900-2700 A produced by dissociative excitation of CO_2.

  12. CAPTURING CO2 WITH MGO AEROGELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CO2 capture from flue gas requires that the adsorbent be active at relatively low CO2 concentrations (3 – 13 vol%), high temperatures (~ 250ºC), and in the presence of many other gas species. These conditions will be simulated in the student designed reactor. The...

  13. CO2 ice on Mars: Theoretical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical model of the energy budget of the polar caps of Mars has been created which is used to study the hemispherical asymmetry in CO2 ice. The observations which show survival of seasonal CO2 ice in the Southern Hemisphere in summer and not in the Northern Hemisphere in summer have been reproduced.

  14. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-03-01

    Project overview provides background on carbonic anhydrase transport mechanism for CO2 in the human body and proposed approach for ARPA-E project to create a synthetic enzyme analogue and utilize it in a membrane for CO2 capture from flue gas.

  15. Aqueous ethylenediamine for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shan; Chen, Xi; Nguyen, Thu; Voice, Alexander K; Rochelle, Gary T

    2010-08-23

    Aqueous ethylenediamine (EDA) has been investigated as a solvent for CO(2) capture from flue gas. EDA can be used at 12 M (mol kg(-1) H(2)O) with an acceptable viscosity of 16 cP (1 cP=10(-3) Pa s) with 0.48 mol CO(2) per equivalent of EDA. Similar to monoethanolamine (MEA), EDA can be used up to 120 degrees C in a stripper without significant thermal degradation. Inhibitor A will effectively eliminate oxidative degradation. Above 120 degrees C, loaded EDA degrades with the production of its cyclic urea and other related compounds. Unlike piperazine, when exposed to oxidative degradation, EDA does not result in excessive foaming. Over much of the loading range, the CO(2) absorption rate with 12 M EDA is comparable to 7 M MEA. However, at typical rich loading, 12 M EDA absorbs CO(2) 2 times slower than 7 M MEA. The capacity of 12 M EDA is 0.72 mol CO(2)/(kg H(2)O+EDA) (for P(CO(2) )=0.5 to 5 kPa at 40 degrees C), which is about double that of MEA. The apparent heat of CO(2) desorption in EDA solution is 84 kJ mol(-1) CO(2); greater than most other amine systems. PMID:20677204

  16. Improved Criteria for Increasing CO2 Storage Potential with CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, J.; Pawar, R.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been found that deployment of CO2 capture and storage technology at large scales will be difficult without significant incentives. One of the technologies that has been a focus in recent years is CO2 enhanced oil/gas recovery, where additional hydrocarbon recovery provides an economic incentive for deployment. The way CO2 EOR is currently deployed, maximization of additional oil production does not necessarily lead to maximization of stored CO2, though significant amounts of CO2 are stored regardless of the objective. To determine the potential of large-scale CO2 storage through CO2 EOR, it is necessary to determine the feasibility of deploying this technology over a wide range of oil/gas field characteristics. In addition it is also necessary to accurately estimate the ultimate CO2 storage potential and develop approaches that optimize oil recovery along with long-term CO2 storage. This study uses compositional reservoir simulations to further develop technical screening criteria that not only improve oil recovery, but maximize CO2 storage during enhanced oil recovery operations. Minimum miscibility pressure, maximum oil/ CO2 contact without the need of significant waterflooding, and CO2 breakthrough prevention are a few key parameters specific to the technical aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery that maximize CO2 storage. We have developed reduced order models based on simulation results to determine the ultimate oil recovery and CO2 storage potential in these formations. Our goal is to develop and demonstrate a methodology that can be used to determine feasibility and long-term CO2 storage potential of CO2 EOR technology.

  17. Venting of CO2 at Enceladus’ Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Davies, Ashley G.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Tom B.; Radebaugh, Jani

    2015-11-01

    Enceladus has CO2 surface deposits in its South Polar Region that have been recently mapped by J.-P. Combe et al. (2015 AGU Fall Meeting). Assuming that these are CO2 frost, we show how they can be formed. We use an ocean-water circulation model [1] that specifies pressure gradients that drive water to the surface from a relatively gas-rich, subsurface ocean. We now examine the movement of CO2 to the surface; formation of shallow CO2 gas pockets in the ice; and the venting of CO2, when at least some of the gas freezes to form frost. If the local heat flow is known (cf. [2]), then the depths of the corresponding gas pockets can be calculated. References: [1] Matson et al. (2012) Icarus, 221, 53-62. [2] Howett et al. (2011) J. Geophys. Res. 116, E03003. Acknowledgements: AGD thanks the NASA OPR Program for support.

  18. Zinc depolarized electrochemical CO2 concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    Two zinc depolarized electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator concepts were analytically and experimentally evaluated for portable life support system carbon dioxide (CO2) removal application. The first concept, referred to as the zinc hydrogen generator electrochemical depolarized CO2 concentrator, uses a ZHG to generate hydrogen for direct use in an EDC. The second concept, referred to as the zinc/electrochemical depolarized concentrator, uses a standard EDC cell construction modified for use with the Zn anode. The Zn anode is consumed and subsequently regenerated, thereby eliminating the need to supply H2 to the EDC for the CO2 removal process. The evaluation was based primarily on an analytical evaluation of the two ZnDCs at projected end item performance and hardware design levels. Both ZnDC concepts for PLSS CO2 removal application were found to be noncompetitive in both total equivalent launch weight and individual extravehicular activity mission volume when compared to other candidate regenerable PLSS CO2 scrubbers.

  19. Geophysical monitoring technology for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jin-Feng; Li, Lin; Wang, Hao-Fan; Tan, Ming-You; Cui, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Yun-Yin; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Jia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical techniques play key roles in the measuring, monitoring, and verifying the safety of CO2 sequestration and in identifying the efficiency of CO2-enhanced oil recovery. Although geophysical monitoring techniques for CO2 sequestration have grown out of conventional oil and gas geophysical exploration techniques, it takes a long time to conduct geophysical monitoring, and there are many barriers and challenges. In this paper, with the initial objective of performing CO2 sequestration, we studied the geophysical tasks associated with evaluating geological storage sites and monitoring CO2 sequestration. Based on our review of the scope of geophysical monitoring techniques and our experience in domestic and international carbon capture and sequestration projects, we analyzed the inherent difficulties and our experiences in geophysical monitoring techniques, especially, with respect to 4D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation.

  20. CO2 degassing in the Hartoušov mofette area, western Eger Rift, imaged by CO2 mapping and geoelectrical and gravity surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickschick, Tobias; Kämpf, Horst; Flechsig, Christina; Mrlina, Jan; Heinicke, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Strong, subcontinental mantle-dominated CO2 degassing occurs in the Hartoušov and Bublák mofette fields in the western Eger Rift. The combination of CO2 gas flux and soil gas measurements as well as gravity and geoelectric surveys provides insight into the surface and subsurface of this unique mofette area. CO2 soil gas and gas flux measurements reveal that large amounts of carbon dioxide are released via channels with diameters below 1 m. Carbon dioxide emissions of several tens and up to more than 100 kg day-1 are ejected via these small seeps. Measurements with small spacings are necessary to account for the point like, focused gas discharge in the lesser degassing surrounding. We estimate that between 23 and 97 tons of CO2 are released over an area of about 350,000 m2 each day in the Hartoušov mofette field. The application of widely used geostatistical tools leads to estimations of the CO2 discharge with very high standard deviations due to the strong positive skewness of the data distribution. Geophysical investigations via electrical resistivity tomography and gravity measurements were carried out over areas of strong seepage and reveal distinct anomalies in the subsurface below mofettes, indicating rock and sediment alterations and/or sediment transport by pressurised, ascending CO2 and water mobilised by it. This study reveals that the gas emanations only occur west of a morphological step which is related to a N-S-oriented fault zone, the Počatky-Plesná fault zone. The results of CO2 mapping and the geophysical studies can track the course of this fault zone in this area. Our results fit into a tectonic model in which the mofette fields are in the centres of two independent pull-apart basin-like structures. We hypothesise that the sinistral strike-slip movement of the Počatky-Plesná fault zone leads to a pull-apart basin-like opening, at which the strong, mantle-derived CO2 degassing occurs nowadays. Since the Hartoušov and Bublák mofette fields

  1. Preparation and Characterization of Facilitated Transport Membranes Composed of Chitosan-Styrene and Chitosan-Acrylonitrile Copolymers Modified by Methylimidazolium Based Ionic Liquids for CO2 Separation from CH4 and N2

    PubMed Central

    Otvagina, Ksenia V.; Mochalova, Alla E.; Sazanova, Tatyana S.; Petukhov, Anton N.; Moskvichev, Alexandr A.; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V.; Afonso, Carlos A. M.; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V.

    2016-01-01

    CO2 separation was found to be facilitated by transport membranes based on novel chitosan (CS)–poly(styrene) (PS) and chitosan (CS)–poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) copolymer matrices doped with methylimidazolium based ionic liquids: [bmim][BF4], [bmim][PF6], and [bmim][Tf2N] (IL). CS plays the role of biodegradable film former and selectivity promoter. Copolymers were prepared implementing the latest achievements in radical copolymerization with chosen monomers, which enabled the achievement of outstanding mechanical strength values for the CS-based membranes (75–104 MPa for CS-PAN and 69–75 MPa for CS-PS). Ionic liquid (IL) doping affected the surface and mechanical properties of the membranes as well as the gas separation properties. The highest CO2 permeability 400 Barrers belongs to CS-b-PS/[bmim][BF4]. The highest selectivity α (CO2/N2) = 15.5 was achieved for CS-b-PAN/[bmim][BF4]. The operational temperature of the membranes is under 220 °C. PMID:27294964

  2. The ins and outs of CO2.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish influx and efflux of inorganic C in photosynthesizing tissues; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases. Some irreversible carboxylases use CO2; others use HCO3(-). The relative role of permeation through the lipid bilayer versus movement through CO2-selective membrane proteins in the downhill, non-energized, movement of CO2 is not clear. Passive permeation explains most CO2 entry, including terrestrial and aquatic organisms with C3 physiology and biochemistry, terrestrial C4 plants and all crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, as well as being part of some mechanisms of HCO3(-) use in CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) function, although further work is needed to test the mechanism in some cases. However, there is some evidence of active CO2 influx at the plasmalemma of algae. HCO3(-) active influx at the plasmalemma underlies all cyanobacterial and some algal CCMs. HCO3(-) can also enter some algal chloroplasts, probably as part of a CCM. The high intracellular CO2 and HCO3(-) pools consequent upon CCMs result in leakage involving CO2, and occasionally HCO3(-). Leakage from cyanobacterial and microalgal CCMs involves up to half, but sometimes more, of the gross inorganic C entering in the CCM; leakage from terrestrial C4 plants is lower in most environments. Little is known of leakage from other organisms with CCMs, though given the leakage better-examined organisms, leakage occurs and increases the energetic cost of net carbon assimilation. PMID:26466660

  3. The ins and outs of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Raven, John A.; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish influx and efflux of inorganic C in photosynthesizing tissues; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases. Some irreversible carboxylases use CO2; others use HCO3 –. The relative role of permeation through the lipid bilayer versus movement through CO2-selective membrane proteins in the downhill, non-energized, movement of CO2 is not clear. Passive permeation explains most CO2 entry, including terrestrial and aquatic organisms with C3 physiology and biochemistry, terrestrial C4 plants and all crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, as well as being part of some mechanisms of HCO3 – use in CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) function, although further work is needed to test the mechanism in some cases. However, there is some evidence of active CO2 influx at the plasmalemma of algae. HCO3 – active influx at the plasmalemma underlies all cyanobacterial and some algal CCMs. HCO3 – can also enter some algal chloroplasts, probably as part of a CCM. The high intracellular CO2 and HCO3 – pools consequent upon CCMs result in leakage involving CO2, and occasionally HCO3 –. Leakage from cyanobacterial and microalgal CCMs involves up to half, but sometimes more, of the gross inorganic C entering in the CCM; leakage from terrestrial C4 plants is lower in most environments. Little is known of leakage from other organisms with CCMs, though given the leakage better-examined organisms, leakage occurs and increases the energetic cost of net carbon assimilation. PMID:26466660

  4. Controlling seepage in discrete particle simulations of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Joldes, Grand R; Wong, Kelvin K L; Tan, Chin Wee; Smith, David W

    2016-08-01

    It is now commonplace to represent materials in a simulation using assemblies of discrete particles. Sometimes, one wishes to maintain the integrity of boundaries between particle types, for example, when modelling multiple tissue layers. However, as the particle assembly evolves during a simulation, particles may pass across interfaces. This behaviour is referred to as 'seepage'. The aims of this study were (i) to examine the conditions for seepage through a confining particle membrane and (ii) to define some simple rules that can be employed to control seepage. Based on the force-deformation response of spheres with various sizes and stiffness, we develop analytic expressions for the force required to move a 'probe particle' between confining 'membrane particles'. We analyse the influence that particle's size and stiffness have on the maximum force that can act on the probe particle before the onset of seepage. The theoretical results are applied in the simulation of a biological cell under unconfined compression. PMID:26629728

  5. Scale-up of Pore Scale Spatiotemporal CO2 Dissolution Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, H.; Srinivasan, S.; Ovaysi, S.; Wheeler, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    One of the potential risks associated with subsurface storage of CO2 is potentially the seepage of CO2 through existing faults and the studies devoted to this topic show that geochemistry plays an important role in rendering these faults as effective conduits for CO2 movement while others show that mineralization due to CO2 injection can result in seep migration and flow channeling. Therefore, understanding the changes in reservoir flow dynamics with time due to geochemical alteration of the porous media and accurately scaling up these changes for representation in field scale models is important to engineer the CO2storage process. After CO2 is injected in a subsurface, dispersion results in mixing of CO2 with aqueous species present in in-situ brine. The reactions of the dissolved CO2 with rock minerals lead to dissolution and/or formation of precipitates which alter the pore structure by changing the porosity and the permeability. Scale-up of reservoir properties and flow response at a single snapshot of time has been described by other authors, however, scale-up for reactive processes cannot be correctly described just at a single snapshot of time. We use the concept of a Representative Elementary Volume (REV) to explore the scaling characteristics of the reactive transport process. We model the REV using a variance-based statistical approach using high-resolution pore-scale data. For comparison purposes, we also compute the REV for a conservative transport using 3-D pressure data. The REV for reactive process is modeled using three different types of data: CO2 concentration, fluid/matrix pore-network data and dissolution data. For simplicity, we consider the spatial variations along a 2-D slice at various times, rendering this a 3D spatiotemporal dataset. The results indicate that the REV in reservoir with reactive flow changes with time and is greater when compared to the REV for conservative flow. The change in REV with time for reservoirs with reactive flow

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic characterization of the three-dimensional compound [Co2(cbut)(H2O)3]n (H4cbut = 1,2,3,4-cyclobutanetetracarboxylic acid).

    PubMed

    Díaz-Gallifa, Pau; Fabelo, Oscar; Pasán, Jorge; Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Juan; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina

    2014-06-01

    A novel cobalt(II) complex of formula [Co2(cbut)(H2O)3]n (1) (H4cbut = 1,2,3,4-cyclobutanetetracarboxylic acid) has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and its crystal structure has been determined by means of synchrotron radiation and neutron powder diffraction. The crystal structure of 1 consists of layers of cobalt(II) ions extending in the bc-plane which are pillared along the crystallographic a-axis through the skeleton of the cbut(4-) ligand. Three crystallographically independent cobalt(II) ions [Co(1), Co(2), and Co(3)] occur in 1. They are all six-coordinate with four carboxylate-oxygens [Co(1)-Co(3)] and two cis-[Co(1)] or trans-water molecules [Co(2) and Co(3)] building distorted octahedral surroundings. Regular alternating double oxo(carboxylate) [between Co(1) and Co(1a)] and oxo(carboxylate) plus one aqua and a syn-syn carboxylate bridges [between Co(1) and Co(2)] occur along the crystallographic b-axis, the values of the cobalt-cobalt separation being 3.1259(8) and 3.1555(6) Å, respectively. These chains are connected to the Co(3) atoms through the OCO carboxylate along the [011] direction leading to the organic-inorganic bc-layers with Co(1)-OCO(anti-syn)-Co(3) and Co(2)-OCO(anti-anti)-Co(3) distances of 5.750(2) and 4.872(1) Å. The shortest interlayer cobalt-cobalt separation through the cbut(4-) skeleton along the crystallographic a-axis is 7.028(2) Å. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements show the occurrence of antiferromagnetic ordering with a Néel temperature of 5.0 K, followed by a field-induced ferromagnetic transition under applied dc fields larger than 1500 Oe. The magnetic structure of 1 has been elucidated at low temperatures in zero field by neutron powder diffraction measurements and was found to be formed by ferromagnetic chains running along the b-axis which are antiferromagnetically coupled with the Co(3) ions through the c-axis giving rise to noncompensated magnetic moments within each bc

  7. Experimental multi-phase H2O-CO2 brine interactions at elevated temperature and pressure: Implications for CO2 sequestration in deep-saline aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, R.; Koksalan, T.

    2004-01-01

    The burning of fossil fuel and other anthropogenic activities have caused a continuous and dramatic 30% increase of atmospheric CO2 over the past 150 yr. CO2 sequestration is increasingly being viewed as a tool for managing these anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. CO2-saturated brine-rock experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of multiphase H2O-CO2 fluids on mineral equilibria and the potential for CO2 sequestration in mineral phases within deep-saline aquifers. Experimental results were generally consistent with theoretical thermodynamic calculations. The solubility of CO2 was enhanced in brines in the presence of both limestone and sandstone relative to brines alone. Reactions between CO2 saturated brines and arkosic sandstones were characterized by desiccation of the brine and changes in the chemical composition of the brine suggesting fixation of CO2 in mineral phases. These reactions were occurring on a measurable but kinetically slow time scale at 120??C.

  8. Effects of CO2 leakage on soil bacterial communities from simulated CO2-EOR areas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu; Yang, Yongjun; Ma, Yanjun; Hou, Huping; Zhang, Shaoliang; Ma, Jing

    2016-05-18

    CO2-EOR (enhanced oil recovery) has been proposed as a viable option for flooding oil and reducing anthropogenic CO2 contribution to the atmospheric pool. However, the potential risk of CO2 leakage from the process poses a threat to the ecological system. High-throughput sequencing was used to investigate the effects of CO2 emission on the composition and structure of soil bacterial communities. The diversity of bacterial communities notably decreased with increasing CO2 flux. The composition of bacterial communities varied along the CO2 flux, with increasing CO2 flux accompanied by increases in the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes phyla, but decreases in the relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi phyla. Within the Firmicutes phylum, the genus Lactobacillus increased sharply when the CO2 flux was at its highest point. Alpha and beta diversity analysis revealed that differences in bacterial communities were best explained by CO2 flux. The redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that differences in bacterial communities were best explained by soil pH values which related to CO2 flux. These results could be useful for evaluating the risk of potential CO2 leakages on the ecosystems associated with CO2-EOR processes. PMID:27056285

  9. CO2 deserts: implications of existing CO2 supply limitations for carbon management.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Richard S; Clarens, Andres F; Liu, Xiaowei; Bielicki, Jeffrey M; Levine, Jonathan S

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to mitigate the impacts of climate change will require deep reductions in anthropogenic CO2 emissions on the scale of gigatonnes per year. CO2 capture and utilization and/or storage technologies are a class of approaches that can substantially reduce CO2 emissions. Even though examples of this approach, such as CO2-enhanced oil recovery, are already being practiced on a scale >0.05 Gt/year, little attention has been focused on the supply of CO2 for these projects. Here, facility-scale data newly collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was processed to produce the first comprehensive map of CO2 sources from industrial sectors currently supplying CO2 in the United States. Collectively these sources produce 0.16 Gt/year, but the data reveal the presence of large areas without access to CO2 at an industrially relevant scale (>25 kt/year). Even though some facilities with the capability to capture CO2 are not doing so and in some regions pipeline networks are being built to link CO2 sources and sinks, much of the country exists in "CO2 deserts". A life cycle analysis of the sources reveals that the predominant source of CO2, dedicated wells, has the largest carbon footprint further confounding prospects for rational carbon management strategies. PMID:25137398

  10. CO2 Accounting and Risk Analysis for CO2 Sequestration at Enhanced Oil Recovery Sites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhenxue; Viswanathan, Hari; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Ampomah, William; Yang, Changbing; Jia, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Balch, Robert; Grigg, Reid; White, Mark

    2016-07-19

    Using CO2 in enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) is a promising technology for emissions management because CO2-EOR can dramatically reduce sequestration costs in the absence of emissions policies that include incentives for carbon capture and storage. This study develops a multiscale statistical framework to perform CO2 accounting and risk analysis in an EOR environment at the Farnsworth Unit (FWU), Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil/gas-water flow and transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major risk metrics: CO2/water injection/production rates, cumulative net CO2 storage, cumulative oil/gas productions, and CO2 breakthrough time. The median and confidence intervals are estimated for quantifying uncertainty ranges of the risk metrics. A response-surface-based economic model has been derived to calculate the CO2-EOR profitability for the FWU site with a current oil price, which suggests that approximately 31% of the 1000 realizations can be profitable. If government carbon-tax credits are available, or the oil price goes up or CO2 capture and operating expenses reduce, more realizations would be profitable. The results from this study provide valuable insights for understanding CO2 storage potential and the corresponding environmental and economic risks of commercial-scale CO2-sequestration in depleted reservoirs. PMID:27362472

  11. Modeling Coupled Evaporation and Seepage in Ventilated Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ghezzehei; R. Trautz; S. Finsterle; P. Cook; C. Ahlers

    2004-07-01

    Cavities excavated in unsaturated geological formations are important to activities such as nuclear waste disposal and mining. Such cavities provide a unique setting for simultaneous occurrence of seepage and evaporation. Previously, inverse numerical modeling of field liquid-release tests and associated seepage into cavities were used to provide seepage-related large-scale formation properties by ignoring the impact of evaporation. The applicability of such models was limited to the narrow range of ventilation conditions under which the models were calibrated. The objective of this study was to alleviate this limitation by incorporating evaporation into the seepage models. We modeled evaporation as an isothermal vapor diffusion process. The semi-physical model accounts for the relative humidity, temperature, and ventilation conditions of the cavities. The evaporation boundary layer thickness (BLT) over which diffusion occurs was estimated by calibration against free-water evaporation data collected inside the experimental cavities. The estimated values of BLT were 5 to 7 mm for the open underground drifts and 20 mm for niches closed off by bulkheads. Compared to previous models that neglected the effect of evaporation, this new approach showed significant improvement in capturing seepage fluctuations into open cavities of low relative humidity. At high relative-humidity values (greater than 85%), the effect of evaporation on seepage was very small.

  12. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar to those predicted for A.D. 2100

    PubMed Central

    Breecker, D. O.; Sharp, Z. D.; McFadden, L. D.

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]atm) during Earth’s ancient greenhouse episodes is essential for accurately predicting the response of future climate to elevated CO2 levels. Empirical estimates of [CO2]atm during Paleozoic and Mesozoic greenhouse climates are based primarily on the carbon isotope composition of calcium carbonate in fossil soils. We report that greenhouse [CO2]atm have been significantly overestimated because previously assumed soil CO2 concentrations during carbonate formation are too high. More accurate [CO2]atm, resulting from better constraints on soil CO2, indicate that large (1,000s of ppmV) fluctuations in [CO2]atm did not characterize ancient climates and that past greenhouse climates were accompanied by concentrations similar to those projected for A.D. 2100. PMID:20080721

  13. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar to those predicted for A.D. 2100.

    PubMed

    Breecker, D O; Sharp, Z D; McFadden, L D

    2010-01-12

    Quantifying atmospheric CO(2) concentrations ([CO(2)](atm)) during Earth's ancient greenhouse episodes is essential for accurately predicting the response of future climate to elevated CO(2) levels. Empirical estimates of [CO(2)](atm) during Paleozoic and Mesozoic greenhouse climates are based primarily on the carbon isotope composition of calcium carbonate in fossil soils. We report that greenhouse [CO(2)](atm) have been significantly overestimated because previously assumed soil CO(2) concentrations during carbonate formation are too high. More accurate [CO(2)](atm), resulting from better constraints on soil CO(2), indicate that large (1,000s of ppmV) fluctuations in [CO(2)](atm) did not characterize ancient climates and that past greenhouse climates were accompanied by concentrations similar to those projected for A.D. 2100. PMID:20080721

  14. Engineered yeast for enhanced CO2 mineralization†

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Roberto; Carnelli, Lino; Simon, Anna; Kao, Albert; Monforte, Alessandra d’Arminio; Riccò, Moreno; Bianchi, Daniele; Belcher, Angela

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a biologically catalyzed CO2 mineralization process for the capture of CO2 from point sources was designed, constructed at a laboratory scale, and, using standard chemical process scale-up protocols, was modeled and evaluated at an industrial scale. A yeast display system in Saccharomyces cerevisae was used to screen several carbonic anhydrase isoforms and mineralization peptides for their impact on CO2 hydration, CaCO3 mineralization, and particle settling rate. Enhanced rates for each of these steps in the CaCO3 mineralization process were confirmed using quantitative techniques in lab-scale measurements. The effect of these enhanced rates on the CO2 capture cost in an industrial scale CO2 mineralization process using coal fly ash as the CaO source was evaluated. The model predicts a process using bCA2- yeast and fly ash is ~10% more cost effective per ton of CO2 captured than a process with no biological molecules, a savings not realized by wild-type yeast and high-temperature stable recombinant CA2 alone or in combination. The levelized cost of electricity for a power plant using this process was calculated and scenarios in which this process compares favorably to CO2 capture by MEA absorption process are presented. PMID:25289021

  15. Glacial CO2 Cycles: A Composite Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are three main contributors to the glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2 content: starvation of the supply of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere reservoir, excess CO2 storage in the deep sea, and surface-ocean cooling. In this talk, I explore a scenario in which all three play significant roles. Key to this scenario is the assumption that deep ocean storage is related to the extent of nutrient stratification of the deep Atlantic. The stronger this stratification, the larger the storage of respiration CO2. Further, it is my contention that the link between Milankovitch insolation cycles and climate is reorganizations of the ocean's thermohaline circulation leading to changes in the deep ocean's CO2 storage. If this is the case, the deep Atlantic d13C record kept in benthic foraminifera shells tells us that deep ocean CO2 storage follows Northern Hemisphere summer insolation cycles and thus lacks the downward ramp so prominent in the records of sea level, benthic 18O and CO2. Rather, the ramp is created by the damping of planetary CO2 emissions during glacial time intervals. As it is premature to present a specific scenario, I provide an example as to how these three contributors might be combined. As their magnitudes and shapes remain largely unconstrained, the intent of this exercise is to provoke creative thinking.

  16. Experimental multi-phase CO2-brine-rock interactions at elevated temperature and pressure: Implications for CO2 sequestration in deep-saline aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, R.J.; Koksalan, T.

    2004-01-01

    Long-term CO2 saturated brine-rock experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of multiphase H2O-CO2 fluids on mineral equilibria and the potential for CO2 sequestration mineral phases within deep-saline aquifers. Experimental results were consistent with theoretical thermodynamic calculations when CO2-saturated brines were reacted with limestone rocks. The CO2-saturated brine-limestone reactions were characterized by compositional and mineralogical-changes in the aquifer fluid and formation rocks that were dependent on initial brine composition as were the changes in formation porosity, especially dissolved sulfate. The solubility of CO2 was enhanced in brines in the presence of both limestone and sandstone rocks relative to brines alone. Reactions between CO2 saturated brines and arkosic sandstones were characterized by desiccation of the brine and changes in the chemical composition of the brine suggesting fixation of CO2 in mineral phases. These reactions occured on a measurable but kinetically slow time scale at 120??C.

  17. Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambal

    2013-01-01

    A durable, high-capacity regenerable sorbent can remove CO2 from the breathing loop under a Martian atmosphere. The system design allows near-ambient temperature operation, needs only a small temperature swing, and sorbent regeneration takes place at or above 8 torr, eliminating the potential for Martian atmosphere to leak into the regeneration bed and into the breathing loop. The physical adsorbent can be used in a metabolic, heat-driven TSA system to remove CO2 from the breathing loop of the astronaut and reject it to the Martian atmosphere. Two (or more) alternating sorbent beds continuously scrub and reject CO2 from the spacesuit ventilation loop. The sorbent beds are cycled, alternately absorbing CO2 from the vent loop and rejecting the adsorbed material into the environment at a high CO2 partial pressure (above 8 torr). The system does not need to run the adsorber at cryogenic temperatures, and uses a much smaller temperature swing. The sorbent removes CO2 via a weak chemical interaction. The interaction is strong enough to enable CO2 adsorption even at 3 to 7.6 torr. However, because the interaction between the surface adsorption sites and the CO2 is relatively weak, the heat input needed to regenerate the sorbent is much lower than that for chemical absorbents. The sorbent developed in this project could potentially find use in a large commercial market in the removal of CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants, if regulations are put in place to curb carbon emissions from power plants.

  18. Estimating lake-atmosphere CO2 exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.E.; Striegl, R.G.; Stannard, D.I.; Michmerhuizen, C.M.; McConnaughey, T.A.; LaBaugh, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Lake-atmosphere CO2 flux was directly measured above a small, woodland lake using the eddy covariance technique and compared with fluxes deduced from changes in measured lake-water CO2 storage and with flux predictions from boundary-layer and surface-renewal models. Over a 3-yr period, lake-atmosphere exchanges of CO2 were measured over 5 weeks in spring, summer, and fall. Observed springtime CO2 efflux was large (2.3-2.7 ??mol m-2 s-1) immediately after lake-thaw. That efflux decreased exponentially with time to less than 0.2 ??mol m-2 s-1 within 2 weeks. Substantial interannual variability was found in the magnitudes of springtime efflux, surface water CO2 concentrations, lake CO2 storage, and meteorological conditions. Summertime measurements show a weak diurnal trend with a small average downward flux (-0.17 ??mol m-2 s-1) to the lake's surface, while late fall flux was trendless and smaller (-0.0021 ??mol m-2 s-1). Large springtime efflux afforded an opportunity to make direct measurement of lake-atmosphere fluxes well above the detection limits of eddy covariance instruments, facilitating the testing of different gas flux methodologies and air-water gas-transfer models. Although there was an overall agreement in fluxes determined by eddy covariance and those calculated from lake-water storage change in CO2, agreement was inconsistent between eddy covariance flux measurements and fluxes predicted by boundary-layer and surface-renewal models. Comparison of measured and modeled transfer velocities for CO2, along with measured and modeled cumulative CO2 flux, indicates that in most instances the surface-renewal model underpredicts actual flux. Greater underestimates were found with comparisons involving homogeneous boundary-layer models. No physical mechanism responsible for the inconsistencies was identified by analyzing coincidentally measured environmental variables.

  19. Geological factors affecting CO2 plume distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Leetaru, H.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the lateral extent of a CO2 plume has important implications with regards to buying/leasing pore volume rights, defining the area of review for an injection permit, determining the extent of an MMV plan, and managing basin-scale sequestration from multiple injection sites. The vertical and lateral distribution of CO2 has implications with regards to estimating CO2 storage volume at a specific site and the pore pressure below the caprock. Geologic and flow characteristics such as effective permeability and porosity, capillary pressure, lateral and vertical permeability anisotropy, geologic structure, and thickness all influence and affect the plume distribution to varying degrees. Depending on the variations in these parameters one may dominate the shape and size of the plume. Additionally, these parameters do not necessarily act independently. A comparison of viscous and gravity forces will determine the degree of vertical and lateral flow. However, this is dependent on formation thickness. For example in a thick zone with injection near the base, the CO2 moves radially from the well but will slow at greater radii and vertical movement will dominate. Generally the CO2 plume will not appreciably move laterally until the caprock or a relatively low permeability interval is contacted by the CO2. Conversely, in a relatively thin zone with the injection interval over nearly the entire zone, near the wellbore the CO2 will be distributed over the entire vertical component and will move laterally much further with minimal vertical movement. Assuming no geologic structure, injecting into a thin zone or into a thick zone immediately under a caprock will result in a larger plume size. With a geologic structure such as an anticline, CO2 plume size may be restricted and injection immediately below the caprock may have less lateral plume growth because the structure will induce downward vertical movement of the CO2 until the outer edge of the plume reaches a spill

  20. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Erickson

    2004-04-01

    The PCOR Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Deployment Issues) activities have focused on utilizing Dakota Gasification Company (DGC) experience and data with respect to DGC participation in the enhanced oil recovery project at Weyburn, Saskatchewan. A solid line of communication has been developed with the Interstate Oil & Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) for the mutual benefit of the PCOR Partnership and IOGCC's complementary efforts. Task 3 (Public Education and Outreach) activities have focused on developing a foundation of background materials in order to avoid a duplication of efforts and provide the best outreach and educational materials possible. Progress in Task 4 (Characterization and Evaluation) has included the development of a database format, the preliminary collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks, and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) activities have resulted in a conceptual model for screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities have also been useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  1. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Lisa S. Botnen

    2005-07-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership characterization work is nearing completion, and most remaining efforts are related to finalizing work products. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) has developed a Topical Report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region''. Task 3 (Public Outreach) has developed an informational Public Television program entitled ''Nature in the Balance'', about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The program was completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in this quarter. Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) efforts are nearing completion, and data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation are being incorporated into a series of topical reports. The expansion of the Decision Support System Geographic Information System database has continued with the development of a ''save bookmark'' feature that allows users to save a map from the system easily. A feature that allows users to develop a report that summarizes CO{sub 2} sequestration parameters was also developed. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options and developing economic estimates for important regional CO{sub 2} sequestration strategies.

  2. Natural Analog for Geologic Storage of CO2: CO2 accumulation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Xu, T.; Liu, N.; Zhou, B.

    2012-12-01

    Natural accumulations of CO2 are potential analogues of CO2 geological storage that can provide useful information on the behaviour of supercritical CO2 in reservoirs. Natural CO2 accumulations are common across Northeast China, and, although they occur in a wide variety of geological settings, their distribution is principally controlled by the Mesozoic-Cenozoic rift basins and associated Quaternary volcanism. High CO2 concentrations (>60 CO2%) in natural gas reservoirs are usually related to volcanism and magmatism, and possesses mantle-genetic origin. CO2 reservoirs consist of sandstone, volcanic rocks and carbonate rocks with the buried depth from 2000-3000 m. Dawsonite is recognized in almost all of the CO2-bearing basin, which has been proved to share the same carbon source with CO2 in the reservoirs in Songliao basin, Hailaer basin and Donghai basin. Petrographic data show that dawsonite is abundant in feldspar- rich sandstone, volcanic rock fragment-rich sandstones and tuff. In some cases, high percentage of dawsonite cement constitutes a diagenetic seal, which occurs in the reservoir-mudstone caprock and prevents upward leakage of CO2. Besides dawsonite, mantle-genetic CO2 flux leads to the formation of calcite, ankerite and siderite. The statistics of porosity and permeability measured from the dawsonite-bearing sandstone and dawsonite-absent sandstone with the almost same burial depth in Songliao basin show that the mantle-genetic CO2 flux result in lower reservoir quality, suggesting that mineral trapping for CO2 is significant. Chemical analyses of formation water in Songliao basin and Hailaer basin indicate that the concentrations of TDS, HCO3-,CO32-, Mg2+,Ca2+ and Na+ + K+ in dawsonite-bearing sandstone are higher than that in dawsonite-absent sandstone. Distribution of CO2 and dawsonite is constrainted by the regional caprocks in the Songliao basin. The charging time of the mantle-genetic CO2 in China dates from 50 to 25 Ma.

  3. The Oceanic Sink for Anthropogenic CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Sabine, Chris; Feely, R. A.; Gruber, N.; Key, Robert; Lee, K.; Bullister, J.L.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wong, C. S.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Tilbrook, B.; Millero, F. J.; Peng, T.-H.; Kozyr, Alexander; Ono, Tsueno

    2004-01-01

    Using inorganic carbon measurements from an international survey effort in the 1990s and a tracer-based separation technique, we estimate a global oceanic anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) sink for the period from 1800 to 1994 of 118 19 petagrams of carbon. The oceanic sink accounts for ~48% of the total fossil-fuel and cement-manufacturing emissions, implying that the terrestrial biosphere was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of about 39 28 petagrams of carbon for this period. The current fraction of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions stored in the ocean appears to be about one-third of the long-term potential.

  4. Atmospheric CO2 Removal by Enhancing Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster van Groos, A. F.; Schuiling, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    The increase of the CO2 content in the atmosphere by the release of anthropogenic CO2 may be addressed by the enhancement of weathering at the surface of the earth. The average emission of mantle-derived CO2 through volcanism is ~0.3 Gt/year (109 ton/year). Considering the ~3.000 Gt of CO2 present in the atmosphere, the residence time of CO2 in the earth's atmosphere is ~10,000 years. Because the vast proportion of carbon in biomass is recycled through the atmosphere, CO2 is continuously removed by a series of weathering reactions of silicate minerals and stored in calcium and magnesium carbonates. The addition of anthropogenic CO2 from fossil fuel and cement production, which currently exceeds 35 Gt/year and dwarfs the natural production 100-fold, cannot be compensated by current rates of weathering, and atmospheric CO2 levels are rising rapidly. To address this increase in CO2 levels, weathering rates would have to be accelerated on a commensurate scale. Olivine ((Mg,Fe)2SiO4) is the most reactive silicate mineral in the weathering process. This mineral is the major constituent in relatively common ultramafic rocks such as dunites (olivine content > 90%). To consume the current total annual anthropogenic release of CO2, using a simplified weathering reaction (Mg2SiO4 + 4CO2 + 4H2O --> 2 Mg2+ + 4HCO3- + H4SiO4) would require ~30 Gt/year or ~8-9 km3/year of dunite. This is a large volume; it is about double the total amount of ore and gravel currently mined (~ 17 Gt/year). To mine and crush these rocks to <100 μm costs ~ 8/ton. The transport and distribution over the earth's surface involves additional costs, that may reach 2-5/ton. Thus, the cost of remediation for the release of anthropogenic CO2 is 300-400 billion/year. This compares to a 2014 global GDP of ~80 trillion. Because weathering reactions require the presence of water and proceed more rapidly at higher temperatures, the preferred environments to enhance weathering are the wet tropics. From a socio

  5. CO2 Sensing and CO2 Regulation of Stomatal Conductance: Advances and Open Questions.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Cawas B; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Negi, Juntaro; Israelsson-Nordström, Maria; Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Iba, Koh; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form epidermal stomatal gas-exchange valves in plants and regulate the aperture of stomatal pores in response to changes in the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration ([CO2]) in leaves. Moreover, the development of stomata is repressed by elevated CO2 in diverse plant species. Evidence suggests that plants can sense [CO2] changes via guard cells and via mesophyll tissues in mediating stomatal movements. We review new discoveries and open questions on mechanisms mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements and CO2 modulation of stomatal development, which together function in the CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance and gas exchange in plants. Research in this area is timely in light of the necessity of selecting and developing crop cultivars that perform better in a shifting climate. PMID:26482956

  6. Statistical analysis of liquid seepage in partially saturated heterogeneous fracture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, T.S.

    1999-12-01

    Field evidence suggests that water flow in unsaturated fracture systems may occur along fast preferential flow paths. However, conventional macroscale continuum approaches generally predict the downward migration of water as a spatially uniform wetting front subjected to strong inhibition into the partially saturated rock matrix. One possible cause of this discrepancy may be the spatially random geometry of the fracture surfaces, and hence, the irregular fracture aperture. Therefore, a numerical model was developed in this study to investigate the effects of geometric features of natural rock fractures on liquid seepage and solute transport in 2-D planar fractures under isothermal, partially saturated conditions. The fractures were conceptualized as 2-D heterogeneous porous media that are characterized by their spatially correlated permeability fields. A statistical simulator, which uses a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, was employed to generate synthetic permeability fields. Hypothesized geometric features that are expected to be relevant for seepage behavior, such as spatially correlated asperity contacts, were considered in the SA algorithm. Most importantly, a new perturbation mechanism for SA was developed in order to consider specifically the spatial correlation near conditioning asperity contacts. Numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport were then performed in these synthetic fractures by the flow simulator TOUGH2, assuming that the effects of matrix permeability, gas phase pressure, capillary/permeability hysteresis, and molecular diffusion can be neglected. Results of flow simulation showed that liquid seepage in partially saturated fractures is characterized by localized preferential flow, along with bypassing, funneling, and localized ponding. Seepage pattern is dominated by the fraction of asperity contracts, and their shape, size, and spatial correlation. However, the correlation structure of permeability field is less important

  7. Partitioning of the Leaf CO2 Exchange into Components Using CO2 Exchange and Fluorescence Measurements.

    PubMed

    Laisk, A.; Sumberg, A.

    1994-10-01

    Photorespiration was calculated from chlorophyll fluorescence and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) kinetics and compared with CO2 evolution rate in the light, measured by three gas-exchange methods in mature sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves. The gas-exchange methods were (a) postillumination CO2 burst at unchanged CO2 concentration, (b) postillumination CO2 burst with simultaneous transfer into CO2-free air, and (c) extrapolation of the CO2 uptake to zero CO2 concentration at Rubisco active sites. The steady-state CO2 compensation point was proportional to O2 concentration, revealing the Rubisco specificity coefficient (Ksp) of 86. Electron transport rate (ETR) was calculated from fluorescence, and photorespiration rate was calculated from ETR using CO2 and O2 concentrations, Ksp, and diffusion resistances. The values of the best-fit mesophyll diffusion resistance for CO2 ranged between 0.3 and 0.8 s cm-1. Comparison of the gas-exchange and fluorescence data showed that only ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylation and photorespiratory CO2 evolution were present at limiting CO2 concentrations. Carboxylation of a substrate other than RuBP, in addition to RuBP carboxylation, was detected at high CO2 concentrations. A simultaneous decarboxylation process not related to RuBP oxygenation was also detected at high CO2 concentrations in the light. We propose that these processes reflect carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate, formed from phosphoglyceric acid and the subsequent decarboxylation of malate. PMID:12232361

  8. How secure is subsurface CO2 storage? Controls on leakage in natural CO2 reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miocic, Johannes; Gilfillan, Stuart; McDermott, Christopher; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only industrial scale technology available to directly reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuelled power plants and large industrial point sources to the atmosphere. The technology includes the capture of CO2 at the source and transport to subsurface storage sites, such as depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or saline aquifers, where it is injected and stored for long periods of time. To have an impact on the greenhouse gas emissions it is crucial that there is no or only a very low amount of leakage of CO2 from the storage sites to shallow aquifers or the surface. CO2 occurs naturally in reservoirs in the subsurface and has often been stored for millions of years without any leakage incidents. However, in some cases CO2 migrates from the reservoir to the surface. Both leaking and non-leaking natural CO2 reservoirs offer insights into the long-term behaviour of CO2 in the subsurface and on the mechanisms that lead to either leakage or retention of CO2. Here we present the results of a study on leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs worldwide. We compiled a global dataset of 49 well described natural CO2 reservoirs of which six are leaking CO2 to the surface, 40 retain CO2 in the subsurface and for three reservoirs the evidence is inconclusive. Likelihood of leakage of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface is governed by the state of CO2 (supercritical vs. gaseous) and the pressure in the reservoir and the direct overburden. Reservoirs with gaseous CO2 is more prone to leak CO2 than reservoirs with dense supercritical CO2. If the reservoir pressure is close to or higher than the least principal stress leakage is likely to occur while reservoirs with pressures close to hydrostatic pressure and below 1200 m depth do not leak. Additionally, a positive pressure gradient from the reservoir into the caprock averts leakage of CO2 into the caprock. Leakage of CO2 occurs in all cases along a fault zone, indicating that

  9. An experimental study of diopside- CO2 -brine interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bing; Liu, Li; Ming, Xiaoran; Guo, Yanjun

    2014-05-01

    Diopside is one of the main minerals that consist igneous rock. It is characterized by high content of divalent cations like Ca, Mg, and Fe and relatively fast dissolution rate. These features make it an expected mineral of releasing metal ions for mineral carbonation during the research of mineral trapping of CO2. This study focus on the dissolution amount and micro-scale observing of diopside after the reaction with CO2 and brine under 100, 150, and 200°C. Each of the three experiments are carried out with 2 pieces of diopside (10mm*10mm*4mm) and 500ml Nacl (1mol/L) for 72h, and the pressure inside is 7Mp after injecting of CO2. SEM analysis of the surface of diopside before and after the experiments shows that the degree of corrosion increase with the rising of temperature. The slices of diopside lose 0.8% of its weight at the end of the experiments of 100°C, about 1.8% at 150°C, and about 3.92% at 200°C. Silicon concentrations after reaction are 14.55 mg/L (100°C), 47.02 mg/L (150°C), and 65.32 mg/L (200°C), which also prove the elevated temperature has a positive influence on dissolution of solid. Concentration of calcium and bicarbonate increase with temperature, while magnesium and iron are not. This may due to the heterogeneity of the composition in each piece of solid, or the precipitation of some compounds during the experiments. There are some amorphous compounds are found under SEM, which are mostly consisted of C, O, Na, Mg, Si, and Ca. A simple numerical simulation of CO2-diopside-brine interaction is carried out by TOUGHREACT. The setting of parameters are based on the experiments. Diopside reacts with 1mol/L Nacl under the CO2 partial pressure of 10Mp and the temperature keeps 100°C. The results present that the volume percent of precipitated carbonates (calcite and magnesite) reaches 1.23% after 100 years, which means 1m3 diopside could capture 16.76kg CO2 after 100 years by the means of mineral carbonation. This study reveals the

  10. Study on CO2 global recycling system.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Sakamoto, Y; Niwa, S

    2001-09-28

    In order to assist in finding ways to mitigate CO2 emission and to slow the depletion of fossil fuels we have established and evaluated a representative system, which consists of three technologies developed in our laboratory. These technologies were in CO2 recovery, hydrogen production and methanol synthesis and in addition we established the necessary supporting systems. Analysis of outline designs of the large scale renewable energy power generation system and this system and energy input for building plant, energy input for running plant has been conducted based on a case using this system for a 1000-MW coal fired power plant, followed by an evaluation of the material balance and energy balance. The results are as follows. Energy efficiency is 34%, the CO2 reduction rate is 41%, the balance ratio of the energy and CO2 of the system is 2.2 and 1.8, respectively, on the assumption that the primary renewable energy is solar thermal power generation, the stationary CO2 emission source is a coal-fired power plant and the generation efficiency of the methanol power plant is 60%. By adopting the system, 3.7 million tons of CO2 can be recovered, approximately 2.7 million tons of methanol can be produced, and 15.4 billion kWh of electricity can be generated per year. Compared to generating all electrical power using only coal, approximately 2.6 million tons of coal per year can be saved and approximately 2.15 million tons of CO2 emission can be reduced. Therefore, it is clearly revealed that this system would be effective to reduce CO2 emissions and to utilize renewable energy. PMID:11589395

  11. Mechanisms of CO2 Interaction with Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, V.; Myshakin, E. M.; Howard, B.; Guthrie, G.

    2013-12-01

    Improved understanding of basic fluid-rock interactions can lead to more accurate models of the coupled fluid-flow and geomechanics in engineered geological systems. We studied carbon dioxide (CO2) interaction with source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. The manometric, infrared (IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) data indicated that montmorillonite can permanently trap CO2 molecules in its interlayer, after dynamic exposure to supercritical CO2. Such trapping is quite secure and appears to result in partial carbonate formation. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate CO2 intercalation into the interlayer and its interaction with interlayer species. Previously reported results of simulations using simplified smectite models suggested that the experimentally observed red shift of the asymmetric-stretch vibrational mode for the trapped carbon dioxide can be attributed to induced polarization of the CO2 molecule by the interlayer water molecules. Modified smectite models were designed to account for the naturally occurring structural disorder that allows guest molecules to occupy localized interlamellar voids. In such models, energy dependences and structural rearrangements of the interlayer species are governed by rotational misalignment in turbostratically disordered clay. CO2 invasion in the interlayer disrupts the long-range ordering of water molecules and cations thus forcing the system to adopt energetically unfavorable configurations. New findings indicate that interaction between intercalated CO2 and H2O is limited and, with the increasing interlayer hydration, CO2 preferentially accumulates in interlamellar voids. The vibrational spectra produced by the new model, assuming that clay systems can exist in fractional hydration states, show either a combination of undisturbed and red-shifted asymmetric-stretch modes or a broad peak consistent with the multiple smeared peaks, which explain the multi-mode features that have appeared

  12. Long-term pCO2 trends in Adirondack Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekell, David A.; Gudasz, Cristian

    2016-05-01

    Lakes are globally significant sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. However, there are few temporally resolved records of lake CO2 concentrations and long-term patterns are poorly characterized. We evaluated annual trends in the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) based on chemical measurements from 31 Adirondack Lakes taken monthly over an 18 year period. All lakes were supersaturated with CO2 and were sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. There were significant pCO2 trends in 29% of lakes. The median magnitude of significant positive trends was 32.1 µatm yr-1. Overall, 52% of lakes had pCO2 trends greater than those reported for the atmosphere and ocean. Significant trends in lake pCO2 were attributable to regional recovery from acid deposition and changing patterns of ice cover. These results illustrate that lake pCO2 can respond rapidly to environmental change, but the lack of significant trend in 71% of lakes indicates substantial lake-to-lake variation in magnitude of response.

  13. Elevated CO2 effects on plant carbon, nitrogen, and water relations: six important lessons from FACE.

    PubMed

    Leakey, Andrew D B; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Bernacchi, Carl J; Rogers, Alistair; Long, Stephen P; Ort, Donald R

    2009-01-01

    Plant responses to the projected future levels of CO(2) were first characterized in short-term experiments lasting days to weeks. However, longer term acclimation responses to elevated CO(2) were subsequently discovered to be very important in determining plant and ecosystem function. Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE) experiments are the culmination of efforts to assess the impact of elevated CO(2) on plants over multiple seasons and, in the case of crops, over their entire lifetime. FACE has been used to expose vegetation to elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO(2) under completely open-air conditions for nearly two decades. This review describes some of the lessons learned from the long-term investment in these experiments. First, elevated CO(2) stimulates photosynthetic carbon gain and net primary production over the long term despite down-regulation of Rubisco activity. Second, elevated CO(2) improves nitrogen use efficiency and, third, decreases water use at both the leaf and canopy scale. Fourth, elevated CO(2) stimulates dark respiration via a transcriptional reprogramming of metabolism. Fifth, elevated CO(2) does not directly stimulate C(4) photosynthesis, but can indirectly stimulate carbon gain in times and places of drought. Finally, the stimulation of yield by elevated CO(2) in crop species is much smaller than expected. While many of these lessons have been most clearly demonstrated in crop systems, all of the lessons have important implications for natural systems. PMID:19401412

  14. The overlooked tropical oceanic CO2 sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibánhez, J. Severino P.; Araujo, Moacyr; Lefèvre, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    The intense rainfall in the tropical Atlantic spatially overlaps with the spread of the Amazon plume. Based on remote-sensed sea surface salinity and rainfall, we removed the contribution of rainfall to the apparent Amazon plume area, thus refining the quantification of its extension (0.84 ± 0.06 × 106 km2 to 0.89 ± 0.06 × 106 km2). Despite the previous overestimation of the Amazon plume area due to the influence of rainfall (>16%), our calculated annual CO2 flux based on rainfall-corrected sea surface CO2 fugacity confirms that the Amazon River plume is an atmospheric CO2 sink of global importance (-7.61 ± 1.01 to -7.85 ± 1.02 Tg C yr-1). Yet we show that current sea-air CO2 flux assessments for the tropical Atlantic could be overestimated in about 10% by neglecting the CO2 sink associated to the Amazon plume. Thus, including the Amazon plume, the sea-air CO2 exchange for the tropical Atlantic is estimated to be 81.1 ± 1.1 to 81.5 ± 1.1 Tg C yr-1.

  15. CO2 As An Inverse Greenhouse Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idso, Sherwood B.

    1984-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that mankind's burning of fossil fuels such as coal, gas and oil has significantly increased the CO2 content of Earth's atmosphere, from something less than 300 ppm (parts per million by volume) in the pre-Industrial Revolution era to a con-centration which is currently somewhat over 340 ppm. It is also fairly well established that a concentration of 600 ppm will be reached sometime in the next century. Atmospheric scientists using complex computer models of the atmosphere have predicted that such a concentration doubling will lead to a calamatous climatic warming, due to the thermal infra-red "greenhouse" properties of CO2. However, my investigation of a large body of empirical evidence suggests just the opposite. Indeed, long-term records of surface air temperature and snow cover data indicate that increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO2 may actually tend to cool the Earth and not warm it. These and other observations of the real world lead to the conclusion that, for the present composition of the Earth's atmosphere, CO2 appears to behave as an inverse greenhouse gas. A mechanism for this phenomenon is suggested; and it is then indicated how enhanced concentrations of atmospheric CO2 may be beneficial for the planet, particularly with respect to the ability of enhanced CO2 concentrations to stimulate plant growth and reduce water requirements.

  16. CO2 cooling in terrestrial planet thermospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Hunten, D. M.; Roble, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the recent progress in the debate on the CO2-O relaxation rate, its temperature dependence, and its corresponding impact on the thermospheric heat budgets of Venus, Earth, and Mars. This comparative approach provides the broadest range of conditions under which a common CO2-O relaxation rate should provide consistent results. New global mean calculations are presented for the heat budgets of these three planets using large CO2-O relaxation rates that have been inferred recently from Earth CO2 radiance measurements and laboratory studies. Results indicate that available Venus and Mars data constrain the CO2-O relaxation rate to be 2-4 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm/s at 300 K. For Venus, this strong cooling serves as an effective thermostat that gives rise to a small variation of thermospheric temperatures over the solar cycle, just as observed. Conversely, CO2 cooling does not appear to be dominant in the dayside heat budget of the Mars thermosphere over most of the solar cycle. For the Earth, this strong cooling implies that the lower thermosphere does not typically require significant eddy diffusion or heat conduction. However, global-scale dynamics or an additional heating mechanism may be needed to restore calculated temperatures to observed values when relaxation rates exceeding 2 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm/s are employed.

  17. CO2 Absorption Spectroscopy and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Daniel; Mlawer, Eli; Mlynczak, Martin; Gero, Jon; Collins, William; Torn, Margaret

    2014-03-01

    Most of the absorption, and therefore radiative forcing, due to increased atmospheric CO2 occurs in line wings, so utilizing an accurate line shape is necessary for climate science. Recent advances in CO2 absorption spectroscopy have been incorporated into benchmark line-by-line radiative transfer models. These updates include the Energy Corrected Sudden Approximation to represent isolated line profiles, line mixing, and line clusters. The CO2 line profiles are sub-Lorentzian and are explicitly modeled up to 25 cm-1 from each line's center. Consistent continuum absorption is implemented over the remainder of the profile except for modest empirical adjustments based on observations. Thus, line-by-line models calculate the absorption effects of CO2 that agree with theory and measurements. This is validated with long-term spectroscopic measurements from the ARM program's AERI instrument. This spectroscopy trains computationally-efficient correlated-k methods for climate model radiative transfer, but they overpredict instantaneous radiative forcing from doubled CO2 by approximately 7% in part because they have larger errors handling the impact of increased CO2 in the stratosphere than the troposphere. The implications of this can be tested with supercomputers. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Biol. & Env. Res., Clim. & Env. Sci. Div., of the U.S. D.O.E., Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 as part of the Atmos. Sys. Res.

  18. CO2 Efflux from Cleared Mangrove Peat

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Ruess, Roger W.; Feller, Ilka C.

    2011-01-01

    Background CO2 emissions from cleared mangrove areas may be substantial, increasing the costs of continued losses of these ecosystems, particularly in mangroves that have highly organic soils. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured CO2 efflux from mangrove soils that had been cleared for up to 20 years on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance of soils after clearing may have on CO2 efflux. CO2 efflux from soils declines from time of clearing from ∼10 600 tonnes km−2 year−1 in the first year to 3000 tonnes km2 year−1 after 20 years since clearing. Disturbing peat leads to short term increases in CO2 efflux (27 umol m−2 s−1), but this had returned to baseline levels within 2 days. Conclusions/Significance Deforesting mangroves that grow on peat soils results in CO2 emissions that are comparable to rates estimated for peat collapse in other tropical ecosystems. Preventing deforestation presents an opportunity for countries to benefit from carbon payments for preservation of threatened carbon stocks. PMID:21738628

  19. Density of aqueous solutions of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Julio E.

    2001-10-10

    In this report, we present a numerical representation for the partial molar volume of CO2 in water and the calculation of the corresponding aqueous solution density. The motivation behind this work is related to the importance of having accurate representations for aqueous phase properties in the numerical simulation of carbon dioxide disposal into aquifers as well as in geothermal applications. According to reported experimental data the density of aqueous solutions of CO2 can be as much as 2-3% higher than pure water density. This density variation might produce an influence on the groundwater flow regime. For instance, in geologic sequestration of CO2, convective transport mixing might occur when, several years after injection of carbon dioxide has stopped, the CO2-rich gas phase is concentrated at the top of the formation, just below an overlaying caprock. In this particular case the heavier CO2 saturated water will flow downward and will be replaced by water with a lesser CO2 content.

  20. Advanced CO2 Removal and Reduction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Dubovik, Margarita; Copeland, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    An advanced system for removing CO2 and H2O from cabin air, reducing the CO2, and returning the resulting O2 to the air is less massive than is a prior system that includes two assemblies . one for removal and one for reduction. Also, in this system, unlike in the prior system, there is no need to compress and temporarily store CO2. In this present system, removal and reduction take place within a single assembly, wherein removal is effected by use of an alkali sorbent and reduction is effected using a supply of H2 and Ru catalyst, by means of the Sabatier reaction, which is CO2 + 4H2 CH4 + O2. The assembly contains two fixed-bed reactors operating in alternation: At first, air is blown through the first bed, which absorbs CO2 and H2O. Once the first bed is saturated with CO2 and H2O, the flow of air is diverted through the second bed and the first bed is regenerated by supplying it with H2 for the Sabatier reaction. Initially, the H2 is heated to provide heat for the regeneration reaction, which is endothermic. In the later stages of regeneration, the Sabatier reaction, which is exothermic, supplies the heat for regeneration.

  1. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    2003-01-01

    The CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) project was performed to develop, test, and analyze thin film membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The membranes developed in this project are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications, such as In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) and In Situ Consumables Production (ISCP). These membrane materials may be used in a variety of ISRU systems, for example as the atmospheric inlet filter for an ISPP process to enhance the concentration of CO2 for use as a reactant gas, to passively separate argon and nitrogen trace gases from CO2 for habitat pressurization, to provide a system for removal of CO2 from breathing gases in a closed environment, or within a process stream to selectively separate CO2 from other gaseous components. The membranes identified and developed for CAM were evaluated for use in candidate ISRU processes and other gas separation applications, and will help to lay the foundation for future unmanned sample return and human space missions. CAM is a cooperative project split among three institutions: Lockheed Martin Astronautics (LMA), the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  2. Seepage measurements from Long Lake, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isiorho, S.A.; Beeching, F.M.; Stewart, P.M.; Whitman, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Long Lake, located near Lake Michigan within the dune-complexes of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, USA, was formed some time during the Pleistocene and Holocene epochs. A surficial aquifer underlies Long Lake, which is either a source or sink for the later. The hydrologic processes in the lakeshore and surrounding environs have been significantly altered during the agricultural, municipal, and industrial development of the region. Limited data suggest that the organisms of Long Lake have elevated levels of several contaminants. This study attempts to quantify seepage within the lake to assess the potential threat to groundwater quality. Seepage measurements and minipiezometric tests were used to determine seepage within the lake. Seepage measurements and minipiezometric tests suggest that water seeps out of Long Lake, thus recharging the groundwater that flows southwest away from the lake. There is a great deal of variability in the seepage rate, with a mean of 11.5×10-4±11.2×10-4 m d-1. The mean seepage rate of 0.3 m yr-1 for Long Lake is greater than the 0.2 m yr-1 recharge rate estimated for the drainage basin area. The Long Lake recharge volume of 2.5 × 105 m3 yr-1 is approximately 22% of the volume of the lake and is significant when compared to the total surface recharge volume of 4.8 × 105 m3 yr-1 to the upper aquifer of the drainage area. There is a potential for contamination of the groundwater system through seepage from the lake from contaminants derived from aerial depositions.

  3. Pressure tomography for exploring CO2 plume evolution in a deep saline homogeneous aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Linwei; Bayer, Peter; Alt-Epping, Peter; Tatomir, Alexandru; Sauter, Martin; Brauchler, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Deep saline aquifers serve as the potential CO2 storage formations due to their often large storage capacity. For characterizing and monitoring CO2 migration in deep saline aquifers, cost-efficient and expressive field methods are required to provide direct insight into the prevailing physical conditions of the subsurface. In our study, we propose an innovative pressure tomography approach to characterize the initial flow properties of the aquifer and the development of CO2 plume based on a virtual homogeneous saline aquifer. Deep CO2 injection has an impact on the flow properties of the CO2 and brine mixture depending on the saturation. Variations of the flow properties, such as hydraulic diffusivity, are considered as indicators for tracking the plume, which can roughly be approximated by a single-phase model. Comparable to seismic tomography experiments, pressure tomography generates streamline patterns by either injecting brine at variable depths (sources) prior to full-scale CO2 injection, or by injecting small amounts of CO2 into the CO2-brine system during later stages of storage. The streamlines are derived by recording the introduced pressure responses at given observation locations (receivers). An eikonal-based pressure tomographical framework allows the quantification of the apparent single-phase or mixed-phase diffusivity of the formation. By applying the inversion at different times and by comparison of the inverted diffusivity tomograms, the evolution of the CO2 plume shape can be monitored temporally in a time-lapse strategy.

  4. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels affect community structure of rice root-associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Takashi; Liu, Dongyan; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ikeda, Seishi; Asakawa, Susumu; Tokida, Takeshi; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Aoki, Naohiro; Ishimaru, Ken; Ujiie, Kazuhiro; Usui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hayashi, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) affects rice yields and grain quality. However, the responses of root-associated bacteria to [CO2] elevation have not been characterized in a large-scale field study. We conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (ambient + 200 μmol.mol−1) using three rice cultivars (Akita 63, Takanari, and Koshihikari) and two experimental lines of Koshihikari [chromosome segment substitution and near-isogenic lines (NILs)] to determine the effects of [CO2] elevation on the community structure of rice root-associated bacteria. Microbial DNA was extracted from rice roots at the panicle formation stage and analyzed by pyrosequencing the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to characterize the members of the bacterial community. Principal coordinate analysis of a weighted UniFrac distance matrix revealed that the community structure was clearly affected by elevated [CO2]. The predominant community members at class level were Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria in the control (ambient) and FACE plots. The relative abundance of Methylocystaceae, the major methane-oxidizing bacteria in rice roots, tended to decrease with increasing [CO2] levels. Quantitative PCR revealed a decreased copy number of the methane monooxygenase (pmoA) gene and increased methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) in elevated [CO2]. These results suggest elevated [CO2] suppresses methane oxidation and promotes methanogenesis in rice roots; this process affects the carbon cycle in rice paddy fields. PMID:25750640

  5. Global CO2 simulation using GOSAT-based surface CO2 flux estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, H.; Oda, T.; Saito, M.; Valsala, V.; Belikov, D.; Saeki, T.; Saito, R.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Yoshida, Y.; Yokota, Y.; Bril, A.; Oshchepkov, S.; Andres, R. J.; Maksyutov, S.

    2012-04-01

    Investigating the distribution and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes is an active research topic in the field of contemporary carbon cycle dynamics. The technique central to this effort is atmospheric inverse modeling with which surface CO2 fluxes are estimated by making corrections to a priori flux estimates such that mismatches between model-predicted and observed CO2 concentrations are minimized. Past investigations were carried out by utilizing CO2 measurements collected in global networks of surface-based monitoring sites. Now, datasets of column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction (XCO2) retrieved from spectral soundings collected by GOSAT are available for complementing the surface-based CO2 observations. These space-based XCO2 data are expected to enhance the spatiotemporal coverage of the existing surface observation network and thus reduce uncertainty associated with the surface flux estimates. We estimated monthly CO2 fluxes in 64 sub-continental regions from a subset of the surface-based GLOBALVIEW CO2 data and the GOSAT FTS SWIR Level 2 XCO2 retrievals. We further simulated CO2 concentrations in 3-D model space using the surface flux estimates obtained. In this presentation, we report the result of a comparison between the simulated CO2 concentrations and independent surface observations. As part of an effort in inter-comparing GOSAT-based surface CO2 flux estimates, we also look at results yielded with XCO2 data retrieved with the PPDF-DOAS algorithm and those made available by the NASA Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space team. For this study, we used version 08.1 of the National Institute for Environmental Studies atmospheric transport model, which was driven by the Japan Meteorological Agency's JCDAS wind analysis data. The CO2 forward simulations were performed on 2.5° × 2.5° horizontal grids at 32 vertical levels between the surface and the top of the atmosphere. The a priori flux dataset used was comprised of the sum of four

  6. Infrared spectra and structures of the neutral and charged CrCO2 and Cr(CO2)2 isomers in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingnan; Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei

    2014-08-01

    The reactions from codeposition of laser-ablated chromium atoms with carbon dioxide in excess neon are studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy. The species formed are identified by the effects of isotopic substitution on their infrared spectra. Density functional calculations are performed to support the spectral assignments and to interpret the geometric and electronic structures of the experimentally observed species. Besides the previously reported insertion products OCrCO and O2Cr(CO)2, the one-to-one Cr(CO2) complex and the one-to-two Cr(CO2)2 complex as well as the CrOCrCO and OCCrCO3 complexes are also formed. The Cr(CO2) complex is characterized to be side-on η(2)-C,O-coordinated. The Cr(CO2)2 complex is identified to involve a side-on η(2)-C,O-coordinated CO2 and an end-on η(1)-O-coordinated CO2. OCCrCO3 is a carbonate carbonyl complex predicted to have a planar structure with a η(2)-O,O-coordinated carbonate ligand. The CrOCrCO complex is predicted to be linear with a high-spin ground state. Besides the neutral molecules, charged species are also produced. The Cr(CO2)(+) and Cr(CO2)2(+) cation complexes are characterized to have linear end-on η(1)-O-coordinated structures with blue-shifted antisymmetric CO2 stretching vibrational frequencies. The OCrCO(-) anion is bent with the Cr-O and CO stretching frequencies red-shifted from those of OCrCO neutral molecule. PMID:25033227

  7. Modeling CO2 Gas Migration of Shallow Subsurface CO2 Leakage Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M. L.; Plampin, M. R.; Pawar, R.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Leakage of injected CO2 into shallow subsurface aquifers or back into the atmosphere at geologic carbon sequestration sites is a risk that must be minimized. One potential CO2 leakage pathway involves the transport of dissolved CO2 into a shallow aquifer where the CO2 exsolves, forming a free CO2 gas phase that subsequently migrates through the aquifer. In order to reduce the negative effects of CO2 exsolution, it is important to fully understand each of the processes controlling the movement CO2, as well as the effects of aquifer heterogeneity on the overall fate and transport of CO2. In this work, we present multiphase flow simulations of intermediate scale CO2 exsolution experiments. The multiphase flow simulations were carried out using the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer code (FEHM) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Simulations were first designed to model experiments conducted in two different homogeneous packed sands. PEST (Parameter Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis) was used to optimize multiphase flow parameters (i.e., porosity, permeability, relative permeability, and capillary pressure) within FEHM. The optimized parameters were subsequently used to model heterogeneous experiments consisting of various packing configurations using the same sands. Comparisons of CO2 saturation between experiments and simulations will be presented and analyzed.

  8. Fingerprinting captured CO2 using natural tracers: Determining CO2 fate and proving ownership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, Stephanie; Gilfillan, Stuart; Johnston, Gareth; Stuart, Finlay; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    In the long term, captured CO2 will most likely be stored in large saline formations and it is highly likely that CO2 from multiple operators will be injected into a single saline formation. Understanding CO2 behavior within the reservoir is vital for making operational decisions and often uses geochemical techniques. Furthermore, in the event of a CO2 leak, being able to identify the owner of the CO2 is of vital importance in terms of liability and remediation. Addition of geochemical tracers to the CO2 stream is an effective way of tagging the CO2 from different power stations, but may become prohibitively expensive at large scale storage sites. Here we present results from a project assessing whether the natural isotopic composition (C, O and noble gas isotopes) of captured CO2 is sufficient to distinguish CO2 captured using different technologies and from different fuel sources, from likely baseline conditions. Results include analytical measurements of CO2 captured from a number of different CO2 capture plants and a comprehensive literature review of the known and hypothetical isotopic compositions of captured CO2 and baseline conditions. Key findings from the literature review suggest that the carbon isotope composition will be most strongly controlled by that of the feedstock, but significant fractionation is possible during the capture process; oxygen isotopes are likely to be controlled by the isotopic composition of any water used in either the industrial process or the capture technology; and noble gases concentrations will likely be controlled by the capture technique employed. Preliminary analytical results are in agreement with these predictions. Comparison with summaries of likely storage reservoir baseline and shallow or surface leakage reservoir baseline data suggests that C-isotopes are likely to be valuable tracers of CO2 in the storage reservoir, while noble gases may be particularly valuable as tracers of potential leakage.

  9. Leaf cavity CO2 concentrations and CO2 exchange in onion, Allium cepa L.

    PubMed

    Byrd, G T; Loboda, T; Black, C C; Brown, R H

    1995-06-01

    Onion (Allium cepa L.) plants were examined to determine the photosynthetic role of CO2 that accumulates within their leaf cavities. Leaf cavity CO2 concentrations ranged from 2250 μL L(-1) near the leaf base to below atmospheric (<350 μL L(-1)) near the leaf tip at midday. There was a daily fluctuation in the leaf cavity CO2 concentrations with minimum values near midday and maximum values at night. Conductance to CO2 from the leaf cavity ranged from 24 to 202 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and was even lower for membranes of bulb scales. The capacity for onion leaves to recycle leaf cavity CO2 was poor, only 0.2 to 2.2% of leaf photosynthesis based either on measured CO2 concentrations and conductance values or as measured directly by (14)CO2 labeling experiments. The photosynthetic responses to CO2 and O2 were measured to determine whether onion leaves exhibited a typical C3-type response. A linear increase in CO2 uptake was observed in intact leaves up to 315 μL L(-1) of external CO2 and, at this external CO2 concentration, uptake was inhibited 35.4±0.9% by 210 mL L(-1) O2 compared to 20 mL L(-1) O2. Scanning electron micrographs of the leaf cavity wall revealed degenerated tissue covered by a membrane. Onion leaf cavity membranes apparently are highly impermeable to CO2 and greatly restrict the refixation of leaf cavity CO2 by photosynthetic tissue. PMID:24307095

  10. Precursory volcanic CO2 signals from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Kataoka, Fumie; Kuze, Akihiko; Shiomi, Kei; Goto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Identification of earliest signals heralding volcanic unrest benefits from the unambiguous detection of precursors that reflect deviation of magmatic systems from metastable background activity. Ascent and emplacement of new basaltic magma at depth may precede eruptions by weeks to months. Transient localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions stemming from exsolution from depressurized magma are expected, and have been observed weeks to months ahead of magmatic surface activity. Detecting such CO2 precursors by continuous ground-based monitoring operations is unfortunately not a widely implemented method yet, save a handful of volcanoes. Detecting CO2 emissions from space offers obvious advantages - however it is technologically challenging, not the least due to the increasing atmospheric burden of CO2, against which a surface emission signal is hard to discern. In a multi-year project, we have investigated the feasibility of space-borne detection of pre-eruptive volcanic CO2 passive degassing signals using observations from the Greenhouse Gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Since 2010, we have observed over 40 active volcanoes from space using GOSAT's special target mode. Over 72% of targets experienced at least one eruption over that time period, demonstrating the potential utility of space-borne CO2 observations in non-imaging target-mode (point source monitoring mode). While many eruption precursors don't produce large enough CO2 signals to exceed space-borne detection thresholds of current satellite sensors, some of our observations have nevertheless already shown significant positive anomalies preceding eruptions at basaltic volcanoes. In 2014, NASA launched its first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2). Its observation strategy differs from the single-shot GOSAT instrument. At the expense of GOSAT's fast time series capability (3-day repeat cycle, vs. 16 for OCO-2), its 8-footprint continuous swath can slice

  11. Hydrological and geochemical monitoring for a CO2 sequestration pilot in a brine formation

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten; Benson, Sally M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Gunter, William D.

    2004-05-17

    Hydrological and geochemical monitoring are key components of site characterization and CO2 plume monitoring for a pilot test to inject CO2 into a brine-bearing sand of the fluvial-deltaic Frio formation in the upper Texas Gulf Coast. In situ, injected CO2 forms a supercritical phase that has gas-like properties (low density and viscosity) compared to the surrounding brine, while some CO2 dissolves in the brine. The pilot test employs one injection well and one monitor well, with continuous pressure and flow-rate monitoring in both wells, and continuous surface fluid sampling and periodic down-hole fluid sampling from the monitor well. Pre-injection site-characterization includes pump tests with pressure-transient analysis to estimate single-phase flow properties, establish hydraulic connectivity between the wells, determine appropriate boundary conditions, and analyze ambient phase conditions within the formation. Additionally, a pre-injection tracer test furnishes estimates of kinematic porosity and the geometry of flow paths between injection and monitor wells under single-phase conditions. Pre-injection geochemical sampling provides a baseline for subsequent geochemical monitoring and helps determine the optimal tracers to accompany CO2 injection. During CO2 injection, hydrological monitoring enables estimation of two-phase flow properties and helps track the movement of the injected CO2 plume, while geochemical sampling provides direct evidence of the arrival of CO2 and tracers at the monitor well. Furthermore, CO2-charged water acts as a weak acid, and reacts to some extent with the minerals in the aquifer, producing a distinct chemical signature in the water collected at the monitor well. Comparison of breakthrough curves for the single-phase tracer test and the CO2 (and its accompanying tracers) illuminates two-phase flow processes between the supercritical CO2 and native brine, an area of current uncertainty that must be better understood to effectively

  12. Geologic CO2 Input Into Groundwater and the Atmosphere, Soda Springs, ID, USA

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Lewicki; G. E. Hilley; L. Dobeck; T. L. McLing; B. M. Kennedy; M. Bill; B. D. V. Marino

    2013-02-01

    A set of CO2 flux, geochemical, and hydrologic measurement techniques was used to characterize the source of and quantify gaseous and dissolved CO2 discharges from the area of Soda Springs, southeastern Idaho. An eddy covariance system was deployed for approximately one month near a bubbling spring and measured net CO2 fluxes from - 74 to 1147 g m- 2 d- 1. An inversion of measured eddy covariance CO2 fluxes and corresponding modeled source weight functions mapped the surface CO2 flux distribution within and quantified CO2 emission rate (24.9 t d- 1) from a 0.05 km2 area surrounding the spring. Soil CO2 fluxes (< 1 to 52,178 g m- 2 d- 1) were measured within a 0.05 km2 area of diffuse degassing using the accumulation chamber method. The estimated CO2 emission rate from this area was 49 t d- 1. A carbon mass balance approach was used to estimate dissolved CO2 discharges from contributing sources at nine springs and the Soda Springs geyser. Total dissolved inorganic carbon (as CO2) discharge for all sampled groundwater features was 57.1 t d- 1. Of this quantity, approximately 3% was derived from biogenic carbon dissolved in infiltrating groundwater, 35% was derived from carbonate mineral dissolution within the aquifer(s), and 62% was derived from deep source(s). Isotopic compositions of helium (1.74–2.37 Ra) and deeply derived carbon (d13C approximately 3‰) suggested contribution of volatiles from mantle and carbonate sources. Assuming that the deeply derived CO2 discharge estimated for sampled groundwater features (approximately 35 t d- 1) is representative of springs throughout the study area, the total rate of deeply derived CO2 input into the groundwater system within this area could be ~ 350 t d- 1, similar to CO2 emission rates from a number of quiescent volcanoes.

  13. Advanced CO2 Removal Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Verma, Sunita; Forrest, Kindall; LeVan, M. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced CO2 Removal Technical Task Agreement covers three active areas of research and development. These include a study of the economic viability of a hybrid membrane/adsorption CO2 removal system, sorbent materials development, and construction of a database of adsorption properties of important fixed gases on several adsorbent material that may be used in CO2 removal systems. The membrane/adsorption CO2 removal system was proposed as a possible way to reduce the energy consumption of the four-bed molecular sieve system now in use. Much of the energy used by the 4BMS is used to desorb water removed in the device s desiccant beds. These beds might be replaced by a desiccating membrane that moves the water from [he incoming stream directly into the outlet stream. The approach may allow the CO2 removal beds to operate at a lower temperature. A comparison between models of the 4BMS and hybrid systems is underway at Vanderbilt University. NASA Ames Research Center has been investigating a Ag-exchanged zeolites as a possible improvement over currently used Ca and Na zeolites for CO2 removal. Silver ions will complex with n:-bonds in hydrocarbons such as ethylene, giving remarkably improved selectivity for adsorption of those materials. Bonds with n: character are also present in carbon oxides. NASA Ames is also continuing to build a database for adsorption isotherms of CO2, N2, O2, CH4, and Ar on a variety of sorbents. This information is useful for analysis of existing hardware and design of new processes.

  14. CO2 and CO Simulations and Their Source Signature Indicated by CO/CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, Randy; Huisheng, Bian

    2004-01-01

    Three years (2000-2002) atmospheric CO2 and CO fields are simulated by a Chemistry Transport Model driven by the assimilated meteorological fields from GEOS-4. The simulated CO2 and CO are evaluated by measurements from surface (CMDL), satellite (MOPITT/CO), and aircraft. The model-observation comparisons indicate reasonable agreement in both source and remote regions, and in the lower and upper troposphere. The simulation also captures the seasonality of CO2 and CO variations. The ratios of CO/CO2 are analyzed over different representative regions to identify the source signature, since the anthropogenic CO comes fiom the same combustion processes as CO2. This work enables us to improve satellite inversion estimates of CO2 sources and sinks by simultaneously using satellite CO measurement.

  15. Drivers of pCO2 dynamics in two contrasting coral reef lagoons: The influence of submarine groundwater discharge (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyronak, T.; Santos, I. R.; Erler, D.; Maher, D. T.; Eyre, B.

    2013-12-01

    The carbon chemistry of coral reef lagoons can be highly variable over short time scales. While much of the diel variability in seawater carbon chemistry is explained by biological processes, external sources such as river and groundwater seepage may deliver large amounts of organic and inorganic carbon to coral reefs and represent a poorly understood feedback to ocean acidification. Here, we assess the impact of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) on pCO2 variability in two coral reef lagoons with distinct SGD driving mechanisms. Diel variability of pCO2 in the two ecosystems was explained by a combination of biological drivers and SGD inputs. In Rarotonga, a South Pacific volcanic island, SGD was driven primarily by a steep terrestrial hydraulic gradient, and the lagoon was influenced by the high pCO2 (5,501 μatm) of the fresh groundwater. In Heron Island, a Great Barrier Reef coral cay, SGD was dominated by seawater recirculation through sediments (i.e. tidal pumping) and pCO2 was mainly impacted through the stimulation of biological processes. The Rarotonga water column had a relatively higher average pCO2 (549 μatm) than Heron Island (471 μatm). However, pCO2 exhibited a greater diel range in Heron Island (778 μatm) than in Rarotonga (507 μatm). The Rarotonga lagoon received 31.2 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1 from SGD, while the Heron Island lagoon received 12.3 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1. Over the course of this study both systems were sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (3.00 to 9.67 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1), with SGD-derived CO2 contributing a large portion to the air-sea CO2 flux. The relationship between both water column pH and aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) and radon (222Rn) concentrations indicate that SGD may enhance the local acidification of some coral reef lagoons. Studies measuring the carbon chemistry of coral reefs (e.g. community metabolism, calcification rates) may need to consider SGD-derived CO2.

  16. Monitoring of near surface CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, E.; Möller, I.; Teschner, M.; Poggenburg, J.; Spickenbom, K.; Schulz, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring of near surface CO2 ECKHARD FABER1, INGO MÖLLER1, MANFRED TESCHNER1, JÜRGEN POGGENBURG1, KAI SPICKENBOM1, HANS-MARTIN SCHULZ1,2 1Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, e.faber@bgr.de 2present adress: GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), Telegrafenberg, D-14473 Potsdam Underground gas storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide is one of the methods to reduce the input of antropogenic CO2 into the atmosphere and its greenhouse effect. Storage of CO2 is planned in depleted reservoirs, in aquifers and in salt caverns. Storage sites must have very small leakage rates to safely store the CO2 for centuries. Thus, a careful investigation and site selection is crucial. However, any leakage of CO2 to the surface is potentially dangerous for humans and environment. Therefore, instruments and systems for the detection of any CO2 escaping the storage sites and reaching the atmosphere have to be developed. Systems to monitor gases in deep wells, groundwater and surface sediments for leaking CO2 are developed, tested and are contnuously improved. Our group is mainly analysing CO2 in shallow (down to 3 m) soil samples using automatically operating monitoring systems. The systems are equipped with sensors to measure CO2 (and other gases) concentrations and other environmental parameters (atmospheric pressure, ambient and soil temperatures, etc.). Data are measured in short intervals (minute to subminute), are stored locally and are transferred by telemetrical systems into the BGR laboratory (Weinlich et al., 2006). In addition to soil gases monitoring systems technical equipment is available for continuous underwater gas flow measurements. Several of those monitoring systems are installed in different areas like Czech Republic, Austria, Italy and Germany. To detect any leaking gas from a sequestration site after CO2 injection, the naturally existing CO2 concentration (before injection) must be known. Thus, the natural

  17. Validation of Airborne CO2 Laser Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J. T.; Kooi, S.; Fenn, M. A.; Choi, Y.; Vay, S. A.; Harrison, F. W.; Moore, B.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    This paper discusses the flight test validation of a unique, multi-frequency, intensity-modulated, single-beam laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) that operates near 1.57 μm for remote column CO2 measurements. This laser system is under development for a future space-based mission to determine the global distribution of regional-scale CO2 sources and sinks, which is the objective of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions during Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. A prototype of this LAS system, called the Multi-frequency Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), was developed by ITT, and it has been flight tested in nine airborne campaigns since May 2005. This paper focuses on the most recent results obtained over the last two years of flight-testing where the MFLL remote CO2 column measurements were evaluated against airborne in situ CO2 profile measurements traceable to World Meteorological Organization standards. A comprehensive multiple-aircraft flight test program was conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia in July-August 2009. The MFLL obtained surface reflectance and average CO2 column variations along the 50-km flight legs over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility (CF) in Lamont, Oklahoma; over rural Virginia and North Carolina; and over the Chesapeake Bay. For a flight altitude of 4.6 km, the average signal to noise ratio (SNR) for a 1-s CO2 column measurement was found to be 760, which is the equivalent of a CO2 mixing ratio precision of 0.60 ppmv, and for a 10-s average the SNR was found to be 2002 or 0.20 ppmv. Absolute comparisons of MFLL-derived and in situ-derived CO2 column measurements were made for all daytime flights conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia with an average agreement to within 0.32 ppmv. A major ASCENDS flight test campaign was conducted using the NASA DC-8 during 6-18 July 2010. The MFLL system and associated in situ CO2 instrumentation were operated on DC-8 flights over the Central Valley

  18. Decarboxylation, CO2 and the reversion problem.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Ronald

    2015-11-17

    Decarboxylation reactions occur rapidly in enzymes but usually are many orders of magnitude slower in solution, if the reaction occurs at all. Where the reaction produces a carbanion and CO2, we would expect that the high energy of the carbanion causes the transition state for C-C bond cleavage also to be high in energy. Since the energy of the carbanion is a thermodynamic property, an enzyme obviously cannot change that property. Yet, enzymes overcome the barrier to forming the carbanion. In thinking about decarboxylation, we had assumed that CO2 is well behaved and forms without its own barriers. However, we analyzed reactions in solution of compounds that resemble intermediates in enzymic reaction and found some of them to be subject to unexpected forms of catalysis. Those results caused us to discard the usual assumptions about CO2 and carbanions. We learned that CO2 can be a very reactive electrophile. In decarboxylation reactions, where CO2 forms in the same step as a carbanion, separation of the products might be the main problem preventing the forward reaction because the carbanion can add readily to CO2 in competition with their separation and solvation. The basicity of the carbanion also might be overestimated because when we see that the decarboxylation is slow, we assume that it is because the carbanion is high in energy. We found reactions where the carbanion is protonated internally; CO2 appears to be able to depart without reversion more rapidly. We tested these ideas using kinetic analysis of catalytic reactions, carbon kinetic isotope effects, and synthesis of predecarboxylation intermediates. In another case, we observed that the decarboxylation is subject to general base catalysis while producing a significant carbon kinetic isotope effect. This requires both a proton transfer from an intermediate and C-C bond-breaking in the rate-determining step. This would occur if the route involves the surprising initial addition of water to the carboxyl

  19. CO2-Induced Acidification of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, G. A.; Phillips, J.; Bennington, V.; Bootsma, H. A.; Pilcher, D.; Sterner, R.; Urban, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    A number of studies indicate that air-water equilibration is the dominant control on pCO2 in several Great Lakes at annual timescales or longer. Assuming this is the case across all lakes at present and into the future, we show that pH will decline by 0.3-0.4 units through 2100 under a business-as-usual CO2 emission scenario. In a survey of the Great Lakes scientific community, 87% of respondents indicate that CO2-driven acidification is likely. The available pH data do not support these predicted trends, but limited sampling in an environment characterized by significant spatio-temporal variability, as well as significant measurement uncertainty, cast doubt on the ability of the historical pH record to resolve the predicted trends. Evaluation of the current sampling strategy using eddy-resolving numerical models of Lake Superior and Lake Michigan are key evidence that the current monitoring strategy is inadequate. In order to track long-term pH change and assess whether atmospheric CO2 will affect the Great Lakes like the oceans, a new approach to Great Lakes pH monitoring is required. Ecological impacts of CO2 acidification have not been studied for the Great Lakes, but potential effects can be gleaned from the literature. In addition, our qualitative and quantitative survey results suggest that processes such as fish recruitment, dreissenid mussel growth, and nutrient cycling may be sensitive to pH, but there is lack of consensus about the magnitude and overall significance of these effects.

  20. Potential Hydrogeomechanical Impacts of Geological CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, B. J.; Haerer, D.; Han, W.; Heath, J.; Morse, J.

    2006-12-01

    Long-term sequestration of anthropogenic "greenhouse gases" such as CO2 is a proposed approach to managing climate change. Deep brine reservoirs in sedimentary basins are possible sites for sequestration, given their ubiquitous nature. We used a mathematical sedimentary basin model, including coupling of multiphase CO2-groundwater flow and rock deformation, to evaluate residence times in possible brine reservoir storage sites, migration patterns and rates away from such sites, and effects of CO2 injection on fluid pressures and rock strain. Study areas include the Uinta and Paradox basins of Utah, the San Juan basin of New Mexico, and the Permian basin of west Texas. Regional-scale hydrologic and mechanical properties, including the presence of fracture zones, were calibrated using laboratory and field data. Our initial results suggest that, in general, long-term (~100 years or more) sequestration in deep brine reservoirs is possible, if guided by robust structural and hydrologic data. However, specific processes must be addressed to characterize and minimize risks. In addition to CO2 migration from target sequestration reservoirs into other reservoirs or to the land surface, another environmental issue is displacement of brines into freshwater aquifers. We evaluated the potential for such unintended aquifer contamination by displacement of brines out of adjacent sealing layers such as marine shales. Results suggest that sustained injection of CO2 may incur significant brine displacement out of adjacent sealing layers, depending on the injection history, initial brine composition, and hydrologic properties of both reservoirs and seals. Model simulations also suggest that as injection-induced overpressures migrate, effective stresses may follow this migration under some conditions, as will associated rock strain. Such "strain migration" may lead to induced or reactivated fractures or faults, but can be controlled through reservoir engineering.

  1. A model for the evolution of CO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Tyler, D.; Mckay, C. P.; Davis, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    There are several lines of evidence that suggest early Mars was warmer and wetter than it is at present. Perhaps the most convincing of these are the valley networks and degraded craters that characterize much of the ancient terrains. In both cases, fluvial activity associated with liquid water is believed to be involved. Thus, Mars appears to have had a warmer climate early in its history than it does today. How much warmer is not clear, but a common perception has been that global mean surface temperatures must have been near freezing - almost 55 K warmer than at present. The most plausible way to increase surface temperatures is through the greenhouse effect, and the most plausible greenhouse gas is CO2. Pollack et al. estimate that in the presence of the faint young Sun, the early Martian atmosphere would have to contain almost 5 bar of CO2 to raise the mean surface temperature up to the freezing level; only 1 bar would be required if the fluvial features were formed near the calculations now appear to be wrong since Kasting showed that CO2 will condense in the atmosphere at these pressures and that this greatly reduces the greenhouse effect of a pure CO2 atmosphere. He suggested that alternative greenhouse gases such as CH4 or NH3, are required. The early Mars dilemma is approached from a slightly different point of view. In particular, a model for the evolution of CO2 on Mars that draws upon published processes that affect such evolution was constructed. Thus, the model accounts for the variation of solar luminosity with time, the greenhouse effect, regolith uptake, polar cap formation, escape, and weathering.

  2. Vibrational relaxation of CO2(ν2) by atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, Karen J.; Kleissas, Katherine M.; Rhinehart, Justin M.; Hwang, Eunsook S.; Dodd, James A.

    2006-09-01

    In the Earth's upper atmosphere, collisions with ambient O atoms efficiently excite the CO2 [0000] vibrational ground-state population to the first excited, [0110] or ν2, vibrational bend state. Subsequent relaxation of the ν2 population occurs through spontaneous emission of 15-μm radiation. Much of this radiation escapes into space, thereby removing ambient kinetic energy from the atmosphere. This cooling mechanism is especially important at altitudes between the mesopause and the lower thermosphere, approximately 80-120 km, where the O-atom density is relatively high and the kinetic temperature is rising. Laboratory measurements have been performed to better characterize the CO2(ν2)-O vibrational relaxation rate coefficient kO(ν2). A 266-nm laser pulse photolyzed trace amounts of O3 in a CO2-O3-rare gas mixture, simultaneously creating O atoms and raising the gas temperature to create a nonequilibrium CO2 vibrational distribution. Transient diode laser absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor CO2 vibrational level population reequilibration. A global nonlinear least squares fitting technique was used to interpret the kinetic data, yielding kO(ν2) = (1.8 ± 0.3) × 10-12 cm3s-1. The result is in good agreement with previous laboratory measurements, with published kO(ν2) values in the (1.2-1.5) × 10-12 cm3s-1 range and at the low end of the (2-6) × 10-12 cm3s-1 range estimated from the analysis of upper atmospheric data.

  3. Direct Copolymerization of CO2 and Diols

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Masazumi; Ito, Kazuki; Honda, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Direct polymerization of CO2 and diols is promising as a simple and environmental-benign method in place of conventional processes using high-cost and/or hazardous reagents such as phosgene, carbon monoxide and epoxides, however, there are no reports on the direct method due to the inertness of CO2 and severe equilibrium limitation of the reaction. Herein, we firstly substantiate the direct copolymerization of CO2 and diols using CeO2 catalyst and 2-cyanopyridine promotor, providing the alternating cooligomers in high diol-based yield (up to 99%) and selectivity (up to >99%). This catalyst system is applicable to various diols including linear C4-C10 α,ω-diols to provide high yields of the corresponding cooligomers, which cannot be obtained by well-known methods such as copolymerization of CO2 and cyclic ethers and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates. This process provides us a facile synthesis method for versatile polycarbonates from various diols and CO2 owing to simplicity of diols modification. PMID:27075987

  4. Direct CO2-Methanation of flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Klaus; Fleige, Michael; Rachow, Fabian; Israel, Johannes; Schmeißer, Dieter

    2013-04-01

    Already discovered by Paul Sabatier in 1902 the Hydrogenation according to CO2 + 4H2 ->CH4 + 2H2O nowadays is discussed in the course of the "Power-to-Gas" approach to utilize excess energy from renewable electricity generation in times of oversupply of electricity. We investigate the behavior of this process in a simulated flue gas atmosphere of conventional base load power plants, which could be used as constant sources of the reactant CO2. In relation to an approach related to carbon capture and cycling, the conversion of CO2 directly from the flue gas of a conventional power plant is a new aspect and has several advantages: The conversion of CO2 into methane could be integrated directly into the combustion process. Even older power plants could be upgraded and used as a possible source for CO2, in the same sense as the amine cleaning of flue gas, as a post combustion process. Further, waste heat of the power plant could be used as process energy for the catalytic reaction. Therefore the influence of different flue gas compositions such as varying contents of nitrogen and residual oxygen are tested in a laboratory scale. The heterogeneous catalysis process is investigated with regard to conversion rates, yield and selectivity and long-term stability of the Ni-catalyst. Also the influence of typical contaminations like SO2 is investigated and will be presented.

  5. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Steven J.; Peters, Glen P.; Caldeira, Ken

    2011-01-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are conventionally attributed to the country where the emissions are produced (i.e., where the fuels are burned). However, these production-based accounts represent a single point in the value chain of fossil fuels, which may have been extracted elsewhere and may be used to provide goods or services to consumers elsewhere. We present a consistent set of carbon inventories that spans the full supply chain of global CO2 emissions, finding that 10.2 billion tons CO2 or 37% of global emissions are from fossil fuels traded internationally and an additional 6.4 billion tons CO2 or 23% of global emissions are embodied in traded goods. Our results reveal vulnerabilities and benefits related to current patterns of energy use that are relevant to climate and energy policy. In particular, if a consistent and unavoidable price were imposed on CO2 emissions somewhere along the supply chain, then all of the parties along the supply chain would seek to impose that price to generate revenue from taxes collected or permits sold. The geographical concentration of carbon-based fuels and relatively small number of parties involved in extracting and refining those fuels suggest that regulation at the wellhead, mine mouth, or refinery might minimize transaction costs as well as opportunities for leakage. PMID:22006314

  6. Direct Copolymerization of CO2 and Diols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Masazumi; Ito, Kazuki; Honda, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    Direct polymerization of CO2 and diols is promising as a simple and environmental-benign method in place of conventional processes using high-cost and/or hazardous reagents such as phosgene, carbon monoxide and epoxides, however, there are no reports on the direct method due to the inertness of CO2 and severe equilibrium limitation of the reaction. Herein, we firstly substantiate the direct copolymerization of CO2 and diols using CeO2 catalyst and 2-cyanopyridine promotor, providing the alternating cooligomers in high diol-based yield (up to 99%) and selectivity (up to >99%). This catalyst system is applicable to various diols including linear C4-C10 α,ω-diols to provide high yields of the corresponding cooligomers, which cannot be obtained by well-known methods such as copolymerization of CO2 and cyclic ethers and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates. This process provides us a facile synthesis method for versatile polycarbonates from various diols and CO2 owing to simplicity of diols modification.

  7. CO2 DIAL measurements of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Margolis, Jack S.; Brothers, Alan M.; Tratt, David M.

    1987-01-01

    CO2 lidars have heretofore been used to measure water vapor concentrations primarily using the 10R(20) line at 10.247 microns, which has a strong overlap with a water vapor absorption line. This paper discusses the use of that line as well as other CO2 laser lines for which the absorption coefficients are weaker. The literature on measurement of water vapor absorption coefficients using CO2 lasers is reviewed, and the results from four laboratories are shown to be generally consistent with each other after they are normalized to the same partial pressure, temperature, and ethylene absorption coefficent for the 10P(14) CO2 laser line; however, the agreement with the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory's HITRAN and FASCOD 2 spectral data tapes is not good either for the water vapor absorption lines or for the water vapor continuum. Demonstration measurements of atmospheric water vapor have been conducted using the Mobile Atmospheric Pollutant Mapping System, a dual CO2 lidar system using heterodyne detection. Results are discussed for measurements using three sets of laser line pairs covering a wide range of water vapor partial pressures.

  8. Direct Copolymerization of CO2 and Diols.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masazumi; Ito, Kazuki; Honda, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Direct polymerization of CO2 and diols is promising as a simple and environmental-benign method in place of conventional processes using high-cost and/or hazardous reagents such as phosgene, carbon monoxide and epoxides, however, there are no reports on the direct method due to the inertness of CO2 and severe equilibrium limitation of the reaction. Herein, we firstly substantiate the direct copolymerization of CO2 and diols using CeO2 catalyst and 2-cyanopyridine promotor, providing the alternating cooligomers in high diol-based yield (up to 99%) and selectivity (up to >99%). This catalyst system is applicable to various diols including linear C4-C10 α,ω-diols to provide high yields of the corresponding cooligomers, which cannot be obtained by well-known methods such as copolymerization of CO2 and cyclic ethers and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates. This process provides us a facile synthesis method for versatile polycarbonates from various diols and CO2 owing to simplicity of diols modification. PMID:27075987

  9. CO2-Binding-Organic-Liquids-Enhanced CO2 Capture using Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Kutnyakov, Igor; Koech, Phillip K.; Zwoster, Andy; Howard, Chris; Zheng, Feng; Freeman, Charles J.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2013-01-01

    A new solvent-based CO2 capture process couples the unique attributes of non-aqueous, CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) with the newly discovered polarity-swing-assisted regeneration (PSAR) process that is unique to switchable ionic liquids. Laboratory measurements with PSAR indicate the ability to achieve a regeneration effect at 75°C comparable to that at 120°C using thermal regeneration only. Initial measurements also indicate that the kinetic behavior of CO2 release is also improved with PSAR. Abstract cleared PNWD-SA-9743

  10. Light-duty vehicle CO2 targets consistent with 450 ppm CO2 stabilization.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sandra L; Wallington, Timothy J; Maas, Heiko; Hass, Heinz

    2014-06-01

    We present a global analysis of CO2 emission reductions from the light-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet consistent with stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentration at 450 ppm. The CO2 emission reductions are described by g CO2/km emission targets for average new light-duty vehicles on a tank-to-wheel basis between 2010 and 2050 that we call CO2 glide paths. The analysis accounts for growth of the vehicle fleet, changing patterns in driving distance, regional availability of biofuels, and the changing composition of fossil fuels. New light-duty vehicle fuel economy and CO2 regulations in the U.S. through 2025 and in the EU through 2020 are broadly consistent with the CO2 glide paths. The glide path is at the upper end of the discussed 2025 EU range of 68-78 g CO2/km. The proposed China regulation for 2020 is more stringent than the glide path, while the 2017 Brazil regulation is less stringent. Existing regulations through 2025 are broadly consistent with the light-duty vehicle sector contributing to stabilizing CO2 at approximately 450 ppm. The glide paths provide long-term guidance for LDV powertrain/fuel development. PMID:24798684

  11. Surface CO2 leakage during the first shallow subsurface CO2release experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2007-09-15

    A new field facility was used to study CO2 migrationprocesses and test techniques to detect and quantify potential CO2leakage from geologic storage sites. For 10 days starting 9 July 2007,and for seven days starting 5 August 2007, 0.1 and 0.3 t CO2 d-1,respectively, were released from a ~;100-m long, sub-water table (~;2.5-mdepth) horizontal well. The spatio-temporal evolution of leakage wasmapped through repeated grid measurements of soil CO2 flux (FCO2). Thesurface leakage onset, approach to steady state, and post-release declinematched model predictions closely. Modeling suggested that minimal CO2was taken up by groundwater through dissolution, and CO2 spread out ontop of the water table. FCO2 spatial patterns were related to well designand soil physical properties. Estimates of total CO2 discharge along withsoil respiration and leakage discharge highlight the influence ofbackground CO2 flux variations on detection of CO2 leakagesignals.

  12. Implications of CO2 Geological Storage on Aquifers Autotrophic Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupraz, Sébastien; Fabbri, Antonin; Joulian, Catherine; Menez, Bénédicte; Gerard, Emanuelle; Henry, Benoit; Crouzet, Catherine; Guyot, François; Garrido, Francis

    2010-05-01

    In a global strategy of carbon emission reduction, a study about CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) feasibility in the case of a French beet sugar factory and distillery in the Parisian basin was undertaken by regional and state authorities. Besides, economical, geological and engineering questions, microbial interactions were also studied since the potential contribution of the deep biosphere on the storage zones appears to be an essential factor in terms of injectivity and CO2 mobilization. Biological processes like biofilm formation, biomineralization and carbon assimilation may hinder the injections or, to the contrary, improve the stability of the sequestration by shifting CO2 into more stable forms like carbonates and organic matter. Regarding those possibilities, it is thus mandatory to establish how the subsurface biosphere will react by determining which metabolisms will be able to sustain the stress due to high concentrations of CO2 and the resulting acidification. In that case, the study of autotrophic communities reactivity is essential because they are the only entrance for CO2 assimilation in the SLiMEs (Subsurface Litho autotrophic Microbial Ecosystems) and thus are accountable for the general biomass and biofilm production in the deep subsurface. Nevertheless, a simple assessment of the toxical effect induced on these strains cannot be representative of the possible interactions at the scale of a long term storage where adaptations should play a major role. For that reason, we decided to choose different strains, namely autotrophic methanogens (Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus and Archeoglobus fulgidus) and sulfate reducing bacteria strains (Desulfotomaculum geothermicum and Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii), that best characterize the autotrophic communities of our injection site (aquifer of the Triassic Keuper sandstones) and to make them undergo a test of selection/adaptation toward a sequential increase of CO2 partial pressure from 0.05 to 5

  13. Electrical Resistance Tomography Field Trials to Image CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newmark, R.

    2003-12-01

    If geologic formations are used to sequester or store carbon dioxide (CO2) for long periods of time, it will be necessary to verify the containment of injected CO2 by assessing leaks and flow paths, and by understanding the geophysical and geochemical interactions between the CO2 and the geologic minerals and fluids. Remote monitoring methods are preferred, to minimize cost and impact to the integrity of the disposal reservoir. Electrical methods are especially well suited for monitoring processes involving fluids, as electrical properties are most sensitive to the presence and nature of the fluids contained in the medium. High resolution tomographs of electrical properties have been used with success for site characterization, monitoring subsurface migration of fluids in instances of leaking underground tanks, water infiltration events, subsurface steam floods, contaminant movement, and assessing the integrity of subsurface barriers. These surveys are commonly conducted utilizing vertical arrays of point electrodes in a crosswell configuration. Alternative ways of monitoring the reservoir are desirable due to the high costs of drilling the required monitoring boreholes Recent field results obtained using steel well casings as long electrodes are also promising. We have conducted field trials to evaluate the effectiveness of long electrode ERT as a potential monitoring approach for CO2 sequestration. In these trials, CO2 is not being sequestered but rather is being used as a solvent for enhanced oil recovery. This setting offers the same conditions expected during sequestration so monitoring secondary oil recovery allows a test of the method under realistic physical conditions and operational constraints. Field experience has confirmed the challenges identified during model studies. The principal difficulty are the very small signals due to the fact that formation changes occur only over a small segment of the 5000 foot length of the electrodes. In addition

  14. Tectonic impact on the dynamics of CO2-rich fluid migration in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadine, E. Z.; Jean Luc, F.; Remy, D.; Battani, A.; Olivier, V.

    2009-12-01

    With the objective to rank the first order parameters acting in the long term CO2 storage, IFP is developing an integrated study based on the analytical results around the natural silici-clastic analogue of the Colorado Plateau in Utah. What are the dominant parameters which governed the fluid/gas migration in front of the Sevier fold-and-thrust Belt, particularly the CO2-enriched ones? Several sites have been investigated in Utah and Idaho provinces; in the Colorado Plateau, East and in front of the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt, as well as in the Basin & Range geological province North and South West of Salt Lake city (Sevier basin). As a first site selection, three distinct structural provinces have been analysed depending on their seal/reservoir characteristics for confinement: the Green Riv