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Sample records for characterizing pulmonary blood

  1. Characterization of peripheral blood and pulmonary leukocyte function in healthy foals.

    PubMed

    Flaminio, M J; Rush, B R; Davis, E G; Hennessy, K; Shuman, W; Wilkerson, M J

    2000-03-15

    Studies in infants and foals indicate an age-dependent maturation of peripheral lymphocyte subsets. The age-dependent relationship for maturation of cellular immune responses, such as phagocytosis and lymphocyte responses of the peripheral and pulmonary-derived leukocytes, has not been characterized in foals. Lymphocyte subpopulations, mitogen stimulation response of lymphocytes, lymphokine-activated killing cell activity, phagocytosis and oxidative burst activity, and serum immunoglobulin (Ig) classes G and M concentrations were determined in developing foals. This study illustrates age-dependent changes in immunoglobulin class concentrations, lymphocyte subsets, and EqMHC Class II expression in cells of the peripheral blood and lungs of developing neonatal-to-weanling foals. The increase in peripheral blood and BAL B-lymphocytes and serum immunoglobulins in developing foals suggests expansion of immune cell populations during a time in which environmental pathogen exposure is great. General immune function, mitogenic responses, LAK cell activity, opsonized phagocytosis, and oxidative burst activity of newborns was similar to the adult horse. Total immune-cell numbers, rather than function, seemed to be the limiting factor in the development of the equine neonatal immune system. There was an age-related percent increase in the appearance of pulmonary lymphocytes, but a percent decrease in macrophages. Although development of the respiratory immune system follows changes in the peripheral blood, cellular expansion, activation, and migration may occur at a slower pace, making the respiratory environment susceptible to pathogens prior to optimal immune system maturity. PMID:10713340

  2. [Pulmonary blood vessels in goats].

    PubMed

    Roos, H; Hegner, K; Vollmerhaus, B

    1999-05-01

    The blood vessels in the lung of the goat, which until now have received little attention, are described in detail for the first time. With regard to the segments of the lung, blood vessels are bronchovascular units in the lobi craniales, lobus medius and lobus accessorius, but bronchoartery units in the lobi caudales. We investigated the types of branches of the Aa. pulmonales dextra et sinistra, the inter- and intraspecific principles of the outlet of the pulmonary veins and the importance of bronchopulmonary segmentation of the lungs. PMID:10386009

  3. Vascular structure determines pulmonary blood flow distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlastala, M. P.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    Scientific knowledge develops through the evolution of new concepts. This process is usually driven by new methodologies that provide observations not previously available. Understanding of pulmonary blood flow determinants advanced significantly in the 1960s and is now changing rapidly again, because of increased spatial resolution of regional pulmonary blood flow measurements.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Two Novel Bacteria Afipia cberi and Mesorhizobium hominis from Blood of a Patient Afflicted with Fatal Pulmonary Illness

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Shyh-Ching; Li, Bingjie; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lei, Haiyan; Li, Tianwei; Zhang, Jing; Nagamine, Kenjiro; Tsai, Shien; Zucker, Mark J.; Olesnicky, Ludmilla

    2013-01-01

    We recently isolated and discovered new Bradyrhizobiaceae microbes from the cryopreserved culture broth of blood samples from 3 patients with poorly defined illnesses using modified SP4 media and culture conditions coupled with genomic sequencing. Using a similar protocol, we studied a previously cryopreserved culture broth of blood sample from a patient who had succumbed to an acute onset of fulminant pulmonary illness. We report that two phases of microbial growth were observed in the re-initiated culture. Biochemical and genomic characterization revealed microbes isolated from the first phase of growth were new Afipia species of Bradyrhizobiaceae, tentatively named A. cberi with a ~ 5 MB chromosome that was different from those of all previously known Afipia microbes including the newly discovered A. septicemium. The microbes isolated from the second phase of growth were prominent sugar assimilators, novel Phyllobacteriaceae, phylogenetically most closely related to Mesorhizobium and tentatively named M. hominis with a ~ 5.5 MB chromosome. All A. cberi isolates carry a circular ~ 140 KB plasmid. Some M. hominis isolates possess a circular ~ 412 KB plasmid that can be lost in prolonged culture or passage. No antibiotics resistant genes could be identified in both of the A. cberi and M. hominis plasmids. Antibiotic susceptibility studies using broth culture systems revealed isolates of A. cberi could be sensitive to some antibiotics, but all isolates of M. hominis were resistant to essentially all tested antibiotics. However, the cell-free antibiotics susceptibility test results may not be applicable to clinical treatment against the microbes that are known to be capable of intracellular growth. It remains to be determined if the 2 previously unknown Rhizobiales were indeed pathogenic and played a role in the pulmonary disease process in this patient. Specific probes and methods will be developed to re-examine the diseased lungs from patient's autopsy. PMID

  5. Reconciling paradigms of abnormal pulmonary blood flow and quasi-malignant cellular alterations in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Happé, C M; Szulcek, R; Voelkel, N F; Bogaard, H J

    2016-08-01

    In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) structural and functional abnormalities of the small lung vessels interact and lead to a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and right heart failure. A current pathobiological concept characterizes PAH as a 'quasi-malignant' disease focusing on cancer-like alterations in endothelial cells (EC) and the importance of their acquired apoptosis-resistant, hyper-proliferative phenotype in the process of vascular remodeling. While changes in pulmonary blood flow (PBF) have been long-since recognized and linked to the development of PAH, little is known about a possible relationship between an altered PBF and the quasi-malignant cell phenotype in the pulmonary vascular wall. This review summarizes recognized and hypothetical effects of an abnormal PBF on the pulmonary vascular bed and links these to quasi-malignant changes found in the pulmonary endothelium. Here we describe that abnormal PBF does not only trigger a pulmonary vascular cell growth program, but may also maintain the cancer-like phenotype of the endothelium. Consequently, normalization of PBF and EC response to abnormal PBF may represent a treatment strategy in patients with established PAH. PMID:26804008

  6. Transcriptional Blood Signatures Distinguish Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Pulmonary Sarcoidosis, Pneumonias and Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Chloe I.; Graham, Christine M.; Berry, Matthew P. R.; Rozakeas, Fotini; Redford, Paul S.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Zhaohui; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Kendrick, Yvonne; Devouassoux, Gilles; Ferry, Tristan; Miyara, Makoto; Bouvry, Diane; Dominique, Valeyre; Gorochov, Guy; Blankenship, Derek; Saadatian, Mitra; Vanhems, Phillip; Beynon, Huw; Vancheeswaran, Rama; Wickremasinghe, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia; Ho, Ling-pei; Lipman, Marc; O’Garra, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Rationale New approaches to define factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of pulmonary diseases including sarcoidosis and tuberculosis are needed to develop new treatments and biomarkers. Comparing the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis to other similar pulmonary diseases will advance knowledge of disease pathways and help distinguish diseases with similar clinical presentations. Objectives To determine the factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of the granulomatous diseases, sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, by comparing the blood transcriptional responses in these and other pulmonary diseases. Methods We compared whole blood genome-wide transcriptional profiles in pulmonary sarcoidosis, pulmonary tuberculosis, to community acquired pneumonia and primary lung cancer and healthy controls, before and after treatment, and in purified leucocyte populations. Measurements and Main Results An Interferon-inducible neutrophil-driven blood transcriptional signature was present in both sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, with a higher abundance and expression in tuberculosis. Heterogeneity of the sarcoidosis signature correlated significantly with disease activity. Transcriptional profiles in pneumonia and lung cancer revealed an over-abundance of inflammatory transcripts. After successful treatment the transcriptional activity in tuberculosis and pneumonia patients was significantly reduced. However the glucocorticoid-responsive sarcoidosis patients showed a significant increase in transcriptional activity. 144-blood transcripts were able to distinguish tuberculosis from other lung diseases and controls. Conclusions Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis revealed similar blood transcriptional profiles, dominated by interferon-inducible transcripts, while pneumonia and lung cancer showed distinct signatures, dominated by inflammatory genes. There were also significant differences between tuberculosis and sarcoidosis in the degree of their transcriptional activity, the

  7. Increased Red Blood Cell Stiffness Increases Pulmonary Vascular Resistance and Pulmonary Arterial Pressure.

    PubMed

    Schreier, David A; Forouzan, Omid; Hacker, Timothy A; Sheehan, John; Chesler, Naomi

    2016-02-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCD) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) have a significantly increased risk of sudden death compared to patients with SCD alone. Sickled red blood cells (RBCs) are stiffer, more dense, more frequently undergo hemolysis, and have a sixfold shorter lifespan compared to normal RBCs. Here, we sought to investigate the impact of increased RBC stiffness, independent of other SCD-related biological and mechanical RBC abnormalities, on the hemodynamic changes that ultimately cause PH and increase mortality in SCD. To do so, pulmonary vascular impedance (PVZ) measures were recorded in control C57BL6 mice before and after ∼50 μl of blood (Hct = 45%) was extracted and replaced with an equal volume of blood containing either untreated RBCs or RBCs chemically stiffened with glutaraldehyde (Hct = 45%). Chemically stiffened RBCs increased mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) (13.5 ± 0.6 mmHg at baseline to 23.2 ± 0.7 mmHg after the third injection), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (1.23 ± 0.11 mmHg*min/ml at baseline to 2.24 ± 0.14 mmHg*min/ml after the third injection), and wave reflections (0.31 ± 0.02 at baseline to 0.43 ± 0.03 after the third injection). Chemically stiffened RBCs also decreased cardiac output, but did not change hematocrit, blood viscosity, pulmonary arterial compliance, or heart rate. The main finding of this study is that increased RBC stiffness alone affects pulmonary pulsatile hemodynamics, which suggests that RBC stiffness plays an important role in the development of PH in patients with SCD. PMID:26638883

  8. Airway mechanics and lung tissue viscoelasticity: effects of altered blood hematocrit in the pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Peták, Ferenc; Fodor, Gergely H; Babik, Barna; Habre, Walid

    2016-07-01

    The contribution of the hematocrit (Hct) of the blood in the pulmonary vasculature to the overall lung mechanics has not been characterized. We therefore set out to establish how changes of the Hct level in the pulmonary circulation affect the airway and lung tissue viscoelastic properties. The Hct level of the blood in an isolated perfused rat lung model was randomly altered. Intermediate (26.5%), followed by low (6.6%) or normal (43.7%), Hct was set in two consecutive sequences. The pulmonary capillary pressure was maintained constant throughout the experiment, and the pulmonary hemodynamic parameters were monitored continuously. The airway resistance (Raw), the viscous (G) and elastic (H) parameters, and the hysteresivity (η = G/H) of the lung tissues were obtained from measurements of forced oscillatory input impedance data. Raw was not affected by the alterations of the Hct levels. As concerns the lung tissues, the decrease of Hct to intermediate or low levels resulted in close to proportional decreases in the viscoelastic parameters G [16.5 ± 7.7% (SD), 12.1 ± 9.5%, P < 0.005] and H (13.2 ± 8.6%, 10.8 ± 4.7%, P < 0.001). No significant changes in η were detected in a wide range of Hct, which indicates that coupled processes cause alterations in the resistive and elastic properties of the lungs following Hct changes in the pulmonary circulation. The diminishment of the viscous and elastic parameters of the pulmonary parenchyma following a reduction of blood Hct demonstrates the significant contribution of the red blood cells to the overall lung viscoelasticity. PMID:27283919

  9. Does pulmonary rehabilitation reduce peripheral blood pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Canavan, Jane L; Kaliaraju, Djeya; Nolan, Claire M; Clark, Amy L; Jones, Sarah E; Kon, Samantha S C; Polkey, Michael I; Man, William D-C

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) can improve aerobic exercise capacity, health-related quality of life and dyspnoea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recent studies have suggested that exercise training may improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness, albeit in small highly selected cohorts. The aim of the study was to establish whether supervised outpatient or unsupervised home PR can reduce peripheral blood pressure. Resting blood pressure was measured in 418 patients with COPD before and after outpatient PR, supervised by a hospital-based team (HOSP). Seventy-four patients with COPD undergoing an unsupervised home-based programme acted as a comparator group (HOME). Despite significant improvements in mean (95% confidence interval) exercise capacity in the HOSP group (56 (50-60) m, p < 0.001) and HOME group (30 (17-42) m, p < 0.001) systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) did not change in either the HOSP (SBP: p = 0.47; DBP: p = 0.06; MAP: p = 0.38) or HOME group (SBP: p = 0.67; DBP: p = 0.38; MAP: p = 0.76). Planned subgroup analysis of HOSP patients with known hypertension and/or cardiovascular disease showed no impact of PR upon blood pressure. PR is unlikely to reduce blood pressure, and by implication, makes a mechanism of action in which arterial stiffness is reduced, less likely. PMID:26015460

  10. Alterations in lung arginine metabolism in lambs with pulmonary hypertension associated with increased pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Kumar, Sanjiv; Sud, Neetu; Wiseman, Dean A.; Tian, Jing; Rehmani, Imran; Datar, Sanjeev; Oishi, Peter; Fratz, Sohrab; Venema, Richard C.; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate impaired nitric oxide (NO) signaling in children and animal models with congenital heart defects and increased pulmonary blood flow. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these alterations remain incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to determine if early changes in arginine metabolic pathways could play a role in the reduced NO signaling demonstrated in our lamb model of congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow (Shunt lambs). The activities of the arginine recycling enzymes, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) and argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) were both decreased in lung tissues of Shunt lambs while arginase activity was increased. Associated with these alterations, lung L-arginine levels were decreased. These changes correlated with an increase in NO synthase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This study provides further insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to decreased NO signaling in Shunt lambs and suggests that altered arginine metabolism may play a role in the development of the endothelial dysfunction associated with pulmonary hypertension secondary to increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:19818875

  11. Pulmonary emboli from blood-biomaterial interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.E.; Ramberg, K.; McEnroe, C.S.; Connolly, R.J.; Callow, A.D.

    1988-07-01

    The problem of surface thrombosis and subsequent embolization remains entrenched as a yet incompletely surmounted barrier to the development of truly satisfactory intravascular prosthetic devices. A baboon ex vivo shunt was used to determine the interaction of Indium-111 platelets and potential biomaterials. The uptake of Indium-111 platelets was monitored continuously by gamma camera scanning. Several of the materials tested demonstrated a saw-toothed pattern of platelet activity, with accumulation followed by rapid decline. Neither PTFE nor Dacron exhibited this pattern. Post shunt scans of the animals' chests showed discrete foci of platelet activity in the lungs, corresponding to each embolic event noted on the material's scan. In conclusion, the search for a smooth surface as a blood material interface may produce a material which accumulates and then sloughs significant platelet aggregates. It is crucial that these materials be subjected to vigorous testing to determine their safety prior to initiation of clinical trials.

  12. Immunological characterization of pulmonary intravascular macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitko-McKown, C. G.; Reddy, D. N.; Chapes, S. K.; McKown, R. D.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) are lung macrophages found apposed to the endothelium of pulmonary capillaries. In many species, they are responsible for the clearance of blood-borne particulates and pathogens; however, little else is known about their roles as immunologic effector cells. We compared PIMs with pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) to determine the relative immunological activities of these two cell populations. Our results suggested that both populations possess similar phagocytic and bactericidal activities. In assays measuring cytotoxicity, PIMs were more cytotoxic than PAMs against virally infected target cells; however, differences between these macrophage populations were not as marked when noninfected targets were used. LPS-stimulated PIMs produced more T-cell proliferative cytokines than PAMs, and both populations of nonstimulated macrophages produced similar amounts of the cytokines. In contrast, PAMs produced more TNF alpha and NO2- than PIMs when both populations were stimulated with LPS; however, nonstimulated PAMs and PIMs produced similar amounts of TNF alpha and NO2. These data suggest that bovine PIMs are immunologically active. Differences between the degrees of activity of PIMs and PAMs indicate that these macrophage populations may have different roles in lung surveillance.

  13. [PULMONARY COMPLICATIONS IN CHILDREN, OPERATED ON FOR INBORN HEART FAILURES IN THE ARTIFICIAL BLOOD CIRCULATION ENVIRONMENT].

    PubMed

    Moshkivska, L V; Nastenko, E A; Golovenko, O S; Lazoryshynets, V V

    2015-11-01

    The risk factors of pulmonary complications occurrence were analyzed in children, operated on for inborn heart failures in atrificial blood circulation environment. Pulmonary complications rate and the risk factors of their occurrence were analyzed. PMID:26939427

  14. Biodegradable radiopaque microspheres for the evaluation of regional pulmonary blood flow distribution using electron-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, Michael J.; Tajik, Jehangir K.; Robinson, Miguel T.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1994-05-01

    Accurate measurement of regional pulmonary blood flow distribution is of interest both as a research and diagnostic tool. Measurements of regional pulmonary perfusion via x-ray CT offer the possibility of detecting perfusion deficits due to pulmonary embolus while maintaining a high degree of anatomic detail. Use of bolus injection of conventional radiopaque contrast with associated short mean transit times (5 - 7 seconds), requires a high degree of temporal resolution offered clinically only by electron beam x-ray CT (Imatron). The present study was intended to characterize biodegradable radiopaque microspheres as an alternative contrast agent which would allow for measurement of regional pulmonary blood flow with scanning times associated with conventional or spiral thin slice, volumetric x-ray CT protocols. To test this, a dog was scanned at 6 slice levels and 13 time points with image acquisition gated to the cardiac cycle. Lung volumes were maintained at functional residual capacity.

  15. Rarefaction and blood pressure in systemic and pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Olufsen, Mette S; Hill, N A; Vaughan, Gareth D A; Sainsbury, Christopher; Johnson, Martin

    2012-08-01

    The effects of vascular rarefaction (the loss of small arteries) on the circulation of blood are studied using a multiscale mathematical model that can predict blood flow and pressure in the systemic and pulmonary arteries. We augmented a model originally developed for the systemic arteries (Olufsen et al. 1998, 1999, 2000, 2004) to (a) predict flow and pressure in the pulmonary arteries, and (b) predict pressure propagation along the small arteries in the vascular beds. The systemic and pulmonary arteries are modelled as separate, bifurcating trees of compliant and tapering vessels. Each tree is divided into two parts representing the `large' and `small' arteries. Blood flow and pressure in the large arteries are predicted using a nonlinear cross-sectional area-averaged model for a Newtonian fluid in an elastic tube with inflow obtained from magnetic resonance measurements. Each terminal vessel within the network of the large arteries is coupled to a vascular bed of small `resistance' arteries, which are modelled as asymmetric structured trees with specified area and asymmetry ratios between the parent and daughter arteries. For the systemic circulation, each structured tree represents a specific vascular bed corresponding to major organs and limbs. For the pulmonary circulation, there are four vascular beds supplied by the interlobar arteries. This manuscript presents the first theoretical calculations of the propagation of the pressure and flow waves along systemic and pulmonary large and small arteries. Results for all networks were in agreement with published observations. Two studies were done with this model. First, we showed how rarefaction can be modelled by pruning the tree of arteries in the microvascular system. This was done by modulating parameters used for designing the structured trees. Results showed that rarefaction leads to increased mean and decreased pulse pressure in the large arteries. Second, we investigated the impact of decreasing vessel

  16. The effect of fetal breathing movements on pulmonary blood flow in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Kitterman, J A

    1994-04-01

    In the fetus, normal lung growth requires both fetal breathing movements (FBM) and adequate pulmonary blood flow. We postulated that FBM intermittently increase pulmonary blood flow and may stimulate lung growth through that effect. To test the hypothesis that normal intermittent FBM cause associated intermittent increases in pulmonary blood flow, we studied eight chronically instrumented fetal sheep (gestational ages 125-143 d) on 34 occasions (total study time = 65.7 h). Each fetus had a cuff electromagnetic flow transducer around the left pulmonary artery, electrocortical electrodes, and catheters in the trachea, main pulmonary artery, carotid artery, and amniotic cavity. Mean blood flow though the left pulmonary artery averaged 59 +/- 8 mL/min (mean +/- SEM; per kg: 25 +/- 4 mL/kg/min) and was similar in both the presence (61 +/- 9 mL/min) and absence (57 +/- 7 mL/min) of FBM and during both high and low voltage electrocortical activity. In contrast, in utero phasic pulmonary blood flow varied with FBM, increasing during the inspiratory phase and decreasing during the expiratory phase. Both pulmonary and systemic vascular pressures showed changes in the opposite directions. Arterial pH and blood gas tensions were normal and did not change with FBM or electrocortical activity. We conclude that FBM do not increase mean blood flow through the left pulmonary artery; thus, it is unlikely that FBM stimulate lung growth through changes in pulmonary blood flow. PMID:8047386

  17. Factors affecting regional pulmonary blood flow in chronic ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pistolesi, M.; Miniati, M.; Bonsignore, M.; Andreotti, F.; Di Ricco, G.; Marini, C.; Rindi, M.; Biagini, A.; Milne, E.N.; Giuntini, C.

    1988-07-01

    To assess the effect of left heart disease on pulmonary blood flow distribution, we measured mean pulmonary arterial and wedge pressures, cardiac output, pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary blood volume, and arterial oxygen tension before and after treatment in 13 patients with longstanding ischemic heart failure and pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was evaluated by a radiographic score, and regional lung perfusion was quantified on a lung scan by the upper to lower third ratio (U:L ratio) of pulmonary blood flow per unit of lung volume. In all cases, redistribution of lung perfusion toward the apical regions was observed; this pattern was not affected by treatment. After treatment, pulmonary vascular pressures, resistance, and edema were reduced, while pulmonary blood volume did not change. At this time, pulmonary vascular resistance showed a positive correlation with the U:L ratio (r = 0.78; P less than 0.01), whereas no correlation was observed between U:L ratio and wedge pressure, pulmonary edema, or arterial oxygen tension. Hence, redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, in these patients, reflects chronic structural vascular changes prevailing in the dependent lung regions.

  18. Studies on blood rheology in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Persson, S U; Gustavsson, C G; Larsson, H; Persson, S

    1991-10-01

    The rheologic properties of blood were studied in 6 patients with primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) and compared with those of a control group of 10 healthy subjects. Blood viscosity was studied with a rotational viscometer and blood cell deformability with a filtrometer giving values for clogging particles (CP) and red cell transit time (RCTT). Blood viscosity at varying shear rates was found to be increased both at natural (p less than 0.025-0.005) and standardized hematocrit, 45% (p less than 0.05 at 40 s-1) in patients with PPH. Red cell deformability was reduced as indicated by a significant increase of RCTT (p less than 0.01). Increased values for hematocrit (p less than 0.001), hemoglobin concentration (p less than 0.001), and erythrocyte count (p less than 0.005) were found and decreased values for mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) (p less than 0.025) and HDL cholesterol (p less than 0.005). Plasma viscosity, white cell deformability, white cell count, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), and plasma fibrinogen concentration did not significantly differ from the values found in the control group. It is concluded that patients with PPH have impaired blood rheology. The hemorheologic abnormalities in these patients may be of hemodynamic significance. PMID:1952272

  19. CARDIOVASCULAR AND BLOOD COAGULATION EFFECTS OF PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular damage induced by pulmonary exposure to environmental chemicals can result from direct action or, secondarily, from pulmonary injury. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary exposure to zinc to demonstrate cardiac, coagulative, and fibrinolytic alterations. Mal...

  20. Redistribution of pulmonary blood flow during hypoxic exercise.

    PubMed

    Kuwahira, I; Moue, Y; Urano, T; Kamiya, U; Iwamoto, T; Ishii, M; Clancy, R L; Gonzalez, N C

    2001-08-01

    Pulmonary blood flow (PBF) distribution was studied at rest and during exercise in rats acclimatized to chronic hypoxia (barometric pressure [PB] 370 Torr for 3 weeks, A rats) and non-acclimatized (NA) littermates. Both A and NA rats exercised in hypoxia (inspired O2 pressure [PIO2] approximately 70 Torr) or in normoxia (PlO2 approximately 145 Torr). PBF distribution was determined using fluorescent-labeled microspheres injected into the right atrium. The lungs were cut into 28 samples to determine relative scatter of specific PBF ([sample fluorescence intensity/sample dry weight)/(total lung fluorescence intensity/total lung dry weight]). Exercise produced redistribution of PBF both in NA and A rats, and this effect was larger in hypoxia than in normoxia, with minimal redistribution occurring during normoxic exercise in NA rats. The pattern of distribution varies considerably among individual animals. As a result of distribution, the previous high flow areas would be overperfused during hypoxic exercise in some rats. The results support the concept that hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is not uniform and suggest that the combination of hypoxia and exercise may lead to overperfusion and capillary leak in some individuals. PMID:11531029

  1. Pulmonary blood flow redistribution by increased gravitational force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlastala, M. P.; Chornuk, M. A.; Self, D. A.; Kallas, H. J.; Burns, J. W.; Bernard, S.; Polissar, N. L.; Glenny, R. W.

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the influence of gravity on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow (PBF) using increased inertial force as a perturbation. PBF was studied in unanesthetized swine exposed to -Gx (dorsal-to-ventral direction, prone position), where G is the magnitude of the force of gravity at the surface of the Earth, on the Armstrong Laboratory Centrifuge at Brooks Air Force Base. PBF was measured using 15-micron fluorescent microspheres, a method with markedly enhanced spatial resolution. Each animal was exposed randomly to -1, -2, and -3 Gx. Pulmonary vascular pressures, cardiac output, heart rate, arterial blood gases, and PBF distribution were measured at each G level. Heterogeneity of PBF distribution as measured by the coefficient of variation of PBF distribution increased from 0.38 +/- 0.05 to 0.55 +/- 0.11 to 0.72 +/- 0.16 at -1, -2, and -3 Gx, respectively. At -1 Gx, PBF was greatest in the ventral and cranial and lowest in the dorsal and caudal regions of the lung. With increased -Gx, this gradient was augmented in both directions. Extrapolation of these values to 0 G predicts a slight dorsal (nondependent) region dominance of PBF and a coefficient of variation of 0.22 in microgravity. Analysis of variance revealed that a fixed component (vascular structure) accounted for 81% and nonstructure components (including gravity) accounted for the remaining 19% of the PBF variance across the entire experiment (all 3 gravitational levels). The results are inconsistent with the predictions of the zone model.

  2. Contribution of calcium-activated chloride channel to elevated pulmonary artery pressure in pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by high pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Chuansi; Ma, Jianfa; Lao, Jinquan; Pang, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high pulmonary blood flow remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated the possible role and effects of CaCC in this disease. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to normal, sham, and shunt groups. Rats in the shunt group underwent abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava shunt surgery. The pulmonary artery pressure was measured by catheterization. Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index (RVHI), arterial wall area/vessel area (W/V), and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter (T/D) were analyzed by optical microscopy. Electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were investigated using patch clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH and pulmonary vascular structural remodeling (PVSR) developed, accompanied by increased pulmonary pressure and pathological interstitial pulmonary changes. Compared with normal and sham groups, pulmonary artery pressure, RVHI, W/V, and T/D of the shunt group rats increased significantly. Electrophysiological results showed primary CaCC characteristics. Compared with normal and sham groups, membrane capacitance and current density of PASMCs in the shunt group increased significantly, which were subsequently attenuated following chloride channel blocker niflumic acid (NFA) treatment. To conclude, CaCC contributed to PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow and may represent a potential target for treatment of PAH. PMID:25755701

  3. Contribution of calcium-activated chloride channel to elevated pulmonary artery pressure in pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by high pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Chuansi; Ma, Jianfa; Lao, Jinquan; Pang, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high pulmonary blood flow remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated the possible role and effects of CaCC in this disease. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to normal, sham, and shunt groups. Rats in the shunt group underwent abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava shunt surgery. The pulmonary artery pressure was measured by catheterization. Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index (RVHI), arterial wall area/vessel area (W/V), and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter (T/D) were analyzed by optical microscopy. Electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were investigated using patch clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH and pulmonary vascular structural remodeling (PVSR) developed, accompanied by increased pulmonary pressure and pathological interstitial pulmonary changes. Compared with normal and sham groups, pulmonary artery pressure, RVHI, W/V, and T/D of the shunt group rats increased significantly. Electrophysiological results showed primary CaCC characteristics. Compared with normal and sham groups, membrane capacitance and current density of PASMCs in the shunt group increased significantly, which were subsequently attenuated following chloride channel blocker niflumic acid (NFA) treatment. To conclude, CaCC contributed to PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow and may represent a potential target for treatment of PAH. PMID:25755701

  4. Expression of peptide fragments from proADM and involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in pulmonary remodeling induced by high pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Guo, Aili; Wang, Lijuan; Kong, Qingyu; Wang, Rong; Han, Li; Zhao, Cuifen

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by progressive pulmonary arterial remodeling and right ventricular failure. Despite recent advances in pathophysiological mechanism exploration and new therapeutic approaches, PAH remains a challenging condition. In this study, we investigated the roles of the peptide fragments from proadrenomedullin (proADM) such as adrenomedullin (ADM), adrenotensin (ADT), and proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) during pulmonary remodeling caused by high pulmonary blood flow, and probed the possible involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathways. Sixteen rat models of PAH were artificially established by surgically connecting the left common carotid artery to the external jugular vein. We subcutaneously injected an extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) inhibitor, PD98059, in eight rats, treated another eight rats with an equal volume of saline. Eight rats without connections served as the control group. We observed that mRNA expression levels of ADM, stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK), and ERK1/2 were significantly elevated in the shunted rats; furthermore, ERK1/2 levels were significantly inhibited by PD98059. Protein levels of ADM, PAMP, p-SAPK, and p-ERK1/2 were significantly higher ADT was lower, and p-p38 remained unchanged in the rat models compared with the controls. However, the protein expression of both ADM and p-ERK1/2 was significantly inhibited by PD98059. Our results suggest that levels of ADM, ADT, and PAMP respond to pulmonary remodeling, and that activation of the SAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways is involved in pulmonary hypertension and artery remodeling caused by high pulmonary blood flow. PMID:25990643

  5. Effect of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis on breathing movements and pulmonary blood flow in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Kitterman, J A

    1995-02-01

    During transition from fetal to extrauterine life, respiration increases in incidence and magnitude as pulmonary blood flow dramatically increases. To determine whether alterations in pulmonary blood flow in utero are directly related to alterations in fetal breathing movements (FBM), we studied six chronically instrumented fetal sheep late in gestation to assess the effects of continuous FBM caused by a 4-h infusion of meclofenamate, a prostaglandin synthase inhibitor, on mean pulmonary blood flow to the fetus. We found a striking increase in FBM from 46 +/- 15% (SD) of the time during control to > 85% of the time by 1 h (P < 0.001), with the fetuses exhibiting continuous FBM by the last 1 h of infusion. The mean pulmonary blood flow also increased significantly during the first 90 min of the infusion as the incidences of FBM were increasing (26 +/- 14 and 56 +/- 23 ml.min-1.kg-1 for control and infusion, respectively; P < 0.01). Despite the simultaneous initial increase in FBM and mean pulmonary blood flow, the increase in left pulmonary artery blood flow was not sustained and decreased back to baseline by 2 h, even though the incidence of FBM continued to increase at this time. During the infusion, the mean pulmonary blood flow was not different between the presence or absence of FBM. There were no changes in fetal heart rate or pulmonary or systemic blood pressures during the infusion nor in arterial pH or blood gas tensions. We conclude that this increase in mean pulmonary blood flow in utero was not solely related to the increase in breathing movements. PMID:7759422

  6. Problems in cerebral blood flow calculation using xenon-133 in patients with pulmonary diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.; Jakobsen, M.; Enevoldsen, E.; Egede, F. )

    1990-05-01

    We used the end-tidal concentration of xenon-133 (air curve) to estimate the profile of its arterial concentration in calculating cerebral blood flow. We examined the effects of pulmonary disease and artificial ventilation on the air curve and the calculated cerebral blood flow. We studied the relation between arterial and end-tidal xenon activities in 19 subjects, of whom 15 had pulmonary dysfunction. The t 1/2 of the declining phases of the arterial and air curves were used to express their shapes. The mean +/- SD reference t 1/2 from 15 normal volunteers was 26.8 +/- 8.4 seconds. The mean +/- SD t 1/2 s of the air and arterial curves from the 15 patients with pulmonary dysfunction were 10.4 +/- 2.9 and 33.8 +/- 10.9 seconds. The degree of pulmonary dysfunction (expressed as the pulmonary shunt percentage) correlated with distortion of the air curve. Substituting the arterial for the air curve, mean calculated cerebral blood flow (as the initial slope index) increased from 40 to 61 for the 12 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The degree of underestimation of cerebral blood flow using the air curve correlated with the pulmonary shunt percentage. Our work confirms the problems of estimating cerebral blood flow in subjects with pulmonary dysfunction.

  7. Pulmonary embolus

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood clot; Blood clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... x-ray CT angiogram of the chest Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan, also called a V/Q scan ...

  8. Clinical non-invasive measurement of effective pulmonary capillary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Winter, S M

    1995-01-01

    Since traditional pulmonary function testing is centered on measurements of air flow and lung volume, a method to assess the pulmonary circulation might improve our ability to evaluate diseases that impact upon pulmonary hemodynamics. We have developed a PC based application that rapidly calculates pulmonary blood flow. Subjects rebreath a mixture of 10% argon and 3.5% freon for 20 seconds. Gas concentrations at the mouth are monitored by a clinical mass spectrometer and signals are acquired and processed with off-the-shelf hardware. To test the accuracy and reproducibility of this technique, patients with pulmonary artery catheters were assessed by standard thermodilution methods and the rebreathing test. Measurements using this non-invasive technology closely corelate with invasive thermodilution methods (r = 0.980) and show equivalent reproducibility (average standard error = 2.5%). This application of signal processing technology can extend the role of pulmonary function testing to include routine evaluation of the pulmonary circulation. PMID:8583166

  9. Niflumic Acid Attenuated Pulmonary Artery Tone and Vascular Structural Remodeling of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Induced by High Pulmonary Blood Flow In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Ma, Jianfa; Pang, Yusheng; Lao, Jinquan; Pan, Xuanren; Tang, Qiaoyun; Zhang, Feng; Su, Danyan; Qin, Suyuan; Shrestha, Arnav Prasad

    2015-10-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) play a vital role in regulating pulmonary artery tone during pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high blood flow. The role of CaCCs inhibitor niflumic acid (NFA) in vivo during this process requires further investigation. We established the PAH model by abdominal shunt surgery and treated with NFA in vivo. Fifty rats were randomly divided into normal, sham, shunt, NFA group 1 (0.2 mg/kg), and NFA group 2 (0.4 mg/kg). Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index, arterial wall area/vessel area, and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter were analyzed. Then contraction reactions of pulmonary arteries were measured. Finally, the electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells were investigated using patch-clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH developed, accompanied with increased right ventricle hypertrophy index, arterial wall area/vessel area, and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter. In the NFA treatment groups, the pressure and pathological changes were alleviated. The pulmonary artery tone in the shunt group increased, whereas it decreased after NFA treatment. The current density of CaCC was higher in the shunt group, and it was decreased in the NFA treatment groups. In conclusion, NFA attenuated pulmonary artery tone and structural remodeling in PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow in vivo. CaCCs were involved and the augmented current density was alleviated by NFA treatment. PMID:26132368

  10. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  11. Bidirectional Glenn with interruption of antegrade pulmonary blood flow: Which is the preferred option: Ligation or division of the pulmonary artery?

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Ujjwal Kumar; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Rao, Keerthi; Gharde, Parag; Kumawat, Mukesh; Jagia, Priya

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare complication of massive aneurysm of the proximal ligated end of the main pulmonary artery which occurred in the setting of a patient with a functionally univentricular heart and increased pulmonary blood flow undergoing superior cavopulmonary connection. Awareness of this possibility may guide others to electively transect the pulmonary artery in such a clinical setting. PMID:27397472

  12. Blood cell characterization by light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnin, Olivier

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we are going to introduce optical methods for blood cell characterization performed by standard hematology analyzers. As a consequence, we are going to focus on methods that are, or will be, compatible with an average cost, commercial, blood cell counter.

  13. Pulmonary blood flow distribution in sheep: effects of anesthesia, mechanical ventilation, and change in posture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, S. M.; Domino, K. B.; Glenny, R. W.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies providing high-resolution images of pulmonary perfusion have questioned the classical zone model of pulmonary perfusion. Hence the present work was undertaken to provide detailed maps of regional pulmonary perfusion to examine the influence of anesthesia, mechanical ventilation, and posture. METHODS: Pulmonary perfusion was analyzed with intravenous fluorescent microspheres (15 microm) in six sheep studied in four conditions: prone and awake, prone with pentobarbital-anesthesia and breathing spontaneously, prone with anesthesia and mechanical ventilation, and supine with anesthesia and mechanical ventilation. Lungs were air dried at total lung capacity and sectioned into approximately 1,100 pieces (about 2 cm3) per animal. The pieces were weighed and assigned spatial coordinates. Fluorescence was read on a spectrophotometer, and signals were corrected for piece weight and normalized to mean flow. Pulmonary blood flow heterogeneity was assessed using the coefficient of variation of flow data. RESULTS: Pentobarbital anesthesia and mechanical ventilation did not influence perfusion heterogeneity, but heterogeneity increased when the animals were in the supine posture (P < 0.01). Gravitational flow gradients were absent in the prone position but present in the supine (P < 0.001 compared with zero). Pulmonary perfusion was distributed with a hilar-to-peripheral gradient in animals breathing spontaneously (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The influence of pentobarbital anesthesia and mechanical ventilation on pulmonary perfusion heterogeneity is small compared with the effect of changes in posture. Analysis of flow gradients indicate that gravity plays a small role in determining pulmonary blood flow distribution.

  14. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis with myeloproliferative syndrome with myelodysplasia: bronchoalveolar lavage reduces white blood cell count.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Seth M; Gutierrez, Guillermo; Ascensao, Joao

    2006-08-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disorder characterized by surfactant component accumulation in the alveolar space. Primary PAP is likely an autoimmune disorder caused by antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). When an underlying disease causes PAP, this is called secondary PAP. Hematologic malignancies are an important cause of secondary PAP. As the pathogenesis of primary PAP has become more fully understood, improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches have followed. However, when PAP is secondary to an underlying hematologic malignancy, much remains unclear. Here we describe for the first time a patient with hybrid myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative syndrome and PAP who had a marked decrease in her white blood cell count following a transbronchial biopsy accompanied by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Similar significant decreases in WBC count accompanied clinical improvement following two unilateral BALs. Given that patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis frequently have elevated GM-CSF in bronchoalveolar fluid, this observation provides a unique vantage point to understand the pathophysiology of secondary PAP. PMID:16906593

  15. Prostaglandin E2 decreases fetal breathing movements, but not pulmonary blood flow, in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Kitterman, J A

    1995-04-01

    Fetal breathing movements are vital for normal fetal lung growth. Inhibition of these fetal breathing movements is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. Pulmonary hypoplasia also occurs subsequent to alterations in other factors, such as a significant decrease in pulmonary blood flow. The prostaglandin system is known to have profound effects on both fetal breathing movements and on the pulmonary vascular system. We studied six late-gestation chronically instrumented fetal sheep by using an electromagnetic flow transducer around the left pulmonary artery to determine whether a decrease in fetal breathing movements, subsequent to a continuous infusion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), is associated with a decrease in pulmonary blood flow. A continuous PGE2 infusion of 0.88 +/- 0.11 microgram.kg-1.min-1 over 120 min led to a significant decrease in fetal breathing movements (control 40.5 +/- 3.6%, infusion 3.3 +/- 1.6%; P < 0.001). In contrast, the PGE2 infusion had no effect on mean left pulmonary artery blood flow (control 27.7 +/- 9.3 ml.min-1.kg-1, infusion 23.8 +/- 7.0 ml.min-1.kg-1. The PGE2 infusion demonstrated central effects in the percentage of time the fetus was in high-voltage electrocortical activity (control 41.9 +/- 2.5%, infusion 56.5 +/- 5.4%; P < 0.05) and in the amount of time spent in low-voltage electrocortical activity without fetal breathing movements (control 17.5 +/- 2.7%, infusion 40.2 +/- 4.8%; P < 0.05). A significant decrease in the fetal heart rate during the infusion was seen with no effect on either the systemic or pulmonary blood pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7615458

  16. Three-dimensional reconstruction of pulmonary blood vessels by using anatomical knowledge base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaoka, Noriko; Suzuki, Hideo; Mori, Masaki; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Suzuki, Akira

    1991-07-01

    This paper presents a knowledge-based method for automatic reconstruction and recognition of pulmonary blood vessels from chest x-ray CT images with 10-mm thickness. The system has four main stages: (1) automatic extraction and segmentation of blood vessel components from each 2-D image, (2) analysis of these components, (3) a search for points connecting blood vessel segments in different CT slices, using a knowledge base for 3-D reconstruction, and (4) object manipulation and display. The authors also describe a method of representing 3-D anatomical knowledge of the pulmonary blood vessel structure. The edges of blood vessels in chest x-ray images are unclear, in contrast to those in angiograms. Each CT slice has thickness, and blood vessels are slender, so a simple graphical display, which can be used for bone tissues from CT images, is not sufficient for pulmonary blood vessels. It is therefore necessary to use anatomical knowledge to track the blood vessel lines in 3-D spaces. Experimental results using actual images of a normal adult male has shown that utilizing anatomical information enables one to improve processing efficiency and precision, such as blood vessel extraction and searching for connecting points.

  17. Anaphylactic contraction of pulmonary blood vessels of chicken.

    PubMed Central

    Chand, N; Eyre, P

    1977-01-01

    1 Isolated pulmonary arterial and vein strips from sensitized or non-sensitized chickens exhibited dose-dependent contractions to adrenaline greater than, noradrenaline greater than, 5-hydroxytryptamine greater than, histamine greater than, dopamine. Individual variability in the responsiveness of the vessels to agonists was marked. In general veins were 2 to 25 times more sensitive to agonists than arterial strips. 2 Isoprenaline (a relatively specific beta-adrenoceptor agonist) induced relaxation of the submaximally contracted pulmonary vein and arteries at low doses and contractions at high concentrations. 3 Contractile responses to acetylcholine or carbachol were not regularly recorded; only 50% of the vessels reacted to cholinoceptor agonists over a wide threshold dose range. 4 Chicken pulmonary vessels were found relatively insensitive to bradykinin. 5 Effects of prostaglandins were variable. Prostaglandin F2alpha induced dose-related contractions of the vein and arterial strips; prostglandins E1 and E2 at low doses partially contracted pulmonary artery irrespective of the spasmogen used and further increase in doses induced either no effect or contractions. Prostaglandin E1 induced marked and rapid contractions of the vein. Prostaglandin E2 induced relaxations of the prostaglandin F2alpha-contracted vein only, but produced no effect or slight contractions of the veins partially contracted to other spasmogens. 6 Pulmonary arterial and vein strips obtained from chickens sensitized to horse plasma exhibited Schultz-Dale contractions of variable magnitude and duration to specific antigenic challenge only. In many vessels, antigen-induced contractions were associated with marked increase in spontaneous activity. 7 The importance of the Schultz-Dale reaction in avian pulmonary vessels is discussed in relation to the right heart dilatation associated with anaphylaxis in the chicken. PMID:836999

  18. Non-invasive pulmonary blood flow analysis and blood pressure mapping derived from 4D flow MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delles, Michael; Rengier, Fabian; Azad, Yoo-Jin; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley, Sebastian; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2015-03-01

    In diagnostics and therapy control of cardiovascular diseases, detailed knowledge about the patient-specific behavior of blood flow and pressure can be essential. The only method capable of measuring complete time-resolved three-dimensional vector fields of the blood flow velocities is velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), often denoted as 4D flow MRI. Furthermore, relative pressure maps can be computed from this data source, as presented by different groups in recent years. Hence, analysis of blood flow and pressure using 4D flow MRI can be a valuable technique in management of cardiovascular diseases. In order to perform these tasks, all necessary steps in the corresponding process chain can be carried out in our in-house developed software framework MEDIFRAME. In this article, we apply MEDIFRAME for a study of hemodynamics in the pulmonary arteries of five healthy volunteers. The study included measuring vector fields of blood flow velocities by phase-contrast MRI and subsequently computing relative blood pressure maps. We visualized blood flow by streamline depictions and computed characteristic values for the left and the right pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA). In all volunteers, we observed a lower amount of blood flow in the LPA compared to the RPA. Furthermore, we visualized blood pressure maps using volume rendering and generated graphs of pressure differences between the LPA, the RPA and the main pulmonary artery. In most volunteers, blood pressure was increased near to the bifurcation and in the proximal LPA, leading to higher average pressure values in the LPA compared to the RPA.

  19. Pulmonary embolus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... area). This type of clot is called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) . The blood clot breaks off and travels ...

  20. Changes in bronchial and pulmonary arterial blood flow with progressive tension pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, P; Hilderbrandt, J; Charan, N B

    1996-10-01

    We studied the effects of unilateral tension pneumothorax and its release on bronchial and pulmonary arterial blood flow and gas exchange in 10 adult anesthetized and mechanically ventilated sheep with chronically implanted ultrasonic flow probes. Right pleural pressure (Ppl) was increased in two steps from -5 to 10 and 25 cmH2O and then decreased to 10 and -5 cmH2O. Each level of Ppl was maintained for 5 min. Bronchial blood flow, right and left pulmonary arterial flows, cardiac output (QT), hemodynamic measurements, and arterial blood gases were obtained at the end of each period. Pneumothorax resulted in a 66% decrease in QT, bronchial blood flow decreased by 84%, and right pulmonary arterial flow decreased by 80% at Ppl of 25 cmH2O (P < 0.001). At peak Ppl, the majority of QT was due to blood flow through the left pulmonary artery. With resolution of pneumothorax, hemodynamic parameters normalized, although abnormalities in gas exchange persisted for 60-90 min after recovery and were associated with a decrease in total respiratory compliance. PMID:8904584

  1. Hemodynamic Characterization of Rodent Models of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Mao, Lan; Rajagopal, Sudarshan

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease of the pulmonary vasculature characterized by endothelial cell apoptosis, smooth muscle proliferation and obliteration of pulmonary arterioles. This in turn results in right ventricular (RV) failure, with significant morbidity and mortality. Rodent models of PAH, in the mouse and the rat, are important for understanding the pathophysiology underlying this rare disease. Notably, different models of PAH may be associated with different degrees of pulmonary hypertension, RV hypertrophy and RV failure. Therefore, a complete hemodynamic characterization of mice and rats with PAH is critical in determining the effects of drugs or genetic modifications on the disease. Here we demonstrate standard procedures for assessment of right ventricular function and hemodynamics in both rat and mouse PAH models. Echocardiography is useful in determining RV function in rats, although obtaining standard views of the right ventricle is challenging in the awake mouse. Access for right heart catheterization is obtained by the internal jugular vein in closed-chest mice and rats. Pressures can be measured using polyethylene tubing with a fluid pressure transducer or a miniature micromanometer pressure catheter. Pressure-volume loop analysis can be performed in the open chest. After obtaining hemodynamics, the rodent is euthanized. The heart can be dissected to separate the RV free wall from the left ventricle (LV) and septum, allowing an assessment of RV hypertrophy using the Fulton index (RV/(LV+S)). Then samples can be harvested from the heart, lungs and other tissues as needed. PMID:27167679

  2. Effect of gravitational and inertial forces on vertical distribution of pulmonary blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, P. A.; Reed, J. H., Jr.; Vandenberg, R. A.; Wood, E. H.

    1978-01-01

    Vertical distribution of pulmonary blood flow (VDPBF) was studied, using radioactive microsphere emboli, in dogs without thoracotomy in the right decubitus position during exposure to lateral accelerations of 1, 2, 4, and 6 G. At all levels of force environment studied, an inverse linear relationship was observed between vertical height in the thorax and pulmonary blood flow (ml/min/ml lung tissue) with a decrease in flow to the most dependent region of the lung despite large increases in intravascular pressures at this site. Changes in blood flow were smallest at the mid-lung level, the hydrostatic 'balance point' for vascular and pleural pressures. These force environment-dependent changes in VDPBF are not readily explainable by the Starling resistor analog. Gravity-dependent regional differences in pleural and associated interstitial pressures, plus possible changes in vascular tone resulting from inadequate aeration of blood in the most dependent regions of the lung, probably also affect VDPBF.

  3. Echocardiographic evaluation of pulmonary venous blood flow and cardiac function changes during one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Namo; Kim, Hyun IL; Oh, Young Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The intra-pulmonary shunt induced by one-lung ventilation (OLV), is alleviated by increased pulmonary blood flow by gravitational redistribution and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. We investigated the changes of pulmonary venous blood flow (PVBF) and biventricular function during OLV with echocardiography. And the correlation between PVBF and intra-pulmonary shunt fraction (Qs/Qt) was evaluated. Methods: PVBF of the left upper pulmonary vein and cardiac function were measured with echocardiography in twenty-five patients who underwent elective thoracic surgery in left lateral decubitus. Qs/Qt and PaO2 were measured with blood gas analysis. Data was obtained at 10 min after two-lung ventilation in supine (TLV-S) and lateral decubitus position (TLV-L), and at 10, 20 and 30 min after OLV in lateral decubitus position (OLV-10, -20 and -30). Results: There were significant changes in PVBF among TLV-S, TLV-L and OLV-10 (959.5±280.8, 1416.9±489.7 and 1999.9±670.5 ml/min; P<0.05, respectively). There were not differences in PVBF, Qs/Qt and PaO2 among OLV-10, -20 and -30. There were an inverse correlation between percent change of PVBF and change of Qs/Qt (r2 = 0.5; P<0.0001) and positive correlations between the percent change of PVBF and change of PaO2 (r2 = 0.4; P<0.0001) during OLV over TLV-L. No significant changes in biventricular systolic and diastolic function were observed during positional change and OLV. Conclusions: A remarkable change of PVBF relevant to gravitational distribution and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction was proved by echocardiography. And PVBF changes could represent the changes of Qs/Qt and PaO2 during OLV. However, biventricular function was not impaired during OLV. PMID:26550232

  4. [Intralobar pulmonary sequestration with multiple arterial blood supply].

    PubMed

    Uroz Tristán, J; Mogueya, S A; Poenaru, D; Martínez Lagares, F; Arteaga García, R; Sanchís Solera, L; López-Pinto Ruiz, J

    1994-04-01

    We report the case of a 4 years old boy, who presented at our institution with reiterative neumonia affecting left basal lobe. Anomalous vascular appearance was detected in the chest x-ray. With the suspicion of pulmonary sequestration we carried on Digital Intravenous Angiography by Substraction (DIVAS) and aortogram. The anomalous systemic arterial supply was formed by 6 vessels coming from the thoracic aorta and going into the left lower lobe basal segment. Lobectomy was performed and previous diagnosis was confirmed pathologically. PMID:8086288

  5. Automated Measurement of Microcirculatory Blood Flow Velocity in Pulmonary Metastases of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fontanella, Andrew N.; Palmer, Gregory M.; Boico, Alina; Min, Hooney; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Irwin, David C.; Zhao, Yulin; Schroeder, Thies

    2014-01-01

    Because the lung is a major target organ of metastatic disease, animal models to study the physiology of pulmonary metastases are of great importance. However, very few methods exist to date to investigate lung metastases in a dynamic fashion at the microcirculatory level, due to the difficulty to access the lung with a microscope. Here, an intravital microscopy method is presented to functionally image and quantify the microcirculation of superficial pulmonary metastases in rats, using a closed-chest pulmonary window and automated analysis of blood flow velocity and direction. The utility of this method is demonstrated to measure increases in blood flow velocity in response to pharmacological intervention, and to image the well-known tortuous vasculature of solid tumors. This is the first demonstration of intravital microscopy on pulmonary metastases in a closed-chest model. Because of its minimized invasiveness, as well as due to its relative ease and practicality, this technology has the potential to experience widespread use in laboratories that specialize on pulmonary tumor research. PMID:25490280

  6. Effect of furosemide on pulmonary blood flow distribution in resting and exercising horses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, H. H.; Bernard, S. L.; Glenny, R. W.; Fedde, M. R.; Polissar, N. L.; Basaraba, R. J.; Walther, S. M.; Gaughan, E. M.; McMurphy, R.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    We determined the spatial distribution of pulmonary blood flow (PBF) with 15-micron fluorescent-labeled microspheres during rest and exercise in five Thoroughbred horses before and 4 h after furosemide administration (0.5 mg/kg iv). The primary finding of this study was that PBF redistribution occurred from rest to exercise, both with and without furosemide. However, there was less blood flow to the dorsal portion of the lung during exercise postfurosemide compared with prefurosemide. Furosemide did alter the resting perfusion distribution by increasing the flow to the ventral regions of the lung; however, that increase in flow was abated with exercise. Other findings included 1) unchanged gas exchange and cardiac output during rest and exercise after vs. before furosemide, 2) a decrease in pulmonary arterial pressure after furosemide, 3) an increase in the slope of the relationship of PBF vs. vertical height up the lung during exercise, both with and without furosemide, and 4) a decrease in blood flow to the dorsal region of the lung at rest after furosemide. Pulmonary perfusion variability within the lung may be a function of the anatomy of the pulmonary vessels that results in a predominantly fixed spatial pattern of flow distribution.

  7. Pulmonary diffusing capacity, capillary blood volume, and cardiac output during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Deutschman, Robert A., III; West, John B.

    1993-01-01

    We measured pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL), diffusing capacity per unit lung volume, pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), membrane diffusing capacity (Dm), pulmonary capillary blood flow or cardiac output (Qc), and cardiac stroke volume (SV) in four subjects exposed to nine days of microgravity. DL in microgravity was elevated compared with preflight standing values and was higher than preflight supine because of the elevation of both Vc and Dm. The elevation in Vc was comparable to that measured supine in 1 G, but the increase in Dm was in sharp contrast to the supine value. We postulate that, in 0 G, pulmonary capillary blood is evenly distributed throughout the lung, providing for uniform capillary filling, leading to an increase in the surface area available for diffusion. By contrast, in the supine 1-G state, the capillaries are less evenly filled, and although a similar increase in blood volume is observed, the corresponding increase in surface area does not occur. DL and its subdivisions showed no adaptive changes from the first measurement 24 h after the start of 0 G to eight days later. Similarly, there were no trends in the postflight data, suggesting that the principal mechanism of these changes was gravitational. The increase in Dm suggests that subclinical pulmonary edema did not result from exposure to 0 G. Qc was modestly increased inflight and decreased postflight compared with preflight standing. Compared with preflight standing, SV was increased 46 percent inflight and decreased 14 percent in the 1st week postflight. There were temporal changes in Qc and SV during 0 G, with the highest values recorded at the first measurement, 24 h into the flight. The lowest values of Qc and SV occurred on the day of return.

  8. The mechanical properties of the systemic and pulmonary arteries of Python regius correlate with blood pressures.

    PubMed

    van Soldt, Benjamin J; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Wang, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Pythons are unique amongst snakes in having different pressures in the aortas and pulmonary arteries because of intraventricular pressure separation. In this study, we investigate whether this correlates with different blood vessel strength in the ball python Python regius. We excised segments from the left, right, and dorsal aortas, and from the two pulmonary arteries. These were subjected to tensile testing. We show that the aortic vessel wall is significantly stronger than the pulmonary artery wall in P. regius. Gross morphological characteristics (vessel wall thickness and correlated absolute amount of collagen content) are likely the most influential factors. Collagen fiber thickness and orientation are likely to have an effect, though the effect of collagen fiber type and cross-links between fibers will need further study. PMID:26780263

  9. Blood flow redistribution and ventilation-perfusion mismatch during embolic pulmonary arterial occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Burrowes, K. S.; Clark, A. R.; Tawhai, M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism causes redistribution of blood in the lung, which impairs ventilation/perfusion matching and gas exchange and can elevate pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) by increasing pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). An anatomically-based multi-scale model of the human pulmonary circulation was used to simulate pre- and post-occlusion flow, to study blood flow redistribution in the presence of an embolus, and to evaluate whether reduction in perfused vascular bed is sufficient to increase PAP to hypertensive levels, or whether other vasoconstrictive mechanisms are necessary. A model of oxygen transfer from air to blood was included to assess the impact of vascular occlusion on oxygen exchange. Emboli of 5, 7, and 10 mm radius were introduced to occlude increasing proportions of the vasculature. Blood flow redistribution was calculated after arterial occlusion, giving predictions of PAP, PVR, flow redistribution, and micro-circulatory flow dynamics. Because of the large flow reserve capacity (via both capillary recruitment and distension), approximately 55% of the vasculature was occluded before PAP reached clinically significant levels indicative of hypertension. In contrast, model predictions showed that even relatively low levels of occlusion could cause localized oxygen deficit. Flow preferentially redistributed to gravitationally non-dependent regions regardless of occlusion location, due to the greater potential for capillary recruitment in this region. Red blood cell transit times decreased below the minimum time for oxygen saturation (<0.25 s) and capillary pressures became high enough to initiate cell damage (which may result in edema) only after ~80% of the lung was occluded. PMID:22140626

  10. Patient-specific computational modeling of blood flow in the pulmonary arterial circulation.

    PubMed

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Rios, Lourdes; Smith, Triston; Schroeder, Theodore; Mueller, Jeffrey; Murali, Srinivas; Lasorda, David; Zikos, Anthony; Spotti, Jennifer; Reilly, John J; Finol, Ender A

    2015-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the pulmonary vasculature has the potential to reveal continuum metrics associated with the hemodynamic stress acting on the vascular endothelium. It is widely accepted that the endothelium responds to flow-induced stress by releasing vasoactive substances that can dilate and constrict blood vessels locally. The objectives of this study are to examine the extent of patient specificity required to obtain a significant association of CFD output metrics and clinical measures in models of the pulmonary arterial circulation, and to evaluate the potential correlation of wall shear stress (WSS) with established metrics indicative of right ventricular (RV) afterload in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Right Heart Catheterization (RHC) hemodynamic data and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively acquired for 10 PH patients and processed to simulate blood flow in the pulmonary arteries. While conducting CFD modeling of the reconstructed patient-specific vasculatures, we experimented with three different outflow boundary conditions to investigate the potential for using computationally derived spatially averaged wall shear stress (SAWSS) as a metric of RV afterload. SAWSS was correlated with both pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (R(2)=0.77, P<0.05) and arterial compliance (C) (R(2)=0.63, P<0.05), but the extent of the correlation was affected by the degree of patient specificity incorporated in the fluid flow boundary conditions. We found that decreasing the distal PVR alters the flow distribution and changes the local velocity profile in the distal vessels, thereby increasing the local WSS. Nevertheless, implementing generic outflow boundary conditions still resulted in statistically significant SAWSS correlations with respect to both metrics of RV afterload, suggesting that the CFD model could be executed without the need for complex outflow boundary conditions that require invasively obtained

  11. Blood lead levels of the battery and exhaust workers and their pulmonary function tests.

    PubMed

    Bagci, C; Bozkurt, A I; Cakmak, E A; Can, S; Cengiz, B

    2004-06-01

    In an attempt to understand the impact of inhaled lead on the pulmonary functions, we assessed the blood lead levels and pulmonary functions of the battery and exhaust workers who are potential candidates for lead inhalation. The hospital staff served as control group. The measurements of lead levels were performed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) were performed using a portable spirometer. The blood lead levels of the battery workers, exhaust workers and controls were found to be 36.83, 26.94 and 14.81 microg/dl, respectively. The values of the workers were significantly higher than the controls (p < 0.001). The lead levels of the battery workers were also significantly higher than the exhaust workers (p < 0.001). PFT results (maximum voluntary ventilation, forced expiration flow and first forced expiration volume values of the workers) were significantly worse than the controls, and their pulmonary function test results were consistent with restrictive problems in the airways. PMID:15311556

  12. Analysis of blood flow in pulmonary hypertension with the pulsed Doppler flowmeter combined with cross sectional echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, M; Miyatake, K; Kinoshita, N; Sakakibara, H; Nimura, Y

    1984-01-01

    Blood flow patterns were analysed at nine points in the pulmonary area using the pulsed Doppler technique combined with cross-sectional echocardiography in 53 patients with heart disease and 10 healthy subjects. In subjects with a normal pulmonary artery pressure the blood flow pattern in systole showed a gradual acceleration and deceleration with a rounded summit in mid systole, designated the round type. In patients with pulmonary hypertension it showed a rapid acceleration and early deceleration with a sharp peak in early systole, designated the triangular type. The acceleration time index, defined as the ratio of the time interval from the beginning to the peak of ejection to the ejection time, showed a significant inverse correlation with mean pulmonary artery pressure. In pulmonary hypertension a prominent reverse flow occurred in the right posterior part of the pulmonary trunk during mid-systole and early diastole, indicating the presence of a vortex. Similar flow patterns were also seen in patients with idiopathic pulmonary artery dilatation. The factors responsible for the triangular type were principally the reduced capacitance and increased impedance of the pulmonary vascular tree. Those responsible for the reverse flow were the curved path of the blood flow and dilatation of the pulmonary artery. Images PMID:6231042

  13. Spatial distribution of pulmonary blood flow in dogs in increased force environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. F.; Ritman, E. L.; Chevalier, P. A.; Sass, D. J.; Wood, E. H.

    1978-01-01

    Spatial distribution of pulmonary blood flow during 2- to 3-min exposures to 6-8 Gy acceleration was studied, using radioactive microspheres in dogs, and compared to previously reported 1 Gy control distributions. Isotope distributions were measured by scintiscanning individual 1-cm-thick cross sections of excised, fixed lungs. Results indicate: (1) the fraction of cardiac output traversing left and right lungs did not change systematically with the duration and magnitude of acceleration; but (2) the fraction is strongly affected by the occurrence or absence of fast deep breaths, which cause an increase or decrease, respectively, in blood flow through the dependent lung; and (3) Gy acceleration caused a significant increase in relative pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in nondependent and dependent regions of the lung concurrent with a decrease in PVR in the midsagittal region of the thorax.

  14. Effects of posture on blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, S. M.; Domino, K. B.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    We used differential excretion of sulphur hexafluoride from the left and right lung to measure blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in the prone and supine positions in dogs (n = 9). Gas exchange was assessed using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Blood flow diversion from the hypoxic (3% oxygen) left lung was mean 70.7 (SD 11.2)% in the supine compared with 57.0 (12.1)% in the prone position (P < 0.02). The supine position was associated with increased perfusion to low VA/Q regions (P < 0.05). The increased flow diversion with hypoxia in the supine position was associated with more ventilation to high VA/Q regions (P < 0.05). We conclude that flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is greater in the supine position. This effect could contribute to the variable response in gas exchange with positioning in patients with ARDS.

  15. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  16. Pattern of pulmonary venous blood flow in the hypoplastic left heart syndrome in the fetus

    PubMed Central

    Better, D; Apfel, H; Zidere, V; Allan, L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether restriction at the atrial septum in the newborn with hypoplastic left heart syndrome can be predicted accurately by examining the pattern of pulmonary venous flow in the fetus. A restrictive atrial septum can contribute to haemodynamic instability before surgery for this lesion and has been associated with an increased mortality.
DESIGN—Pulmonary venous pulsed Doppler tracings were compared between fetuses with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and controls. The size of the atrial septal defect on the postnatal echocardiogram was graded according to the degree of restriction. Pulsed Doppler tracings of pulmonary venous blood flow were obtained in 18 fetuses with left atrial outflow atresia and compared with 77 controls, adjusted for gestational age. Postnatal echocardiograms were available for analysis in 13 of 18 neonates.
SETTING—A tertiary referral centre for fetal cardiology and paediatric cardiac surgery.
RESULTS—Fetuses with hypoplastic left heart syndrome were different from controls in all pulmonary vein indices measured. As assessed from the postnatal echocardiogram, there were seven fetuses with a restrictive atrial septum. In these fetuses, the systolic flow velocity (p < 0.01), S/D ratio (p < 0.01), and peak reversal wave (p < 0.001) in the pulmonary vein tracing showed a good correlation with the degree of restriction.
CONCLUSIONS—The Doppler pattern of pulmonary venous flow in the fetus with hypoplastic left heart syndrome appears to be a reliable predictor of restriction of the atrial septum in the neonate. This may help in the immediate post-delivery management of these infants before surgery.


Keywords: fetus; congenital heart defects; echocardiography; risk factors PMID:10336926

  17. [Blood gas changes during treadmill exercise in convalescents from pulmonary tuberculosis. 1. Method of measurement].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, F

    1989-09-01

    With advances in treatment for tuberculosis, pulmonary tuberculosis has become curable. However, chronic respiratory failure has been more often observed in those who have ever had thoracic operation, and were cured with anti-tuberculous chemotherapy in spite of initially severe pulmonary tuberculosis with wide spread lesions in both lungs, particularly in the aged. Therefore it is now necessary to understand accurately the real physio-dynamic situation of respiro-circulatory impairment in these patients. For this purpose, an exercise test was newly designed, and changing curves of blood gas (O2- and CO2-partial pressure, measured transcutaneously) were drawn in 4 healthy persons and 23 recovered patients from pulmonary tuberculosis. The newly designed method was carried out by using Treadmill walk apparatus (Nihon-Denki Sanei Co., Japan), transcutaneous blood gas measurement apparatus (Radio-Meter Co., Copenhagen) and automatic blood pressure measurement apparatus (Kyorin Co., Japan). Treadmill walk exercise test was done through Bruce-Sheffield converted method. The details of this exercise test are written and illustrated in this paper. The results of the test were classified into 4 types by the changes of transcutaneously measured O2 partial pressure curve during the test: 1. unchanged, 2. slightly decreased, 3. moderately decreased, 4. markedly decreased. The significance of these 4 types will be discussed in the next report after examining more convalescents from pulmonary tuberculosis. The reproducibility of this test was examined in 6 patients, and it was almost good. In addition, in 3 out of 27 patients, odd curves contrary to our expectation, that is increase of the value of trans-cutaneously measured O2 partial pressure and/or decrease of the value of trans-cutaneously measured CO2 partial pressure immediately after the initiation of the first test were observed. But in the second test, carried out in the other day, the curve fell into one of the 4 types

  18. The physiological basis of pulmonary gas exchange: implications for clinical interpretation of arterial blood gases.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    The field of pulmonary gas exchange is mature, with the basic principles developed more than 60 years ago. Arterial blood gas measurements (tensions and concentrations of O₂ and CO₂) constitute a mainstay of clinical care to assess the degree of pulmonary gas exchange abnormality. However, the factors that dictate arterial blood gas values are often multifactorial and complex, with six different causes of hypoxaemia (inspiratory hypoxia, hypoventilation, ventilation/perfusion inequality, diffusion limitation, shunting and reduced mixed venous oxygenation) contributing variably to the arterial O₂ and CO₂ tension in any given patient. Blood gas values are then usually further affected by the body's abilities to compensate for gas exchange disturbances by three tactics (greater O₂ extraction, increasing ventilation and increasing cardiac output). This article explains the basic principles of gas exchange in health, mechanisms of altered gas exchange in disease, how the body compensates for abnormal gas exchange, and based on these principles, the tools available to interpret blood gas data and, quantitatively, to best understand the physiological state of each patient. This understanding is important because therapeutic intervention to improve abnormal gas exchange in any given patient needs to be based on the particular physiological mechanisms affecting gas exchange in that patient. PMID:25323225

  19. Blood Perfusion in Microfluidic Models of Pulmonary Capillary Networks: Role of Geometry and Hematocrit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauber, Hagit; Waisman, Dan; Sznitman, Josue; Technion-IIT Team; Department of Neonatology Carmel Medical Center; Faculty of Medicine-Technion IIT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Microfluidic platforms are increasingly used to study blood microflows at true physiological scale due to their ability to overcome manufacturing obstacle of complex anatomical morphologies, such as the organ-specific architectures of the microcirculation. In the present work, we utilize microfluidic platforms to devise in vitro models of the underlying pulmonary capillary networks (PCN), where capillary lengths and diameters are similar to the size of RBCs (~ 5-10 μm). To better understand flow characteristics and dispersion of red blood cells (RBCs) in PCNs, we have designed microfluidic models of alveolar capillary beds inspired by the seminal ``sheet flow'' model of Fung and Sobin (1969). Our microfluidic PCNs feature confined arrays of staggered pillars with diameters of ~ 5,7 and 10 μm, mimicking the dense structure of pulmonary capillary meshes. The devices are perfused with suspensions of RBCs at varying hematocrit levels under different flow rates. Whole-field velocity patterns using micro-PIV and single-cell tracking using PTV are obtained with fluorescently-labelled RBCs and discussed. Our experiments deliver a real-scale quantitative description of RBC perfusion characteristics across the pulmonary capillary microcirculation.

  20. Successful treatment of pulmonary hypertension with beraprost and sildenafil after cord blood transplantation for infantile leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Nozomu; Ikoma, Masanobu; Sekiya, Yuko; Narita, Atsushi; Yoshida, Nao; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Hatano, Tameo; Kato, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and its etiology and therapeutic strategies, especially in infants, remain unclear. We report a case of severe PH that developed in an infant with acute leukemia following administration of busulfan as a preconditioner for cord blood transplantation; the case was successfully treated with sildenafil and beraprost, which to our knowledge is the first reported successful use of this regimen in PH following transplantation for infantile leukemia. From a review of all previous reports, use of busulfan in infants may raise the risk of developing PH, and unlike definitive pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, PH in this subgroup may be reversible by early detection and treatment. PMID:23243005

  1. Numerical simulation of blood flow and pressure drop in the pulmonary arterial and venous circulation.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M Umar; Vaughan, Gareth D A; Sainsbury, Christopher; Johnson, Martin; Peskin, Charles S; Olufsen, Mette S; Hill, N A

    2014-10-01

    A novel multiscale mathematical and computational model of the pulmonary circulation is presented and used to analyse both arterial and venous pressure and flow. This work is a major advance over previous studies by Olufsen et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 28:1281-1299, 2012) which only considered the arterial circulation. For the first three generations of vessels within the pulmonary circulation, geometry is specified from patient-specific measurements obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Blood flow and pressure in the larger arteries and veins are predicted using a nonlinear, cross-sectional-area-averaged system of equations for a Newtonian fluid in an elastic tube. Inflow into the main pulmonary artery is obtained from MRI measurements, while pressure entering the left atrium from the main pulmonary vein is kept constant at the normal mean value of 2 mmHg. Each terminal vessel in the network of 'large' arteries is connected to its corresponding terminal vein via a network of vessels representing the vascular bed of smaller arteries and veins. We develop and implement an algorithm to calculate the admittance of each vascular bed, using bifurcating structured trees and recursion. The structured-tree models take into account the geometry and material properties of the 'smaller' arteries and veins of radii ≥ 50 μm. We study the effects on flow and pressure associated with three classes of pulmonary hypertension expressed via stiffening of larger and smaller vessels, and vascular rarefaction. The results of simulating these pathological conditions are in agreement with clinical observations, showing that the model has potential for assisting with diagnosis and treatment for circulatory diseases within the lung. PMID:24610385

  2. Comparative physiology of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier: the unique avian solution

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Two opposing selective pressures have shaped the evolution of the structure of the blood-gas barrier in air breathing vertebrates. The first pressure, which has been recognized for 100 years, is to facilitate diffusive gas exchange. This requires the barrier to be extremely thin and have a large area. The second pressure, which has only recently been appreciated, is to maintain the mechanical integrity of the barrier in the face of its extreme thinness. The most important tensile stress comes from the pressure within the pulmonary capillaries, which results in a hoop stress. The strength of the barrier can be attributed to the type IV collagen in the extracellular matrix. In addition, the stress is minimized in mammals and birds by complete separation of the pulmonary and systemic circulations. Remarkably, the avian barrier is about 2.5 times thinner than that in mammals and also is much more uniform in thickness. These advantages for gas exchange come about because the avian pulmonary capillaries are unique among air breathers in being mechanically supported externally in addition to the strength that comes from the structure of their walls. This external support comes from epithelial plates that are part of the air capillaries, and the support is available because the terminal air spaces in the avian lung are extremely small due to the flow-through nature of ventilation in contrast to the reciprocating pattern in mammals. PMID:19793953

  3. An analysis of estimation of pulmonary blood flow by the single-breath method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.

    1986-01-01

    The single-breath method represents a simple noninvasive technique for the assessment of capillary blood flow across the lung. However, this method has not gained widespread acceptance, because its accuracy is still being questioned. A rigorous procedure is described for estimating pulmonary blood flow (PBF) using data obtained with the aid of the single-breath method. Attention is given to the minimization of data-processing errors in the presence of measurement errors and to questions regarding a correction for possible loss of CO2 in the lung tissue. It is pointed out that the estimations are based on the exact solution of the underlying differential equations which describe the dynamics of gas exchange in the lung. The reported study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining highly reliable estimates of PBF from expiratory data in the presence of random measurement errors.

  4. Changes of Number and Function of Late Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Peripheral Blood of COPD Patients Combined with Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Zhang, Hongmei; Liu, Jianxin; Sheng, Chunfeng; Zhang, Linlin; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-06-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the changes of number and function of late endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in peripheral blood of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients combined with pulmonary hypertension. Subjects and Methods The study enrolled 120 cases including 40 non-COPD and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients (non-COPD group), 40 COPD non-PAH patients (COPD group), and 40 COPD patients combined with PAH (COPD + PAH group). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation, cultured for 21 days, and then identified as late endothelial progenitor cells. The cell colonies were counted. MTT assay, modified Boyden chamber assay, and human fibronectin plates were used to measure the proliferation, migration, and adhesion functions of the late endothelial progenitor cells, respectively. Results Compared with non-COPD and COPD groups, the number of peripheral blood late EPCs in COPD + PAH group was significantly reduced, and the proliferation, adhesion, and migration capacities were significantly lowered; the differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The number and function of late EPCs decreased with the increase of pulmonary artery pressure (p < 0.05). Conclusion The number of late EPCs in COPD patients combined with pulmonary hypertension was reduced, which implies the impaired cell functions. The changes of number and function were negatively correlated with the severity of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25226359

  5. Blood Level of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Leukocytes and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) have an important defensive role against various microorganisms and other agents, but by liberating various substances, first of all the superoxide anion (O 2¯), they can damage the bronchial mucosa and influence the development of bronchial inflammation which is the fundamental of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). Objective: to show the role of the PMNL for development and level of BHR in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Material and methods: We observed 160 patients with COPD treated in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Sarajevo during three years :from 2012 to 2014. They were divided into groups and subgroups according to the first registration of BHR in the course of illness and to the number of exacerbations of the disease in one year. The number of blood PMNL was measured in a stable state of disease at the begging and at the end of investigation. Results: The number of blood PMNL was significantly greater in patients with 3 or more exacerbations per one year (p <0.01). Patients with BHR had significantly greater number blood PMNL than patients without BHR (p< 0.05). Patients with 3 exacerbations per year had a statistically significant increase of number of PMNL between first and last examination (p<0.01). Conclusion: There is statistically significant correlation between the number of blood PMNL and the level of BHR in COPD, but future examination need to be done to determine real role and mode of action of PMNL for these processes. PMID:26543311

  6. Hypoxia, not pulmonary vascular pressure, induces blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Joshua C; Lovering, Andrew T; Ainslie, Philip N; Stembridge, Mike; Burgess, Keith R; Bakker, Akke; Donnelly, Joseph; Lucas, Samuel JE; Lewis, Nia CS; Dominelli, Paolo B; Henderson, William R; Dominelli, Giulio S; Sheel, A William; Foster, Glen E

    2015-01-01

    Blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA) is increased with exposure to acute hypoxia and has been associated with pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). We aimed to determine the direct relationship between blood flow through IPAVA and PASP in 10 participants with no detectable intracardiac shunt by comparing: (1) isocapnic hypoxia (control); (2) isocapnic hypoxia with oral administration of acetazolamide (AZ; 250 mg, three times a day for 48 h) to prevent increases in PASP; and (3) isocapnic hypoxia with AZ and 8.4% NaHCO3 infusion (AZ + HCO3–) to control for AZ-induced acidosis. Isocapnic hypoxia (20 min) was maintained by end-tidal forcing, blood flow through IPAVA was determined by agitated saline contrast echocardiography and PASP was estimated by Doppler ultrasound. Arterial blood samples were collected at rest before each isocapnic–hypoxia condition to determine pH, [HCO3–] and . AZ decreased pH (–0.08 ± 0.01), [HCO3–] (−7.1 ± 0.7 mmol l−1) and (−4.5 ± 1.4 mmHg; P < 0.01), while intravenous NaHCO3 restored arterial blood gas parameters to control levels. Although PASP increased from baseline in all three hypoxic conditions (P < 0.05), a main effect of condition expressed an 11 ± 2% reduction in PASP from control (P < 0.001) following AZ administration while intravenous NaHCO3 partially restored the PASP response to isocapnic hypoxia. Blood flow through IPAVA increased during exposure to isocapnic hypoxia (P < 0.01) and was unrelated to PASP, cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance for all conditions. In conclusion, isocapnic hypoxia induces blood flow through IPAVA independent of changes in PASP and the influence of AZ on the PASP response to isocapnic hypoxia is dependent upon the H+ concentration or . PMID:25416621

  7. New findings on the three-dimensional anatomical relations between the bronchi and pulmonary blood vessels at the pulmonary hilum.

    PubMed

    Onuki, Takamasa; Kanzaki, Masato; Kikkawa, Takuma; Isaka, Tamami; Sakamoto, Kei; Oyama, Kunihiro; Murasugi, Masahide

    2015-05-01

    During the 1940s, considerable knowledge was acquired about the anatomy of pulmonary segments, and anatomical terms were proposed and have been widely accepted. In recent years, minimally invasive and thoracoscopic segmentectomy has been performed with a versatile sublobar resection approach on patients with early peripheral lung cancer, metastatic lung tumors, and undiagnosed nodules. The three-dimensional (3D) anatomy of the bronchi and the pulmonary vessels has also been studied in individual patients. Three-dimensional models of the bronchi and pulmonary vessels were prepared using homemade software from computed tomograms (CT) of the chests of patients scheduled to undergo surgical procedures. Using these models, the authors examined the 3D positional relationships of the segmental broncho-arterial triangle (SBAT) created by three points defined by the origins and courses of the bronchi and the pulmonary arteries, which are located apart from each other at the pulmonary hilum, and the segmental pulmonary veins (SPV), which run near the SBAT. In the left and right upper lobes, many branches of the pulmonary arteries and parallel bronchi in subsegments were widely separated at the origin of the pulmonary hilum, creating a relatively large SBAT. However, as an exceptional case, an SPV passed through an SBAT in only one of 158 patients. To our knowledge, no similar findings have been documented previously. Our findings could help to determine resection surfaces for thoracoscopic segmentectomy in the future, and provide new insights into the 3D anatomy and development of the lung. PMID:25546314

  8. Evaluation of optimized bronchoalveolar lavage sampling designs for characterization of pulmonary drug distribution.

    PubMed

    Clewe, Oskar; Karlsson, Mats O; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2015-12-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a pulmonary sampling technique for characterization of drug concentrations in epithelial lining fluid and alveolar cells. Two hypothetical drugs with different pulmonary distribution rates (fast and slow) were considered. An optimized BAL sampling design was generated assuming no previous information regarding the pulmonary distribution (rate and extent) and with a maximum of two samples per subject. Simulations were performed to evaluate the impact of the number of samples per subject (1 or 2) and the sample size on the relative bias and relative root mean square error of the parameter estimates (rate and extent of pulmonary distribution). The optimized BAL sampling design depends on a characterized plasma concentration time profile, a population plasma pharmacokinetic model, the limit of quantification (LOQ) of the BAL method and involves only two BAL sample time points, one early and one late. The early sample should be taken as early as possible, where concentrations in the BAL fluid ≥ LOQ. The second sample should be taken at a time point in the declining part of the plasma curve, where the plasma concentration is equivalent to the plasma concentration in the early sample. Using a previously described general pulmonary distribution model linked to a plasma population pharmacokinetic model, simulated data using the final BAL sampling design enabled characterization of both the rate and extent of pulmonary distribution. The optimized BAL sampling design enables characterization of both the rate and extent of the pulmonary distribution for both fast and slowly equilibrating drugs. PMID:26316105

  9. Effects of concentrated ambient particles on heart rate and blood pressure in pulmonary hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tsun-Jen; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Wang, Peng-Yau; Tsai, Chia-Fang; Chen, Chun-Yen; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that increased concentrations of ambient particles are associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Recent studies have revealed that particulate air pollution exposure is associated with indicators of autonomic function including heart rate, blood pressure, and heart rate variability. However, this association has not been clearly demonstrated in animal studies. To overcome the problems of wide variations in diseased animals and circadian cycles, we adopted a novel approach using a mixed-effects model to investigate whether ambient particle exposure was associated with changes in heart rate and blood pressure in pulmonary hypertensive rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with radiotelemetry devices and exposed to concentrated ambient particles generated by an air particle concentrator. The rats were held in nose-only exposure chambers for 6 hr per day for 3 consecutive days and then rested for 4 days in each week during the experimental period of 5 weeks. These animals were exposed to concentrated particles during weeks 2, 3, and 4 and exposed to filtered air during weeks 1 and 5. The particle concentrations for tested animals ranged between 108 and 338 micro g/m(3). Statistical analysis using mixed-effects models revealed that entry and exit of exposure chamber and particle exposure were associated with changes in heart rate and mean blood pressure. Immediately after particle exposure, the hourly averaged heart rate decreased and reached the lowest at the first and second hour of exposure for a decrease of 14.9 (p < 0.01) and 11.7 (p = 0.01) beats per minute, respectively. The hourly mean blood pressure also decreased after the particle exposure, with a maximal decrease of 3.3 (p < 0.01) and 4.1 (p < 0.01) mm Hg at the first and second hour of exposure. Our results indicate that ambient particles might influence blood pressure and heart rate. PMID:12573896

  10. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, as inferred from lung areas in gated blood-pool scintigrams: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Urbina, A.; Okada, R.D.; Palacios, I.; Osbakken, M.; Strauss, H.W.

    1981-11-01

    To determine whether the apex-to-base distribution of pulmonary blood volume, as obtained from gated cardiac blood-pool scans, could be used as a noninvasive method to estimate mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), gated blood-pool scans were analyzed in 77 patients who also had PCWP measurements at cardiac catheterization. Ten of these patients had gated cardiac blood-pool scans and PCWP measurements both at rest and during exercise. The apex-to-base distribution of pulmonary blood volume was determined from the end-systolic frame of the left anterior oblique view by placing equal-sized regions of interest over the apex and base of the right lung. The ratio of apex counts over base counts (A/B ratio) was considered abnormal if greater than unity. The mean A/B ratio was 1.15 +/- 0.27 (1 s.d.) for the 32 studies associated with an abnormal mean PCWP (greater than 12 mm Hg). The mean A/B ratio was 0.85 +/- 0.23 for the 55 studies associated with a normal mean PCWP (p less than 0.01 comparing normal group with abnormal). The sensitivity of the A/B ratio for a mean PCWP greater than 12 mm Hg was 81%R (26/32). The specificity of the A/B ratio for a mean PCWP greater than or equal to 12 mm Hg was 89% (49/55). Thus, noninvasive determination of the pulmonary apex-to-base ratio from gated cardiac blood-pool scans appears to differentiate subjects with normal and abnormal mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressures.

  11. In vivo support for the new concept of pulmonary blood flow-mediated CO2 gas excretion in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yoshiko; Ajima, Kumiko; Kaidoh, Maki; Sakaguchi, Masao; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kawamata, Mikito; Kimura, Hiroko; Ohhashi, Toshio

    2015-06-15

    To further examine the validity of the proposed concept of pulmonary blood flow-dependent CO2 gas excretion in the lungs, we investigated the effects of intramediastinal balloon catheterization-, pulmonary artery catheterization-, or isoprenaline (ISP)-induced changes in pulmonary blood flow on the end-expiratory CO2 gas pressure (PeCO2 ), the maximal velocity of the pulmonary artery (Max Vp), systemic arterial pressure, and heart rate of anesthetized rabbits. We also evaluated the changes in the PeCO2 in clinical models of anemia or pulmonary embolism. An almost linear relationship was detected between the PeCO2 and Max Vp. In an experiment in which small pulmonary arteries were subjected to stenosis, the PeCO2 fell rapidly, and the speed of the reduction was dependent on the degree of stenosis. ISP produced significant increases in the PeCO2 of the anesthetized rabbits. Conversely, treatment with piceatannol or acetazolamide induced significant reductions in the PeCO2 . Treatment with a cell surface F1/FO ATP synthase antibody caused significant reductions in the PeCO2 itself and the ISP-induced increase in the PeCO2 . Neither the PeCO2 nor SAP was significantly influenced by marked anemia [%hematocrit (Ht), 70 ∼ 47%]. On the other hand, in the presence of less severe anemia (%Ht: 100 ∼ 70%) both the PeCO2 and SAP fell significantly when the rabbits' blood viscosity was decreased. The rabbits in which pulmonary embolisms were induced demonstrated significantly reduced PeCO2 values, which was compatible with the lowering of their Max Vp. In conclusion, we reaffirm the validity of the proposed concept of CO2 gas exchange in the lungs. PMID:25888575

  12. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  13. The effects of hemolyzed blood on pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure and heart rate of the dog.

    PubMed Central

    McCrady, J D; Pendery, G B; Camp, B J; Clark, D R; Smith, B P; Davis, R H; Moody, G M

    1978-01-01

    The injection of hemolyzed blood into the venous system of the dog produced a rise in the pulmonary arterial pressure and a fall in the systemic arterial pressure. There were variable changes in the heart rate. Comparison with serotonin injections indicated that the above responses were produced by factors other than serotonin. Images Fig. 1. PMID:647460

  14. Redistribution of pulmonary blood flow impacts thermodilution-based extravascular lung water measurements in a model of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Easley, R. Blaine; Mulreany, Daniel G.; Lancaster, Christopher T.; Custer, Jason W.; Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Simon, Brett A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies using transthoracic thermodilution have demonstrated increased extravascular lung water (EVLW) measurements attributed to progression of edema and flooding during sepsis and acute lung injury. We hypothesize that redistribution of pulmonary blood flow can cause increased apparent EVLW secondary to increased perfusion of thermally silent tissue, not increased lung edema. Methods Anesthetized, mechanically ventilated canines were instrumented with PiCCO® (Pulsion Medical, Munich, Germany) catheters and underwent lung injury by repetitive saline lavage. Hemodynamic and respiratory physiologic data were recorded. After stabilized lung injury, endotoxin was administered to inactivate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Computerized tomographic imaging was performed to quantify in vivo lung volume, total tissue (fluid) and air content, and regional distribution of blood flow. Results Lavage injury caused an increase in airway pressures and decreased arterial oxygen content with minimal hemodynamic effects. EVLW and shunt fraction increased after injury and then markedly following endotoxin administration. Computerized tomographic measurements quantified an endotoxin-induced increase in pulmonary blood flow to poorly aerated regions with no change in total lung tissue volume. Conclusions The abrupt increase in EVLW and shunt fraction after endotoxin administration is consistent with inactivation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased perfusion to already flooded lung regions that were previously thermally silent. Computerized tomographic studies further demonstrate in vivo alterations in regional blood flow (but not lung water) and account for these alterations in shunt fraction and EVLW. PMID:19809280

  15. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE WITH INCREASED PULMONARY BLOOD FLOW: LESSONS FROM THE NEONATAL LAMB

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases associated with increased pulmonary blood flow commonly lead to the development of pulmonary hypertension. However, most patients who undergo histological evaluation have advanced pulmonary hypertension, and therefore it has been difficult to investigate aberrations in signaling cascades that precede the development of overt vascular remodeling. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role played by oxidative and nitrosative stress in the lung and their impact on the signaling pathways that regulate vasodilation, vessel growth and vascular remodeling in the neonatal lung exposed to increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:22293025

  16. Redistribution of pulmonary blood flow during unilateral hypoxia in prone and supine dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, C. M.; Domino, K. B.; Walther, S. M.; Glenny, R. W.; Polissar, N. L.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    We used fluorescent-labeled microspheres in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs to study the effects of unilateral alveolar hypoxia on the pulmonary blood flow distribution. The left lung was ventilated with inspired O2 fraction of 1.0, 0.09, or 0.03 in random order; the right lung was ventilated with inspired O2 fraction of 1.0. The lungs were removed, cleared of blood, dried at total lung capacity, then cubed to obtain approximately 1,500 small pieces of lung ( approximately 1.7 cm3). The coefficient of variation of flow increased (P < 0.001) in the hypoxic lung but was unchanged in the hyperoxic lung. Most (70-80%) variance in flow in the hyperoxic lung was attributable to structure, in contrast to only 30-40% of the variance in flow in the hypoxic lung (P < 0.001). When adjusted for the change in total flow to each lung, 90-95% of the variance in the hyperoxic lung was attributable to structure compared with 70-80% in the hypoxic lung (P < 0.001). The hilar-to-peripheral gradient, adjusted for change in total flow, decreased in the hypoxic lung (P = 0.005) but did not change in the hyperoxic lung. We conclude that hypoxic vasoconstriction alters the regional distribution of flow in the hypoxic, but not in the hyperoxic, lung.

  17. [Reconstruction of pulmonary blood flow in the Norwood procedure; Blalock-Taussig shunt; from bench to surgery].

    PubMed

    Kitaichi, Takashi; Sugano, Mikio; Kinoshita, Hajime; Nakayama, Taisuke; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Kanbara, Tamotsu; Fujimoto, Eiki; Kitagawa, Tetsuya

    2014-04-01

    Although the right-ventricle to pulmonary artery( RV-PA) shunt as a source of pulmonary blood supply of Norwood procedure has improved early outcomes, disadvantages including right ventricular dysfunction or arrhythmias have been reported. So it has been still remained controversial whether BT shunt or RV-PA conduit should be selected. We examined the influence of Blalock-Taussig( BT) shunt size on regulation of the pulmonary blood flow in experimental model of a univentricular heart to determine the specific guidelines regarding suitable shunt size in the Norwood procedure. The canine univentricular heart model with the ratio of shunt size to body weight (SS/BW) of 0.8 to 1.1 showed significant negative correlation between the pulmonary/systemic blood flow ratio( Qp/Qs)and arterial PCo2, but those with SS/BW of 1.1 to 1.4 did not. Similar phenomena were shown with the grouped data on relationship between the Qp/Qs and inspired oxygen fraction. These findings imply that when SS/BW is 0.8 to 1.1, the Qp/Qs is controllable by physiologic respiratory manipulations. In the context of our clinical experiences, SS/BW of 0.9 to 1.0 is considered a useful index for suitable BT shunt in the Norwood procedure. PMID:24917156

  18. Asymmetric distribution of the pulmonary blood flow between the right and left lungs in d-transposition of the great arteries.

    PubMed

    Muster, A J; Paul, M H; Van Grondelle, A; Conway, J J

    1976-09-01

    Pulmonary angiograms, radionuclide lung images and chest roentgenograms were evaluated regarding the incidence, magnitude and natural evolution of maldistribution of the pulmonary blood flow between the lungs in 63 patients with dextrotransposition of the great arteries. Approximately half of these patients had some degree of greater perfusion of the right relative to the left lung. A significant correlation was demonstrated between the incidence of this maldistribution of blood flow and the angulation between the main and the right pulmonary arteries. For any given angulation between these vessels, additional pulmonary stenosis increased the incidence of disparity in perfusion. Our observations suggest the following developmental mechanisms: The maldistribution in flow results from the abnormal rightward inclination of the main pulmonary artery in the transposition malformation which straightens the flow axis from the main to the right pulmonary artery. Under these circumstances the momentum of the blood in the main pulmonary artery carries the blood preferentially into the right pulmonary artery. This momentum is increased when there is stenosis of the left ventricular outflow tract. Consequent differences in the mechanical properties of the two pulmonary vascular beds can increase this maldistribution. The disparity in perfusion between the lungs is not present in newborns with d-transposition, appears to be progressive in severity and in time may result in almost complete cessation of effective perfusion of the left lung. The effect of the Mustard operation on this abnormality of flow is discussed. PMID:961610

  19. Oral antioxidants improve leg blood flow during exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Matthew J; Trinity, Joel D; Garten, Ryan S; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Witman, Melissa A H; Bledsoe, Amber D; Morgan, David E; Runnels, Sean; Reese, Van R; Zhao, Jia; Amann, Markus; Wray, D Walter; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-09-01

    The consequence of elevated oxidative stress on exercising skeletal muscle blood flow as well as the transport and utilization of O2 in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not well understood. The present study examined the impact of an oral antioxidant cocktail (AOC) on leg blood flow (LBF) and O2 consumption during dynamic exercise in 16 patients with COPD and 16 healthy subjects. Subjects performed submaximal (3, 6, and 9 W) single-leg knee extensor exercise while LBF (Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial blood pressure, leg vascular conductance, arterial O2 saturation, leg arterial-venous O2 difference, and leg O2 consumption (direct Fick) were evaluated under control conditions and after AOC administration. AOC administration increased LBF (3 W: 1,604 ± 100 vs. 1,798 ± 128 ml/min, 6 W: 1,832 ± 109 vs. 1,992 ± 120 ml/min, and 9W: 2,035 ± 114 vs. 2,187 ± 136 ml/min, P < 0.05, control vs. AOC, respectively), leg vascular conductance, and leg O2 consumption (3 W: 173 ± 12 vs. 210 ± 15 ml O2/min, 6 W: 217 ± 14 vs. 237 ± 15 ml O2/min, and 9 W: 244 ± 16 vs 260 ± 18 ml O2/min, P < 0.05, control vs. AOC, respectively) during exercise in COPD, whereas no effect was observed in healthy subjects. In addition, the AOC afforded a small, but significant, improvement in arterial O2 saturation only in patients with COPD. Thus, these data demonstrate a novel beneficial role of AOC administration on exercising LBF, O2 consumption, and arterial O2 saturation in patients with COPD, implicating oxidative stress as a potential therapeutic target for impaired exercise capacity in this population. PMID:26188020

  20. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

  1. Regional heterogeneity in the reactivity of equine small pulmonary blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Stack, Alice; Derksen, Frederik J; Williams, Kurt J; Robinson, N Edward; Jackson, William F

    2016-03-15

    Regional differences in large equine pulmonary artery reactivity exist. It is not known if this heterogeneity extends into small vessels. The hypothesis that there is regional heterogeneity in small pulmonary artery and vein reactivity to sympathomimetics (phenylephrine and isoproterenol) and a parasympathomimetic (methacholine) was tested using wire myography on small vessels from caudodorsal (CD) and cranioventral (CV) lung of 12 horses [9 mares, 3 geldings, 8.67 ± 0.81 (age ± SE) yr, of various breeds that had never raced]. To study relaxation, vessels were precontracted with U46619 (10(-6) M). Methacholine mechanism of action was investigated using l-nitroarginine methylester (l-NAME, 100 μM) and indomethacin (10 μM). Phenylephrine did not contract any vessels. Isoproterenol relaxed CD arteries more than CV arteries (maximum relaxation 28.18% and 48.67%; Log IC50 ± SE -7.975 ± 0.1327 and -8.033 ± 0.1635 for CD and CV, respectively, P < 0.0001), but not veins. Methacholine caused contraction of CD arteries (maximum contraction 245.4%, Log EC50 ± SE -6.475 ± 0.3341), and relaxation of CV arteries (maximum relaxation 40.14%, Log IC50 ± SE -6.791 ± 0.1954) and all veins (maximum relaxation 50.62%, Log IC50 ± SE -6.932 ± 0.1986) in a nonregion-dependent manner. l-NAME (n = 8, P < 0.0001) and indomethacin (n = 7, P < 0.0001) inhibited methacholine-induced relaxation of CV arteries, whereas indomethacin augmented CD artery contraction (n = 8, P < 0.0001). Our data demonstrate significant regional heterogeneity in small blood vessel reactivity when comparing the CD to the CV region of the equine lung. PMID:26769957

  2. [Effect of Ca-antagonists on pulmonary blood flow during single-lung ventilation in the dog].

    PubMed

    Minami, T; Inoue, H; Ogawa, J; Shohtsu, A

    1993-10-01

    Experiments were conducted in 21 adult mongrel dogs to clarify the effects of Ca-antagonist (nifedipine sublingual administration 2.5 mg or 5 mg, or nicardipine intravenous administration 30 micrograms/kg or 60 micrograms/kg) on pulmonary blood flow under the condition of collapsed lung on the side of thoracotomy. Under anesthesia, an endotracheal tube with a movable blocker was used to intubate the trachea and the thoracotomized lung was collapsed. Subsequently, a Ca-antagonist was given and the ratio of the left main pulmonary artery/ascending thoracic aorta blood flow was used as an index of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). The following results were obtained. 1. Ca-antagonist administration under lung-collapse on the thoracotomy side resulted in inhibition of HPV of the collapsed lung, whereas, arterial blood oxygen tension (PaO2) remained in the acceptable range. 2. The maintenance of the lowered PaO2 within the acceptable range may have been due to the increase in cardiac output and the elevation of mixed venous blood oxygen tension resulting from Ca-antagonist administration, as well as the residual HPV even after administration of the Ca-antagonist. PMID:8271651

  3. Regional pulmonary distribution of iodine-125-labeled oleic acid. Its relationship to the pattern of oleic acid edema and pulmonary blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, R.D.; Tsai, J.; Hedlund, L.W.; Sullivan, D.C.; Lischko, M.M.; Harris, C.C.; Effmann, E.L.; Putman, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    Oleic acid infusion in dogs produces a patchy, predominantly peripheral lesion on CT scans. This study correlates the pattern of oleic acid injury with the distribution of infused oleic acid and pulmonary blood flow. Radiolabeled oleic acid (I-125, 0.05 ml/kg) and radiolabeled 15-micron microspheres (Co-57) were infused into the right atria of 11 dogs. Oleic acid was given after the microspheres in six dogs and before microspheres in five dogs. Ten minutes after infusion, the lungs were removed. Four transverse slices (0.5 cm thick) of the lower lobes were taken from each dog and cubed. Samples were grouped into three regions of the transverse slice: outer, middle, and inner concentric rings. In both groups, I-125 (oleic acid) activity was greater in the outer than the middle and inner concentric layers (P less than 0.001). When Cobalt-57 microspheres were given before oleic acid, Cobalt-57 activity was marginally lower in the outer layer compared with the middle and inner layers. However, when oleic acid was given first, microsphere activity in the outer layer was significantly lower (P less than 0.001) than the middle layer. Thus, oleic acid was preferentially distributed to the peripheral regions of the lung, similar to the regions of injury on CT. This distribution did not correspond to the pattern of pulmonary blood flow as indicated by the microspheres. Immediately after oleic acid infusion, pulmonary blood flow to the periphery was reduced, reflecting a response to the predominantly peripheral injury by oleic acid.

  4. Characterization of the human blood plasma proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Kim, Jeongkwon; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Fang, Ruihua; Tolic, Nikola; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-10-15

    We describe methods for broad characterization of the human plasma proteome. The combination of stepwise IgG and albumin protein depletion by affinity chromatography and ultrahigh-efficiency capillary liquid chromatography separations coupled to ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry enabled identification of 2392 proteins from a single plasma sample with an estimated confidence level of >94%, and an additional 2198 proteins with an estimated confidence level of 80%. The relative abundances of the identified proteins span a range of over eight orders of magnitude in concentration (<30 pg/mL to {approx}30 mg/mL), facilitated by the attomole-level sensitivity of the analysis methods. More than 80% of the observed proteins demonstrate interactions with IgG and/or albumin. The results from this study provide a basis for a wide range of plasma proteomics studies, including broad quantitation of relative abundances in comparative studies for the identification of novel protein disease markers, as well as further studies of protein-protein interactions.

  5. Influence of Rho kinase inhibitor Fasudil on late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood of COPD patients with pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Zhang, Hongmei; Tang, Yijun; Sheng, Chunfeng; Liu, Jianxin; Zeng, Yanjun

    2014-02-01

    The objective of our work was to investigate the influence of Fasudil, a Rho inhibitor on the number and function of the late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) patients with pulmonary artery hypertension. Eighty COPD patients with pulmonary artery hypertension were selected and divided into two groups: the treatment group and the control group, which had 40 patients respectively. The control group received routine treatment, including oxygen uptake, anti-infection and phlegm dissolving. The treatment group received the Fasudil in addition to the routine treatment. The changes on the number and function of the late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood of the patients before and after the treatment were compared between the two groups. The changes on the pulmonary artery pressure were also compared. The number of the late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood of the treatment group increased and the function was enhanced. The pulmonary artery pressure was reduced. The difference before and after the treatment and with the control group was statistically significant (p<0.05). The changes on the number and function of the late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood and the pulmonary artery pressure before and after the treatment of the control group were not statistically significant (p>0.05). The Rho-kinase inhibitor Fasudil increased the number and enhanced the function of the late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood of COPD patients with pulmonary artery hypertension. PMID:24579970

  6. Expression Profile of Cytokines and Enzymes mRNA in Blood Leukocytes of Dogs with Leptospirosis and Its Associated Pulmonary Hemorrhage Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maissen-Villiger, Carla A.; Schweighauser, Ariane; van Dorland, H. Anette; Morel, Claudine; Bruckmaier, Rupert M.; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Francey, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Background Dogs with leptospirosis show similar organ manifestations and disease course as human patients, including acute kidney injury and pulmonary hemorrhage, making this naturally-occurring infection a good animal model for human leptospirosis. Expression patterns of cytokines and enzymes have been correlated with disease manifestations and clinical outcome in humans and animals. The aim of this study was to describe mRNA expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in canine leptospirosis and to compare it with other renal diseases to identify patterns characterizing the disease and especially its pulmonary form. Methodology and Principal Findings The mRNA abundance of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, TGF-β) and enzymes (5-LO, iNOS) was measured prospectively in blood leukocytes from 34 dogs with severe leptospirosis and acute kidney injury, including 22 dogs with leptospirosis-associated pulmonary hemorrhages. Dogs with leptospirosis were compared to 14 dogs with acute kidney injury of other origin than leptospirosis, 8 dogs with chronic kidney disease, and 10 healthy control dogs. Canine leptospirosis was characterized by high 5-LO and low TNF-α expression compared to other causes of acute kidney injury, although the decreased TNF-α expression was also seen in chronic kidney disease. Leptospirosis-associated pulmonary hemorrhage was not characterized by a specific pattern, with only mild changes noted, including increased IL-10 and decreased 5-LO expression on some days in affected dogs. Fatal outcome from pulmonary hemorrhages was associated with low TNF-α, high IL-1β, and high iNOS expression, a pattern possibly expressed also in dogs with other forms of acute kidney injury. Conclusion The patterns of cytokine and enzyme expression observed in the present study indicate a complex pro- and anti-inflammatory response to the infection with leptospires. The recognition of these signatures may be of diagnostic and prognostic relevance

  7. Primary Pulmonary NUT Midline Carcinoma: Clinical, Radiographic, and Pathologic Characterizations.

    PubMed

    Sholl, Lynette M; Nishino, Mizuki; Pokharel, Saraswati; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; French, Christopher A; Janne, Pasi A; Lathan, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a poorly differentiated tumor typically driven by a t(15;19) rearrangement leading to a NUT fusion event. This rare and uniformly fatal tumor arises in multiple organ sites; however the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic characteristics of primary pulmonary NMC are poorly defined. We identified eight cases of primary pulmonary NMC in our consult practice over 4 years and, using a NUT immunohistochemistry screen, retrospectively identified one additional case from 166 (0.6%) consecutive in-house biopsies of lung carcinomas lacking glandular differentiation. Eight cases had available clinical and radiographic data and shared a remarkable degree of similarity. The median age at presentation was 30 (range 21-68). Six patients had little or no smoking history. All complained of 1 to 3 months of cough at presentation. Computed tomography scans showed a large, centrally located primary mass with confluent involvement of mediastinal lymph nodes, pleural disease, and sparing of the contralateral lung. Lytic bone metastases were common but brain metastases were absent in all cases. Pathologically, all cases showed primitive-appearing round to epitheloid cells growing in nests and sheets. All tumors expressed keratin, p63 or p40, and NUT protein. Eight cases had a fluorescence in situ hybridization-proven BRD4-NUT or BRD3-NUT rearrangement; one case was presumed to have a NUT-variant fusion event. Median overall survival was 2.2 months. Despite the rarity of primary pulmonary NMC, it is important to recognize this entity to counsel patients regarding outcome and to identify candidates for targeted BRD inhibitors currently in clinical trials. PMID:26001144

  8. Molecular characterization of pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma: analysis of 33 cases.

    PubMed

    Terra, Simone Bsp; Jang, Jin S; Bi, Lintao; Kipp, Benjamin R; Jen, Jin; Yi, Eunhee S; Boland, Jennifer M

    2016-08-01

    Several targetable genetic alterations have been found in lung cancer, predominantly in adenocarcinomas, which have led to important therapeutic advancements with the advent of targeted therapy. In contrast, the molecular features and presence of targetable genetic abnormalities in pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinomas are largely unknown. Thirty-three cases of pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma were tested for approximately 2800 mutations in 50 oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, including EGFR, KRAS, NRAS, TP53, BRAF, ERBB2, JAK3, AKT1, ATM, MET, KIT, and PIK3CA. ALK immunostaining was performed, and ALK FISH was performed on cases with any degree of staining. Twenty-four of the 33 cases (72%) had at least one genetic abnormality: 19 cases (58%) had TP53 mutations; 10 cases (30%) had KRAS mutations; AKT1, JAK3, BRAF, NRAS, and PIK3CA mutations were observed in 1 case each (3%). Six of the 19 cases (32%) with a mutation in TP53 had simultaneous mutations in KRAS (18%). The cases with alterations in JAK3, BRAF, and NRAS also had mutations in TP53. The case showing a mutation in PIK3CA had a mutation in KRAS. No EGFR mutations were observed. One case had ALK gene rearrangement. ALK rearrangement was observed in a single case of sarcomatoid carcinoma (3%), which has currently available targeted therapy. Four tumors had mutations in genes with experimental molecular-based therapy, including BRAF, NRAS, PIK3CA, and AKT1. Testing for targetable mutations should be considered for patients with pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma, as a subset may benefit from currently approved drugs or clinical trials of novel therapeutic options available for other types of lung cancer. PMID:27174587

  9. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  10. Pulmonary Hemorrhage: Imaging with a New Magnetic Resonance Blood Pool Agent in Conjunction with Breathheld Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Weishaupt, Dominik; Hilfiker, Paul R.; Schmidt, Michaela; Debatin, Joerg F.

    1999-07-15

    Purpose: To describe the three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (3D MRA) imaging appearance of the pulmonary arteries following administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent to human volunteers, and to demonstrate in an animal model (pigs) how this technique can be used to detect pulmonary parenchymal hemorrhage. Methods: Two volunteers were examined following the intravenous administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent (NC100150 Injection, Nycomed Amersham Imaging, Wayne, PA, USA). T1-weighted 3D gradient recalled echo (GRE) image sets (TR/TE 5.1/1.4 msec, flip angle 30 deg.) were acquired breathheld over 24 sec. To assess the detectability of pulmonary bleeding with intravascular MR contrast, pulmonary parenchymal injuries were created in two animals under general anesthesia, and fast T1-weighted 3D GRE image sets collected before and after the injury. Results: Administration of the intravascular contrast in the two volunteers resulted in selective enhancement of the pulmonary vasculature permitting complete visualization and excellent delineation of central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries. Following iatrogenic injury in the two animals, pulmonary hemorrhage was readily detected on the 3D image sets. Conclusion: The data presented illustrate that ultrafast 3D GRE MR imaging in conjunction with an intravenously administered intravascular blood pool agent can be used to perform high-quality pulmonary MRA as well as to detect pulmonary hemorrhage.

  11. Abolished ventilation and perfusion of lung caused by blood clot in the left main bronchus: auto-downregulation of pulmonary arterial blood supply.

    PubMed

    Afzelius, P; Bergmann, A; Henriksen, J H

    2015-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the lungs possess arterial autoregulation associated with bronchial obstruction. A patient with pneumonia and congestive heart failure unexpectedly developed frequent haemoptysis. High-resolution CT and diagnostic CT were performed as well as ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy with single-photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT. V/Q SPECT/CT demonstrated abolished ventilation due to obstruction of the left main bronchus and markedly reduced perfusion of the entire left lung, a condition that was completely reversed after removal of a blood clot. We present the first pictorially documented case of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction and flow shift in a main pulmonary artery due to a complete intrinsic obstruction of the ipsilateral main bronchus. The condition is reversible, contingent on being relieved within a few days. PMID:26374773

  12. Development and characterization of spray dried microparticles for pulmonary delivery of antifungal drug.

    PubMed

    Mathpal, Divita; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is a life threatening fungal infection mainly caused by Aspergillus species. Available treatment strategy against pulmonary aspergillosis is having very limited applicability, due to its toxicity and low circulation half-life. Pulmonary drug delivery is one of the strategies that can minimize these pitfalls. In the present study, polymeric and lipidic nanoparticles of amphotericin B were prepared by spray drying technique using hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and stearylamine with oleic acid respectively. Formulations were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, in-vitro release studies, uptake analysis and in-vivo bio distribution studies. Developed polymeric and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were found in submicron size (600-700nm) and spherical in shape. Studies suggested that NLCs have better entrapment efficiency (77.1±5.5 %) as compared to HPMC carrier (71.28±5.22 %). Both formulations provided sustained drug release (HPMC, 82.05% releases up to 32 hrs and NLC, 88.2 % up to 40 hrs) and reduced dose dumping that may be helpful to reduce the toxicity and improve patient compliance. In-vitro antifungal studies suggested that stearylamine formulations exhibited better antifungal activity over control and HPMC formulations. Pharmacokinetic and organ distribution studies also support our hypothesis i.e. localized drug delivery for prolong period, improving the therapeutic effectiveness of the encapsulated drug against pulmonary aspergillosis. Studies suggested that drug delivery by pulmonary route is beneficial for local action in lungs. PMID:25808185

  13. Technetium-99m red blood cell venography of the lower limb in symptomatic pulmonary embolization.

    PubMed

    Lisbona, R; Rush, C; Lepanto, L

    1987-02-01

    Tc-99m RBC venography of the legs was obtained in 42 patients with primary pulmonary symptomatology and a diagnosis of pulmonary embolization. In 31 of these 42 patients (74%), the nuclear venogram revealed the presence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and a source of embolization. Of the 31 patients with leg DVT documented by venography, 13 (42%) showed thrombosis confined to the calf. Clinical findings suggested that only 20 of the 31 patients (65%) with DVT could have harboured a source of embolization in the legs. Tc-99m RBC venography is a useful noninvasive test for the global and comprehensive assessment of patients with symptomatic pulmonary embolization. PMID:3829541

  14. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and vein in the lungs. As a result, blood passes ... Pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas are usually the result of abnormal development of the blood vessels of the lung. Most occur in ...

  15. Characterization of a postlavage, in situ pulmonary macrophage population.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Davies, P; Shorey, J M; Gibran, N S; Simpson, P J; Huber, G L

    1982-04-01

    A postlavage in situ subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages (PM), biochemically distinct from the lavaged population, has recently been isolated from rats. After exhaustive bronchopulmonary lavage to extract the free lung cells, the lungs were excised, homogenized, and filtered, and the resultant cell suspension was allowed to form a monolayer on plastic Petri dishes. Electron microscopic morphometry failed to indicate any morphologic differences in the two populations. The postlavage in situ PM were more active metabolically during phagocytosis of zymosan particles or stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) than the corresponding lavage population, as evidenced by greater superoxide generation. Macrophages prepared by either method became more avidly phagocytic when incubated with cell-free medium isolated in the preparation of the situ population. Peroxidase, an enzyme absent from the granules of PM separated by lavage techniques, was found in a granule-rich fraction of the in situ macrophage. Catalase activity was found in similar amounts in both supernatants and granule-rich fractions of both populations. The results support the concept of subpopulations of PM and suggest that these subpopulations are distinguished by their biochemical properties and their functional abilities. PMID:6282908

  16. Dynamic blood flow and wall shear stress in pulmonary hypertensive disease.

    PubMed

    Postles, Arthur; Clark, Alys R; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2014-01-01

    This study provides new model of pulsatile flow in the pulmonary circulation in health and pulmonary hypertensive disease. Structural vascular remodeling typical of pulmonary hypertensive disease was implemented in the model by progressively altering the mechanical properties of the arterial geometry and progressively increasing the inlet pulse pressure (PP). The transmission of PP throughout the tree was shown to increase in advanced stages of disease, creating the potential for a `vicious-cycle' of damage to vasculature. Wall shear stress (WSS) was shown to be highest in the terminal arteries of the model and increased significantly with disease. A further trend observed in WSS results was that high WSS values began to `climb' the arterial tree towards the proximal vessels as disease progressed. This suggests a link between WSS and distal remodeling in pulmonary hypertensive disease, which initiates in the small muscular arteries and arterioles and spreads into larger arteries as the disease progresses. PMID:25571282

  17. Characterization of pulmonary sigma receptors by radioligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Lever, John R.; Litton, Tyler P.; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    This study establishes the expression of appreciable populations of sites on mouse lung membranes that exhibit radioligand binding properties and pharmacology consistent with assignment as sigma1 and sigma2 receptors. Specific binding of the sigma1 receptor radioligand [3H](+)-pentazocine reached steady state within 6 h at 37 °C. Saturation studies revealed high affinity binding to a single class of sites (Kd 1.36 ± 0.04 nM; Bmax 967 ± 11 fmol / mg protein). Inhibition studies showed appropriate sigma1 receptor pharmacology, including higher affinity for (+)-N-allylnormetazocine with respect to the (−)-enantiomer, and positive allosteric modulation of dextromethorphan binding by phenytoin. Using [3H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine in the presence of (+)-pentazocine to assess sigma2 receptor binding, steady state was achieved within 2 min at 25 °C. Cold saturation studies revealed one high affinity, low capacity binding site (Kd 31.8 ± 8.3 nM; Bmax 921 ± 228 fmol / mg protein) that displayed sigma2 receptor pharmacology. A very low affinity, high capacity interaction also was observed that represents saturable, but not sigma receptor specific, binding. A panel of ligands showed rank order inhibition of radioligand binding appropriate for the sigma2 receptor, with ifenprodil displaying the highest apparent affinity. In vivo, dextromethorphan inhibited the specific binding of a radioiodinated sigma1 receptor ligand in lung with an ED50 of 1.2 µmol / kg, a value near the recommended dosage for the drug as a cough suppressant. Overall, the present work provides a foundation for studies of drug interactions with pulmonary sigma1 and sigma2 receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26004528

  18. Characterization of pulmonary sigma receptors by radioligand binding.

    PubMed

    Lever, John R; Litton, Tyler P; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A

    2015-09-01

    This study establishes the expression of appreciable populations of sites on mouse lung membranes that exhibit radioligand binding properties and pharmacology consistent with assignment as sigma1 and sigma2 receptors. Specific binding of the sigma1 receptor radioligand [(3)H](+)-pentazocine reached steady state within 6h at 37°C. Saturation studies revealed high affinity binding to a single class of sites (Kd 1.36±0.04nM; Bmax 967±11fmol/mg protein). Inhibition studies showed appropriate sigma1 receptor pharmacology, including higher affinity for (+)-N-allylnormetazocine with respect to the (-)-enantiomer, and positive allosteric modulation of dextromethorphan binding by phenytoin. Using [(3)H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine in the presence of (+)-pentazocine to assess sigma2 receptor binding, steady state was achieved within 2min at 25°C. Cold saturation studies revealed one high affinity, low capacity binding site (Kd 31.8±8.3nM; Bmax 921±228fmol/mg protein) that displayed sigma2 receptor pharmacology. A very low affinity, high capacity interaction also was observed that represents saturable, but not sigma receptor specific, binding. A panel of ligands showed rank order inhibition of radioligand binding appropriate for the sigma2 receptor, with ifenprodil displaying the highest apparent affinity. In vivo, dextromethorphan inhibited the specific binding of a radioiodinated sigma1 receptor ligand in lung with an ED50 of 1.2μmol/kg, a value near the recommended dosage for the drug as a cough suppressant. Overall, the present work provides a foundation for studies of drug interactions with pulmonary sigma1 and sigma2 receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26004528

  19. Characterization of Pulmonary Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, OH; Finkel, RS; Rummey, C; Benton, MJ; Glanzman, AM; Flickinger, J; Lindström, B-M; Meier, T

    2015-01-01

    Decline in pulmonary function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) contributes to significant morbidity and reduced longevity. Spirometry is widely used and fairly easily performed technique to assess lung function, and in particular lung volume; however, the acceptability criteria from the American Thoracic Society (ATS) may be overly restrictive and inappropriate for patients with neuromuscular disease. We examined prospective spirometry data (Forced Vital Capacity [FVC] and peak expiratory flow [PEF]) from 60 DMD patients enrolled in a natural history cohort study (median age 10.3y, range 5–24y). Expiratory flow-volume curves were examined by a pulmonologist and the data were evaluated for acceptability using ATS criteria modified based on the capabilities of patients with neuromuscular disease. Data were then analyzed for change with age, ambulation status and glucocorticoid use. At least one acceptable study was obtained in 44 subjects (73%) and 81 of the 131 studies (62%) were acceptable. The FVC and PEF showed similar relative changes in absolute values with increasing age: an increase through 10y, relative stabilization from 10–18y, and then a decrease at older age. The percent predicted FVC and PEF showed a near linear decline of approximately 5 percentage points/year from ages 5 to 24y. Surprisingly, no difference was observed in FVC or PEF by ambulation or steroid treatment. Acceptable spirometry can be performed on DMD patients over a broad range of ages. Using modified ATS criteria, curated spirometry data, excluding technically unacceptable data, may provide a more reliable means of determining change in lung function over time. PMID:25755201

  20. Pulmonary blood volume indexed to lung volume is reduced in newly diagnosed systemic sclerosis compared to normals – a prospective clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance study addressing pulmonary vascular changes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary involvement, manifested as pulmonary arterial hypertension or pulmonary fibrosis, is the most common cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc). We aimed to explore the feasibility of detecting early pulmonary involvement in SSc using recently developed non-invasive quantitative measures of pulmonary physiology using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods Twenty-seven SSc patients (9 men, 57 ± 13 years) and 10 healthy controls (3 men, 54 ± 9 years) underwent CMR to determine the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and the PBV variation (PBVV) throughout the cardiac cycle. Patients underwent Doppler echocardiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), and pulmonary function testing by spirometry. Comparisons were performed using the unpaired t-test and linear regression analysis was performed with Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r). Results Compared to healthy controls, the PBV indexed to lung volume (PBVI) was lower in patients (16 ± 4 vs 20 ± 5%, p < 0.05). There was no difference in PBV (466 ± 87 vs 471 ± 122 mL, p = 0.91) or PBVV/stroke volume (45 ± 10 vs 40 ± 6%, p = 0.09). There were no significant correlations between PBVI and pulmonary artery pressure estimated by Doppler (p = 0.08) the lung’s diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) (p = 0.09), vital capacity (p = 0.45), or pulmonary fibrosis by HRCT (p = 0.74). Conclusions This study is the first to measure the PBV in humans using CMR. Compared to healthy controls, newly diagnosed SSc patients have a reduced amount of blood in the pulmonary vasculature (PBVI) but unchanged pulmonary vascular distensibility (PBVV/stroke volume). PBVI is unrelated to DLCO, pulmonary artery pressure, vital capacity, and the presence of pulmonary fibrosis. PBVI may be a novel parameter reflecting vascular lung involvement in early-stage SSc, and these findings may be consistent with pathophysiological changes of

  1. Development and Characterization of Acellular Porcine Pulmonary Valve Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Korossis, Sotirios A.; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul; Jennings, Louise M; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Currently available replacement heart valves all have limitations. This study aimed to produce and characterize an acellular, biocompatible porcine pulmonary root conduit for reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract e.g., during Ross procedure. A process for the decellularization of porcine pulmonary roots was developed incorporating trypsin treatment of the adventitial surface of the scraped pulmonary artery and sequential treatment with hypotonic Tris buffer (HTB; 10 mM Tris pH 8.0, 0.1% (w/v) EDTA, and 10 KIU aprotinin), 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate in HTB, two cycles of DNase and RNase, and sterilization with 0.1% (v/v) peracetic acid. Histology confirmed an absence of cells and retention of the gross histoarchitecture. Immunohistochemistry further confirmed cell removal and partial retention of the extracellular matrix, but a loss of collagen type IV. DNA levels were reduced by more than 96% throughout all regions of the acellular tissue and no functional genes were detected using polymerase chain reaction. Total collagen levels were retained but there was a significant loss of glycosaminoglycans following decellularization. The biomechanical, hydrodynamic, and leaflet kinematics properties were minimally affected by the process. Both immunohistochemical labeling and antibody absorption assay confirmed a lack of α-gal epitopes in the acellular porcine pulmonary roots and in vitro biocompatibility studies indicated that acellular leaflets and pulmonary arteries were not cytotoxic. Overall the acellular porcine pulmonary roots have excellent potential for development of a tissue substitute for right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction e.g., during the Ross procedure. PMID:24786313

  2. Blood volume increase in salt-induced pulmonary hypertension, heart failure and ascites in broiler and White Leghorn chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Mirsalimi, S M; O'Brien, P J; Julian, R J

    1993-01-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that excess dietary salt produces an expansion of extracellular fluid volume which may be associated with pulmonary hypertension-induced right ventricular failure in chickens with rapid growth rates. One-week-old broiler and White Leghorn chickens were given 0.5% salt in their drinking water for three weeks. Saline water had a minimal effect on White Leghorns. The hypothesis appears to be correct since salt-treatment in broilers resulted in up to 30% expansion in blood volume and there was 50% mortality from pulmonary hypertension-induced right ventricular failure and ascites. There was marked (up to 88% in some broilers) right ventricular hypertrophy, an indicator of pulmonary hypertension. There was less left ventricular hypertrophy as shown by an increase in the ratio of the right to total ventricle weight. There was up to 32% decrease in growth rate. There was renal hypertrophy in the salt-treated birds as shown by a higher kidney to body weight ratio. PMID:8490804

  3. Characterization of cloned cells from an immortalized fetal pulmonary type II cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.F.; Waide, J.J.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    A cultured cell line that maintained expression of pulmonary type II cell markers of differentiation would be advantageous to generate a large number of homogenous cells in which to study the biochemical functions of type II cells. Type II epithelial cells are the source of pulmonary surfactant and a cell of origin for pulmonary adenomas. Last year our laboratory reported the induction of expression of two phenotypic markers of pulmonary type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and surfactant lipid synthesis) in cultured fetal rat lung epithelial (FRLE) cells, a spontaneously immortalized cell line of fetal rat lung type II cell origin. Subsequently, the induction of the ability to synthesize surfactant lipid became difficult to repeat. We hypothesized that the cell line was heterogenuous and some cells were more like type II cells than others. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis and to obtain a cultured cell line with type II cell phenotypic markers by cloning several FRLE cells and characterizing them for phenotypic markers of type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and presence of surfactant lipids). Thirty cloned cell lines were analyzed for induced alkaline phosphatase activity (on x-axis) and for percent of phospholipids that were disaturated (i.e., surfactant).

  4. Flow Cytometric Quantification of Peripheral Blood Cell β-Adrenergic Receptor Density and Urinary Endothelial Cell-Derived Microparticles in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jonathan A.; Wanner, Nicholas; Cheong, Hoi I.; Queisser, Kimberly; Barrett, Patrick; Park, Margaret; Hite, Corrine; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V.; Erzurum, Serpil; Asosingh, Kewal

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by severe angiogenic remodeling of the pulmonary artery wall and right ventricular hypertrophy. Thus, there is an increasing need for novel biomarkers to dissect disease heterogeneity, and predict treatment response. Although β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) dysfunction is well documented in left heart disease while endothelial cell-derived microparticles (Ec-MPs) are established biomarkers of angiogenic remodeling, methods for easy large clinical cohort analysis of these biomarkers are currently absent. Here we describe flow cytometric methods for quantification of βAR density on circulating white blood cells (WBC) and Ec-MPs in urine samples that can be used as potential biomarkers of right heart failure in PAH. Biotinylated β-blocker alprenolol was synthesized and validated as a βAR specific probe that was combined with immunophenotyping to quantify βAR density in circulating WBC subsets. Ec-MPs obtained from urine samples were stained for annexin-V and CD144, and analyzed by a micro flow cytometer. Flow cytometric detection of alprenolol showed that βAR density was decreased in most WBC subsets in PAH samples compared to healthy controls. Ec-MPs in urine was increased in PAH compared to controls. Furthermore, there was a direct correlation between Ec-MPs and Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) in PAH patients. Therefore, flow cytometric quantification of peripheral blood cell βAR density and urinary Ec-MPs may be useful as potential biomarkers of right ventricular function in PAH. PMID:27270458

  5. Flow Cytometric Quantification of Peripheral Blood Cell β-Adrenergic Receptor Density and Urinary Endothelial Cell-Derived Microparticles in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jonathan A; Wanner, Nicholas; Cheong, Hoi I; Queisser, Kimberly; Barrett, Patrick; Park, Margaret; Hite, Corrine; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Erzurum, Serpil; Asosingh, Kewal

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by severe angiogenic remodeling of the pulmonary artery wall and right ventricular hypertrophy. Thus, there is an increasing need for novel biomarkers to dissect disease heterogeneity, and predict treatment response. Although β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) dysfunction is well documented in left heart disease while endothelial cell-derived microparticles (Ec-MPs) are established biomarkers of angiogenic remodeling, methods for easy large clinical cohort analysis of these biomarkers are currently absent. Here we describe flow cytometric methods for quantification of βAR density on circulating white blood cells (WBC) and Ec-MPs in urine samples that can be used as potential biomarkers of right heart failure in PAH. Biotinylated β-blocker alprenolol was synthesized and validated as a βAR specific probe that was combined with immunophenotyping to quantify βAR density in circulating WBC subsets. Ec-MPs obtained from urine samples were stained for annexin-V and CD144, and analyzed by a micro flow cytometer. Flow cytometric detection of alprenolol showed that βAR density was decreased in most WBC subsets in PAH samples compared to healthy controls. Ec-MPs in urine was increased in PAH compared to controls. Furthermore, there was a direct correlation between Ec-MPs and Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) in PAH patients. Therefore, flow cytometric quantification of peripheral blood cell βAR density and urinary Ec-MPs may be useful as potential biomarkers of right ventricular function in PAH. PMID:27270458

  6. Telomere Shortening in Blood Leukocytes of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sadr, Makan; Noori Mugahi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Nadji, Seyed Alireza; Kiani, Arda; Abedini, Atefeh; Javadi, Alireza; Mohammadi, Forozan; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Bahadori, Moslem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation that is not completely reversible by administration of inhaled bronchodilators. Many studies propose that telomere length shortening might have occurred in COPD patients. We aimed to determine the telomere length in COPD patients and compare the results of non-smoking and smoking control subjects. Materials and Methods: In our case-control study, 84 clinically stable COPD patients were recruited on admission to Masih Daneshvari Hospital. Eighty-five healthy controls were also selected including 45 non-smokers and 40 smokers admitted for diseases other than COPD. Spirometry was done for all subjects. Telomere length was measured by quantitative real time PCR as described by Cawthon. The telomere repeat copy number (T) to single-gene copy number (S) ratio was calculated using the comparative Ct method. Results: The mean ±SD of age was 64.33±10.04 years in patients and 65.06 ±10.02 years in controls (P=0.693). The mean ±SD of FEV1 was 1.62±0.75 L in patients, 2.84±0.54 L in smoker controls and 2.83±0.56 L in non-smoker controls; significant differences were detected in this regard between cases and controls (P<0.001). T/S ratio was significantly lower in COPD patients (0.61±0.08) than in the control subjects (0.69±0.09) (P<0.001). However, telomere length was shorter in the patients than in controls in each age group (P<0.001). Additionally, there were no statistically significant differences in telomere length between the smoker and non-smoker control subjects. Regarding the correlation between BMI and telomere length, there were no significant differences among the patients and control groups. Conclusion: In conclusion, we found that telomere length in COPD patients was shorter than that in smoker and non-smoker controls, irrespective of age, sex, spirometric variables, BMI and history of cigarette smoking. PMID:26221147

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have it, the blood ... heart has to work harder to pump the blood through. Over time, your heart weakens and ... of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  8. Ibn nafis - a forgotten genius in the discovery of pulmonary blood circulation.

    PubMed

    Akmal, M; Zulkifle, M; Ansari, Ah

    2010-03-01

    Scientific theories take centuries to come into existence and they keep on evolving. Uncountable intellectual minds work on these theories; some fail to do anything about it; some add a little after tremendous efforts, and some people give remarkable and unforgettable contribution.As far as credit is concerned, the person who is able to prove the theory by his facts and who clears the maximum doubts by his observations, experimentations, facts and reasoning, gets the credit for that theory, and this should be done with honesty.The theory of pulmonary circulation took more than 2000 years to come into existence as we know it today. With the passage of time different people were given credit. Some say that it was given to Galen; some say it was Michael Servetus; others say that Realdus Columbus was the real discoverer; some gave the credit to Ibn Nafis, and finally people gave the credit to William Harvey. But after the rediscovery of Ibn Nafis' manuscript no.62243 titled Sharah al Tashreeh al Qanoon, or "Commentary on the anatomy of Canon of Avicenna" in 1924 AD in Europe, it became clear that Ibn Nafis had described the pulmonary circulation almost 300 years before Harvey, and the historians like Aldo Mieli, Max Mayrhoff, Edward Coppola etc. clearly state that Ibn Nafis is the real discoverer of the pulmonary circulation and that he should be given the credit for the discovery of the pulmonary circulation. PMID:21042463

  9. IBN NAFIS – A FORGOTTEN GENIUS IN THE DISCOVERY OF PULMONARY BLOOD CIRCULATION

    PubMed Central

    Akmal, M; Zulkifle, M; Ansari, AH

    2010-01-01

    Scientific theories take centuries to come into existence and they keep on evolving. Uncountable intellectual minds work on these theories; some fail to do anything about it; some add a little after tremendous efforts, and some people give remarkable and unforgettable contribution. As far as credit is concerned, the person who is able to prove the theory by his facts and who clears the maximum doubts by his observations, experimentations, facts and reasoning, gets the credit for that theory, and this should be done with honesty. The theory of pulmonary circulation took more than 2000 years to come into existence as we know it today. With the passage of time different people were given credit. Some say that it was given to Galen; some say it was Michael Servetus; others say that Realdus Columbus was the real discoverer; some gave the credit to Ibn Nafis, and finally people gave the credit to William Harvey. But after the rediscovery of Ibn Nafis’ manuscript no.62243 titled Sharah al Tashreeh al Qanoon, or “Commentary on the anatomy of Canon of Avicenna” in 1924 AD in Europe, it became clear that Ibn Nafis had described the pulmonary circulation almost 300 years before Harvey, and the historians like Aldo Mieli, Max Mayrhoff, Edward Coppola etc. clearly state that Ibn Nafis is the real discoverer of the pulmonary circulation and that he should be given the credit for the discovery of the pulmonary circulation. PMID:21042463

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  11. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood flow from the right ventricle (right side pumping chamber) to the lungs. In pulmonary atresia, a ... Reconstructing the heart as a single ventricle (1 pumping chamber instead of 2) Heart transplant

  12. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot in the leg called a deep vein thrombosis that breaks loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a ...

  13. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  14. [Pulmonary circulation in embolic pulmonary edema].

    PubMed

    Sanotskaia, N V; Polikarpov, V V; Matsievskiĭ, D D

    1989-02-01

    The ultrasonic method was used in acute experiments on cats with open chest under artificial lung ventilation to obtain blood flow in low-lobar pulmonary artery and vein, the blood pressure in pulmonary artery, as well as the left atrial pressure in fat (olive oil) and mechanical (Lycopodium spores) pulmonary embolism. It is shown that pulmonary embolism produces the decrease in the blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein, the increase of the pressure in pulmonary artery and left atria, the increase of lung vessels resistance. The decrease is observed of systemic arterial pressure, bradycardia, and extrasystole. After 5-10 min the restoration of arterial pressure and heart rhythm occur and partial restoration of blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein. In many experiments the blood flow in vein outdoes that in the artery--it allows to suppose the increase of the blood flow in bronchial artery. After 60-90 min there occur sudden decrease of systemic arterial pressure, the decrease of the blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein. The pressure in pulmonary artery and resistance of pulmonary vessels remain high. Pulmonary edema developed in all animals. The death occurs in 60-100 min after the beginning of embolism. PMID:2923969

  15. Association of haematocrit and red blood cell transfusion with outcomes in infants with shunt-dependent pulmonary blood flow and univentricular physiology

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Rahul; Parsons, Andrew; McClelland, Sarenthia; Morgan, Elizabeth; Robertson, Michael J.; Noel, Tommy R.; Schmitz, Michael L.; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Gupta, Punkaj

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and haematocrit values with outcomes in infants with univentricular physiology undergoing surgery for a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt. Material and methods This study included infants ≤ 2 months of age who underwent modified Blalock-Taussig shunt surgery at the Arkansas Children’s Hospital (2006–2012). Infants undergoing a Norwood operation or Damus-Kaye-Stansel operation with modified Blalock-Taussig shunt were excluded. Demographics, pre-operative, operative, daily laboratory data, and post-operative variables were collected. We studied the association between haematocrit and blood transfusion with a composite clinical outcome. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to study the probability of study outcomes as a function of haematocrit values and RBC transfusions after operation. Results Seventy-three patients qualified for inclusion. All study patients received blood transfusion within the first 48 hours after heart surgery. The median haematocrit was 44.3 (interquartile range [IQR] 42.5–46.2), and the median volume of RBC transfused was 28 mL/kg (IQR, 10–125) in the first 14 days after surgery. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 13.6% (10 patients). A multivariable analysis adjusted for risk factors, including weight, prematurity, cardiopulmonary bypass and postoperative need for nitric oxide and dialysis, revealed no association between haematocrit values and RBC transfusion with the composite clinical outcome. Discussion We did not find an association between higher haematocrit values and increasing RBC transfusions with improved outcomes in infants with shunt-dependent pulmonary blood flow and univentricular physiology. The power of our study was small, which prevents any strong statement on this lack of association. Future multi-centre, randomised controlled trials are needed to investigate this topic in further

  16. Relationship of cerebral blood flow to aortic-to-pulmonary collateral/shunt flow in single ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Mark A; Li, Christine; Wilson, Felice; Pawlowski, Tom; Nicolson, Susan C; Montenegro, Lisa M; Berenstein, Laura Diaz; Spray, Thomas L; Gaynor, J William; Fuller, Stephanie; Keller, Marc S; Harris, Matthew A; Whitehead, Kevin K; Clancy, Robert; Elci, Okan; Bethel, Jim; Vossough, Arastoo; Licht, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with single ventricle can develop aortic-to-pulmonary collaterals (APCs). Along with systemic-to-pulmonary artery shunts, these structures represent a direct pathway from systemic to pulmonary circulations, and may limit cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study investigated the relationship between CBF and APC flow on room air and in hypercarbia, which increases CBF in patients with single ventricle. Methods 106 consecutive patients with single ventricle underwent 118 cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) scans in this cross-sectional study; 34 prior to bidirectional Glenn (BDG) (0.50±0.30 years old), 50 prior to Fontan (3.19±1.03 years old) and 34 3–9 months after Fontan (3.98±1.39 years old). Velocity mapping measured flows in the aorta, cavae and jugular veins. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple linear regression were used. Significance was p<0.05. Results A strong inverse correlation was noted between CBF and APC/shunt both on room air and with hypercarbia whether CBF was indexed to aortic flow or body surface area, independent of age, cardiopulmonary bypass time, Po2 and Pco2 (R=−0.67–−0.70 for all patients on room air, p<0.01 and R=−0.49–−0.90 in hypercarbia, p<0.01). Correlations were not different between surgical stages. CBF was lower, and APCs/shunt flow was higher prior to BDG than in other stages. Conclusions There is a strong inverse relationship between CBF and APC/shunt flow in patients with single ventricle throughout surgical reconstruction on room air and in hypercarbia independent of other factors. We speculate that APC/shunt flow may have a negative impact on cerebral development and neurodevelopmental outcome. Interventions on APC may modify CBF, holding out the prospect for improving neurodevelopmental trajectory. Trial Registration Number NCT02135081. PMID:26048877

  17. Characterization of right ventricular remodeling and failure in a chronic pulmonary hypertension model.

    PubMed

    Aguero, Jaume; Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Hadri, Lahouaria; Santos-Gallego, Carlos; Fish, Kenneth; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Chaanine, Antoine; Torquato, Samantha; Naim, Charbel; Ibanez, Borja; Pereda, Daniel; García-Alvarez, Ana; Fuster, Valentin; Sengupta, Partho P; Leopold, Jane A; Hajjar, Roger J

    2014-10-15

    In pulmonary hypertension (PH), right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and failure is the main determinant of a poor prognosis. We aimed to characterize RV structural and functional differences during adaptive RV remodeling and progression to RV failure in a large animal model of chronic PH. Postcapillary PH was created surgically in swine (n = 21). After an 8- to 14-wk follow-up, two groups were identified based on the development of overt heart failure (HF): PH-NF (nonfailing, n = 12) and PH-HF (n = 8). In both groups, invasive hemodynamics, pressure-volume relationships, and echocardiography confirmed a significant increase in pulmonary pressures and vascular resistance consistent with PH. Histological analysis also demonstrated distal pulmonary arterial (PA) remodeling in both groups. Diastolic dysfunction, defined by a steeper RV end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship and longitudinal strain, was found in the absence of HF as an early marker of RV remodeling. RV contractility was increased in both groups, and RV-PA coupling was preserved in PH-NF animals but impaired in the PH-HF group. RV hypertrophy was present in PH-HF, although there was evidence of increased RV fibrosis in both PH groups. In the PH-HF group, RV sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase2a expression was decreased, and endoplasmic reticulum stress was increased. Aldosterone levels were also elevated in PH-HF. Thus, in the swine pulmonary vein banding model of chronic postcapillary PH, RV remodeling occurs at the structural, histological, and molecular level. Diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis are present in adaptive RV remodeling, whereas the onset of RV failure is associated with RV-PA uncoupling, defective calcium handling, and hyperaldosteronism. PMID:25158063

  18. PPAR-γ Regulates Carnitine Homeostasis and Mitochondrial Function in a Lamb Model of Increased Pulmonary Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Hou, Yali; Oishi, Peter E.; Datar, Sanjeev A.; Raff, Gary; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Carnitine homeostasis is disrupted in lambs with endothelial dysfunction secondary to increased pulmonary blood flow (Shunt). Our recent studies have also indicated that the disruption in carnitine homeostasis correlates with a decrease in PPAR-γ expression in Shunt lambs. Thus, this study was carried out to determine if there is a causal link between loss of PPAR-γ signaling and carnitine dysfunction, and whether the PPAR-γ agonist, rosiglitazone preserves carnitine homeostasis in Shunt lambs. Methods and Results siRNA-mediated PPAR-γ knockdown significantly reduced carnitine palmitoyltransferases 1 and 2 (CPT1 and 2) and carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) protein levels. This decrease in carnitine regulatory proteins resulted in a disruption in carnitine homeostasis and induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as determined by a reduction in cellular ATP levels. In turn, the decrease in cellular ATP attenuated NO signaling through a reduction in eNOS/Hsp90 interactions and enhanced eNOS uncoupling. In vivo, rosiglitazone treatment preserved carnitine homeostasis and attenuated the development of mitochondrial dysfunction in Shunt lambs maintaining ATP levels. This in turn preserved eNOS/Hsp90 interactions and NO signaling. Conclusion Our study indicates that PPAR-γ signaling plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial function through the regulation of carnitine homeostasis both in vitro and in vivo. Further, it identifies a new mechanism by which PPAR-γ regulates NO signaling through Hsp90. Thus, PPAR-γ agonists may have therapeutic potential in preventing the endothelial dysfunction in children with increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:22962578

  19. A study of the role of IL-12 in pulmonary tuberculosis using the whole blood flowcytometry technique.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Wafaa A; Ghonaim, Mabrouk M; Koura, Bothina A; El-Banna, Hassan; Ali, Sahar M; El-Sheikh, Nabila

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis remains a major health problem. It is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which elicits a T-cell dependent immune response, initiated by monocytes through a large number of cytokines of which interleukin-12 is thought to play a critical role in initiation and regulation of T-helper (Th-1) like responses. To better understand the role of IL-12 in pulmonary tuberculosis patients, intracellular IL-12 in peripheral blood-derived monocytes was examined by flowcytometery. The percentage of monocytes producing IL-12 was measured after invitro stimulation of heparinized whole blood with mycobacterial protein antigens (culture filtrate). Of the 22 active tuberculosis patients, 17 were recent cases and 5 recurrent cases. Healthy controls were 14 individuals with detectable reaction to purified protein derivative (PPD+) and 14 without detectable reaction to PPD. The role of different factors affecting disease outcome such as treatment, age, gender, smoking, severity of disease and presence of other complications on the percentage of monocytes producing IL-12 was studied. Recurrent TB patients had a higher number of monocytes producing IL-12 in unstimulated cultures compared to other groups (P < 0.001). However, after in vitro stimulation there was a significant decrease in the number of monocytes producing IL-12 in recurrent TB patients as compared to recently diagnosed TB patients and healthy PPD+ individuals (P < 0.001). Antituberculosis chemotherapy was the only factor that had significant effect on the percentage of monocytes producing IL-12 (p < 0.05) while other studied factors did not show significant effect (p > 0.05). It is concluded that IL-12 plays a prominent regulatory role in tuberculosis. PMID:17974150

  20. Regional pulmonary blood flow in mitral disease studied by xenon radiospirometry.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, L H; Johansen, J K; Hyldebrandt, N

    1976-01-01

    Regional lung perfusion was measured in the sitting position by 4 external detectors after intravenous injection of 133Xe in 24 patients with mitral valve disease and in 8 people with no cardiopulmonary disease acting as normal controls. Right- and left-sided heart catheterization was carried out on the patients on the following day. Mitral valve stenosis was found in 9, mitral valve regurgitation in 8, and both stenosis and regurgitation in the remaining 7. Regional lung perfusion in the normal people fell linearly from the basal to the apical sections of the lungs. The perfusion distribution in patients with mitral valve disease and a pulmonary capillary vein (PCV) pressure lower than 15 mmHg (2-0 kPa) did not differ significantly from that of the controls. A redistribution of the regional perfusion, with an increase in the apical perfusion and a fall in the basal perfusion of the lungs, was seen in patients with a raised PCV pressure. The hyperperfusion of the apical lung sections correlated with the mean pressure in the pulmonary artery (r=+0-795, P less than 0-001), while the basal hypoperfusion correlated with the PCV pressure (r=0-842, P less than 0-001). The PCV pressure can be predicted with an exactitude of +/- 7 mmHg (0-9 kPa) (95% confidence limits). Neither the cardiac index nor the pulmonary vascular resistance correlated with the changes in perfusion. Xenon radiospirometry is a rapid and reliable method for evaluating PCV pressure before or after operation in patients with mitral valve disease. PMID:1275987

  1. Pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic hemolytic anemia and other blood disorders.

    PubMed

    Machado, Roberto F; Farber, Harrison W

    2013-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has emerged as a major complication of several hematologic disorders, including hemoglobinopathies, red cell membrane disorders, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, and splenectomy. With the exception of sickle cell disease, there are a limited number of studies systematically evaluating the prevalence of PH using the gold standard right heart catheterization in these disorders. The cause of the PH in patients with hematologic disorders is multifactorial, and a thorough diagnostic evaluation is essential. More importantly, there are virtually no high-quality data on the safety and efficacy of PH-targeted therapy in this patient population. PMID:24267302

  2. Drospirenone detected in postmortem blood of a young woman with pulmonary thromboembolism: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Idota, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Miyamori, Daisuke; Kakiuchi, Yasuhiro; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Progestin/estrogen oral contraceptives have some side effects, including venous thromboembolism. To alleviate side effects, improvements have been made to low-dose oral contraceptives, including reductions in the amount of estrogen and/or changes the type of progestin. A compound drug containing 3mg drospirenone and 20μg ethinylestradiol (DRSP/EE20, YAZ®) was released in overseas markets in 2006, and in Japan in 2010 as a newly developed low-dose medicines. This drug is expected to have lower side effects. We received a medicolegal autopsy case of a young woman who had been prescribed YAZ for dysmenorrhea for 17months. The autopsy revealed a blood clot in her pulmonary artery bifurcation. Blood screening by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis did not detect any medicinal toxicants. However, from police investigations, it is strongly believed that she had been taking YAZ. Therefore we performed a single ion resolution mode assay and detected DRSP. A quantitative analysis revealed 32.3ng/mL of DRSP. As no other cause of the pulmonary thromboembolism was evident, we consider YAZ as the likely cause of the pulmonary thromboembolism. Recent reports from the past few years suggest a higher risk of venous thromboembolism with DRSP/EE20 than earlier progestin/estrogen oral contraceptives. Comparing the risk associated with DRSP/EE20 and DRSP/EE30, one report found no differences and another report showed DRSP/EE20 was associated with a higher risk than DRSP/EE30. No cases of thrombosis caused by progestin alone have been reported. But comparing the risk between DRSP/EE20 and other progestins/EE20, two studies reported DRSP/EE20 had a higher risk than other progestins/EE20. The incidence of venous thromboembolism is highest in the first year of use and decreases thereafter. Because DRSP/EE20 has been on the market for only a couple of years, it is necessary for clinicians to use the drug carefully and accumulate more side-effect data. It is

  3. Characterization of red blood cells (RBCs) using dual Brillouin/Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocytes, or red blood cells, transport oxygen to and carbon dioxide from the body's tissues and organs. Red blood cell mechanical properties are altered in a number of diseases such as sickle cell anaemia and malaria. Additionally, mechanically modified red blood cell ghosts are being considered as a long-term, biocompatible carrier for drug delivery and for blood analyte sensing. Brillouin spectroscopy enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this report, Brillouin spectroscopy is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of red blood cells and red blood cell ghosts.

  4. Encapsulation of Alpha-1 antitrypsin in PLGA nanoparticles: In Vitro characterization as an effective aerosol formulation in pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha 1- antitrypsin (α1AT) belongs to the superfamily of serpins and inhibits different proteases. α1AT protects the lung from cellular inflammatory enzymes. In the absence of α1AT, the degradation of lung tissue results to pulmonary complications. The pulmonary route is a potent noninvasive route for systemic and local delivery. The aerosolized α1AT not only affects locally its main site of action but also avoids remaining in circulation for a long period of time in peripheral blood. Poly (D, L lactide-co glycolide) (PLGA) is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer approved for sustained controlled release of peptides and proteins. The aim of this work was to prepare a wide range of particle size as a carrier of protein-loaded nanoparticles to deposit in different parts of the respiratory system especially in the deep lung. Various lactide to glycolide ratio of the copolymer was used to obtain different release profile of the drug which covers extended and rapid drug release in one formulation. Results Nonaqueous and double emulsion techniques were applied for the synthesis of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were characterized in terms of surface morphology, size distribution, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, FTIR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). To evaluate the nanoparticles cytotoxicity, cell cytotoxicity test was carried out on the Cor L105 human epithelial lung cancer cell line. Nanoparticles were spherical with an average size in the range of 100 nm to 1μ. The encapsulation efficiency was found to be higher when the double emulsion technique was applied. XRD and DSC results indicated that α1AT encapsulated in the nanoparticles existed in an amorphous or disordered-crystalline status in the polymer matrix. The lactic acid to glycolic acid ratio affects the release profile of α1AT. Hence, PLGA with a 50:50 ratios exhibited the ability to release %60 of the drug within 8

  5. Effects of body position, hyperinflation, and blood gas tensions on maximal respiratory pressures in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Heijdra, Y. F.; Dekhuijzen, P. N.; van Herwaarden, C. L.; Folgering, H. T.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Inspiratory muscle strength in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be affected by mechanical factors which influence the length of the diaphragm, and by non-mechanical factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate firstly the effects of body position on respiratory pressures and, secondly, to determine the relative contribution of age, body mass index (BMI), lung volumes, and arterial blood gas tensions to respiratory muscle strength. METHODS--Thirty male patients with stable COPD (mean FEV1 40.4% predicted) participated in the study. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures (PImax, PEmax) and maximal inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressures (PDI) in the sitting and supine position, lung function, and arterial blood gas tensions were measured. RESULTS--Mean (SD) PImax in the sitting position was higher than in the supine position (7.1(2.3)kPa v 6.4(2.2)kPa respectively). In contrast, PDI in the sitting position was lower than in the supine position (10.0(3.5)kPa v 10.8(3.7)kPa respectively). PEmax was higher in the sitting position (9.3(3.0)kPa) than in the supine position (8.7(2.8)kPa). Significant correlations were found between inspiratory muscle strength on the one hand, and lung function parameters, BMI, and arterial blood gas tensions on the other. CONCLUSIONS--Inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD is influenced by mechanical factors (body position, lung volumes) and non-mechanical factors (BMI, FEV1, and blood gases). PImax and PEmax are lower in the supine position while, in contrast to healthy subjects, PDI is higher in the supine position than in the sitting position. PMID:8016765

  6. A Modified Verhoeff-Van Gieson Elastin Histochemical Stain to Enable Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Model Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Percival, K.R.; Radi, Z.A.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal histochemical staining is critical to ensure excellent quality stained sections to enable light microscopic and histomorphometric image analysis. Verhoeff-van Gieson is the most widely used histochemical stain for the visualization of vascular elastic fibers. However, it is notoriously difficult to differentiate fine elastic fibers of small vasculature to enable histomorphometric image analysis, especially in organs such as the lung. A tissue fixation procedure of 10% neutral buffered formalin with subsequent fixation in 70% ethanol further compounds the problem of small vessel staining and identification. Therefore, a modified Verhoeff’s elastin stain was developed as a reliable method to optimally highlight the internal and external elastic laminae of small arteries (50-100 µm external diameter) and intra-acinar vessels (10-50 µm external diameter) in 3 µm thick lung tissue sections from models of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This modified Verhoeff’s elastin stain demonstrated well-defined staining of fine elastic fibers of pulmonary blood vessels enabling subsequent histomorphometric image analysis of vessel wall thickness in small arteries and intra-acinar vessels. In conclusion, modification of the standard Verhoeff-van Gieson histochemical stain is needed to visualize small caliber vessels’ elastic fibers especially in tissues fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin followed by additional fixation in 70% ethanol. PMID:26972717

  7. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  8. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  9. Genetic testing and blood biomarkers in paediatric pulmonary hypertension. Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Pattathu, Joseph; Gorenflo, Matthias; Hilgendorff, Anne; Koskenvuo, Juha W; Apitz, Christian; Hansmann, Georg; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka

    2016-05-01

    Childhood-onset pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is considered complex and multifactorial, with relatively poor estimates of the natural history of the disease. Strategies allowing earlier detection, establishment of disease aetiology together with more accurate and sensitive biomarkers could enable better estimates of prognosis and individualise therapeutic strategies. Evidence is accumulating that genetic defects play an important role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic and hereditary forms of PAH. Altogether nine genes have been reported so far to be associated with childhood onset PAH suggesting that comprehensive multigene diagnostics can be useful in the assessment. Identification of disease-causing mutations allows estimates of prognosis and forms the most effective way for risk stratification in the family. In addition to genetic determinants the analysis of blood biomarkers are increasingly used in clinical practice to evaluate disease severity and treatment responses. As in genetic diagnostics, a multiplex approach can be helpful, as a single biomarker for PAH is unlikely to meet all requirements. This consensus statement reviews the current evidence for the use of genetic diagnostics and use of blood biomarkers in the assessment of paediatric patients with PAH. PMID:27053696

  10. Imbalance between subsets of CD8+ peripheral blood T cells in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming-Qiang; Liu, Hong-Ju; Xin, Jian-Bao; Zhang, Jian-Chu; Wu, Jiang-Hua; Meng, Zhao-Ji; Sun, Sheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background. CD8+ T lymphocytes are known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, systematic analyses of CD8+ T cell (Cytotoxic T cells, Tc) subsets in COPD patients have yet to be well conducted. Methods. The whole Tc subsets, including Tc1/2/10/17, CD8+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD8+α7+ T cells, were quantified by flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 24 stable COPD subjects (SCOPD), 14 patients during acute exacerbations (AECOPD), and 14 healthy nonsmokers (HN). Results. Acute exacerbations of COPD were accompanied by elevated levels of circulating CD8+ T cells. Tc1 cells were increased in both SCOPD and AECOPD patients, whereas the percentage of Tc2 cells was decreased in SCOPD patients but remained normal in AECOPD patients. Tc17 cells were increased only in AECOPD patients, and the percentage of Tc10 cells was reduced in both SCOPD and AECOPD patients. The imbalances of pro/anti-inflammatory Tc subsets observed in COPD may be caused by the lack of Tc10 cells and the impaired anti-inflammatory capacity of CD8+ Tregs. Conclusions. The imbalances between subsets of CD8+ peripheral blood T cells contribute to the immune response dysfunction in COPD pathogenesis. PMID:27547589

  11. Dried Blood Spot Technique for the Monitoring of Ambrisentan, Bosentan, Sildenafil, and Tadalafil in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Enderle, Yeliz; Meid, Andreas D; Friedrich, Jörg; Grünig, Ekkehard; Wilkens, Heinrike; Haefeli, Walter E; Burhenne, Jürgen

    2015-12-15

    Endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5I) are long-term therapeutics for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Their interindividual pharmacokinetic variability is remarkably large, and despite the seriousness of the disease, nonadherence is occurring. Therefore, methods to monitor sufficient circulating drug levels are essential. The objectives of this study were to develop and validate dried blood spot (DBS) assays for the quantification of ambrisentan, bosentan, sildenafil, tadalafil, and their main metabolites. We also quantified the influence of different hematocrit levels and assessed the correlation of simultaneously taken capillary whole blood (DBS) and venous plasma samples. The aliquot punches were extracted by liquid/liquid extraction followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) quantification methods. All assays fulfilled the requirements of the FDA and EMA guidelines for assay validation with a lower limit of quantification of 2.5 ng/mL for the ERAs, 5 ng/mL for sildenafil, and 10 ng/mL for tadalafil. All analytes were stable for at least 147 days when stored on DBS filter paper cards at room temperature in the dark. Due to poor distribution into erythrocytes, drug concentrations in DBS were always lower than in plasma, resulting in conversion factors of 1.58 for ambrisentan and sildenafil and 1.52 for bosentan and tadalafil. PMID:26583764

  12. Peripheral Blood Neutrophilia as a Biomarker of Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bosson, Jenny A.; Blomberg, Anders; Stenfors, Nikolai; Helleday, Ragnberth; Kelly, Frank J.; Behndig, Annelie F.; Mudway, Ian S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ozone concentrations are predicted to increase over the next 50 years due to global warming and the increased release of precursor chemicals. It is therefore urgent that good, reliable biomarkers are available to quantify the toxicity of this pollutant gas at the population level. Such a biomarker would need to be easily performed, reproducible, economically viable, and reflective of ongoing pathological processes occurring within the lung. Methodology We examined whether blood neutrophilia occurred following a controlled ozone challenge and addressed whether this could serve as a biomarker for ozone-induced airway inflammation. Three separate groups of healthy subjects were exposed to ozone (0.2 ppm, 2h) and filtered air (FA) on two separate occasions. Peripheral blood samples were collected and bronchoscopy with biopsy sampling and lavages was performed at 1.5h post exposures in group 1 (n=13), at 6h in group 2 (n=15) and at 18h in group 3 (n=15). Total and differential cell counts were assessed in blood, bronchial tissue and airway lavages. Results In peripheral blood, we observed fewer neutrophils 1.5h after ozone compared with the parallel air exposure (-1.1±1.0x109 cells/L, p<0.01), at 6h neutrophil numbers were increased compared to FA (+1.2±1.3x109 cells/L, p<0.01), and at 18h this response had fully attenuated. Ozone induced a peak in neutrophil numbers at 6h post exposure in all compartments examined, with a positive correlation between the response in blood and bronchial biopsies. Conclusions These data demonstrate a systemic neutrophilia in healthy subjects following an acute ozone exposure, which mirrors the inflammatory response in the lung mucosa and lumen. This relationship suggests that blood neutrophilia could be used as a relatively simple functional biomarker for the effect of ozone on the lung. PMID:24391708

  13. Peripheral blood B lymphocytes derived from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension express a different RNA pattern compared with healthy controls: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Silvia; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laima; Huber, Lars C; Speich, Rudolf; Voelkel, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a progressive and still incurable disease. Research of IPAH-pathogenesis is complicated by the lack of a direct access to the involved tissue, the human pulmonary vasculature. Various auto-antibodies have been described in the blood of patients with IPAH. The purpose of the present work was therefore to comparatively analyze peripheral blood B lymphocyte RNA expression characteristics in IPAH and healthy controls. Methods Patients were diagnosed having IPAH according to WHO (mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥ 25 mmHg, pulmonary capillary occlusion pressure ≤ 15 mmHg, absence of another explaining disease). Peripheral blood B-lymphocytes of patients and controls were immediately separated by density gradient centrifugation and magnetic beads for CD19. RNA was thereafter extracted and analyzed by the use of a high sensitivity gene chip (Affymetrix HG-U133-Plus2) able to analyze 47000 transcripts and variants of human genes. The array data were analyzed by two different softwares, and up-and down-regulations were defined as at least 1.3 fold with standard deviations smaller than fold-changes. Results Highly purified B-cells of 5 patients with IPAH (mean pulmonary artery pressure 51 ± 13 mmHg) and 5 controls were analyzed. Using the two different analyzing methods we found 225 respectively 128 transcripts which were up-regulated (1.3–30.7 fold) in IPAH compared with healthy controls. Combining both methods, there were 33 overlapping up-regulated transcripts and no down-regulated B-cell transcripts. Conclusion Patients with IPAH have a distinct RNA expression profile of their peripheral blood B-lymphocytes compared to healthy controls with some clearly up-regulated genes. Our finding suggests that in IPAH patients B cells are activated. PMID:18269757

  14. Inverse thermodilution with conventional pulmonary artery catheters for the assessment of cerebral, hepatic, renal, and femoral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Ganter, Christoph C; Buser, Christof; Haenggi, Matthias; Mattes, Hanswilly; Takala, Jukka; Jakob, Stephan M

    2009-08-01

    Assessment of regional blood flow changes is difficult in the clinical setting. We tested whether conventional pulmonary artery catheters (PACs) can be used to measure regional venous blood flows by inverse thermodilution (ITD). Inverse thermodilution was tested in vitro and in vivo using perivascular ultrasound Doppler (USD) flow probes as a reference. In anesthetized pigs, PACs were inserted in jugular, hepatic, renal, and femoral veins, and their measurements were compared with simultaneous USD flow measurements from carotid, hepatic, renal, and femoral arteries and from portal vein. Fluid boluses were injected through the PAC's distal port, and temperature changes were recorded from the proximally located thermistor. Injectates of 2 and 5 mL at 22 degrees C and 4 degrees C were used. Flows were altered by using a roller pump (in vitro), and infusion of dobutamine and induction of cardiac tamponade, respectively. In vitro: At blood flows between 400 mL . min-1 and 700 mL . min-1 (n = 50), ITD and USD correlated well (r = 0.86, P < 0.0001), with bias and limits of agreement of 3 +/- 101 mL . min-1. In vivo: 514 pairs of measurements had to be excluded from analysis for technical reasons, and 976 were analyzed. Best correlations were r = 0.87 (P < 0.0001) for renal flow and r = 0.46 (P < 0.0001) for hepatic flow. No significant correlation was found for cerebral and femoral flows. Inverse thermodilution using conventional PAC compared moderately well with USD for renal but not for other flows despite good in vitro correlation in various conditions. In addition, this method has significant technical limitations. PMID:19033887

  15. Non-invasive measurement of pulmonary blood flow during prone positioning in patients with early acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reutershan, Jörg; Schmitt, Andre; Dietz, Klaus; Fretschner, Reinhold

    2004-01-01

    In the daily clinical routine at the bedside, information on effective pulmonary blood flow (PBF) is limited and requires invasive monitoring, including a pulmonary artery catheter, to determine both cardiac output and intrapulmonary shunt. Therefore we evaluated a non-invasive method for the measurement of PBF in a clinical setting, including 12 patients with acute respiratory failure (acute respiratory distress syndrome) undergoing prone positioning. PBF was determined before (baseline), during and after prone positioning, by using a foreign gas rebreathing method with a new photoacoustic gas analyser. Values were compared with the cardiac output corrected for intrapulmonary shunt (COeff). Responders to prone positioning were defined according to the improvement of arterial oxygenation. A total of 84 measurements were performed. PBF values correlated well with COeff (R2=0.96; P<0.0001). Bias and limits of agreement (+/- 2 S.D.) for all measurements were -0.11 +/- 0.76 litre/min. At baseline, responders showed significantly lower PBF levels than non-responders (4.8 +/- 1.0 compared with. 6.4 +/- 1.2 litre/min; P=0.03). During prone positioning, PBF increased continuously in responders and remained high after patients had been returned to the supine position. PBF was unaffected in non-responders. Mean total increase in PBF was 1.2 +/- 0.2 litre/min in responders compared with -0.4 +/- 0.2 litre/min in non-responders (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the investigated rebreathing system allows for a non-invasive determination of PBF at the bedside. The accuracy of the measurements is comparable with the thermodilution method. It is able to reliably reflect changes in PBF induced by prone positioning. Moreover, measuring PBF might be a promising tool to identify responders to prone therapy. PMID:12877652

  16. A water-filled body plethysmograph for the measurement of pulmonary capillary blood flow during changes of intrathoracic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yoshikazu; Menkes, Harold A.; DuBois, Arthur B.

    1970-01-01

    A water-filled body plethysmograph was constructed to measure gas exchange in man. As compared to an air-filled plethysmograph, its advantages were greater sensitivity, less thermal drift, and no change from adiabatic to isothermal conditions after a stepwise change of pressure. When five subjects were completely immersed within it and were breathing to the ambient atmosphere, they had a normal heart rate, oxygen consumption, CO2 output, and functional residual capacity. Pulmonary capillary blood flow ([unk]Qc) during and after Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers was calculated from measurements of N2O uptake. Control measurements of [unk]Qc were 2.58 liters/min per m2 at rest and 3.63 liters/min per m2 after moderate exercise. During the Valsalva maneuver at rest (intrapulmonary pressure: 24, SD 3.0, mm Hg), [unk]Qc decreased from a control of 2.58, SD 0.43, liters/min per m2 to 1.62, SD 0.26, liters/min per m2 with a decrease in pulmonary capillary stroke volume from a control of 42.4, SD 8.8, ml/stroke per m2 to 25.2, SD 5.5, ml/stroke per m2. After release of the Valsalva, there was an overshoot in [unk]Qc averaging +0.78, SD 0.41, liter/min per m2 accompanied by a significant increase in heart rate. Similar changes occurred during and after the Valsalva following moderate exercise. During the Mueller maneuver at rest and after exercise, [unk]Qc, heart rate, and central stroke volume did not change significantly. Images PMID:5422025

  17. The prognostic blood biomarker proadrenomedullin for outcome prediction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a qualitative clinical review.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Philipp; Marlowe, Robert J; Mueller, Beat

    2015-03-01

    Plasma proadrenomedullin (ProADM) is a blood biomarker that may aid in multidimensional risk assessment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Co-secreted 1:1 with adrenomedullin (ADM), ProADM is a less biologically active, more chemically stable surrogate for this pluripotent regulatory peptide, which due to biological and ex vivo physical characteristics is difficult to reliably directly quantify. Upregulated by hypoxia, inflammatory cytokines, bacterial products, and shear stress and expressed widely in pulmonary cells and ubiquitously throughout the body, ADM exerts or mediates vasodilatory, natriuretic, diuretic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and metabolic effects. Observational data from four separate studies totaling 1366 patients suggest that as a single factor, ProADM is a significant independent, and accurate, long-term all-cause mortality predictor in COPD. This body of work also suggests that combined with different groups of demographic/clinical variables, ProADM provides significant incremental long-term mortality prediction power relative to the groups of variables alone. Additionally, the literature contains indications that ProADM may be a global cardiopulmonary stress marker, potentially supplying prognostic information when cardiopulmonary exercise testing results such as 6-min walk distance are unavailable due to time or other resource constraints or to a patient's advanced disease. Prospective, randomized, controlled interventional studies are needed to demonstrate whether ProADM use in risk-based guidance of site-of-care, monitoring, and treatment decisions improves clinical, quality-of-life, or pharmacoeconomic outcomes in patients with COPD. PMID:25252756

  18. Sample characterization of automobile and forklift diesel exhaust particles and comparative pulmonary toxicity in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pramila; DeMarini, David M; Dick, Colin A J; Tabor, Dennis G; Ryan, Jeff V; Linak, William P; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Gilmour, M Ian

    2004-01-01

    Two samples of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) predominate in health effects research: an automobile-derived DEP (A-DEP) sample and the National Institute of Standards Technology standard reference material (SRM 2975) generated from a forklift engine. A-DEPs have been tested extensively for their effects on pulmonary inflammation and exacerbation of allergic asthmalike responses. In contrast, SRM 2975 has been tested thoroughly for its genotoxicity. In the present study, we combined physical and chemical analyses of both DEP samples with pulmonary toxicity testing in CD-1 mice to compare the two materials and to make associations between their physicochemical properties and their biologic effects. A-DEPs had more than 10 times the amount of extractable organic material and less than one-sixth the amount of elemental carbon compared with SRM 2975. Aspiration of 100 micro g of either DEP sample in saline produced mild acute lung injury; however, A-DEPs induced macrophage influx and activation, whereas SRM 2975 enhanced polymorphonuclear cell inflammation. A-DEPs stimulated an increase in interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha, macrophage inhibitory protein-2, and the TH2 cytokine IL-5, whereas SRM 2975 only induced significant levels of IL-6. Fractionated organic extracts of the same quantity of DEPs (100 micro g) did not have a discernable effect on lung responses and will require further study. The disparate results obtained highlight the need for chemical, physical, and source characterization of particle samples under investigation. Multidisciplinary toxicity testing of diesel emissions derived from a variety of generation and collection conditions is required to meaningfully assess the health hazards associated with exposures to DEPs. Key words: automobile, diesel exhaust particles, forklift, mice, pulmonary toxicity, SRM 2975. PMID:15175167

  19. Characterization of Red Blood Cells with Multiwavelength Transmission Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Serebrennikova, Yulia M.; Huffman, Debra E.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2015-01-01

    Multiwavelength transmission (MWT) spectroscopy was applied to the investigation of the morphological parameters and composition of red blood cells (RBCs). The MWT spectra were quantitatively analyzed with a Mie theory based interpretation model modified to incorporate the effects of the nonsphericity and orientation of RBCs. The MWT spectra of the healthy and anemic samples were investigated for the RBC indices in open and blinded studies. When MWT performance was evaluated against a standard reference system, very good agreement between two methods, with R2 > 0.85 for all indices studied, was demonstrated. The RBC morphological parameters were used to characterize three types of anemia and to draw an association between RBC morphology and anemia severity. The MWT spectra of RBCs infected with malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at different life cycle stages were analyzed for RBC morphological parameters. The changes in the RBC volume, surface area, aspect ratio, and hemoglobin composition were used to trace the morphological and compositional alterations in the infected RBCs occurring with parasites' development and to provide insights into parasite-host interactions. The MWT method was shown to be reliable for determination of the RBC morphological parameters and to be valuable for identification of the RBC pathologic changes and disease states. PMID:25654099

  20. Characterization of red blood cells with multiwavelength transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serebrennikova, Yulia M; Huffman, Debra E; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H

    2015-01-01

    Multiwavelength transmission (MWT) spectroscopy was applied to the investigation of the morphological parameters and composition of red blood cells (RBCs). The MWT spectra were quantitatively analyzed with a Mie theory based interpretation model modified to incorporate the effects of the nonsphericity and orientation of RBCs. The MWT spectra of the healthy and anemic samples were investigated for the RBC indices in open and blinded studies. When MWT performance was evaluated against a standard reference system, very good agreement between two methods, with R (2) > 0.85 for all indices studied, was demonstrated. The RBC morphological parameters were used to characterize three types of anemia and to draw an association between RBC morphology and anemia severity. The MWT spectra of RBCs infected with malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at different life cycle stages were analyzed for RBC morphological parameters. The changes in the RBC volume, surface area, aspect ratio, and hemoglobin composition were used to trace the morphological and compositional alterations in the infected RBCs occurring with parasites' development and to provide insights into parasite-host interactions. The MWT method was shown to be reliable for determination of the RBC morphological parameters and to be valuable for identification of the RBC pathologic changes and disease states. PMID:25654099

  1. Regional pulmonary blood flow measurement in humans with electron-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, William W.; Konhilas, John; Wolfkiel, Christopher J.

    1995-05-01

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) is a potentially useful modality to quantitate regional pulmonary flow (RPF) with minimal invasiveness, in part because it has good spatial and temporal resolution. The present studies used a single compartment model of indicator transport and EBCT to measure regional tissue flow in the lungs of human subjects. The model postulates that flow is proportional to maximal enhancement and assumes complete tissue accumulation of indicator before significant indicator washout (WO). EBCT flow studies were retrospectively analyzed with respect to RPF in 10 adult patients who had undergone clinically indicated or research cardiovascular studies. Time density curves from the left atrial (LA) cavity and one-third segments of left (LL) and right (RL) lungs (A: anterior, M: middle, and P: posterior segments) were used to calculate RPF. Washout was determined as the percent of the LA curve at the time of peak parenchymal opacification using gamma curve fits to both tissue data and the LA curve data. Mean +/- standard deviation RPF in ml/min/ml was 0.8 +/- 0.4, 1.1 +/- 0.4, and 1.3 +/- 0.4 for A, M, and P respectively for one-third regions in the left lung. Similar results were found in the right lung. No difference in RPF was found when images were measured either by including the largest of visible parenchymal vessels or when such vessels were excluded. Flow in A of LL and RL was less than that in M or P. Average WO was about 10%, with a range of 0-41% of the LA curve area. There was no significant difference between one-third segment WO using pairwise comparison on the left and right sides when tested separately. RPF values were greater in the posterior vs anterior regions of these supine patients. In conclusion, EBCT can detect gravity related flow differences in the human lung. EBCT has potential for clinical assessment of absolute regional pulmonary flow determination in animals and man.

  2. Effect of gravitational overloads, hypokinesia and hypodynamia on the vessels of the pulmonary blood circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasimtsev, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    Vessels of the pulmonary circuit are studied under normal conditions, in exposure to single stress or continuous threshold endurable chestspine gravitational stresses, and one to eight weak hypokinesia and hypodynamic effects followed by stress. Examination methods include rentgenography and microrentgenography, clearing, and histology. In exposure to gravitational stress the distal portions of the arterial vessels of the 3 and 4 orders constrict, while all veins dilate. Sinuosity of all vessels is noted. The volume of the capillary bed increases and signs of perivascular edema occur. Due to hypokinesia and hypodynamia the arteries constricted and the arterial bed becomes poor. The veins of all orders dilate and the volume of the capillary bed increases. The changes grew greater the longer the terms of hypodyamic effects. Successive combination of hypokinesia and hypodynamia and gravitational stresses cause more pronounced changes than separate effects of these two factors and result in great deformity of the vascular walls, including their rupture and penetration of formed elements beyond the limits of the vascular bed.

  3. A novel platform for pulmonary and cardiovascular toxicological characterization of inhaled engineered nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    SOTIRIOU, GEORGIOS A.; DIAZ, EDGAR; LONG, MARK S.; GODLESKI, JOHN; BRAIN, JOSEPH; PRATSINIS, SOTIRIS E.; DEMOKRITOU, PHILIP

    2013-01-01

    A novel method is presented which is suitable for assessing in-vivo the link between the physico-chemical properties of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and their biological outcomes. The ability of the technique to generate a variety of industry-relevant, property-controlled ENM exposure atmospheres for inhalation studies was systematically investigated. The primary particle size for Fe2O3, SiO2, Ag and Ag/SiO2 was controlled from 4 to 25 nm, while the corresponding agglomerate mobility diameter of the aerosol was also controlled and varied from 40 to 120 nm. The suitability of the technique to characterize the pulmonary and cardiovascular effects of inhaled ENMs in intact animal models is also demonstrated using in-vivo chemiluminescence (IVCL). The IVCL technique is a highly sensitive method for identifying cardiopulmonary responses to inhaled ENMs under relatively small doses and acute exposures. It is shown that moderate and acute exposures to inhaled nanostructured Fe2O3 can cause both pulmonary and cardiovascular effects. PMID:21809902

  4. Nano-liposomal dry powder inhaler of tacrolimus: preparation, characterization, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Chougule, Mahavir; Padhi, Bijay; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2007-01-01

    The studies were undertaken to evaluate feasibility of pulmonary delivery of liposomaly encapsulated tacrolimus dry powder inhaler for prolonged drug retention in lungs as rescue therapy to prevent refractory rejection of lungs after transplantation. Tacrolimus encapsulated liposomes were prepared by thin film evaporation technique and liposomal dispersion was passed through high pressure homogenizer. Tacrolimus nano-liposomes (NLs) were separated by centrifugation and characterized. NLs were dispersed in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) pH 7.4 containing different additives like lactose, sucrose, and trehalose, and L-leucine as antiadherent. The dispersion was spray dried and spray dried powders were characterized. In vitro and in vivo pulmonary deposition was performed using Andersen Cascade Impactor and intratracheal instillation in rats respectively. NLs were found to have average size of 140 nm, 96% +/- 1.5% drug entrapment, and zeta potential of 1.107 mV. Trehalose based formulation was found to have low density, good flowability, particle size of 9.46 +/- 0.8 microm, maximum fine particle fraction (FPF) of 71.1 +/- 2.5%, mean mass aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) 2.2 +/- 0.1 microm, and geometric standard deviation (GSD) 1.7 +/- 0.2. Developed formulations were found to have in vitro prolonged drug release up to 18 hours, following Higuchi's Controlled Release model. In vivo studies revealed maximal residence of tacrolimus within lungs of 24 hours, suggesting slow clearance from the lungs. The investigation provides a practical approach for direct delivery of tacrolimus encapsulated in NLs for controlled and prolonged retention at the site of action. It may play a promising role as rescue therapy in reducing the risk of acute rejection and chronic rejection. PMID:18203434

  5. Nano-liposomal dry powder inhaler of tacrolimus: Preparation, characterization, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Chougule, Mahavir; Padhi, Bijay; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2007-01-01

    The studies were undertaken to evaluate feasibility of pulmonary delivery of liposomaly encapsulated tacrolimus dry powder inhaler for prolonged drug retention in lungs as rescue therapy to prevent refractory rejection of lungs after transplantation. Tacrolimus encapsulated liposomes were prepared by thin film evaporation technique and liposomal dispersion was passed through high pressure homogenizer. Tacrolimus nano-liposomes (NLs) were separated by centrifugation and characterized. NLs were dispersed in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) pH 7.4 containing different additives like lactose, sucrose, and trehalose, and L-leucine as antiadherent. The dispersion was spray dried and spray dried powders were characterized. In vitro and in vivo pulmonary deposition was performed using Andersen Cascade Impactor and intratracheal instillation in rats respectively. NLs were found to have average size of 140 nm, 96% ± 1.5% drug entrapment, and zeta potential of 1.107 mV. Trehalose based formulation was found to have low density, good flowability, particle size of 9.46 ± 0.8 μm, maximum fine particle fraction (FPF) of 71.1 ± 2.5%, mean mass aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) 2.2 ± 0.1 μm, and geometric standard deviation (GSD) 1.7 ± 0.2. Developed formulations were found to have in vitro prolonged drug release up to 18 hours, following Higuchi’s Controlled Release model. In vivo studies revealed maximal residence of tacrolimus within lungs of 24 hours, suggesting slow clearance from the lungs. The investigation provides a practical approach for direct delivery of tacrolimus encapsulated in NLs for controlled and prolonged retention at the site of action. It may play a promising role as rescue therapy in reducing the risk of acute rejection and chronic rejection. PMID:18203434

  6. Reactive oxygen species in peripheral blood and sputum neutrophils during bacterial and nonbacterial acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Vaitkus, Mindaugas; Lavinskiene, Simona; Barkauskiene, Diana; Bieksiene, Kristina; Jeroch, Jolanta; Sakalauskas, Raimundas

    2013-12-01

    Chronic airway inflammation can be mediated by an enhanced neutrophil oxidative burst. However, the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations is highly controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in peripheral blood and sputum neutrophils during bacterial and nonbacterial acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD). A total of 40 patients with AECOPD, 10 healthy nonsmokers, and 10 "healthy" smokers were enrolled into the study. Peripheral blood and sputum samples were obtained during exacerbation and after recovery. Neutrophils were isolated by high-density gradient centrifugation and magnetic separation. ROS production by neutrophils was investigated after stimulation with phorbol-myristate-acetate and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. ROS production by neutrophils was assessed as the mean fluorescent intensity using a flow cytometer. IL-8 levels in serum and induced sputum were determinant by ELISA. Spontaneous ROS production was significantly higher in neutrophils from the patients with bacterial AECOPD as compared with nonbacterial AECOPD and stable COPD (P <0.05). ROS production stimulated with PMA and with Staphylococcus aureus was significantly higher in neutrophils isolated from the patients with bacterial AECOPD as compared with nonbacterial and stable COPD (P <0.05). The serum and induced sputum IL-8 levels were significantly increased in the patients with bacterial AECOPD than nonbacterial AECOPD, stable COPS, and "healthy" smokers and nonsmokers (P <0.05) and higher in the induced sputum as the compared with serum in all studied groups (P <0.05). Enlarge CRP level was documented during AECOPD than in all other groups (P <0.05). A markedly increased ROS production in sputum neutrophils during bacterial AECOPD shows an inflammatory response reflecting enhanced local inflammation, which can be mediated by bacterial colonization. PMID:23872721

  7. Pretransplant pulmonary function tests predict risk of mortality following fractionated total body irradiation and allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anurag K. . E-mail: singan@mail.nih.gov; Karimpour, Shervin E.; Savani, Bipin N.; Guion, Peter M.S.; Hope, Andrew J.; Mansueti, John R.; Ning, Holly; Altemus, Rosemary M. Ph.D.; Wu, Colin O.; Barrett, A. John

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) done before peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) in predicting mortality after total body irradiation (TBI) performed with or without dose reduction to the lung. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 2004, 146 consecutive patients with hematologic malignancies received fractionated TBI before PBSCT. With regimen A (n = 85), patients were treated without lung dose reduction to 13.6 gray (Gy). In regimen B (n = 35), total body dose was decreased to 12 Gy (1.5 Gy twice per day for 4 days) and lung dose was limited to 9 Gy by use of lung shielding. In regimen C (n = 26), lung dose was reduced to 6 Gy. All patients received PFTs before treatment, 90 days after treatment, and annually. Results: Median follow-up was 44 months (range, 12-90 months). Sixty-one patients had combined ventilation/diffusion capacity deficits defined as both a forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV{sub 1}) and a diffusion capacity of carbon dioxide (DLCO) <100% predicted. In this group, there was a 20% improvement in one-year overall survival with lung dose reduction (70 vs. 50%, log-rank test p = 0.042). Conclusion: Among those with combined ventilation/diffusion capacity deficits, lung dose reduction during TBI significantly improved survival.

  8. Cytokine Profiles from Antigen-Stimulated Whole-Blood Samples among Patients with Pulmonary or Nonmeningeal Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Ampel, Neil M; Nesbit, Lance A; Nguyen, Chinh T; Chavez, Suzette; Knox, Kenneth S; Johnson, Suzanne M; Pappagianis, Demosthenes

    2015-08-01

    The outcome of coccidioidomycosis depends on a robust specific cellular immune response. A T-helper type 1 (Th1) cellular immune response has been previously associated with resolution of clinical illness. However, the precise elements of this response and whether cytokines not involved with the Th1 response play a role in coccidioidomycosis are not known. Whole-blood samples were obtained from subjects with active coccidioidomycosis and controls and incubated for 18 h with T27K, a coccidioidal antigen preparation. The supernatant was then assayed for gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-17A. A total of 43 subjects, 16 with acute pneumonia, 9 with pulmonary sequelae of nodules and cavities, and 18 with nonmeningeal disseminated coccidioidomycosis, were studied. Compared to concentrations in healthy immune and nonimmune donors, the median concentration of IL-17A was significantly higher in those with active coccidioidomycosis (for both, P < 0.01). In addition, IL-6 concentrations were higher while IL-2 and IFN-γ concentrations were significantly lower in those with nonmeningeal disseminated disease diagnosed within 12 months than in those with acute pneumonia (for all, P < 0.05). The cytokine profile among patients with active coccidioidomycosis is distinct in that IL-17A is persistently present. In addition, those with nonmeningeal disseminated disease have an increased inflammatory cytokine response and diminished Th1 responses that modulate over time. PMID:26041038

  9. A modelling study of atrial septostomy for pulmonary arterial hypertension, and its effect on the state of tissue oxygenation and systemic blood flow.

    PubMed

    Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Lammers, Astrid E; Haworth, Sheila G; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Derrick, Graham; Bonhoeffer, Philipp; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Francis, Darrel P

    2010-02-01

    Atrial septostomy is performed in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, and has been shown to improve symptoms, quality of life and survival. Despite recognized clinical benefits, the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. We aimed to assess the effects of right-to-left shunting on arterial delivery of oxygen, mixed venous content of oxygen, and systemic cardiac output in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and a fixed flow of blood to the lungs. We formulated equations defining the mandatory relationship between physiologic variables and delivery of oxygen in patients with right-to-left shunting. Using calculus and computer modelling, we considered the simultaneous effects of right-to-left shunting on physiologies with different pulmonary flows, total metabolic rates, and capacities for carrying oxygen. Our study indicates that, when the flow of blood to the lungs is fixed, increasing right-to-left shunting improves systemic cardiac output, arterial blood pressure, and arterial delivery of oxygen. In contrast, the mixed venous content of oxygen, which mirrors the average state of tissue oxygenation, remains unchanged. Our model suggests that increasing the volume of right-to-left shunting cannot compensate for right ventricular failure. Atrial septostomy in the setting of pulmonary arterial hypertension, therefore, increases the arterial delivery of oxygen, but the mixed systemic saturation of oxygen, arguably the most important index of tissue oxygenation, stays constant. Our data suggest that the clinically observed beneficial effects of atrial septostomy are the result of improved flow of blood rather than augmented tissue oxygenation, provided that right ventricular function is adequate. PMID:20144254

  10. Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Blood Biomarkers in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Cho, Michael H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Lomas, David A.; Miller, Bruce E.; Kong, Xiangyang; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Agustí, Alvar; Wouters, Emiel; Celli, Bartolome; Coxson, Harvey; Vestbo, Jørgen; MacNee, William; Yates, Julie C.; Rennard, Stephen; Litonjua, Augusto; Qiu, Weiliang; Beaty, Terri H.; Crapo, James D.; Riley, John H.; Tal-Singer, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) for circulating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) biomarkers could identify genetic determinants of biomarker levels and COPD susceptibility. Objectives: To identify genetic variants of circulating protein biomarkers and novel genetic determinants of COPD. Methods: GWAS was performed for two pneumoproteins, Clara cell secretory protein (CC16) and surfactant protein D (SP-D), and five systemic inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α) in 1,951 subjects with COPD. For genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (P < 1 × 10−8), association with COPD susceptibility was tested in 2,939 cases with COPD and 1,380 smoking control subjects. The association of candidate SNPs with mRNA expression in induced sputum was also elucidated. Measurements and Main Results: Genome-wide significant susceptibility loci affecting biomarker levels were found only for the two pneumoproteins. Two discrete loci affecting CC16, one region near the CC16 coding gene (SCGB1A1) on chromosome 11 and another locus approximately 25 Mb away from SCGB1A1, were identified, whereas multiple SNPs on chromosomes 6 and 16, in addition to SNPs near SFTPD, had genome-wide significant associations with SP-D levels. Several SNPs affecting circulating CC16 levels were significantly associated with sputum mRNA expression of SCGB1A1 (P = 0.009–0.03). Several SNPs highly associated with CC16 or SP-D levels were nominally associated with COPD in a collaborative GWAS (P = 0.001–0.049), although these COPD associations were not replicated in two additional cohorts. Conclusions: Distant genetic loci and biomarker-coding genes affect circulating levels of COPD-related pneumoproteins. A subset of these protein quantitative trait loci may influence their gene expression in the lung and/or COPD susceptibility. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00292552). PMID

  11. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... fight infection and are part of your body's defense system. Platelets help blood to clot when you have a cut or wound. Bone marrow, the spongy material inside your bones, makes new blood cells. Blood cells ...

  12. Functional characterization of voltage-gated K+ channels in mouse pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun A; Burg, Elyssa D; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Msefya, Joseph; Firth, Amy L; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2007-09-01

    Mice are useful animal models to study pathogenic mechanisms involved in pulmonary vascular disease. Altered expression and function of voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) have been implicated in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. K(V) currents (I(K(V))) in mouse PASMCs have not been comprehensively characterized. The main focus of this study was to determine the biophysical and pharmacological properties of I(K(V)) in freshly dissociated mouse PASMCs with the patch-clamp technique. Three distinct whole cell I(K(V)) were identified based on the kinetics of activation and inactivation: rapidly activating and noninactivating currents (in 58% of the cells tested), rapidly activating and slowly inactivating currents (23%), and slowly activating and noninactivating currents (17%). Of the cells that demonstrated the rapidly activating noninactivating current, 69% showed I(K(V)) inhibition with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), while 31% were unaffected. Whole cell I(K(V)) were very sensitive to tetraethylammonium (TEA), as 1 mM TEA decreased the current amplitude by 32% while it took 10 mM 4-AP to decrease I(K(V)) by a similar amount (37%). Contribution of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (K(Ca)) channels to whole cell I(K(V)) was minimal, as neither pharmacological inhibition with charybdotoxin or iberiotoxin nor perfusion with Ca(2+)-free solution had an effect on the whole cell I(K(V)). Steady-state activation and inactivation curves revealed a window K(+) current between -40 and -10 mV with a peak at -31.5 mV. Single-channel recordings revealed large-, intermediate-, and small-amplitude currents, with an averaged slope conductance of 119.4 +/- 2.7, 79.8 +/- 2.8, 46.0 +/- 2.2, and 23.6 +/- 0.6 pS, respectively. These studies provide detailed electrophysiological and pharmacological profiles of the native K(V) currents in mouse PASMCs. PMID:17581857

  13. Structural characterization of the pulmonary innate immune protein SPLUNC1 and identification of lipid ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Fangkun; Wang, Chao; Berry, Karin Zemski; Kandasamy, Pitchaimani; Liu, Haolin; Murphy, Robert C.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Nho, Chu Won; Pan, Choel-Ho; Dai, Shaodong; Niu, Liwen; Chu, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Gongyi

    2014-01-01

    The short palate, lung and nasal epithelial clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is a member of the palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC) family, also known as bactericidal/permeability-increasing (BPI) fold-containing protein, family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). SPLUNC1 is an abundant protein in human airways, but its function remains poorly understood. The lipid ligands of SPLUNC1 as well as other PLUNC family members are largely unknown, although some reports provide evidence that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) could be a lipid ligand. Unlike previous hypotheses, we found significant structural differences between SPLUNC1 and BPI. Recombinant SPLUNC1 produced in HEK 293 cells harbored several molecular species of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine as its ligands. Significantly, in vitro lipid-binding studies failed to demonstrate interactions between SPLUNC1 and LPS, lipoteichoic acid, or polymyxin B. Instead, one of the major and most important pulmonary surfactant phospholipids, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), bound to SPLUNC1 with high affinity and specificity. We found that SPLUNC1 could be the first protein receptor for DPPC. These discoveries provide insight into the specific determinants governing the interaction between SPLUNC1 and lipids and also shed light on novel functions that SPLUNC1 and other PLUNC family members perform in host defense.—Ning, F., Wang, C., Berry, K. Z., Kandasamy, P., Liu, H., Murphy, R. C., Voelker, D. R., Nho, C. W., Pan, C.-H., Dai, S., Niu, L., Chu, H.-W., Zhang, G. Structural characterization of the pulmonary innate immune protein SPLUNC1 and identification of lipid ligands. PMID:25223608

  14. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough, shortness of breath, fatigue and low blood oxygen levels. Pulmonary fibrosis can be caused by an ... breath. Your health care provider may notice the oxygen levels in your blood drop when you walk. ...

  15. Genetic characterization of hantaviruses associated with sigmodontine rodents in an endemic area for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Renata Carvalho; Padula, Paula J; Gomes, Raphael; Martinez, Valeria P; Bellomo, Carla; Bonvicino, Cibele R; Freire e Lima, Danúbia Inês; Bragagnolo, Camila; Caldas, Antônio C S; D'Andrea, Paulo S; de Lemos, Elba R S

    2011-03-01

    An ecological assessment of reservoir species was conducted in a rural area (Jaborá) in the mid-west of the state of Santa Catarina in southern Brazil, where hantavirus pulmonary syndrome is endemic, to evaluate the prevalence of hantavirus infection in wild rodents. Blood and tissue samples were collected from 507 rodents during seven field trips from March 2004 to April 2006. Some of the animals were karyotyped to confirm morphological identification. Phylogenetic reconstructions of rodent specimens, based on the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene sequences, were also obtained. Hantavirus antibody was found in 22 (4.3%) of the 507 rodents: 5 Akodon montensis, 2 Akodon paranaensis, 14 Oligoryzomys nigripes, and 1 Sooretamys angouya. Viral RNAs detected in O. nigripes and A. montensis were amplified and sequenced. O. nigripes virus genome was 97.5% (nt) and 98.4% (nt) identical to sequences published for Araucaria (Juquitiba-like) virus based on N and G2 fragment sequences. Viral sequences from A. montensis strain showed 89% and 88% nucleotide identities in a 905-nt fragment of the nucleocapsid (N) protein-coding region of the S segment when it was compared with two other Akodontine rodent-associated viruses from Paraguay, A. montensis and Akodon cursor, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed the cocirculation of two genetic hantavirus lineages in the state of Santa Catarina, one from O. nigripes and the other from A. montensis, previously characterized in Brazil and Paraguay, respectively. The hantavirus associated with A. montensis, designed Jaborá virus, represents a distinct phylogenetic lineage among the Brazilian hantaviruses. PMID:21138380

  16. Longitudinal Impedance Tomography for Blood Pressure Characterization of Valve Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Vahabi, Zahra; Amirfattahi, Rasool

    2015-01-01

    Aorta is formed in a dynamic environment which gives rise to imbalances between many forces that tend to extend the diameter and length. Furthermore, internal forces tend to resist this extension. Impedance tomography can show this imbalance to stimulate the stenosis of aortic valve, growth of the elastic, collagen and to effectively reduce the stresses in the underlying tissue. In blood flow, auscultation noises occurred and in the echocardiography decrease in left ventricular ejection speed can be observed. In this paper, we have modeled an aorta based on anatomical studies to simulate natural, 20% and 30% stenosis as usual heart disease to early diagnosis. Valve deformation causes different impedance tomography in 3D mesh of aorta as blood pressure. Remodeling of aorta and its flow is found when a cylindrical slice of the fully retracted blood aorta is cut longitudinally through the wall. PMID:26120568

  17. Therapeutic Effects of Umbilical Cord Blood Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium on Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul; Cha, Choong Ik; Kim, Dong-Sik; Choe, Soo Young

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) may have multiple therapeutic applications for cell based therapy including the treatment of pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). As low survival rates and potential tumorigenicity of implanted cells could undermine the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) cell-based therapy, we chose to investigate the use of conditioned medium (CM) from a culture of MSC cells as a feasible alternative. Methods: CM was prepared by culturing hUCB-MSCs in three-dimensional spheroids. In a rat model of PAH induced by monocrotaline, we infused CM or the control unconditioned culture media via the tail-vein of 6-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats. Results: Compared with the control unconditioned media, CM infusion reduced the ventricular pressure, the right ventricle/(left ventricle+interventricular septum) ratio, and maintained respiratory function in the treated animals. Also, the number of interleukin 1α (IL-1α), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1)–positive cells increased in lung samples and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL)–positive cells decreased significantly in the CM treated animals. Conclusions: From our in vivo data in the rat model, the observed decreases in the TUNEL staining suggest a potential therapeutic benefit of the CM in ameliorating PAH-mediated lung tissue damage. Increased IL-1α, CCL5, and TIMP-1 levels may play important roles in this regard. PMID:26471341

  18. Characterization of Blood Properties from Coagulating Blood of Different Hematocrits Using Ultrasonic Backscatter and Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2006-09-01

    The influence of hematocrit on the change of blood properties during coagulating was extensively investigated using ultrasonic integrated backscatter and attenuation. Measurements were performed with porcine blood at hematocrits ranging from 25 to 55% using a 10 MHz transducer. Results showed that both integrated backscatter and attenuation are able to sensitively differentiate various stages of blood properties during coagulating. The slopes of integrated backscatter (Sr, dB/S) and attenuation (αr, dB\\cdotcm-1\\cdotMHz-1\\cdotmS-1) are increased relative to hematocrit. The best fits for Sr and αr as a function of hematocrit (H) equal to Sr=0.0357+1.62e-0.108H and αr=0.0281+0.003H, respectively. Variations of clotting time (Ts) and reaction time (Tα), estimated respectively from ultrasonic integrated backscatter and attenuation, associated with clot formation are also increased with hematocrit. This study demonstrates that blood hematocrit is a substantial factor affecting viscosity and backscattering properties of blood during coagulation capable of being discerned by ultrasonic backscattering and attenuation.

  19. Phenotypic, ultra-structural and functional characterization of bovine peripheral blood dendritic cell subsets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dendritic cells (DC) are multifunctional cells that bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immune systems. In bovine, significant information is lacking on the precise identity and role of peripheral blood DC subsets. In this study, we identify and characterize bovine peripheral blood DC subsets...

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anticoagulants (blood-thinning medicine) Calcium channel blockers Diuretics (water pills) Digoxin Your doctor will decide what type of medicine is right for you. In some cases, people who have pulmonary hypertension need surgical treatment. Surgical treatment options include a lung transplant and ...

  1. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What is Pulmonary Hypertension? Updated:Aug 12,2014 Is pulmonary hypertension different ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  2. Characterization of Blood Flow in Capillaries by Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Xing, Zhongwen

    2011-03-01

    We presents a numerical investigation of the axisymmetric, pressure driven motion of single file erythrocyte (i.e., red blood cell) suspensions flowing in capillaries of diameter 8- 11 μ m. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using the operator splitting technique and solved by the finite element method. The study takes consideration the particulate nature of the blood. The red blood cell (RBC) is modeled as a closed membrane filled with a Newtonian fluid which has the same viscosity as the surrounding plasma. The cell membrane is described by a spring model so that the deformability of the cells can be considered. An immersed boundary method is also developed for dealing with the cell/fluid interaction in the flow. Our study successfully recreates several important in vivo hemodynamic and hemorheological properties of microscopic blood flow, such as parachute shape of the cells, blunt velocity profile, and the Fahraeus effect, and they have been shown to have strong dependence on cell deformability, hematocrit and vessel size.

  3. Robust anisotropic Gaussian fitting for volumetric characterization of pulmonary nodules in multislice CT.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazunori; Comaniciu, Dorin; Krishnan, Arun

    2005-03-01

    This paper proposes a robust statistical estimation and verification framework for characterizing the ellipsoidal (anisotropic) geometrical structure of pulmonary nodules in the Multislice X-ray computed tomography (CT) images. Given a marker indicating a rough location of a target, the proposed solution estimates the target's center location, ellipsoidal boundary approximation, volume, maximum/average diameters, and isotropy by robustly and efficiently fitting an anisotropic Gaussian intensity model. We propose a novel multiscale joint segmentation and model fitting solution which extends the robust mean shift-based analysis to the linear scale-space theory. The design is motivated for enhancing the robustness against margin-truncation induced by neighboring structures, data with large deviations from the chosen model, and marker location variability. A chi-square-based statistical verification and analytical volumetric measurement solutions are also proposed to complement this estimation framework. Experiments with synthetic one-dimensional and two-dimensional data clearly demonstrate the advantage of our solution in comparison with the gamma-normalized Laplacian approach (Linderberg, 1998) and the standard sample estimation approach (Matei, 2001). A quasi-real-time three-dimensional nodule characterization system is developed using this framework and validated with two clinical data sets of thin-section chest CT images. Our experiments with 1310 nodules resulted in (1) robustness against intraoperator and interoperator variability due to varying marker locations, (2) 81% correct estimation rate, (3) 3% false acceptance and 5% false rejection rates, and (4) correct characterization of clinically significant nonsolid ground-glass opacity nodules. This system processes each 33-voxel volume-of-interest by an average of 2 s with a 2.4-GHz Intel CPU. Our solution is generic and can be applied for the analysis of blob-like structures in various other applications. PMID

  4. Pulmonary arterial compliance: How and why should we measure it?

    PubMed Central

    Ghio, Stefano; Schirinzi, Sandra; Pica, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high-flow/low-pressure system, coupled with a flow generator chamber–the right ventricle–, which is relatively unable to tolerate increases in afterload. A right heart catheterization, using a fluid-filled, balloon-tipped Swan-Ganz catheter allows the measurement of all hemodynamic parameters characterizing the pulmonary circulation: the inflow pressure, an acceptable estimate the outflow pressure, and the pulmonary blood flow. However, the study of the pulmonary circulation as a continuous flow system is an oversimplification and a thorough evaluation of the pulmonary circulation requires a correct understanding of the load that the pulmonary vascular bed imposes on the right ventricle, which includes static and dynamic components. This is critical to assess the prognosis of patients with pulmonary hypertension or with heart failure. Pulmonary compliance is a measure of arterial distensibility and, either alone or in combination with pulmonary vascular resistance, gives clinicians the possibility of a good prognostic stratification of patients with heart failure or with pulmonary hypertension. The measurement of pulmonary arterial compliance should be included in the routine clinical evaluation of such patients. PMID:26779530

  5. Three-dimensional characterization of fibroblast foci in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mark G.; Fabre, Aurélie; Schneider, Philipp; Cinetto, Francesco; Sgalla, Giacomo; Mavrogordato, Mark; Jogai, Sanjay; Alzetani, Aiman; Marshall, Ben G.; O’Reilly, Katherine M.A.; Warner, Jane A.; Lackie, Peter M.; Davies, Donna E.; Hansell, David M.; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Sinclair, Ian; Brown, Kevin K.; Richeldi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), the fibroblast focus is a key histological feature representing active fibroproliferation. On standard 2D pathologic examination, fibroblast foci are considered small, distinct lesions, although they have been proposed to form a highly interconnected reticulum as the leading edge of a “wave” of fibrosis. Here, we characterized fibroblast focus morphology and interrelationships in 3D using an integrated micro-CT and histological methodology. In 3D, fibroblast foci were morphologically complex structures, with large variations in shape and volume (range, 1.3 × 104 to 9.9 × 107 μm3). Within each tissue sample numerous multiform foci were present, ranging from a minimum of 0.9 per mm3 of lung tissue to a maximum of 11.1 per mm3 of lung tissue. Each focus was an independent structure, and no interconnections were observed. Together, our data indicate that in 3D fibroblast foci form a constellation of heterogeneous structures with large variations in shape and volume, suggesting previously unrecognized plasticity. No evidence of interconnectivity was identified, consistent with the concept that foci represent discrete sites of lung injury and repair. PMID:27275013

  6. Preparation, characterization and pulmonary pharmacokinetics of a new inhalable zanamivir dry powder.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xingshi; Yang, Yang; Xie, Xiangyang; Yu, Fanglin; Yang, Yanfang; Yang, Zhenbo; Zhang, Tao; Mei, Xingguo

    2016-07-01

    This work describes a new dry powder for inhalation containing zanamivir, which is less hygroscopic than Relenza®. The powders were prepared via a spray-drying technique using mannitol as the carrier. A 5(3) central composite design was used to optimize the formulations. The final optimized powders, characterized with an angle of repose 37.48°, an aerodynamic diameter of 2.346 μm and in vitro deposition of 58.54%, were obtained by using the predicted variable values. Relenza® absorbed a significant amount of water at 66%, 75% and 85% relative humidity (RH; weight changes of approximately 1.38%, 2.18% and 3.72%, respectively). In contrast, the weight change for the zanamivir dry powder inhalation (DPI) was negligible when the RH was increased to 66%. The in vivo potential for the optimized powders was studied further in rats via the endotracheal administration of an 8.4 mg/kg dose. The bioavailability was 116% relative to Relenza®. Fluorescence imaging monitored the zanamivir dry powder inhalers in rats. The results indicated that the zanamivir DPIs were effectively delivered to the lung. These results indicate that the spray-dried zanamivir DPIs were promising for pulmonary delivery. PMID:26066037

  7. High-resolution CT in simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis. Lack of correlation with pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas values.

    PubMed

    Collins, L C; Willing, S; Bretz, R; Harty, M; Lane, E; Anderson, W H

    1993-10-01

    We examined 21 miners by means of standard chest radiography, high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT), pulmonary function tests, and resting arterial blood gas levels. Using the ILO/UC classification of pneumoconiosis, 7 miners had category 1/0 or 2/1 simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). By HRCT, nodules were identified in 12 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as category 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; 5 of 6, 1/0 CWP; and 1 of 1, 2/1 CWP by chest radiograph. Focal emphysema was identified by HRCT in 7 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; and 1 of 6, 1/0 CWP by standard chest radiography. Four miners with definite nodules confirmed by HRCT had focal emphysema, while three without nodules had focal emphysema. Pulmonary function testing was not different between miners with or without CWP by standard chest radiography, nor was it different between miners with or without definite nodules evidenced by HRCT. No difference in resting oxygenation was found between any group of miners. The presence of focal emphysema confirmed by HRCT did not significantly affect pulmonary function tests on resting arterial blood gas values. There was, however, a significantly lower FEV1 and mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of forced vital capacity with lifetime nonsmoking miners. The presence of CWP on chest radiography was significantly correlated with smoking cigarettes but not the years of mining. The presence of nodules on HRCT approached a significant correlation with cigarette smoking, but focal emphysema did not. For detecting evidence of coal dust accumulation in lung parenchyma and identifying focal emphysema, HRCT was more sensitive than standard chest radiography. However, despite earlier detection of parenchymal abnormalities, abnormal pulmonary function attributable to coal dust could not be identified. PMID:8404184

  8. High-resolution CT in simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis. Lack of correlation with pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas values

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.C.; Willing, S.; Bretz, R.; Harty, M.; Lane, E.; Anderson, W.H. )

    1993-10-01

    We examined 21 miners by means of standard chest radiography, high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT), pulmonary function tests, and resting arterial blood gas levels. Using the ILO/UC classification of pneumoconiosis, 7 miners had category 1/0 or 2/1 simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). By HRCT, nodules were identified in 12 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as category 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; 5 of 6, 1/0 CWP; and 1 of 1, 2/1 CWP by chest radiograph. Focal emphysema was identified by HRCT in 7 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; and 1 of 6, 1/0 CWP by standard chest radiography. Four miners with definite nodules confirmed by HRCT had focal emphysema, while three without nodules had focal emphysema. Pulmonary function testing was not different between miners with or without CWP by standard chest radiography, nor was it different between miners with or without definite nodules evidenced by HRCT. No difference in resting oxygenation was found between any group of miners. The presence of focal emphysema confirmed by HRCT did not significantly affect pulmonary function tests on resting arterial blood gas values. There was, however, a significantly lower FEV1 and mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of forced vital capacity with lifetime nonsmoking miners. The presence of CWP on chest radiography was significantly correlated with smoking cigarettes but not the years of mining. The presence of nodules on HRCT approached a significant correlation with cigarette smoking, but focal emphysema did not. For detecting evidence of coal dust accumulation in lung parenchyma and identifying focal emphysema, HRCT was more sensitive than standard chest radiography. However, despite earlier detection of parenchymal abnormalities, abnormal pulmonary function attributable to coal dust could not be identified.

  9. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  10. Development and Characterization of an Inducible Rat Model of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Arias-Loza, Paula-Anahi; Jung, Pius; Abeßer, Marco; Umbenhauer, Sandra; Williams, Tatjana; Frantz, Stefan; Schuh, Kai; Pelzer, Theo

    2016-05-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is an entity of PH that not only limits patients quality of life but also causes significant morbidity and mortality. The treatment of choice is pulmonary endarterectomy. However numerous patients do not qualify for pulmonary endarterectomy or present with residual vasculopathy post pulmonary endarterectomy and require specific vasodilator treatment. Currently, there is no available specific small animal model of CTEPH that could serve as tool to identify targetable molecular pathways and to test new treatment options. Thus, we generated and standardized a rat model that not only resembles functional and histological features of CTEPH but also emulates thrombi fibrosis. The pulmonary embolism protocol consisted of 3 sequential tail vein injections of fibrinogen/collagen-covered polystyrene microspheres combined with thrombin and administered to 10-week-old male Wistar rats. After the third embolism, rats developed characteristic features of CTEPH including elevated right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, pulmonary artery remodeling, increased serum brain natriuretic peptide levels, thrombi fibrosis, and formation of pulmonary cellular-fibrotic lesions. The current animal model seems suitable for detailed study of CTEPH pathophysiology and permits preclinical testing of new pharmacological therapies against CTEPH. PMID:27045032

  11. [Synthesis, characterization and blood compatibility studies of waterproof breathable polyurethanes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Luo, Jianbin; Du, Minhui; He, Chengsheng; Fan, Cuirong; Zhong, Yinping

    2005-08-01

    Adopting the two-step method and changing the proportion between PEG (Polyethylene glycol) and PTMG (poly (tetrahydrofuran), we used the MDI (4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate) and short chain extender BDO (1,4-butanediol) as hard segment, the PTMG and PEG as soft segment, and hence prepared a series of polyether-based thermoplastic polyurethanes. FTIR showed the structure character of these polyurethanes. The determination of mechanics property and water contact angles revealed their good mechanics properties and hydrophilicity. Blood compatibility was evaluated by hemolysis test and platelet adhesion test, which revealed their good hemocompatibility. So those polyurethanes may be of wide application in the future. PMID:16156261

  12. NF-κB Repressing Factor Inhibits Chemokine Synthesis by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Alveolar Macrophages in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Hsiung; Wang, Chun-Hua; Lee, Kang-Yun; Lin, Shu-Min

    2013-01-01

    NF-κB repressing factor (NRF) is a transcriptional silencer implicated in the basal silencing of specific NF-κB targeting genes, including iNOS, IFN-β and IL-8/CXCL8. IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 are involved in neutrophil and lymphocyte recruitment against M. tuberculosis (MTb) and disease progression of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Alveolar macrophages (AM) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were used to study the regulatory role of NRF in pulmonary TB. AM and PBMC were purified from 19 TB patients and 15 normal subjects. To study the underlying mechanism, PBMC were exposed to heated TB bacilli. The regulation role of NRF in IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 was determined by NRF knock-down or over-expression. NRF binding capabilities in promoter sites were measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. The levels of IP-10/CXCL10, IL-8/CXCL8 and NRF were significantly higher in AM and PBMC in patients with active TB. NRF played an inhibitory role in IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 inductions. We delineate the role of NRF in pulmonary TB, which inhibits the expressions of IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 in AM and PBMC of patients with high bacterial load. NRF may serve as an endogenous repressor to prevent robust increase in IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 when TB bacterial load is high. PMID:24223729

  13. A murine inhalation model to characterize pulmonary exposure to dry Aspergillus fumigatus conidia.

    PubMed

    Buskirk, Amanda D; Green, Brett J; Lemons, Angela R; Nayak, Ajay P; Goldsmith, W Travis; Kashon, Michael L; Anderson, Stacey E; Hettick, Justin M; Templeton, Steven P; Germolec, Dori R; Beezhold, Donald H

    2014-01-01

    Most murine models of fungal exposure are based on the delivery of uncharacterized extracts or liquid conidia suspensions using aspiration or intranasal approaches. Studies that model exposure to dry fungal aerosols using whole body inhalation have only recently been described. In this study, we aimed to characterize pulmonary immune responses following repeated inhalation of conidia utilizing an acoustical generator to deliver dry fungal aerosols to mice housed in a nose only exposure chamber. Immunocompetent female BALB/cJ mice were exposed to conidia derived from Aspergillus fumigatus wild-type (WT) or a melanin-deficient (Δalb1) strain. Conidia were aerosolized and delivered to mice at an estimated deposition dose of 1×105 twice a week for 4 weeks (8 total). Histopathological and immunological endpoints were assessed 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the final exposure. Histopathological analysis showed that conidia derived from both strains induced lung inflammation, especially at 24 and 48 hour time points. Immunological endpoints evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the mediastinal lymph nodes showed that exposure to WT conidia led to elevated numbers of macrophages, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. Importantly, CD8+ IL17+ (Tc17) cells were significantly higher in BALF and positively correlated with germination of A. fumigatus WT spores. Germination was associated with specific IgG to intracellular proteins while Δalb1 spores elicited antibodies to cell wall hydrophobin. These data suggest that inhalation exposures may provide a more representative analysis of immune responses following exposures to environmentally and occupationally prevalent fungal contaminants. PMID:25340353

  14. A Murine Inhalation Model to Characterize Pulmonary Exposure to Dry Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia

    PubMed Central

    Buskirk, Amanda D.; Green, Brett J.; Lemons, Angela R.; Nayak, Ajay P.; Goldsmith, W. Travis; Kashon, Michael L.; Anderson, Stacey E.; Hettick, Justin M.; Templeton, Steven P.; Germolec, Dori R.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Most murine models of fungal exposure are based on the delivery of uncharacterized extracts or liquid conidia suspensions using aspiration or intranasal approaches. Studies that model exposure to dry fungal aerosols using whole body inhalation have only recently been described. In this study, we aimed to characterize pulmonary immune responses following repeated inhalation of conidia utilizing an acoustical generator to deliver dry fungal aerosols to mice housed in a nose only exposure chamber. Immunocompetent female BALB/cJ mice were exposed to conidia derived from Aspergillus fumigatus wild-type (WT) or a melanin-deficient (Δalb1) strain. Conidia were aerosolized and delivered to mice at an estimated deposition dose of 1×105 twice a week for 4 weeks (8 total). Histopathological and immunological endpoints were assessed 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the final exposure. Histopathological analysis showed that conidia derived from both strains induced lung inflammation, especially at 24 and 48 hour time points. Immunological endpoints evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the mediastinal lymph nodes showed that exposure to WT conidia led to elevated numbers of macrophages, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. Importantly, CD8+ IL17+ (Tc17) cells were significantly higher in BALF and positively correlated with germination of A. fumigatus WT spores. Germination was associated with specific IgG to intracellular proteins while Δalb1 spores elicited antibodies to cell wall hydrophobin. These data suggest that inhalation exposures may provide a more representative analysis of immune responses following exposures to environmentally and occupationally prevalent fungal contaminants. PMID:25340353

  15. Characterizing asthma from a drop of blood using neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Sackmann, Eric Karl-Heinz; Berthier, Erwin; Schwantes, Elizabeth A; Fichtinger, Paul S; Evans, Michael D; Dziadzio, Laura L; Huttenlocher, Anna; Mathur, Sameer K; Beebe, David J

    2014-04-22

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder that affects more than 300 million people worldwide. Asthma management would benefit from additional tools that establish biomarkers to identify phenotypes of asthma. We present a microfluidic solution that discriminates asthma from allergic rhinitis based on a patient's neutrophil chemotactic function. The handheld diagnostic device sorts neutrophils from whole blood within 5 min, and generates a gradient of chemoattractant in the microchannels by placing a lid with chemoattractant onto the base of the device. This technology was used in a clinical setting to assay 34 asthmatic (n = 23) and nonasthmatic, allergic rhinitis (n = 11) patients to establish domains for asthma diagnosis based on neutrophil chemotaxis. We determined that neutrophils from asthmatic patients migrate significantly more slowly toward the chemoattractant compared with nonasthmatic patients (P = 0.002). Analysis of the receiver operator characteristics of the patient data revealed that using a chemotaxis velocity of 1.55 μm/min for asthma yields a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 73%, respectively. This study identifies neutrophil chemotaxis velocity as a potential biomarker for asthma, and we demonstrate a microfluidic technology that was used in a clinical setting to perform these measurements. PMID:24711384

  16. [Interpretation and use of routine pulmonary function tests: Spirometry, static lung volumes, lung diffusion, arterial blood gas, methacholine challenge test and 6-minute walk test].

    PubMed

    Bokov, P; Delclaux, C

    2016-02-01

    Resting pulmonary function tests (PFT) include the assessment of ventilatory capacity: spirometry (forced expiratory flows and mobilisable volumes) and static volume assessment, notably using body plethysmography. Spirometry allows the potential definition of obstructive defect, while static volume assessment allows the potential definition of restrictive defect (decrease in total lung capacity) and thoracic hyperinflation (increase in static volumes). It must be kept in mind that this evaluation is incomplete and that an assessment of ventilatory demand is often warranted, especially when facing dyspnoea: evaluation of arterial blood gas (searching for respiratory insufficiency) and measurement of the transfer coefficient of the lung, allowing with the measurement of alveolar volume to calculate the diffusing capacity of the lung for CO (DLCO: assessment of alveolar-capillary wall and capillary blood volume). All these pulmonary function tests have been the subject of an Americano-European Task force (standardisation of lung function testing) published in 2005, and translated in French in 2007. Interpretative strategies for lung function tests have been recommended, which define abnormal lung function tests using the 5th and 95th percentiles of predicted values (lower and upper limits of normal values). Thus, these recommendations need to be implemented in all pulmonary function test units. A methacholine challenge test will only be performed in the presence of an intermediate pre-test probability for asthma (diagnostic uncertainty), which is an infrequent setting. The most convenient exertional test is the 6-minute walk test that allows the assessment of walking performance, the search for arterial desaturation and the quantification of dyspnoea complaint. PMID:26657268

  17. Effect of blood pH on pulmonary artery pressure, left atrial pressure and fluid filtration rate in isolated rabbit lung.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Plata, V M; Pozo-Parilli, J C; Baum-Agay, A; Curiel, C; Sánchez de León, R

    1995-09-01

    To determine the effects of pH changes on Pulmonary Artery Pressure (PAP), 18 isolated rabbit lung preparations, perfused with autologous blood mixture and constant PaCO2 have been studied. Each preparation was studied under 3 conditions: Baseline: 30 minutes equilibration period. Acidosis: pH was decreased by 0.2 N HCl infusion, the ventilatory rate was changed and different CO2 mixtures were used to maintain the PCO2 within the initial parameters. Compensated Acidosis (CA): pH was returned to normal values by 0.7 N NaHCO3 infusion maintaining PCO2 in its initial values. The decrease in pH (acidosis) from 7.36 +/- 0.05 to 7.18 +/- 0.06 at constant PCO2, generated a significant increase in PAP (13.6 +/- 3.2 cm H2O to 18.8 +/- 5.2 cm H2O, p < 0.01). The pH increase (CA) from 7.18 +/- 0.06 to 7.40 +/- 0.09 caused the PAP to decrease (18.8 +/- 5.2 cm H2O to 15.9 +/- 4.2 cm H2O); the fluid filtration rate remained unchanged during the whole experiment. It is concluded that blood pH changes at constant PCO2 result in significant changes of PAP. Acidemia produces pulmonary vasoconstriction, which may be a contributing factor in the genesis of pulmonary hypertension in clinical conditions with increased hydrogen ion concentration [H+]. PMID:8606988

  18. Pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Newman, G.E.; Perlmutt, L.M.; Braun, S.D.

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common medical problem whose incidence is likely to increase in our aging population. Although it is life-threatening, effective therapy exists. The treatment is not, however, without significant complications. Thus, accurate diagnosis is important. Unfortunately, the clinical manifestations of pulmonary embolism are nonspecific. Furthermore, in many patients the symptoms of an acute embolism are superimposed on underlying chronic heart or lung disease. Thus, a high index of suspicion is needed to identify pulmonary emboli. Laboratory parameters, including arterial oxygen tensions and electrocardiography, are as nonspecific as the clinical signs. They may be more useful in excluding another process than in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. The first radiologic examination is the chest radiograph, but the clinical symptoms are frequently out of proportion to the findings on the chest films. Classic manifestations of pulmonary embolism on the chest radiograph include a wedge-shaped peripheral opacity and a segmental or lobar diminution in vascularity with prominent central arteries. However, these findings are not commonly seen and, even when present, are not specific. Even less specific findings include cardiomegaly, pulmonary infiltrate, elevation of a hemidiaphragm, and pleural effusion. Many patients with pulmonary embolism may have a normal chest radiograph. The chest radiograph is essential, however, for two purposes. First, it may identify another cause of the patient's symptoms, such as a rib fracture, dissecting aortic aneurysm, or pneumothorax. Second, a chest radiograph is essential to interpretation of the radionuclide V/Q scan. The perfusion scan accurately reflects the perfusion of the lung. However, a perfusion defect may result from a variety of etiologies. Any process such as vascular stenosis or compression by tumor may restrict blood flow. 84 references.

  19. Genetic Characterization of Atypical Mansonella (Mansonella) ozzardi Microfilariae in Human Blood Samples from Northeastern Peru

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Luis A.; Arrospide, Nancy; Recuenco, Sergio; Cabezas, Cesar; Weil, Gary J.; Fischer, Peter U.

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequence comparisons are useful for characterizing proposed new parasite species or strains. Microfilariae with an atypical arrangement of nuclei behind the cephalic space have been recently described in human blood samples from the Amazon region of Peru. Three blood specimens containing atypical microfilariae were genetically characterized using three DNA markers (5S ribosomal DNA, 12S ribosomal DNA, and cytochrome oxidase I). All atypical microfilariae were clustered into the Mansonella group and indistinguishable from M. ozzardi based on these DNA markers. PMID:22826497

  20. In-Situ Characterization of Tissue Blood Flow, Blood Content, and Water State Using New Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conturo, Thomas Edward

    Tissue blood flow, blood content, and water state have been characterized in-situ with new nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The sensitivities of standard techniques to the physiologic tissue parameters spin density (N_{rm r}) and relaxation times (T_1 and T_2 ) are mathematically defined. A new driven inversion method is developed so that tissue T_1 and T_2 changes produce cooperative intensity changes, yielding high contrast, high signal to noise, and sensitivity to a wider range of tissue parameters. The actual tissue parameters were imaged by automated collection of multiple-echo data having multiple T _1 dependence. Data are simultaneously fit by three-parameters to a closed-form expression, producing lower inter-parameter correlation and parameter noise than in separate T_1 or T_2 methods or pre-averaged methods. Accurate parameters are obtained at different field strengths. Parametric images of pathology demonstrate high sensitivity to tissue heterogeneity, and water content is determined in many tissues. Erythrocytes were paramagnetically labeled to study blood content and relaxation mechanisms. Liver and spleen relaxation were enhanced following 10% exchange of animal blood volumes. Rapid water exchange between intracellular and extracellular compartments was validated. Erythrocytes occupied 12.5% of renal cortex volume, and blood content was uniform in the liver, spleen and kidney. The magnitude and direction of flow velocity was then imaged. To eliminate directional artifacts, a bipolar gradient technique sensitized to flow in different directions was developed. Phase angle was reconstructed instead of intensity since the former has a 2pi -fold higher dynamic range. Images of flow through curves demonstrated secondary flow with a centrifugally-biased laminar profile and stationary velocity peaks along the curvature. Portal vein flow velocities were diminished or reversed in cirrhosis. Image artifacts have been characterized and removed. The

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characterization and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk of infection by P. aeruginosa. The specific role of bronchiectasis in both infection and chronic colonization by this microorganism in COPD, however, remains ill defined. To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for P. aeruginosa recovery from sputum in outpatients with severe COPD, characterizing P. aeruginosa isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and focusing on the influence of bronchiectasis on chronic colonization in these patients. Methods A case-cohort study of 118 patients with severe COPD attended at a Respiratory Day Unit for an acute infectious exacerbation and followed up over one year. High-resolution CT scans were performed during stability for bronchiectasis assessment and sputum cultures were obtained during exacerbation and stability in all patients. P. aeruginosa isolates were genotyped by PFGE. Determinants of the recovery of P. aeruginosa in sputum and chronic colonization by this microorganism were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41 of the 118 patients studied (34.7%). Five of these 41 patients (12.2%) with P. aeruginosa recovery fulfilled criteria for chronic colonization. In the multivariate analysis, the extent of bronchiectasis (OR 9.8, 95% CI: 1.7 to 54.8) and the number of antibiotic courses (OR 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1 to 2.5) were independently associated with an increased risk of P. aeruginosa isolation. Chronic colonization was unrelated to the presence of bronchiectasis (p=0.75). In patients with chronic colonization the isolates of P. aeruginosa retrieved corresponded to the same clones during the follow-up, and most of the multidrug resistant isolates (19/21) were harbored by these patients. Conclusions The main risk factors for P. aeruginosa isolation in severe COPD were the extent of bronchiectasis and exposure to antibiotics. Over 10% of these patients fulfilled criteria for

  2. From blood to bubbles: Time resolved micro-particle detection and characterization by scattered ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Ronald A.

    2001-05-01

    Robert Apfel believed in the creative application of acoustics technology to difficult problems in biomedical sensing. Much of his work in this area focused on material characterization, with the intention of effecting diagnosis. His early work in blood cell characterization employed acoustic levitation to measure the bulk mechanical properties of human red blood cells. This subsequently paved the way to the use of high-frequency acoustic scattering to yield the compressibility and density of individual blood cells. Technology developed in this later effort was then adapted to the very difficult problem of transient micro-cavitation detection, and the active cavitation detector (ACD) was born. This paper traces this line of work from its origins and, in the process, serves to celebrate Bob Apfel's peerless ingenuity and irrepressible creativity.

  3. Functional characterization of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in lung development, injury, and tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs) are proposed to be the first specialized cell type to appear in the lung, but their ontogeny remains obscure. Although studies of PNECs have suggested their involvement in a number of lung functions, neither their in vivo significance nor the molecular mechanis...

  4. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY FIBROSIS-LIKE CONDITION IN CATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interstitial lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders due to a variety of causes. In veterinary medicine, those with a prominent fibrotic component of unknown etiology are often called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). In human medicine, this term is reserved for ...

  5. Relationship between blood and bronchial submucosal eosinophilia and reticular basement membrane thickening in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Eltboli, Osama; Mistry, Vijay; Barker, Bethan; Brightling, Chris E

    2015-05-01

    A sputum eosinophilia is observed in 10-40% of COPD subjects. The blood eosinophil count is a biomarker of sputum eosinophilia, but whether it is associated with bronchial submucosal eosinophils is unclear. In 20 COPD subjects and 21 controls we assessed the number of bronchial submucosal eosinophils and reticular basement membrane thickening and found these were positively correlated with the blood eosinophil percentage. In COPD, blood eosinophils are a good biomarker of bronchial eosinophilia and remodelling. PMID:25645275

  6. Relationship between blood and bronchial submucosal eosinophilia and reticular basement membrane thickening in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Eltboli, Osama; Mistry, Vijay; Barker, Bethan

    2015-01-01

    A sputum eosinophilia is observed in 10–40% of COPD subjects. The blood eosinophil count is a biomarker of sputum eosinophilia, but whether it is associated with bronchial submucosal eosinophils is unclear. In 20 COPD subjects and 21 controls we assessed the number of bronchial submucosal eosinophils and reticular basement membrane thickening and found these were positively correlated with the blood eosinophil percentage. In COPD, blood eosinophils are a good biomarker of bronchial eosinophilia and remodelling. PMID:25645275

  7. Pentobarbital anesthesia modifies pulmonary vasoregulation after hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, B B; Nyhan, D P; Goll, H M; Clougherty, P W; Fehr, D M; Murray, P A

    1988-09-01

    Our objectives were 1) to investigate the extent to which the pulmonary vascular response to increasing cardiac index after a period of hypotension and hypoperfusion (defined as reperfusion) measured in conscious dogs is altered during pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, and 2) to determine whether pentobarbital anesthesia modifies autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of the pulmonary circulation during reperfusion. Base-line and reperfusion pulmonary vascular pressure-cardiac index (P/Q) plots were generated by stepwise inflation and deflation, respectively, of an inferior vena caval occluder to vary Q in conscious and pentobarbital-anesthetized (30 mg/kg iv) dogs. During pentobarbital anesthesia, controlled ventilation (without positive end-expiratory pressure) allowed matching of systemic arterial and mixed venous blood gases to conscious values. Marked pulmonary vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) was observed during reperfusion in pentobarbital-anesthetized but not in conscious dogs. Both sympathetic alpha-adrenergic receptor block and total ANS ganglionic block attenuated, but did not abolish, the pulmonary vasoconstriction during reperfusion in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. Neither sympathetic beta-adrenergic receptor block nor cholinergic receptor block enhanced the magnitude of the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to reperfusion during pentobarbital anesthesia. Thus, in contrast to the conscious state, the pulmonary vascular response to reperfusion is characterized by active, non-flow-dependent pulmonary vasoconstriction during pentobarbital anesthesia. This response is primarily, but not exclusively, mediated by sympathetic alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction and is not offset by either sympathetic beta-adrenergic or cholinergic vasodilation. These results indicate, that, compared with the conscious state, pentobarbital anesthesia modifies pulmonary vasoregulation, during reperfusion following hypotension and hypoperfusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250

  8. Characterization of the phase dependent pulmonary response following irritant inhalation exposure to nitrogen dioxide gas

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    The present study utilized NO{sub 2} to fingerprint the biochemical reaction of the pulmonary compartment to oxidative damage and to correlate this with histopathology following acute and subacute exposures to NO{sub 2}. Acute exposure to NO{sub 2} produced dose-dependent immediate increases in the nonenzymatic parameters of pulmonary protein content, protease inhibitor activity and lung weight. The enzymatic activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), choline kinase and beta-glucuronidase were elevated by two days following acute exposure. All of the above parameters were elevated following subacute exposure, however, nonenzymatic manifestations were attenuated with respect to enzymatic alterations. Hydroxyurea-induced granulocytopenia attenuated the increases in activities of LDH and beta-glucuronidase following acute, but not subacute exposures. Cycloheximide-induced protein synthesis inhibition decrease the LDH and beta-glucuronidase response to NO{sub 2} without altering the increases in protein content or protease inhibitor activity.

  9. Prevalence and characterization of opportunistic candidal infections among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Astekar, Madhusudan; Bhatiya, Priyanka Sharma; Sowmya, GV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although Candida albicans remains the most common cause of human candidiasis, the frequency of infection attributed to other members of the genus is also increasing. Hence, the present study was carried out to know the prevalence of opportunistic candidal infection in tuberculosis, and if positive, the species of Candida that is most commonly associated. Materials and Methods: The present study comprised sixty pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were divided into (1) fresh or untreated group, (2A) chronic or treated group having no complications and (2B) having complications, comprising twenty patients each, respectively. The collected sputum samples were initially stained with Ziehl–Neelsen stain for confirmation of presence of tubercle Bacilli. Primary isolation was done on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA). The candidal colonies were confirmed microscopically for the presence of pseudohyphae. Further speciation of the positive candidal samples was carried out using ChromAgar. Result: The total fungal prevalence among 60 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis on SDA was 33 (55%) Candida and 3 (5%) Aspergillus. The prevalence of different candidal species on ChromAgar showed C. albicans as the predominant one, followed by Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei. Freshly diagnosed or untreated group was less commonly associated with pulmonary mycoses than chronic or treated group. The prevalence of Candida had increased with treatment, duration and age, and it was more in males than females. Conclusion: The present study confirms the phenomenon of opportunistic candidal infections in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Rapid and reliable identification of Candida species is essential as they differ in their virulence and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. PMID:27601806

  10. Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Characterization of Solitary Pulmonary Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Çağlayan; Gençhellaç, Hakan; Temizöz, Osman; Polat, Ahmet; Şengül, Ersin; Duygulu, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. Aims: To investigate the value of diffusion weighted imaging on the differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary lesions. Study Design: Randomized prospective study. Methods: This prospective study included 48 solitary pulmonary nodules and masses (18 benign, 30 malignant). Single shot echo planar spin echo diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) was performed with two b factors (0 and 1000 s/mm2). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were calculated. On diffusion weighted (DW) trace images, the signal intensities (SI) of the lesions were visually compared to the SI of the thoracic spinal cord using a 5-point scale: 1: hypointense, 2: moderately hypointense, 3: isointense, 4: moderately hyperintense, 5: significantly hyperintense. For the quantitative evaluation, the lesion to thoracic spinal signal intensity ratios and the ADCs of the lesions were compared between groups. Results: On visual evaluation, taking the density of the spinal cord as a reference, most benign lesions were found to be hypointense, while most of the malignant lesions were evaluated as hyperintense on DWI with a b factor of 1000 s/mm2. In contrast, on T2 weighted images, it was seen that the distinction of malignant lesions from benign lesions was not statistically significant. The ADCs of the malignant lesions were significantly lower than those of benign lesions (mean ADC was 2.02×10−3 mm2/s for malignant lesions, and 1.195×10−3±0.3 mm2/s for benign lesions). Setting the cut-off value at 1.5×10−3, ADC had a sensitivity of 86.7% and a specificity of 88.9% for the differentiation of benign lesions from malignant lesions. Conclusion: DWI may aid in the differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary lesions. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02482181) PMID:26740901

  11. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Caroline; Montani, David; Savale, Laurent; Sitbon, Olivier; Parent, Florence; Seferian, Andrei; Bulifon, Sophie; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Dartevelle, Philippe; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Jaïs, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by the persistence of thromboembolic obstructing the pulmonary arteries as an organized tissue and the presence of a variable small vessel arteriopathy. The consequence is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in progressive right heart failure. CTEPH is classified as group IV pulmonary hypertension according to the WHO classification of pulmonary hypertension. CTEPH is defined as precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mmHg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg) associated with mismatched perfusion defects on ventilation-perfusion lung scan and signs of chronic thromboembolic disease on computed tomography pulmonary angiogram and/or conventional pulmonary angiography, in a patient who received at least 3 months of therapeutic anticoagulation. CTEPH as a direct consequence of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) is rare, and a significant number of CTEPH cases develop in the absence of history of PE. Thus, CTEPH should be considered in any patient with unexplained PH. Splenectomy, chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, indwelling catheters and cardiac pacemakers have been identified as associated conditions increasing the risk of CTEPH. Ventilation-perfusion scan (V/Q) is the best test available for establishing the thromboembolic nature of PH. When CTEPH is suspected, patients should be referred to expert centres where pulmonary angiography, right heart catheterization and high-resolution CT scan will be performed to confirm the diagnosis and to assess the operability. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) remains the gold standard treatment for CTEPH when organized thrombi involve the main, lobar or segmental arteries. This operation should only be performed by experienced surgeons in specialized centres. For inoperable patients, current ESC/ERS guidelines for the

  12. Genistein attenuates low temperature induced pulmonary hypertension in broiler chicks by modulating endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Gao, Mingyu; Wu, Zhenlong; Guo, Yuming

    2010-12-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by high pulmonary blood pressure, vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy. In the present study, we investigated whether genistein would prevent the development of low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension in broilers. Hemodynamic parameters, vascular remodeling, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide and endothelin-1 content in lung tissue were evaluated. The results demonstrated that genistein significantly reduced pulmonary arterial hypertension and suppressed pulmonary arterial vascular remodeling without affecting broilers' performance. The beneficial effects appeared to be mediated by restoring endothelial function especially endothelial nitric oxide and endothelin-1, two critical vasoactive molecules that associated with the development of hypertension. Genistein supplementation might be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:20854807

  13. Label-free characterization of white blood cells by measuring 3D refractive index maps

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, HyunJoo; Choi, Chulhee; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of white blood cells (WBCs) is crucial for blood analyses and disease diagnoses. However, current standard techniques rely on cell labeling, a process which imposes significant limitations. Here we present three-dimensional (3D) optical measurements and the label-free characterization of mouse WBCs using optical diffraction tomography. 3D refractive index (RI) tomograms of individual WBCs are constructed from multiple two-dimensional quantitative phase images of samples illuminated at various angles of incidence. Measurements of the 3D RI tomogram of WBCs enable the separation of heterogeneous populations of WBCs using quantitative morphological and biochemical information. Time-lapse tomographic measurements also provide the 3D trajectory of micrometer-sized beads ingested by WBCs. These results demonstrate that optical diffraction tomography can be a useful and versatile tool for the study of WBCs. PMID:26504637

  14. Swine model of chronic postcapillary pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular remodeling: long-term characterization by cardiac catheterization, magnetic resonance, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Pereda, Daniel; García-Alvarez, Ana; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Nuño, Mario; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; García-Ruíz, José Manuel; Sandoval, Elena; Aguero, Jaume; Castellá, Manuel; Hajjar, Roger J; Fuster, Valentín; Ibáñez, Borja

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is prevalent and carries high morbidity and mortality, mostly due to right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. Postcapillary PH is the most frequent form but there are no large-animal models available. We developed and characterized a porcine model of postcapillary PH by non-restrictive banding of the confluent of both inferior pulmonary veins (n = 10; sham controls n = 3). Right heart catheterization and magnetic resonance were performed before the procedure and monthly during 4 months. All banded animals developed PH. Compared to controls, banded animals presented higher mean pulmonary artery pressure [median (first to third quartile) 30 mmHg (25-37) vs. 20 mmHg (18-23); p = 0.018] and higher pulmonary vascular resistance [5.2 WU (3.8-7.1) vs. 2.3 WU (2.1-3.5); p = 0.028] after 2 months. Differences in indexed RV end-systolic volume [42 mL/m(2) (36-53) vs. 24 mL/m(2) (24-33); p = 0.028] and RV ejection fraction [59 % (54-63) vs. 66 % (64-68); p = 0.028] were also significant after 2 months. Differences remained significant throughout the study. Histopathology revealed increased lung weight and fibrosis but no increase in average water content. Also, remodeling on pulmonary arteries including increased medial and intimal thickness and fibrosis and RV myocardial disarray and fibrosis was demonstrated. Lung remodeling findings were similar in all pulmonary lobes. PMID:24771313

  15. Characterization of a Reverse-Phase Perfluorocarbon Emulsion for the Pulmonary Delivery of Tobramycin

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, Charlene Irvin; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Pavlovsky, Leonid; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Younger, John G.; Cook, Keith E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Aerosolized delivery of antibiotics is hindered by poor penetration within distal and plugged airways. Antibacterial perfluorocarbon ventilation (APV) is a proposed solution in which the lungs are partially or totally filled with perfluorocarbon (PFC) containing emulsified antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate emulsion stability and rheological, antibacterial, and pharmacokinetic characteristics. Methods: This study examined emulsion aqueous droplet diameter and number density over 24 hr and emulsion and neat PFC viscosity and surface tension. Additionally, Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth was measured after 2-hr exposure to emulsion with variable aqueous volume percentages (0.25, 1, and 2.5%) and aqueous tobramycin concentrations (Ca=0.4, 4, and 40 mg/mL). Lastly, the time course of serum and pulmonary tobramycin concentrations was evaluated following APV and conventional aerosolized delivery of tobramycin in rats. Results: The initial aqueous droplet diameter averaged 1.9±0.2 μm with little change over time. Initial aqueous droplet number density averaged 3.5±1.7×109 droplets/mL with a significant (p<0.01) decrease over time. Emulsion and PFC viscosity were not significantly different, averaging 1.22±0.03×10–3 Pa·sec. The surface tensions of PFC and emulsion were 15.0±0.1×10–3 and 14.6±0.6×10–3 N/m, respectively, and the aqueous interfacial tensions were 46.7±0.3×10–3 and 26.9±11.0×10–3 N/m (p<0.01), respectively. Biofilm growth decreased markedly with increasing Ca and, to a lesser extent, aqueous volume percentage. Tobramycin delivered via APV yielded 2.5 and 10 times larger pulmonary concentrations at 1 and 4 hr post delivery, respectively, and significantly (p<0.05) lower serum concentrations compared with aerosolized delivery. Conclusions: The emulsion is bactericidal, retains the rheology necessary for pulmonary delivery, is sufficiently stable for this application, and results in

  16. Non-ionic surfactant vesicles in pulmonary glucocorticoid delivery: characterization and interaction with human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Marianecci, Carlotta; Paolino, Donatella; Celia, Christian; Fresta, Massimo; Carafa, Maria; Alhaique, Franco

    2010-10-01

    Non-ionic surfactant vesicles (NSVs) were proposed for the pulmonary delivery of glucocorticoids such as beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) for the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases, e.g. asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and various type of pulmonary fibrosis. The thin layer evaporation method followed by sonication was used to prepare small non-ionic surfactant vesicles containing beclomethasone dipropionate. Light scattering experiments showed that beclomethasone dipropionate-loaded non-ionic surfactant vesicles were larger than unloaded ones and showed a significant (P<0.001) decrease of the zeta potential. The morphological analysis, by freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy, showed the maintenance of a vesicular structure in the presence of the drug. The colloidal and storage stability were evaluated by Turbiscan Lab Expert, which evidenced the good stability of BDP-loaded non-ionic surfactant vesicles, thus showing no significant variations of mean size and no colloidal phase segregation. Primary human lung fibroblast (HLF) cells were used for in vitro investigation of vesicle tolerability, carrier-cell interaction, intracellular drug uptake and drug-loaded vesicle anti-inflammatory activity. The investigated NSVs did not show a significant cytotoxic activity at all incubation times for concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 1 μM. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed vesicular carrier localization at the level of the cytoplasm compartment, where the glucocorticoid receptor (target site) is localized. BDP-loaded non-ionic surfactant vesicles elicited a significant improvement of the HLF intracellular uptake of the drug with respect to the free drug solution, drug/surfactant mixtures and empty vesicles used as references. The treatment of HLF cells with BDP-loaded non-ionic surfactant vesicles determined a noticeable increase of the drug anti-inflammatory activity by reducing the secretion of both constitutive and interleukin-1

  17. [Effect of changes in airway pressure and the inspiratory volume on the fluid filtration rate and pulmonary artery pressure in isolated rabbit lungs perfused with blood and acellular solution].

    PubMed

    Crespo, Astrid; Novoa, Eva; Urich, Daniela; Trejo, Humberto; Pezzulo, Alejandro; Sznajder, Jacob I; Livia, Fernández; Sánchez-de León, Roberto

    2006-12-01

    It has been reported that ventilation with large tidal volumes causes pulmonary edema in rats by the stimulation and release of proinflammatory mediators. Our objective was to determine the level at which volutrauma induced by changes in Airway Pressure (PAW) and Inspiratory Volume (VI) produce significant changes on the Fluid Filtration Rate (FFR) and Pulmonary Artery Pressure (PAP) in lungs perfused with blood (cellular groups) or with a buffer-albumin solution (acellular groups), with a Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) 0 or 2 cmH2O and to study the effect of a vasodilator with antiinflammatory properties (fenoterol) in blood-perfused groups. Three experimental groups were used: the cellular groups studied the effect of increased PAW and IV in isolated lungs perfused with blood and PEEP 0 and 2; the acellular groups studied the increased PAW and IV in isolated lungs perfused with a buffer-albumin solution and PEEP 0 and 2; The fenoterol group studied the effect of increased PAW and IV in isolated lungs perfused with blood + fenoterol and PEEP 2. The results show that an increase of FFR is produced earlier in acellular groups than in cellular ones and that the damage in cellular groups is microscopically and macroscopically inferior when compared to acellular groups. Fenoterol did not inhibit edema formation, and that PEEP 2, both in the cellular and the acellular groups, has a protective effect. We propose the possible existence of mediators with protective effects against the formation of pulmonary edema in the blood. These data suggest that volutrauma induced pulmonary edema has a predominantly traumatic origin when the lungs are perfused with blood. PMID:17176901

  18. The rabbit pulmonary cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid metabolic pathway: characterization and significance.

    PubMed Central

    Zeldin, D C; Plitman, J D; Kobayashi, J; Miller, R F; Snapper, J R; Falck, J R; Szarek, J L; Philpot, R M; Capdevila, J H

    1995-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 metabolizes arachidonic acid to several unique and biologically active compounds in rabbit liver and kidney. Microsomal fractions prepared from rabbit lung homogenates metabolized arachidonic acid through cytochrome P450 pathways, yielding cis-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and their hydration products, vic-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, mid-chain cis-trans conjugated dienols, and 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. Inhibition studies using polyclonal antibodies prepared against purified CYP2B4 demonstrated 100% inhibition of arachidonic acid epoxide formation. Purified CYP2B4, reconstituted in the presence of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome b5, metabolized arachidonic acid, producing primarily EETs. EETs were detected in lung homogenate using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy, providing evidence for the in vivo pulmonary cytochrome P450 epoxidation of arachidonic acid. Chiral analysis of these lung EETs demonstrated a preference for the 14(R),15(S)-, 11(S),12(R)-, and 8(S),9(R)-EET enantiomers. Both EETs and vic-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. At micromolar concentrations, methylated 5,6-EET and 8,9-EET significantly relaxed histamine-contracted guinea pig hilar bronchi in vitro. In contrast, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid caused contraction to near maximal tension. We conclude that CYP2B4, an abundant rabbit lung cytochrome P450 enzyme, is the primary constitutive pulmonary arachidonic acid epoxygenase and that these locally produced, biologically active eicosanoids may be involved in maintaining homeostasis within the lung. Images PMID:7738183

  19. Recent advances in thoracic x-ray computed tomography for pulmonary imaging

    PubMed Central

    Precious, Bruce J; Raju, Rekha; Leipsic, Jonathon

    2014-01-01

    The present article reviews recent advances in pulmonary computed tomography (CT) imaging, focusing on the application of dual-energy CT and the use of iterative reconstruction. Dual-energy CT has proven to be useful in the characterization of pulmonary blood pool in the setting of pulmonary embolism, characterization of diffuse lung parenchymal diseases, evaluation of thoracic malignancies and in imaging of lung ventilation using inhaled xenon. The benefits of iterative reconstruction have been largely derived from reduction of image noise compared with filtered backprojection reconstructions which, in turn, enables the use of lower radiation dose CT acquisition protocols without sacrificing image quality. Potential clinical applications of iterative reconstruction include imaging for pulmonary nodules and high-resolution pulmonary CT. PMID:24791258

  20. Unbiased Characterization of Anopheles Mosquito Blood Meals by Targeted High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Logue, Kyle; Keven, John Bosco; Cannon, Matthew V; Reimer, Lisa; Siba, Peter; Walker, Edward D; Zimmerman, Peter A; Serre, David

    2016-03-01

    Understanding mosquito host choice is important for assessing vector competence or identifying disease reservoirs. Unfortunately, the availability of an unbiased method for comprehensively evaluating the composition of insect blood meals is very limited, as most current molecular assays only test for the presence of a few pre-selected species. These approaches also have limited ability to identify the presence of multiple mammalian hosts in a single blood meal. Here, we describe a novel high-throughput sequencing method that enables analysis of 96 mosquitoes simultaneously and provides a comprehensive and quantitative perspective on the composition of each blood meal. We validated in silico that universal primers targeting the mammalian mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rRNA) should amplify more than 95% of the mammalian 16S rRNA sequences present in the NCBI nucleotide database. We applied this method to 442 female Anopheles punctulatus s. l. mosquitoes collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG). While human (52.9%), dog (15.8%) and pig (29.2%) were the most common hosts identified in our study, we also detected DNA from mice, one marsupial species and two bat species. Our analyses also revealed that 16.3% of the mosquitoes fed on more than one host. Analysis of the human mitochondrial hypervariable region I in 102 human blood meals showed that 5 (4.9%) of the mosquitoes unambiguously fed on more than one person. Overall, analysis of PNG mosquitoes illustrates the potential of this approach to identify unsuspected hosts and characterize mixed blood meals, and shows how this approach can be adapted to evaluate inter-individual variations among human blood meals. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to any disease-transmitting arthropod and can be easily customized to investigate non-mammalian host sources. PMID:26963245

  1. Unbiased Characterization of Anopheles Mosquito Blood Meals by Targeted High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Kyle; Keven, John Bosco; Cannon, Matthew V.; Reimer, Lisa; Siba, Peter; Walker, Edward D.; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Serre, David

    2016-01-01

    Understanding mosquito host choice is important for assessing vector competence or identifying disease reservoirs. Unfortunately, the availability of an unbiased method for comprehensively evaluating the composition of insect blood meals is very limited, as most current molecular assays only test for the presence of a few pre-selected species. These approaches also have limited ability to identify the presence of multiple mammalian hosts in a single blood meal. Here, we describe a novel high-throughput sequencing method that enables analysis of 96 mosquitoes simultaneously and provides a comprehensive and quantitative perspective on the composition of each blood meal. We validated in silico that universal primers targeting the mammalian mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rRNA) should amplify more than 95% of the mammalian 16S rRNA sequences present in the NCBI nucleotide database. We applied this method to 442 female Anopheles punctulatus s. l. mosquitoes collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG). While human (52.9%), dog (15.8%) and pig (29.2%) were the most common hosts identified in our study, we also detected DNA from mice, one marsupial species and two bat species. Our analyses also revealed that 16.3% of the mosquitoes fed on more than one host. Analysis of the human mitochondrial hypervariable region I in 102 human blood meals showed that 5 (4.9%) of the mosquitoes unambiguously fed on more than one person. Overall, analysis of PNG mosquitoes illustrates the potential of this approach to identify unsuspected hosts and characterize mixed blood meals, and shows how this approach can be adapted to evaluate inter-individual variations among human blood meals. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to any disease-transmitting arthropod and can be easily customized to investigate non-mammalian host sources. PMID:26963245

  2. Electrophysiological characterization of voltage-dependent calcium currents and TRPV4 currents in human pulmonary fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mozibur; Mukherjee, Subhendu; Sheng, Wei; Nilius, Bernd; Janssen, Luke J

    2016-04-01

    We have presented indirect evidence of a key role for voltage-dependent Ca(2+) currents in TGFβ-induced synthetic function in human pulmonary fibroblast (HPF), as well as in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Others, however, have provided indirect evidence for transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels in both of those effects. Unfortunately, definitive electrophysiological descriptions of both currents in HPFs have been entirely lacking. In this study, we provide the first direct electrophysiological and pharmacological evidence of the currents in HPFs at rest and during overnight stimulation with TGFβ. These currents include a Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) current, a TRPV4 current, a chloride current, and an L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) current. Evidence for the TRPV4 current include activation of a large-conductance change by two putatively TRPV4-selective agonists (4α-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate; GSK1016790A), with a reversal potential near 0 mV, partial sensitivity to two different TRPV4-selective blockers (RN1734; HC067047), and partial reduction following removal of external Na(+) Substantial reduction of the evoked current was seen following the coapplication of RN1734, DIDS, and niflumic acid, suggesting that a chloride current is also involved. The voltage-dependent Ca(2+) current is found to be "L-type" in nature, as indicated by the voltage and time dependence of its activation, deactivation, and inactivation properties, and by its pharmacology (sensitivity to replacement with barium and inhibition by nifedipine, verapamil, or mibefradil). We also found that overnight treatment with TGFβ evoked a periodic current (inward at negative holding potentials, with reversal potential near 0 mV), which is sufficient to trigger the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) currents and, thereby, account for the rhythmic Ca(2+) oscillations, which we have described previously in these cells. PMID:26851262

  3. Characterization of the early pulmonary inflammatory response associated with PTFE fume exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, C. J.; Finkelstein, J. N.; Gelein, R.; Baggs, R.; Oberdorster, G.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Heating of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) has been described to release fumes containing ultrafine particles (approximately 18 nm diam). These fumes can be highly toxic in the respiratory tract inducing extensive pulmonary edema with hemorrhagic inflammation. Fischer-344 rats were exposed to PTFE fumes generated by temperatures ranging from 450 to 460 degrees C for 15 min at an exposure concentration of 5 x 10(5) particles/cm3, equivalent to approximately 50 micrograms/m3. Responses were examined 4 hr post-treatment when these rats demonstrated 60-85% neutrophils (PMNs) in their lung lavage. Increases in abundance for messages encoding the antioxidants manganese superoxide dismutase and metallothionein (MT) increased 15- and 40-fold, respectively. For messages encoding the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin 1 alpha, 1 beta, and 6 (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6), macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) increases of 5-, 5-, 10-, 40-, 40-, and 15-fold were present. Vascular endothelial growth factor, which may play a role in the integrity of the endothelial barrier, was decreased to 20% of controls. In situ sections were hybridized with 33P cRNA probes encoding IL-6, MT, surfactant protein C, and TNF alpha. Increased mRNA abundance for MT and IL-6 was expressed around all airways and interstitial regions with MT and IL-6 demonstrating similar spatial distribution. Large numbers of activated PMNs expressed IL-6, MT, and TNF alpha. Additionally, pulmonary macrophages and epithelial cells were actively involved. These observations support the notion that PTFE fumes containing ultrafine particles initiate a severe inflammatory response at low inhaled particle mass concentrations, which is suggestive of an oxidative injury. Furthermore, PMNs may actively regulate the inflammatory process through cytokine and antioxidant expression.

  4. Development and characterization of a blood mimicking fluid for high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunbo; Maruvada, Subha; King, Randy L; Herman, Bruce A; Wear, Keith A

    2008-09-01

    A blood mimicking fluid (BMF) has been developed for the acoustic and thermal characterizations of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation devices. The BMF is based on a degassed and de-ionized water solution dispersed with low density polyethylene microspheres, nylon particles, gellan gum, and glycerol. A broad range of physical parameters, including attenuation coefficient, speed of sound, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusivity, were characterized as a function of temperature (20-70 degrees C). The nonlinear parameter B/A and backscatter coefficient were also measured at room temperature. Importantly, the attenuation coefficient is linearly proportional to the frequency (2-8 MHz) with a slope of about 0.2 dB cm(-1) MHz(-1) in the 20-70 degrees C range as in the case of human blood. Furthermore, sound speed and bloodlike backscattering indicate the usefulness of the BMF for ultrasound flow imaging and ultrasound-guided HIFU applications. Most of the other temperature-dependent physical parameters are also close to the reported values in human blood. These properties make it a unique HIFU research tool for developing standardized exposimetry techniques, validating numerical models, and determining the safety and efficacy of HIFU ablation devices. PMID:19045670

  5. One-class acoustic characterization applied to blood detection in IVUS.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Sean M; Naghavi, Morteza; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2007-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is an invasive imaging modality capable of providing cross-sectional images of the interior of a blood vessel in real time and at normal video framerates (10-30 frames/s). Low contrast between the features of interest in the IVUS imagery remains a confounding factor in IVUS analysis; it would be beneficial therefore to have a method capable of detecting certain physical features imaged under IVUS in an automated manner. We present such a method and apply it to the detection of blood. While blood detection algorithms are not new in this field, we deviate from traditional approaches to IVUS signal characterization in our use of 1-class learning. This eliminates certain problems surrounding the need to provide "foreground" and "background" (or, more generally, n-class) samples to a learner. Applied to the blood-detection problem on 40 MHz recordings made in vivo in swine, we are able to achieve approximately 95% sensitivity with approximately 90% specificity at a radial resolution of approximately 600 microm. PMID:18051060

  6. Correlation of gene expression with physiological functions: Examples of pulmonary blood vessel rheology, hypoxic hypertension, and tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Sher, Y P; Peck, K; Fung, Y C

    2001-01-01

    Microarray gene chip technology is a powerful invention looking for applications. A general principle is proposed here to direct the power of the technology toward physiology, medicine, and pharmacology. Our principle is to match quantitative measures of gene expression with the trend of mathematical parameters that describe biological functions. Mathematical parameterization is the heart. The procedure is illustrated by lung physiology, including the hypoxic hypertension, rheological properties of the tissues, and the remodeling of the pulmonary arterial wall under hypertensive stress. We show first how to reduce the experimental results on these physiological functions into mathematical formulas, and how the parameters of these formulas describe the functional trends precisely. Then under the assumption that the microarray reveals gene activities quantitatively, we match the trends of the gene activity with the trends of the functional parameters. Genes whose trends do match are interpreted as relevant to the functions. Those that do not match are considered irrelevant to the functions. The more functions we consider, the fewer will be the number of genes that are relevant to all functions. Thus we learn about the generality and specificity of the influence of genes on physiology. PMID:11381166

  7. Characterization of lymphoid cells in the blood of healthy adults: sequential immunological, cytochemical and cytokinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hirt, A.; Wagner, H.P.

    1980-01-01

    With a new method, sequential immunological, cytochemical and cytokinetic studies were done on lymphoid cells in the peripheral blood of 12 healthy adults. Every single lymphoid cell could therefore be characterized by the following markers: surface immunoglobulins (sIg); rosetting with sheep red blood cells (E); unspecific acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE); and 3HdT incorporation. Significantly more E+sIg-ANAE-cells (51% and 22% of all lymphoid cells, respectively). Of all ANAE+ cells 90% were E+, but 64% of all ANAE- cells were also E+. In all individuals a subpopulation of E+sIg+ cells was found. The esterase pattern of these cells was similar to that of E-sIg+ cells. The overall labeling index of the lymphoid cells examined was less than or equal to 0.2%.

  8. Molecular characterization of microbial contaminants isolated from Umbilical Cord Blood Units for transplant.

    PubMed

    Bello-López, Juan Manuel; Noguerón-Silva, Jorge; Castañeda-Sánchez, Jorge Ismael; Rojo-Medina, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Disposal of Umbilical Cord Blood Units due to microbial contamination is a major problem in Cord Blood Banks worldwide as it reduces the number of units available for transplantation. Additionally, economic losses are generated as result of resources and infrastructure used to obtain such units. Umbilical Cord Blood Units that showed initial microbial contamination were subject to strains isolation, identification, and characterization by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene and Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC-PCR). Moreover, tests of antimicrobial resistance/sensitivity and phenotypic activities that may play an important role in microbial infection were performed. Microbial contamination was detected in 120 Umbilical Cord Blood Units (2.31%) in the period from 2003 to 2013. The most frequently isolated strains were Enterococcus faecium, followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus haemoliticus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus durans, Lactobacillus helveticus, Enterococcus hiriae and Roseomonas genomospecies 5. The ERIC-PCR assays revealed a wide genetic diversity in some strains although belonging to the same genus and specie, indicating different sources of contamination. Broad-spectrum penicillins, third generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones showed lower inhibitory activity on the tested strains. All strains were proteolytic, 67.69% were amylase-positive, 27.6% hemolysis-positive, and 34.71% nuclease-positive. The most common sources of contamination were: vaginal flora, digestive tract, and skin flora, highlighting the need for staff training in good manufacturing practices in collection SCU since all contaminants identified are part of the microbial flora of the donors. Implications and consequences in the therapeutic use of Umbilical Cord Blood Units for transplantation contaminated by multiresistant bacteria in immunocompromised patients are discussed. PMID

  9. Partial blood oxygen pressure and pulmonary ventilation changes in patients with fractures with a view to traumatic fat embolism development.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, J; Kusák, I

    1983-01-01

    The body's response to the effects of mechanical injury, taking the form of shock during the first hours and the onset of fat embolism in the subsequent period, is substantially higher in patients with multiple or associated injuries, both as regards the severity of manifestations and prognostic risk. Also the death rate due to this sort of complication is seen rising. Two groups of injured persons with isolated (n = 33) and multiple fractures (n = 33) were used to show that dynamic follow-up of PaO2 in the blood could serve as a criterion of the risk of fat embolism development in the body and, in particular, as a prognostic criterion for the progress of fat embolism. Special point was made of findings demonstrating a time relationship between PaO2 deterioration in the early post-injury period (up to 24-36 hours) as compared with the period of 48-72 hours after the injury. PaO2 is seen dropping rapidly in injured persons showing signs of fat embolism syndrome development. The decrease can be recorded as early as the free interval phase, i.e. prior to the manifestation of the clinical signs of fat embolism. The findings of low PaO2 levels in the blood are in accordance with respiratory ventilation disturbances and impaired diffusion documented in our investigation. PMID:6409565

  10. Noninvasive optical characterization of muscle blood flow, oxygenation, and metabolism in women with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Women with fibromyalgia (FM) have symptoms of increased muscular fatigue and reduced exercise tolerance, which may be associated with alterations in muscle microcirculation and oxygen metabolism. This study used near-infrared diffuse optical spectroscopies to noninvasively evaluate muscle blood flow, blood oxygenation and oxygen metabolism during leg fatiguing exercise and during arm arterial cuff occlusion in post-menopausal women with and without FM. Methods Fourteen women with FM and twenty-three well-matched healthy controls participated in this study. For the fatiguing exercise protocol, the subject was instructed to perform 6 sets of 12 isometric contractions of knee extensor muscles with intensity steadily increasing from 20 to 70% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). For the cuff occlusion protocol, forearm arterial blood flow was occluded via a tourniquet on the upper arm for 3 minutes. Leg or arm muscle hemodynamics, including relative blood flow (rBF), oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration ([HbO2] and [Hb]), total hemoglobin concentration (THC) and blood oxygen saturation (StO2), were continuously monitored throughout protocols using a custom-built hybrid diffuse optical instrument that combined a commercial near-infrared oximeter for tissue oxygenation measurements and a custom-designed diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flowmeter for tissue blood flow measurements. Relative oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) and oxygen consumption rate (rVO2) were calculated from the measured blood flow and oxygenation data. Post-manipulation (fatiguing exercise or cuff occlusion) recovery in muscle hemodynamics was characterized by the recovery half-time, a time interval from the end of manipulation to the time that tissue hemodynamics reached a half-maximal value. Results Subjects with FM had similar hemodynamic and metabolic response/recovery patterns as healthy controls during exercise and during arterial occlusion. However, tissue r

  11. Characterization and pharmacokinetic analysis of crystalline versus amorphous rapamycin dry powder via pulmonary administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Simone R; Watts, Alan B; Peters, Jay I; Liu, Sha; Hengsawas, Soraya; Escotet-Espinoza, Manuel S; Williams, Robert O

    2014-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics of inhaled rapamycin (RAPA) is compared for amorphous versus crystalline dry powder formulations. The amorphous formulation of RAPA and lactose (RapaLac) was prepared by thin film freezing (TFF) using lactose as the stabilizing agent in the weight ratio 1:1. The crystalline formulation was prepared by wet ball milling RAPA and lactose and posteriorly blending the mixture with coarse lactose (micronized RAPA/micronized lactose/coarse lactose=0.5:0.5:19). While both powders presented good aerosolization performance for lung delivery, TFF formulation exhibited better in vitro aerodynamic properties than the crystalline physical mixture. Single-dose 24h pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats following inhalation of the aerosol mist in a nose-only inhalation exposure system. Lung deposition was higher for the crystalline group than for the TFF group. Despite higher pulmonary levels of drug that were found for the crystalline group, the systemic circulation (AUC₀₋₂₄) was higher for the amorphous group (8.6 ngh/mL) than for crystalline group (2.4 ngh/mL) based on a five-compartmental analysis. Lung level profiles suggest that TTF powder stays in the lung for the same period of time as the crystalline powder but it presented higher in vivo systemic bioavailability due to its enhanced solubility, faster dissolution rate and increased FPF at a more distal part of the lungs. PMID:24859653

  12. Nocturnal periodic breathing in primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R; Baseler, G; Ghofrani, H A; Grimminger, F; Olschewski, H; Seeger, W

    2002-04-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration is frequently observed in congestive heart failure. Among other factors, prolongation of circulation time, hypocapnia and hypoxia are thought to underlie this sleep-related breathing disorder. Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is also characterized by reduced cardiac output and blood gas alterations. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether a nocturnal periodic breathing (PB) occurs in PPH. A total of 20 consecutive patients with PPH who had been admitted for pharmacological investigation of pulmonary vasoreactivity were investigated by lung function testing, right heart catheterization and full-night attended polysomnography. PB was detected in six patients (30%) (mean +/- SEM: apnoea/hypopnoea index 37 +/- 5 h(-1); arterial oxygen saturation was <90% during 56 +/- 6.5% of total sleep time). The patients with PB had more severe haemodynamic impairment than those without. They also had a more marked reduction in the pulmonary diffusion capacity and greater arterial hypoxia. PB was markedly improved or even eradicated by nasal oxygen during the night. Periodic breathing occurs in patients with advanced primary pulmonary hypertension and can be reversed by nocturnal nasal oxygen. The clinical and prognostic significance of periodic breathing in primary pulmonary hypertension needs to be determined by further studies. PMID:11998995

  13. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  14. Rheological characterization of a gel produced using human blood plasma and alginate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Malagón-Romero, Dionisio; Hernández, Nicolás; Cardozo, Carmen; Godoy-Silva, Rubén D

    2014-06-01

    Human blood plasma is a material used to generate tissue equivalents due to presence of fibrinogen. However, gels formed using human blood plasma has weak mechanical properties. In this study, different mixtures of sodium alginate and blood plasma were performed and evaluated. By determining ζ potential can be established the stability of the plasma-alginate mixture and by dynamic rheology can determine the most suitable parameters for the gelation of the above mixtures, when calcium chloride is used as a crosslinker. Experimental results evidence an increment in ζ potential at alginate concentrations of 0.8% and 1.6% with a resulting pseudoplastic behavior of evaluated mixtures, which described the homogenization of the mixture. On the other hand, mixtures were gelled by using aspersion of calcium chloride and characterized by dynamic rheology. Solid behavior is dominant in all range of frequency sweep test between 0.1Hz and 100Hz. Finally, the ultimate tensile strength of a gel reach 6.36938±0.24320kPa, which is enough for manual handling of the gel. Between the tasks of the gel would be used for cell entrapment, for controlled release of drugs or in the manufacture of wound dressings. PMID:24603213

  15. Isolation, Culture, and Characterization of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Bieback, Karen; Netsch, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (CB) is considered one of the youngest available sources of adult stem cells. Besides hematopoietic stem cells, CB has been shown to contain endothelial progenitor cells as well as mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC). To isolate MSC from cord blood, CB is collected into a sterile bag containing the anticoagulant citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD). The CB is then processed by density-gradient centrifugation to obtain mononuclear cells (MNC). These are cultured until the outgrowth of fibroblastoid cell colonies appears. After reaching a subconfluent stage, cells are harvested, expanded, and characterized as cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells (CB-MSC) according to standard criteria: plastic adherence, fibroblast morphology, CFU-f assay, proliferation potential, immune phenotype, and differentiation potential.Apparently, the frequency of MSC in CB is extremely low. Thus, not every CB unit will provide adequate MSC isolation yields. Different strategies have been proposed aiming to optimize the isolation success by selecting CB units of optimal quality. It is commonly agreed on that a high CB volume, a high cellular content, and a short time frame between birth and MSC isolation are criteria that will enhance the MSC isolation success.The procedures in this chapter are standardized protocols that were established and optimized in the authors' research laboratory; however, various modifications of the protocols are possible. PMID:27236676

  16. Characterization of human antibody responses to four corners hantavirus infections among patients with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Jenison, S; Yamada, T; Morris, C; Anderson, B; Torrez-Martinez, N; Keller, N; Hjelle, B

    1994-01-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a human disease caused by a newly identified hantavirus, which we will refer to as Four Corners virus (FCV). FCV is related most closely to Puumala virus (PUU) and to Prospect Hill virus (PHV). Twenty-five acute HPS serum samples were tested for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibody reactivities to FCV-encoded recombinant proteins in Western blot (immunoblot) assays. All HPS serum samples contained both IgG and IgM antibodies to the FCV nucleocapsid (N) protein. FCV N antibodies cross-reacted with PUU N and PHV N proteins. A dominant FCV N epitope was mapped to the segment between amino acids 17 and 59 (QLVTARQKLKDAERAVELDPDDVNKSTLQSRRAAVSALETKLG). All HPS serum samples contained IgG antibodies to the FCV glycoprotein-1 (G1) protein, and 21 of 25 serum samples contained FCV G1 IgM antibodies. The FCV G1 antibodies did not cross-react with PUU G1 and PHV G1 proteins. The FCV G1 type-specific antibody reactivity mapped to a segment between amino acids 59 and 89 (LKIESSCNFDLHVPATTTQKYNQVDWTKKSS). One hundred twenty-eight control serum samples were tested for IgG reactivities to the FCV N and G1 proteins. Nine (7.0%) contained FCV N reactivities, 3 (2.3%) contained FCV G1 reactivities, and one (0.8%) contained both FCV N and FCV G1 reactivities. The epitopes recognized by antibodies present in control serum samples were different from the epitopes recognized by HPS antibodies, suggesting that the control antibody reactivities were unrelated to FCV infections. These reagents constitute a type-specific assay for FCV antibodies. Images PMID:7512156

  17. Fabrication and characterization of 3C-silicon carbide micro sensor for wireless blood pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Nupur

    A potentially implantable single crystal 3C-SiC pressure sensor for blood pressure measurement was designed, simulated, fabricated, characterized and optimized. This research uses a single crystal 3C-SiC, for the first time, to demonstrate its application as a blood pressure measurement sensor. The sensor, which uses the epitaxial grown 3C-SiC membrane to measure changes in pressure, is designed to be wireless, biocompatible and linear. The SiC material was chosen for its superior physical, chemical and mechanical properties; the capacitive sensor uses a 3C-SiC membrane as one of the electrodes; and, the sensor system is wireless for comfort and to allow for convenient reading of real-time pressure data (wireless communication is enabled by connecting the sensor parallel to a planar inductor). Together, the variable capacitive sensor and planar inductor create a pressure sensitive resonant circuit. The sensor system described above allows for implantation into a human patient's body, after which the planar inductor can be coupled with an external inductor to receive data for real-time blood pressure measurement. Electroplating, thick photo-resist characterization, RIE etching, oxidation, CVD, chemical mechanical polishing and wafer bonding were optimized during the process of fabricating the sensor system and, in addition to detailing the sensor system simulation and characterization; the optimized processes are detailed in the dissertation. This absolute pressure sensor is designed to function optimally within the human blood pressure range of 50-350mmHg. The layout and modeling of the sensor uses finite element analysis (FEA) software. The simulations for membrane deflection, stress analysis and electro-mechanical analysis are performed for 100 μm2 and 400μm2sensors. The membrane deflection-pressure, capacitance-pressure and resonant frequency-pressure graphs were obtained, and detailed in the dissertation, along with the planar inductor simulation for

  18. Characterization of blood drawn rapidly for use in blood volume expansion studies: An animal model for simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenault, V. Michelle; Lynch, Colleen D.; Morris, Mariana; Clodfelter, Jill; Hutchins, Phillip M.

    1990-01-01

    It was demonstrated that up to 8ml of blood can be drawn from donar rats without significantly increasing volume and stress sensitive hormones, and thus can be used for volume expansion studies. Infusion of whole blood allows more physiological changes that can be seen with volume expansion by saline or other ionic solutions. The infusion of whole blood to induce hypervolemia may provide an improved model to study the fluid balance and control mechanisms operative in weightlessness. Blood samples were drawn as quickly as possible from femoral artery catheters chronically implanted in Sprague Dawley rats and analyzed for hematocrit, plasma sodium, potassium, osmolality, corticosterone, epinepherine, norepinephrine, and vasopressin. The levels were found to be comparable to those of normal rats.

  19. Effect of voluntary hyperventilation with supplemental CO2 on pulmonary O2 uptake and leg blood flow kinetics during moderate-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Chin, Lisa M K; Heigenhauser, George J F; Paterson, Donald H; Kowalchuk, John M

    2013-12-01

    Pulmonary O2 uptake (V(O₂p)) and leg blood flow (LBF) kinetics were examined at the onset of moderate-intensity exercise, during hyperventilation with and without associated hypocapnic alkalosis. Seven male subjects (25 ± 6 years old; mean ± SD) performed alternate-leg knee-extension exercise from baseline to moderate-intensity exercise (80% of estimated lactate threshold) and completed four to six repetitions for each of the following three conditions: (i) control [CON; end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (P(ET, CO₂)) ~40 mmHg], i.e. normal breathing with normal inspired CO2 (0.03%); (ii) hypocapnia (HYPO; P(ET, CO₂) ~20 mmHg), i.e. sustained hyperventilation with normal inspired CO2 (0.03%); and (iii) normocapnia (NORMO; P(ET, CO₂) ~40 mmHg), i.e. sustained hyperventilation with elevated inspired CO2 (~5%). The V(O₂p) was measured breath by breath using mass spectrometry and a volume turbine. Femoral artery mean blood velocity was measured by Doppler ultrasound, and LBF was calculated from femoral artery diameter and mean blood velocity. Phase 2 V(O₂p) kinetics (τV(O₂p)) was different (P < 0.05) amongst all three conditions (CON, 19 ± 7 s; HYPO, 43 ± 17 s; and NORMO, 30 ± 8 s), while LBF kinetics (τLBF) was slower (P < 0.05) in HYPO (31 ± 9 s) compared with both CON (19 ± 3 s) and NORMO (20 ± 6 s). Similar to previous findings, HYPO was associated with slower V(O₂p) and LBF kinetics compared with CON. In the present study, preventing the fall in end-tidal P(CO₂) (NORMO) restored LBF kinetics, but not V(O₂p) kinetics, which remained 'slowed' relative to CON. These data suggest that the hyperventilation manoeuvre itself (i.e. independent of induced hypocapnic alkalosis) may contribute to the slower V(O₂p) kinetics observed during HYPO. PMID:23975901

  20. Phenotypic, Ultra-Structural, and Functional Characterization of Bovine Peripheral Blood Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Janet J.; Ochoa, Amanda S.; Bishop, Elizabeth; Barlow, John W.; Golde, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are multi-functional cells that bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immune systems. In bovine, significant information is lacking on the precise identity and role of peripheral blood DC subsets. In this study, we identify and characterize bovine peripheral blood DC subsets directly ex vivo, without further in vitro manipulation. Multi-color flow cytometric analysis revealed that three DC subsets could be identified. Bovine plasmacytoid DC were phenotypically identified by a unique pattern of cell surface protein expression including CD4, exhibited an extensive endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, efficiently internalized and degraded exogenous antigen, and were the only peripheral blood cells specialized in the production of type I IFN following activation with Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. Conventional DC were identified by expression of a different pattern of cell surface proteins including CD11c, MHC class II, and CD80, among others, the display of extensive dendritic protrusions on their plasma membrane, expression of very high levels of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, efficient internalization and degradation of exogenous antigen, and ready production of detectable levels of TNF-alpha in response to TLR activation. Our investigations also revealed a third novel DC subset that may be a precursor of conventional DC that were MHC class II+ and CD11c−. These cells exhibited a smooth plasma membrane with a rounded nucleus, produced TNF-alpha in response to TLR-activation (albeit lower than CD11c+ DC), and were the least efficient in internalization/degradation of exogenous antigen. These studies define three bovine blood DC subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics which can be analyzed during immune responses to pathogens and vaccinations of cattle. PMID:25295753

  1. Real-time characterization of the uterine blood flow in mares before and after artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, J C; Ignácio, F S; Rocha, N S; Thompson, D L; Pinto, C R; Meira, C

    2015-09-01

    The present experiment was divided into two studies to investigate the effect of age and endometrial degeneration on uterine blood flow of mares throughout the immediate post-breeding period. In study 1, uterine blood flow was characterized in mares (n = 7 mares/group) with minimal, moderate or severe endometrial degenerative changes (GI, GII and GIII, respectively). In study 2, the effect of age was investigated using young (≤ 6 years) and old (≥ 15 years) mares (n = 7 mares/group). Uterine vascular perfusion and mesometrial pulsatility index (PI) were evaluated every hour from H0 (moment immediately before AI) to H12. In study 1, a pronounced and transitory increase on uterine vascular perfusion was detected (P < 0.001) between H1 and H3 in the three endometrial groups. In addition, GIII mares had greater (P < 0.05) mesometrial PI than GI mares during the post-breeding period, denoting reduced uterine blood flow. In study 2, a transitory increase on uterine vascular perfusion was also observed in both age groups during the first hour after mating. However, mesometrial PI of young and old mares was similar (P > 0.05) and constant (P > 0.7) through the first 12h after AI. Results demonstrated, for the first time, the immediate changes on uterine vascular perfusion and mesometrial PI in response to semen infusion. Moreover, reduced blood flow of the uterus during the post-breeding period was strongly associated with endometrial degenerative changes in mares, regardless of age. PMID:26277047

  2. Human whole-blood culture system for ex vivo characterization of designer-cell function.

    PubMed

    Schukur, Lina; Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Encapsulated designer cells implanted into mice are currently used to validate the efficacy of therapeutic gene networks for the diagnosis and treatment of various human diseases in preclinical research. Because many human conditions cannot be adequately replicated by animal models, complementary and alternative procedures to test future treatment strategies are required. Here we describe a novel approach utilizing an ex vivo human whole-blood culture system to validate synthetic biology-inspired designer cell-based treatment strategies. The viability and functionality of transgenic mammalian designer cells co-cultured with primary human immune cells were characterized. We demonstrated that transgenic mammalian designer cells required adequate insulation from the human blood microenvironment to maintain viability and functionality. The biomaterial alginate-(poly-l-lysine)-alginate used to encapsulate the transgenic designer cells did neither affect the viability of primary granulocytes and lymphocytes nor the functionality of lymphocytes. Additionally, alginate-encapsulated transgenic designer cells remained responsive to the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) from the whole-blood culture upon exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TNF diffused into the alginate capsules, bound to the specific TNF receptors on the transgenic designer cells' surface and triggered the expression of the reporter gene SEAP (human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase) that was rewired to the TNF-specific signaling cascade. Human whole-blood culture systems can therefore be considered as valuable complementary assays to animal models for the validation of synthetic circuits in genetically modified mammalian cells and may speed up preclinical research in a world of personalized medicine. PMID:26348251

  3. The adsorption of biomolecules to multi-walled carbon nanotubes is influenced by both pulmonary surfactant lipids and surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During production and processing of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), they may be inhaled and may enter the pulmonary circulation. It is essential that interactions with involved body fluids like the pulmonary surfactant, the blood and others are investigated, particularly as these interactions could lead to coating of the tubes and may affect their chemical and physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to characterize the possible coatings of different functionalized MWCNTs in a cell free environment. Results To simulate the first contact in the lung, the tubes were coated with pulmonary surfactant and subsequently bound lipids were characterized. The further coating in the blood circulation was simulated by incubating the tubes in blood plasma. MWCNTs were amino (NH2)- and carboxyl (-COOH)-modified, in order to investigate the influence on the bound lipid and protein patterns. It was shown that surfactant lipids bind unspecifically to different functionalized MWCNTs, in contrast to the blood plasma proteins which showed characteristic binding patterns. Patterns of bound surfactant lipids were altered after a subsequent incubation in blood plasma. In addition, it was found that bound plasma protein patterns were altered when MWCNTs were previously coated with pulmonary surfactant. Conclusions A pulmonary surfactant coating and the functionalization of MWCNTs have both the potential to alter the MWCNTs blood plasma protein coating and to determine their properties and behaviour in biological systems. PMID:21159192

  4. Characterization at the individual cell level and in whole blood samples of shear stress preventing red blood cells aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Kinnunen, M; Danilina, A V; Ustinov, V D; Shin, S; Meglinski, I; Priezzhev, A V

    2016-05-01

    The aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is an intrinsic feature of blood that has a strong impact on its microcirculation. For a number of years it has been attracting a great attention in basic research and clinical studies. Here, we study a relationship between the RBC aggregation parameters measured at the individual cell level and in a whole blood sample. The home made optical tweezers were used to measure the aggregating and disaggregating forces for a pair of interacting RBCs, at the individual cell level, in order to evaluate the corresponding shear stresses. The RheoScan aggregometer was used for the measurements of critical shear stress (CSS) in whole blood samples. The correlation between CSS and the shear stress required to stop an RBC pair from aggregating was found. The shear stress required to disaggregate a pair of RBCs using the double channel optical tweezers appeared to be about 10 times higher than CSS. The correlation between shear stresses required to prevent RBCs from aggregation at the individual cell level and in whole blood samples was estimated and assessed quantitatively. The experimental approach developed has a high potential for advancing hemorheological studies. PMID:26916508

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Rifampin Loaded Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as a Potential System for Pulmonary Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Meysam; Gilani, Kambiz; Mortazavi, Seyed Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this research is to determine the feasibility of loading rifampin into mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Rifampin was selected as a model lipophilic molecule since it is a well-documented and much used anti tuberculosis drug. The mesoporous silica nanoparticles were prepared by using tetraethyl ortho silicate and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (as surfactant). The prepared nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their particle size measurement and porosimetry. The results showed that the particle size is 218 ± 46 nm (mean ± SD) and surface area is 816 m2g-1. In order to load rifampin within the mesopores, adsorption experiments using three different solvents (methanol, water and dimethyl sulfoxide) were carried out. The loading procedure resulted in a significant improvement in the amount of rifampin loaded into mesoporous silica nanoparticles and methanol was found to be a suitable solvent, providing a drug entrapment efficiency of 52 %. Rifampin loaded nanoparticles underwent different in-vitro tests including, SEM and drug release. The in-vitro drug release was investigated using buffer phosphate (pH=7.4). Regarding the drug release study, a biphasic pattern of release was observed. The drug-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles were capable of releasing 95% of their drug content after 24 h, following a faster release in the first four hours. The prepared rifampin loaded nanoparticles seem to have potential for use as a pulmonary drug delivery. PMID:25561909

  6. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve pulmonary stenosis; Pulmonary stenosis; Stenosis - pulmonary valve; Balloon valvuloplasty - pulmonary ... water pills) Treat abnormal heartbeats and rhythms Percutaneous balloon pulmonary dilation (valvuloplasty) may be performed when no ...

  7. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... occlusive disease is an extremely rare disease that causes high blood pressure in the lung arteries ( pulmonary hypertension ). ... In most cases, the cause of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is ... arteries directly connected to the right side of the heart. The ...

  8. Multifractal characterization of morphology of human red blood cells membrane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ţălu, Ş; Stach, S; Kaczmarska, M; Fornal, M; Grodzicki, T; Pohorecki, W; Burda, K

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show applicability of multifractal analysis in investigations of the morphological changes of ultra-structures of red blood cells (RBCs) membrane skeleton measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human RBCs obtained from healthy and hypertensive donors as well as healthy erythrocytes irradiated with neutrons (45 μGy) were studied. The membrane skeleton of the cells was imaged using AFM in a contact mode. Morphological characterization of the three-dimensional RBC surfaces was realized by a multifractal method. The nanometre scale study of human RBCs surface morphology revealed a multifractal geometry. The generalized dimensions Dq and the singularity spectrum f(α) provided quantitative values that characterize the local scale properties of their membrane skeleton organization. Surface characterization was made using areal ISO 25178-2: 2012 topography parameters in combination with AFM topography measurement. The surface structure of human RBCs is complex with hierarchical substructures resulting from the organization of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton. The analysed AFM images confirm a multifractal nature of the surface that could be useful in histology to quantify human RBC architectural changes associated with different disease states. In case of very precise measurements when the red cell surface is not wrinkled even very fine differences can be uncovered as was shown for the erythrocytes treated with a very low dose of ionizing radiation. PMID:27002485

  9. Bosentan for pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Naomi; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic factor in patients with interstitial lung disease. No established treatment exists for pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial pneumonia. We describe the case of an 81-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), who was admitted to our hospital due to aggravation of dyspnea and decreased oxygen saturation, as well as onset of orthopnea and rapidly progressing edema. The transthoracic echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 39 mmHg and the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 9 mmHg. After various examinations, the diagnoses of pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to IPF and of congestive heart failure secondary to PH were established. Diuretic therapy was started, but the patient's condition showed poor improvement. Subsequent initiation of oral bosentan therapy led to improvement in symptoms and findings. At the follow-up assessment one year later her pulmonary function showed no significant changes and no apparent worsening of arterial blood gases, with evident improvement of PH, WHO functional class, maximum exercise tolerance on treadmill exercise testing, right heart catheterization, and transthoracic echocardiography. This report describes a case of successful treatment with bosentan for severe pulmonary hypertension in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We also present a review of the literature on treatment of pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic lung disease. Bosentan appears to be efficacious in some patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis. PMID:26029570

  10. Molecular characterization, distribution, and dynamics of hepatitis C virus genotypes in blood donors in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Mora, Mónica Viviana Alvarado; Romano, Camila Malta; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Gutiérrez, Maria Fernanda; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a frequent cause of acute and chronic hepatitis and a leading cause for cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is classified in six major genotypes and more than 70 subtypes. In Colombian blood banks, serum samples were tested for anti-HCV antibodies using a third-generation ELISA. The aim of this study was to characterize the viral sequences in plasma of 184 volunteer blood donors who attended the "Banco Nacional de Sangre de la Cruz Roja Colombiana," Bogotá, Colombia. Three different HCV genomic regions were amplified by nested PCR. The first of these was a segment of 180 bp of the 5'UTR region to confirm the previous diagnosis by ELISA. From those that were positive to the 5'UTR region, two further segments were amplified for genotyping and subtyping by phylogenetic analysis: a segment of 380 bp from the NS5B region; and a segment of 391 bp from the E1 region. The distribution of HCV subtypes was: 1b (82.8%), 1a (5.7%), 2a (5.7%), 2b (2.8%), and 3a (2.8%). By applying Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation, it was estimated that HCV-1b was introduced into Bogotá around 1950. Also, this subtype spread at an exponential rate between about 1970 to about 1990, after which transmission of HCV was reduced by anti-HCV testing of this population. Among Colombian blood donors, HCV genotype 1b is the most frequent genotype, especially in large urban conglomerates such as Bogotá, as is the case in other South American countries. PMID:20872715

  11. Isolation, characterization and in vitro mitogenic stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes from an American buffalo.

    PubMed

    Nagi, A M; Babiuk, L A

    1989-10-01

    A rapid and reproducible method is described for the isolation and characterization of leukocytes from the peripheral blood of an American buffalo (bison). Centrifugation of the buffy coat cells on a Percoll gradient (1.079 g/mL) at 650 x g for 20 min resulted in the separation and high yields of pure viable leukocytes. The sheep erythrocyte-rosetting technique (ER) showed that 59% of the cells were ER+ (T lymphocytes). Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated peanut agglutinin and FITC-conjugated concanavalin A revealed 77% and 89% positive cells, respectively. The isolated leukocytes contained adherent accessory cells and functionally active T and B lymphocytes which proliferated in response to both T and B cell mitogens and to exogenous recombinant bovine interleukin-2 in the absence and/or presence of the thiol compound 2-mercaptoethanol. PMID:2590878

  12. Molecular characterization of porcine Siglec-10 and analysis of its expression in blood and tissues.

    PubMed

    Escalona, Z; Álvarez, B; Uenishi, H; Toki, D; Yuste, M; Revilla, C; del Moral, M Gómez; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J

    2015-01-01

    Siglecs are sialic acid binding Ig-like proteins involved in the control of leukocyte responses. In this study we describe the characterization of a porcine orthologue of Siglec-10. A cDNA clone was obtained from a porcine library which encodes a protein with sequence homology to human Siglec-10. This cDNA codes for a type I transmembrane protein containing four Ig-like domains, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tail with three tyrosine-based motifs, including a membrane-proximal Grb2-binding motif, and two ITIM motifs. When expressed on transfected cells, porcine Siglec-10 was able to bind red blood cells in a sialic acid-dependent manner. Monoclonal antibodies were developed against this protein and used to examine its cell and tissue distribution in the pig. Siglec-10 was found to be expressed on blood B cells and B cell areas of the spleen and lymph nodes. A weak expression was also detected on monocytes. PMID:25280627

  13. Characterizations of individual human red blood cells from patients with diabetes mellitus (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, SangYun; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, HyunJoo; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    We systematically measure the morphological, biochemical, and biomechanical properties of individual human red blood cells (RBCs) from patients with diabetes mellitus using quantitative phase imaging technique to characterize the diabetic red cells with respect to those of the healthy. The 3-D refractive index tomograms and 2-D dynamic membrane fluctuation maps of individual RBCs are reconstructed from a set of the retrieved complex optical fields at various laser incidence angles using the Common-path diffraction optical tomography, from which volume, surface area, sphericity, hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, Hb content, and membrane fluctuation are obtained simultaneously. The correlative relations among the retrieved red cell indices of diabetic and healthy RBCs are also investigated with capabilities of individual cell measurement. As expected, there are no significant alterations in morphologies (cellular volumes, surface area, and sphericity) between diabetic and healthy RBCs. However, despite the minute mean corpuscular Hb differences in cell blood count datasheet, the measured Hb concentrations and Hb contents of diabetic RBCs are statistically higher than those of healthy RBCs, which might be related to the glycation of Hb molecules by hyperglycemia. Meanwhile, the membrane fluctuations of diabetic RBCs are clearly diminished compared to healthy red cells, implying the significantly decreased RBC deformability. In particular, it seems that the membrane fluctuations have mild negative relationships with the reported HbA1c levels.

  14. Light-scattering flow cytometry for identification and characterization of blood microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konokhova, Anastasiya I.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Moskalensky, Alexander E.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A.; Chikova, Elena D.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2012-05-01

    We describe a novel approach to study blood microparticles using the scanning flow cytometer, which measures light scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual particles. Starting from platelet-rich plasma, we separated spherical microparticles from non-spherical plasma constituents, such as platelets and cell debris, based on similarity of their LSP to that of sphere. This provides a label-free method for identification (detection) of microparticles, including those larger than 1 μm. Next, we rigorously characterized each measured particle, determining its size and refractive index including errors of these estimates. Finally, we employed a deconvolution algorithm to determine size and refractive index distributions of the whole population of microparticles, accounting for largely different reliability of individual measurements. Developed methods were tested on a blood sample of a healthy donor, resulting in good agreement with literature data. The only limitation of this approach is size detection limit, which is currently about 0.5 μm due to used laser wavelength of 0.66 μm.

  15. Complete blood count - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hematocrit may indicate: Dehydration Burns Diarrhea Eclampsia Erythrocytosis Polycythemia vera Shock ... blood Congenital heart disease Cor pulmonale Pulmonary fibrosis Polycythemia vera Dehydration (such as from severe diarrhea) Emphysema

  16. Doppler color flow imaging: a new technique for visualization and characterization of the blood flow jet in mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Khandheria, B K; Tajik, A J; Reeder, G S; Callahan, M J; Nishimura, R A; Miller, F A; Seward, J B

    1986-08-01

    We used Doppler color flow imaging, a new noninvasive technique for mapping of intracardiac blood flow, to visualize and characterize the blood flow jet in 42 patients with mitral stenosis. Color flow imaging provides information about the direction of blood flow, its velocity, and the presence of turbulence. Although we found various jet configurations, most frequently the jet was centrally and apically directed and had a "candle flame" appearance (a central blue zone surrounded by hues of yellow and orange). The blood flow jet can be used to guide the positioning of the continuous-wave Doppler beam parallel to the blood flow; thus, the accuracy of the Doppler data can be enhanced. This new technology has promising potential for other clinical applications in cardiology. PMID:3724241

  17. Main pulmonary arterial wall shear stress correlates with invasive hemodynamics and stiffness in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Michal; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Schroeder, Joyce D; Dunning, Jamie; Shandas, Robin; Buckner, J Kern; Browning, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Hunter, Kendall S; Fenster, Brett E

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with proximal pulmonary arterial remodeling characterized by increased vessel diameter, wall thickening, and stiffness. In vivo assessment of wall shear stress (WSS) may provide insights into the relationships between pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling. We investigated the relationship between main pulmonary artery (MPA) WSS and pulmonary hemodynamics as well as markers of stiffness. As part of a prospective study, 17 PH patients and 5 controls underwent same-day four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4-D CMR) and right heart catheterization. Streamwise velocity profiles were generated in the cross-sectional MPA in 45° increments from velocity vector fields determined by 4-D CMR. WSS was calculated as the product of hematocrit-dependent viscosity and shear rate generated from the spatial gradient of the velocity profiles. In-plane average MPA WSS was significantly decreased in the PH cohort compared with that in controls (0.18 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.08 N/m(2); P = 0.01). In-plane MPA WSS showed strong inverse correlations with multiple hemodynamic indices, including pulmonary resistance (ρ = -0.74, P < 0.001), mean pulmonary pressure (ρ = -0.64, P = 0.006), and elastance (ρ = -0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, MPA WSS had significant associations with markers of stiffness, including capacitance (ρ = 0.67, P < 0.001), distensibility (ρ = 0.52, P = 0.013), and elastic modulus (ρ = -0.54, P = 0.01). In conclusion, MPA WSS is decreased in PH and is significantly associated with invasive hemodynamic indices and markers of stiffness. 4-D CMR-based assessment of WSS may represent a novel methodology to study blood-vessel wall interactions in PH. PMID:27076906

  18. Main pulmonary arterial wall shear stress correlates with invasive hemodynamics and stiffness in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O.; Schroeder, Joyce D.; Dunning, Jamie; Shandas, Robin; Buckner, J. Kern; Browning, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Hunter, Kendall S.; Fenster, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with proximal pulmonary arterial remodeling characterized by increased vessel diameter, wall thickening, and stiffness. In vivo assessment of wall shear stress (WSS) may provide insights into the relationships between pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling. We investigated the relationship between main pulmonary artery (MPA) WSS and pulmonary hemodynamics as well as markers of stiffness. As part of a prospective study, 17 PH patients and 5 controls underwent same-day four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4-D CMR) and right heart catheterization. Streamwise velocity profiles were generated in the cross-sectional MPA in 45° increments from velocity vector fields determined by 4-D CMR. WSS was calculated as the product of hematocrit-dependent viscosity and shear rate generated from the spatial gradient of the velocity profiles. In-plane average MPA WSS was significantly decreased in the PH cohort compared with that in controls (0.18 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.08 N/m2; P = 0.01). In-plane MPA WSS showed strong inverse correlations with multiple hemodynamic indices, including pulmonary resistance (ρ = −0.74, P < 0.001), mean pulmonary pressure (ρ = −0.64, P = 0.006), and elastance (ρ = −0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, MPA WSS had significant associations with markers of stiffness, including capacitance (ρ = 0.67, P < 0.001), distensibility (ρ = 0.52, P = 0.013), and elastic modulus (ρ = −0.54, P = 0.01). In conclusion, MPA WSS is decreased in PH and is significantly associated with invasive hemodynamic indices and markers of stiffness. 4-D CMR–based assessment of WSS may represent a novel methodology to study blood-vessel wall interactions in PH. PMID:27076906

  19. Quantitative characterization of circadian rhythm of pulmonary function in asthmatic patients treated with inhaled corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Di; Li, Hongshan; Wang, Yaning; Hochhaus, Guenther; Sinha, Vikram; Zhao, Liang

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the circadian rhythm observed for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) in patients with persistent asthma being treated with inhaled corticosteroids. The database included 3379 FEV1 measurements from 189 patients with mild to moderate asthma. A model using the sum of two Sine functions with periods of 12 and 24 h and a constant component of mean circadian rhythm adequately described the circadian rhythm in FEV1 measurements over time. The model adequateness was evaluated by various approaches including visual predictive check (VPC), prediction-corrected VPC, standardized VPC and normalized prediction distribution error. Covariates tested included age, body weight, height, body mass index, baseline FEV1, and sex. Age and height were found to have significant effects on the mean FEV1 level and no covariate was found to have an effect on the magnitude and timing of circadian rhythm. The model predicted that a minimum FEV1 occurred in the early morning and maximum FEV1 occurred in the early afternoon, with a population mean fluctuation of 170 mL, which is consistent with the finding that asthma symptoms usually exacerbate in the early morning for patients with persistent asthma. This developed model provides the first quantitative approach to describing FEV1 circadian rhythm with ICS background treatment and provided insight in designing future registration trials for asthma drug development. PMID:26099861

  20. Characterization and Optimization of Trans-Blood-Brain Barrier Diffusion In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Choi, James; Baseri, Babak; Lee, Ann

    2009-04-01

    Current treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases are limited due to the lack of a truly noninvasive, transient, and regionally selective brain drug delivery method. The brain is particularly difficult to deliver drugs to because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Over the past few years, we have been developing methods that combine Focused Ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles in order to noninvasively, locally and transiently open the BBB so as to treat neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, we will focus on the characterization of the type of molecular delivery that can be induced through the opened BBB. More specifically, we will characterize important properties of the BBB opening such as its reversibility and permeability using fluorescence and MR imaging techniques, respectively. Results on both wildtype and Alzheimer's model mice showed that the timeline of BBB opening is very similar between the presence and absence of amyloid plaques. The permeability change induced by BBB opening was found to increase by up to a 10-fold and to similar levels with those found in literature for glioma tumors.

  1. Formulation and Characterization of Pyrazinamide Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Efficiency for Alveolar Macrophage Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Varma, J. N. Ravi; Kumar, T. Santosh; Prasanthi, B.; Ratna, J. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Pyrazinamide, a highly specific agent against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is used as first-line drug to treat tuberculosis. The current work aims to formulate polymeric nanoparticles based drug delivery system to sustain the release profile and reduce the dosing frequency of pyrazinamide. Further aim was to target the macrophages within body fluid. These polymeric nanoparticles were prepared by simultaneous double-emulsion (W/O/W) solvent evaporation/diffusion technique. The prepared dispersions were characterized for various biopharmaceutical parameters such as particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug loading capacity, entrapment efficiency and targeting to alveolar macrophages. The formulated polymeric nanoparticles were in the particle size range of 45.51 to 300.4 nm with a maximum drug entrapment efficiency of 80.9%. The stability study of optimized batch conducted at 40±2°/75±5% relative humidity showed no significant changes up to 90 days. X-Ray Diffraction spectrum exhibits the transformation of crystalline form of drug to amorphous in the formulation. Scanning Electron Microscope image showed nanoparticles spherical in shape with smooth surface. In vitro release profiles were biphasic in nature with burst release followed by controlled release over a period of 24 h obeying diffusion mechanism. In vivo and ex vivo studies results of the study show significant uptake of the nanoparticles by alveolar macrophages through fluorescent micrograph. Polymeric nanoparticles formulation of pyrazinamide could encompass significant uptake by alveolar macrophages, the high first-pass metabolism, sustain the release of drug leading to reduction in dose, toxicity and improvement of patient compliance. PMID:26180270

  2. Effects of Low-Dose and Long-Term Treatment with Erythromycin on Interleukin-17 and Interleukin-23 in Peripheral Blood and Induced Sputum in Patients with Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Caimei; Huang, Huijuan; Zhang, Jianquan; He, Zhiyi; Zhong, Xiaoning; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To study the effects of low-dose and long-term treatment with erythromycin on IL-17 and IL-23, in peripheral blood and induced sputum, in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods. Patients were randomly divided into placebo-treated group, group A (12 months of additive treatment with erythromycin, N = 18), and group B (6 months of additive treatment with erythromycin followed by 6 months of follow-up, N = 18). Inflammatory cells in induced sputum, pulmonary function, and the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) were analyzed. Concentrations of IL-17 and IL-23 in peripheral blood and sputum were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results. After treatment, sputum and peripheral blood concentrations of IL-17 and IL-23 significantly decreased in groups A and B compared with placebo-treated group. There were no significant differences after erythromycin withdrawal at months 9 and 12 in group B compared with placebo-treated group. An increase in 6MWD was observed after treatment. Conclusions. Erythromycin was beneficial and reduced airway inflammation in COPD patients. Underlying mechanisms may involve inhibition of IL-17 and IL-23 mediated airway inflammation. COPD patients treated with erythromycin for 6 months experienced improved exercise capacity. Finally, treatment for 12 months may be more effective than treatment for 6 months. PMID:27127346

  3. Novel biomarkers for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Anjum; Ruffenach, Gregoire; Mahajan, Aman; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Umar, Soban

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a deadly disease characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressures leading to right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. The confirmatory gold standard test is the invasive right heart catheterization. The disease course is monitored by pulmonary artery systolic pressure measurement via transthoracic echocardiography. A simple non-invasive test to frequently monitor the patients is much needed. Search for a novel biomarker that can be detected by a simple test is ongoing and many different options are being studied. Here we review some of the new and unique pre-clinical options for potential pulmonary hypertension biomarkers. These biomarkers can be broadly categorized based on their association with endothelial cell dysfunction, inflammation, epigenetics, cardiac function, oxidative stress, metabolism,extracellular matrix, and volatile compounds in exhaled breath condensate. A biomarker that can be detected in blood, urine or breath condensate and correlates with disease severity, progression and response to therapy may result in significant cost reduction and improved patient outcomes. PMID:27439993

  4. Growth Kinetics, Characterization, and Plasticity of Human Menstrual Blood Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mehrabani, Davood; Nazarabadi, Roshanak Bahrami; Kasraeian, Maryam; Tamadon, Amin; Dianatpour, Mehdi; Vahdati, Akbar; Zare, Shahrokh; Ghobadi, Farnaz

    2016-03-01

    One of the readily available sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is menstrual blood-derived stem cells (Men-SCs), which exhibit characteristics similar to other types of MSCs. This study was performed to determine the growth kinetics, plasticity, and characterization of Men-SCs in women. During spring 2014 in the southern Iranian city of Shiraz, menstrual blood (5 mL) was obtained from 10 women on their third day of menstruation in 2 age groups of 30 to 40 and 40 to 50 years old. Ficoll was used to separate the mononuclear cell fraction. After the Men-SCs were cultured, they were subcultured up to passage 4. Growth behavior and population doubling time were evaluated by seeding 5×10(4) cells into 12- and 24-well culture plates, and the colonies were enumerated. The expression of CD44, CD90, and CD34 was evaluated. The osteogenic potential was assessed by alizarin red staining. The Men-SCs were shown to be plastic adherent and spindle-shaped. Regarding the growth curves in the 12- and 24-well culture plates, it was demonstrated that in the women aged between 30 and 40 years, population doubling time was 55.5 and 62 hours, respectively, while these values in the women aged between 40 and 50 years were 70.4 and 72.4 hours, correspondingly. Positive expression of CD44 and CD90 and negative expression of CD34 were noted. In the osteogenic differentiation medium, the cells differentiated toward osteoblasts. As human Men-SCs are easily collectable without any invasive procedure and are a safe and rapid source of MSCs, they can be a good candidate for stem cell banking and cell transplantation in women. PMID:26989284

  5. Growth Kinetics, Characterization, and Plasticity of Human Menstrual Blood Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Davood; Nazarabadi, Roshanak Bahrami; Kasraeian, Maryam; Tamadon, Amin; Dianatpour, Mehdi; Vahdati, Akbar; Zare, Shahrokh; Ghobadi, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    One of the readily available sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is menstrual blood-derived stem cells (Men-SCs), which exhibit characteristics similar to other types of MSCs. This study was performed to determine the growth kinetics, plasticity, and characterization of Men-SCs in women. During spring 2014 in the southern Iranian city of Shiraz, menstrual blood (5 mL) was obtained from 10 women on their third day of menstruation in 2 age groups of 30 to 40 and 40 to 50 years old. Ficoll was used to separate the mononuclear cell fraction. After the Men-SCs were cultured, they were subcultured up to passage 4. Growth behavior and population doubling time were evaluated by seeding 5×104 cells into 12- and 24-well culture plates, and the colonies were enumerated. The expression of CD44, CD90, and CD34 was evaluated. The osteogenic potential was assessed by alizarin red staining. The Men-SCs were shown to be plastic adherent and spindle-shaped. Regarding the growth curves in the 12- and 24-well culture plates, it was demonstrated that in the women aged between 30 and 40 years, population doubling time was 55.5 and 62 hours, respectively, while these values in the women aged between 40 and 50 years were 70.4 and 72.4 hours, correspondingly. Positive expression of CD44 and CD90 and negative expression of CD34 were noted. In the osteogenic differentiation medium, the cells differentiated toward osteoblasts. As human Men-SCs are easily collectable without any invasive procedure and are a safe and rapid source of MSCs, they can be a good candidate for stem cell banking and cell transplantation in women. PMID:26989284

  6. Detection and characterization of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation with photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysi, Eno; Saha, Ratan K.; Rui, Min; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-02-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) aggregate in the presence of increased plasma fibrinogen and low shear forces during blood flow. RBC aggregation has been observed in deep vein thrombosis, sepsis and diabetes. We propose using photoacoustics (PA) as a non-invasive imaging modality to detect RBC aggregation. The theoretical and experimental feasibility of PA for detecting and characterizing aggregation was assessed. A simulation study was performed to generate PA signals from non-aggregated and aggregated RBCs using a frequency domain approach and to study the PA signals' dependence on hematocrit and aggregate size. The effect of the finite bandwidth nature of transducers on the PA power spectra was also investigated. Experimental confirmation of theoretical results was conducted using porcine RBC samples exposed to 1064 nm optical wavelength using the Imagio Small Animal PA imaging system (Seno Medical Instruments, Inc., San Antonio, TX). Aggregation was induced with Dextran-70 (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) and the effect of hematocrit and aggregation level was investigated. The theoretical and experimental PA signal amplitude increased linearly with increasing hematocrit. The theoretical dominant frequency content of PA signals shifted towards lower frequencies (<30 MHz) and 9 dB enhancements in spectral power were observed as the size of aggregates increased compared to non-aggregating RBCs. Calibration of the PA spectra with the transducer response obtained from a 200 nm gold film was performed to remove system dependencies. Analysis of the spectral parameters from the calibrated spectra suggested that PA can assess the degree of aggregation at multiple hematocrit and aggregation levels.

  7. Elevated blood plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, TGFβ1, and TNFα associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema in an Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Priyanka; Ali, Zahara; Mohammad, Ghulam; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are essential to unravel the locked pathophysiology of any disease. This study investigated the role of biomarkers and their interactions with each other and with the clinical parameters to study the physiology of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in HAPE-patients (HAPE-p) against adapted highlanders (HLs) and healthy sojourners, HAPE-controls (HAPE-c). For this, seven circulatory biomarkers, namely, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), platelet-derived growth factor beta beta, and C-reactive protein (CRP), were measured in blood plasma of the three study groups. All the subjects were recruited at ~3,500 m, and clinical features such as arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), body mass index, and mean arterial pressure were measured. Increased levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor-beta 1, and TNFα were observed in HAPE-p against the healthy groups, HAPE-c, and HLs (P<0.0001). CRP levels were decreased in HAPE-p against HAPE-c and HLs (P<0.0001). There was no significant difference or very marginal difference in the levels of these biomarkers in HAPE-c and HLs (P>0.01). Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between epinephrine and norepinephrine (P=4.6E−06) in HAPE-p and positive correlation in HAPE-c (P=0.004) and HLs (P=9.78E−07). A positive correlation was observed between TNFα and CRP (P=0.004) in HAPE-p and a negative correlation in HAPE-c (P=4.6E−06). SaO2 correlated negatively with platelet-derived growth factor beta beta (HAPE-p; P=0.05), norepinephrine (P=0.01), and TNFα (P=0.005) and positively with CRP (HAPE-c; P=0.02) and norepinephrine (HLs; P=0.04). Body mass index correlated negatively with epinephrine (HAPE-p; P=0.001) and positively with norepinephrine and tyrosine hydroxylase in HAPE-c (P<0.05). Mean arterial pressure correlated positively with TNFα in HAPE-p and norepinephrine in

  8. Elevated blood plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, TGFβ1, and TNFα associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema in an Indian population.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Priyanka; Ali, Zahara; Mohammad, Ghulam; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are essential to unravel the locked pathophysiology of any disease. This study investigated the role of biomarkers and their interactions with each other and with the clinical parameters to study the physiology of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in HAPE-patients (HAPE-p) against adapted highlanders (HLs) and healthy sojourners, HAPE-controls (HAPE-c). For this, seven circulatory biomarkers, namely, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), platelet-derived growth factor beta beta, and C-reactive protein (CRP), were measured in blood plasma of the three study groups. All the subjects were recruited at ~3,500 m, and clinical features such as arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), body mass index, and mean arterial pressure were measured. Increased levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor-beta 1, and TNFα were observed in HAPE-p against the healthy groups, HAPE-c, and HLs (P<0.0001). CRP levels were decreased in HAPE-p against HAPE-c and HLs (P<0.0001). There was no significant difference or very marginal difference in the levels of these biomarkers in HAPE-c and HLs (P>0.01). Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between epinephrine and norepinephrine (P=4.6E-06) in HAPE-p and positive correlation in HAPE-c (P=0.004) and HLs (P=9.78E-07). A positive correlation was observed between TNFα and CRP (P=0.004) in HAPE-p and a negative correlation in HAPE-c (P=4.6E-06). SaO2 correlated negatively with platelet-derived growth factor beta beta (HAPE-p; P=0.05), norepinephrine (P=0.01), and TNFα (P=0.005) and positively with CRP (HAPE-c; P=0.02) and norepinephrine (HLs; P=0.04). Body mass index correlated negatively with epinephrine (HAPE-p; P=0.001) and positively with norepinephrine and tyrosine hydroxylase in HAPE-c (P<0.05). Mean arterial pressure correlated positively with TNFα in HAPE-p and norepinephrine in HLs (P

  9. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vinay; Berkelhamer, Sara; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2015-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in right-to-left shunting of blood and hypoxemia. PPHN is often secondary to parenchymal lung disease (such as meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia or respiratory distress syndrome) or lung hypoplasia (with congenital diaphragmatic hernia or oligohydramnios) but can also be idiopathic. The diagnosis of PPHN is based on clinical evidence of labile hypoxemia often associated with differential cyanosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by the echocardiographic demonstration of - (a) right-to-left or bidirectional shunt at the ductus or foramen ovale and/or, (b) flattening or leftward deviation of the interventricular septum and/or, (c) tricuspid regurgitation, and finally (d) absence of structural heart disease. Management strategies include optimal oxygenation, avoiding respiratory and metabolic acidosis, blood pressure stabilization, sedation and pulmonary vasodilator therapy. Failure of these measures would lead to consideration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO); however decreased need for this rescue therapy has been documented with advances in medical management. While trends also note improved survival, long-term neurodevelopmental disabilities such as deafness and learning disabilities remain a concern in many infants with severe PPHN. Funded by: 1R01HD072929-0 (SL). PMID:27057331

  10. Complete blood count - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    High numbers of red blood cells may indicate: Cigarette smoking Low oxygen tension in the blood Congenital heart disease Cor pulmonale Pulmonary fibrosis Polycythemia vera Dehydration (such as from severe diarrhea) Emphysema

  11. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  12. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation If you have shortness of breath because of lung problems, you may have asked yourself: • Can I ... medications do I really need to take? Pulmonary rehabilitation can help answer these and other questions. Enrolling ...

  13. Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Rali, Parth; Gandhi, Viral; Malik, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism covers a wide spectrum of presentation from an asymptomatic individual to a life-threatening medical emergency. It is of paramount importance to appropriately risk stratify patients with pulmonary embolism, particularly with those who present without hypotension. Right ventricular dysfunction can evolve after a patient has received a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, necessitating aggressive measures rather than simple anticoagulation. In this review, we discuss definition, risk stratification, pathogenesis, diagnostic approach, and management, with particular focus on massive pulmonary embolism. PMID:26919674

  14. [Pulmonary vasoconstrictor responses].

    PubMed

    Onodera, S

    1992-12-01

    Alterations in the physiological balance to maintain the pulmonary circulation at a normal low pressure level result in an elevation in pulmonary vascular tone. Pulmonary vasoconstrictor responses were analyzed under some experimental conditions, which included microembolism, administration of vasoactive agents, hypoxia, and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. It is widely accepted that these responses are highly localized and complex. In the present study, excised canine lung lobes, rat lungs, and pulmonary arterial rings from the rat were employed according to the particular experimental design. The mechanism of the initial rapid elevation followed by a gradual decline in perfusion pressure in microembolism was considered to be related not only to the size of the emboli, but to the degree of mechanical injury of the endothelium. The main sites of constriction of the pulmonary vasculature by several drugs were determined in the pulsatile perfused canine lung lobes, according to the degree of decrease in inflow wave amplitude during antegrade or retrograde perfusion. Further, by applying the same method it was confirmed that the site of hypoxic vasoconstriction is located in the peripheral pulmonary vascular bed between the muscular arteries and veins, which are constricted mainly by serotonin and histamine, respectively. A cross perfusion system was set up, employing two lobes from the same dog, in which normoxic blood was perfused into the hypoxic ventilated lobe and vice versa. As a result, the pulmonary vessels showed a response to ventilation hypoxia that was far more sensitive than that to perfusion hypoxia. The effects of a beta-agonist (isoproterenol) and beta-antagonists (propranolol, pindolol) on hypoxic vasoconstriction were observed. Although pindolol (a vasodilatory beta-blocker) abolished hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, which was similar to the effect of isoproterenol, the mechanism of action of pindolol was suggested to be different

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF DRUG-PROTEIN INTERACTIONS IN BLOOD USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Jackson, Abby; Sobansky, Matt; Schiel, John E.; Yoo, Michelle J.; Joseph, K. S.

    2009-01-01

    The binding of drugs with proteins in blood, serum or plasma is an important process in determining the activity, distribution, rate of excretion, and toxicity of drugs in the body. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) has received a great deal of interest as a means for studying these interactions. This review examines the various techniques that have been used in HPAC to examine drug-protein binding and discusses the types of information that can be obtained through this approach. A comparison of these techniques with traditional methods for binding studies (e.g., equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration) will also be presented. The use of HPAC with specific serum proteins and binding agents will then be discussed, including human serum albumin and α1-acid glycoprotein. Several examples from the literature are provided to illustrate the applications of such research. Recent developments in this field are also described, such as the use of improved immobilization techniques, new data analysis methods, techniques for working for directly with complex biological samples, and work with immobilized lipoproteins. The relative advantages and limitations of the methods that are described will be considered and the possible use of these techniques in the high-throughput screening or characterization of drug-protein binding will be discussed. PMID:19278006

  16. Characterization of vascular disruption and blood-spinal cord barrier permeability following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Figley, Sarah A; Khosravi, Ramak; Legasto, Jean M; Tseng, Yun-Fan; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-03-15

    Significant vascular changes occur subsequent to spinal cord injury (SCI), which contribute to progressive pathophysiology. In the present study, we used female Wistar rats (300-350 g) and a 35-g clip-compression injury at T6 to T7 to characterize the spatial and temporal vascular changes that ensue post-SCI. Before sacrifice, animals were injected with vascular tracing dyes (2% Evans Blue (EB) or fluorescein isothiocyanate/Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin [FITC-LEA]) to assess blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) integrity or vascular architecture, respectively. Spectrophotometry of EB tissue showed maximal BSCB disruption at 24 h postinjury, with significant disruption observed until 5 days postinjury (p<0.01). FITC-LEA-identified functional vasculature was dramatically reduced by 24 h. Similarly, RECA-1 immunohistochemistry showed a significant decrease in the number of vessels at 24 h postinjury, compared to uninjured animals (p<0.01), with slight increases in endogenous revascularization by 10 days postinjury. White versus gray matter (GM) quantification showed that GM vessels are more susceptible to SCI. Finally, we observed an endogenous angiogenic response between 3 and 7 days postinjury: maximal endothelial cell proliferation was observed at day 5. These data indicate that BSCB disruption and endogenous revascularization occur at specific time points after injury, which may be important for developing effective therapeutic interventions for SCI. PMID:24237182

  17. Temporal and spatial characterization of mononuclear phagocytes in circulating, lung alveolar and interstitial compartments in a mouse model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary injury.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wen-Jie; Ma, Yong-Qiang; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Yi-Dan; Lu, Rui-Yi; Sun, Hai-Ying; Guo, Zhao-Zeng; Zhang, Zhuoli; Li, Yu-Ming; Wei, Lu-Qing

    2014-01-31

    The mononuclear phagocyte system, including circulating monocytes and tissue resident macrophages, plays an important role in acute lung injury and fibrosis. The detailed dynamic changes of mononuclear phagocytes in the circulating, lung alveolar and interstitial compartments in bleomycin-induced pulmonary injury model have not been fully characterized. The present study was designed to address this issue and analyzed their relationships with pulmonary pathological evolution after bleomycin challenge. A total of 100 male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided to receive bleomycin (2.5mg/kg, n=50) or normal saline (n=50) via oropharyngeal approach, and were sacrificed on days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21. Circulating monocyte subsets, polarization state of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF)-derived alveolar macrophages (AMφ) and lung interstitial macrophages (IMφ, derived from enzymatically digested lung tissue) were analyzed by flow cytometry. There was a rapid expansion of circulating Ly6C(hi) monocytes which peaked on day 3, and its magnitude was positively associated with pulmonary inflammatory response. Moreover, an expansion of M2-like AMφ (F4/80+CD11c+CD206+) peaked on day 14, and was positively correlated with the magnitude of lung fibrosis. The polarization state of IMφ remained relatively stable in the early- and mid-stage after bleomycin challenge, expect for an increase of M2-like (F4/80+CD11c-CD206+) IMφ on day 21. These results support the notion that there is a Ly6C(hi)-monocyte-directed pulmonary AMφ alternative activation. Our result provides a dynamic view of mononuclear phagocyte change in three compartments after bleomycin challenge, which is relevant for designing new treatment strategies targeting mononuclear phagocytes in this model. PMID:24280595

  18. MR phase-contrast imaging in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Ursula; Reiter, Gert; Fuchsjäger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a life-threatening, multifactorial pathophysiological haemodynamic condition, diagnosed when the mean pulmonary arterial pressure equals or exceeds 25 mmHg at rest during right heart catheterization. Cardiac MRI, in general, and MR phase-contrast (PC) imaging, in particular, have emerged as potential techniques for the standardized assessment of cardiovascular function, morphology and haemodynamics in PH. Allowing the quantification and characterization of macroscopic cardiovascular blood flow, MR PC imaging offers non-invasive evaluation of haemodynamic alterations associated with PH. Techniques used to study the PH include both the routine two-dimensional (2D) approach measuring predominant velocities through an acquisition plane and the rapidly evolving four-dimensional (4D) PC imaging, which enables the assessment of the complete time-resolved, three-directional blood-flow velocity field in a volume. Numerous parameters such as pulmonary arterial mean velocity, vessel distensibility, flow acceleration time and volume and tricuspid regurgitation peak velocity, as well as the duration and onset of vortical blood flow in the main pulmonary artery, have been explored to either diagnose PH or find non-invasive correlates to right heart catheter parameters. Furthermore, PC imaging-based analysis of pulmonary arterial pulse-wave velocities, wall shear stress and kinetic energy losses grants novel insights into cardiopulmonary remodelling in PH. This review aimed to outline the current applications of 2D and 4D PC imaging in PH and show why this technique has the potential to contribute significantly to early diagnosis and characterization of PH. PMID:26942293

  19. Further characterization of the binding properties of two monoclonal antibodies recognizing human Tn red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Wua, Albert M; Wub, June H; Kuoa, Hsiang-Wei; Herpa, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    The terminal alpha anomeric Ga1NAc residue is an essential sugar for the Tn glycotope, human blood group A determinant, and Forssman antigen. In a previous study [King M.J., Parson S.F., Wu A,M., Jones N., Transfusion 31: 142-149, 1991] we defined two monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs, BRIC66 and BRIC111) reacting with human Tn red blood cells. However, more advanced studies of these two MoAbs were hampered by the lack of availability of Gal/GalNAc related glycotopes. In order to use these antibodies as powerful probes to elucidate structural changes during life processes, we have characterized in detail the combining sites of these two MoAbs using enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) and inhibition assays with an extended glycan/ligand collection. From the results, it has been established that BRIC66 demonstrated multiple specificities and its reactivity towards glycotopes was defined as: Ga1NAc alpha1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) > or = Ga1NAc alpha1-->3(LFuc alpha1-->2)Gal (Ah) > Ga1NAcalpha1-->3Galbeta1-->4Glc (AL) > Ga1NAalpha1-->3Gal (A) GalNAc alpha1-->3GalNAc > Gal or Glc. Another MoAb, BRIC111, mainly bound Tn-glycophorin. The best ligand for this MoAb was Tn-containing glycopeptides (M.W. < 3.0 x 10(3) Da) from asialo ovine salivary mucin (OSM), which was approximately 70 and 58 times more active than Ga1NAc and monomeric Ga1NAc alpha1-->Ser/Thr (Tn), respectively, suggesting that the active glycotopes present in glycophorin for BRIC111 binding also exist in OSM. The N-acetyl group at carbon-2 and configuration at carbon-2 and carbon-4 of the alpha anomeric Ga1NAc are required for the binding of either MoAb. Identification of these binding properties should aid in the selection of these MoAbs and the conditions required for biological studies and clinical applications. PMID:15864747

  20. Diagnosis of Intra-Abdominal Extralobar Pulmonary Sequestration by means of Ultrasound in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Claudio Rodrigues; Czapkowski, Adriano; Zanforlin Filho, Sebastião Marques

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary sequestration is a congenital abnormality consisting of a mass of pulmonary tissue that presents an abnormal connection with the tracheobronchial tree, with a blood supply coming from an anomalous artery derived from the systemic circulation. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration is characterized by having pleural coverings that are independent of the normal lungs, with vascular supply usually coming from the aorta or from one of its branches. This diagnosis can be suspected prenatally if an abdominal mass, generally below the diaphragm, is seen. Here, we present a case of a neonate on the second day of life, with ultrasonography showing extralobar pulmonary sequestration located above the left adrenal gland that prenatally simulated a neuroblastoma. PMID:23762717

  1. Immunophenotypic characterization and tenogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from equine umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Niharika; Gulati, Baldev R; Kumar, Rajesh; Gera, Sandeep; Kumar, Pawan; Somasundaram, Rajesh K; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) in equines have not been well characterized with respect to the expression of pluripotency and mesenchymal markers and for tenogenic differentiation potential in vitro. The plastic adherent fibroblast-like cells isolated from 13 out of 20 UCB samples could proliferate till passage 20. The cells expressed pluripotency markers (OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2) and MSC surface markers (CD90, CD73, and CD105) by RT-PCR, but did not express CD34, CD45, and CD14. On immunocytochemistry, the isolated cells showed expression of CD90 and CD73 proteins, but tested negative for CD34 and CD45. In flow cytometry, CD29, CD44, CD73, and CD90 were expressed by 96.36 ± 1.28%, 93.40 ± 0.70%, 73.23 ± 1.29% and 46.75 ± 3.95% cells, respectively. The UCB-MSCs could be differentiated to tenocytes by culturing in growth medium supplemented with 50 ng/ml of BMP-12 by day 10. The differentiated cells showed the expression of mohawk homeobox (Mkx), collagen type I alpha 1 (Col1α1), scleraxis (Scx), tenomodulin (Tnmd) and decorin (Dcn) by RT-PCR. In addition, flow cytometry detected tenomodulin and decorin protein in 95.65 ± 2.15% and 96.30 ± 1.00% of differentiated cells in comparison to 11.30 ± 0.10% and 19.45 ± 0.55% cells, respect vely in undifferentiated control cells. The findings support the observation that these cells may be suitable for therapeutic applications, including ruptured tendons in racehorses. PMID:24414976

  2. Characterization of blood borne microparticles as markers of premature coronary calcification in newly menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Litwiller, Robert D.; Owen, Whyte G.; Heit, John A.; Behrenbeck, Thomas; Mulvagh, Sharon L.; Araoz, Philip A.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Harman, S. Mitchell; Miller, Virginia M.

    2008-01-01

    While the risk for symptomatic atherosclerotic disease increases after menopause, currently recognized risk factors do not identify ongoing disease processes in low-risk women. This study tested the hypothesis that circulating cell-derived microparticles may reflect disease processes in women defined as low risk by the Framingham risk score. The concentration and phenotype of circulating microparticles were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of apparently healthy menopausal women, screened for enrollment into the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study. Microparticles were evaluated by flow cytometry, and coronary artery calcification (CAC) was scored using 64-slice computed tomography scanners. The procoagulant activity of isolated microparticles was determined with a sensitive fluorescent thrombin generation assay. Chronological age, body mass index, serum lipids, systolic blood pressure (Framingham risk score < 10%, range 1–3%), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein did not differ significantly among women with low (0 < 35; range, 0.3–32 Agatston units) or high (>50; range, 93–315 Agatston units) CAC compared with women without calcification. The total concentration and percentage of microparticles derived from platelets and endothelial cells were greatest in women with high CAC scores. The thrombin-generating capacity of the isolated microparticles correlated with phosphatidylserine expression, which also was greatest in women with high CAC scores. The percentages of microparticles expressing granulocyte and monocyte markers were not significantly different among groups. Therefore, the characterization of platelet and endothelial microparticles may identify early menopausal women with premature CAC who would not otherwise be identified by the usual risk factor analysis. PMID:18621859

  3. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  4. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  5. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  6. Characterization of blood flow rate in dental pulp by speckle patterns of backscattered light from an in vivo tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Sergey K.; Chistyakova, Galina G.; Terekh, Alex S.; Smirnov, Alex V.; Salimi Zadeh, Mehrnush M.; Barun, Vladimir V.

    2014-10-01

    Experimental data on the hemodynamics of dental pulp at different stages of caries treatment are given. Observations of speckle patterns in backscattered laser light are used as a measurement method to qualitatively characterize changes in blood flow rate through the dental pulp. The measurements were made by the author-designed experimental setup. Theoretical estimations showed that stationary reflected light from an in vivo tooth contains a negligibly small information body on changes in the pulpal blood flow due to the shadowing of the pulp by optically thick enamel and dentin. Therefore, the temporal variations in the speckle patterns are the only possible way that can provide monitoring of blood conditions in the pulp by using backscattered light. Various statistical characteristics of the random reflected light fields are studied as indicators of blood flow rate changes. There were selected five statistical parameters of backscattered speckle images that give self-consistent data on these changes. The parameters include four combinations of integrals of the Fourier transforms of the observed temporal variations as well as the speckle image contrast. The selected parameters are shown to qualitatively agree with general considerations on the effects of reduced or increased blood flow rates on the selected integral quantities.

  7. Preparation, characterization and in vivo investigation of blood-compatible hemoglobin-loaded nanoparticles as oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingzi; Zhao, Caiyan; Wang, Quan; You, Guoxing; Wang, Ying; Deng, Hongzhang; Chen, Gan; Xia, Sha; Zhao, Jingxiang; Wang, Bo; Li, Xianlei; Shao, Leihou; Wu, Yan; Zhao, Lian; Zhou, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Although many attempts have been made to design advanced hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs), no clinically viable product has been widely approved, because they do not perform normal blood functions, such as coagulation, hematologic reactions and stability. Additionally, the in vivo oxygenation of hemoglobin-loaded nanoparticles (HbPs) encapsulated with polymers has seldom been proved. Herein, HbPs of approximately 200nm with good stability were successfully fabricated and exhibited oxygen-carrying capacity. The HbPs preserve the biological and structure features of hemoglobin according to UV-vis spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectral analysis. In vitro, the HbPs showed a viscosity comparable to that of blood with no obvious effects on red blood cell aggregation. At the same time, blood compatibility was characterized in terms of platelet function, clot strength, speed of clot formation, degree of fibrin cross-linking and hemolysis rate. After intravenous administration of HbPs to mice with controlled hemorrhages, blood flow recovery and maintenance of systemic oxygenation were observed. PMID:26708138

  8. [Magnetic resonance tomographic characterization of intracranial tumors by evaluating the blood-brain barrier and regional cerebral circulation].

    PubMed

    Böck, J C; Sander, B; Schedel, H; Felix, R

    1993-11-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to characterize intracranial tumors on the basis of the degree of blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption and tumor blood flow (TBF). We studied 28 patients with brain tumors by MRI. BBB disruption was demonstrated by a pathological increase of signal intensity in T1-weighted spin-echo images (1.5 T, TR = 600 ms, TE = 10 ms, alpha = 90 degrees) after intravenous gadolinium-DTPA injection. TBF flow was assessed by an MRI-method based on the signal intensity decrease in T2-weighted gradient-echo images (TR = 25 ms, TE = 20 ms, alpha = 10 degrees) immediately after gadolinium-DTPA bolus injection. Typical constellations include intake BBB and low TBF in low-grade intraaxial tumors (astrocytoma I/II), disrupted BBB and heterogeneous TBF in high-grade intraaxial tumors (glioblastomas and metastases), and disrupted BBB and high TBF in extraaxial tumors (meningeomas). This study demonstrates the quasi-simultaneous assessment of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor blood flow. The results support the concept that additional uncorrelated information is obtained from the assessment of regional cerebral blood flow that may be helpful for the differential diagnosis of brain tumors. PMID:8241297

  9. Rheological characterization of cellular blood via a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann / coarse-grained spectrin-link method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasor, Daniel; Clausen, Jonathan; Aidun, Cyrus

    2010-11-01

    In small vessels, the cellular nature of blood is of utmost importance. The investigation of the non-Newtonian effects of blood for a complete range of hematocrit values and shear rates requires the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of individual red blood cells (RBCs) immersed in Newtonian blood plasma with hemoglobin within. Consequently, a coarse-grained spectrin-link (SL) RBC membrane model is coupled with a highly scalable lattice-Boltzmann (LB) flow solver to capture RBC dynamics in isolation and in dense suspensions of O(1,000) RBCs at realistic hematocrit values. Validation results include experimental comparisons with results for isolated RBCs tumbling, tank-treading, deforming in the wheel configuration, and parachuting in a microvessel-sized rigid tube. The rheology of blood is analyzed via LB-SL simulations of RBC suspensions at physiological concentrations. The results characterize the effect of the RBC deformation on the viscosity, normal stress differences, and particle pressure. Also, a demonstration of the Fahraeus effect is included which correlates the cell-depleted wall layer thickness with tube diameter for a variety of rigid microvessel-sized tube sizes. Lastly, the Fahraeus--Lindqvist effect is demonstrated using the apparent viscosity obtained from these simulations.

  10. Pulmonary vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Kenneth W; Flake, Alan W

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary vascular malformations have historically been diagnosed in a wide range of age groups, but the extensive use of prenatal imaging studies has resulted in the majority of lesions being diagnosed in utero. Among this group of lesions, bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), hybrid lesions with both congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and BPS, aberrant systemic vascular anastomoses, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM), are the most common. The biologic behavior of these lesions and the subsequent therapy is, in large part, determined by the age of the patient at diagnosis. In the fetus, large BPS or hybrid lesions can result in fetal hydrops and in utero fetal demise. In the perinatal period, pulmonary hypoplasia from the mass effect or air trapping within the cystic component of hybrid lesions can result in life-threatening respiratory distress. In the postnatal period, communication of the lesion with the aero-digestive system can result in recurrent pneumonia. Alternatively, increased pulmonary blood flow from the systemic arterial supply can result in hemorrhage, hemoptysis, or high output cardiac failure. In addition, there have been several reports of malignant degeneration. Finally, the broad spectrum encompassed by these lesions makes classification and subsequent communication of the lesions confusing and difficult. This paper will review the components of these lesions, their associated anomalies, the diagnosis and natural history, and finally, current concepts in the management of pulmonary vascular malformations. PMID:18158137

  11. A rare case of human pulmonary dirofilariasis with a growing pulmonary nodule after migrating infiltration shadows, mimicking primary lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Haro, Akira; Tamiya, Sadafumi; Nagashima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary dirofilariasis is a rare pulmonary parasitic infection by the nematode Dirofilaria immitis. It is characterized by an asymptomatic pulmonary nodule usually seen on chest X-ray. The differential diagnosis of pulmonary dirofilariasis includes other pulmonary diseases, primary lung carcinoma and metastatic lung tumor. Case presentation Pulmonary dirofilariasis was diagnosed in a woman who presented with interstitial pneumonia. Growth of the pulmonary nodule was detected subsequent to hemoptysis. The histological diagnosis was made based on a wedge resection performed under video-associated thoracic surgery (VATS). Conclusion Pulmonary dirofilariasis often varies in its clinical course. The diagnosis is best made using wedge resection under VATS. PMID:27015012

  12. Pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Troosters, Thierry; Demeyer, Heleen; Hornikx, Miek; Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Janssens, Wim

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is a therapy that offers benefits to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that are complementary to those obtained by pharmacotherapy. The main objective of pulmonary rehabilitation is to restore muscle function and exercise tolerance, reverse other nonrespiratory consequences of the disease, and help patients to self-manage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its exacerbations and symptoms. To do so, a multidisciplinary program tailored to the patient in terms of program content, exercise prescription, and setting must be offered. Several settings and programs have shown to spin off in significant immediate results. The challenge lies in maintaining the benefits outside the program. PMID:24507849

  13. Alcohol, head injury, and pulmonary complications.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M A; Janson, S; Seago, J A

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in rates of pulmonary complications (e.g., aspiration, pneumonia) in head-injured patients with and without concomitant alcohol intoxication. The records of 98 consecutive patients admitted over a 1-year period to a Level I Trauma Center were reviewed. The patients were grouped into three subsets: acutely intoxicated (n = 26), acutely intoxicated with a diagnosis of chronic alcoholism (n = 14), and non-intoxicated (n = 58). Alcohol intoxication was defined as a blood alcohol level (BAL) > or = 0.08 mg/dl. Admission BALs and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores were tabulated at admission. Frequency of arterial blood gas (ABG) measurements, need for an artificial airway/mechanical ventilation, and length of stay (LOS) were analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance. Intergroup differences in breath sounds were compared by using the nonparametric Kruskall-Wallis technique. We found no statistical difference between groups in terms of pulmonary sequelae despite the remarkably high BALs observed in the study groups. Similarly, there was no statistically greater LOS in the groups with alcohol intoxication than in alcohol-free cohorts. Despite a great deal of BAL science research to support our hypothesis, we failed to demonstrate a significantly higher rate of pulmonary problems in inebriated individuals with head injuries. We found that our strict exclusion criteria (no concomitant chest, abdominal, or pelvic trauma) limited the sample to only those patients without significant intracranial bleeding, whereas most complications in blood alcohol neuroscience research have been associated with much larger mass lesions (e.g., epidural or subdural hematomas). In addition, we found the characterizations of patients as chronically alcoholic were cumbersome and inaccurate in many cases. Future research should allow for a greater range of concomitant injuries that might suggest a positive or negative relationship to acute

  14. Morphological and functional characterization of leech circulating blood cells: role in immunity and neural repair.

    PubMed

    Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Vergote, David; Slomianny, Christian; Jouy, Nathalie; Salzet, Michel; Tasiemski, Aurélie

    2012-05-01

    Unlike most invertebrates, annelids possess a closed vascular system distinct from the coelomic liquid. The morphology and the function of leech blood cells are reported here. We have demonstrated the presence of a unique cell type which participates in various immune processes. In contrast to the mammalian spinal cord, the leech CNS is able to regenerate and restore function after injury. The close contact of the blood with the nerve cord also led us to explore the participation of blood in neural repair. Our data evidenced that, in addition to exerting peripheral immune functions, leech blood optimizes CNS neural repair through the release of neurotrophic substances. Circulating blood cells also appeared able to infiltrate the injured CNS where, in conjunction with microglia, they limit the formation of a scar. In mammals, CNS injury leads to the generation of a glial scar that blocks the mechanism of regeneration by preventing axonal regrowth. The results presented here constitute the first description of neuroimmune functions of invertebrate blood cells. Understanding the basic function of the peripheral circulating cells and their interactions with lesioned CNS in the leech would allow us to acquire insights into the complexity of the neuroimmune response of the injured mammalian brain. PMID:22159559

  15. Characterization of the attachment mechanisms of tissue-derived cell lines to blood-compatible polymers.

    PubMed

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Nikaido, Mayo; Tanaka, Masaru

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in biomedical engineering require the development of new types of blood-compatible polymers that also allow non-blood cell attachment for the isolation of stem cells and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood and for the development of artificial organs for use under blood-contact conditions. Poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) and poly(tetrafurfuryl acrylate) (PTHFA) were previously identified as blood-compatible polymers. Here, it is demonstrated that cancer cells can attach to the PMEA and PTHFA substrates, and the differences in the attachment mechanisms to the PMEA and PTHFA substrates between cancer cells and platelets are investigated. It is also found that the adsorption-induced deformation of fibrinogen, which is required for the attachment and activation of platelets, does not occur on the PMEA and PTHFA substrates. In contrast, fibronectin is deformed on the PMEA and PTHFA substrates. Therefore, it is concluded that cancer cells and not platelets can attach to the PMEA and PTHFA substrates based on this protein-deformation difference between these substrates. Moreover, it is observed that cancer cells attach to the PMEA substrate via both integrin-dependent and -independent mechanisms and attach to the PTHFA substrate only through an integrin-dependent mechanism. It is expected that PMEA and PTHFA will prove useful for blood-contact biomedical applications. PMID:24105989

  16. Spatial and functional relationships between air conduits and blood capillaries in the pulmonary gas exchange tissue of adult and developing chickens.

    PubMed

    Makanya, Andrew N; El-Darawish, Yosif; Kavoi, Boniface M; Djonov, Valentin

    2011-02-01

    The documented data regarding the three-dimensional structure of the air capillaries (ACs), the ultimate sites of gas exchange in the avian lung is contradictory. Further, the mode of gas exchange, described as cross-current has not been clearly elucidated. We studied the temporal and spatial arrangement of the terminal air conduits of the chicken lung and their relationship with the blood capillaries (BCs) in embryos as well as the definitive architecture in adults. Several visualization techniques that included corrosion casting, light microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used. Two to six infundibulae extend from each atrium and give rise to numerous ACs that spread centrifugally. Majority of the ACs are tubular structures that give off branches, which anastomose with their neighboring cognates. Some ACs have globular shapes and a few are blind-ending tapering tubes. During inauguration, the luminal aspects of the ACs are characterized by numerous microvillus-like microplicae, which are formed during the complex processes of cell attenuation and canalization of the ACs. The parabronchial exchange BCs, initially inaugurated as disorganized meshworks, are reoriented via pillar formation to lie predominantly orthogonal to the long axes of the ACs. The remodeling of the retiform meshworks by intussusceptive angiogenesis essentially accomplishes a cross-current system at the gas exchange interface in the adults, where BCs form ring-like patterns around the ACs, thus establishing a cross-current system. Our findings clarify the mode of gas exchange in the parabronchial mantle and illuminate the basis for the functional efficiency of the avian lung. PMID:21275004

  17. Effect of mixing scanner types and reconstruction kernels on the characterization of lung parenchymal pathologies: emphysema, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and normal non-smokers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ye; van Beek, Edwin J.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Guo, Junfeng; Sonka, Milan; Hoffman, Eric

    2006-03-01

    In this study we utilize our texture characterization software (3-D AMFM) to characterize interstitial lung diseases (including emphysema) based on MDCT generated volumetric data using 3-dimensional texture features. We have sought to test whether the scanner and reconstruction filter (kernel) type affect the classification of lung diseases using the 3-D AMFM. We collected MDCT images in three subject groups: emphysema (n=9), interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n=10), and normal non-smokers (n=9). In each group, images were scanned either on a Siemens Sensation 16 or 64-slice scanner, (B50f or B30 recon. kernel) or a Philips 4-slice scanner (B recon. kernel). A total of 1516 volumes of interest (VOIs; 21x21 pixels in plane) were marked by two chest imaging experts using the Iowa Pulmonary Analysis Software Suite (PASS). We calculated 24 volumetric features. Bayesian methods were used for classification. Images from different scanners/kernels were combined in all possible combinations to test how robust the tissue classification was relative to the differences in image characteristics. We used 10-fold cross validation for testing the result. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated. One-way Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) was used to compare the classification result between the various combinations of scanner and reconstruction kernel types. This study yielded a sensitivity of 94%, 91%, 97%, and 93% for emphysema, ground-glass, honeycombing, and normal non-smoker patterns respectively using a mixture of all three subject groups. The specificity for these characterizations was 97%, 99%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. The F test result of ANOVA shows there is no significant difference (p <0.05) between different combinations of data with respect to scanner and convolution kernel type. Since different MDCT and reconstruction kernel types did not show significant differences in regards to the classification result, this study suggests that the 3-D AMFM can

  18. Hyskon-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Mangar, D

    1993-12-01

    Hyskon (32 percent dextran-70) (Hyskon Division, Pharmacia) is used during hysteroscopy to help visualization of the uterine surfaces. Pulmonary edema of an uncertain cause has occurred in many patients. Because this study could not be conducted in humans, we determined if Hyskon caused cardiogenic or non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema in a dog model. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive an infusion of Hyskon or whole blood to sustain left ventricular end-diastolic pressure between 20 and 23 millimeters of mercury for 60 minutes. In dogs receiving blood, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before or after blood was given. In the Hyskon group, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before Hyskon and 0.6 +/- 1.4 milligrams per deciliter (range of 0.1 to 3.7 milligram per deciliter) after Hyskon. The ratio of bronchoalveolar lavage protein to plasma protein after Hyskon was 8.0 +/- 18.0 percent compared with zero percent in the blood group. Hyskon altered pulmonary microvascular membrane permeability, causing alveolar flooding with plasma proteins and possibly accounting for the deterioration of oxygenation and pulmonary compliance seen in patients. These results suggest a significant noncardiogenic component of Hyskon induced pulmonary edema. PMID:7505487

  19. Development of an Automated and Sensitive Microfluidic Device for Capturing and Characterizing Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) from Clinical Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Priya; Sepehri, Saedeh; Zhou, Yi; Gorin, Michael A.; Paolillo, Carmela; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gleason, Kyle; Payne, Austin; Boniface, Brian; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Morgan, Todd M.; Fortina, Paolo; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Handique, Kalyan; Wang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hindered by sub-optimal sensitivity and specificity of devices or assays as well as lack of capability of characterization of CTCs with clinical biomarkers. Here, we validate a novel technology to enrich and characterize CTCs from blood samples of patients with metastatic breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using a microfluidic chip which is processed by using an automated staining and scanning system from sample preparation to image processing. The Celsee system allowed for the detection of CTCs with apparent high sensitivity and specificity (94% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Moreover, the system facilitated rapid capture of CTCs from blood samples and also allowed for downstream characterization of the captured cells by immunohistochemistry, DNA and mRNA fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). In a subset of patients with prostate cancer we compared the technology with a FDA-approved CTC device, CellSearch and found a higher degree of sensitivity with the Celsee instrument. In conclusion, the integrated Celsee system represents a promising CTC technology for enumeration and molecular characterization. PMID:26808060

  20. Development of an Automated and Sensitive Microfluidic Device for Capturing and Characterizing Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) from Clinical Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Priya; Sepehri, Saedeh; Zhou, Yi; Gorin, Michael A; Paolillo, Carmela; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gleason, Kyle; Payne, Austin; Boniface, Brian; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Morgan, Todd M; Fortina, Paolo; Pienta, Kenneth J; Handique, Kalyan; Wang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hindered by sub-optimal sensitivity and specificity of devices or assays as well as lack of capability of characterization of CTCs with clinical biomarkers. Here, we validate a novel technology to enrich and characterize CTCs from blood samples of patients with metastatic breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using a microfluidic chip which is processed by using an automated staining and scanning system from sample preparation to image processing. The Celsee system allowed for the detection of CTCs with apparent high sensitivity and specificity (94% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Moreover, the system facilitated rapid capture of CTCs from blood samples and also allowed for downstream characterization of the captured cells by immunohistochemistry, DNA and mRNA fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). In a subset of patients with prostate cancer we compared the technology with a FDA-approved CTC device, CellSearch and found a higher degree of sensitivity with the Celsee instrument. In conclusion, the integrated Celsee system represents a promising CTC technology for enumeration and molecular characterization. PMID:26808060

  1. Characterization of Transition to Turbulence for Blood in a Straight Pipe Under Steady Flow Conditions.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dipankar; Casey, David M; Crowder, Douglas C; Steinman, David A; Yun, Yang H; Loth, Francis

    2016-07-01

    Blood is a complex fluid that, among other things, has been established to behave as a shear thinning, non-Newtonian fluid when exposed to low shear rates (SR). Many hemodynamic investigations use a Newtonian fluid to represent blood when the flow field of study has relatively high SR (>200 s-1). Shear thinning fluids have been shown to exhibit differences in transition to turbulence (TT) compared to that of Newtonian fluids. Incorrect prediction of the transition point in a simulation could result in erroneous hemodynamic force predictions. The goal of the present study was to compare velocity profiles near TT of whole blood and Newtonian blood analogs in a straight rigid pipe with a diameter 6.35 mm under steady flow conditions. Rheology was measured for six samples of whole porcine blood and three samples of a Newtonian fluid, and the results show blood acts as a shear thinning non-Newtonian fluid. Measurements also revealed that blood viscosity at SR = 200 s-1 is significantly larger than at SR = 1000 s-1 (13.8%, p < 0.001). Doppler ultrasound (DUS) was used to measure velocity profiles for blood and Newtonian samples at different flow rates to produce Reynolds numbers (Re) ranging from 1000 to 3300 (based on viscosity at SR = 1000 s-1). Two mathematically defined methods, based on the velocity profile shape change and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), were used to detect TT. Results show similar parabolic velocity profiles for both blood and the Newtonian fluid for Re < 2200. However, differences were observed between blood and Newtonian fluid velocity profiles for larger Re. The Newtonian fluid had blunt-like velocity profiles starting at Re = 2403 ± 8 which indicated transition. In contrast, blood did not show this velocity profile change until Re = 2871 ± 104. The Newtonian fluid had large velocity fluctuations (root mean square (RMS) > 20%) with a maximum TKE near the pipe center at Re = 2316 ± 34

  2. Design, characterization, and aerosolization of organic solution advanced spray-dried moxifloxacin and ofloxacin dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) microparticulate/nanoparticulate powders for pulmonary inhalation aerosol delivery

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jinghua; Vogt, Frederick G; Li, Xiaojian; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and develop respirable antibiotics moxifloxacin (MOXI) hydrochloride and ofloxacin (OFLX) microparticles and nanoparticles, and multifunctional antibiotics particles with or without lung surfactant 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) for targeted dry powder inhalation delivery as a pulmonary nanomedicine. Particles were rationally designed and produced by advanced spray-drying particle engineering from an organic solution in closed mode (no water) from dilute solution. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that these particles had both optimal particle morphology and surface morphology, and the particle size distributions were suitable for pulmonary delivery. Comprehensive and systematic physicochemical characterization and in vitro aerosol dispersion performance revealed significant differences between these two fluoroquinolone antibiotics following spray drying as drug aerosols and as cospray-dried antibiotic drug: DPPC aerosols. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and confocal Raman microspectroscopy were employed to probe composition and interactions in the solid state. Spray-dried MOXI was rendered noncrystalline (amorphous) following organic solution advanced spray drying. This was in contrast to spray-dried OFLX, which retained partial crystallinity, as did OFLX:DPPC powders at certain compositions. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using inertial impaction with a dry powder inhaler device approved for human use. The present study demonstrates that the use of DPPC offers improved aerosol delivery of MOXI as cospray-dried microparticulate/nanoparticulate powders, whereas residual partial crystallinity influenced aerosol dispersion of OFLX and most of the compositions of OFLX:DPPC inhalation powders. PMID:24092972

  3. Characterization of blood biochemical markers during aging in the Grey Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus): impact of gender and season

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hematologic and biochemical data are needed to characterize the health status of animal populations over time to determine the habitat quality and captivity conditions. Blood components and the chemical entities that they transport change predominantly with sex and age. The aim of this study was to utilize blood chemistry monitoring to establish the reference levels in a small prosimian primate, the Grey Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus). Method In the captive colony, mouse lemurs may live 10–12 years, and three age groups for both males and females were studied: young (1–3 years), middle-aged (4–5 years) and old (6–10 years). Blood biochemical markers were measured using the VetScan Comprehensive Diagnostic Profile. Because many life history traits of this primate are highly dependent on the photoperiod (body mass and reproduction), the effect of season was also assessed. Results The main effect of age was observed in blood markers of renal functions such as creatinine, which was higher among females. Additionally, blood urea nitrogen significantly increased with age and is potentially linked to chronic renal insufficiency, which has been described in captive mouse lemurs. The results demonstrated significant effects related to season, especially in blood protein levels and glucose rates; these effects were observed regardless of gender or age and were likely due to seasonal variations in food intake, which is very marked in this species. Conclusion These results were highly similar with those obtained in other primate species and can serve as references for future research of the Grey Mouse Lemur. PMID:23131178

  4. Characterizing biological variability in livestock blood cholinesterase activity for biomonitoring organophosphate nerve agent exposure.

    PubMed

    Halbrook, R S; Shugart, L R; Watson, A P; Munro, N B; Linnabary, R D

    1992-09-01

    A biomonitoring protocol, using blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity in livestock as a monitor of potential organophosphate nerve agent exposure during the planned destruction of US unitary chemical warfare agent stockpiles, is described. The experimental design included analysis of blood ChE activity in individual healthy sheep, horses, and dairy and beef cattle during a 10- to 12-month period. Castrated and sexually intact males, pregnant and lactating females, and adult and immature animals were examined through at least one reproductive cycle. The same animals were used throughout the period of observation and were not exposed to ChE-inhibiting organophosphate or carbamate compounds. A framework for an effective biomonitoring protocol within a monitoring area includes establishing individual baseline blood ChE activity for a sentinel group of 6 animals on the bases of blood samples collected over a 6-month period, monthly collection of blood samples for ChE-activity determination during monitoring, and selection of adult animals as sentinels. Exposure to ChE-inhibiting compounds would be suspected when all blood ChE activity of all animals within the sentinel group are decreased greater than 20% from their own baseline value. Sentinel species selection is primarily a logistical and operational concern; however, sheep appear to be the species of choice because within-individual baseline ChE activity and among age and gender group ChE activity in sheep had the least variability, compared with data from other species. This protocol provides an effective and efficient means for detecting abnormal depressions in blood ChE activity in livestock and can serve as a valuable indicator of the extent of actual plume movement and/or deposition in the event of organophosphate nerve agent release. PMID:1399773

  5. Characterizing biological variability in livestock blood cholinesterase activity for biomonitoring organophosphate nerve agent exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Shugart, L.R.; Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B.; Linnabary, R.D. )

    1992-09-01

    A biomonitoring protocol, using blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity in livestock as a monitor of potential organophosphate nerve agent exposure during the planned destruction of US unitary chemical warfare agent stockpiles, is described. The experimental design included analysis of blood ChE activity in individual healthy sheep, horses, and dairy and beef cattle during a 10- to 12-month period. Castrated and sexually intact males, pregnant and lactating females, and adult and immature animals were examined through at least one reproductive cycle. The same animals were used throughout the period of observation and were not exposed to ChE-inhibiting organophosphate or carbamate compounds. A framework for an effective biomonitoring protocol within a monitoring area includes establishing individual baseline blood ChE activity for a sentinel group of 6 animals on the bases of blood samples collected over a 6-month period, monthly collection of blood samples for ChE-activity determination during monitoring, and selection of adult animals as sentinels. Exposure to ChE-inhibiting compounds would be suspected when all blood ChE activity of all animals within the sentinel group are decreased greater than 20% from their own baseline value. Sentinel species selection is primarily a logistical and operational concern; however, sheep appear to be the species of choice because within-individual baseline ChE activity and among age and gender group ChE activity in sheep had the least variability, compared with data from other species. This protocol provides an effective and efficient means for detecting abnormal depressions in blood ChE activity in livestock and can serve as a valuable indicator of the extent of actual plume movement and/or deposition in the event of organophosphate nerve agent release.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Circular RNAs As a New Class of Putative Biomarkers in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Oliver; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Covalently closed circular RNA molecules (circRNAs) have recently emerged as a class of RNA isoforms with widespread and tissue specific expression across animals, oftentimes independent of the corresponding linear mRNAs. circRNAs are remarkably stable and sometimes highly expressed molecules. Here, we sequenced RNA in human peripheral whole blood to determine the potential of circRNAs as biomarkers in an easily accessible body fluid. We report the reproducible detection of thousands of circRNAs. Importantly, we observed that hundreds of circRNAs are much higher expressed than corresponding linear mRNAs. Thus, circRNA expression in human blood reveals and quantifies the activity of hundreds of coding genes not accessible by classical mRNA specific assays. Our findings suggest that circRNAs could be used as biomarker molecules in standard clinical blood samples. PMID:26485708

  7. Dielectric properties of human diabetic blood: Thermodynamic characterization and new prospective for alternative diagnostic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsaci, F.; Ficarra, S.; Russo, A.; Galtieri, A.; Tellone, E.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we will show the possibility of studying physical properties and irreversible phenomena that occur in blood by applying the dielectric Kluitenberg's nonequilibrium thermodynamic theory. Namely, we shall use some recent extensions of this theory that allow to infer its main characteristic parameters from experimental measures. Applying these results to the study of normal and diabetic blood we show, by comparing them, that it is possible to determine the difference, in some details, of the amount of particular phenomena occurring inside them and give a biological meaning to these phenomena. Moreover, observing a correspondence between a particular value of the frequency for which state coefficients are equal and glucose levels we introduce an alternative diagnostic method to measure the values of the glucose in the blood by determining only this frequency value. The thermodynamic description will be completed by determining the trend of the entropy production.

  8. Characterization of the novel antibacterial peptide Leucrocin from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Pata, Supawadee; Yaraksa, Nualyai; Daduang, Sakda; Temsiripong, Yosapong; Svasti, Jisnuson; Araki, Tomohiro; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2011-05-01

    Four novel antibacterial peptides, Leucrocin I-IV from Siamese crocodile white blood cell extracts were purified by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Leucrocins exhibit strong antibacterial activity towards Staphylococcus epidermidis, Salmonella typhi and Vibrio cholerae. The peptides were 7-10 residues in length with different primary structure. The amino acid sequence of Leucrocin I is NGVQPKY with molecular mass around 806.99 Da and Leucrocin II is NAGSLLSGWG with molecular mass around 956.3 Da. Further, the interaction between peptides and bacterial membranes as part of their killing mechanism was studied by fluorescence and electron microscopy. The outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane was the target of action of Leucrocins as assayed in model membrane by release of β-galactosidase due to the membrane permeabilization. Finally, the hemolytic effect was tested against human red blood cell. Leucrocin I, III and IV showed less toxicity against human red blood cells than Leucrocin II. PMID:21184776

  9. Endovascular treatment of isolated arterial pulmonary malinosculation

    PubMed Central

    Mammen, Suraj; Keshava, Shyamkumar N; Moses, Vinu; Chiramel, George Koshy; Irodi, Aparna; Gnanamuthu, Birla Roy

    2015-01-01

    We report the endovascular management of a series of four cases of isolated systemic supply to normal lung or isolated arterial pulmonary malinosculation of the left lung. In these cases, the basal segments of the left lung lacked normal pulmonary arterial supply and instead received systemic arterial blood from the descending thoracic aorta. The relevant anatomy and literature are also reviewed. PMID:26288517

  10. Pulmonary function in space.

    PubMed

    West, J B; Elliott, A R; Guy, H J; Prisk, G K

    1997-06-25

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth. PMID:9200637

  11. Pulmonary function in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.

  12. Development and characterization of spray-dried porous nanoaggregates for pulmonary delivery of anti-tubercular drugs.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ranjot; Garg, Tarun; Malik, Basant; Gupta, Umesh Datta; Gupta, Pushpa; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis, MTB or tubercle bacillus (TB) is a lethal, infectious disease mainly caused by various strains of mycobacteria, usually Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study, guar gum-based porous nanoaggregates were formulated by precipitation technique with two frontline antitubercular drugs, i.e. isoniazid and rifampicin. The formulations were optimized on the basis of various evaluation parameters such as morphology, density, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. The optimized formulations were administered by inhalable route to Wistar rats for the evaluation of drugs in different organs (lungs, liver and kidneys). High drug encapsulation efficiency was achieved in guar gum porous nanoaggregates, ranging from 50% to 60%. A single pulmonary dose resulted in therapeutic drug concentrations of 30%-50% in the lungs and in other organs (less than 5%) for 24 h. From this study, we can conclude that delivering drugs through pulmonary route is advantageous for local action in lungs. Furthermore, the formulation showed sustained drug release pattern, which could be beneficial for reducing the drug dose or frequency of dosing, thus helpful in improving patient compliance. PMID:24870203

  13. Formulation and characterization of inhalable magnetic nanocomposite microparticles (MnMs) for targeted pulmonary delivery via spray drying.

    PubMed

    Stocke, Nathanael A; Meenach, Samantha A; Arnold, Susanne M; Mansour, Heidi M; Hilt, J Zach

    2015-02-20

    Targeted pulmonary delivery facilitates the direct application of bioactive materials to the lungs in a controlled manner and provides an exciting platform for targeting magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to the lungs. Iron oxide MNPs remotely heat in the presence of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) providing unique opportunities for therapeutic applications such as hyperthermia. In this study, spray drying was used to formulate magnetic nanocomposite microparticles (MnMs) consisting of iron oxide MNPs and d-mannitol. The physicochemical properties of these MnMs were evaluated and the in vitro aerosol dispersion performance of the dry powders was measured by the Next Generation Impactor(®). For all powders, the mass median aerosol diameter (MMAD) was <5μm and deposition patterns revealed that MnMs could deposit throughout the lungs. Heating studies with a custom AMF showed that MNPs retain excellent thermal properties after spray drying into composite dry powders, with specific absorption ratios (SAR)>200W/g, and in vitro studies on a human lung cell line indicated moderate cytotoxicity of these materials. These inhalable composites present a class of materials with many potential applications and pose a promising approach for thermal treatment of the lungs through targeted pulmonary administration of MNPs. PMID:25542988

  14. Severe Pulmonary Arteriopathy Is Associated with Persistent Hypoxemia after Pulmonary Endarterectomy in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Sakao, Seiichiro; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ishida, Keiichi; Naito, Akira; Kato, Fumiaki; Takeuchi, Takao; Sekine, Ayumi; Nishimura, Rintaro; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Shigeta, Ayako; Masuda, Masahisa; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterized by occlusion of pulmonary arteries by organized chronic thrombi. Persistent hypoxemia and residual pulmonary hypertension (PH) following successful pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) are clinically important problems; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have previously reported that residual PH is closely related to severe pulmonary vascular remodeling and hypothesize that this arteriopathy might also be involved in impaired gas exchange. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between hypoxemia and pulmonary arteriopathy after PEA. Methods and Results Between December 2011 and November 2014, 23 CTEPH patients underwent PEA and lung biopsy. The extent of pulmonary arteriopathy was quantified pathologically in lung biopsy specimens. We then analyzed the relationship between the severity of pulmonary arteriopathy and gas exchange after PEA. We observed that the severity of pulmonary arteriopathy was negatively correlated with postoperative and follow-up PaO2 (postoperative PaO2: r = -0.73, p = 0.0004; follow-up PaO2: r = -0.66, p = 0.001), but not with preoperative PaO2 (r = -0.373, p = 0.08). Multivariate analysis revealed that the obstruction ratio and patient age were determinants of PaO2 one month after PEA (R2 = 0.651, p = 0.00009). Furthermore, the obstruction ratio and improvement of pulmonary vascular resistance were determinants of PaO2 at follow-up (R2 = 0.545, p = 0.0002). Severe pulmonary arteriopathy might increase the alveolar-arterial oxygen difference and impair diffusion capacity, resulting in hypoxemia following PEA. Conclusion The severity of pulmonary arteriopathy was closely associated with postoperative and follow-up hypoxemia. PMID:27571267

  15. Eight Years Follow-up of a Case with Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis After Corticosteroid Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Hasan; Köksal, Nurhan; Ozkan, Fuat

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is characterized by recurrent episodes of alveolar hemorrhage, hemoptysis, and secondary iron deficiency anemia with unknown etiology. It generally emerges in childhood and adolescence periods but rarely found in adulthood. Definite diagnosis is established by appearing the hemosiderin-laden macrophages at sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, or open lung biopsy. We reported a male patient who was born in 1975, expectorated blood since 1995, and was diagnosed in 1998. He received many blood replacements. He admitted to our clinic in 2003 with complaints of coughing up blood, shortness of breath, and tiredness. We gave the corticosteroid therapy to patient for 6-month period. After treatment, the patient did not have any complaints. Clinicians should keep in mind that idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis may differ in localization on chest X-ray and corticosteroid treatment should be started when diagnosis is established. PMID:22393549

  16. Treatment of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajendrakumar; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Patel, Laxeshkumar; Gandhi, Kaushang; Desai, Harit; Kaul, Dhiraj; Sahgal, Sumir P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and secondary right ventricular failure. PAH is considered a life-threatening condition unless treated. This article provides a comprehensive review of controlled and uncontrolled trials to define the risk-benefit for different therapeutic options of this clinical disorder. Relevant published articles were identified through searches of the National Center for Biotechnology PubMed database. All therapeutic measures for PAH were discussed. Six drugs have been approved in the United States for the treatment of PAH. Extensive medical advancement has been achieved in treatment of PAH. However, none of the approved therapies have shown ability to cure the disease. New research should be performed to develop promising new therapies. PMID:22460104

  17. Neonatal pulmonary hemosiderosis.

    PubMed

    Limme, Boris; Nicolescu, Ramona; Misson, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare complex entity characterized clinically by acute or recurrent episodes of hemoptysis secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. The radiographic features are variable, including diffuse alveolar-type infiltrates, and interstitial reticular and micronodular patterns. We describe a 3-week-old infant presenting with hemoptysis and moderate respiratory distress. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis was the first working diagnosis at the Emergency Department and was confirmed, 2 weeks later, by histological studies (bronchoalveolar lavage). The immunosuppressive therapy by 1 mg/kg/d prednisone was immediately started, the baby returned home on steroid therapy at a dose of 0,5 mg/kg/d. The diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis should be evocated at any age, even in the neonate, when the clinical presentation (hemoptysis and abnormal radiological chest images) is strongly suggestive. PMID:25389504

  18. Replication and Characterization of Association between ABO SNPs and Red Blood Cell Traits by Meta-Analysis in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Stela; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Charoen, Pimphen; Wong, Andrew; Finan, Chris; Engmann, Jorgen; Shah, Tina; Hersch, Micha; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara J.; Dale, Caroline E.; Hypponen, Elina; Morris, Richard W.; Casas, Juan P.; Kumari, Meena; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Gaunt, Tom R.; Drenos, Fotios; Langenberg, Claudia; Kuh, Diana; Kivimaki, Mika; Rueedi, Rico; Waeber, Gerard; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Price, Jacqueline F.

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) traits are routinely measured in clinical practice as important markers of health. Deviations from the physiological ranges are usually a sign of disease, although variation between healthy individuals also occurs, at least partly due to genetic factors. Recent large scale genetic studies identified loci associated with one or more of these traits; further characterization of known loci and identification of new loci is necessary to better understand their role in health and disease and to identify potential molecular mechanisms. We performed meta-analysis of Metabochip association results for six RBC traits—hemoglobin concentration (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and red blood cell count (RCC)—in 11 093 Europeans from seven studies of the UCL-LSHTM-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium. We identified 394 non-overlapping SNPs in five loci at genome-wide significance: 6p22.1-6p21.33 (with HFE among others), 6q23.2 (with HBS1L among others), 6q23.3 (contains no genes), 9q34.3 (only ABO gene) and 22q13.1 (with TMPRSS6 among others), replicating previous findings of association with RBC traits at these loci and extending them by imputation to 1000 Genomes. We further characterized associations between ABO SNPs and three traits: hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cell count, replicating them in an independent cohort. Conditional analyses indicated the independent association of each of these traits with ABO SNPs and a role for blood group O in mediating the association. The 15 most significant RBC-associated ABO SNPs were also associated with five cardiometabolic traits, with discordance in the direction of effect between groups of traits, suggesting that ABO may act through more than one mechanism to influence cardiometabolic risk. PMID:27280446

  19. Automated microscopy system for detection and genetic characterization of fetal nucleated red blood cells on slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravkin, Ilya; Temov, Vladimir

    1998-04-01

    The detection and genetic analysis of fetal cells in maternal blood will permit noninvasive prenatal screening for genetic defects. Applied Imaging has developed and is currently evaluating a system for semiautomatic detection of fetal nucleated red blood cells on slides and acquisition of their DNA probe FISH images. The specimens are blood smears from pregnant women (9 - 16 weeks gestation) enriched for nucleated red blood cells (NRBC). The cells are identified by using labeled monoclonal antibodies directed to different types of hemoglobin chains (gamma, epsilon); the nuclei are stained with DAPI. The Applied Imaging system has been implemented with both Olympus BX and Nikon Eclipse series microscopes which were equipped with transmission and fluorescence optics. The system includes the following motorized components: stage, focus, transmission, and fluorescence filter wheels. A video camera with light integration (COHU 4910) permits low light imaging. The software capabilities include scanning, relocation, autofocusing, feature extraction, facilities for operator review, and data analysis. Detection of fetal NRBCs is achieved by employing a combination of brightfield and fluorescence images of nuclear and cytoplasmic markers. The brightfield and fluorescence images are all obtained with a single multi-bandpass dichroic mirror. A Z-stack of DNA probe FISH images is acquired by moving focus and switching excitation filters. This stack is combined to produce an enhanced image for presentation and spot counting.

  20. Linear response range characterization and in vivo application of laser speckle imaging of blood flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bernard; Ramírez-San-Juan, Julio C.; Lotfi, Justin; Nelson, J. S.

    2006-07-01

    Noninvasive blood flow imaging can provide critical information on the state of biological tissue and the efficacy of approaches to treat disease. With laser speckle imaging (LSI), relative changes in blood flow are typically reported, with the assumption that the measured values are on a linear scale. A linear relationship between the measured and actual flow rate values has been suggested. The actual flow rate range, over which this linear relationship is valid, is unknown. Herein we report the linear response range and velocity dynamic range (VDR) of our LSI instrument at two relevant camera integration times. For integration times of 1 and 10 ms, the best case VDR was 80 and 60 dB, respectively, and the worst case VDR was 20 and 50 dB. The best case VDR values were similar to those reported in the literature for optical Doppler tomography. We also demonstrate the potential of LSI for monitoring blood flow dynamics in the rodent dorsal skinfold chamber model. These findings imply that LSI can provide accurate wide-field maps of microvascular blood flow rate dynamics and highlight heterogeneities in flow response to the application of exogenous agents.

  1. Mass Spectrometry and Antibody-Based Characterization of Blood Vessels from Brachylophosaurus canadensis.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Timothy P; Schroeter, Elena R; Zamdborg, Leonid; Zheng, Wenxia; Lee, Ji Eun; Tran, John C; Bern, Marshall; Duncan, Michael B; Lebleu, Valerie S; Ahlf, Dorothy R; Thomas, Paul M; Kalluri, Raghu; Kelleher, Neil L; Schweitzer, Mary H

    2015-12-01

    Structures similar to blood vessels in location, morphology, flexibility, and transparency have been recovered after demineralization of multiple dinosaur cortical bone fragments from multiple specimens, some of which are as old as 80 Ma. These structures were hypothesized to be either endogenous to the bone (i.e., of vascular origin) or the result of biofilm colonizing the empty osteonal network after degradation of original organic components. Here, we test the hypothesis that these structures are endogenous and thus retain proteins in common with extant archosaur blood vessels that can be detected with high-resolution mass spectrometry and confirmed by immunofluorescence. Two lines of evidence support this hypothesis. First, peptide sequencing of Brachylophosaurus canadensis blood vessel extracts is consistent with peptides comprising extant archosaurian blood vessels and is not consistent with a bacterial, cellular slime mold, or fungal origin. Second, proteins identified by mass spectrometry can be localized to the tissues using antibodies specific to these proteins, validating their identity. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001738. PMID:26595531

  2. Morphological and morphometric characterization of agoutis' peripheral blood cells (Dasyprocta prymnolopha, Wagler, 1831) raised in captivity.

    PubMed

    Conde Júnior, Airton Mendes; De Moura Fortes, Eunice Anita; De Menezes, Danilo José Ayres; De Oliveira Lopes, Luana; De Carvalho, Maria Acelina Martins

    2012-03-01

    Thirty adult agoutis (Dasyprocta primnolopha) from the Nucleus of Study and Preservation of Wild Animals at the Federal University of Piauí were used. Blood scrubs of these animals were colored by the Leishman method and analyzed in light microscopy. The cells had been measured using programs that analyze images (Leica QWin - Image Processing and Analysis Software). Mature erythrocytes, basophil reticulocytes, lymphocytes, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes, and thrombocytes were identified. Agoutis' erythrocytes presented elliptical form, without nucleus with an average diameter of 5.64 micromeres ± 0.38. The lymphocytes are spherical cells with scarce cytoplasm, dense and with a very centralized rounded nucleus measuring an average diameter of 13.20 micromeres ± 0.35. The monocytes are slightly basophilic, with a spherical nucleus, central constriction, and an average diameter of 20.59 micromeres ± 0.32. The neutrophils are spherical, with a polymorphic lobulated nucleus, with an average diameter of 11.2 micromeres ± 0.20. The eosinophils are spherical with lobulated nucleus and with an average diameter of 14.25 micromeres ± 0.36. Only five basophils were observed, with abundance of cytoplasmic granules with 9.8 micrometers of diameter ± 0.30. Thrombocytopenic pleomorphism was frequent. There were similarities in the cellular constituents in peripheral blood of agoutis and of other rodents and humans. The cellular types from the peripheral blood, the morphology, and morphometry of the blood's cells did not vary according to sex. PMID:21898666

  3. Transcriptome Characterization of Bovine Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Stimulated by LPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to identify transcription networks and signatures of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to LPS stimulation. A total of 464 genes including at least 17 transcription factors were identified to be significantly induced by LPS using a high density bovine oligonucleo...

  4. Microarray characterization of gene expression changes in blood during acute ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of the civil aviation safety program to define the adverse effects of ethanol on flying performance, we performed a DNA microarray analysis of human whole blood samples from a five-time point study of subjects administered ethanol orally, followed by breathalyzer analysis, to monitor blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to discover significant gene expression changes in response to the ethanol exposure. Methods Subjects were administered either orange juice or orange juice with ethanol. Blood samples were taken based on BAC and total RNA was isolated from PaxGene™ blood tubes. The amplified cDNA was used in microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analyses to evaluate differential gene expression. Microarray data was analyzed in a pipeline fashion to summarize and normalize and the results evaluated for relative expression across time points with multiple methods. Candidate genes showing distinctive expression patterns in response to ethanol were clustered by pattern and further analyzed for related function, pathway membership and common transcription factor binding within and across clusters. RT-qPCR was used with representative genes to confirm relative transcript levels across time to those detected in microarrays. Results Microarray analysis of samples representing 0%, 0.04%, 0.08%, return to 0.04%, and 0.02% wt/vol BAC showed that changes in gene expression could be detected across the time course. The expression changes were verified by qRT-PCR. The candidate genes of interest (GOI) identified from the microarray analysis and clustered by expression pattern across the five BAC points showed seven coordinately expressed groups. Analysis showed function-based networks, shared transcription factor binding sites and signaling pathways for members of the clusters. These include hematological functions, innate immunity and inflammation functions, metabolic functions expected of ethanol metabolism, and pancreatic

  5. Characterization of the relationship between dose and blood eosinophil response following subcutaneous administration of mepolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Pouliquen, Isabelle J.; Kornmann, Oliver; Barton, Sharon V.; Price, Jeffrey A.; Ortega, Hector G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mepolizumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that blocks human IL-5 from binding to the IL-5 receptor, which is mainly expressed on eosinophils. Eosinophils are key cells in the inflammatory cascade of various diseases, including asthma. This study investigated the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) relationship between exposure of mepolizumab subcutaneous (SC) administration and blood eosinophil reduction compared with intravenous (IV) administration in adult subjects with asthma. Methods: In this multi-center, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, repeat-dose study, 70 adult subjects received one of four possible treatment regimens: mepolizumab 12.5, 125, or 250 mg SC or 75 mg IV. In addition to analyzing the dose and PK/PD relationship, absolute bioavailability, safety, tolerability, and incidence of anti-mepolizumab antibodies were evaluated. Results: Blood eosinophil levels decreased in a dose-dependent manner with the lowest (12.5 mg) dose clearly differentiating from the other doses. A non-linear inhibition Imax model based on blood eosinophil levels at week 12 identified that the SC doses providing 50% and 90% of maximal blood eosinophil inhibition were 11 mg (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.19 – 16.85) and 99 mg (95% CI: 47 – 152), respectively. The route of administration did not affect the exposure-response relationship. The estimated mepolizumab SC absolute bioavailability (arm) was 74% (90% CI: 54 – 102%). The safety profile of mepolizumab was favorable. Conclusions: A dose-dependent reduction in blood eosinophils across all mepolizumab doses investigated was observed. The subcutaneous absolute bioavailability was 74%. The route of administration did not affect the mepolizumab exposure eosinophil response relationship. PMID:26445140

  6. Systemic and Pulmonary Vascular Remodelling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Esquerre, Mariana; López-Sánchez, Marta; Escobar, Ignacio; Huertas, Daniel; Penín, Rosa; Molina-Molina, María; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Santos, Salud

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is associated with subclinical systemic atherosclerosis and pulmonary vascular remodelling characterized by intimal hyperplasia and luminal narrowing. We aimed to determine differences in the intimal thickening of systemic and pulmonary arteries in COPD subjects and smokers. Secondary aims include comparisons with a non-smokers group; determining the clinical variables associated with systemic and pulmonary intimal thickening, and the correlations between systemic and pulmonary remodelling changes. Methods All consecutive subjects undergoing lung resection were included and divided into 3 groups: 1) COPD, 2) smokers, and 3) non-smokers. Sections of the 5th intercostal artery and muscular pulmonary arteries were measured by histo-morphometry. Four parameters of intimal thickening were evaluated: 1) percentage of intimal area (%IA), 2) percentage of luminal narrowing, 3) intimal thickness index, and 4) intima-to-media ratio. Results In the adjusted analysis, the systemic arteries of COPD subjects showed greater intimal thickening (%IA) than those of smokers (15.6±1.5% vs. 14.2±1.6%, p = 0.038). In the pulmonary arteries, significant differences were observed for %IA between the 2 groups (37.3±2.2% vs. 29.3±2.3%, p = 0.016). Among clinical factors, metabolic syndrome, gender and COPD status were associated with the systemic intimal thickening, while only COPD status was associated with pulmonary intimal thickening. A correlation between the %IA of the systemic and pulmonary arteries was observed (Spearman’s rho = 0.46, p = 0.008). Conclusions Greater intimal thickening in systemic and pulmonary arteries is observed in COPD patients than in smokers. There is a correlation between systemic and pulmonary vascular remodelling in the overall population. PMID:27046203

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Jentzer, Jacob C; Mathier, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension occurs as the result of disease processes increasing pressure within the pulmonary circulation, eventually leading to right ventricular failure. Patients may become critically ill from complications of pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure or may develop pulmonary hypertension as the result of critical illness. Diagnostic testing should evaluate for common causes such as left heart failure, hypoxemic lung disease and pulmonary embolism. Relatively few patients with pulmonary hypertension encountered in clinical practice require specific pharmacologic treatment of pulmonary hypertension targeting the pulmonary vasculature. Management of right ventricular failure involves optimization of preload, maintenance of systemic blood pressure and augmentation of inotropy to restore systemic perfusion. Selected patients may require pharmacologic therapy to reduce right ventricular afterload by directly targeting the pulmonary vasculature, but only after excluding elevated left heart filling pressures and confirming increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Critically-ill patients with pulmonary hypertension remain at high risk of adverse outcomes, requiring a diligent and thoughtful approach to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25944777

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension: Types and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Rose-Jones, Lisa J; Mclaughlin, Vallerie V

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a panvasculopathy that affects the distal pulmonary arteries and leads to restricted blood flow. This increased afterload leads to adaptive mechanisms of the right ventricle, with eventual failure once it can no longer compensate. Pulmonary hypertension from associated conditions, most importantly left heart disease, i.e. heart failure, can also lead to the same sequela. Patients often experience early vague symptoms of dyspnea and exercise intolerance, and thus PH can elude clinicians until right heart failure symptoms predominate. Evidence-based treatment options with pulmo-nary vasodilators are available for those with PAH and should be employed early. It is essential that patients be accurately categorized by their etiology of PH, as treatment strategies differ, and can potentially be dangerous if employed in the wrong clinical scenario. PMID:24251459

  9. Electrophoretic characterization of aldehyde-fixed red blood cells, kidney cells, lynphocytes and chamber coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Ground-based electrokinetic data on the electrophoresis flight experiment to be flown on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project experiment MA-011 are stipulated. Aldehyde-fixed red blood cells, embryonic kidney cells and lymphocytes were evaluated by analytical particle electrophoresis. The results which aided in the interpretation of the final analysis of the MA-011 experiment are documented. The electrophoresis chamber surface modifications, the buffer, and the material used in the column system are also discussed.

  10. Identification and characterization of HIV-1 latent viral reservoirs in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Chargin, Amanda; Yin, Fangfang; Song, Min; Subramaniam, Srividyabhuvaneswari; Knutson, Grace; Patterson, Bruce K

    2015-01-01

    Plasma viral load and CD4 counts are effective for clinical monitoring, but they do not give a full representation of HIV-1 quasispecies in cellular reservoirs, the major repository of replication-competent HIV-1 in infected individuals. We sought to develop a diagnostic system that might stimulate the replication-competent HIV-1 reservoirs for enhanced clinical monitoring, including selection of antiretroviral regimens. Whole-blood samples from 45 HIV-infected individuals were collected into 1 ViraStim HIV-1 activation tube and 1 EDTA tube. Samples were tested for viral load and cell type-specific HIV-1 replication. Further, 7 matched activated/nonactivated samples were sequenced using the Trugene HIV-1 genotyping kit. The percentage of patients with replication-competent virus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) varied, depending on the baseline plasma viral load in the EDTA tubes. Six out of 24 patients with a starting plasma viral load of <20 copies/ml (cp/ml), 6 out of 8 patients with starting viral loads of >20 and <1,000 cp/ml, and 8 out of 13 patients with starting viral loads of >1,000 all showed increases in viral replication of >5-fold. These increases came from cellular reservoirs in blood as determined by simultaneous ultrasensitive subpopulation staining/hybridization in situ (SUSHI). When resistance genotypes in plasma from activation tubes were compared to those from EDTA tubes for 7 patients, all patients showed additional mutations in the activation tube, while 3 patients demonstrated additional genotypic resistance determinants. We show that HIV-1 viral replication can be stimulated directly from infected whole blood. The sequencing results showed that 3 of 7 cases demonstrated additional drug resistance following stimulation. PMID:25339403

  11. Expression of myotubularins in blood platelets: Characterization and potential diagnostic of X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Rana; Severin, Sonia; Xuereb, Jean-Marie; Gratacap, Marie-Pierre; Laporte, Jocelyn; Buj-Bello, Ana; Tronchère, Hélène; Payrastre, Bernard

    2016-07-29

    Phosphoinositides play a key role in the spatiotemporal control of central intracellular processes and several specific kinases and phosphatases regulating the level of these lipids are implicated in human diseases. Myotubularins are a family of 3-phosphatases acting specifically on phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,5 bisphosphate. Members of this family are mutated in genetic diseases including myotubularin 1 (MTM1) and myotubularin-related protein 2 (MTMR2) which mutations are responsible of X-linked centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy, respectively. Here we show that MTM1 is expressed in blood platelets and that hundred microliters of blood is sufficient to detect the protein by western blotting. Since the most severe cases of pathogenic mutations of MTM1 lead to loss of expression of the protein, we propose that a minimal amount of blood can allow a rapid diagnostic test of X-linked myotubular myopathy, which is currently based on histopathology of muscle biopsy and molecular genetic testing. In platelets, MTM1 is a highly active 3-phosphatase mainly associated to membranes and found on the dense granules and to a lesser extent on alpha-granules. However, deletion of MTM1 in mouse had no significant effect on platelet count and on platelet secretion and aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen stimulation. Potential compensation by other members of the myotubularin family is conceivable since MTMR2 was easily detectable by western blotting and the mRNA of several members of the family increased during in vitro differentiation of human megakaryocytes and MEG-01 cells. In conclusion, we show the presence of several myotubularins in platelets and propose that minimal amounts of blood can be used to develop a rapid diagnostic test for genetic pathologies linked to loss of expression of these phosphatases. PMID:27155155

  12. Pulmonary microembolism associated with massive transfusion: II. The basic pathophysiology of its pulmonary effects.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, J; Dawidson, I; Dhurandhar, H N; Miller, E; Litwin, M S

    1975-01-01

    In animals pulmonary hypertension, a decrease in total body O2 consumption and metabolic acidosis occur after transfusion of blood with an elevated screen filtration pressure (SFP) through standard blood transfusion filters. The purpose of this study was to define in detail the pulmonary abnormalities that develop following transfusion of blood with an elevated SFP through standard blood transfusion filters. Exchange transfusions of approximately twice blood volume were administered through standard commercially available blood transfusion filters (measured pore size--200 microns) to 6 animals. SFP measurements verified the presence of large numbers of aggregates in the transfusions. Although filters reduced SFP of the stored blood somewhat, numerous microaggregates passed the filters, and post-filtration SFP remained high. After transfusion average O2 consumption decreased to 77% of normal and metabolic acidosis developed. Pulmonary arterial hypertension was associated with an increase in pulmonary shunting of blood and a decrease in pulmonary diffusing capacity. The presence of extensive numbers of microemboli in the pulmonary arteriolar and capillary bed was confirmed by microscopic examination of lung tissue. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1147710

  13. Identification and characterization of the major huperzine a metabolite in rat blood.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gregory E; Hicks, Rickey P; Skanchy, David; Moorad-Doctor, Deborah R; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Ved, Haresh S

    2004-01-01

    Huperzine A (Hup A) is under investigation as a treatment of Alzheimer's disease because of its properties of reversible and specific AChE inhibition. It has additional interesting pharmacological effects such as the protection of primary neuronal cells isolated from embryonic rat brains from glutamate-induced toxicity. We have isolated a new compound which has similar absorbance characteristics as Hup A from blood of rats administered Hup A. Monitoring the effluent from reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) of blood collected 60 min after Hup A treatment at an absorbance of 308 nm (lambdamax for Hup A), yielded a peak height and area for this compound that was approximately 1.4-fold the initial Hup A peak. The compound was isolated from RP-HPLC fractions from blood and liver for analysis by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The compound gave an (M+H)+ ion with m/z 259 in positive ion mode, yielding a molecular weight (MW) of 258. If derived from Hup A (MW 242), the change in MW indicates a mass gain of 16. This would be consistent with the addition of a single oxygen or a hydroxylation. To determine the location of the modification, it was examined by 1H NMR, and it was found that the added mass was due to a single epoxidation yielding 13,14-epoxy Hup-A. PMID:15239859

  14. Characterization of the Threshold Response of Initiation of Blood Clotting to Stimulus Patch Size

    PubMed Central

    Kastrup, Christian J.; Shen, Feng; Runyon, Matthew K.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2007-01-01

    This article demonstrates that the threshold response of initiation of blood clotting to the size of a patch of stimulus is a robust phenomenon under a wide range of conditions and follows a simple scaling relationship based on the Damköhler number. Human blood and plasma were exposed to surfaces patterned with patches presenting clotting stimuli using microfluidics. Perturbations of the complex network of hemostasis, including temperature, variations in the concentration of stimulus (tissue factor), and the absence or inhibition of individual components of the network (factor IIa, factor V, factor VIII, and thrombomodulin), did not affect the existence of this response. A scaling relationship between the threshold patch size and the timescale of reaction for clotting was supported in numerical simulations, a simple chemical model system, and experiments with human blood plasma. These results may be useful for understanding the spatiotemporal dynamics of other autocatalytic systems and emphasize the relevance of clustering of proteins and lipids in the regulation of signaling processes. PMID:17586576

  15. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline apatites from solution modeling human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodyankina, Anna; Nikolaev, Anton; Frank-Kamenetskaya, Olga; Golovanova, Olga

    2016-09-01

    Present paper is devoted to the research of the calcification processes in the blood plasma of human body. Spontaneous crystallization from the solution modeling the inorganic part of the blood plasma has been carried out. Obtained precipitates were studied by the various instrumental methods (X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and gas-volumetric method). All gathered data allow to summarize that nonstoichiometric carbonated hydroxyapatite with low crystallinity (CSD lengths 18-28 nm), high water content and small amount of chlorine ion was obtained throughout the syntheses. Part of vacancies at the Ca sites varies from 0.17 to 0.87; the value of the Cat/(P + C) ratio-from 1.52 to 1.64 (where Cat = Ca2+ + Na+ + K+ + Mg2+). The poor crystallized synthetic apatites with high carbonate ion content (from 4.34 to 5.54 wt%) and c parameter (6.888-6.894 Å) are analogues of the apatites of the pathological cardiovascular deposits. They can be obtained from the solution modeling human blood plasma by the inorganic components with calcium phosphate supersaturation 25 and 50 and with 10 and 12 weeks experiment time.

  16. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Cystic fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung abscess Lung cancer Sarcoidosis See also: Aspergillosis Symptoms You may not have ... fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Update Date 8/31/2014 Updated by: Jatin ...

  17. Pulmonary Atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... to repair the defect. Return to main topic: Congenital Heart Disease See on other sites: MedlinePlus https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001091.htm Pulmonary atresia American Heart Association www. ...

  18. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of heart disease that occurs from birth (congenital heart disease), in which the pulmonary valve does not form ... As with most congenital heart diseases, there is no known cause of ... is associated with another type of congenital heart defect ...

  19. [Pulmonary rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Senjyu, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation commenced in Japan in 1957. However, the development of pulmonary rehabilitation took a long time due to the lack of the necessary health and medical services. Pulmonary rehabilitation is a comprehensive intervention based on a thorough patient assessment followed by patient-tailored therapies that include, but are not limited to, exercise training, education, and behavior change, designed to improve the physical and psychological condition of people with chronic respiratory disease and to promote the long-term adherence to health-enhancing behaviors. The benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation include a decrease in breathlessness and an improvement in exercise tolerance. It is important that the gains in exercise tolerance lead to an increase in daily physical activity. PMID:27254948

  20. Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Tanser, Paul H.

    1980-01-01

    The physician who deals with pulmonary edema from a pathophysiologic basis will seldom make a diagnostic or therapeutic error. Recent additions to preload and afterload therapy have greatly helped in the emergency and ambulatory treatment of pulmonary edema due to left heart failure. Careful follow-up and patient self-monitoring are the most effective means of reducing hospitalization of chronic heart failure patients. PMID:21293700

  1. Cell electrophoretic characterization of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations enriched by rosette formation, from normal individuals and CLL patients.

    PubMed

    Rychly, J; Babusíková, O; Koníková, E; Anders, O

    1984-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects and patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL) were isolated and their subpopulations enriched through formation of spontaneous rosettes with sheep or mouse red blood cells, respectively. Electrophoretic measurements were performed in unseparated as well as in fractionated cell populations. Normal blood lymphocytes showed two clearly distinguishable populations of different electrophoretic mobilities. After separation by SRBC rosette formation the rosette-forming cells could be identified as high mobility cells. CLL lymphocytes showed in most cases an unimodally distributed cytopherogram, the mean electrophoretic mobility being intermediate between the low and high mobility cells of control persons. After separation through mouse erythrocytes rosette formation these cells contained two cell fractions differing in their electrophoretic mobility: a fraction of slower mouse rosette-forming cells and a fraction of the non-MRFC which contained mainly cells of higher mobility that could be identified as enriched T cells. These both fractions showed unimodal distributions. This study shows that CLL lymphocyte subpopulations can be further characterized by surface charge density. PMID:6700796

  2. In-depth comparative characterization of hemoglobin glycation in normal and diabetic bloods by LC-MSMS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Hao; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2014-05-01

    The glycation level at β-Val-1 of the hemoglobin β chain in human blood (HbA1c%) is used to diagnose diabetes and other diseases. However, hemoglobin glycation occurs on multiple sites on different isoforms with different kinetics, but its differential profile has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, hemoglobin was extracted from the blood of normal and diabetic individuals by protein precipitation. Triplicate solutions prepared from each sample were directly analyzed or digested with multiple enzymes and then analyzed by nano-LC/MS via bottom-up approach for side-by-side characterization. Intact hemoglobin analysis indicated a single glucose-dominant glycation, which showed good correlation with the HbA1c% values. Moreover, full sequence (100%) of α/β globin was mapped and seven glycation sites were unambiguously assigned. In addition to β-Val-1, two other major sites at α-Lys-61 and β-Lys-66, which contain the common sequence HGKK, and four minor sites (<1%) on α-Val-1, β-Lys-132, α-Lys-127, and α-Lys-40 were identified. All sites were shown to exhibit similar patterns of site distribution despite different glucose levels. Both the intact mass measurement and bottom-up data consistently indicated that the total glycation percentage of the β-globin was twice higher than the α-globin. Using molecular modeling, the 3D structure of the consensus sequence (HGKK) was shown to contain a phosphate triangle cavity, which helps to catalyze the glycation reaction. For the first time, hemoglobin glycation in normal and diabetic bloods was comparatively characterized in-depth with 100% sequence coverage. The results provide insight about the HbA1c parameter and help define the new and old markers. PMID:24578002

  3. In-Depth Comparative Characterization of Hemoglobin Glycation in Normal and Diabetic Bloods by LC-MSMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shih-Hao; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2014-05-01

    The glycation level at β-Val-1 of the hemoglobin β chain in human blood (HbA1c%) is used to diagnose diabetes and other diseases. However, hemoglobin glycation occurs on multiple sites on different isoforms with different kinetics, but its differential profile has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, hemoglobin was extracted from the blood of normal and diabetic individuals by protein precipitation. Triplicate solutions prepared from each sample were directly analyzed or digested with multiple enzymes and then analyzed by nano-LC/MS via bottom-up approach for side-by-side characterization. Intact hemoglobin analysis indicated a single glucose-dominant glycation, which showed good correlation with the HbA1c% values. Moreover, full sequence (100 %) of α/β globin was mapped and seven glycation sites were unambiguously assigned. In addition to β-Val-1, two other major sites at α-Lys-61 and β-Lys-66, which contain the common sequence HGK K, and four minor sites (<1 %) on α-Val-1, β-Lys-132, α-Lys-127, and α-Lys-40 were identified. All sites were shown to exhibit similar patterns of site distribution despite different glucose levels. Both the intact mass measurement and bottom-up data consistently indicated that the total glycation percentage of the β-globin was twice higher than the α-globin. Using molecular modeling, the 3D structure of the consensus sequence (HGK K) was shown to contain a phosphate triangle cavity, which helps to catalyze the glycation reaction. For the first time, hemoglobin glycation in normal and diabetic bloods was comparatively characterized in-depth with 100 % sequence coverage. The results provide insight about the HbA1c parameter and help define the new and old markers.

  4. Characterization of the Humoral Immune Response during Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Global Gene Expression by Staphylococcus aureus in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    den Reijer, Paul Martijn; Lemmens-den Toom, Nicole; Kant, Samantha; Snijders, Susan V.; Boelens, Hélène; Tavakol, Mehri; Verkaik, Nelianne J.; van Belkum, Alex; Verbrugh, Henri A.; van Wamel, Willem J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Attempts to develop an efficient anti-staphylococcal vaccine in humans have so far been unsuccessful. Therefore, more knowledge of the antigens that are expressed by Staphylococcus aureus in human blood and induce an immune response in patients is required. In this study we further characterize the serial levels of IgG and IgA antibodies against 56 staphylococcal antigens in multiple serum samples of 21 patients with a S. aureus bacteremia, compare peak IgG levels between patients and 30 non-infected controls, and analyze the expression of 3626 genes by two genetically distinct isolates in human blood. The serum antibody levels were measured using a bead-based flow cytometry technique (xMAP®, Luminex corporation). Gene expression levels were analyzed using a microarray (BµG@s microarray). The initial levels and time taken to reach peak IgG and IgA antibody levels were heterogeneous in bacteremia patients. The antigen SA0688 was associated with the highest median initial-to-peak antibody fold-increase for IgG (5.05-fold) and the second highest increase for IgA (2.07-fold). Peak IgG levels against 27 antigens, including the antigen SA0688, were significantly elevated in bacteremia patients versus controls (P≤0.05). Expression of diverse genes, including SA0688, was ubiquitously high in both isolates at all time points during incubation in blood. However, only a limited number of genes were specifically up- or downregulated in both isolates when cultured in blood, compared to the start of incubation in blood or during incubation in BHI broth. In conclusion, most staphylococcal antigens tested in this study, including many known virulence factors, do not induce uniform increases in the antibody levels in bacteremia patients. In addition, the expression of these antigens by S. aureus is not significantly altered by incubation in human blood over time. One immunogenic and ubiquitously expressed antigen is the putative iron-regulated ABC transporter SA0688. PMID

  5. Functional total anomalous pulmonary venous connection via levoatriocardinal vein.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Taiyu; Ozawa, Katsusuke; Sugibayashi, Rika; Wada, Seiji; Ono, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    We report a fetal case of double outlet right ventricle, mitral atresia, and intact atrial septum. Although the pulmonary veins were connected to the left atrium, pulmonary venous blood drained into the right superior vena cava via the stenotic levoatriocardinal vein (LACV), which resulted in a circulation resembling total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) with pulmonary venous obstruction. Since the pulmonary veins were connected to both the stenotic LACV and the "dead-end" left atrium, the pulmonary venous flow had a to-and-fro pattern along with atrial relaxation and contraction. Postnatal echocardiography and computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis of normally connected but anomalously draining pulmonary veins via the LACV. Surgical creation of an atrial septal defect on the day of birth successfully relieved pulmonary venous obstruction. Normally connected but anomalously draining pulmonary veins via the LACV should be considered for TAPVC differential diagnosis in fetuses with a left-side heart obstruction. PMID:27460400

  6. Activity of α1-Antitrypsin and Some Lysosomal Enzymes in the Blood Serum of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease after Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Bartosz; Woźniak, Alina; Konca, Jacek; Górecki, Dariusz; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Szpinda, Michał; Sutkowy, Paweł; Wesołowski, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The activity of α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and the lysosomal enzymes, cathepsin D (CTS D), arylsulfatase (ASA), and acid phosphatase, (AcP) was determined in patients with COPD (GOLD category A). Moreover, the diagnostic usefulness of these parameters in blood serum was assessed along with establishing whether smoking cessation affects these parameters. The study included 70 patients with COPD who ceased smoking (study group) and two control groups of 33 subjects each: nonsmokers without COPD (control I) and patients with COPD who continued smoking (control II). In control I, blood was taken once and in control II, at the start of the experiment and after the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd months. AAT in the patients exhibited higher activity than in the healthy subjects at all time points. AAT activity in the patients before the start of the experiment was ~80% higher (P < 0.001) than in control I. No statistically significant differences in CTS D, ASA, and AcP activity were found. COPD involves increased AAT activity and unchanged activities of the assessed lysosomal enzymes. Three-month tobacco abstinence does not affect these parameters in peripheral blood. Determining the AAT levels in blood serum can be used in the diagnostics of COPD. PMID:25802837

  7. Solitary pulmonary MALT lymphoma presenting crystal-storing histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nagaharu, Keiki; Kageyama, Yuki; Watanabe, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Ito, Ryugo; Baba, Youichirou; Masuya, Masahiro; Ohashi, Riuko; Kawakami, Keiki

    2016-08-01

    Crystal-storing histiocytosis (CSH) is characterized by the accumulation of large histiocytes with intracytoplasmic crystallized immunoglobulin and is typically associated with hematological malignancies. A 69-year-old man, who had a history of left nephrectomy and chemotherapy for renal pelvic cancer six years earlier, had received a CT scan every year thereafter and a small nodule was found in the left lower lobe of his lungs two years prior to the current presentation. Because of progression of this pulmonary nodule, he underwent pulmonary lobectomy on suspicion of lung cancer. He was ultimately diagnosed as having CSH accompanied by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma stage IAE. In the absence of further treatment, he has been well with no recurrence of the disease for 10 months postoperatively. Because CSH could reportedly be an initial presentation of hematological malignancies, careful observation and evaluation for the presence of these blood disorders is essential. PMID:27599420

  8. [A case of pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy induced by early gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hideki; Akamatsu, Taisuke; Nakamura, Yutarou; Inui, Naoki; Suda, Takafumi; Chida, Kingo; Meguro, Shiori; Baba, Satoshi

    2011-02-01

    A 56-year-old man with chief complaints of dry cough and dyspnea was admitted. He had severe hypoxemia, and his chest radiographs showed enhancement of pulmonary artery opacities with multiple defects on pulmonary blood flow scintigraphy. Enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed swelling of the mediastinum and hilar lymph nodes, but no apparent thrombi in the pulmonary arteries was seen. A biopsy specimen of a left neck lymph node showed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, including signet-ring cell carcinoma components, but the origin was unclear. Despite receiving chemotherapy, his respiratory condition worsened, and he died 3 days after admission. Routine autopsy failed to clarify the tumor origin, but a detailed dissection of specimens confirmed early gastric cancer. Additionally, pathology of the pulmonary arteries was compatible with pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM). PTTM is a rare condition characterized by the presence of diffuse thrombotic microthrombi and fibrocellular intimal proliferation in the pulmonary vasculature. Accompanied with early gastric cancer, this is an extremely rare but important case of PTTM. PMID:21400909

  9. Characterization of Adsorbents for Cytokine Removal from Blood in an In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, Franz; Hartmann, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Cytokines are basic targets that have to be removed effectively in order to improve the patient's health status in treating severe inflammation, sepsis, and septic shock. Although there are different adsorbents commercially available, the success of their clinical use is limited. Here, we tested different adsorbents for their effective removal of cytokines from plasma and the resulting effect on endothelial cell activation. Methods. The three polystyrene divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) based adsorbents Amberchrom CG161c and CG300m and a clinically approved haemoperfusion adsorbent (HAC) were studied with regard to cytokine removal in human blood. To induce cytokine release from leucocytes, human blood cells were stimulated with 1 ng/ml LPS for 4 hours. Plasma was separated and adsorption experiments in a dynamic model were performed. The effect of cytokine removal on endothelial cell activation was evaluated using a HUVEC-based cell culture model. The beneficial outcome was assessed by measuring ICAM-1, E-selectin, and secreted cytokines IL-8 and IL-6. Additionally the threshold concentration for HUVEC activation by TNF-α and IL-1β was determined using this cell culture model. Results. CG161c showed promising results in removing the investigated cytokines. Due to its pore size the adsorbent efficiently removed the key factor TNF-α, outperforming the commercially available adsorbents. The CG161c treatment reduced cytokine secretion and expression of cell adhesion molecules by HUVEC which underlines the importance of effective removal of TNF-α in inflammatory diseases. Conclusion. These results confirm the hypothesis that cytokine removal from the blood should approach physiological levels in order to reduce endothelial cell activation. PMID:26770992

  10. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  11. Characterizations of individual mouse red blood cells parasitized by Babesia microti using 3-D holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, HyunJoo; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Won-Ja; Kim, Youngchan; Lee, Sang-Eun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Babesia microti causes “emergency” human babesiosis. However, little is known about the alterations in B. microti invaded red blood cells (Bm-RBCs) at the individual cell level. Through quantitative phase imaging techniques based on laser interferometry, we present the simultaneous measurements of structural, chemical, and mechanical modifications in individual mouse Bm-RBCs. 3-D refractive index maps of individual RBCs and in situ parasite vacuoles are imaged, from which total contents and concentration of dry mass are also precisely quantified. In addition, we examine the dynamic membrane fluctuation of Bm-RBCs, which provide information on cell membrane deformability. PMID:26039793

  12. Pulmonary and extrapulmonary contributors to hypoxemia in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R; Dechamps, P; Hallemans, R; Lejeune, P

    1989-03-01

    To determine and to quantify the pulmonary and extrapulmonary contributors to hypoxemia in liver cirrhosis, we measured in 10 cirrhotics blood gases, P50, hemodynamics, ventilation, and the distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratios (VA/Q) using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Seven patients had an arterial hypoxemia (PaO2 = 69 +/- 6 mm Hg, mean +/- SD), and three patients were normoxemic (PaO2 = 89 +/- 6 mm Hg). In each hypoxemic patient, the VA/Q distributions were characterized by the presence of low VA/Q units. A negative logarithmic correlation was found between the dispersion of the blood flow distribution and the arterial PO2. An acute inspiratory hypoxia (FIO2, 0.125) elicited an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance by 58.5% in the hypoxemic group and by 81.6% in the normoxemic one (p = NS between the two groups). The percent change in pulmonary vascular resistance induced by hypoxia was not correlated with the percent change in the dispersion of the blood flow distribution. A theoretical analysis showed that the mean arterial PO2 of 69 mm Hg of the hypoxemic group differed from a normal reference value of 96 mm Hg as a result of the combined effects of reduced hemoglobin (-4 mm Hg), increased P50 (+4 mm Hg), increased ventilation (+10 mm Hg), low VA/Q (-35 mm Hg), and true shunt (-2 mm Hg). These results show that the "hypoxemia of liver cirrhosis" is essentially caused by VA/Q mismatching, which is not explained by an abnormal hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. PMID:2923362

  13. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease. PMID:24930078

  14. Atomic resolution structural characterization of recognition of histo-blood group antigens by Norwalk virus

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae-Mun; Hutson, Anne M.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram

    2008-07-28

    Members of Norovirus, a genus in the family Caliciviridae, are causative agents of epidemic diarrhea in humans. Susceptibility to several noroviruses is linked to human histo-blood type, and its determinant histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are regarded as receptors for these viruses. Specificity for these carbohydrates is strain-dependent. Norwalk virus (NV) is the prototype genogroup I norovirus that specifically recognizes A- and H-type HBGA, in contrast to genogroup II noroviruses that exhibit a more diverse HBGA binding pattern. To understand the structural basis for how HBGAs interact with the NV capsid protein, and how the specificity is achieved, we carried out x-ray crystallographic analysis of the capsid protein domain by itself and in complex with A- and H-type HBGA at a resolution of {approx}1.4 {angstrom}. Despite differences in their carbohydrate sequence and linkage, both HBGAs bind to the same surface-exposed site in the capsid protein and project outward from the capsid surface, substantiating their possible role in initiating cell attachment. Precisely juxtaposed polar side chains that engage the sugar hydroxyls in a cooperative hydrogen bonding and a His/Trp pair involved in a cation-p interaction contribute to selective and specific recognition of A- and H-type HBGAs. This unique binding epitope, confirmed by mutational analysis, is highly conserved, but only in the genogroup I noroviruses, suggesting that a mechanism by which noroviruses infect broader human populations is by evolving different sites with altered HBGA specificities.

  15. The characterization of exosome from blood plasma of patients with colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunusova, N. V.; Tamkovich, S. N.; Stakheeva, M. N.; Afanas'ev, S. G.; Frolova, A. Y.; Kondakova, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    Exosomes are extracellular membrane structures involved in many physiological and pathological processes including cancerogenesis and metastasis. The clarification of the criteria for exosome isolating and identifying is the purpose of this study. Exosome samples from the plasma of patients with colorectal cancer and healthy donors were examined using transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry in accordance with the minimum requirements of "International Society for Extracellular Vesicles". The choice of the method for isolation of exosomes from the blood plasma by ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation allowed obtaining highly purified samples of exosomes, in which all the structural components were clearly seen. The results obtained with flow cytometry suggest that exosomes of blood plasma from patients with colorectal cancer can be produced by epithelial cells. Moreover, cells produce different types of exosomes, which correspond to different mechanisms in sorting macromolecules in the membrane of multivesicular bodies. Determination of significant differences in the expression of specific exosomal proteins from colorectal cancer patients compared to healthy donors suggests a high diagnostic potential significance of circulating exosomes.

  16. Surface-emitting superconductor laser spectroscopy for characterizing normal and sickled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Meissner, K.E.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Gourley, M.F.

    1995-02-01

    We have developed a new intracavity laser technique that uses a living or a fixed cell as an integral component of the laser. The cells are placed on an AlGaAs/GaAs surface-emitting semiconductor wafer and covered with a glass dielectric mirror to form a laser resonator. In this arrangement, the cells serve as optical waveguides (or lens elements) to confine (or focus) light generated in the resonator by the semiconductor. Because of the high transparency, the cells aid the lasing process to generate laser light. This ultra sensitive laser provides a novel imaging/spectroscopic technique for histologic examination which we demonstrate with normal and sickled human red blood cells. Extremely high contrast microscopic images of the cells are observed near 830-850 nm. These images correspond to electromagnetic modes of cell structures and are sensitive to shape of the cell. Using a high resolution spectrometer, we resolve the light emitted from these images into very narrow spectral peaks associated with the lasing modes. Analysis of the spectra reveals that the distribution of peaks is quite different for normal and sickled red blood cells. This technique, in a more developed form, may be useful for the rapid analysis of other kinds of normal and abnormal cells.

  17. Effectiveness of Multiple Blood-Cleansing Interventions in Sepsis, Characterized in Rats.

    PubMed

    Stojkovic, Ivan; Ghalwash, Mohamed; Cao, Xi Hang; Obradovic, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a serious, life-threatening condition that presents a growing problem in medicine, but there is still no satisfying solution for treating it. Several blood cleansing approaches recently gained attention as promising interventions that target the main site of problem development-the blood. The focus of this study is an evaluation of the theoretical effectiveness of hemoadsorption therapy and pathogen reduction therapy. This is evaluated using the mathematical model of Murine sepsis, and the results of over 2,200 configurations of single and multiple intervention therapies simulated on 5,000 virtual subjects suggest the advantage of pathogen reduction over hemoadsorption therapy. However, a combination of two approaches is found to take advantage of their complementary effects and outperform either therapy alone. The conducted computational experiments provide unprecedented evidence that the combination of two therapies synergistically enhances the positive effects beyond the simple superposition of the benefits of two approaches. Such a characteristic could have a profound influence on the way sepsis treatment is conducted. PMID:27097769

  18. Identification and characterization of Serpulina pilosicoli isolates recovered from the blood of critically ill patients.

    PubMed Central

    Trott, D J; Jensen, N S; Saint Girons, I; Oxberry, S L; Stanton, T B; Lindquist, D; Hampson, D J

    1997-01-01

    The phenotypic and genetic characteristics of spirochetes isolated from the blood of one U.S. and six French patients with severe clinical disease or impaired immunity were examined. All spirochetes were anaerobic, weakly beta-hemolytic, positive for hippurate hydrolysis, and negative for beta-glucosidase activity. Cell lengths ranged from 4 to 8 microm, and each isolate had between 8 and 12 periplasmic flagella per cell. These features were consistent with the spirochetes' being Serpulina pilosicoli, the agent of intestinal spirochetosis. All isolates were positive in a PCR assay amplifying a portion of the S. pilosicoli 16S rRNA gene, and they all grouped with fecal isolates of S. pilosicoli in multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). The blood isolates could be differentiated from each other by MLEE, although the U.S. and two French isolates were closely related. Apparently S. pilosicoli may translocate from the large intestine to establish spirochetemia. The clinical significance of this finding remains uncertain and requires further investigation. PMID:9003622

  19. Effectiveness of Multiple Blood-Cleansing Interventions in Sepsis, Characterized in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovic, Ivan; Ghalwash, Mohamed; Cao, Xi Hang; Obradovic, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a serious, life-threatening condition that presents a growing problem in medicine, but there is still no satisfying solution for treating it. Several blood cleansing approaches recently gained attention as promising interventions that target the main site of problem development–the blood. The focus of this study is an evaluation of the theoretical effectiveness of hemoadsorption therapy and pathogen reduction therapy. This is evaluated using the mathematical model of Murine sepsis, and the results of over 2,200 configurations of single and multiple intervention therapies simulated on 5,000 virtual subjects suggest the advantage of pathogen reduction over hemoadsorption therapy. However, a combination of two approaches is found to take advantage of their complementary effects and outperform either therapy alone. The conducted computational experiments provide unprecedented evidence that the combination of two therapies synergistically enhances the positive effects beyond the simple superposition of the benefits of two approaches. Such a characteristic could have a profound influence on the way sepsis treatment is conducted. PMID:27097769

  20. Methodology for Isolation, Identification and Characterization of Microvesicles in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Miller, Virginia M.; Heit, John A.; Owen, Whyte G.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Analyses of circulating cell membrane-derived microvesicles (MV) have come under scrutiny as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of disease. However, methods to isolate, label and quantify MV have been neither systematized nor validated. Objective To determine how pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical factors affect plasma MV counts, markers for cell of origin and expression of procoagulant surface phosphatidylserine. Methods and Results Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers and patients with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. Effects of blood sample collection, anticoagulant and sample processing to platelet free plasma (PFP), and MV isolation, staining and storage (freeze-thaw) and cytometer design were evaluated with replicate samples from these populations. The key finding is that use of citrate or EDTA anticoagulants decreases or eliminates microvesicles from plasma by inducing adhesion of the microvesicles to platelets or other formed elements. Protease inhibitor anticoagulants, including heparin, preserve MV counts. A centrifugation protocol was developed in which recovery of isolated MV was high with resolution down to the equivalent light scatter of 0.2 micron latex beads. Each procedure was systematically evaluated for its impact on the MV counts and characteristics. Conclusion This study provides a systematic methodology for MV isolation, identification and quantification, essential for development of MV as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of disease. PMID:22075275

  1. High-throughput linear optical stretcher for mechanical characterization of blood cells.

    PubMed

    Roth, Kevin B; Neeves, Keith B; Squier, Jeff; Marr, David W M

    2016-04-01

    This study describes a linear optical stretcher as a high-throughput mechanical property cytometer. Custom, inexpensive, and scalable optics image a linear diode bar source into a microfluidic channel, where cells are hydrodynamically focused into the optical stretcher. Upon entering the stretching region, antipodal optical forces generated by the refraction of tightly focused laser light at the cell membrane deform each cell in flow. Each cell relaxes as it flows out of the trap and is compared to the stretched state to determine deformation. The deformation response of untreated red blood cells and neutrophils were compared to chemically treated cells. Statistically significant differences were observed between normal, diamide-treated, and glutaraldehyde-treated red blood cells, as well as between normal and cytochalasin D-treated neutrophils. Based on the behavior of the pure, untreated populations of red cells and neutrophils, a mixed population of these cells was tested and the discrete populations were identified by deformability. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:26565892

  2. Concurrent sensitization to Aspergillus Fumigatus in tropical pulmonary eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Sunil K; Dash, Devi Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia (TPE) is characterized by lung tissue and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Serum total IgE is also markedly increased in TPE. However, an association with asthma or other hypersensitivity conditions has not been described. During the diagnostic workup of three patients eventually confirmed to have TPE, hypersensitivity to the fungus, Aspergillus Fumigatus was found. However, there was no evidence of diseases of aspergillus hypersensitivity such as severe asthma with fungal sensitization (SAFS) and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). This association however raises the possibility of a future risk of these potentially serious allergic respiratory manifestations. PMID:27374215

  3. Right Ventricular Hemodynamics in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, James; Fenster, Brett; Hertzberg, Jean; Schroeder, Joyce

    2012-11-01

    Recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) have allowed for characterization of blood flow in the right ventricle (RV), including calculation of vorticity and circulation, and qualitative visual assessment of coherent flow patterns. In this study, we investigate qualitative and quantitative differences in right ventricular hemodynamics between subjects with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and normal controls. Fifteen (15) PH subjects and 10 age-matched controls underwent same day 3D time resolved CMR and echocardiography. Echocardiography was used to determine right ventricular diastolic function as well as pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). Velocity vectors, vorticity vectors, and streamlines in the RV were visualized in Paraview and total RV Early (E) and Atrial (A) wave diastolic vorticity was quantified. Visualizations of blood flow in the RV are presented for PH and normal subjects. The hypothesis that PH subjects exhibit different RV vorticity levels than normals during diastole is tested and the relationship between RV vorticity and PASP is explored. The mechanics of RV vortex formation are discussed within the context of pulmonary arterial pressure and right ventricular diastolic function coincident with PH.

  4. Purinergic dysregulation in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Visovatti, Scott H; Hyman, Matthew C; Goonewardena, Sascha N; Anyanwu, Anuli C; Kanthi, Yogendra; Robichaud, Patrick; Wang, Jintao; Petrovic-Djergovic, Danica; Rattan, Rahul; Burant, Charles F; Pinsky, David J

    2016-07-01

    Despite the fact that nucleotides and adenosine help regulate vascular tone through purinergic signaling pathways, little is known regarding their contributions to the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a condition characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and remodeling. Even less is known about the potential role that alterations in CD39 (ENTPD1), the ectonucleotidase responsible for the conversion of the nucleotides ATP and ADP to AMP, may play in pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this study we identified decreased CD39 expression on the pulmonary endothelium of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We next determined the effects of CD39 gene deletion in mice exposed to normoxia or normobaric hypoxia (10% oxygen). Compared with controls, hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice were found to have a markedly elevated ATP-to-adenosine ratio, higher pulmonary arterial pressures, more right ventricular hypertrophy, more arterial medial hypertrophy, and a pro-thrombotic phenotype. In addition, hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice exhibited a marked increase in lung P2X1 receptors. Systemic reconstitution of ATPase and ADPase enzymatic activities through continuous administration of apyrase decreased pulmonary arterial pressures in hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice to levels found in hypoxic CD39(+/+) controls. Treatment with NF279, a potent and selective P2X1 receptor antagonist, lowered pulmonary arterial pressures even further. Our study is the first to implicate decreased CD39 and resultant alterations in circulating purinergic signaling ligands and cognate receptors in the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Reconstitution and receptor blocking experiments suggest that phosphohydrolysis of purinergic nucleotide tri- and diphosphates, or blocking of the P2X1 receptor could serve as treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27208163

  5. Mechanical characteristics of the pulmonary artery in beagle dogs with hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    YAN, GUOZHEN; HE, JUNFENG; YU, YUELI; LIU, YANG; YUAN, YANFEN; GUO, ZHIYONG

    2016-01-01

    The continuous changes in pulmonary hemodynamic properties in hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) and portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) have not been fully characterized in large animal models of HPS and PoPH. Beagle dog models of HPS and PoPH were induced by chronic common bile duct ligation and Sephadex microspheres, respectively. The model was validated by catheter examination and pathological analyses, and the hemodynamic characteristics of the models were observed. The results revealed that the cross-sectional area of the blood vessel was significantly increased in HPS models, but it was significantly decreased in the PoPH models. Furthermore, the resistance of pulmonary circulation was elevated in models of HPS, but it was decreased in models of PoPH. The present findings renew the traditional view that pulmonary hypertension is due to the enhanced peripheral resistance. PMID:26870333

  6. Isolation and characterization of 48 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the blood clam Scapharca broughtonii (Arcidae).

    PubMed

    Tian, J-T; Liu, Z-H; Zhou, L-Q; Wu, B; Liu, P; Yang, A-G

    2012-01-01

    Blood clams (Scapharca broughtonii) are widely cultivated and consumed in noutheast Asia. Forty-eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed for this clam using magnetic-bead hybridization enrichment. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 14. Polymorphism of these loci was assessed in 30 individuals from a population collected from coastal areas of Qingdao, China. The values of observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity and polymorphism information content per locus ranged from 0.1034 to 0.9655, from 0.1831 to 0.9208, and from 0.1638 to 0.8964, respectively. Forty-three of 48 loci conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci would be useful for molecular genetic breeding, population genetics, genome mapping, and other relevant research on S. broughtonii. PMID:23096914

  7. Characterization of certain inflammatory variables in the peripheral blood of clinically healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, R; Donahy, C; Jones, B R; Bloomfield, F J

    2006-01-01

    Many laboratory techniques have been developed to study and quantify the inflammatory response, including the release of acid hydrolase enzymes, leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) production, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and complement conversion studies. Although extensively studied in human health and disease, the relevance of such tests in the dog is largely unknown. After isolation of the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) fractions from the peripheral blood of 38 clinically healthy dogs, values for ROS production were similar for both cell fractions when measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (17,853+/-9,695 U/10(6) cells versus 19,138+/-14,569 U/10(6) cells for the PBMC (n=38) and PMN (n=18) fractions, respectively). However, the mean time taken to reach maximum chemiluminescence was noticeably shorter in the PBMC fraction (5.1+/-3.3 versus 10.7+/-2.5 min for PBMCs (n=36) and PMNs (n=18), respectively). Intracellular concentrations of beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase were assayed by spectrofluorometry. Mean values for all three enzymes were higher in PBMCs (n=31-35) than in PMNs (n=10-14). Both cell fractions released 20% of the intracellular enzyme concentration when stimulated with opsonized zymosan. Following incubation with A23187 (1 microM), mean LTB(4) production was higher in PBMCs (4.45+/-2.92 ng/10(6) cells; n=27) than in PMNs (0.96+/-2.22 ng/10(6) cells; n=13) using a validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed that the mean percentage conversion of C3 to C3b following stimulation with opsonized zymosan was 57.3+/-13.4% (n=36). The results provide normal values for clinically healthy dogs that may subsequently be used in future studies investigating dogs with various inflammatory disorders. PMID:16427586

  8. Characterizing the white matter hyperintensity penumbra with cerebral blood flow measures

    PubMed Central

    Promjunyakul, N.; Lahna, D.; Kaye, J.A.; Dodge, H.H.; Erten-Lyons, D.; Rooney, W.D.; Silbert, L.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are common with age, grow over time, and are associated with cognitive and motor impairments. Mechanisms underlying WMH growth are unclear. We aimed to determine the presence and extent of decreased normal appearing white matter (NAWM) cerebral blood flow (CBF) surrounding WMHs to identify ‘WM at risk’, or the WMH CBF penumbra. We aimed to further validate cross-sectional finding by determining whether the baseline WMH penumbra CBF predicts the development of new WMHs at follow-up. Methods Sixty-one cognitively intact elderly subjects received 3 T MPRAGE, FLAIR, and pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL). Twenty-four subjects returned for follow-up MRI. The inter-scan interval was 18 months. A NAWM layer mask, comprised of fifteen layers, 1 mm thick each surrounding WMHs, was generated for periventricular (PVWMH) and deep (DWMH) WMHs. Mean CBF for each layer was computed. New WMH and persistent NAWM voxels for each penumbra layer were defined from follow-up MRI. Results CBF in the area surrounding WMHs was significantly lower than the total brain NAWM, extending approximately 12 mm from both the established PVWMH and DWMH. Voxels with new WMH at follow-up had significantly lower baseline CBF than voxels that maintained NAWM, suggesting that baseline CBF can predict the development of new WMHs over time. Conclusions A CBF penumbra exists surrounding WMHs, which is associated with future WMH expansion. ASL MRI can be used to monitor interventions to increase white matter blood flow for the prevention of further WM damage and its cognitive and motor consequences. PMID:26106546

  9. Microscopic polyangiitis associated with pleuropericarditis, pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hemorrhage as a complication of silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rajhi, Amjad; Brega, Elisa Ferreira; Colman, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Silica (silicon dioxide) occupational exposure has been linked to both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary toxicity. Silicosis is the major pulmonary toxicity, which has also been associated with the development of collagen-vascular disease and with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis, especially perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (P-ANCA). The most common pulmonary manifestations of microscopic polyangitis (MPA) are interstitial fibrosis and alveolar hemorrhage. We describe a patient who had unusual presentation of microscopic polyangitis, characterized by lung hemorrhage, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, pleuropericarditis and pulmonary embolism that was associated with a history of silica exposure and radiologic evidence for silicosis. PMID:26236617

  10. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ajmal; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2011-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare but potentially treatable disease, characterized by impaired surfactant metabolism that leads to accumulation in the alveoli of proteinaceous material rich in surfactant protein and its component. Novel insights from an animal model aided the discovery of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibodies as a pathogenetic mechanism in human pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The vast majority of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis occurs as an autoimmune disease; less commonly, it is congenital or secondary to an underlying disorder such as infection, hematological malignancy, or immunodeficiency. The subacute indolent course of this disease often delays the diagnosis by months to years. Crazy-paving appearance in a geographic distribution is a characteristic feature of this disease visible on high-resolution computed tomography (CT). A definitive diagnosis, however, requires lung biopsy, which typically shows partial or complete filling of alveoli with periodic-acid-Schiff-positive granular and eosinophilic material in preserved alveolar architecture. Patients with minimal symptoms are managed conservatively, whereas patients with hypoxemia require a more aggressive approach. Whole-lung lavage is the most widely accepted therapy for symptomatic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Correction of GM-CSF deficiency with exogenous GM-CSF is an alternative therapy. The combination of a systemic treatment (GM-CSF) and a local treatment (whole-lung lavage) augmenting the action of one another is a promising new approach. As the knowledge about this rare disease increases, the role of novel therapies is likely to be better defined and optimized. PMID:21496372

  11. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (PLCH) is a relatively uncommon lung disease that generally, but not invariably, occurs in cigarette smokers. The pathologic hallmark of PLCH is the accumulation of Langerhans and other inflammatory cells in small airways, resulting in the formation of nodular inflammatory lesions. While the overwhelming majority of patients are smokers, mechanisms by which smoking induces this disease are not known, but likely involve a combination of events resulting in enhanced recruitment and activation of Langerhans cells in small airways. Bronchiolar inflammation may be accompanied by variable lung interstitial and vascular involvement. While cellular inflammation is prominent in early disease, more advanced stages are characterized by cystic lung destruction, cicatricial scarring of airways, and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Pulmonary function is frequently abnormal at presentation. Imaging of the chest with high resolution chest CT scanning may show characteristic nodular and cystic abnormalities. Lung biopsy is necessary for a definitive diagnosis, although may not be required in instances were imaging findings are highly characteristic. There is no general consensus regarding the role of immunosuppressive therapy in smokers with PLCH. All smokers must be counseled on the importance of smoking cessation, which may result in regression of disease and obviate the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. The prognosis for most patients is relatively good, particularly if longitudinal lung function testing shows stability. Complications like pneumothoraces and secondary pulmonary hypertension may shorten life expectancy. Patients with progressive disease may require lung transplantation. PMID:22429393

  12. Pulmonary consequences of transfusion: TRALI and TACO.

    PubMed

    Popovsky, Mark A

    2006-06-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload are important, life-threatening complications of transfusion. Each adversely impact hospital length of stay and cost of healthcare. TRALI is clinically indistinguishable from the adult respiratory distress syndrome but it has a more favorable prognosis. Approximately 10% of TRALI patients die from this complication. The at-risk patient for TRALI has not been identified. The most commonly cited incidence is 1:5000 plasma-containing blood component transfusions. Although several pathways may lead to TRALI, passive transfusion of leukocyte antibodies is currently the most important association. TACO occurs in 1-8% of patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty. It is precipitated by positive fluid balance and high transfusion flow rates. TACO is characterized by respiratory distress and acute pulmonary edema. PMID:16872902

  13. The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, S.; Griffiths, P. D.

    1974-01-01

    A blind assessment of abnormalities of pulmonary scintiscans in patients with pulmonary emboli and other clinical conditions showed that there was no abnormality specific for pulmonary embolism. However, a normal lung scan virtually excluded pulmonary embolism and an area, or areas, of absent perfusion was confirmatory evidence of embolism, without infarction, if the chest radiograph was normal, and of embolism with infarction if the clinical and radiographic findings were compatible. A controlled analysis of biochemical and electrocardiographic abnormalities associated with pulmonary embolism showed that abnormalities of liver function and blood urea were more frequent than in a group of patients suspected of, but not having, emboli. A similar analysis of the electrocardiograms showed that a Q3R3S1 with T wave inversion over the right ventricular leads and lead III (±avf) that developed or regressed was pathognomonic of embolism, but other features were of little value. It is suggested that all hospital patients should have an electrocardiogram performed on admission so that serial changes may be assessed and that lung scanning should be used as a screening test in patients suspected of having pulmonary embolism. PMID:4467868

  14. Characterizing Blood Metabolomics Profiles Associated with Self-Reported Food Intakes in Female Twins

    PubMed Central

    Pallister, Tess; Jennings, Amy; Mohney, Robert P.; Yarand, Darioush; Mangino, Massimo; Cassidy, Aedin; MacGregor, Alexander; Spector, Tim D.; Menni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Using dietary biomarkers in nutritional epidemiological studies may better capture exposure and improve the level at which diet-disease associations can be established and explored. Here, we aimed to identify and evaluate reproducibility of novel biomarkers of reported habitual food intake using targeted and non-targeted metabolomic blood profiling in a large twin cohort. Reported intakes of 71 food groups, determined by FFQ, were assessed against 601 fasting blood metabolites in over 3500 adult female twins from the TwinsUK cohort. For each metabolite, linear regression analysis was undertaken in the discovery group (excluding MZ twin pairs discordant [≥1 SD apart] for food group intake) with each food group as a predictor adjusting for age, batch effects, BMI, family relatedness and multiple testing (1.17x10-6 = 0.05/[71 food groups x 601 detected metabolites]). Significant results were then replicated (non-targeted: P<0.05; targeted: same direction) in the MZ discordant twin group and results from both analyses meta-analyzed. We identified and replicated 180 significant associations with 39 food groups (P<1.17x10-6), overall consisting of 106 different metabolites (74 known and 32 unknown), including 73 novel associations. In particular we identified trans-4-hydroxyproline as a potential marker of red meat intake (0.075[0.009]; P = 1.08x10-17), ergothioneine as a marker of mushroom consumption (0.181[0.019]; P = 5.93x10-22), and three potential markers of fruit consumption (top association: apple and pears): including metabolites derived from gut bacterial transformation of phenolic compounds, 3-phenylpropionate (0.024[0.004]; P = 1.24x10-8) and indolepropionate (0.026[0.004]; P = 2.39x10-9), and threitol (0.033[0.003]; P = 1.69x10-21). With the largest nutritional metabolomics dataset to date, we have identified 73 novel candidate biomarkers of food intake for potential use in nutritional epidemiological studies. We compiled our findings into the Diet

  15. Characterizing Blood Metabolomics Profiles Associated with Self-Reported Food Intakes in Female Twins.

    PubMed

    Pallister, Tess; Jennings, Amy; Mohney, Robert P; Yarand, Darioush; Mangino, Massimo; Cassidy, Aedin; MacGregor, Alexander; Spector, Tim D; Menni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Using dietary biomarkers in nutritional epidemiological studies may better capture exposure and improve the level at which diet-disease associations can be established and explored. Here, we aimed to identify and evaluate reproducibility of novel biomarkers of reported habitual food intake using targeted and non-targeted metabolomic blood profiling in a large twin cohort. Reported intakes of 71 food groups, determined by FFQ, were assessed against 601 fasting blood metabolites in over 3500 adult female twins from the TwinsUK cohort. For each metabolite, linear regression analysis was undertaken in the discovery group (excluding MZ twin pairs discordant [≥1 SD apart] for food group intake) with each food group as a predictor adjusting for age, batch effects, BMI, family relatedness and multiple testing (1.17x10-6 = 0.05/[71 food groups x 601 detected metabolites]). Significant results were then replicated (non-targeted: P<0.05; targeted: same direction) in the MZ discordant twin group and results from both analyses meta-analyzed. We identified and replicated 180 significant associations with 39 food groups (P<1.17x10-6), overall consisting of 106 different metabolites (74 known and 32 unknown), including 73 novel associations. In particular we identified trans-4-hydroxyproline as a potential marker of red meat intake (0.075[0.009]; P = 1.08x10-17), ergothioneine as a marker of mushroom consumption (0.181[0.019]; P = 5.93x10-22), and three potential markers of fruit consumption (top association: apple and pears): including metabolites derived from gut bacterial transformation of phenolic compounds, 3-phenylpropionate (0.024[0.004]; P = 1.24x10-8) and indolepropionate (0.026[0.004]; P = 2.39x10-9), and threitol (0.033[0.003]; P = 1.69x10-21). With the largest nutritional metabolomics dataset to date, we have identified 73 novel candidate biomarkers of food intake for potential use in nutritional epidemiological studies. We compiled our findings into the Diet

  16. Automated system for characterization and classification of malaria-infected stages using light microscopic images of thin blood smears.

    PubMed

    Das, D K; Maiti, A K; Chakraborty, C

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a comprehensive image characterization cum classification framework for malaria-infected stage detection using microscopic images of thin blood smears. The methodology mainly includes microscopic imaging of Leishman stained blood slides, noise reduction and illumination correction, erythrocyte segmentation, feature selection followed by machine classification. Amongst three-image segmentation algorithms (namely, rule-based, Chan-Vese-based and marker-controlled watershed methods), marker-controlled watershed technique provides better boundary detection of erythrocytes specially in overlapping situations. Microscopic features at intensity, texture and morphology levels are extracted to discriminate infected and noninfected erythrocytes. In order to achieve subgroup of potential features, feature selection techniques, namely, F-statistic and information gain criteria are considered here for ranking. Finally, five different classifiers, namely, Naive Bayes, multilayer perceptron neural network, logistic regression, classification and regression tree (CART), RBF neural network have been trained and tested by 888 erythrocytes (infected and noninfected) for each features' subset. Performance evaluation of the proposed methodology shows that multilayer perceptron network provides higher accuracy for malaria-infected erythrocytes recognition and infected stage classification. Results show that top 90 features ranked by F-statistic (specificity: 98.64%, sensitivity: 100%, PPV: 99.73% and overall accuracy: 96.84%) and top 60 features ranked by information gain provides better results (specificity: 97.29%, sensitivity: 100%, PPV: 99.46% and overall accuracy: 96.73%) for malaria-infected stage classification. PMID:25523795

  17. Characterization of the cation-binding capacity of a potassium-adsorption filter used in red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takao; Muto, Shigeaki; Miyata, Yukio; Maeda, Takao; Odate, Takayuki; Shimanaka, Kimio; Kusano, Eiji

    2015-06-01

    A K(+) -adsorption filter was developed to exchange K(+) in the supernatant of stored irradiated red blood cells with Na(+) . To date, however, the filter's adsorption capacity for K(+) has not been fully evaluated. Therefore, we characterized the cation-binding capacity of this filter. Artificial solutions containing various cations were continuously passed through the filter in 30 mL of sodium polystyrene sulfonate at 10 mL/min using an infusion pump at room temperature. The cation concentrations were measured before and during filtration. When a single solution containing K(+) , Li(+) , H(+) , Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , or Al(3+) was continuously passed through the filter, the filter adsorbed K(+) and the other cations in exchange for Na(+) in direct proportion to the valence number. The order of affinity for cation adsorption to the filter was Ca(2+) >Mg(2+) >K(+) >H(+) >Li(+) . In K(+) -saturated conditions, the filter also adsorbed Na(+) . After complete adsorption of these cations on the filter, their concentration in the effluent increased in a sigmoidal manner over time. Cations that were bound to the filter were released if a second cation was passed through the filter, despite the different affinities of the two cations. The ability of the filter to bind cations, especially K(+) , should be helpful when it is used for red blood cell transfusion at the bedside. The filter may also be useful to gain a better understanding of the pharmacological properties of sodium polystyrene sulfonate. PMID:25656422

  18. [Post-transfusion pulmonary oedema: the French hemovigilance network classification method].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y; Renaudier, P; Caldani, C; Aguilon, P; Canivet, N; Fabrigli, P; Mertes, P-M; Muller, J-Y; Rebibo, D; Tazerout, M; Trophilme, C; Willaert, B; Carlier, M

    2010-12-01

    Pulmonary oedema after transfusion of blood products may be hydrostatic (transfusion-associated circulatory overload [taco]) or exsudative (transfusion-related acute lung injury [trali]). Both conditions have been recognized as major hazards to transfusion recipients. Risk characterization is necessary to improve safety and to monitor trends in the national blood transfusion system. A collaborative multidisciplinary working group of the French National Hemovigilance Committee has proposed an analysis framework for case definitions and classification. The method relies on internationally used definitions and is adapted to the codification procedures used in the french transfusion incident reports electronic data management. PMID:21051260

  19. Vasopressin decreases pulmonary-to-systemic vascular resistance ratio in a porcine model of severe hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Joy; Golden, Patrick J; Kajiura, Lauren N; Murata, Lee-Ann M; Uyehara, Catherine F T

    2015-05-01

    Vasopressors are gaining renewed interest as treatment adjuncts in hemorrhagic shock. The ideal vasoconstrictor will increase systemic blood pressure without increasing pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), which hinders pulmonary perfusion and exacerbates hypoxemia. However, the selectivity of pressors for pulmonary versus systemic vasoconstriction during hemorrhage has not been characterized. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that vasopressin (VP) has distinct effects on pulmonary versus systemic hemodynamics, unlike the catecholamine vasopressors norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine (PE). Anesthetized and ventilated pigs were assigned to resuscitation with saline only (n = 7) or saline with VP (n = 6), NE (n = 6), or PE (n = 6). Animals were hemorrhaged to a target volume of 30 mL/kg and a mean arterial pressure of 35 mmHg. One hour after the start of hemorrhage, animals were resuscitated with saline up to one shed blood volume, followed by either additional saline or a vasopressor. Hemodynamics and oxygenation were measured hourly for 4 h after the start of hemorrhage. Vasopressin increased systemic vascular resistance (SVR) while sparing the pulmonary vasculature, leading to a 45% decrease in the PVR/SVR ratio compared with treatment with PE. Conversely, NE induced pulmonary hypertension and led to an increased PVR/SVR ratio associated with decreased oxygen saturation. Phenylephrine and crystalloid had no significant effect on the PVR/SVR ratio. Sparing of pulmonary vasoconstriction occurs only with VP, not with administration of crystalloid or catecholamine pressors. The ability of VP to maintain blood oxygenation indicates that VP may prevent hypoxemia in the management of hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25565637

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  1. Characterization of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance by Calorimetric Analysis of Blood Serum Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Barceló, Francisca; Cerdà, Joan J.; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Jimenez-Marco, Teresa; Durán, M. Antonia; Novo, Andrés; Ros, Teresa; Sampol, Antonia; Portugal, José

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignant proliferative disorder that may progress to multiple myeloma, a malignant plasma cell neoplasia. We evaluated differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as an experimental tool for differentiating serum samples of MGUS patients from healthy individuals. DSC thermograms can be used for monitoring changes in the serum proteome associated with MGUS. MGUS patients showed great variability in serum thermogram characteristics, which depended on the IgG, IgA or IgM isotypes and/or the κ or λ light chains. Thermogram feature parameters distinguished patients with MGUS from healthy people. Serum samples, named as non-MGUS, were also collected from patients with subjacent immunological pathologies who were discarded of having MGUS through serum immunofixation. They were used to verify the sensitivity of DSC for discriminating MGUS from related blood dyscrasias. Only some DSC thermogram feature parameters differentiated, to a lesser extent, between MGUS and non-MGUS individuals. We contemplate DSC as a tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of MGUS. PMID:25794164

  2. Characterization of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance by calorimetric analysis of blood serum proteome.

    PubMed

    Barceló, Francisca; Cerdà, Joan J; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Jimenez-Marco, Teresa; Durán, M Antonia; Novo, Andrés; Ros, Teresa; Sampol, Antonia; Portugal, José

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignant proliferative disorder that may progress to multiple myeloma, a malignant plasma cell neoplasia. We evaluated differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as an experimental tool for differentiating serum samples of MGUS patients from healthy individuals. DSC thermograms can be used for monitoring changes in the serum proteome associated with MGUS. MGUS patients showed great variability in serum thermogram characteristics, which depended on the IgG, IgA or IgM isotypes and/or the κ or λ light chains. Thermogram feature parameters distinguished patients with MGUS from healthy people. Serum samples, named as non-MGUS, were also collected from patients with subjacent immunological pathologies who were discarded of having MGUS through serum immunofixation. They were used to verify the sensitivity of DSC for discriminating MGUS from related blood dyscrasias. Only some DSC thermogram feature parameters differentiated, to a lesser extent, between MGUS and non-MGUS individuals. We contemplate DSC as a tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of MGUS. PMID:25794164

  3. Bioinformatic Characterization of Genes and Proteins Involved in Blood Clotting in Lampreys.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Russell F

    2015-10-01

    Lampreys and hagfish are the earliest diverging of extant vertebrates and are obvious targets for investigating the origins of complex biochemical systems found in mammals. Currently, the simplest approach for such inquiries is to search for the presence of relevant genes in whole genome sequence (WGS) assemblies. Unhappily, in the past a high-quality complete genome sequence has not been available for either lampreys or hagfish, precluding the possibility of proving gene absence. Recently, improved but still incomplete genome assemblies for two species of lamprey have been posted, and, taken together with an extensive collection of short sequences in the NCBI trace archive, they have made it possible to make reliable counts for specific gene families. Particularly, a multi-source tactic has been used to study the lamprey blood clotting system with regard to the presence and absence of genes known to occur in higher vertebrates. As was suggested in earlier studies, lampreys lack genes for coagulation factors VIII and IX, both of which are critical for the "intrinsic" clotting system and responsible for hemophilia in humans. On the other hand, they have three each of genes for factors VII and X, participants in the "extrinsic" clotting system. The strategy of using raw trace sequence "reads" together with partial WGS assemblies for lampreys can be used in studies on the early evolution of other biochemical systems in vertebrates. PMID:26437661

  4. Synthesis and characterization of PEGylated polyethylenimine-entrapped gold nanoparticles for blood pool and tumor CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Benqing; Zheng, Linfeng; Peng, Chen; Li, Du; Li, Jingchao; Wen, Shihui; Shen, Mingwu; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang

    2014-10-01

    The synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) entrapped within polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified polyethylenimine (PEI) for blood pool and tumor computed tomography (CT) imaging are reported. In this approach, partially PEGylated PEI was used as a template for AuNP synthesis, followed by acetylating the PEI remaining surface amines. The synthesized PEGylated PEI-entrapped AuNPs (Au PENPs) were characterized via different methods. Our results reveal that the synthesized Au PENPs can be tuned to have an Au core size in a range of 1.9-4.6 nm and to be water-soluble, stable, and noncytotoxic in a studied concentration range. With a demonstrated better X-ray attenuation property than that of clinically used iodinated small molecular contrast agent (e.g., Omnipaque) and the prolonged half-decay time (11.2 h in rat) confirmed by pharmacokinetics studies, the developed PEGylated Au PENPs enabled efficient and enhanced blood pool CT imaging with imaging time up to 75 min. Likewise, thanks to the enhanced permeability and retention effect, the PEGylated Au PENPs were also able to be used as a contrast agent for effective CT imaging of a tumor model. With the proven organ biocompatibility by histological studies, the designed PEGylated Au PENPs may hold great promise to be used as contrast agents for CT imaging of a variety of biological systems. The significance of this study is that rather than the use of dendrimers as templates, cost-effective branched polymers (e.g., PEI) can be used as templates to generate functionalized AuNPs for CT imaging applications. PMID:25208617

  5. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH. PMID:27137522

  6. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary disease and dysfunction exact a tremendous health burden on society. In a recent survey of lung disease published by the American Lung Association in 2012, upwards of 10 million Americans were diagnosed with chronic bronchitis while over 4 million Americans had emphysem...

  7. Pulmonary ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, C M; Thompson, J E

    1979-07-28

    A case of pulmonary ascariasis is reported for the first time in Australia. Because of increasing immigration from countries which have a high incidence of ascariasis (especially those of South-East Asia), and increasing travel to Asian countries, the awareness of this infestation as a cause of respiratory disease may be of great importance. PMID:40103

  8. Pulmonary nocardiosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection from returning. Alternative Names Nocardiosis - pulmonary Images Respiratory system References Limper AH. Overview of pneumonia. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010: ...

  9. Pulmonary manifestations revealing Rosai-Dorfman disease.

    PubMed

    Goupil de Bouillé, J; de Muret, A; Diot, E; Dumont, P; Plantier, L; Diot, P; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, mainly involving cervical nodes. We present the case of a patient with a pulmonary form of Rosai-Dorfman disease without peripheral or intra-thoracic lymph nodes, characterized by the presence of pulmonary nodules and cysts associated with bilateral pleural effusions. PMID:26422575

  10. Magnetic resonance characterization of septal bounce: findings of blood impact physiology.

    PubMed

    Angheloiu, George O; Rayarao, Geetha; Williams, Ronald; Yamrozik, June; Doyle, Mark; Biederman, Robert W W

    2015-01-01

    'Septal bounce' is a pathognomonic sign of constrictive pericarditis (CP). The objectives of the study are to resolve the etiology of the septal bounce, to generate septal bounce-related diagnostic tools, and to prove that its presence is related to the mechanical interaction between the atrioventricular inflow and the inter-ventricular septum. We compared steady state free precession four-chamber images between 11 CP patients and 11 controls via cardiac magnetic resonance. The septal bounce was composed of two movements observed during every cardiac cycle, simultaneous with the rapid filling and atrial systole respectively. Three parameters (measured at end-systole) were generated: right ventricular (RV) clamp (compression ratio of the RV)-greater in CP (0.88 ± 0.03) than controls (0.85 ± 0.03, p = 0.02), tri-septal angle between the tricuspid valve annulus plane and the interventricular septum (81° ± 9° vs. 91° ± 7°, p = 0.01), and impact angle between the tricuspid inflow vector and septum (8.6° ± 8.7° vs. 0° ± 6.6°, p = 0.01). The accuracy, positive predictive value, sensitivity and specificity of these parameters in differentiating CP from controls ranged from 100 to 82 %. A forth parameter-septal flow ratio, gauging the proportion of tricuspid inflow impacting the septum, was markedly higher in CP than controls (0.38 ± 0.19 vs. 0.01 ± 0.03, p < 0.0001) with 100 % sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value. The septal bounce consists of two sequential movements during each cardiac cycle, is time-related with the rapid ventricular filling and atrial systole, and likely represents a result of the tricuspid blood inflow impacting the interventricular septum. Four septal bounce-derived parameters have a good accuracy in differentiating CP from volunteers. PMID:25266227

  11. Characterization of the equine blood-testis barrier during tubular development in normal and cryptorchid stallions.

    PubMed

    Rode, K; Sieme, H; Richterich, P; Brehm, R

    2015-09-15

    The formation of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) is defined as occurring with the first appearance of spermatocytes at around puberty and is vital for normal spermatogenesis. This barrier between two adjacent Sertoli cells (SCs) consists of a cell junctional protein complex, which includes tight junctions (TJs), adherens junctions, and gap junctions. In many mammalian species, BTB composition has already been investigated, whereas little is known about the equine BTB. In the present study, immunohistochemistry and qualitative Western Blot analysis were used to assess the expression and distribution patterns of the junctional proteins claudin-11 (TJ), zonula occludens-1 (TJ associated), N-cadherin (adherens junctions), and connexin 43 (gap junctions) in equine testes during tubular development and in testes of stallions exhibiting unilateral cryptorchidism. Therefore, testes of 21 warmblood stallions (aged 12 months-11 years) were obtained during routine surgical castration. In the normal adult equine testis, the junctional proteins are localized at the basolateral region of the seminiferous tubules forming a circumferential seal corresponding to the known BTB localization. N-cadherin is additionally expressed along the lateral SC surface. In immature seminiferous cords still lacking a lumen, a diffuse distribution pattern of the junctional proteins throughout the SC cytoplasm is visible. As lumen formation advances, the immunolocalization shifts progressively toward the basolateral SC membranes. Additionally, apoptotic germ cells were detected and quantified in prepubertal stallions using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay and correlated with junctional protein localization. In the retained testis of cryptorchid stallions, which exhibit an aberrant testicular morphology, a deviating expression of the junctional proteins is visible. The present data show for the first time that (1) the equine SC junctional complex contains claudin-11

  12. Characterization of partial NS5B region among hepatitis C virus genotype 6 subtypes isolated from Thai blood donors.

    PubMed

    Chaiwong, Suriya; Sistayanarain, Anchalee

    2016-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of liver dysfunction which continues to spread in Thailand, particularly as genotype 6. The NS5B gene fragment is particularly variable and thus provides a valuable tracker for its spread. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to characterize the HCV genotype 6 based on partial NS5B region using Thai blood donor samples. Twenty-nine samples were genotyped as HCV 6 by nested PCR, nucleotide sequencing and amino acid sequence analysis. Amplified products were identified as HCV genotypes 6f, 6c, 6n, and 6i. There were amino acid variations of 4-18 residues in subtypes 6f, 6c, and 6n whereas subtype 6i was conserved when compared with their referent strains. In subtypes 6f, 6c, 6n, and 6i, the amino acid mutations at positions 244, 309, and 310 which are associated with HCV resistance were present. In summary, the sequences and phylogenetic analysis of NS5B of HCV used in our study yielded the genotypes 6f, 6c, 6n, and 6i. This finding indicates diversity of amino acids in NS5B of HCV. Characterizing the partial NS5B region among hepatitis C virus genotype 6 subtypes may predict efficacious anti-HCV therapy. J. Med. Virol. 88:1785-1790, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018495

  13. Characterizing the Mechanistic Pathways of the Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction in Xenogeneic Neonatal Islet Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Liuwantara, David; Chew, Yi Vee; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.; Hawkes, Joanne M.; Burns, Heather L.; O'Connell, Philip J.; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) causes major loss of islets after transplantation and consequently represents the initial barrier to survival of porcine neonatal islet cell clusters (NICC) after xenotransplantation. Methods This study used novel assays designed to characterize the various immunologic components responsible for xenogeneic IBMIR to identify initiators and investigate processes of IBMIR-associated coagulation, complement activation and neutrophil infiltration. The IBMIR was induced in vitro by exposing NICC to platelet-poor or platelet-rich human plasma or isolated neutrophils. Results We found that xenogeneic IBMIR was characterized by rapid, platelet-independent thrombin generation, with addition of platelets both accelerating and exacerbating this response. Platelet-independent complement activation was observed as early as 30 minutes after NICC exposure to plasma. However, membrane attack complex formation was not observed in NICC histopathology sections until after 60 minutes. We demonstrated for the first time that NICC-mediated complement activation was necessary for neutrophil activation in the xenogeneic IBMIR setting. Finally, using the Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer, we identified substantial loss of islet function (up to 40%) after IBMIR with surviving NICC showing evidence of mitochondrial damage. Conclusions This study used novel assays to describe multiple key pathways by which xenogeneic IBMIR causes islet destruction, allowing further refinement of future interventions aimed at resolving the issue of IBMIR in xenotransplantation. PMID:27500267

  14. The Pathobiology of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lang, Irene M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a late sequel of venous thromboembolism that cannot be completely reproduced in animal models. The prevalence of CTEPH in humans is estimated at roughly 17-20 per million; however, partly because up to 50% of patients with CTEPH never experience symptomatic pulmonary embolism, precise numbers on the incidence and prevalence are not known. Because CTEPH is diagnosed at a median age of 63 years in patients who often have other concomitant cardiovascular disease or lung disease, assessment of pathophysiology in patients can be challenging, We do know that CTEPH is a dual vascular disorder. Stenoses, webs, and occlusions predominate in large and medium-sized pulmonary arteries at the sites of previous pulmonary emboli. A "secondary vasculopathy" resembling the pulmonary arteriopathy encountered in other forms of pulmonary hypertension predominates in low-resistance vessels. Anastomoses between bronchial artery branches and precapillary pulmonary arterioles appear during evolution of the disease. Other acquired vascular connections between bronchial arteries and pulmonary veins may trigger venous remodeling. Current concepts regarding the pathophysiology of CTEPH include contributions of hyperactive coagulation (e.g., high coagulation factor VIII, combined coagulation defects, dysfibrinogenemias), insufficient anticoagulation, non-O blood groups, and misguided thrombus resolution (e.g., infection, inflammation, dysfunctional innate immunity, abnormal circulating phospholipids). Current research focuses on the question as to whether a genetic predisposition leads to misguided vascular healing after pulmonary thromboembolism in susceptible individuals. PMID:27571003

  15. Functional and anatomical characterization of brown adipose tissue in heart failure with blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Panagia, Marcello; Chen, Yin-Ching Iris; Chen, Howard H; Ernande, Laura; Chen, Chan; Chao, Wei; Kwong, Kenneth; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Sosnovik, David E

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested that brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in obesity, insulin resistance and heart failure. The characterization of BAT in vivo, however, has been challenging. No technique to comprehensively image BAT anatomy and function has been described. Moreover, the impact on BAT of the neuroendocrine activation seen in heart failure has only recently begun to be evaluated in vivo. The aim of this study was to use MRI to characterize the impact of heart failure on the morphology and function of BAT. Mice subjected to permanent ligation of the left coronary artery were imaged with MRI 6 weeks later. T2 weighted MRI of BAT volume and blood oxygen level dependent MRI of BAT function were performed. T2 * maps of BAT were obtained at multiple time points before and after administration of the β3 adrenergic agonist CL 316 243 (CL). Blood flow to BAT was studied after CL injection using the flow alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) approach. Excised BAT tissue was analyzed for lipid droplet content and for uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) mRNA expression. BAT volume was significantly lower in heart failure (51 ± 1 mm(3) versus 65 ± 3 mm(3) ; p < 0.05), and characterized by a reduction in lipid globules and a fourfold increase in UCP1 mRNA (p < 0.05). CL injection increased BAT T2 * in healthy animals but not in mice with heart failure (24 ± 4% versus 6 ± 2%; p < 0.01), consistent with an increase in flow in control BAT. This was confirmed by a significant difference in the FAIR response in BAT in control and heart failure mice. Heart failure results in the chronic activation of BAT, decreased BAT lipid stores and decreased BAT volume, and it is associated with a marked decrease in ability to respond to acute physiological stimuli. This may have important implications for substrate utilization and overall metabolic homeostasis in heart failure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27226402

  16. Pulmonary Renal Syndrome After Streptococcal Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Mara-Koosham, Gopi; Stoltze, Karl; Aday, Jeffrey; Rendon, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary renal syndrome is a class of small vessel vasculitides that are characterized by the dual presentation of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and glomerulonephritis. Pulmonary renal syndrome has multiple etiologies, but its development has been rarely reported following infection with group A streptococcus. We present the case of a 36-year-old Native American male who was transferred to our facility due to refractory hypoxic respiratory failure. He had been diagnosed with streptococcal pharyngitis 2 weeks prior to admission. Given the presence of hemoptysis, bronchoscopy was performed and was consistent with DAH. Urinalysis demonstrated hematuria and proteinuria, in the setting of elevated creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. Additionally, antistreptolysin O titer was positive. Given the constellation of laboratory findings and history of streptococcal pharyngitis, the patient was diagnosed with PRS secondary to streptococcal infection. High-dose methylprednisolone was initiated with concomitant plasmapheresis. He was extubated successfully after his respiratory status improved and was eventually discharged home after making a full recovery within 2 weeks after admission. This case illustrates the importance of clinically relevant sequelae of streptococcal infection as well as the appropriate treatment of PRS secondary to streptococcal pharyngitis with plasmapheresis and intravenous corticosteroids. PMID:27231692

  17. Perfusion visualization and analysis for pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2005-04-01

    Given the nature of pulmonary embolism (PE), timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. Contrast enhanced high-resolution CT images allow physicians to accurately identify segmental and sub-segmental emboli. However, it is also important to assess the effect of such emboli on the blood flow in the lungs. Expanding upon previous research, we propose a method for 3D visualization of lung perfusion. The proposed method allows users to examine perfusion throughout the entire lung volume at a single glance, with areas of diminished perfusion highlighted so that they are visible independent of the viewing location. This may be particularly valuable for better accuracy in assessing the extent of hemodynamic alterations resulting from pulmonary emboli. The method also facilitates user interaction and may help identify small peripheral sub-segmental emboli otherwise overlooked. 19 patients referred for possible PE were evaluated by CT following the administration of IV contrast media. An experienced thoracic radiologist assessed the 19 datasets with 17 diagnosed as being positive for PE with multiple emboli. Since anomalies in lung perfusion due to PE can alter the distribution of parenchymal densities, we analyzed features collected from histograms of the computed perfusion maps and demonstrate their potential usefulness as a preliminary test to suggest the presence of PE. These histogram features also offer the possibility of distinguishing distinct patterns associated with chronic PE and may even be useful for further characterization of changes in perfusion or overall density resulting from associated conditions such as pneumonia or diffuse lung disease.

  18. [Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis].

    PubMed

    Floarea-Strat, Alina; Stanciu, Adriana; Creţeanu, Mihai

    2003-01-01

    It is a disease of obscure cause that is characterized by the accumulation of a granular material that contains abundant lipid within the alveoli of lung. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) has been divided into a congenital and an adult form. The acquired form has been subdivided into a idiopathic form and a secondary form associated with a know disorder or exposure as silica, aluminium, titanium. Dyspnea and cough are the most common presenting symptoms. Chest pain, hemoptysis, fever and weight loss are variably reported. Pathogenesis remains unknown, but evidence points to a dysfunction of alveolar macrophages. Mice genetically deficient in granulocyte macrophagecolony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) show an alveolar proteinosis. A neutralizing antibody against GM-CSF was found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum of patients with idiopathic PAP. Currently, no specific therapy exists for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and sequential whole lung lavage is standard treatment. PMID:14756054

  19. Quantification and characterization of ACTH-related peptides produced by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, G.M.; Maimon, J.; Schneider, B.S. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors have used a sensitive radioimmunoassay to quantify and characterize PBMC-associated immunoreactive ACTH (ACTH-IR). Mean ACTH content of freshly isolated human PBMCs was 3.8 {plus minus} 0.72 pg (SEM) per 10(6) cells. During 3 days of incubation ACTH-IR in conditioned media of control PBMCs increased significantly, p less than 0.02. Gel filtration chromatography revealed a minor peak of ACTH-IR coeluting with ACTH (1-39) and a major peak coeluting with ACTH (11-24). Treatment with 15 nM CRH did not alter the amount of ACTH-IR secreted or its gel pattern. Synthetic ACTH (11-24), was radioiodinated and was used for binding experiments that demonstrated specific high- and low-affinity binding sites for ACTH (11-24) on a human T cell line. These results add support for a role of ACTH and related peptides in immune regulatory systems and suggest that cell-specific post-translational processing of PBMC may generate an expanding number of biologically active moieties.

  20. Breath Analysis in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cikach, Frank S.; Tonelli, Adriano R.; Barnes, Jarrod; Paschke, Kelly; Newman, Jennie; Grove, David; Dababneh, Luma; Wang, Sihe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive and devastating condition characterized by vascular cell proliferation and is associated with several metabolic derangements. We hypothesized that metabolic derangements in PAH can be detected by measuring metabolic by-products in exhaled breath. Methods: We collected breath and blood samples from patients with PAH at the time of right-sided heart catheterization (n = 31) and from healthy control subjects (n = 34). Breath was analyzed by selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry in predetermined training and validation cohorts. Results: Patients with PAH were 51.5 ± 14 years old, and 27 were women (85%). Control subjects were 38 ± 13 years old, and 22 were women (65%). Discriminant analysis in the training set identified three ion peaks (H3O+29+, NO+56+, and O2+98+) and the variable age that correctly classified 88.9% of the individuals. In an independent validation cohort, 82.8% of the individuals were classified correctly. The concentrations of the volatile organic compounds 2-propanol, acetaldehyde, ammonia, ethanol, pentane, 1-decene, 1-octene, and 2-nonene were different in patients with PAH compared with control subjects. Exhaled ammonia was higher in patients with PAH (median [interquartile range]: 94.7 parts per billion (ppb) [70-129 ppb] vs 60.9 ppb [46-77 ppb], P < .001) and was associated with right atrial pressure (ρ = 0.57, P < .001), mean pulmonary artery pressure (ρ = 0.43, P = .015), cardiac index by thermodilution (ρ = −0.39, P = .03), pulmonary vascular resistance (ρ = 0.40, P = .04), mixed venous oxygen (ρ = −0.59, P < .001), and right ventricular dilation (ρ = 0.42, P = .03). Conclusions: Breathprint is different between patients with PAH and healthy control subjects. Several specific compounds, including ammonia, were elevated in the breath of patients with PAH. Exhaled ammonia levels correlated with severity of disease. PMID:24091389

  1. Diagnosis and Management of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Houtchens, Jeanne; Martin, Douglas; Klinger, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare disease, which requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose when patients initially present. Initial symptoms can be nonspecific and include complaints such as fatigue and mild dyspnea. Once the disease is suspected, echocardiography is used to estimate the pulmonary arterial (PA) pressure and to exclude secondary causes of elevated PA pressures such as left heart disease. Right heart catheterization with vasodilator challenge is critical to the proper assessment of pulmonary hemodynamics and to determine whether patients are likely to benefit from vasodilator therapy. Pathologically, the disease is characterized by deleterious remodeling of the distal pulmonary arterial and arteriolar circulation, which results in increased pulmonary vascular resistance. In the last fifteen years, medications from three different classes have been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. These include the prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. PMID:21941650

  2. Asthma Outcomes: Pulmonary Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Robert S.; Wise, Robert S.; Covar, Ronina; Irvin, Charles G.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Kraft, Monica; Liu, Mark C.; O’Connor, George T.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald; Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes of pulmonary physiology have a central place in asthma clinical research. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to provide recommendations on the use of pulmonary function measures as asthma outcomes that should be assessed in a standardized fashion in future asthma clinical trials and studies to allow for cross-study comparisons. Methods Our subcommittee conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed to identify studies that focused on the validation of various airway response tests used in asthma clinical research. The subcommittee classified the instruments as core (to be required in future studies), supplemental (to be used according to study aims and in a standardized fashion), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results A list of pulmonary physiology outcomes that applies to both adults and children older than 6 years was created. These outcomes were then categorized into core, supplemental, and emerging. Spirometric outcomes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and FEV1/FVC) are proposed as core outcomes for study population characterization, for observational studies, and for prospective clinical trials. Bronchodilator reversibility and pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1 also are core outcomes for study population characterization and observational studies. Conclusions The subcommittee considers pulmonary physiology outcomes of central importance in asthma and proposes spirometric outcomes as core outcomes for all future NIH-initiated asthma clinical research. PMID:22386510

  3. Ovarian angiogenesis. Phenotypic characterization of endothelial cells in a physiological model of blood vessel growth and regression.

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, H. G.; Braun, K.; Telemenakis, I.; Modlich, U.; Kuhn, W.

    1995-01-01

    Angiogenesis occurs during embryogenesis and is a down-regulated process in the healthy adult that is almost exclusively linked to pathological conditions such as tumor growth, wound healing, and inflammation. Physiological angiogenic processes in the adult are restricted to the female reproductive system where they occur cyclically during the ovarian and uterine cycle as well as during pregnancy. By systematically analyzing the phenotypic changes of endothelial cells during bovine corpus luteum (CL) formation and regression, we have established a physiological model of blood vessel growth and regression. Quantitation of vessel density, percentage of vessels with lumen, and ratio of Bandeiraea simplicifolia-I to von Willebrand Factor-positive endothelial cells were established as parameters of angiogenesis. Sprouting endothelial cells invade the growing CL and continue to grow throughout the first third of the ovarian cycle. Thereafter the mature CL is characterized by a dense network of vessels with gradually decreasing vessel density. During luteolysis and for several weeks thereafter (regressing and residual CL) all newly formed vessels regress, which is accompanied by gradual foreshortening and rounding of endothelial cells and subsequent detachment. Based on histochemical detection of nucleosomal fragmentation products physiological blood vessel regression in the cyclic CL does not appear to involve endothelial cell apoptosis. Lectin histochemical analysis revealed a distinct alteration of endothelial cell glycoconjugate expression during ovarian angiogenesis comparable with the distinct pattern of hyperglycosylation of cultured migrating endothelial cells (up-regulation of binding sites for Lycopersicon esculentum lectin, wheat germ agglutinin, neuraminidase-treated peanut agglutinin, and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I on sprouting ECs). Northern blot analysis of glycosyltransferases during the different stages of angiogenesis revealed an up-regulation of beta

  4. Comparison of computed tomography pulmonary angiography and point-of-care tests for pulmonary thromboembolism diagnosis in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Goggs, R; Chan, D L; Benigni, L; Hirst, C; Kellett-Gregory, L; Fuentes, V L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of CT pulmonary angiography for identification of naturally occurring pulmonary thromboembolism in dogs using predefined diagnostic criteria and to assess the ability of echocardiography, cardiac troponins, D-dimers and kaolin-activated thromboelastography to predict the presence of pulmonary thromboembolism in dogs. Methods Twelve dogs with immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia and evidence of respiratory distress were prospectively evaluated. Dogs were sedated immediately before CT pulmonary angiography using intravenous butorphanol. Spiral CT pulmonary angiography was performed with a 16 detector-row CT scanner using a pressure injector to infuse contrast media through peripheral intravenous catheters. Pulmonary thromboembolism was diagnosed using predefined criteria. Contemporaneous tests included echocardiography, arterial blood gas analysis, kaolin-activated thromboelastography, D-dimers and cardiac troponins. Results Based on predefined criteria, four dogs were classified as pulmonary thromboembolism positive, three dogs were suspected to have pulmonary thromboembolism and the remaining five dogs had negative scans. The four dogs identified with pulmonary thromboembolism all had discrete filling defects in main or lobar pulmonary arteries. None of the contemporaneous tests was discriminant for pulmonary thromboembolism diagnosis, although the small sample size was limiting. Clinical Significance CT pulmonary angiography can be successfully performed in dogs under sedation, even in at-risk patients with respiratory distress and can both confirm and rule out pulmonary thromboembolism in dogs. PMID:24521253

  5. Anticoagulation in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: An update on current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Tamara; Landzberg, Michael J; Deicicchi, David J; Atay, Julie K; Waxman, Aaron B

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a severe clinical condition characterized by molecular and anatomic changes in pulmonary circulation. It is associated with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, which leads to right-sided heart failure if left untreated and, ultimately, death. Treatment of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) involves a complex strategy that takes into consideration disease severity, general and supportive measures, and combination drug regimens. Abnormalities of blood coagulation factors, anti-thrombotic factors, and the fibrinolytic system may contribute to a prothrombotic state in patients with idiopathic PAH. These physiologic changes, in concert with the presence of non-specific risk factors for venous thromboembolism such as heart failure and immobility, are thought to be the basis for oral anticoagulation in PAH. Several observational studies provide helpful information in favor of anticoagulation use in idiopathic PAH but not in other pulmonary hypertension etiologies. Guideline recommendations are based on the lack of prospective comparative trials in this regard. For that reason, large differences exist in the use of anticoagulants in different countries and centers. More studies should be carried out to clarify the risks and the potential benefits of anticoagulant use in a heterogeneous population of patients who are already at considerable life risk. PMID:26527532

  6. [Pulmonary melioidosis].

    PubMed

    Perret, J L; Vidal, D; Thibault, F

    1998-12-01

    Melioidosis is most frequently encountered in pulmonary localization. Melioidosis is an infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei first described by Whitmore in 1912 in Burma. B. pseudomallei is a Gram negative rod belonging to the Pseudomonadaceae family. Soil and water are the natural reservoirs for the germ which is a specific pathogen for several mammal species. Long endemic in Southeast Asia and several tropical zones, B. pseudomallei has recently been found in temperate zones, including France. Human contamination occurs via the transcutaneous route and often leads to dormant inapparent infection. Many conditions, such as diabetes, renal lithiasis, various circumstances of immunodepression or stress, facilitate clinical manifestations which vary greatly. Pulmonary manifestations may be acute and extensive, producing a torpid pseudo-tuberculous condition or a variety of clinical and radiological features mimicking other diseases. Bacteriological and serological tests may be negative. Exposure in an endemic zone, the notion of a favorable context, weight loss, cavitary images on successive chest x-rays and the presence of extra-pulmonary localizations may be suggestive. Ceftazidime or the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination are indicated, but mortality in acute forms still reaches 40%. Relapse can be expected if the treatment duration is too short. PMID:10100350

  7. Preparation of budesonide nanosuspensions for pulmonary delivery: Characterization, in vitro release and in vivo lung distribution studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the present article was to prepare stable and well-dispersible budesonide (BUD) nanosuspensions by microfluidizer method. The morphology, particle size, and zeta potential of formulation were investigated and in vitro release and in vivo lung distribution were evaluated. Characterizations showed that BUD nanosuspensions were spherical in shape with a smooth surface. The measured average particle size was 122.5 ± 6.3 nm, and ζ potential was - 13.6 ± 0.4 mV. In vitro release behavior of three batches BUD nanosuspensions had a good reproduction. The deposition distribution of BUD different formulations was measured using a modified multi-stage liquid collision method. The data showed that BUD nanosuspensions have the most outstanding deposition distribution with fine particle ratio 82.2%. Compared with normal particle and micronized particles, nanosuspensions were easier to be distributed in lung. After inhalation of 1 h, the drug concentration can reach 872.9 ng/g, which was extremely significantly different from normal particles (p < 0.01) and significantly different from micronized particles (p < 0.05). PMID:25100657

  8. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the ... different types of PH. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may have no known cause, or the ...

  9. Pharmacotherapeutic management of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joe R; Nawarskas, James J

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disabling chronic disorder of the pulmonary vasculature, which is characterized by increased pulmonary artery pressure as a result of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The pathology of PAH is characterized by pulmonary vascular vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and thrombosis. These changes are a result of an imbalance between vasodilators (prostacyclin, nitric oxide, vasoactive intestinal peptide) and vasoconstrictors (thromboxane A2, endothelin, serotonin), growth inhibitors and mitogenic factors, and antithrombotic and prothrombotic factors. Recent advances in treatment are directed at restoring the balance between these systems. Endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, ambrisentan, sitaxsentan), phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil), and prostacylin (epoprostenol, iloprost, treprostinil, beraprost) represent the different classes of medications that are currently used in monotherapy and in combination to treat PAH. The purpose of this drug highlight is to provide the reader with an update of the pharmacotherapeutic treatment of PAH. PMID:20395700

  10. Complement and the severity of pulmonary failure.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, J A; Chenoweth, D E; Borman, K R; Norcross, J F

    1988-07-01

    Complement-induced granulocyte aggregation is suspected as a cause of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. Quantifying the lung damage in these patients is difficult, and complement levels combined with clinical parameters of oxygenation might help define the severity of pulmonary deterioration. Forty-five high-risk patients, selected by arterial blood gas criteria, had their pulmonary insult related to C3a and C5a levels. Patients were stratified by pulmonary shunt, alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, and radiographic findings into two categories of severity: pulmonary dysfunction, a milder insult, and ARDS, a major aberration in pulmonary function. The clinical assignment of a diagnostic category required at least 96 hours of monitoring. During this 96-hour period, multiple complement levels were obtained. These complement levels were then compared in pulmonary dysfunction and ARDS patients. ARDS patients had significantly higher C3a and C5a values after the patients were selected as high risk. These results suggest that the amount of complement activated in patients with incipient respiratory failure correlates with the severity of eventual pulmonary insult. The use of arterial blood gases and C3a and C5a levels should allow better and earlier definition of patients at risk for ARDS. PMID:3260964

  11. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculous Pleuritis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Wang, Mao-Yun; Liu, Dan; Zhu, Hui; Yang, Sai; Liang, Bin-Miao; Liang, Zong-An

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary paragonimiasis is a food-borne zoonosis with a wide variety of radiologic findings, which sometimes can be confused with tuberculosis and carcinoma. Therefore, differential diagnosis is always warranted. A 43-year-old male farmer, with productive cough, blood-tinged sputum and chest pain, as well as patchy consolidation and pleural effusions in chest computer tomography, was misdiagnosed of community-acquired pneumonia and tuberculosis. Complete blood cell count, sputum smear and culture, chest computer tomography, thoracoscopy, and biopsy. The diagnosis of pulmonary paragonimiasis was established due to the finding of Charcot–Leyden crystals in the pleural necrosis, and antibodies against Paragonimus westermani in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Paragonimiasis should be considered as a possibility in the differential diagnosis of tuberculosis. Thoracoscopy is an effective and valuable technology that can help make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:27082624

  12. [The effect of high-frequency ventilation of the lungs on the pulmonary and systemic circulations in microembolism of the pulmonary artery].

    PubMed

    Sanotskaia, N V; Vyzhigina, M A; Matsievskiĭ, D D; Luk'ianov, M V; Aleĭnikov, S O

    1993-11-01

    The linear and volumetric blood flow velocity in the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery conus, right-left ventricular ejection balance, pulmonary and femoral arterial blood pressures, pulmonary microcirculation in fat pulmonary microembolism induced during the routine and high-frequency jet lung ventilation (HFJLV) were studied by ultrasonic techniques in acute experiments on cats with open chest under nembutal narcosis. Pulmonary microembolism was shown to resulted in 487 and 252% increases in pulmonary vascular resistance during the routine and HFJLVs, respectively. There were also 167 and 127% increases in mean pulmonary pressure and 60 and 34% decreases in the volumetric velocity of pulmonary blood flow. The linear velocity of pulmonary blood flow was unchanged with routine lung ventilation, whereas it decreased by 68% with HFJLV. Microembolism impaired the balance between right and left ventricular ejections with blood being redistributed into the greater circulation. The imbalance lasted 5-7 min during HFJLV, while with the routine lung ventilation it was preserved up to the end of the experiment, and systemic blood pressure and total peripheral vascular resistance decreased. Alveolar edema developed in interstitial pulmonary edema. The animals' death occurred 40-60 min later. PMID:8312529

  13. Pulmonary artery segmentation and quantification in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linguraru, Marius George; Mukherjee, Nisha; Van Uitert, Robert L.; Summers, Ronald M.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Machado, Roberto F.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a known complication associated with sickle-cell disease; roughly 75% of sickle cell disease-afflicted patients have pulmonary arterial hypertension at the time of death. This prospective study investigates the potential of image analysis to act as a surrogate for presence and extent of disease, and whether the size change of the pulmonary arteries of sickle cell patients could be linked to sickle-cell associated pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary CT-Angiography scans from sickle-cell patients were obtained and retrospectively analyzed. Randomly selected pulmonary CT-Angiography studies from patients without sickle-cell anemia were used as negative controls. First, images were smoothed using anisotropic diffusion. Then, a combination of fast marching and geodesic active contours level sets were employed to segment the pulmonary artery. An algorithm based on fast marching methods was used to compute the centerline of the segmented arteries. From the centerline, the diameters at the pulmonary trunk and first branch of the pulmonary arteries were measured automatically. Arterial diameters were normalized to the width of the thoracic cavity, patient weight and body surface. Results show that the pulmonary trunk and first right and left pulmonary arterial branches at the pulmonary trunk junction are significantly larger in diameter with increased blood flow in sickle-cell anemia patients as compared to controls (p values of 0.0278 for trunk and 0.0007 for branches). CT with image processing shows great potential as a surrogate indicator of pulmonary hemodynamics or response to therapy, which could be an important tool for drug discovery and noninvasive clinical surveillance.

  14. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia; Loffler syndrome; Eosinophilic pneumonia; Pneumonia - eosinophilic ... simple pulmonary eosinophilia is a severe type of pneumonia called acute idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia.

  15. Sevoflurane-Sulfobutylether-β-Cyclodextrin Complex: Preparation, Characterization, Cellular Toxicity, Molecular Modeling and Blood-Brain Barrier Transport Studies.

    PubMed

    Shityakov, Sergey; Puskás, István; Pápai, Katalin; Salvador, Ellaine; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola; Broscheit, Jens-Albert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to study the ability of sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBEβCD) to form an inclusion complex with sevoflurane (SEV), a volatile anesthetic with poor water solubility. The inclusion complex was prepared, characterized and its cellular toxicity and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeation potential of the formulated SEV have also been examined for the purpose of controlled drug delivery. The SEV-SBEβCD complex was nontoxic to the primary brain microvascular endothelial (pEND) cells at a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane. The inclusion complex exhibited significantly higher BBB permeation profiles as compared with the reference substance (propranolol) concerning calculated apparent permeability values (Papp). In addition, SEV binding affinity to SBEβCD was confirmed by a minimal Gibbs free energy of binding (ΔGbind) value of -1.727 ± 0.042 kcal·mol-1 and an average binding constant (Kb) of 53.66 ± 9.24 mM indicating rapid drug liberation from the cyclodextrin amphiphilic cavity. PMID:26046323

  16. Characterization of surface interleukin-2 receptor expression on gated populations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Sweat, J M; Johnson, C M; Marikar, Y; Gibbs, E P

    2005-12-15

    An in vitro system to determine surface interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) expression on mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from free-ranging manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris was developed. Human recombinant IL-2, conjugated with a fluorescein dye was used in conjunction with flow cytometric analysis to determine changes in surface expression of IL-2R at sequential times over a 48-h period of in vitro stimulation. Surface expression of IL-2R was detected on manatee PBMC, which also cross-reacted with an anti-feline pan T-cell marker. An expression index (EI) was calculated by comparing mitogen-activated and non-activated PBMC. Based on side- and forward-scatter properties, flow cytometric analysis showed an increase in the number of larger, more granular "lymphoblasts" following concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation. The appearance of lymphoblasts was correlated with an increase in their surface expression of IL-2 receptors. Surface IL-2R expression, in Con A-stimulated PBMC, was detected at 16 h, peaked at 24-36 h, and began to decrease by 48 h. Characterization of the IL-2R expression should provide additional information on the health status of manatees, and the effect of their sub lethal exposure to brevetoxin. PMID:16112745

  17. Characterization, biodegradability and blood compatibility of poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] based poly(ester-urethane)s.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiaoyan; Cheng, Shaoting; Li, Zibiao; Xu, Kaitian; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-09-15

    Poly(ester-urethane)s (PUs) were synthesized using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) or toluene diisocyanate (TDI) to join short chains (M(n) = 2000) of poly(R-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) diols and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) diols with different feed ratios under different reaction conditions. The multiblock copolymers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). XRD spectra and second DSC heat thermograms of the multiblock copolymers revealed that the crystallization of both PHB and PCL segments was mutually restricted, and, especially, the PCL segment limited the cold crystallization of the PHB segment. The SEM of platelet adhesion experiments showed that the hemocompatibility was affected to some extent by the chain flexibility of the polymers. Hydrolysis studies demonstrated that the hydrolytic degradation of PUs was generated from the scission of their ester bonds or/and urethane bonds. Simultaneously, the rate of ester bond scission was determined to some extent by the crystallization degree, which was further affected by the configuration of polymer chains. These highly elastic multiblock copolymers combining hemocompatibility and biodegradability may be developed into blood contact implant materials for biomedical applications. PMID:18671259

  18. Current Approach to Diagnosis and Management of Pulmonary Eosinophilic Syndromes: Eosinophilic Pneumonias, Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis, and Hypereosinophilic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sergew, Amen; Fernández Pérez, Evans R

    2016-06-01

    Eosinophils play a key role in orchestrating the complex clinicopathological pulmonary and extrapulmonary disease features in patients with eosinophilic syndromes. Eosinophilic pulmonary syndromes consist of a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of peripheral blood eosinophilia and/or eosinophilic-related pulmonary impairment. These disorders can present with varying degrees of organ involvement, and while their presentation may be similar, it is important to define the disease state, as management and prognosis differ. In this article, we discuss acute and chronic eosinophilic pneumonias, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and the hypereosinophilic syndromes. The mainstay of therapy for these disorders has been corticosteroids; however, recent and ongoing studies have provided strong grounds for optimism for specific targeted treatment approaches. PMID:27231866

  19. Imaging of extralobar pulmonary sequestration in a patient with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect and multiple aorto-pulmonary collateral arteries with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Greil, Gerald F; Schoebinger, Max; Kuettner, Axel; Schaefer, Jürgen F; Hofbeck, Michael; Claussen, Claus D; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Sieverding, Ludger

    2008-01-01

    Complex pulmonary vascular blood supply is common in patients with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, major systemic to pulmonary collateral arteries and hypoplastic or deficient central pulmonary arteries. An extralobar lung sequestration, which has not been described previously in these patients, was imaged in a 6-week-old infant with multidetector computed tomography with sub-millimeter resolution. Arterial and venous vessels were analyzed using three-dimensional vascular exploration tools and results were confirmed with cardiac catheterization. PMID:18715464

  20. Changes in Caspase-3, B Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma-2, Interleukin-6, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene Expression after Human Umbilical Cord Blood Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transfusion in Pulmonary Hypertension Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwan Chang; Lee, Jae Chul; Lee, Hyeryon; Cho, Min-Sun; Choi, Soo Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Failure of vascular smooth muscle apoptosis and inflammatory response in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a current research focus. The goals of this study were to determine changes in select gene expressions in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rat models after human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) transfusion. Materials and Methods The rats were separated into 3 groups i.e., control group (C group), M group (MCT 60 mg/kg), and U group (hUCB-MSCs transfusion) a week after MCT injection. Results TUNEL assay showed that the U group had significantly lowered positive apoptotic cells in the lung tissues, as compared with the M group. mRNA of caspase-3, B cell leukemia/lymphoma (Bcl)-2, interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the lung tissues were greatly reduced at week 4 in the U group. Immunohistochemical staining of the lung tissues also demonstrated a similar pattern, with the exception of IL-6. The protein expression of caspase-3, Bcl-2 VEGF, IL-6, TNF-α and brain natriuretic peptide in the heart tissues were significantly lower in the U group, as compared with the M group at week 2. Furthermore, the protein expression of VEGF, IL-6 and BNP in the heart tissues were significantly lower in the U group at week 4. Collagen content in the heart tissues was significantly lower in the U group, as compared with M group at weeks 2 and 4, respectively. Conclusion hUCB-MSCs could prevent inflammation, apoptosis and remodeling in MCT-induced PAH rat models. PMID:26798389

  1. Pulmonary hypertension in infants with congenital heart defects: are leukotrienes involved?

    PubMed Central

    Serraf, A.; Gascard, J-P.; Bruniaux, J.; Labat, C.; Planche, C.

    1997-01-01

    The circulating levels of leukotriene E4 in infants with congenital heart defects, increased pulmonary blood flow and pulmonary arterial hypertension, were determined and compared with infants with decreased pulmonary blood flow (Tetralogy of Fallot). There was no correlation (r=0.38) between the pulmonary arterial pressure (56 ± 4 mmHg) and the leukotriene E4 levels (1.37 ± 0.67 ng/ml blood) measured in peripheral blood samples from the hypertensive group prior to surgery. There was considerable variation in the detectable leukotriene E4 levels in blood samples from different patients. The levels detected in the blood samples between the two groups of patients was similar. These data suggest that neither the surgical repair during cardiopulmonary bypass nor the pulmonary hypertension appeared to modify the leukotriene E4 blood levels in the small number of patients studied. PMID:18472866

  2. Bronchovascular role in pulmonary congestion.

    PubMed

    McIlveen, S A

    2000-12-01

    1. A postulated role for the bronchial circulation in the development of pulmonary congestion may be based on recent studies of bronchovascular control. 2. The bronchial circulation is the nutrient blood supply of the conducting airways and, therefore, plays an important role in the function of the bronchial mucosa. Mucosal swelling secondary to elevation of mucosal capillary hydrostatic pressure may decrease airway calibre, increase resistance to airflow and precipitate symptoms of pulmonary congestion. 3. Resting mucosal capillary hydrostatic pressure is relatively constant due to autoregulation of bronchial blood flow and is maintained low by nett bronchovascular constriction due to the dominance of autonomic vasoconstriction over nitric oxidedependent vasodilatation. 4. Bronchial blood flow is also regulated by cardiac afferent reflexes. Stimulation of cardiac vagal and spinal afferents produces vasodilatation and vasoconstriction, respectively. Tonic activity of cardiac spinal afferents probably contributes to the resting autonomic vasoconstriction. 5. Therefore, mild heart failure, which is associated with abnormal cardiovascular reflex function, may decrease cardiac spinal afferent-mediated bronchial vasoconstriction and produce active dilatation due to stimulation of cardiac vagal afferents by excessive myocardial stretch, leading to bronchial mucosal swelling and pulmonary congestion. PMID:11117228

  3. Characterization of extracellular vesicles in whole blood: Influence of pre-analytical parameters and visualization of vesicle-cell interactions using imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fendl, Birgit; Weiss, René; Fischer, Michael B; Spittler, Andreas; Weber, Viktoria

    2016-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles are central players in intercellular communication and are released from the plasma membrane under tightly regulated conditions, depending on the physiological and pathophysiological state of the producing cell. Their heterogeneity requires a spectrum of methods for isolation and characterization, where pre-analytical parameters have profound impact on vesicle analysis, particularly in blood, since sampling, addition of anticoagulants, as well as post-sampling vesicle generation may influence the outcome. Here, we characterized microvesicles directly in whole blood using a combination of flow cytometry and imaging flow cytometry. We assessed the influence of sample agitation, anticoagulation, and temperature on post-sampling vesicle generation, and show that vesicle counts remained stable over time in samples stored without agitation. Storage with gentle rolling mimicking agitation, in contrast, resulted in strong release of platelet-derived vesicles in blood anticoagulated with citrate or heparin, whereas vesicle counts remained stable upon anticoagulation with EDTA. Using imaging flow cytometry, we could visualize microvesicles adhering to blood cells and revealed an anticoagulant-dependent increase in vesicle-cell aggregates over time. We demonstrate that vesicles adhere preferentially to monocytes and granulocytes in whole blood, while no microvesicles could be visualized on lymphocytes. Our data underscore the relevance of pre-analytical parameters in vesicle analysis and demonstrate that imaging flow cytometry is a suitable tool to study the interaction of extracellular vesicles with their target cells. PMID:27444383

  4. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuji; Trapnell, Bruce C

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare syndrome characterized by the accumulation of surfactant in alveoli and terminal airways resulting in respiratory failure. PAP comprises part of a spectrum of disorders of surfactant homeostasis (clearance and production). The surfactant production disorders are caused by mutations in genes required for normal surfactant production. The PAP syndrome is identified based on history, radiologic, and bronchoalveolar lavage and/or histopathologic findings. The diagnosis of PAP-causing diseases in secondary PAP requires further studies. Whole-lung lavage is the current standard therapy and promising new pharmacologic therapies are in development. PMID:27514590

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factors in human pulmonary arterial hypertension: a link to the intrinsic myeloid abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Farha, Samar; Asosingh, Kewal; Xu, Weiling; Sharp, Jacqueline; George, Deepa; Comhair, Suzy; Park, Margaret; Tang, W H Wilson; Loyd, James E; Theil, Karl; Tubbs, Raymond; Hsi, Eric; Lichtin, Alan; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2011-03-31

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a proliferative vasculopathy characterized by high circulating CD34(+)CD133(+) proangiogenic progenitors, and endothelial cells that have pathologic expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α (HIF-1α). Here, CD34(+)CD133(+) progenitor cell numbers are shown to be higher in PAH bone marrow, blood, and pulmonary arteries than in healthy controls. The HIF-inducible myeloid-activating factors erythropoietin, stem cell factor (SCF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are also present at higher than normal levels in PAH blood, and related to disease severity. Primary endothelial cells harvested from human PAH lungs produce greater HGF and progenitor recruitment factor stromal-derived factor 1 α (SDF-1α) than control lung endothelial cells, and thus may contribute to bone marrow activation. Even though PAH patients had normal numbers of circulating blood elements, hematopoietic alterations in myeloid and erythroid lineages and reticulin fibrosis identified a subclinical myeloproliferative process. Unexpectedly, evaluation of bone marrow progenitors and reticulin in nonaffected family members of patients with familial PAH revealed similar myeloid abnormalities. Altogether, the results show that PAH is linked to myeloid abnormalities, some of which may be related to increased production of HIF-inducible factors by diseased pulmonary vasculature, but findings in nonaffected family suggest myeloid abnormalities may be intrinsic to the disease process. PMID:21258008

  6. Hypoxia-inducible factors in human pulmonary arterial hypertension: a link to the intrinsic myeloid abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Asosingh, Kewal; Xu, Weiling; Sharp, Jacqueline; George, Deepa; Comhair, Suzy; Park, Margaret; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Loyd, James E.; Theil, Karl; Tubbs, Raymond; Hsi, Eric; Lichtin, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a proliferative vasculopathy characterized by high circulating CD34+CD133+ proangiogenic progenitors, and endothelial cells that have pathologic expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α (HIF-1α). Here, CD34+CD133+ progenitor cell numbers are shown to be higher in PAH bone marrow, blood, and pulmonary arteries than in healthy controls. The HIF-inducible myeloid-activating factors erythropoietin, stem cell factor (SCF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are also present at higher than normal levels in PAH blood, and related to disease severity. Primary endothelial cells harvested from human PAH lungs produce greater HGF and progenitor recruitment factor stromal-derived factor 1 α (SDF-1α) than control lung endothelial cells, and thus may contribute to bone marrow activation. Even though PAH patients had normal numbers of circulating blood elements, hematopoietic alterations in myeloid and erythroid lineages and reticulin fibrosis identified a subclinical myeloproliferative process. Unexpectedly, evaluation of bone marrow progenitors and reticulin in nonaffected family members of patients with familial PAH revealed similar myeloid abnormalities. Altogether, the results show that PAH is linked to myeloid abnormalities, some of which may be related to increased production of HIF-inducible factors by diseased pulmonary vasculature, but findings in nonaffected family suggest myeloid abnormalities may be intrinsic to the disease process. PMID:21258008

  7. Pulmonary vascular remodelling in a high-altitude Aymara Indian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Donald; Williams, David

    1991-12-01

    A histological study of the pulmonary vasculature in a young male high-altitude Aymara Indian revealed four aspects of interest. There was muscularization of the terminal portion of the pulmonary arterial tree to involve pulmonary arterioles as small as 15 μm in diameter, thus forming a basis for the slightly increased pulmonary vascular resistance of native highlanders. Intimal longitudinal muscle was found in pulmonary arteries and arterioles and thought to be due to chronic alveolar hypoxia. Inner muscular tubes similar to those found in chronic obstructive lung disease were present. Pulmonary veins and venules also showed intimal muscularization suggesting that alveolar hypoxia affects vascular smooth muscle cells per se irrespective of their situation. The nature of the remodelling in a pulmonary blood vessel depends on a combination of hypoxia and haemodynamics.

  8. [Pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Söffker, Gerold; Kluge, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is an important differential diagnosis of acute chest pain. The clinical signs are often non-specific. However, diagnosis and therapy must be done quickly in order to reduce morbidity and mortality. The new (2014) European guidelines for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) focus on risk-adapted diagnostic algorithms and prognosis adapted therapy concepts. According to the hemodynamic presentation the division in a high-risk group (unstable patient with persistent hypotension or shock) or in non-high-risk groups (hemodynamically stable) was proposed. In the high-risk group the immediate diagnosis is usually done by multidetector spiral computed tomography (MDCT) and primarily the medical therapy of right ventricular dysfunction and thrombolysis is recommended.In the non-high-risk group, this is subdivided into an intermediate-risk group and low-risk group, the diagnosis algorithm based on the PE-pretest probability--determined by validated scores. Moreover, the diagnosis is usually secured by MDCT--the new gold standard in the PE-diagnosis, scores, or it can be primarily ruled out due to the high negative predictive value of D-dimer determination. To improve the prognostic risk stratification in non-high-risk group patients the additional detection of right ventricular dysfunction (MDCT, echocardiography), cardiac biomarkers (troponin, NT proBNP) and validated scores (e.g. Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index) is recommended. Therefore, the intermediate-risk group can be further subdivided. For treatment of non-high-risk group patients, the initial anticoagulation (except those with severe renal insufficiency) using low molecular weight heparin/fondaparinux and conversion to vitamin-K antagonists or alternatively with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAK) is recommended. Hemodynamically stable patients with right ventricular dysfunction and myocardial ischemia (Intermediate-high-risk group patients) but with clinically progressive hemodynamic

  9. Peptide-micelle hybrids containing fasudil for targeted delivery to the pulmonary arteries and arterioles to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nilesh; Ibrahim, Hany M; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the respirability and efficacy of peptide-micelle hybrid nanoparticles as carriers for inhalational therapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). CARSKNKDC (CAR), a cell-penetrating and lung-homing peptide, conjugated polyethylene glycol-distearoyl-phosphoethanolamine micelles containing fasudil, an investigational anti-PAH drug, were prepared by solvent evaporation method and characterized for various physicochemical properties. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacological efficacy of hybrid particles containing fasudil were evaluated in healthy rats and monocrotaline-induced PAH rats. CAR micelles containing fasudil had an entrapment efficiency of approximately 58%, showed controlled release of the drug, and were monodispersed with an average size of approximately 14 nm. Nuclear magnetic resonance scan confirmed the drug's presence in the core of peptide-micelle hybrid particles. Compared with plain micelles, CAR peptide increased the cellular uptake by approximately 1.7-fold and extended the drug half-life by approximately fivefold. The formulations were more prone to accumulate in the pulmonary vasculature than in the peripheral blood, which is evident from the ratio of the extent of reduction of pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. On the whole, this study demonstrates that peptide-polymer hybrid micelles can serve as inhalational carriers for PAH therapy. PMID:25266507

  10. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Deep Vein Thrombosis Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan Overweight and Obesity Send ... often is a complication of a condition called deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In DVT, blood clots form in the ...

  11. Extensive pulmonary sarcoid reaction in a patient with BMPR-2 associated idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Braam, Evelien A J E; Quanjel, Marian J R; Van Haren-Willems, Jolanda H G M; Van Oosterhout, Matthijs F M; Vink, Aryan; Heijdra, Yvonne F; Kwakkel-van Erp, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive life-threatening disease characterized by vascular remodeling. There is evidence that varied immune mechanism play an important role in progression of pulmonary hypertension.  We describe a case of a 35-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and a novel BMPR2 mutation, who underwent a successful lung transplantation.  Extensive granulomatous inflammation was seen in the resected lungs. The granulomatous inflammation found in the histology supports  a sarcoid-like reaction due to pulmonary hypertension in the context of the BMPR2 mutation. PMID:27537724

  12. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Shovlin, Claire L

    2014-12-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ~1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  13. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ∼1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  14. Pulmonary function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We report the successful collection of a large quantity of human resting pulmonary function data on the SLS-1 mission. Preliminary analysis suggests that cardiac stroke volumes are high on orbit, and that an adaptive reduction takes at least several days, and in fact may still be in progress after 9 days on orbit. It also suggests that pulmonary capillary blood volumes are high, and remain high on orbit, but that the pulmonary interstitium is not significantly impacted. The data further suggest that the known large gravitational gradients of lung function have only a modest influence on single breath tests such as the SBN washout. They account for only approximately 25% of the phase III slope of nitrogen, on vital capacity SBN washouts. These gradients are only a moderate source of the cardiogenic oscillations seen in argon (bolus gas) and nitrogen (resident gas), on such tests. They may have a greater role in generating the normal CO2 oscillations, as here the phase relationship to argon and nitrogen reverses in microgravity, at least at mid exhalation in those subjects studied to date. Microgravity may become a useful tool in establishing the nature of the non-gravitational mechanisms that can now be seen to play such a large part in the generation of intra-breath gradients and oscillations of expired gas concentration. Analysis of microgravity multibreath nitrogen washouts, single breath washouts from more physiological pre-inspiratory volumes, both using our existing SLS-1 data, and data from the upcoming D-2 and SLS-2 missions, should be very fruitful in this regard.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Computer-assisted diagnostic tool to quantify the pulmonary veins in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajamovich, Guido H.; Pamulapati, Vivek; Alam, Shoaib; Mehari, Alem; Kato, Gregory J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a common cause of death among patients with sickle cell disease. This study investigates the use of pulmonary vein analysis to assist the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension non-invasively with CT-Angiography images. The characterization of the pulmonary veins from CT presents two main challenges. Firstly, the number of pulmonary veins is unknown a priori and secondly, the contrast material is degraded when reaching the pulmonary veins, making the edges of these vessels to appear faint. Each image is first denoised and a fast marching approach is used to segment the left atrium and pulmonary veins. Afterward, a geodesic active contour is employed to isolate the left atrium. A thinning technique is then used to extract the skeleton of the atrium and the veins. The locations of the pulmonary veins ostia are determined by the intersection of the skeleton and the contour of the atrium. The diameters of the pulmonary veins are measured in each vein at fixed distances from the corresponding ostium, and for each distance, the sum of the diameters of all the veins is computed. These indicators are shown to be significantly larger in sickle-cell patients with pulmonary hypertension as compared to controls (p-values < 0.01).

  16. Pulmonary perfusion during anesthesia and mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, G

    2005-06-01

    Cardiac output and the pulmonary perfusion can be affected by anesthesia and by mechanical ventilation. The changes contribute to impeded oxygenation of the blood. The major determinant of perfusion distribution in the lung is the relation between alveolar and pulmonary capillary pressures. Perfusion increases down the lung, due to hydrostatic forces. Since atelectasis is located in dependent lung regions, perfusion of non-ventilated lung parenchyma is common, producing shunt of around 8-10% of cardiac output. In addition, non-gravitational inhomogeneity of perfusion, that can be greater than the gravitational inhomogeneity, adds to impeded oxygenation of blood. Essentially all anaesthetics exert some, although mild, cardiodepressant action with one exception, ketamine. Ketamine may also increase pulmonary artery pressure, whereas other agents have little effect on pulmonary vascular tone. Mechanical ventilation impedes venous return and pushes blood flow downwards to dependent lung regions, and the effect may be striking with higher levels of PEEP. During one-lung anesthesia, there is shunt blood flow both in the non-ventilated and the ventilated lung, and shunt can be much larger in the ventilated lung than thought of. Recruitment manoeuvres shall be directed to the ventilated lung and other physical and pharmacological measures can be taken to manipulate blood flow in one lung anesthesia. PMID:15886595

  17. 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging characterization of acute blood-brain-barrier disruption achieved with intracranial irreversible electroporation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Robertson, John L; Olson, John D; Johnson, Annette J; Ellis, Thomas L; Davalos, Rafael V

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) presents a significant obstacle to the delivery of systemically administered chemotherapeutics for the treatment of brain cancer. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technology that uses pulsed electric fields for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. We hypothesized that there is a minimal electric field at which BBB disruption occurs surrounding an IRE-induced zone of ablation and that this transient response can be measured using gadolinium (Gd) uptake as a surrogate marker for BBB disruption. The study was performed in a Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) compliant facility and had Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approval. IRE ablations were performed in vivo in normal rat brain (n = 21) with 1-mm electrodes (0.45 mm diameter) separated by an edge-to-edge distance of 4 mm. We used an ECM830 pulse generator to deliver ninety 50-μs pulse treatments (0, 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 V/cm) at 1 Hz. The effects of applied electric fields and timing of Gd administration (-5, +5, +15, and +30 min) was assessed by systematically characterizing IRE-induced regions of cell death and BBB disruption with 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic evaluations. Statistical analysis on the effect of applied electric field and Gd timing was conducted via Fit of Least Squares with α = 0.05 and linear regression analysis. The focal nature of IRE treatment was confirmed with 3D MRI reconstructions with linear correlations between volume of ablation and electric field. Our results also demonstrated that IRE is an ablation technique that kills brain tissue in a focal manner depicted by MRI (n = 16) and transiently disrupts the BBB adjacent to the ablated area in a voltage-dependent manner as seen with Evan's Blue (n = 5) and Gd administration. PMID:23226293

  18. 7.0-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characterization of Acute Blood-Brain-Barrier Disruption Achieved with Intracranial Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Robertson, John L.; Olson, John D.; Johnson, Annette J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) presents a significant obstacle to the delivery of systemically administered chemotherapeutics for the treatment of brain cancer. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technology that uses pulsed electric fields for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. We hypothesized that there is a minimal electric field at which BBB disruption occurs surrounding an IRE-induced zone of ablation and that this transient response can be measured using gadolinium (Gd) uptake as a surrogate marker for BBB disruption. The study was performed in a Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) compliant facility and had Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approval. IRE ablations were performed in vivo in normal rat brain (n = 21) with 1-mm electrodes (0.45 mm diameter) separated by an edge-to-edge distance of 4 mm. We used an ECM830 pulse generator to deliver ninety 50-μs pulse treatments (0, 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 V/cm) at 1 Hz. The effects of applied electric fields and timing of Gd administration (−5, +5, +15, and +30 min) was assessed by systematically characterizing IRE-induced regions of cell death and BBB disruption with 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic evaluations. Statistical analysis on the effect of applied electric field and Gd timing was conducted via Fit of Least Squares with α = 0.05 and linear regression analysis. The focal nature of IRE treatment was confirmed with 3D MRI reconstructions with linear correlations between volume of ablation and electric field. Our results also demonstrated that IRE is an ablation technique that kills brain tissue in a focal manner depicted by MRI (n = 16) and transiently disrupts the BBB adjacent to the ablated area in a voltage-dependent manner as seen with Evan's Blue (n = 5) and Gd administration. PMID:23226293

  19. Characterization of MicroRNAs from Orientobilharzia turkestanicum, a Neglected Blood Fluke of Human and Animal Health Significance

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jing-Hua; Nisbet, Alasdair J.; Chang, Qiao-Cheng; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Huang, Si-Yang; Zou, Feng-Cai; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-01-01

    The neglected blood flukes Orientobilharzia spp. belonging to the Platyhelminthes, infect animals in a number of countries of the world, and cause cercarial dermatitis in humans, as well as significant diseases and even death in economically-important animals. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are now considered to be a key mechanism of gene regulation. Herein, we investigated the global miRNA expression profile of adult O. turkestanicum using next-generation sequencing technology and real-time quantitative PCR, to gain further information on the role of these molecules in host invasion and the parasitic lifestyle of this species. A total of 13.48 million high quality reads were obtained out of 13.78 million raw sequencing reads, with 828 expressed miRNAs identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the miRNAs of O. turkestanicum were still rapidly evolving and there was a “directed mutation” pattern compared with that of other species. Target mRNAs were successfully predicted to 518 miRNAs. These targets included energy metabolism, transcription initiation factors, signal transduction, growth factor receptors. miRNAs targeting egg proteins, including major egg antigen p40, and heat shock proteins were also found. Enrichment analysis indicated enrichment for mRNAs involved in catalytic, binding, transcription regulators and translation regulators. The present study represented the first large-scale characterization of O. turkestanicum miRNAs, which provides novel resources for better understanding the complex biology of this zoonotic parasite, which, in turn, has implications for the effective control of the disease it causes. PMID:23071694

  20. Characterization of carbapenem resistance mechanisms and integrons in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from blood samples in a French hospital.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Cavalié, Laurent; Dubois, Damien; Oswald, Eric; Torres, Carmen; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), porin OprD, integrons, virulence factors and the clonal relationships were characterized in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IRPA) isolates. Fifty-six IRPA strains were recovered from blood samples of different patients at a Toulouse teaching hospital from 2011 to 2013. Susceptibility testing of 14 antibiotics was performed by the disc diffusion method. Detection and characterization of MBLs, the oprD gene and integrons were studied by PCR and sequencing. Thirteen genes involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa were analysed. Molecular typing of IRPA strains was performed by PFGE and multilocus sequence typing. In this study, 61 % of the IRPA isolates showed a multi-resistance phenotype. The MBL phenotype, detected in three isolates (5.4 %), was linked to the blaVIM-2 gene. The oprD gene was amplified in 55 (98.2 %) IRPA strains, and variations were observed in 54 of them. Insertion sequences (IS) truncating oprD were detected in eight IRPA strains, with the novel ISPa56 identified in two strains. Class 1 integrons were detected in 24 (42.9 %) IRPA strains. The blaVIM-2 gene was found inside the class 1 integron arrangements. The new integrons In1054 (intI1-aacA56-qacEΔ1-sul1) and In1160 (intI1-aacA4-aacC1d-ISKpn4-gcuE-qacEΔ1-sul1) have been described for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in this study. A high clonal diversity was found in our strains. Among the variety of sequence types (STs) found, ST175, ST233, ST235, ST244 and ST654 were noteworthy as epidemic clones. In conclusion, 5.4 % of IRPA strains showed an MBL phenotype linked to the blaVIM-2 gene. The identified oprD high polymorphism could be implicated in the variable resistance to carbapenems in IRPA strains. The dissemination of high-risk clones is a cause of concern. PMID:26838942

  1. Pulmonary vascular resistance in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, N J; Shinebourne, E A; Scallan, M J; Sopwith, T A; Denison, D M

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary and systemic blood flow and pulmonary vascular resistance were measured in 21 children with congenital heart disease. Blood flow was calculated by the direct Fick method, using measurements of metabolic gas exchange obtained by remote respiratory mass spectrometry. The observations showed that the administration of oxygen caused an appreciable fall in pulmonary vascular resistance in 16 of the 21 children studied and that this fall would not have been appreciated from a study of pulmonary arterial pressure alone as it was masked by a corresponding rise in blood flow. In 10 of 14 children, in whom superior vena caval blood was also sampled, the rise in flow was largely due to an increase in intracardiac left to right shunt. It was accompanied by widening of the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, perhaps due to imperfect gas equilibration within the lung. PMID:6515594

  2. [Pulmonary compromise in leptospirosis].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, J E; Marchiori, E dos S; Guedes e Silva, J B; Netto, B A; Tavares, W; de Paula, A V

    1992-01-01

    To study the pulmonary complications in leptospirosis case records of 23 such patients admitted at the Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Brasil, were reviewed. Hemoptysis were seen in 21.7% and sputal blood in 30.4% of patients. Arterial gasometry detected hypoxemia and hypocapnia in most cases. Thoracic radiology showed an alveolar pattern in 60% of the patients, alveolo-interstitial in 20%, interstitial in 6%, and in 14% the lungs were considered to be normal. Necropsy of 13 cases showed edema, congestion and hemorrhage in the lungs in all cases. Hyaline membrane was found in 30% and fibrin thrombi in 46% of these cases, resulting in a diagnosis of adult respiratory distress syndrome and acute disseminated intravascular coagulation (consumption coagulopathy) in leptospirosis. PMID:1308063

  3. Measurement of Pulmonary Flow Reserve and Pulmonary Index of Microcirculatory Resistance for Detection of Pulmonary Microvascular Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ilsar, Rahn; Chawantanpipat, Chirapan; Chan, Kim H.; Dobbins, Timothy A.; Waugh, Richard; Hennessy, Annemarie; Celermajer, David S.; Ng, Martin K. C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The pulmonary microcirculation is the chief regulatory site for resistance in the pulmonary circuit. Despite pulmonary microvascular dysfunction being implicated in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary vascular conditions, there are currently no techniques for the specific assessment of pulmonary microvascular integrity in humans. Peak hyperemic flow assessment using thermodilution-derived mean transit-time (Tmn) facilitate accurate coronary microcirculatory evaluation, but remain unvalidated in the lung circulation. Using a high primate model, we aimed to explore the use of Tmn as a surrogate of pulmonary blood flow for the purpose of measuring the novel indices Pulmonary Flow Reserve [PFR = (maximum hyperemic)/(basal flow)] and Pulmonary Index of Microcirculatory Resistance [PIMR = (maximum hyperemic distal pulmonary artery pressure)×(maximum hyperemic Tmn)]. Ultimately, we aimed to investigate the effect of progressive pulmonary microvascular obstruction on PFR and PIMR. Methods and Results Temperature- and pressure-sensor guidewires (TPSG) were placed in segmental pulmonary arteries (SPA) of 13 baboons and intravascular temperature measured. Tmn and hemodynamics were recorded at rest and following intra-SPA administration of the vasodilator agents adenosine (10–400 µg/kg/min) and papaverine (3–24 mg). Temperature did not vary with intra-SPA sensor position (0.010±0.009 v 0.010±0.009°C; distal v proximal; p = 0.1), supporting Tmn use in lung for the purpose of hemodynamic indices derivation. Adenosine (to 200 µg/kg/min) & papaverine (to 24 mg) induced dose-dependent flow augmentations (40±7% & 35±13% Tmn reductions v baseline, respectively; p<0.0001). PFR and PIMR were then calculated before and after progressive administration of ceramic microspheres into the SPA. Cumulative microsphere doses progressively reduced PFR (1.41±0.06, 1.26±0.19, 1.17±0.07 & 1.01±0.03; for 0, 104, 105 & 106 microspheres; p = 0.009) and

  4. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  5. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  6. Pulmonary actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Solmaz; Sevinir, Betul; Saraydaroglu, Ozlem; Gurpinar, Arif; Hacimustafaoglu, Mustafa

    2009-02-01

    Pulmonary actinomycosis is rarely reported in pediatric age. An 11-year-old girl with history of two-month back pain was admitted to our hospital. On physical examination respiratory sounds were diminished on the left upper lung. Chest radiograph revealed a mass in the left upper lobe. Computed tomography showed solitary lesion (5.6 x 4.5 cm in size) in the left upper lobe. We could not rule out the possibility of malignant thoracic tumor. The patient underwent surgery. Histological examination of the resected tissue revealed, numerous sulfur granules, characteristic of Actinomyces, surrounded by purulent exudates, which are consistent with actinomycosis. She was treated with penicillin G. The patient responded well to penicillin therapy and the lesions regressed completely. She remained well throughout the three-year follow-up. PMID:19129990

  7. Pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Tarbox, Abigail K.; Swaroop, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is responsible for approximately 100,000 to 200,000 deaths in the United States each year. With a diverse range of clinical presentations from asymptomatic to death, diagnosing PE can be challenging. Various resources are available, such as clinical scoring systems, laboratory data, and imaging studies which help guide clinicians in their work-up of PE. Prompt recognition and treatment are essential for minimizing the mortality and morbidity associated with PE. Advances in recognition and treatment have also enabled treatment of some patients in the home setting and limited the amount of time spent in the hospital. This article will review the risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment of PE. PMID:23724389

  8. Pulmonary disability in former Appalachian coal miners.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R. C.; Rachal, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    A prospective case-control study was undertaken to assess respiratory disability in 133 former coal miners who were claimants for "black lung" benefits. Consecutive assignment was made to either case or control group based on their chest radiograph having shown coal workers' pneumoconiosis or no coal workers' pneumoconiosis. A respiratory occupational survey was completed with physical examination that placed special emphasis on the cardiorespiratory systems. Subjects underwent pulmonary function testing while 92 of these also received arterial blood gases to assess respiratory disability and pulmonary insufficiency. Arterial blood gases were superior to spirometry in assessment of pulmonary insufficiency/disability. Smoking interacts with coal workers' pneumoconiosis to cause pulmonary insufficiency. The most frequent spirometric pattern was obstructive. Disability was caused by occupational injuries and comorbidities, both of which occurred with greater frequency in miners with coal workers' pneumoconiosis than in controls. Pulmonary insufficiency appears to be a better discriminator than respiratory disability in coal miners, suggesting that arterial blood gases replace spirometry in their evaluation. Greater emphasis on smoking intervention among coal miners should be given. Images Figure PMID:8803434

  9. Pulmonary chemoreflex and phrenic sympathetic efferents.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Szulczyk, P

    1993-11-01

    The pulmonary chemoreflex components such as reactions of phrenic sympathetic neuron (PhSN) activity, phrenic nerve activity, heart rate and blood pressure were tested in chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed cats. 10 micrograms to 160 micrograms phenylbiguanide (PBG) in 0.9% NaCl was injected into the pulmonary circulation. PBG injected into the right atrium (in 11 of 19 experiments) and into the pulmonary artery (in 5 of 8 experiments), evoked short-latency (1-1.4 sec) dose-dependent increase in PhSN activity accompanied by increase in blood pressure, and followed by decrease in these two variables. In all experiments, activity of the phrenic nerve was depressed, and bradycardia occurred after PBG injection. All responses to PBG injections into the pulmonary artery were abolished following bilateral vagotomy. In the same procedure related to the right atrium after vagotomy, the increases in PhSN activity and blood pressure were also abolished, although a decrease in heart rate, PhSN activity and in the amplitude of phrenic nerve discharges together with an increase in their frequency persisted. Our results suggest that short-latency increase in PhSN activity is a component of pulmonary chemoreflex. PMID:8272587

  10. Biological and physiological characterization of in vitro blood feeding in nymph and adult stages of Ornithodoros turicata (Acari: Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongyuan; Li, Andrew Y; Teel, Pete D; Pérez de León, Adalberto A; Seshu, Janakiram; Liu, Jingze

    2015-04-01

    Biological and physiological aspects of blood feeding in nymph and adult Ornithodoros turicata were investigated using an in vitro technique combined with electrophysiological recordings and respirometry. The duration of blood feeding through a Parafilm® membrane was similar (19.2-22.6 min) in both developmental stages. The mean (±SD) size of blood meal ingested by nymphs, females, and males was 44.2±17.9, 150.6±48.7, and 74.2±36.9 mg, respectively, representing a 2.5-, 2.8- and 3.0-fold increase from their respective unfed weights. Electrophysiological recordings of the pharyngeal pump during blood feeding revealed that ticks ingested blood at a rate of 6.1-6.4 suctions per second. Mean blood volume ingested per suction was 0.013 μl in females and 0.007 μl in both males and nymphs. Blood meal size (mg) correlated with unfed body weight (mg) (r(2)=0.50, p<0.05) and with blood volume ingested per suction (r(2)=0.71, p<0.05). Unfed ticks exhibited a circadian ventilation rhythm with discontinuous gas exchange pattern during the daytime and continuous pattern during nighttime. Mean standard metabolic rates (SMR, V̇(CO2)) in unfed nymphs, females and males of 1.4, 3.0 and 0.9 μl h(-1) increased to 2.0, 5.7 and 2.4 μl h(-1), respectively, after a blood meal. SMR correlated positively with blood meal size (r(2)=0.89, p<0.05). Mean coxal fluid weight excreted after a blood meal in nymphs, females, and males was 8.7, 20.0, and 7.7 mg, respectively, which represents 27.0%, 23.4% and 26.7% of their blood meal size. This study revealed biological and physiological characteristics of soft tick blood feeding and metabolism important to tick survival. PMID:25783956

  11. Imatinib in pulmonary arterial hypertension: c-Kit inhibition.

    PubMed

    Farha, Samar; Dweik, Raed; Rahaghi, Franck; Benza, Raymond; Hassoun, Paul; Frantz, Robert; Torres, Fernando; Quinn, Deborah A; Comhair, Suzy; Erzurum, Serpil; Asosingh, Kewal

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease characterized by severe remodeling of the pulmonary artery resulting in increased pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy and, ultimately, failure. Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells play a critical role in vascular homeostasis and have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of PAH. A proliferation of c-Kit(+) hematopoietic progenitors and mast cells has been noted in the remodeled vessels in PAH. Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets c-Kit, has been shown to be beneficial for patients with PAH. Here we hypothesize that the clinical benefit of imatinib in PAH could be related to c-Kit inhibition of progenitor cell mobilization and maturation into mast cells. As a corollary to the phase 3 study using imatinib in PAH, blood samples were collected from 12 patients prior to starting study drug (baseline) and while on treatment at weeks 4 and 24. Eight were randomized to imatinib and 4 to placebo. Circulating c-Kit(+) and CD34(+)CD133(+) hematopoietic progenitors as well as biomarkers of mast cell numbers and activation were measured. Circulating CD34(+)CD133(+) and c-Kit(+) progenitor cells as well as c-Kit(+)/CD34(+)CD133(+) decreased with imatinib therapy (all P < 0.05). In addition, total tryptase, a marker of mast cell load, dropped with imatinib therapy (P = 0.02) and was related to pulmonary vascular resistance (R = 0.7, P = 0.02). The findings support c-Kit inhibition as a potential mechanism of action of imatinib in PAH and suggest that tryptase is a potential biomarker of response to therapy. PMID:25621158

  12. Characterization of the T cell repertoire by deep T cell receptor sequencing in tissues and blood from patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, KENJI; HAZAMA, SHOICHI; YAMAGUCHI, RUI; IMOTO, SEIYA; TAKENOUCHI, HIROKO; INOUE, YUKA; KANEKIYO, SHINSUKE; SHINDO, YOSHITARO; MIYANO, SATORU; NAKAMURA, YUSUKE; KIYOTANI, KAZUMA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize infiltrated T cell clones that define the tumor immune environment and are important in the response to treatment in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). In order to explore predictive biomarkers for the efficacy of immunochemotherapies, T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire analysis was performed using blood samples and tumor tissues obtained from patients with advanced CRC that had been treated with a combination of five-cancer peptide vaccines and oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The TCR-α/β complementary DNAs (cDNAs), prepared from the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) obtained from 17 tumor tissues and 39 peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 9 CRC patients at various time points, were sequenced. The oligoclonal enrichment of certain TCR sequences was identified in tumor tissues and blood samples; however, only a few TCR sequences with a frequency of >0.1% were commonly detected in pre- and post-treatment tumor tissues, or in post-treatment blood and tissue samples. The average correlation coefficients of the TCR-α and TCR-β clonotype frequencies between the post-treatment tumor tissues and blood samples were 0.023 and 0.035, respectively, and were much lower compared with the correlation coefficients of the TCR-α and TCR-β clonotype frequencies between pre- and post-treatment blood samples (0.430 and 0.370, respectively), suggesting that T cell populations in tumor tissues vary from those in blood. Although the sample size was small, a tendency for the TCR diversity in tumor tissues to drastically decrease during the treatment was indicated in two patients, who exhibited a longer progression-free survival time. The results of the present study suggest that TCR diversity scores in tissues may be a useful predictive biomarker for the therapeutic effect of immunochemotherapy for patients with advanced CRC. PMID:27284367

  13. Blood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Blood disorders affect one or more parts of the blood and prevent ...

  14. Air pollution source apportionment before, during, and after the 2008 Beijing Olympics and association of sources to aldehydes and biomarkers of blood coagulation, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress in healthy young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemose, Brent A.

    Based on principal component analysis (PCA) of air pollution data collected during the Summer Olympic Games held in Beijing, China during 2008, the five source types of air pollution identified -- natural soil/road dust, vehicle and industrial combustion, vegetative burning, oil combustion, and secondary formation, were all distinctly lower during the Olympics. This was particularly true for vehicle and industrial combustion and oil combustion, and during the main games period between the opening and closing ceremonies. The reduction in secondary formation was reflective of a reduction in nitrogen oxides, but this also contributed to increased ozone concentrations during the Olympic period. Among three toxic aldehydes measured in Beijing during the same time period, only acetaldehyde had a reduction in mean concentration during the Olympic air pollution control period compared to the pre-Olympic period. Accordingly, acetaldehyde was significantly correlated with primary emission sources including vegetative burning and oil combustion, and with several pollutants emitted mainly from primary sources. In contrast, formaldehyde and acrolein increased during the Olympic air pollution control period; accordingly both were significantly correlated with ozone and with the secondary formation source type. These findings indicate primary sources may dominate for acetaldehyde while secondary sources may dominate for formaldehyde and acrolein. Biomarkers for pulmonary inflammation (exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH, exhaled nitric oxide, and EBC nitrite) and hemostasis and blood coagulation (vWF and sCD62p) were most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion, oil combustion, and vegetative burning. The systemic inflammation biomarker 8-OHdG was most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion. In contrast, the associations between the biomarkers and the aldehydes were generally not significant or in the hypothesized direction, although

  15. Pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Saey, D; Bernard, S; Gagnon, P; Laviolette, L; Soicher, J; Maltais, F; Esgagne, P; Coats, V; Devost, A-A

    2009-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and an important worldwide cause of disability and handicap. Centered around exercise training, pulmonary rehabilitation is a global, multidisciplinary, individualized and comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. Pulmonary rehabilitation is now well recognized as an effective and key intervention in the management of several respiratory diseases particularly in COPD. Modern and effective pulmonary rehabilitation programs are global, multidisciplinary, individualized and use comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. In the last two decades interest for pulmonary rehabilitation is on the rise and a growing literature including several guidelines is now available. This review addresses the recent developments in the broad area of pulmonary rehabilitation as well as new methods to consider in the development of future and better programs. Modern literature for rationale, physiopathological basis, structure, exercise training as well challenges for pulmonary rehabilitation programs are addressed. Among the main challenges of pulmonary rehabilitation, efforts have to be devoted to improve accessibility to early rehabilitation strategies, not only to patients with COPD but to those with other chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:19776711

  16. Pulmonary vasculature in COPD: The silent component.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Isabel; Piccari, Lucilla; Barberà, Joan Albert

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow obstruction that results from an inflammatory process affecting the airways and lung parenchyma. Despite major abnormalities taking place in bronchial and alveolar structures, changes in pulmonary vessels also represent an important component of the disease. Alterations in vessel structure are highly prevalent and abnormalities in their function impair gas exchange and may result in pulmonary hypertension (PH), an important complication of the disease associated with reduced survival and worse clinical course. The prevalence of PH is high in COPD, particularly in advanced stages, although it remains of mild to moderate severity in the majority of cases. Endothelial dysfunction, with imbalance between vasodilator/vasoconstrictive mediators, is a key determinant of changes taking place in pulmonary vasculature in COPD. Cigarette smoke products may perturb endothelial cells and play a critical role in initiating vascular changes. The concurrence of inflammation, hypoxia and emphysema further contributes to vascular damage and to the development of PH. The use of drugs that target endothelium-dependent signalling pathways, currently employed in pulmonary arterial hypertension, is discouraged in COPD due to the lack of efficacy observed in randomized clinical trials and because there is compelling evidence indicating that these drugs may worsen pulmonary gas exchange. The subgroup of patients with severe PH should be ideally managed in centres with expertise in both PH and chronic lung diseases because alterations of pulmonary vasculature might resemble those observed in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Because this condition entails poor prognosis, it warrants specialist treatment. PMID:27028849

  17. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should therefore be determined by a multidisciplinary expert team in a specialised centre. It is still a major challenge to identify sarcoidosis patients at risk for developing PH. There is no validated algorithm when to refer a patient suspected for PH, and PH analysis itself is difficult. Until present, there is no established therapy for PH in sarcoidosis. Besides optimal treatment for sarcoidosis, case series evaluating new therapeutic options involving PH-targeted therapy are arising for a subgroup of patients. This review summarises the current knowledge regarding the aetiology, diagnosis and possible treatment options for PH in sarcoidosis. PMID:27194118

  18. Blood sugar test - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink a certain amount of glucose ( oral glucose tolerance test ) How the Test will Feel When the ... a fasting blood glucose, HbA1c test , or glucose tolerance test , depending on your random blood glucose test ...

  19. Characterization of Transcription Factor Networks Involved in Umbilical Cord Blood CD34+ Stem Cells-Derived Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Biaoru; Ding, Lianghao; Yang, Chinrang; Kang, Baolin; Liu, Li; Story, Michael D.; Pace, Betty S.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal stem cells isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) possess a great capacity for proliferation and differentiation and serve as a valuable model system to study gene regulation. Expanded knowledge of the molecular control of hemoglobin synthesis will provide a basis for rational design of therapies for β-hemoglobinopathies. Transcriptome data are available for erythroid progenitors derived from adult stem cells, however studies to define molecular mechanisms controlling globin gene regulation during fetal erythropoiesis are limited. Here, we utilize UCB-CD34+ stem cells induced to undergo erythroid differentiation to characterize the transcriptome and transcription factor networks (TFNs) associated with the γ/β-globin switch during fetal erythropoiesis. UCB-CD34+ stem cells grown in the one-phase liquid culture system displayed a higher proliferative capacity than adult CD34+ stem cells. The γ/β-globin switch was observed after day 42 during fetal erythropoiesis in contrast to adult progenitors where the switch occurred around day 21. To gain insights into transcription factors involved in globin gene regulation, microarray analysis was performed on RNA isolated from UCB-CD34+ cell-derived erythroid progenitors harvested on day 21, 42, 49 and 56 using the HumanHT-12 Expression BeadChip. After data normalization, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified transcription factors (TFs) with significant changes in expression during the γ/β-globin switch. Forty-five TFs were silenced by day 56 (Profile-1) and 30 TFs were activated by day 56 (Profile-2). Both GSEA datasets were analyzed using the MIMI Cytoscape platform, which discovered TFNs centered on KLF4 and GATA2 (Profile-1) and KLF1 and GATA1 for Profile-2 genes. Subsequent shRNA studies in KU812 leukemia cells and human erythroid progenitors generated from UCB-CD34+ cells supported a negative role of MAFB in γ-globin regulation. The characteristics of erythroblasts derived from UCB-CD34+ stem cells

  20. Characterization of transcription factor networks involved in umbilical cord blood CD34+ stem cells-derived erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Biaoru; Ding, Lianghao; Yang, Chinrang; Kang, Baolin; Liu, Li; Story, Michael D; Pace, Betty S

    2014-01-01

    Fetal stem cells isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) possess a great capacity for proliferation and differentiation and serve as a valuable model system to study gene regulation. Expanded knowledge of the molecular control of hemoglobin synthesis will provide a basis for rational design of therapies for β-hemoglobinopathies. Transcriptome data are available for erythroid progenitors derived from adult stem cells, however studies to define molecular mechanisms controlling globin gene regulation during fetal erythropoiesis are limited. Here, we utilize UCB-CD34+ stem cells induced to undergo erythroid differentiation to characterize the transcriptome and transcription factor networks (TFNs) associated with the γ/β-globin switch during fetal erythropoiesis. UCB-CD34+ stem cells grown in the one-phase liquid culture system displayed a higher proliferative capacity than adult CD34+ stem cells. The γ/β-globin switch was observed after day 42 during fetal erythropoiesis in contrast to adult progenitors where the switch occurred around day 21. To gain insights into transcription factors involved in globin gene regulation, microarray analysis was performed on RNA isolated from UCB-CD34+ cell-derived erythroid progenitors harvested on day 21, 42, 49 and 56 using the HumanHT-12 Expression BeadChip. After data normalization, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified transcription factors (TFs) with significant changes in expression during the γ/β-globin switch. Forty-five TFs were silenced by day 56 (Profile-1) and 30 TFs were activated by day 56 (Profile-2). Both GSEA datasets were analyzed using the MIMI Cytoscape platform, which discovered TFNs centered on KLF4 and GATA2 (Profile-1) and KLF1 and GATA1 for Profile-2 genes. Subsequent shRNA studies in KU812 leukemia cells and human erythroid progenitors generated from UCB-CD34+ cells supported a negative role of MAFB in γ-globin regulation. The characteristics of erythroblasts derived from UCB-CD34+ stem cells

  1. Pulmonary arterial remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is lobe dependent.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Jeremy P; McLean, Catriona A; Thompson, Bruce R; Stuart-Andrews, Christopher R; Paul, Eldho; Snell, Gregory I; Williams, Trevor J

    2013-09-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial remodeling has been demonstrated in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but it is not known whether lobar heterogeneity of remodeling occurs. Furthermore, the relationship between pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary arterial remodeling in COPD has not been established. Muscular pulmonary arterial remodeling in arteries 0.10-0.25 mm in diameter was assessed in COPD-explanted lungs and autopsy controls. Remodeling was quantified as the percentage wall thickness to vessel diameter (%WT) using digital image analysis. Repeat measures mixed-effects remodeling for %WT was performed according to lobar origin (upper and lower), muscular pulmonary arterial size (small, medium, and large), and echocardiography-based pulmonary arterial pressure (no PH, mild PH, and moderate-to-severe PH). Lobar perfusion and emphysema indices were determined from ventilation-perfusion and computed tomography scans, respectively. Overall, %WT was greater in 42 subjects with COPD than in 5 control subjects ([Formula: see text]). Within the COPD group, %WT was greater in the upper lobes ([Formula: see text]) and in the small muscular pulmonary arteries ([Formula: see text]). Lobar differences were most pronounced in medium and large arteries. Lobar emphysema index was not associated with arterial remodeling. However, there was a significant positive relationship between the lobar perfusion index and pulmonary arterial remodeling ([Formula: see text]). The presence of PH on echocardiography showed only a trend to a small effect on lower lobe remodeling. The pattern of pulmonary arterial remodeling in COPD is complicated and lobe dependent. Differences in regional blood flow partially account for the lobar heterogeneity of pulmonary arterial remodeling in COPD. PMID:24618551

  2. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Sakkijha, Husam; Idrees, Majdy M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases are common causes of pulmonary hypertension. It ranks second after the left heart disease. Both obstructive and restrictive lung diseases are know to cause pulmonary hypertension. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex, and includes factors affecting the blood vessels, airways, and lung parenchyma. Hypoxia and the inhalation of toxic materials are another contributing factors. Recent guidelines have further clarified the association between pulmonary hypertension and chronic lung disease and made general guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management. In this article, we will provide a detailed revision about the new classification and give general recommendations about the management of pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases. PMID:25076998

  3. [Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Fernández F, Cristina; Salinas F, Mauricio; de Grazia K, José Andrés; Díaz P, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is an extremely rare disease characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of calcified spherical particles (called microliths), due to a mutation of the gene encoding a membrane transport protein of the alveolar surface. Most patients are asymptomatic at diagnosis. The course of the disease is slowly progressive, with development of pulmonary fibrosis and respiratory failure. The "sandstorm" pattern is the characteristic finding of this disease. We report a 39-year-old female presenting with progressive dyspnea. A chest X ray showed ground-glass opacities and a high resolution CT scan showed numerous calcified lung micronodules. A surgical lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. PMID:25427025

  4. Systemic Sclerosis with Multiple Pulmonary Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Parinita; Reddy, Venkata Siva Prasad; Sharma, Tarun; Salim, Nabil Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic autoimmune multisystem disorder characterized by endothelial dysfunction and fibroblast dysfunction, which results in progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs more frequently the lungs and gastro intestinal tract. Pulmonary involvement is common in the course of SSc, with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) and Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) being the leading causes of death. Here we report, case of an elderly female patient presenting with Diffuse SSc with multiple uncommon pulmonary manifestations like ILD with Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) pattern (usually less common), PAH and right sided pleural effusion. PMID:27504339

  5. Endothelin-1 receptor antagonist BQ123 prevents pulmonary artery hypertension induced by low ambient temperature in broilers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Qiao, Jian; Wu, Zhenlong; Chen, Yue; Gao, Mingyu; Ou, Deyuan; Wang, Huiyu

    2005-12-01

    Evidence has indicated that endothelin-1 is related to the pathogenesis of hypertension. To characterize the role of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in the development of pulmonary hypertension syndrome in broilers, the blockade effect of ETA receptor (ET(A)) antagonist, BQ123, on blood pressure in experimental models of pulmonary hypertension was examined. Birds were locally anesthetized and instrumented with venous catheters for pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and right ventricular pressure (RVP), followed by packed cell volume (PCV) and Ascites heart index (AHI) measured, after exposed to low ambient temperature for 7 or 14 d. In treated groups, BQ123 (0.4 or 2.0 microg each time, 2 times a day), administered in abdominal cavities for 7 or 14 d during birds kept in low ambient temperature, prevented both PAP and RVP increasing, especially the high dose BQ123 lowered PAP and RVP to normotensive levels as that in control under normal temperature, whereas significant increases (p<0.05) were found in the two parameters of broilers in both untreated and saline treated group under low ambient temperature compared with those of birds in control. Furthermore, there was also a reduction in low ambient temperature-induced right ventricular hypertrophy in the groups administered BQ123. The preventive effect of BQ123 suggests that ET-1 is associated with the development of broilers' pulmonary hypertension, which leads to the development of ascites, and BQ123 can prevent the occurrence of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:16327149

  6. Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis presenting as severe iron deficiency anaemia--a case from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Noureen; Mushtaq, Ammara; Rahman, Arshalooz; Qureshi, Sonia

    2012-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis is an uncommon disorder, which is characterized by iron deficiency, recurrent haemoptysis and diffuse parenchymal infiltration on chest radiograph. We report an 8 year old child who had past history of multiple blood transfusions with diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia and recurrent chest infection since the age of 21/2 year. At the age of 8 years, the child presented with fever and severe respiratory distress requiring intubation and ventilation. On Chest X-ray, bilateral white out was found and CT scan lung showed diffuse alveolar involvement. Lung biopsy confirmed haemosiderin-laden macrophages. Child was put on steroids and despite severe anaemia (Hb 3.2 g/dl), he showed improvement and survived. To our knowledge, this is the first case of idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis reported from Pakistan. PMID:23862264

  7. Pulmonary vascular wall stiffness: An important contributor to the increased right ventricular afterload with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijie; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with structural and mechanical changes in the pulmonary vascular bed that increase right ventricular (RV) afterload. These changes, characterized by narrowing and stiffening, occur in both proximal and distal pulmonary arteries (PAs). An important consequence of arterial narrowing is increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Arterial stiffening, which can occur in both the proximal and distal pulmonary arteries, is an important index of disease progression and is a significant contributor to increased RV afterload in PH. In particular, arterial narrowing and stiffening increase the RV afterload by increasing steady and oscillatory RV work, respectively. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the causes and consequences of pulmonary arterial stiffening in PH and its impact on RV function. We review direct and indirect techniques for measuring proximal and distal pulmonary arterial stiffness, measures of arterial stiffness including elastic modulus, incremental elastic modulus, stiffness coefficient β and others, the changes in cellular function and the extracellular matrix proteins that contribute to pulmonary arterial stiffening, the consequences of PA stiffening for RV function and the clinical implications of pulmonary vascular stiffening for PH progression. Future investigation of the relationship between PA stiffening and RV dysfunction may facilitate new therapies aimed at improving RV function and thus ultimately reducing mortality in PH. PMID:22034607

  8. [Idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Uehara, Mayuko; Kuroda, Yosuke; Ohori, Syunsuke; Mawatari, Toru; Morishita, Kiyofumi

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary trunk aneurysm is generally associated with congenital cardiac defects, pulmonary hypertension, or infection. Idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm without any associated diseases is a rare lesion and has seldom been reported. Here, we report a case of a 68-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm. The maximum diameter of the aneurysm was 53 mm while she was 142 cm in height. We successfully performed aneurysmorrhaphy and her postoperative course was uneventful. Aneurysmorrhaphy was an effective technique for idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm without pulmonary hypertention. PMID:20662238

  9. Pulmonary endarterectomy after pulmonary infectious embolisms

    PubMed Central

    Heiberg, Johan; Ilkjær, Lars B.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is a well-established procedure in the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTPH). The procedure is known to increase functional outcome and to raise the 5-year survival rate. We report 2 cases of pulmonary valve endocarditis and secondary embolisms causing sustained pulmonary hypertension. Both were treated with PEA. In none of the cases, a cleavage between the thrombotic masses and the vessel wall was obtainable, and both attempts were therefore inadequate. Based on our reports, we recommend not attempting PEA in cases of CTPH after infectious embolisms. PMID:23248168

  10. Evolving Concepts of Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Bhavadharini; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension. Although its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, it is now well recognized that the presence of pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis. Right ventricular failure has independent and additive prognostic value over pulmonary hypertension for adverse outcomes in left heart disease. Recently, several new terminologies have been introduced to better define and characterize the nature and severity of pulmonary hypertension. Several new treatment options including the use of pulmonary arterial hypertension specific therapies are being considered, but there is lack of evidence. Here, we review the recent advances in this field and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of use in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease. PMID:26886381

  11. Pulmonary cachexia.

    PubMed

    Schols, Annemie M W J

    2002-09-01

    Weight loss is a frequent complication in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is a determining factor of functional capacity, health status, and mortality. Weight loss in COPD is a consequence of increased energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Both metabolic and mechanical inefficiency contribute to the elevated energy expenditure during physical activity, while systemic inflammation is a determinant of hypermetabolism at rest. A disbalance between protein synthesis and protein breakdown may cause a disproportionate depletion of fat-free mass in some patients. Nutritional support is indicated for depleted patients with COPD because it provides not only supportive care, but direct intervention through improvement in respiratory and peripheral skeletal muscle function and in exercise performance. A combination of oral nutritional supplements and exercise or anabolic stimulus appears to be the best treatment approach to obtaining significant functional improvement. Patients responding to this treatment even demonstrated a decreased mortality. Poor response was related to the effects of systemic inflammation on dietary intake and catabolism. The effectiveness of anticatabolic modulation requires further investigation. PMID:12163214

  12. Pulmonary Langerhans cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Harari, S; Comel, A

    2001-10-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell Histiocytosis is a rare granulomatous disease affecting both sexes, with greater incidence in the second and third decades of life; smoking appears to be the most important risk factor. Its etiology is unknown, although there are data indicating an uncontrolled immune response as possible cause, sustained by the Langerhans cells, antigen presenting cells for T lymphocytes, and their accumulation in the distal bronchioles; these cells express on their surface the CD1a and CD1c antigens, and the B7 molecule, essential for activating quiescent T lymphocytes. In its evolution the granuloma is characterized by the progressive reduction in the LC number, with the increase of fibrosis, surrounding and destroying the bronchiolar lumen; the remaining of the lumen, or the traction exerted by fibrous tissue on the adjacent alveolar spaces leads to the cyst development. Vascular involvement occurs frequently, and may explain the onset of pulmonary hypertension in advanced cases of the disease. The disease may be asymptomatic, or it may present with aspecific respiratory signs and symptoms, and has characteristic radiological findings, being included in the group of cysticaerial parenchymal alterations. The diagnosis could be suggested by the finding of a number of LC in BAL greater than 5%. Different therapies have been proposed, but it seems that the most important measure is smoking cessation. PMID:11587096

  13. Pulmonary vascular effects of pulsed inhaled nitric oxide in COPD patients with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hajian, Bita; De Backer, Jan; Vos, Wim; Van Holsbeke, Cedric; Ferreira, Francisca; Quinn, Deborah A; Hufkens, Annemie; Claes, Rita; De Backer, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with secondary pulmonary hypertension (PH), which worsens prognosis. PH can be lowered by oxygen, but also by inhaled nitric oxide (NO), which has the potential to improve the health status of these patients. NO is an important mediator in vascular reactions in the pulmonary circulation. Oral compounds can act through NO-mediated pathways, but delivering pulsed inhaled NO (iNO) directly to the airways and pulmonary vasculature could equally benefit patients. Therefore, a proof-of-concept study was performed to quantify pulmonary blood vessel caliber changes after iNO administration using computed tomography (CT)-based functional respiratory imaging (FRI). Methods Six patients with secondary PH due to COPD received “pulsed” iNO in combination with oxygen for 20 minutes via a nasal cannula. Patients underwent a high-resolution CT scan with contrast before and after iNO. Using FRI, changes in volumes of blood vessels and associated lobes were quantified. Oxygen saturation and blood pressure were monitored and patients were asked about their subjective feelings. Results Pulmonary blood vessel volume increased by 7.06%±5.37% after iNO. A strong correlation (Ω20=0.32, P=0.002) was obtained between ventilation and observed vasodilation, suggesting that using the pulsed system, iNO is directed toward the ventilated zones, which consequently experience more vasodilation. Patients did not develop oxygen desaturation, remained normotensive, and perceived an improvement in their dyspnea sensation. Conclusion Inhalation of pulsed NO with oxygen causes vasodilation in the pulmonary circulation of COPD patients, mainly in the well-ventilated areas. A high degree of heterogeneity was found in the level of vasodilation. Patients tend to feel better after the treatment. Chronic use trials are warranted. PMID:27462149

  14. Acetazolamide and chronic hypoxia: effects on haemorheology and pulmonary haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Aurélien; Connes, Philippe; Quidu, Patricia; Marchant, Dominique; Brunet, Julien; Levy, Bernard I; Vilar, José; Safeukui, Innocent; Cymbalista, Florence; Maignan, Maxime; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Favret, Fabrice

    2012-12-01

    We tested the effect of acetazolamide on blood mechanical properties and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) during chronic hypoxia. Six groups of rats were either treated or not treated with acetazolamide (curative: treated after 10 days of hypoxic exposure; preventive: treated before hypoxic exposure with 40 mg · kg(-1) · day(-1)) and either exposed or not exposed to 3 weeks of hypoxia (at altitude >5,500 m). They were then used to assess the role of acetazolamide on pulmonary artery pressure, cardiac output, blood volume, haematological and haemorheological parameters. Chronic hypoxia increased haematocrit, blood viscosity and PVR, and decreased cardiac output. Acetazolamide treatment in hypoxic rats decreased haematocrit (curative by -10% and preventive by -11%), PVR (curative by -36% and preventive by -49%) and right ventricular hypertrophy (preventive -20%), and increased cardiac output (curative by +60% and preventive by +115%). Blood viscosity was significantly decreased after curative acetazolamide treatment (-16%) and was correlated with PVR (r=0.87, p<0.05), suggesting that blood viscosity could influence pulmonary haemodynamics. The fall in pulmonary vascular hindrance (curative by -27% and preventive by -45%) after treatment suggests that acetazolamide could decrease pulmonary vessels remodelling under chronic hypoxia. The effect of acetazolamide is multifactorial by acting on erythropoiesis, pulmonary circulation, haemorheological properties and cardiac output, and could represent a pertinent treatment of chronic mountain sickness. PMID:22523353

  15. Total contribution of airborne lead to blood lead.

    PubMed Central

    Manton, W I

    1985-01-01

    A nine year study of blood lead concentrations and isotope ratios carried out on a married couple shows that pulmonary deposition cannot account for all the airborne lead in blood; that lead from bone may comprise 70% of blood lead; and that during pregnancy blood lead may double due to mobilisation of lead from bone. PMID:3970881

  16. Vomiting blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... first part of the small intestine, or esophagus Blood clotting disorders Defects in the blood vessels of the ... as a complete blood count (CBC), blood chemistries, blood clotting tests, and liver function tests Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (placing ...

  17. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  18. Blood transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... homologous blood donation. Many communities have a blood bank at which any healthy person can donate blood. ... to arrange with your hospital or local blood bank before your surgery to have directed donor blood. ...

  19. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both ...

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000091.htm Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common lung disease. Having COPD ...

  1. Who Needs Pulmonary Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... other symptoms. Examples of interstitial lung diseases include sarcoidosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis . Cystic fibrosis (CF). CF ...

  2. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here: Health Information > Condition Information Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis: Overview When two or more members within the ... Associate Professor View full profile More Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Information Forms Causes Genetic Counseling Print Page Email ...

  3. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis (PULL-mun-ary fi-BRO-sis) is a ... time. The formation of scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue thickens, your lungs can' ...

  4. Absent pulmonary valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... can occur with absent pulmonary valve include: Abnormal tricuspid valve Atrial septal defect Double outlet right ventricle Ductus arteriosis Endocardial cushion defect Marfan syndrome Tricuspid atresia Heart problems that occur with absent pulmonary ...

  5. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Severe HPS. Image courtesy D. ... the workers showed evidence of infection or illness. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Topics Transmission Where HPS is ...

  6. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001090.htm Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and ...

  7. Absent pulmonary valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... absent pulmonary valve syndrome associated with bronchial obstruction. Ann Thoracic Surg. 2006;82:2221-2226. PMID: 17126138 ... of airway compression in absent pulmonary valve syndrome. Ann Thorac Surg . 2006;81:1802-1807. PMID: 16631676 ...

  8. Emily Cooley lecture 2012: Emily Cooley and techniques that have been applied to characterize DO and JR blood groups.

    PubMed

    Reid, Marion E

    2013-09-01

    Emily Cooley was a well-respected medical technologist and morphologist with a remarkable skill set. She was highly regarded both professionally and personally. The "Emily Cooley Lectureship and Award" was established to honor her in particular and medical technologists in general. This article first reviews the history of the Emily Cooley award and provides some of the reasons why it carries her name. Then, using two blood group systems, DO and JR, it illustrates how many discoveries regarding blood groups were dependent on access to techniques. PMID:23581612

  9. Molecular characterization of Italian Candida parapsilosis isolates reveals the cryptic presence of the newly described species Candida orthopsilosis in blood cultures from newborns.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Delfino, Demetrio; Costanzo, Barbara; Cascio, Antonio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    The authors report the molecular characterization of Candida parapsilosis isolates recovered from the blood and venous central catheter tips of patients admitted to different care units of the Polyclinic Hospital, University of Messina, Italy. Among 97 presumed C. parapsilosis isolates examined, 94 were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and the remaining 3 isolates were found to belong to the cryptic species Candida orthopsilosis which was recovered only from blood cultures of neonates (<30 days old) born prematurely. No C. metapsilosis was found in this study. This study emphasizes the role of C. parapsilosis as an important nosocomial pathogen, and it also describes, for the first time, the occurrence of C. orthopsilosis in newborns. PMID:22244186

  10. Aldosterone Inactivates the Endothelin-B Receptor via a Cysteinyl Thiol Redox Switch to Decrease Pulmonary Endothelial Nitric Oxide Levels and Modulate Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; White, Kevin; Chan, Stephen Y.; Handy, Diane E.; Mahoney, Christopher E.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized, in part, by decreased endothelial nitric oxide (NO•) production and elevated levels of endothelin-1. Endothelin-1 is known to stimulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) via the endothelin-B receptor (ETB), suggesting that this signaling pathway is perturbed in PAH. Endothelin-1 also stimulates adrenal aldosterone synthesis; in systemic blood vessels, hyperaldosteronism induces vascular dysfunction by increasing endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and decreasing NO• levels. We hypothesized that aldosterone modulates PAH by disrupting ETB-eNOS signaling through a mechanism involving increased pulmonary endothelial oxidant stress. Methods and Results In rats with PAH, elevated endothelin-1 levels were associated with elevated aldosterone levels in plasma and lung tissue and decreased lung NO• metabolites in the absence of left heart failure. In human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs), endothelin-1 increased aldosterone levels via PGC-1α/steroidogenesis factor-1-dependent upregulation of aldosterone synthase. Aldosterone also increased ROS production, which oxidatively modified cysteinyl thiols in the eNOS-activating region of ETB to decrease endothelin-1-stimulated eNOS activity. Substitution of ETB-Cys405 with alanine improved ETB-dependent NO• synthesis under conditions of oxidant stress, confirming that Cys405 is a redox sensitive thiol that is necessary for ETB-eNOS signaling. In HPAECs, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism with spironolactone decreased aldosterone-mediated ROS generation and restored ETB-dependent NO• production. Spironolactone or eplerenone prevented or reversed pulmonary vascular remodeling and improved cardiopulmonary hemodynamics in two animal models of PAH in vivo. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that aldosterone modulates an ETB cysteinyl thiol redox switch to decrease pulmonary endothelium-derived NO• and promote PAH

  11. Increasing pulmonary artery pulsatile flow improves hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in piglets.

    PubMed

    Courboulin, Audrey; Kang, Chantal; Baillard, Olivier; Bonnet, Sebastien; Bonnet, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease affecting distal pulmonary arteries (PA). These arteries are deformed, leading to right ventricular failure. Current treatments are limited. Physiologically, pulsatile blood flow is detrimental to the vasculature. In response to sustained pulsatile stress, vessels release nitric oxide (NO) to induce vasodilation for self-protection. Based on this observation, this study developed a protocol to assess whether an artificial pulmonary pulsatile blood flow could induce an NO-dependent decrease in pulmonary artery pressure. One group of piglets was exposed to chronic hypoxia for 3 weeks and compared to a control group of piglets. Once a week, the piglets underwent echocardiography to assess PAH severity. At the end of hypoxia exposure, the piglets were subjected to a pulsatile protocol using a pulsatile catheter. After being anesthetized and prepared for surgery, the jugular vein of the piglet was isolated and the catheter was introduced through the right atrium, the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery, under radioscopic control. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) was measured before (T0), immediately after (T1) and 30 min after (T2) the pulsatile protocol. It was demonstrated that this pulsatile protocol is a safe and efficient method of inducing a significant reduction in mean PAP via an NO-dependent mechanism. These data open up new avenues for the clinical management of PAH. PMID:25993379

  12. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction as a contributor to response in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Burrowes, K S; Clark, A R; Wilsher, M L; Milne, D G; Tawhai, M H

    2014-08-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an adaptive response unique to the lung whereby blood flow is diverted away from areas of low alveolar oxygen to improve ventilation-perfusion matching and resultant gas exchange. Some previous experimental studies have suggested that the HPV response to hypoxia is blunted in acute pulmonary embolism (APE), while others have concluded that HPV contributes to elevated pulmonary blood pressures in APE. To understand these contradictory observations, we have used a structure-based computational model of integrated lung function in 10 subjects to study the impact of HPV on pulmonary hemodynamics and gas exchange in the presence of regional arterial occlusion. The integrated model includes an experimentally-derived model for HPV. Its function is validated against measurements of pulmonary vascular resistance in normal subjects at four levels of inspired oxygen. Our results show that the apparently disparate observations of previous studies can be explained within a single model: the model predicts that HPV increases mean pulmonary artery pressure in APE (by 8.2 ± 7.0% in these subjects), and concurrently shows a reduction in response to hypoxia in the subjects who have high levels of occlusion and therefore maximal HPV in normoxia. PMID:24770844

  13. Unusual presentation of pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oi, Ryoko; Saji, Hisashi; Marushima, Hideki; Maeda, Ichiro; Takagi, Masayuki; Nakamura, Haruhiko

    2016-09-01

    Primary pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC) is a rare malignant tumour with histological features similar to undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A close association is known to exist between pulmonary LELC and Epstein-Barr virus infection in Southeast Asian countries. We report a 69-year-old man with pulmonary LELC arising from a thin-walled cavity with a smooth inner surface and characterized by an unexpectedly rapid progression. PMID:27516893

  14. Characterization of a hybrid diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy system for real-time monitoring of cerebral blood flow and oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, K.; Diop, M.; Lee, A.; St. Lawrence, K.

    2015-03-01

    The combination of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) offers the ability to provide real-time monitoring of cerebral oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. However, measuring these parameters accurately requires depth-sensitive techniques that can remove the effects of signal contamination from extracerebral tissues. Towards this goal, we developed and characterized a hybrid DCS/time-resolved (TR)-NIRS system. Both systems acquire data at three source-detector distances (SDD: 7, 20 and 30 mm) to provide depth sensitivity. The TR-NIRS system uses three pulsed lasers (760, 810, and 830 nm) to quantify tissue optical properties, and DCS uses one continuous-wave, long coherence length (>5 m) laser (785 nm) for blood flow monitoring. The stability of the TR-NIRS system was characterized by continuously measuring the instrument response function (IRF) for four hours, and a warmup period of two hours was required to reduce the coefficient of variation of the extracted optical properties to < 2%. The errors in the measured optical properties were <10% at SDDs of 20 and 30 mm; however, the error at 7 mm was greater due to the effects of the IRF. The number of DCS detectors at each SDD and the minimum count-rate (20 kHz per detector resulting in <10% uncertainty in the extracted blood flow index) were optimized using a homogenous phantom. The depth sensitivity was assessed using a two-layer phantom, with the flow rate in the bottom layer altered to mimic cerebral blood flow.

  15. Drugs induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Savale, Laurent; Günther, Sven; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature, resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification, PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly appetite suppressant drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used but are also considered as possible risk factors for PAH. Dasatinib, a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, in part reversible after its withdrawal. Recently several studies raised the potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. Other possible risk factors for PAH include: nasal decongestants, like phenylpropanolamine, dietary supplement - L-Tryptophan, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, pergolide and other drugs that could act on 5HT2B receptors. Interestingly, PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drugs induced PAH. PMID:23972547

  16. Identification and characterization of a genome-wide significant region associated with red blood cell phenotypes in domestic sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome wide association study (GWAS) investigating red blood cell (RBC) phenotypes was performed with over 500 domestic sheep (Ovis aries) from three economically important breeds in the US (Columbia, Polypay, and Rambouillet). A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, hereafter the discovery SNP) sh...

  17. Role of prostacyclin in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jane A.; Ahmetaj-Shala, Blerina; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Wright, William R.; Mackenzie, Louise S.; Reed, Daniel M.; Mohamed, Nura

    2014-01-01

    Prostacyclin is a powerful cardioprotective hormone released by the endothelium of all blood vessels. Prostacyclin exists in equilibrium with other vasoactive hormones and a disturbance in the balance of these factors leads to cardiovascular disease including pulmonary arterial hypertension. Since it's discovery in the 1970s concerted efforts have been made to make the best therapeutic utility of prostacyclin, particularly in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This has centred on working out the detailed pharmacology of prostacyclin and then synthesising new molecules based on its structure that are more stable or more easily tolerated. In addition, newer molecules have been developed that are not analogues of prostacyclin but that target the receptors that prostacyclin activates. Prostacyclin and related drugs have without doubt revolutionised the treatment and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension but are seriously limited by side effects within the systemic circulation. With the dawn of nanomedicine and targeted drug or stem cell delivery systems it will, in the very near future, be possible to make new formulations of prostacyclin that can evade the systemic circulation allowing for safe delivery to the pulmonary vessels. In this way, the full therapeutic potential of prostacyclin can be realised opening the possibility that pulmonary arterial hypertension will become, if not curable, a chronic manageable disease that is no longer fatal. This review discusses these and other issues relating to prostacyclin and its use in pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:25780793

  18. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tisha; Lazar, Catherine A; Fishbein, Michael C; Lynch, Joseph P

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disorder characterized by the accumulation of surfactant lipids and protein in the alveolar spaces, with resultant impairment in gas exchange. The clinical course can be variable, ranging from spontaneous resolution to respiratory failure and death. PAP in all forms is caused by excessive accumulation of surfactant within the alveolar spaces. Autoimmune PAP accounts for the vast majority of cases in humans and is caused by autoantibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which results in impaired catabolism and clearance of surfactant lipids and proteins. Inherited or congenital forms of PAP are exceptionally rare and caused by mutations of genes encoding for surfactant proteins. Secondary forms of PAP are associated with diverse clinical disorders and are caused by reduced alveolar macrophage numbers or function with resultant reduced pulmonary clearance of surfactant. PAP is characterized by progressive exertional dyspnea and nonproductive cough with hypoxemia. Bilateral infiltrates are typically present on chest radiograph, and high-resolution computed tomography reveals diffuse ground-glass opacities and airspace consolidation with interlobular septal thickening in a characteristic "crazy paving" pattern. Although surgical lung biopsy will provide a definitive diagnosis, a combination of typical clinical and imaging features with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive material on bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsies is usually sufficient. The standard of care for treatment of PAP remains whole lung lavage, but treatment is not required in all patients. Autoimmune PAP has also been successfully treated with GM-CSF, both inhaled and systemic, but the optimal dose, duration, and route of administration of GM-CSF have not been elucidated. PMID:23001804

  19. A Huge Thrombosed Pulmonary Artery Aneurysm without Pulmonary Hypertension in a Patient with Hepatosplenic Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Abo-Salem, Elsayed S.; Ramadan, Mahmoud M.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 55 Final Diagnosis: Thrombosed pulmonary artery aneurysm Symptoms: Cough productive • fever • shortness of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Pericardiocentesis Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: We herein report a case of huge pulmonary artery aneurysm in a 55-year-old male farmer from the Nile delta (Lower-Egypt), mostly due to infestation with Schistosoma mansoni, which is the parasite causing hepatosplenic schistosomiasis. Case Report: This male patient was admitted with a month-long history of progressive shortness of breath, 2-month history of fever, and a cough with mucoid sputum for 10 days. On examination, he had normal temperature and blood pressure, but he had tachypnea, tachycardia, and congested neck veins. Electrocardiography showed multifocal atrial tachycardia and right bundle branch block. Conclusions: The present case is unique in that it shows the presence of a huge pulmonary artery aneurysm despite the absence of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25746428

  20. 3D MRI of impaired hyperpolarized 129Xe uptake in a rat model of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Zackary I; Virgincar, Rohan S; Qi, Yi; Robertson, Scott H; Degan, Simone; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2014-12-01

    A variety of pulmonary pathologies, in particular interstitial lung diseases, are characterized by thickening of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier, and this thickening results in reduced gas exchange. Such diffusive impairment is challenging to quantify spatially, because the distributions of the metabolically relevant gases (CO2 and O2) cannot be detected directly within the lungs. Hyperpolarized (HP) (129)Xe is a promising surrogate for these metabolic gases, because MR spectroscopy and imaging allow gaseous alveolar (129)Xe to be detected separately from (129)Xe dissolved in the red blood cells (RBCs) and the adjacent tissues, which comprise blood plasma and lung interstitium. Because (129)Xe reaches the RBCs by diffusing across the same barrier tissues (blood plasma and interstitium) as O2, barrier thickening will delay (129)Xe transit and, thus, reduce RBC-specific (129)Xe MR signal. Here we have exploited these properties to generate 3D, MR images of (129)Xe uptake by the RBCs in two groups of rats. In the experimental group, unilateral fibrotic injury was generated prior to imaging by instilling bleomycin into one lung. In the control group, a unilateral sham instillation of saline was performed. Uptake of (129)Xe by the RBCs, quantified as the fraction of RBC signal relative to total dissolved (129)Xe signal, was significantly reduced (P = 0.03) in the injured lungs of bleomycin-treated animals. In contrast, no significant difference (P = 0.56) was observed between the saline-treated and untreated lungs of control animals. Together, these results indicate that 3D MRI of HP (129)Xe dissolved in the pulmonary tissues can provide useful biomarkers of impaired diffusive gas exchange resulting from fibrotic thickening. PMID:24816478

  1. [Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis in a menopaused woman].

    PubMed

    Zeggane, A; Assouline, P S; Tebboune, D; Levasseur, P; Dulmet, E; Oliviero, G

    2000-12-01

    We report an unusual case of pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis in a menopaused woman who had been taking estrogen hormone replacement therapy for several years. The characteristic feature of this uncommon disease is a proliferation of non-tumoral abnormal smooth muscle cells within the alveolar walls, and around the bronchi, lymph nodes and blood vessels. About twenty cases of pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis have been described in menopaused women, who generally were taking estrogen hormone replacement therapy. This subpopulation does not appear to present any particular clinical, functional or radiographic features. PMID:11226927

  2. [Pulmonary complications of transfusion (TACO-TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Renaudier, P; Rebibo, D; Waller, C; Schlanger, S; Vo Mai, M-P; Ounnoughene, N; Breton, P; Cheze, S; Girard, A; Hauser, L; Legras, J-F; Saillol, A; Willaert, B; Caldani, C

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary oedemas occurring during or after a blood transfusion appear as the most frequent serious immediate incidents in the French hemovigilance database. They include transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). TACO are a major cause of transfusion-related death in France. TRALI are more and more recognized and notified. In no case, pooled fresh frozen plasma (100 donations) treated with solvent-detergent were involved in French TRALI cases. A logigrame will allow hemovigilance officers to better classify pulmonary oedemas in e-fit, the French hemovigilance database. PMID:19446484

  3. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary valve disease need multiple procedures over their lifetimes to replace their pulmonary valves. Chronic pulmonary stenosis, regurgitation, or both have untoward effects on ventricular function and on the clinical status of these patients. To date, all right ventricle–pulmonary artery conduits have had relatively short lifespans. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, although relatively new, will probably reduce the number of operative procedures that these patients will have to undergo over a lifetime. Refinement and further development of this procedure holds promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations. PMID:26175629

  4. Calcium antagonist verapamil prevented pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers with ascites by arresting pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Qiao, Jian; Wang, Huiyu; Gao, Mingyu; Ou, Deyuan; Zhang, Jianjun; Sun, Maohong; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaobo; Guo, Yuming

    2007-04-30

    Calcium signaling has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Verapamil, one of the calcium antagonists, is used to characterize the role of calcium signaling in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension syndrome in broilers. The suppression effect of verapamil on pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling was examined in broilers, from the age of 16 days to 43 days. Our results showed that oral administration of lower dose of verapamil (5 mg/kg body weight every 12 h) prevented the mean pulmonary arterial pressure, the ascites heart index and the erythrocyte packed cell volume of birds at low temperature from increasing, the heart rate from decreasing, and pulmonary arteriole median from thickening, and no pulmonary arteriole remodeling in broilers treated with the two doses of verapamil at low temperature was observed. Our results indicated that calcium signaling was involved in the development of broilers' pulmonary arterial hypertension, which leads to the development of ascites, and we suggest that verapamil may be used as a preventive agent to reduce the occurrence and development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers. PMID:17320074