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Sample records for charge exchange collisions

  1. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  2. Charge-exchange collisions in the low-velocity regime between multiply charged ions and atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, L.R. )

    1993-06-05

    Close-coupling calculations using a full quantum mechanical molecular-orbital model have been carried out for low-energy charge-exchange collisions with multiply charged ions. Trajectory effects at eV/amu energies are exemplified by the isotope-dependence of the charge-exchange cross sections and the polarization-induced enhancement of the capture probability in O[sup 5+]--H(D) collisions. An unfavorable comparison with experimental differential cross sections for Ar[sup 6+]--He collisions leads to a discussion of transfer-excitation caused by configuration mixing in the Ar[sup 5+] capture states.

  3. Neutral Collisions and Charge Exchange in Titan's Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillanpää, I.; Johnson, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Results from new hybrid simulations for Titan are presented. These simulations take into account the elastic collisions between ions and neutral gas as well as the charge exchange reactions for protons and oxygen ions. We used SRIM [1] cross sections for hydrogen and oxygen ions in nitrogen gas to calculate cross sections for the five ions species used in the HYB-Titan hybrid model [2, see also 3] (H+, H2+, O+, CH4+, and N2+). The N2 density profile used was from INMS measurements over a dozen flybys. In addition, we are studying the effect the charge transfer (CT) reactions for H+ and O+ leading to simple CT, dissociative CT and CT with ionization. All reaction cross sections are energy dependent. Neutral particles are not created, but the total ENA energy is recorded as well as the resulting reaction rates. The results show that both of neutral collisions and CT processes have a significant role in the development and shape of Titan's ionotail and wake structure. Results will be described in detail as well as the implications of the ion-neutral collisions for the heating of Titan's neutral corona and atmospheric escape [4]. References [1] Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM), Monte Carlo software by James F. Ziegler (online at http://www.srim.org/ ) [2] Sillanpää, I., Hybrid Modelling of Titan's Interaction with the Magnetosphere of Saturn, Ph.D. dissertation, Finnish Meteorological Contributions, 68, Yliopistopaino, Helsinki, 2008. (online at http://urn.fi/URN:ISBN:978-951-697-660-3) [3] Sillanpää, I., D. Young, F. Crary, M. Thomsen, D. Reisenfeld, J-E.Wahlund, C. Bertucci, E. Kallio, R. Jarvinen, and P. Janhunen, Cassini Plasma Spectro:meter and Hybrid Model Study on Titan's Interaction: Effect of Oxygen Ions, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA016443, 2011. [4] Johnson, R.E., O.J. Tucker, M. Michael, E.C. Sittler, H.T. Smith, D.T. Young, and J.H. Waite, Mass Loss Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere, Chap. 15 in "Titan from Cassini-Huygens" (eds

  4. Resonance charge exchange between excited states in slow proton-hydrogen collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Kato, Daiji

    2010-09-15

    The theory of resonance charge exchange in slow collisions of a proton with a hydrogen atom in the excited state is developed. It extends the Firsov-Demkov theory of resonance charge exchange to the case of degenerate initial and final states. The theory is illustrated by semiclassical and quantum calculations of charge exchange cross sections between states with n=2 in parabolic and spherical coordinates. The results are compared with existing close-coupling calculations.

  5. Charge exchange and ionization in hydrogen atom-fully stripped ion collisions in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Wang, J. G.; He, B.; Qiu, Y. B.; Janev, R. K.

    2007-05-15

    The processes of charge exchange and ionization in collisions of ground state hydrogen atom with fully stripped ions in a weakly coupled plasma are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method in the collision energy range 10-900 keV/amu. The interparticle interactions are described by the Debye-Hueckel model with inclusion of dynamical effects associated with the projectile velocity. The microcanonical distribution of initial state electronic coordinates and momenta has been determined by inclusion of plasma screening effects. The cross section dependencies on plasma parameters and ion charge and velocity are investigated. It is shown that plasma effects on charge exchange and ionization cross sections are significant and particularly pronounced at low collision velocities. The results of systematic cross section calculations for different values of Debye screening length (in the range 1-50a{sub 0}) and ion charges (in the range 1-14) are presented.

  6. Molecular (Feshbach) treatment of charge exchange Li/sup 3 +/+He collisions. I. Energies and couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.; Riera, A.; Yanez, M.

    1986-05-15

    We point out a fundamental difference between the molecular treatment of charge exchange X/sup n/++H(1s) and X/sup n/++He(1s/sup 2/) collisions, which is that the latter process involves molecular states that are formally autoionizing. Then standard ab initio methods do not, in general, yield the relevant wave functions that are needed in the collision treatment, irrespective of whether quasimolecular autoionization be significant or not during the collision. We implement a particularly simple and useful form of the Feshbach formalism to calculate the energies of those two electron systems, and a method to evaluate the corresponding dynamical couplings is presented for the first time. Our implementation of this formalism together with the new computational techniques involved are presented in detail.

  7. Ionosphere-exosphere coupling through charge exchange and momentum transfer in hydrogen-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The implications of a traditional assumption of exospheric physics, that collisions of hydrogen atoms and protons preferentially result in charge exchange with negligible momentum transfer are examined. Initially adopted as a necessary convenience to accommodate limited computer resources in exosphere model calculations, this approximation results in a direct transformation of the proton velocity distribution into a hot component of neutral hydrogen. With expanding computational facilities, the need for the approximation has passed. As the first step toward its replacement with a realistic, quantum mechanical model of the H - H(+) collision process, differential and cumulative cross sections were calculated for quantum elastic scattering of indistinguishable nuclei for a fine grid of encounter energies and scattering angles. These data are used to study the nature of ionosphere-exosphere coupling through H - H(+) collisions, and to demonstrate that the distribution of velocities of scattered H produced in the traditional exospheric charge exchange approximation, as well as that arising from an alternative, fluid dynamic approach, leads to unacceptable abundances of coronal atoms in long-term, highly elliptic trajectories.

  8. Charge exchange collisions of slow C6 + with atomic and molecular H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bidhan C.; Guevara, Nicolais L.; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, Erik; Öhrn, Yngve

    2016-04-01

    Charge exchange in collisions of C6+ ions with H and H2 is investigated theoretically at projectile energies 0.1 < E < 10 keV/amu, using electron nuclear dynamics (END) - a semi-classical approximation which not only includes electron translation factors for avoiding spurious couplings but also employs full dynamical trajectories to treat nuclear motions. Both the total and partial cross sections are reported for the collision of C6+ ions with atomic and molecular hydrogen. A comparison with other theoretical and experimental results shows, in general good agreement except at very low energy, considered here. For H2, the one- and two-electron charge exchange cross sections are calculated and compared with other theoretical and experimental results. Small but non-negligible isotope effects are found at the lowest energy studied in the charge transfer of C6+ with H. In low energy region, it is observed that H2 has larger isotope effects than H atom due to the polarizability effect which is larger than the mass effect.

  9. Signatures of the electron saddle swaps mechanism in the photon spectra following charge-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otranto, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    During the last few years, several experimental and theoretical studies have focused on state selective charge exchange processes between charged ions and alkali metals. These data are of particular importance for the tokamak nuclear fusion reactor program, since diagnostics on the plasma usually rely on charge-exchange spectroscopy. In this sense, alkali metals, have been proposed as potential alternatives to excited hydrogen/deuterium for which laboratory experiments are not feasible at present. In this talk, we present our recent work involving ion collisions with alkali metals. Oscillatory structures in the angular differential charge-exchange cross sections obtained using the MOTRIMS technique are correctly described by classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. These oscillations are found to originate from the number of swaps the electron undergoes around the projectile-target potential saddle before capture takes place and are very prominent at impact energies below 10 keV/amu. Moreover, cross sections of higher order of differentiability also indicate that the swaps leave distinctive signatures in the (n,l)-state selective cross sections and in the photon line emission cross sections. Oscillatory structures for the x-ray hardness ratio parameter are also predicted. In collaboration with Ronnie Hoekstra, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen and Ronald Olson, Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology.

  10. Charge-exchange collision dynamics and ion engine grid geometry optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Bradford

    The development of a new three-dimensional model for determining the absolute energy distribution of ions at points corresponding to spacecraft surfaces to the side of an ion engine is presented. The ions resulting from elastic collisions, both charge-exchange (CEX) and direct, between energetic primary ions and thermal neutral xenon atoms are accounted for. Highly resolved energy distributions of CEX ions are found by integration over contributions from all points in space within the main beam formed by the primary ions.The sputtering rate due to impingement of these ions on a surface is calculated. The CEX ions that obtain significant energy (10 eV or more) in the collision are responsible for the majority of the sputtering, though this can depend on the specific material being sputtered. In the case of a molybdenum surface located 60 cm to the side of a 30 cm diameter grid, nearly 90% of the sputtering is due to the 5% of ions with the highest collision exit energies. Previous models that do not model collision energetics cannot predict this. The present results agree with other models and predict that the majority of the ion density is due to collisions where little to no energy is transferred.The sputtering model is combined with a grid-structure model in an optimization procedure where the sputtering rate at specified locations is minimized by adjustment of parameters defining the physical shape of the engine grids. Constraints are imposed that require that the deflection of the grid under a specified load does not exceed a maximum value, in order to ensure survivability of the grids during launch. To faciliate faster execution of the calculations, simplifications based on the predicted behavior of the CEX ions are implemented. For diametrically opposed sputtering locations, a rounded barrel-vault shape reduces the expected sputtering rate by up to 30% in comparison to an NSTAR-shaped grid.

  11. Scaling for state-selective charge exchange due to collisions of multicharged ions with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge, A.; Illescas, Clara; Miraglia, J. E.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we evaluate state-resolved charge exchange cross sections for Be{}4+, {{{B}}}5+, {{{C}}}6+, {{{N}}}7+, and {{{O}}}8+ projectiles colliding with atomic hydrogen employing two different methods: the classical trajectory Monte Carlo and the eikonal impulse approximations. These cross sections are used to extend previously derived scaling laws for n-, nl-, and nlm-distributions to highly excited final levels with 4≤slant n≤slant 9, covering energies in the range 50-2000 {{keV}}/ amu. Present total and partial capture cross sections are in agreement with available experimental and theoretical data for these collision systems. Besides, the proposed scaling rules are also verified by other theories, becoming a useful instrument for plasma research.

  12. Scaling for state-selective charge exchange due to collisions of multicharged ions with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge, A.; Illescas, Clara; Miraglia, J. E.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    In this article we evaluate state-resolved charge exchange cross sections for Be{}4+, {{{B}}}5+, {{{C}}}6+, {{{N}}}7+, and {{{O}}}8+ projectiles colliding with atomic hydrogen employing two different methods: the classical trajectory Monte Carlo and the eikonal impulse approximations. These cross sections are used to extend previously derived scaling laws for n-, nl-, and nlm-distributions to highly excited final levels with 4≤slant n≤slant 9, covering energies in the range 50-2000 {{keV}}/ amu. Present total and partial capture cross sections are in agreement with available experimental and theoretical data for these collision systems. Besides, the proposed scaling rules are also verified by other theories, becoming a useful instrument for plasma research.

  13. Calculation of total cross sections for charge exchange in molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, J.

    1979-01-01

    Areas of investigation summarized include nitrogen ion-nitrogen molecule collisions; molecular collisions with surfaces; molecular identification from analysis of cracking patterns of selected gases; computer modelling of a quadrupole mass spectrometer; study of space charge in a quadrupole; transmission of the 127 deg cylindrical electrostatic analyzer; and mass spectrometer data deconvolution.

  14. Charge transfer and momentum exchange in exospheric D-H(+) and H-D(+) collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms that control the escape of deuterium from planetary exospheres include the acceleration of D(+) in the polar wind, and the production of suprathermal D atoms through nonthermal collisions. In this paper we examine the effects of neutral-ion interactions involving deuterium and hydrogen on the velocity distribution of neutral D. A two-center scattering approximation is used as the basis for calculations of the differential cross sections for charge transfer and elastic scatter in collision of H with D(+) and of D with H(+) for ionosphere-exosphere collision energies below 10 e V. These data are used to derive temperature dependent rate coefficients for the charge transfer branches of these interactions, and to determine the effects of ion-neutral temperature differences on the rate of generation of suprathermal D through charge transfer and elastic scatter.

  15. High-intensity, high-brightness polarized and unpolarized beam production in charge-exchange collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A.; Ritter, J.; Zubets, V.; Steski, D.; Atoian, G.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.

    2011-03-28

    Basic limitations on the high-intensity H{sup -} ion beam production were experimentally studied in charge-exchange collisions of the neutral atomic hydrogen beam in the Na-vapour jet ionizer cell. These studies are the part of the polarized source upgrade (to 10 mA peak current and 85% polarization) project for RHIC. In the source the atomic hydrogen beam of a 5-10 keV energy and total (equivalent) current up to 5 A is produced by neutralization of proton beam in pulsed hydrogen gas target. Formation of the proton beam (from the surface of the plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature {approx}0.2 eV) is produced by four-electrode spherical multi-aperture ion-optical system with geometrical focusing. The hydrogen atomic beam intensity up to 1.0 A/cm{sup 2} (equivalent) was obtained in the Na-jet ionizer aperture of a 2.0 cm diameter. At the first stage of the experiment H-beam with 36 mA current, 5 keV energy and {approx}1.0 cm {center_dot} mrad normalized emittance was obtained using the flat grids and magnetic focusing.

  16. Influence of the isotope effect on the charge exchange in slow collisions of Li, Be, and C ions with H, D, and T

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Shevelko, V. P.; Kato, Daiji

    2011-07-15

    The influence of the isotope effect (mass dependence) on the charge-exchange process in low-energy collisions of light ions with hydrogen isotopes (H, D, and T) is studied using the adiabatic theory of transitions in slow collisions developed by E. Solov'ev [Sov. Phys. Usp. 32, 228 (1989)]. Results of the numerical calculations are presented for the charge-exchange probabilities and cross sections of Li, Be, and C ions colliding with hydrogen isotopes and for the inverse reactions.

  17. Charge-exchange EUV spectroscopy in collisions of Xe{sup q+} (q=7-9) with rare gases

    SciTech Connect

    Tanuma, H.; Ohashi, H.; Yamamoto, N.; Kato, D.; Murakami, I.; Fujioka, S.; Nishimura, H.; Nishihara, K.

    2011-10-15

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission spectra have been measured in charge exchange collisions between Xe{sup q+} (q=7--9) and rare gases at an energy of 20 q keV. We have observed 4, 22, and 39 lines in collisions of Xe{sup 7+}, Xe{sup 8+}, and Xe{sup 9+}. Of these emission lines, four lines of Xe vii, eight lines of Xe viii, and nine lines of Xe ix correspond to newly observed transitions. The identification procedure is described in detail. The aim of this work is to obtain spectroscopic data for multiply charged Xe ions. In addition, the electron capture mechanism is also discussed using the crude classical over-the-barrier model to understand the target dependence of the emission spectra.

  18. Asymptotic form of the charge exchange cross section in the three body rearrangement collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1975-01-01

    A three body general rearrangement collision is considered where the initial and final bound states are described by the hydrogen-like wave functions. Mathematical models are developed to establish the relationships of quantum number, the reduced mass, and the nuclear charge of the final state. It is shown that for the low lying levels, the reciprocal of n cubed scaling law at all incident energies is only approximately satisfied. The case of the symmetric collisions is considered and it is shown that for high n and high incident energy, E, the cross section behaves as the reciprocal of E cubed. Zeros and minima in the differential cross sections in the limit of high n for protons on atomic hydrogen and positrons on atomic hydrogen are given.

  19. Single charge exchange in collision of fast protons with hydrogen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari-Adivi, Ebrahim; Sattarpour, Seyedeh Hedyeh

    2015-11-01

    Single charge transfer process in collision of energetic protons with molecular hydrogens is theoretically studied using a first-order two-effective-center Born approximation. The correct boundary conditions are incorporated in the formalism and the Hartree-Fock molecular wave function for molecular targets and the residual ions are used to calculate the transition amplitude. The interference patterns in the capture differential cross-sections (DCSs) for a given fixed orientation of the molecule, due to the scattering from the two-atomic centers in the molecular targets, are examined. The dependence of the DCSs upon the angle between the molecular axis and the direction of the incident velocity is theoretically investigated. Both average differential and integral cross-sections are calculated. The obtained results are compared with the available experimental data.

  20. Radiative loss and charge exchange in low energy Na - Ca+ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; McAlpine, K.; McCann, J. F.; Pattillo, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Forrey, R. C.; Babb, J. F.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments on radiative loss and capture are currently being performed at the University of Connecticut. In response to this experimental effort we have performed detailed calculations for a variety of loss and capture processes. Several low lying states of the NaCa+ cation are used with the accurate potentials energy curves, transition dipole moments and non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements between the states, obtained at the MRCI+Q level of approximation with the MOLPRO suite of quantum chemistry codes. Cross sections and rate coefficients are calculated for radiative charge transfer (RCX), radiative association (RA) and charge exchange in a fully quantum molecular close-coupling (MOCC) approximation at the higher energies. We use a variety of approaches, the optical potential method, semi-classical and MOCC methods to compare and contrast approximations. In addition a kinetic theory recently applied to SiO is utilized which illustrates the dramatic impact resonances have on the radiative association rates. Supported by NASA and HLRS at Stuttgart University.

  1. Analysis of x-ray emission spectra in charge-exchange collisions of C6 + with He and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange in C6 +-He and -H2 collisions followed by x-ray emission is examined using the two-center basis generator method for low to intermediate projectile energies. Within the independent electron model, we calculate capture cross sections and perform a radiative cascade analysis to obtain Lyman line-emission ratios. Single capture is considered for the C6 +-He system, while both single capture and autoionizing double capture are considered for the C6 +-H2 system. Effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on the l distribution of capture cross sections and the line-emission ratios are examined as well. Calculated line-emission ratios based on the no-response approximation are in satisfactory agreement with previous measurements.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of ion-neutral charge exchange collisions and grid erosion in an ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Xiaohang; Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    A combined particle-in-cell (PIC)/Monte Carlo simulation model has been developed in which the PIC method is used to simulate the charge exchange collisions. It is noted that a number of features were reproduced correctly by this code, but that its assumption of two-dimensional axisymmetry for a single set of grid apertures precluded the reproduction of the most characteristic feature of actual test data; namely, the concentrated grid erosion at the geometric center of the hexagonal aperture array. The first results of a three-dimensional code, which takes into account the hexagonal symmetry of the grid, are presented. It is shown that, with this code, the experimentally observed erosion patterns are reproduced correctly, demonstrating explicitly the concentration of sputtering between apertures.

  3. Analysis of x-ray emission in charge-exchange collisions of C6+ ions with He and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange in C6+-He and - H2 collisions followed by x-ray emission is examined using the two-center basis generator method within the independent electron model. The analysis examines the two collision systems for low to intermediate projectile energies. We perform capture cross section and radiative cascade calculations to obtain Lyman line emission ratios which can be compared to measurements that were carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Multicharged Ion Research Facility. Single-electron capture is considered for the C6+-He system while both single and autoionizing double capture are considered for the C6+- H2 system. We also examine the effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on the l distribution of the capture cross sections and the emission ratios. Calculated line emission ratios based on the no-response approximation are found to be in satisfactory agreement with the measurements. Work supported by SHARCNET, OGS, and NSERC, Canada

  4. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  5. Charge exchange transition probability for collisions between unlike ions and atoms within the adiabatic approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    A simple formula for the transition probability for electron exchange between unlike ions and atoms is established within the adiabatic approximation by employing the Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (LCAO) method. The formula also involves an adiabatic parameter, introduced by Massey, and thus the difficulties arising from the internal energy defect and the adiabatic approximation are avoided. Specific reactions Li(+++) + H to Li(++) + H(+) and Be(4+) + H to Be(3+) + H(+) are considered as examples. The calculated capture cross section results of the present work are compared with the experimental data and with the calculation of other authors over the velocity range of 10(7) cm/sec to 10(8) cm/sec.

  6. Facility produced charge-exchange ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    These facility produced ions are created by charge-exchange collisions between neutral atoms and energetic thruster beam ions. The result of the electron transfer is an energetic neutral atom and an ion of only thermal energy. There are true charge-exchange ions produced by collisions with neutrals escaping from the ion thruster and being charge-exchange ionized before the neutral intercepts the tank wall. The facility produced charge-exchange ions will not exist in space and therefore, represent a source of error where measurements involving ion thruster plasmas and their density are involved. The quantity of facility produced ions in a test chamber with a 30 cm mercury ion thruster was determined.

  7. Visible and near UV photon spectroscopy of charge-exchange collisions between Ar7+ and Li at 105 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, E.; Boduch, P.; Chantepie, M.; Druetta, M.; Hennecart, D.; Husson, X.; Lecler, D.; Wilson, M.

    1994-04-01

    Charge exchange collisions at 105 keV between Ar7+ ions and lithium atoms have been studied by photon spectroscopy in the 2000-6000 Å wavelength range. A large number of new lines in Ar VII have been identified with the help of ab initio pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations taking into account electrostatic interactions between 3snl (n = 6-10), 3 pnl (n = 4-6) and 3dnl (n = 4) configurations. They correspond to transitions 3snl-3sn'l' with n = 7, 8, 9 and Δn = 1 and 2. Lines in Ar VI were also observed and identified as transitions 3s2nl-3s2n'l' and 3s3pnl-3s3pn'l'(n = 6, 7) and Δn = 1.

  8. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  9. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  10. Charge exchange in the Io torus and exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Strobel, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Charge-exchange cross sections and their velocity dependence have been estimated for the most important reactions in the Io torus and exosphere. The methods used for calculating the cross sections are given and discussed in some detail. For symmetric-resonant single and double charge exchange, the cross sections are slowly varying functions of velocity. For inelastic charge-exchange collisions, the transition probabilities into a given final state can depend critically on velocity. Models are described which can be used to estimate both the most rapid charge-exchange processes and those states which play an important role. Calculated cross sections are used to obtain reaction rates as a function of radial position, demonstrating the importance of charge exchange in the inner torus. Charge-exchange reactions of torus ions with molecular species in Io's exosphere may yield a net supply of neutrals and plasma to the torus.

  11. Charge exchange X-rays from the heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, M. V.; Robertson, I. P.; Cravens, T. E.; Zank, G. P.; Florinski, V.

    2006-09-01

    X-rays are produced throughout the heliosphere as a consequence of charge transfer collisions between heavy solar wind ions and neutral atoms. After such a collision the solar wind ion is left in a highly excited state and emits extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray photons. In the outer heliosphere, solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission is mainly due to charge exchange with neutral interstellar hydrogen. We have combined MHD simulations with a comprehensive charge exchange computation code. We trace the full evolution of solar wind ions along stream line in order to produce three-dimensional emissivities and, subsequently, two-dimensional X-ray brightness and spectral maps of the heliosphere as would be observed from the outside. The model treats both the collisionally thin and the collisionally thick regimes. This model can be a diagnostic tool for studying stellar wind properties of nearby Sun-like stars.

  12. Momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions yield fragments (Delta-Z = + 1) whose longitudinal momentum distributions are downshifted by larger values than those associated with the remaining fragments (Delta-Z = 1, -2,...). Kinematics alone cannot account for the observed downshifts; therefore, an additional contribution from collision dynamics must be included. In this work, an optical model description of collision momentum transfer is used to estimate the additional dynamical momentum downshift. Good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data is obtained.

  13. Charge-exchange processes in collisions of H+,H2+,H3+,He+ , and He2+ ions with CO and CO2 molecules at energies below 1000 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbowy, S.; Pranszke, B.

    2016-02-01

    Absolute measurements of charge-exchange cross sections of H+,H2+,H3+,He+, and He2+ ions in CO and CO2 have been made for energies below 1000 eV, an equivalent of the energy of ionized particles at typical solar-wind conditions. An attenuation method for the case of complex ions of a molecule, taking into account the influence on the ion beam composition of the processes of disintegration of the primary ions into secondary ones with different charge-exchange cross sections, is described. Also the secondary effects, like three-body collisions and re-ionization processes that could emerge at higher pressures of the gas layer, are discussed. Dependence of the cross sections on the number of atomic centers in the projectile have been explained on the basis of the energy defect of the reactions and asymmetric near-resonant charge-exchange process between the ion and target molecule including the Doppler broadening in the interaction of the monoenergetic ion beam and target molecules having an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution corresponding to room temperature. Using the semiempirical approach based on the parametrized numerical coupled-channel two-state calculations, we have extrapolated the cross sections to a broader range of velocities.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamics and charge identified directed flow in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürsoy, Umut; Kharzeev, Dmitri; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Strong magnetic fields produced in any non-central heavy ion collision are expected to affect the dynamics of the hot QCD matter produced in this collision. The magnetic field is time-dependent and the medium is expanding, which leads to the induction of charged currents due to the combination of Faraday and Hall effects. We study the imprint the magnetic fields produced in non-central heavy ion collisions leave on the azimuthal distributions and correlations of the produced charged hadrons by employing an analytic solution to hydrodynamics combined with the electromagnetic effects in a perturbative fashion. We use the Cooper-Frye freeze-out procedure on an isothermal freeze-out surface to obtain the azimuthal hadron distributions. We find that the charged currents induced by the present of the electromagnetic fields result in a charge-dependent directed flow v1 that is odd in rapidity and odd under charge exchange. It can be detected by measuring correlations between the directed flow of charged hadrons at different rapidities, < v1±(y1)v1±(y2) > .

  15. Effect of collisions on dust particle charging via particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision

    SciTech Connect

    Rovagnati, B.; Davoudabadi, M.; Lapenta, G.; Mashayek, F.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of collisions on the charging and shielding of a single dust particle immersed in an infinite plasma is studied. A Monte-Carlo collision (MCC) algorithm is implemented in the particle-in-cell DEMOCRITUS code to account for the collisional phenomena which are typical of dusty plasmas in plasma processing, namely, electron-neutral elastic scattering, ion-neutral elastic scattering, and ion-neutral charge exchange. Both small and large dust particle radii, as compared to the characteristic Debye lengths, are considered. The trends of the steady-state dust particle potential at increasing collisionality are presented and discussed. The ions and electron energy distributions at various locations and at increasing collisionality in the case of large particle radius are shown and compared to their local Maxwellians. The ion-neutral charge-exchange collision is found to be by far the most important collisional phenomenon. For small particle radius, collisional effects are found to be important also at low level of collisionality, as more ions are collected by the dust particle due to the destruction of trapped ion orbits. For large particle radius, the major collisional effect is observed to take place in proximity of the presheath. Finally, the species energy distribution functions are found to approach their local Maxwellians at increasing collisionality.

  16. Evidence of charge exchange pumping in calcium-xenon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Charge exchange between xenon ions and calcium atoms may produce an inversion between the 5s or 4d and 4p energy levels of the calcium ions. A low power flowing xenon plasma seeded with calcium was utilized to determine if charge exchange or electron collisions populate the 5s and 4d levels Ca(+). Line intensity ratios proportional to the density ratios n5s/n4p and n4d/n4p were measured. From the dependence of these intensity ratios on power input to the xenon plasma it was concluded that charge exchange pumping of the 5s and 4d levels predominates over electron collisional pumping of these levels. Also, by comparing intensity ratios obtained using argon and krypton in place of xenon with those obtained in xenon the same conclusion was made.

  17. Charge Exchange Spectra of Hydrogenic and He-like Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wargelin, B J; Beiersdorfer, P; Neill, P A; Olson, R E; Scofield, J H

    2005-04-27

    We present H-like Fe XXVI and He-like Fe XXV charge-exchange spectra resulting from collisions of highly charged iron with N{sub 2} gas at an energy of {approx}10 eV amu{sup -1} in an electron beam ion trap. Although high-n emission lines are not resolved in our measurements, we observe that the most likely level for Fe{sup 25+} {yields} Fe{sup 24+} electron capture is n{sub max} {approx} 9, in line with expectations, while the most likely value for Fe{sup 26+} {yields} Fe{sup 25+} charge exchange is significantly higher. In the Fe XXV spectrum, the K{alpha} emission feature dominates, whether produced via charge exchange or collisional excitation. The K{alpha} energy centroid is lower in the former case than the latter (6666 versus 6685 eV, respectively), as expected because of the strong enhancement of emission from the forbidden and intercombination lines, relative to the resonance line, in charge-exchange spectra. In contrast, the Fe XXVI high-n Lyman lines have a summed intensity greater than that of Ly{alpha}, and are substantially stronger than predicted from theoretical calculations of charge exchange with atomic H. A discussion is presented of the relevance of our results to studies of diffuse Fe emission in the Galactic Center and Galactic Ridge, particularly with ASTRO-E2.

  18. Charge exchange and dissociative processes in collisions of slow He{sup 2+} ions with H{sub 2}O molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Seredyuk, B.; McCullough, R.W.; Tawara, H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Bodewits, D.; Hoekstra, R.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Sobocinski, P.; Pesic, D.; Hellhammer, R.; Sulik, B.; Stolterfoht, N.; Abu-Haija, O.; Kamber, E.Y.

    2005-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of one-electron capture in collisions of He{sup 2+} ions with H{sub 2}O molecules have been carried out in the range 0.025-12 keV amu{sup -1} corresponding to typical solar wind velocities of 70-1523 km s{sup -1}. Translational energy spectroscopy (TES), photon emission spectroscopy (PES), and fragment ion spectroscopy were employed to identify and quantify the collision mechanisms involved. Cross sections for selective single electron capture into n=1, 2, and 3 states of the He{sup +} ion were obtained using TES while PES provided cross sections for capture into the He{sup +}(2p) and He{sup +}(3p) states. Our model calculations show that He{sup +}(n=2) and He{sup +}(n=3) formation proceeds via a single-electron process governed by the nucleus-electron interaction. In contrast, the He{sup +}(1s) formation mechanism involves an exothermic two-electron process driven by the electron-electron interaction, where the potential energy released by the electron capture is used to remove a second electron thereby resulting in fragmentation of the H{sub 2}O molecule. This process is found to become increasingly important as the collision energy decreases. The experimental cross sections are found to be in reasonable agreement with cross sections calculated using the Demkov and Landau-Zener models.

  19. Charge exchange in zinc-neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Excitation of the 4d and 5p levels of Zn+ by charge exchange bewteen Ne+ and Zn was investigated. From measured electron temperature and line intensity ratios it was concluded that charge exchange is the dominate mechanism for populating the 4d2D5/2 level of Zn+. Comparison of Zn-Ne and Zn-Ar results imply the same conclusion. No evidence for charge exchange as the dominant pumping mechanism for the 5p2Pl/2, 5p2P3/2, or 4d2D3/2 levels was obtained.

  20. Pion double charge exchange and hadron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will review theoretical results to show how pion double charge exchange is contributing to our understanding of hadron dynamics in nuclei. The exploitation of the nucleus as a filter is shown to be essential in facilitating the comparison between theory and experiment. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phobos Collaboration; Steinberg, Peter A.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/pbar-p and e+e- data. N_tot/(N_part/2) in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with sqrt(s) in a similar way as N_tot in e+e- collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  2. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  3. Charge exchange avalanche at the cometopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas I.

    1987-01-01

    A sharp transition from a solar wind proton dominated flow to a plasma population primarily consisting of relatively cold cometary heavy ions has been observed at a cometocentric distance of about 160,000 km by the VEGA and GIOTTO missions. This boundary (the cometopause) was thought to be related to charge transfer processes, but its location and thickness are inconsistent with conventionally estimated ion - neutral coupling boundaries. In this paper a two-fluid model is used to investigate the major physical processes at the cometopause. By adopting observed comet Halley parameters the model is able to reproduce the location and the thickness of this charge exchange boundary.

  4. Transfer ionization in collisions with a fast highly charged ion.

    PubMed

    Voitkiv, A B

    2013-07-26

    Transfer ionization in fast collisions between a bare ion and an atom, in which one of the atomic electrons is captured by the ion whereas another one is emitted, crucially depends on dynamic electron-electron correlations. We show that in collisions with a highly charged ion a strong field of the ion has a very profound effect on the correlated channels of transfer ionization. In particular, this field weakens (strongly suppresses) electron emission into the direction opposite (perpendicular) to the motion of the ion. Instead, electron emission is redirected into those parts of the momentum space which are very weakly populated in fast collisions with low charged ions. PMID:23931364

  5. Integral cross section measurements and product recoil velocity distributions of Xe(2+) + N2 hyperthermal charge-transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Hause, Michael L; Prince, Benjamin D; Bemish, Raymond J

    2016-07-28

    Charge exchange from doubly charged rare gas cations to simple diatomics proceeds with a large cross section and results in populations of many vibrational and electronic product states. The charge exchange between Xe(2+) and N2, in particular, is known to create N2 (+) in both the A and B electronic states. In this work, we present integral charge exchange cross section measurements of the Xe(2+) + N2 reaction as well as axial recoil velocity distributions of the Xe(+) and N2 (+) product ions for collision energies between 0.3 and 100 eV in the center-of-mass (COM) frame. Total charge-exchange cross sections decrease from 70 Å(2) to about 40 Å(2) with increasing collision energy through this range. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions indicates that a Xe(2+) - N2 complex exists at low collision energies but is absent by 17.6 eV COM. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions reveals evidence for complexes with lifetimes comparable to the rotational period at low collision energies. The velocity distributions are consistent with quasi-resonant single charge transfer at high collision energies. PMID:27475363

  6. Integral cross section measurements and product recoil velocity distributions of Xe2+ + N2 hyperthermal charge-transfer collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, Michael L.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J.

    2016-07-01

    Charge exchange from doubly charged rare gas cations to simple diatomics proceeds with a large cross section and results in populations of many vibrational and electronic product states. The charge exchange between Xe2+ and N2, in particular, is known to create N2 + in both the A and B electronic states. In this work, we present integral charge exchange cross section measurements of the Xe2+ + N2 reaction as well as axial recoil velocity distributions of the Xe+ and N2 + product ions for collision energies between 0.3 and 100 eV in the center-of-mass (COM) frame. Total charge-exchange cross sections decrease from 70 Å2 to about 40 Å2 with increasing collision energy through this range. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions indicates that a Xe2+ - N2 complex exists at low collision energies but is absent by 17.6 eV COM. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions reveals evidence for complexes with lifetimes comparable to the rotational period at low collision energies. The velocity distributions are consistent with quasi-resonant single charge transfer at high collision energies.

  7. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T.

    1975-01-01

    Explorer 45 measurements during the recovery phase of a moderate magnetic storm have confirmed that the charge exchange decay mechanism can account for the decay of the storm-time proton ring current. Data from the moderate magnetic storm of 24 February 1972 was selected for study since a symmetrical ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5 to 30 keV decayed throughout the L-value range of 3.5 to 5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn. After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange can entirely account for the storm-time proton ring current decay, and that this mechanism must be considered in all studies involving the loss of proton ring current particles.

  8. Charge-exchange plasma environment for an ion drive spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A model was reviewed which describes the propagation of the mercury charge-exchange plasma and extended to describe the flow of the molybdenum component of the charge-exchange plasma. The uncertainties in the models for various conditions are discussed. Such topics as current drain to the solar array, charge-exchange plasma material deposition, and the effects of space plasma on the charge-exchange plasma propagation are addressed.

  9. Charge symmetry breaking two-pion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Niskanen, J.A. )

    1992-06-01

    Two-pion exchange (TPE) contribution to the charge symmetry breaking class IV neutron-proton interaction is examined in a potential and coupled channels approach. Based on nonrelativistic {pi}{ital NN} and {pi}{ital N}{Delta} vertices, a TPE interaction is treated in two ways, as a potential or as a part calculable by the coupled channels method plus a residual potential interaction. A practical parametrization of the TPE potentials is given, which can also be used in the case of class III charge symmetry breaking (CSB) forces as well as for charge symmetric interactions. The results show that below 300 MeV the TPE contribution to CSB in elastic {ital np} scattering is insignificant, whereas at higher energies it should not be neglected.

  10. Charge exchange lifetimes for ions in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1977-01-01

    Latest and best measurements of physical quantities involved in complete calculation of the charge exchange lifetime of mirroring magnetospheric ions are coalesced and summarized. It is critical that the charge exchange lifetimes for ions be known as accurately as possible in order to apply the charge exchange mechanism to ion phenomena within the earth's magnetosphere.

  11. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies Of Highly Charged Ions On Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganić, I. N.; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-06-01

    Accurate studies of low-energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X-ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H-like, and He-like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H-like ions of C, N, O and fully-stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV/u-20 keV/u) and compared to previous H-oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV/u-3.3 keV/u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H-oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  12. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies of Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D; Havener, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Accurate studies of low energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H like, and He like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H like ions of C, N, O and fully stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV u 20 keV u) and compared to previous H oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV u 3.3 keV u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  13. Charge transfer during individual collisions in ice growing by riming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, Eldo E.; Caranti, Giorgio M.

    1991-01-01

    The charging of a target by riming in the wind was studied in the temperature range of (-10, -18 C). For each temperature, charge transfers of both signs are observed and, according to the environmental conditions, one of them prevails. The charge is more positive as the liquid water concentration is increased at any particular temperature. It is found that even at the low impact velocities used (5 m/s) there is abundant evidence of fragmentation following the collision.

  14. Status of Charge Exchange Cross Section Measurements for Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Schultz, D. R.; Seely, D. G.; Schultz, P. C.

    2011-05-01

    Total cross sections of charge exchange (CX) for C5+, N6+, and O7+ ions on ground state atomic hydrogen are measured in an extended collision energy range of 1 - 20,000 eV/u. Absolute CX measurements are performed using an improved merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source mounted on a high voltage platform. In order to improve the problematic H+ signal collection for these exoergic CX collisions at low relative energies, a new double focusing electrostatic analyzer was installed. Experimental CX data are in good agreement with all previous H-oven relative measurements at higher collision energies. We compare our results with the most recent molecular orbital close-coupling (MOCC) and atomic orbital close-coupling (AOCC) theoretical calculations. Work supported by the NASA Solar & Heliospheric Physics Program NNH07ZDA001N, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. DoE.

  15. Cometary X-Rays: Line Emission Cross Sections for Multiply Charged Solar Wind Ion Charge Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S; Olson, R E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-12-22

    Absolute line emission cross sections are presented for 1 keV/amu charge exchange collisions of multiply charged solar wind ions with H{sub 2}O, H, O, CO{sub 2}, and CO cometary targets. The present calculations are contrasted with available laboratory data. A parameter-free model is used to successfully predict the recently observed x-ray spectra of comet C/LINEAR 1999 S4. We show that the resulting spectrum is extremely sensitive to the time variations of the solar wind composition. Our results suggest that orbiting x-ray satellites may be a viable way to predict the solar wind intensities and composition on the Earth many hours before the ions reach the earth.

  16. Ion thruster charge-exchange plasma flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Gabriel, S. B.; Kitamura, S.

    1982-01-01

    The electron bombardment ion thruster has been under development for a number of years and during this time, studies of the plasmas produced by the thrusters and their interactions with spacecraft have been evaluated, based on available data. Due to diagnostic techniques used and facility effects, there is uncertainty as to the reliability of data from these early studies. This paper presents data on the flow of the charge-exchange plasma produced just downstream of the thruster's ion optics. The 'end-effect' of a cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to determine ion density and directed ion velocity. Results are compared with data obtained from a retarding potential analyzer-Faraday cup.

  17. Production of charge in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Scott; McCormack, William Patrick; Ratti, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    By analyzing preliminary experimental measurements of charge-balance functions from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), it is found that scenarios in which balancing charges are produced in a single surge, and therefore separated by a single length scale, are inconsistent with data. In contrast, a model that assumes two surges, one associated with the formation of a thermalized quark-gluon plasma and a second associated with hadronization, provides a far superior reproduction of the data. A statistical analysis of the model comparison finds that the two-surge model best reproduces the data if the charge production from the first surge is similar to expectations for equilibrated matter taken from lattice gauge theory. The charges created in the first surge appear to separate by approximately one unit of spatial rapidity before emission, while charges from the second wave appear to have separated by approximately a half unit or less.

  18. Electron-exchange collisions with molecular open-shell targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkötter, I.; Hanne, G. F.

    2009-08-01

    Low-energy electron-exchange collisions with the simple open-shell molecules O2 , NO, and NO2 have been investigated by measuring the change in electron-spin polarization after scattering polarized electrons from unpolarized molecules with energies between 8 and 20 eV and scattering angles up to 130° . Results for elastic collisions with O2 and NO are compared with existing theories where the agreement is fair. Direct observation of spin-exchange collisions is obtained for elastic scattering from NO2 and for electron-impact excitation of O2 (6.1 eV energy loss). It is also shown that the results may be influenced by spin-orbit interaction, which was assumed to be negligible in previous studies.

  19. Tuning Charge Transfer in Ion-Surface Collisions at Hyperthermal Energies.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yunxi; Giapis, Konstantinos P

    2016-05-18

    Charge exchange in ion-surface collisions may be influenced by surface adsorbates to alter the charge state of the scattered projectiles. We show here that the positive-ion yield, observed during ion scattering on metal surfaces at low incident energies, is greatly enhanced by adsorbing electronegative species onto the surface. Specifically, when beams of N(+) and O(+) ions are scattered off of clean Au surfaces at hyperthermal energies, no positive ions are observed exiting. Partial adsorption of F atoms on the Au surface, however, leads to the appearance of positively charged primary ions scattering off of Au, a direct result of the increase in the Au work function. The inelastic energy losses for positive-ion exits are slightly larger than the corresponding ionization energies of the respective N and O atoms, which suggest that the detected positive ions are formed by surface reionization during the hard collision event. PMID:26879471

  20. Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Ina P.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Sibeck, David G.; Collier, Michael R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    On March 31st. 2001, a coronal mass ejection pushed the subsolar magnetopause to the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit at 6.6 RE. The NASA/GSFC Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMe) employed a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to simulate the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the peak of this geomagnetic storm. Robertson et aL then modeled the expected 50ft X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange with geocoronal neutrals in the dayside cusp and magnetosheath. The locations of the bow shock, magnetopause and cusps were clearly evident in their simulations. Another geomagnetic storm took place on July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day). We again modeled X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange, but this time as observed from a moving spacecraft. This paper discusses the impact of spacecraft location on observed X-ray emission and the degree to which the locations of the bow shock and magnetopause can be detected in images.

  1. Collision phenomena involving highly-charged ions in astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.

    2001-01-01

    A description of the role of highly charged ions in various astronomical objects; includes the use of critical quantities such as cross sections for excitation, charge-exchange, X-ray emission, radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR); and lifetimes, branching ratios, and A-values.

  2. Systematics of pion double charge exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    Differential cross sections have been measured for pion-induced double-charge-exchange (DCX) reactions leading to double-isobaric-analog states (DIAS) and low-lying nonanalog states in the residual nuclei. A description of the experimental details and data analysis is presented. The experimentally observed systematics of reactions leading to DIAS, to nonanalog ground states, and to low-lying 2 states are described. Lowest-order optical-model calculations of DIAS DCX are compared to the data. Efforts to understand the anomalies by invoking additional reaction-mechanism amplitudes and a higher-order optical potential are described. Calculations of nonanalog DCX reactions leading to J/sup / = 0 states were performed within a distorted-wave impulse-approximation framework. The sensitivities of these calculations to input parameters are discussed. 58 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Duval, B. P.

    2012-05-25

    For fusion, obtaining reliable measurements of basic plasma parameters like ion and electron densities and temperatures is a primary goal. For theory, measurements are needed as a function of time and space to understand plasma transport and confinement with the ultimate goal of achieving economic nuclear fusion power. Electron profile measurements and plasma spectroscopy for the plasma ions are introduced. With the advent of Neutral Beam auxiliary plasma heating, Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy provides accurate and time resolved measurements of the ions in large volume fusion devices. In acknowledgement of Nicol Peacock's role in the development of these techniques, still at the forefront of plasma fusion research, this paper describes the evolution of this diagnostic method.

  4. Visible charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.; Schechtman, N.; Synakowski, E.J.

    1991-03-01

    Visible charge exchange recombination spectroscopy is routinely used to measure the time evolution of the ion temperature (T{sub i}) and toroidal rotation velocity (v{sub {phi}}) profiles on TFTR. These measurements are made with the CHERS diagnostic, a fiber-optically coupled spectrometer equipped with a two-dimensional photodiode array detector which provides both spectral and spatial resolution. The instrumentation, data analysis techniques, and examples of T{sub i} and v{sub {phi}} measurements are described. Recently, CHERS has been used to perform impurity transport experiments: radial profiles of diffusivities and convective velocities for helium and iron have been deduced from measurements of the time evolutions of He{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 24+} profiles following impurity injection. Examples of these measurements are given. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  5. 75 FR 60674 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ...The U.S. Department of State (Department) is proposing to revise its Fees and Charges assessed for providing Exchange Visitor Program (EVP) services to recoup the Department's costs associated with operating all aspects of the Exchange Visitor...

  6. Dependence of the charge exchange lifetimes on mirror latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of the charge exchange lifetimes on the mirror latitude for ions mirroring off the geomagnetic equator was re-computed using the improved hydrogen distribution models. The Chamberlain model was used to define the spatial distribution of the neutral hydrogen environment through which the ring current ions traverse. The resultant dependence of the charge exchange lifetime on mirror latitude is best fitted by the approximation that contains the charge exchange lifetime for equatorial particles.

  7. Calculations and analysis of cross sections required for argon charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, David Robert; Lee, Teck; Loch, Stuart D

    2010-01-01

    A large set of calculations has been carried out providing a basis for diagnostics of fusion plasmas through emission resulting from radiative deexcitation following charge transfer between hydrogen and highly charged argon ions, so-called argon charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. These results have been obtained using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method to treat charge transfer to states with principal quantum numbers up to 30 or more. Nine collision energies between 13.3333 and 250 keV/u pertinent to neutral beam injection have been considered for Arq+ (q=15-18) colliding with atomic hydrogen in both the ground and metastable states. Atomic orbital close coupling calculations have also been undertaken in order to provide a fully quantum mechanical test of the CTMC results for Ar18+ + H(1s) collisions. The results of the calculations are discussed here and the full set of data is made available through a web posting.

  8. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-11-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  9. Resonant charge-exchange involving excited helium atoms and reactive transport of local thermodynamic equilibrium helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarim, A. V.; Smirnov, B. M.; Laricchiuta, A.; Capitelli, M.

    2012-06-01

    The cross sections for charge-exchange and charge-transfer processes are evaluated for collisions of helium ions with parent-atoms in ground and excited states, with the principal quantum number n = 1-5, in the collision energy range from thermal up to 10 eV. Corresponding diffusion-type collision integrals are derived, and the role of "abnormal" transport of electronically excited states on the reactive thermal conductivity of equilibrium helium plasma, at atmospheric pressure, estimated in the frame of a simplified approach.

  10. Charge exchange reactions and applications to astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Kajino, T.

    2012-11-01

    Neutrino-induced reactions have been known to play important roles as the neutrino process on the nucleosynthesis in core collapsing supernovae (SNe) explosions because expected neutrino flux and energy are sufficiently high enough to excite many relevant nuclei in spite of small cross sections of the weak interaction. However, we do not have enough data for the neutrino reaction to be exploited in the network calculation. Only a sparse data in the relevant energy range is known, in specific, for 12C. Therefore we have to rely on theoretical estimation of the reaction, which has two different modes, charge current (CC) and neutral current (NC). In particular, CC reactions are closely related to charge exchange reactions (CEXRs) which are feasible in the experiment, such as, (p,n) or (n,p) reactions. These CEXRs are usually dominated by the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition in the lower energy region. In this respect, any theoretical approaches for the neutrino reaction should be investigated for the CEXR because we have and expect more useful experimental data. After confirming our models to the GT strength deduced from the CEXR, we calculated neutrino-induced reactions in the energy range below the quasielastic region for nuclei of astrophysical importance. Our calculations are carried out with the Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA), which successfully described the nuclear beta decays of relevant nuclei. To describe neutrino-nucleus reactions, general multipole transitions by the weak interaction are considered for CC and NC reactions. Both reactions are described in a theoretical framework. Our results are shown to well reproduce the data from CEXRs and the sparse experimental data related to the neutrino-induced reaction, and further extended for neutrino reactions on various nuclear targets. Parts of the results are reported in this talk.

  11. Suzaku Observations of Charge Exchange Emission from Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezoe, Y.; Fujimoto, R.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Ohashi, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Oishi, S.; Miyoshi, Y; Terada, N.; Futaana, Y.; Porter, F. S.; Brown, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    Recent results of charge exchange emission from solar system objects observed with the Japanese Suzaku satellite are reviewed. Suzaku is of great importance to investigate diffuse X-ray emission like the charge exchange from planetary exospheres and comets. The Suzaku studies of Earth's exosphere, Martian exosphere, Jupiter's aurorae, and comets are overviewed.

  12. Computation of intrabeam charge-exchange rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, R.A.; Arnold, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    ANL's planned Accelerator Development Facility (ADF) for heavy-ion fusion will test and demonstrate virtually all of the beam manipulations thought to be necessary for a heavy-ion inertial-confinement-fusion driver. The relatively simple upgrade of adding synchrotron acceleration capability to the storage ring would also allow important energy-deposition and materials experiments. The feasibility of this upgrade depends critically on the beam loss rate from charge-exchange scattering. A computer program has been written for the purpose of obtaining a better estimate for this lifetime. The code assumes a K-V transverse distribution folded into a Neuffer longitudinal distribution. The emittance ellipse parameters, along with various estimates for the velocity-dependent ion-ion cross sections, are read in and a numerical integration is performed over the distribution, yielding a value for the loss rate -1/N/sup 2/ dN/dt. Preliminary estimates indicate that this mode of beam loss presents no obstacle to upgrading the ADF.

  13. Cometary X-ray emission: theoretical cross sections following charge exchange by multiply charged ions of astrophysical interest

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S; Olson, R E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-13

    The CTMC method is used to calculate emission cross sections following charge exchange collisions involving highly charged ions of astrophysical interest and typical cometary targets. Comparison is made to experimental data obtained on the EBIT machine at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for O{sup 8+} projectiles impinging on different targets at a collision energy of 10 eV/amu. The theoretical cross sections are used together with ion abundances measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer as well as those obtained by a fitting procedure using laboratory emission cross sections in order to reproduce the x-ray spectrum of comet C/LINEAR S4 measured on July 14th 2001.

  14. Charge transfer in energetic Li^2+ - H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancev, I.

    2008-07-01

    The total cross sections for charge transfer in Li^2+ - H collisions have been calculated, using the four-body first Born approximation with correct boundary conditions (CB1-4B) and four-body continuum distorted wave method (CDW-4B) in the energy range 10 - 5000 keV/amu. Present results call for additional experimental data at higher impact energies than presently available.

  15. Charge transfer reactions in multiply charged ion-atom collisions. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms of hydrogen and/or helium may be rapid at thermal energies. If these reactions are rapid, they will suppress highly charged ions in H I regions and guarantee that the observed absorption features from such ions cannot originate in the interstellar gas. A discussion of such charge-transfer reactions is presented and compared with the available experimental data. The possible implications of these reactions for observations of the interstellar medium, H II regions, and planetary nebulae are outlined.

  16. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  17. Charge Transfer in C6+ Collisions with H and He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. G.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    Charge transfer cross sections are calculated for C6+ + H and C6+ + He collisions using a time-dependent close-coupling method in Cartesian coordinates. Capture cross sections into the 1 s , 2 l(l = 0 - 1) , 3 l(l = 0 - 2) , and 4 l(l = 0 - 3) subshells of C5+ are found for projectile energies ranging from 5.0 keV/amu to 15.0 keV/amu. Comparisons are made with previous calculations and recent experiments. The atomic collision data will be used to better understand the interaction of solar wind ions with interplanetary atoms. Work supported in part by grants from NSF, NASA, and DOE.

  18. Charge-exchange plasma generated by an ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The charge exchange plasma generated by an ion thruster was investigated experimentally using both 5 cm and 15 cm thrusters. Results are shown for wide ranges of radial distance from the thruster and angle from the beam direction. Considerations of test environment, as well as distance from the thruster, indicate that a valid simulation of a thruster on a spacecraft was obtained. A calculation procedure and a sample calculation of charge exchange plasma density and saturation electron current density are included.

  19. 78 FR 28137 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ..., 2013 (RIN 1400-AD28; 78 FR 6263), with a request for comments, to amend 22 CFR 62.17 (``Fees and... Part 62 RIN 1400-AD28 Exchange Visitor Program--Fees and Charges AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION... Application Fee for Sponsor Designation or Redesignation and the Administrative Fee for Exchange Visitor...

  20. Charge transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions under Debye plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of plasma environment on the 1s → nlm charge transfer, for arbitrary n, l, and m, in proton-hydrogen collisions has been investigated within the framework of a distorted wave approximation. The effect of external plasma has been incorporated using Debye screening model of the interacting charge particles. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogenic wave function, it has been possible to obtain the scattering amplitude in closed form. A detailed study has been made to investigate the effect of external plasma environment on the differential and total cross sections for electron capture into different angular momentum states for the incident energy in the range of 20–1000 keV. For the unscreened case, our results are in close agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  1. Electron impact collision strengths for excitation of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.H. . Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics)

    1990-08-20

    The principle task given us by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform under Subcontract 6181405 was to develop a method and corresponding computer programs to make very rapid, yet accurate, fully relativistic and quasirelativistic calculations of cross sections or collision strengths for electron impact excitation of highly charged ions with any value for the nuclear charge number Z. Also while this major code development was being done we were asked to calculate cross sections of interest using our previous rapid, more approximate codes, which used hydrogenic basis functions and screening constants with both the electron-electron Coulomb interaction and relativistic interactions included by perturbation theory. We were also asked to determine the branching ratio for ionization to various final states in complex cases, where two or more states corresponding to the final configuration of the ion were possible.

  2. Charge transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions under Debye plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of plasma environment on the 1s → nlm charge transfer, for arbitrary n, l, and m, in proton-hydrogen collisions has been investigated within the framework of a distorted wave approximation. The effect of external plasma has been incorporated using Debye screening model of the interacting charge particles. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogenic wave function, it has been possible to obtain the scattering amplitude in closed form. A detailed study has been made to investigate the effect of external plasma environment on the differential and total cross sections for electron capture into different angular momentum states for the incident energy in the range of 20-1000 keV. For the unscreened case, our results are in close agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  3. 76 FR 10498 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... rule, Public Notice 7077 at 75 FR 60674-60679, October 1, 2010, with a request for comments, amending... Part 62 RIN 1400-AC67 Exchange Visitor Program--Fees and Charges AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of State is amending its regulations regarding fees and charges...

  4. Charge exchange cooling in the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Logan, B. Grant

    1978-01-01

    Method and apparatus for cooling a plasma of warm charged species confined in the center mirror cell of the tandem mirror apparatus by injecting cold neutral species of the plasma into at least one mirroring region of the center mirror cell, the cooling due to the loss of warm charged species through charge exchange with the cold neutral species with resulting diffusion of the warm neutral species out of the plasma.

  5. Charge exchange in a planetary corona - Its effect on the distribution and escape of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The theory for a spherical collisionless planetary corona is extended to include charge-exchange collisions between H(+) and H, which are assumed to constitute intermingled gases with different kinetic temperatures. The treatment is based on the conventional concept of a critical level (or exobase) above which the only collisions considered in the Boltzmann equation are those that resonantly exchange charge. Although the geometry treated is an oversimplification for a real planet, numerical examples are given for an idealized earth and Venus. For earth, an ion temperature of 4 times the neutral temperature, an ion density at the exobase of 14,000 per cu cm, and a plasmapause at 1.5 earth radii will raise the escape flux of H by a factor of 6. The total H above the exobase is changed by less than 1%. For Venus, conditions are examined that would account for the peculiar H distribution observed from Mariner 5. The plasma conditions required are not obviously outrageous by terrestrial standards, but the Mariner 5 ionosphere measurements did not show a high plasmapause at, say, 1.25 or 1.5 planetary radii, a fact that might argue against a charge-exchange model.

  6. Charge exchange of a polar molecule at its cation

    SciTech Connect

    Buslov, E. Yu. Zon, B. A.

    2011-01-15

    The Landau-Herring method is used to derive an analytic expression for the one-electron exchange interaction of a polar molecule with its positively charged ion, induced by a {sigma}-electron. Analogously to the classical Van der Pole method, the exchange interaction potential is averaged over the rotational states of colliding particles. The resonant charge-transfer cross section is calculated, and the effect of the dipole moments of the core on the cross section is analyzed. It is shown that allowance for the dependence of the exchange potential on the orientation of the dipole moments relative to the molecular axis may change the dependence of the cross section on the velocity of colliding particles, which is typical of the resonant charge exchange, from the resonance to the quasi-resonance dependence.

  7. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  8. Particle-in-cell charged-particle simulations, plus Monte Carlo collisions with neutral atoms, PIC-MCC

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences)

    1991-04-01

    Many-particle (meaning 100's) charged-particle plasma simulations using spatial meshes for the electromagnetic field solutions, particle-in-cell (PIC) merged with Monte Carlo collision (MCC) calculations, are coming into wide use for application to partially ionized gases. This paper emphasizes the development of PIC computer experiments since the 1950's starting with one-dimensional (1-D) charged-sheet models, the addition of the mesh, and fast direct Poisson equation solvers for 2-D and 3-D. The finite-size particle-in-mesh (finite {Delta}{chi}, {Delta}t) theory of Langdon is presented in part to display the effects of too small {lambda}{sub D}/{Delta}{chi}, even for Maxwellian velocity distributions, as a caution, for example, when some ions are cooled to background gas temperatures by charge exchange. Early work on adding collisions to 1-D charge-sheet models by Burger and Shanny et al. are presented, with many of the elements of current Monte Carlo codes. Bounded plasma modeling is presented with electrode charges and external R, L, C, and V(t), I(t) sources now in use on fast desktop computers as real-time computer experiments, complementing analytic modeling and laboratory experiments. This paper reports that the addition of Monte Carlo collisions (usually done with irregular timesteps) to PIC (usually done with uniform {Delta}t's) is displayed as a developing art, relying on experimental total cross sections and approximate analytical differential cross sections to produce changes in charged-particle speed and direction due to collisions with neutrals, so far including elastic, excitation, ionization, charge exchange, and attachment processes.

  9. Systematics of Charged Particle Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions with the PHOBOS Detector at Rhic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Peter A.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Corbo, J.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hicks, D.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Rafelski, M.; Rbeiz, M.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2002-03-01

    The multiplicity of charged particles produced in Au+Au collisions as a function of energy, centrality, rapidity and azimuthal angle has been measured with the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. These results contribute to our understanding of the initial state of heavy ion collisions and provide a means to compare basic features of particle production in nuclear collisions with more elementary systems.

  10. Multiple scattering and charged-particle - hydrogen-atom collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Thomas, B. K.

    1979-01-01

    Glauber-approximation scattering amplitudes for charged-particle - hydrogen-atom elastic and inelastic collisions are derived directly in terms of the known particle-electron and particle-proton Coulomb scattering amplitudes and the known hydrogen-atom form factors. It is shown that the particle-hydrogen amplitude contains no single-scattering term. The double-scattering term is obtained as a two-dimensional integral in momentum space. It is demonstrated how the result can be used as the starting point for an alternative and relatively simple derivation, in closed form, of the Glauber particle-hydrogen scattering amplitude for transitions from the ground state to an arbitrary (nlm) state.

  11. Charge exchange cross sections for the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, M. A.; Johnson, R. E.

    1989-03-01

    An impact parameter method for calculating cross sections as a function of incident ion energy is used in conjunction with an improved exchange energy formulation to update several of the charge exchange cross sections currently used in Io plasma torus modeling. New cross sections for S(+) + S(2+) yielding S(2+) + S(+) and Na(+) on neutral targets, useful in analyzing the fast Na jets observed at Io, are also calculated.

  12. Pion double charge exchange reactions leading to double pionic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, J.; Oset, E.; Vincente-Vacas, M.J. ); Hirenzaki, S.; Toki, H. )

    1992-10-20

    In this paper, the authors study theoretically pion double charge exchange reactions leading to double pionic atoms. The reaction cross-sections with two pions in the deeper bound pionic orbits in [sup 208]Pb are calculated with realistic pionic atom wave functions and distortion effects. The cross-sections are found to be d[sup 2] [sigma]/dEd[Omega] [approx] 10[sup [minus] 3] [minus] 10[sup [minus] 4] [mu]b/srMeV, which are only a small fraction of the double charge exchange.

  13. HIGH CURRENT D- PRODUCTION BY CHARGE EXCHANGE IN SODIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B.; Poulsen, P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1981-02-01

    A beam of D{sup -} ions has been produced at 7-13 keV, with currents up to 2.2 {angstrom}, using charge exchange in sodium vapor. The beam profile is bi-Gaussian with angular divergence 0.7{sup o} x 2.8{sup o} and peak current density 15 mA/cm{sup 2}. The characteristics of the beam are in excellent agreement with predictions based on atomic cross sections. The sodium vapor target is formed by a jet directed across the beam. The sodium density drops rapidly in the beamline downstream from the charge exchange region, decreasing three orders of magnitude in 15 cm. Measurement and analysis of the plasma accompanying the beam demonstrate that plasma densities nearly equal to the beam density are obtained 1 m from the charge exchange medium. The plasma produced in the sodium is thus well confined to the charge exchange region and does not propagate along the beam.

  14. 76 FR 17027 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 22 CFR Part 62 RIN 1400-AC67 Exchange Visitor Program--Fees and Charges Correction In rule document 2011-4276, appearing on pages 10498-10500 in the issue of Friday, February 25, 2011, make the following correction:...

  15. Ion exchange and surface charge on montmorillonite clay

    SciTech Connect

    Sperry, J.M.; Peirce, J.J.

    1999-05-01

    An ion-exchange model originally developed for pure oxides prepared in the laboratory is extended to study of ion exchange and surface charge on a naturally occurring montmorillonite clay. The range of surface charges measured for montmorillonite with various electrolyte solutions and clay pretreatments is within the range of those measured for a wide variety of oxides prepared in the laboratory, including MnO{sub 2}-IC1, MnO{sub 2}-IC12, MnO{sub 2}-IC22, titanium dioxide, ferric oxide, and aluminum oxide. In addition, fitted parameter values for lateral interaction constants and equilibrium constants for the acid sites that characterize ion exchange on montmorillonite are on the same order of magnitude as those obtained for pure oxides. Surface charge of montmorillonite in sodium nitrate solution is measured to be approximately 15 to 25% greater than that measured between a pH of 4 and 9 in calcium chloride solution. This difference is attributed to the greater charge on the calcium (2{sup +}) ion; thus, its stronger electrostatic attraction to the acid hydroxyl site. An order of magnitude change in solids concentration (C{sub p}) can lead to a difference in measured net surface charge density of the same oxide sample of several orders of magnitude. This difference increases at higher pH, indicating the importance of reporting the corresponding C{sub p} at which experiments are conducted.

  16. Helium escape from the Earth's atmosphere - The charge exchange mechanism revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lie-Svendsen, O.; Rees, M. H.; Stamnes, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the escape of neutral helium from the terrestrial atmosphere through exothermic charge exchange reactions between He(+) ions and the major atmospheric constituents N2, O2 and O. Elastic collisions with the neutral background particles were treated quantitatively using a recently developed kinetic theory approach. An interhemispheric plasma transport model was employed to provide a global distribution of He(+) ions as a function of altitude, latitude and local solar time and for different levels of solar ionization. Combining these ion densities with neutral densities from an MSIS model and best estimates for the reaction rate coefficients of the charge exchange reactions, we computed the global distribution of the neutral He escape flux. The escape rates show large diurnal and latitudinal variations, while the global average does not vary by more than a factor of three over a solar cycle. We find that this escape mechanism is potentially important for the overall balance of helium in the Earth's atmosphere. However, more accurate values for the reaction rate coefficients of the charge exchange reactions are required to make a definitive assessment of its importance.

  17. Overview on collision processes of highly charged ions with atoms present status and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Janev, R.K.

    1983-05-01

    This paper provides a brief discussion on the present status of the collision physics of highly charged ions with atoms. The emphasis is on the main achievements in understanding and describing the most important collision processes, and as charge transfer, ionization and Auger-type processes, and even more on those open problems which, due either to their scientific or practical importance, represent challenges to current research in this field. The paper concentrates on general ideas and problems whose development and solutions have advanced or will advance our basic understanding of the collision dynamics of multiply charged ions with atoms.

  18. Krypton charge exchange cross sections for Hall effect thruster models

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, Michael L.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J.

    2013-04-28

    Following discharge from a Hall effect thruster, charge exchange occurs between ions and un-ionized propellant atoms. The low-energy cations produced can disturb operation of onboard instrumentation or the thruster itself. Charge-exchange cross sections for both singly and doubly charged propellant atoms are required to model these interactions. While xenon is the most common propellant currently used in Hall effect thrusters, other propellants are being considered, in particular, krypton. We present here guided-ion beam measurements and comparisons to semiclassical calculations for Kr{sup +} + Kr and Kr{sup 2+} + Kr cross sections. The measurements of symmetric Kr{sup +} + Kr charge exchange are in good agreement with both the calculations including spin-orbit effects and previous measurements. For the symmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr reaction, we present cross section measurements for center-of-mass energies between 1 eV and 300 eV, which spans energies not previously examined experimentally. These cross section measurements compare well with a simple one-electron transfer model. Finally, cross sections for the asymmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr {yields} Kr{sup +} + Kr{sup +} reaction show an onset near 12 eV, reaching cross sections near constant value of 1.6 A{sup 2} with an exception near 70-80 eV.

  19. Laboratory Measurements of Solar-Wind/Comet X-Ray Emission and Charge Exchange Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Cadez, I.; Greenwood, J. B.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Smith, S. J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    The detection of X-rays from comets such as Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, d Arrest, and Linear as they approach the Sun has been unexpected and exciting. This phenomenon, moreover, should be quite general, occurring wherever a fast solar or stellar wind interacts with neutrals in a comet, a planetary atmosphere, or a circumstellar cloud. The process is, O(+8) + H2O --> O(+7*) + H2O(+), where the excited O(+7*) ions are the source of the X-ray emissions. Detailed modeling has been carried out of X-ray emissions in charge-transfer collisions of heavy solar-wind Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) and interstellar/interplanetary neutral clouds. In the interplanetary medium the solar wind ions, including protons, can charge exchange with interstellar H and He. This can give rise to a soft X-ray background that could be correlated with the long-term enhancements seen in the low-energy X-ray spectrum of ROSAT. Approximately 40% of the soft X-ray background detected by Exosat, ROSAT, Chandra, etc. is due to Charge Exchange (CXE): our whole heliosphere is glowing in the soft X-ray due to CXE.

  20. Universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Peter A.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; Phobos Collaboration

    2003-04-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/ overlinepp and e +e - data. < Nch>/< Npart/2> in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with √ s in a similar way as Nch in e +e - collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  1. A time-resolved study on the interaction of oppositely charged bicelles--implications on the charged lipid exchange kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Po-Wei; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Hu, Yuan; Jeng, U-Ser

    2015-03-21

    Time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering was applied to study charged lipid exchange between oppositely charged disc-shaped bicelles. The exchange of charged lipids gradually reduces the surface charge density and weakens the electrostatic attraction between the oppositely charged bicelles which form alternately stacked aggregates upon mixing. Initially, at a high surface charge density with almost no free water layer between the stacked bicelles, fast exchange kinetics dominate the exchange process. At a later stage with a lower surface charge density and a larger water gap between the stacked bicelles, slow exchange kinetics take over. The fast exchange kinetics are correlated with the close contact of the bicelles when there is almost no free water layer between the tightly bound bicelles with a charged lipid exchange time constant as short as 20-40 min. When the water gap becomes large enough to have a free water layer between the stacked bicelles, the fast lipid exchange kinetics are taken over by slow lipid exchange kinetics with time constants around 200-300 min, which are comparable to the typical time constant of lipid exchange between vesicles in aqueous solution. These two kinds of exchange mode fit well with the lipid exchange models of transient hemifusion for the fast mode and monomer exchange for the slow mode. PMID:25649711

  2. Charge transfer in collisions of C{sup 2+} carbon ions with CO and OH targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bene, E.; Martinez, P.; Halsaz, G. J.; Vibok, A.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M. C.

    2009-07-15

    The charge transfer in collisions of C{sup 2+} ions with the CO molecule and the OH radical has been studied theoretically by means of ab initio quantum chemistry molecular methods followed by a semiclassical dynamical treatment in the keV collision energy range. The comparison of the cross sections calculated for these two collision systems exhibits interesting features with regard to the anisotropy of these processes and the influence of the vibration of the molecular target.

  3. Directed Flow of Charged Kaons in Au+Au Collisions from the BES Program at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Yadav; STAR Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We report the measurement of the directed flow (v1) for charged kaons in Au+Au collisions at =7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV as a function of rapidity and compare these results for pions, protons and antiprotons. These new kaon results may help to constrain the medium properties and collision dynamics including the in-medium kaon potential and baryon number transport in these collisions.

  4. Charge transfer in slow collisions between hydrogen atoms and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrim, B.; Thumm, U.

    2002-05-01

    We have developed a new two-center close-coupling approach [1] for slow ion (atom)-surface collision in which the continuum of metal conduction-band states is discretized by using Weyl wave packets [2] to represent the motion of the active electron in the metal subspace. Results for the time evolution of the atomic and metallic population amplitudes for a hydrogen atom in colliding at perpendicular incidence with an model aluminum surface are shown and discussed. For the n=2 hydrogenic manifold, we have obtained converged atomic populations amplitudes by including all projectile levels up to the n=5 manifold and 480 Weyl wave packets in the close-coupling expansion. We will discuss the electron dynamics in particular in view of possible dephasing effects (in distance and time) and recurrence effects that may arrise due to our continuum discretization in term of a finite number of localized Weyl packets. [1] B. Bahrim and U. Thumm, Surf. Sci. 451, 1 (2000), and to appear in Phys. Rev. A. [2] B.H. Bransden and M.R.C. McDowell, "Charge Exchange and the Theory of Ion-Atom Collisions" Clarendon Press (Oxford 1992). Supported by NSF and by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research, U.S. DOE

  5. An instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L.; Bao, N.; Jiang, Y.; Han, K.; Zhou, J.

    2016-01-01

    It universally exists in moving particular systems that particles can be electrified, in which the particles are chemically identical, just as toner particles, coal dust, and pharmaceutical powders. However, owing to the limit of experimental instruments, so far, there are yet no experiments to illustrate whether a particle can be electrified due to a single collision between two spherical particles, and there are also no experiments to measure the charge carried by a single particle due to a single collision between two particles. So we have developed an instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spheres. The instrument consists of two-sphere collision device, collision charge measurement apparatus, and particles' trajectory tracking system. By using this instrument, we can investigate the collision contact electrification due to a single collision between two spheres and simultaneously record the moving trajectories of spheres after the collision to calculate the rebound angles to identify the contribution of the triboelectrification due to the rubbing between the contact surfaces and the collision contact electrification due to the normal pressure between the contact surfaces.

  6. An instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Xie, L; Bao, N; Jiang, Y; Han, K; Zhou, J

    2016-01-01

    It universally exists in moving particular systems that particles can be electrified, in which the particles are chemically identical, just as toner particles, coal dust, and pharmaceutical powders. However, owing to the limit of experimental instruments, so far, there are yet no experiments to illustrate whether a particle can be electrified due to a single collision between two spherical particles, and there are also no experiments to measure the charge carried by a single particle due to a single collision between two particles. So we have developed an instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spheres. The instrument consists of two-sphere collision device, collision charge measurement apparatus, and particles' trajectory tracking system. By using this instrument, we can investigate the collision contact electrification due to a single collision between two spheres and simultaneously record the moving trajectories of spheres after the collision to calculate the rebound angles to identify the contribution of the triboelectrification due to the rubbing between the contact surfaces and the collision contact electrification due to the normal pressure between the contact surfaces. PMID:26827339

  7. Charge exchange in solar wind-cometary interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Horanyi, M.; Kecskemety, K.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    A simple model of a cometary spherically symmetrical atmosphere and ionosphere is considered. An analytic solution of the governing equations describing the radial distribution of the neutral and ion densities is found. The new solution is compared to the well-known solution of the equations containing only ionization terms. Neglecting recombination causes a significant overestimate of the ion density in the vicinity of the comet. An axisymmetric model of the solar wind-cometary interaction is considered, taking into account the loss of solar wind ions due to charge exchange. The calculations predict that for active comets, solar wind absorption due to charge exchange becomes important at a few thousand kilometers from the nucleus, and a surface separating the shocked solar wind from the cometary ionosphere develops in this region. These calculations are in reasonable agreement with the few observations available for the ionopause location at comets.

  8. Pion double charge exchange scattering above the delta resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    Data are presented on pion-nucleus double-charge-exchange scattering at energies between 300 and 500 MeV, the highest energies measured so far, together with a review of results at lower energies. The small-angle excitation functions disagree with predictions based on a sex-quark cluster model and on an optical model consistent with single-charge-exchange scattering at these energies, but they are consistent with a distorted-wave calculation. Data on f{sub 7/2}-shell nuclei are in partial agreement with a two-amplitude model which is successful at lower energies. In order to achieve good understanding of this process at these energies, more work; both experimental and theoretical, is needed. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Computer code for charge-exchange plasma propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1981-01-01

    The propagation of the charge-exchange plasma from an electrostatic ion thruster is crucial in determining the interaction of that plasma with the associated spacecraft. A model that describes this plasma and its propagation is described, together with a computer code based on this model. The structure and calling sequence of the code, named PLASIM, is described. An explanation of the program's input and output is included, together with samples of both. The code is written in ASNI Standard FORTRAN.

  10. PLASIM: A computer code for simulating charge exchange plasma propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Deininger, W. D.; Winder, D. R.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The propagation of the charge exchange plasma for an electrostatic ion thruster is crucial in determining the interaction of that plasma with the associated spacecraft. A model that describes this plasma and its propagation is described, together with a computer code based on this model. The structure and calling sequence of the code, named PLASIM, is described. An explanation of the program's input and output is included, together with samples of both. The code is written in ANSI Standard FORTRAN.

  11. Solar System X-rays from Charge Exchange Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Christian, D. J.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dennerl, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Bodewits, D.; Combi, M. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Lepri, S. T.

    2013-04-01

    The discovery of high energy x-ray emission in 1996 from comet C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) uncovered a new class of x-ray emitting objects. Subsequent detections of the morphology, spectra, and time dependence of the x-rays from more than 20 comets have shown that the very soft (E < 1 keV) emission is due to a charge-exchange interaction between highly charged solar wind minor ions and the comet's extended neutral atmosphere. Many solar system objects are now known to shine in the X-ray, including Venus, Mars, the Moon, the Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, with total power outputs on the MW - GW scale. Like comets, the X-ray emission from the Earth's geo-corona, the Jovian & Saturnian aurorae, and the Martian halo are thought to be driven by charge exchange between highly charged minor (heavy) ions in the solar wind and gaseous neutral species in the bodies' atmosphere. The non-auroral X-ray emissions from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth, and those from disks of Mars, Venus, and the Moon are produced by scattering of solar X-rays. The first soft X-ray observations of Earth’s aurora by Chandra shows that it is highly variable, and the giant planet aurorae are fascinating puzzles that are just beginning to yield their secrets and may be the only x-ray sources not driven directly by the Sun in the whole system as well as properties of hot exo-solar Jupiters. Observations of local solar system charge exchange processes can also help inform us about x-rays produced at more distant hot ionized gas/cold neutral gas interfaces, like the heliopause, stellar astrospheres, galactic star forming regions, and starburst galaxies.

  12. Modeling Charge Transfer in Fullerene Collisions via Real-Time Electron Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jakowski, Jacek; Irle, Stephan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Morokuma, Keiji

    2012-06-01

    An approach for performing real-time dynamics of electron transfer in a prototype redox reaction that occurs in reactive collisions between neutral and ionic fullerenes is discussed. The quantum dynamical simulations show that the electron transfer occurs within 60 fs directly preceding the collision of the fullerenes, followed by structural changes and relaxation of electron charge. The consequences of real-time electron dynamics are fully elucidated for the far from equilibrium processes of collisions between neutral and multiply charged fullerenes. PMID:26285634

  13. Charge Transfer Process During Collision of Riming Graupel Pellet with Small Ice Crystals within a Thundercloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Saswati; De, Utpal K.; Goswami, K.; Jones, Linwood

    1999-01-01

    A charge transfer process during the collision of a riming graupel pellet and an ice-crystal at low temperature is proposed. During riming, the surface structure of graupel deviates from perfect crystalline structure. A concept of quasi-solid layer (QSL) formation on the surface is introduced. This QSL contains defects formed during riming. In absence of impurities, positively charged X-defect abundance is considered in the outer layer. These defects are assumed to be the charge carriers during the charge transfer process. Some part of the QSL is stripped off by the colliding ice crystals, which thereby gain some positive charge, leaving the graupel pellet negatively charged. With the proposed model, fC to pC of charge transfer is observed per collision. A transition temperature between -10 C to -15 C is also noted beyond which the QSL concept does not hold. This transition temperature is dependent on the bulk liquid water content of the cloud.

  14. Charge-Exchange Processes of Titanium-Doped Aluminate Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wing Cheong

    1995-01-01

    Titanium exists in more than one charge state in the aluminate crystals: it is stable as Ti^ {3+} and Ti^{4+}. Other than the intense Ti^{4+ } absorption, a ubiquitous absorption/luminescence excitation band in the UV region is identified as a titanium -bound exciton in Al_2rm O_3, Y_3Al_5rm O_{12}, {rm YAlO}_3, MgAl_2O _4, and LaMgAl_{11} {rm O}_{19}. One -step and two-step photoconductivities of Ti^ {3+} are measured and compared. While the selectivity of the two-step process is demonstrated, its use in locating the energy threshold is hampered by the small Franck-Condon factor for the transition between the Ti^{3+} ^2{ rm E} excited state and Ti^ {4+}. The titanium-bound exciton band, together with the one-step photocurrent signal, makes it possible to determine the photoionization energy threshold accurately. The charge-transfer transition energy thresholds of Ti^{4+} are obtained from the emission and the luminescence excitation spectra. Locally and non-locally charge compensated Ti^{4+ } are found in Al_2{rm O}_3. The luminescence kinetics for the two kinds of Ti^{4+} are well explained by a three-level system with a lower triplet excited state and a higher singlet excited state. These charge-exchange threshold energies can be deduced from the Born-Haber thermodynamical cycle. The electrostatic site potentials are calculated and from it, the calculated photoionization and charge-transfer energy thresholds are found to be consistent with the experimental results. The deficiency of this model is pointed out and possible improvement is discussed. Quantitatively, the sum of the two charge-exchange energy thresholds is close to the band-gap energy of the host crystal. This offers a convenient way for material characterization. Provided that any two of the three quantities (band-gap energy, photoionization energy threshold, and charge-transfer transition energy threshold) have been found, the third quantity can be calculated. In addition, the trapping of charge

  15. Charged Particle Multiplicity and Open Heavy Flavor Physics in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yujiao

    In this thesis, two independent measurements are presented: the measurements of centrality dependence and pseudo-rapidity dependence of charged particle multiplicities, and the measurements of centrality dependence of open heavy flavor suppression. These measurements are carried out with the Pb+Pb collisions data at the LHC energy sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector. For the charged particle measurements, charged particles are reconstructed with two algorithms (2-point "tracklet" and full tracking) from the pixel detector only. Measurements are presented of the per-event charged particle density distribution, dNch /deta and the average charged particle multiplicity in the pseudo-rapidity interval |eta| <0.5 in several intervals of collision centrality. The results are compared to previous mid-rapidity measurements at the LHC and RHIC. The variation of the mid-rapidity charged particle yield per colliding nucleon pair with the number of participants is consistent with the lower sNN results measured at RHIC. The shape of the dNch/deta distribution is found to be independent of centrality within the systematic uncertainties of the measurement. For the open heavy flavor suppression measurements, muons identified by the muon spectrometer are classified as heavy flavor decays and background contributions by using a fitting procedure with templates from Monte Carlo samples. Results are presented for the per-event muon yield as a function of muon transverse momentum, p T, over the range of 4 < pT < 14 GeV. Over that momentum range single muon production results largely from heavy quark decays. The centrality dependence of the muon yields is characterized by the "central to peripheral" ratio, RCP. Using this measure, muon production from heavy quark decays is found to be suppressed by a centrality-dependent factor that increases smoothly from peripheral to central collisions. Muon production is suppressed by approximately a factor of two in central collisions relative to

  16. Can Charge Exchange Explain Anomalous Soft X-Ray Emission in the Cygnus Loop?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, R. S.; Henley, D. B.; Stancil, P. C.; Shelton, R. L.; Nolte, J. L.; Wu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.

    2014-06-01

    Recent X-ray studies have shown that supernova shock models are unable to satisfactorily explain X-ray emission in the rim of the Cygnus Loop. In an attempt to account for this "anomalously" enhanced X-ray flux, we fit the region with a model including theoretical charge exchange (CX) data along with shock and background X-ray models. The model includes the CX collisions of O8 +, O7 +, N7 +, N6 +, C6 +, and C5 + with H with an energy of 1 keV u-1 (438 km s-1). The observations reveal a strong emission feature near 0.7 keV that cannot fully be accounted for by a shock model, nor the current CX data. Inclusion of CX, specifically O7 + + H, does provide for a statistically significant improvement over a pure shock model.

  17. Study of multi-electron ionization and charge exchange in HIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linchun

    Beam ion stripping on background gases or plasma in a Heavy Ion Beam Fusion (HIBF) chamber increases the charge state of the beam and the diameter of the focus, complicating the final focusing on the focusing target. To model beam transport in the chamber, it is necessary to know the beam charge-state evolution, including both ionization and charge exchange dynamics. The main objective of this research is to explore theoretical approaches including scaling law. Improved models are developed to calculate multi-electron loss, especially ion stripping and charge exchange cross sections, for both near-term experiments and future power plant scale HIBF research. First, a new space-charge neutralization approach that uses electron injection is proposed for the ion beam transport in HIBF chamber. An analytical study was performed to illustrate the plasma dynamics and final neutralization effects with this technique. The results examine the effect of different injected electron profiles. Next, to improve the accuracy of such simulations, methods to improve cross sections of ionization and charge exchange are studied. Both classical and quantum mechanical approaches are examined. Attention is focused on the interaction by low-charge-state heavy ions. Multi-electron processes for dressed ions, including screening and anti-screening effects, internuclear forces, are given special attention, This analysis is complex and requires a combining several different theoretical approaches. Finally, a Classic Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) model based on an improvement of Olson's n-body CTMC method is presented. This model solves the n-body ion-atom ionization problem in a regime of intent to HIBF. In the paper, a new and complete computational module for these interactions has been developed. The cross section data for Xe, Cs, and Bi ions colliding with various background gases (Xe, N2, Ar and Flibe) is presented. After the calculation of the cross section data, the predicted energy

  18. Ne X X-ray emission due to charge exchange in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, R. S.; Liu, L.; Lyons, D.; Schultz, D. R.; Stancil, P. C.; Wang, J. G.; Ali, R.

    2016-06-01

    Recent X-ray observations of star-forming galaxies such as M82 have shown the Ly β/Ly α line ratio of Ne X to be in excess of predictions for thermal electron impact excitation. Here, we demonstrate that the observed line ratio may be due to charge exchange and can be used to constrain the ion kinetic energy to be ≲ 500 eV/u. This is accomplished by computing spectra and line ratios via a range of theoretical methods and comparing these to experiments with He over astrophysically relevant collision energies. The charge exchange emission spectra calculations were performed for Ne10++ H and Ne10++ He using widely applied approaches including the atomic orbital close coupling, classical trajectory Monte Carlo, and multichannel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) methods. A comparison of the results from these methods indicates that for the considered energy range and neutrals (H, He) the so-called low-energy ℓ-distribution MCLZ method provides the most likely reliable predictions.

  19. Electron Terms and Resonant Charge Exchange Involving Oxygen Atoms and Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarim, A.V.; Smirnov, B.M.

    2005-10-01

    The electron terms are constructed for oxygen dimer ions at large ion-atom distances taking into account a certain scheme of summation of electron momenta on the basis of a hierarchy of various ion-atom interactions. Because the number of interaction types exceeds that in the Hund scheme, a realistic hierarchy of interactions and corresponding quantum numbers of the diatomic ion are outside the Hund coupling scheme. Electron terms are evaluated for the oxygen dimer ion in the case where the ground and first excited states of an atom and an ion belong to the respective valence electron shells p{sup 4} and p{sup 3} and correspond to the range of separations that determine the cross sections of resonant charge exchange in plasma. These electron terms allow us to calculate the partial and average cross sections for resonant charge exchange involving an oxygen ion and atom in the ground and first excited states in the range of collision energies of interest for oxygen plasmas. The specific features of electron terms of the oxygen ion dimer and the cross section of electron transfer are analyzed.

  20. Laser-assisted H- charge exchange injection in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlov, T.; Danilov, V.; Shishlo, A.

    2010-05-01

    The use of stripping foils for charge exchange injection can cause a number of operational problems in high intensity hadron accelerators. A recently proposed three-step method of laser-assisted injection is capable of overcoming these problems. This paper presents advances in the physical model of laser-assisted charge exchange injection of H- beams and covers a wide field of atomic physics. The model allows the calculation of the evolution of an H0 beam taking into account spontaneous emission, field ionization, and external electromagnetic fields. Some new data on the hydrogen atom related to the problem are calculated. The numerical calculations in the model use realistic descriptions of laser field and injection beam. Generally, the model can be used for design and optimization of a laser-assisted injection cell within an accelerator lattice. Example calculations of laser-assisted injection for an intermediate experiment at SNS in Oak Ridge and for the PS2 accelerator at CERN are presented. Two different schemes, distinctively characterized by various magnetic fields at the excitation point, are discussed. It was shown that the emittance growth of an injected beam can be drastically decreased by moving the excitation point into a strong magnetic field.

  1. Charge transfer in Li2+ + He2+ and Li2+ + Li3+ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuning, H.; Trassl, R.; Theiß, A.; Diehl, A.; Salzborn, E.; Keim, M.; Achenbach, A.; Lüdde, H. J.; Kirchner, T.

    2005-07-01

    True one-electron collision systems provide an ideal testing ground for theory. Absolute cross sections for charge transfer in the collision systems Li2+ + He2+ and Li2+ + Li3+ have been measured for centre-of-mass energies between 52 and 148 keV and 6 and 63 keV, respectively. The data are compared with calculations using the two-centre basis generator method. A fair agreement between the experimental data and the calculations is found.

  2. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p_T from 0.25 to 5GeV/c is studied as a function of collision centrality over a range from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p_T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  3. Charge exchange of hydrogen atoms with multiply charged ions in a hot plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V. A.; Baryshnikov, F. F.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    1980-08-01

    The symmetry properties of the hydrogen atom were used to calculate the charge exchange cross sections sigma of hydrogen with the nuclei of multiply charged ions, while allowance was made for the degeneration of final states. If the transitions between these states produced by rotation of the internuclear axis are taken into account, there is a qualitative change in the dependence of sigma on v for low values of v (a gradual decrease in the cross section instead of the exponential one in the Landau-Zener model) and also a considerable increase in the peak cross section. The cross sections are calculated for a wide range of velocities and charge values-Z. The distribution of final states over orbital angular momenta is found.

  4. Attosecond timing the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.

    2011-04-15

    By solving the three-dimensional, time-dependent Schroedinger equation, we have demonstrated that the ultrafast charge-transfer process in ion-atom collisions can be mapped out with attosecond extreme uv (xuv) pulses. During the dynamic-charge transfer from the target atom to the projectile ion, the electron coherently populates the two sites of both nuclei, which can be viewed as a 'short-lived' molecular state. A probing attosecond xuv pulse can instantly unleash the delocalized electron from such a ''transient molecule,'' so that the resulting photoelectron may exhibit a ''double-slit'' interference. On the contrary, either reduced or no photoelectron interference will occur if the attosecond xuv pulse strikes well before or after the collision. Therefore, by monitoring the photoelectron interference visibility, one can precisely time the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions with time-delayed attosecond xuv pulses.

  5. The velocity dependence of X-ray emission due to Charge Exchange in the Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, Renata; Lyons, David; Mullen, Patrick Dean; Shelton, Robin L.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Schultz, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere [1], planetary exospheres [2], and supernova remnants [3,4]. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly-excited, high charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays.To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate these environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross-sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities relevant to astrophysics for collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant will be shown as an example with ion velocity dependence.[1] Henley, D. B. & Shelton, R. L. 2010, ApJSS, 187, 388[2] Dennerl, K. et al. 2002, A&A 386, 319[3] Katsuda, S. et al. 2011, ApJ 730 24[4] Cumbee, R. S. et al. 2014, ApJ 787 L31This work was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  6. Large numbers of cold positronium atoms created in laser-selected Rydberg states using resonant charge exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, R.; Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Richerme, P.; Müllers, A.; Walz, J.; Grzonka, D.; Zielinski, M.; Fitzakerley, D.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; ATRAP Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Lasers are used to control the production of highly excited positronium atoms (Ps*). The laser light excites Cs atoms to Rydberg states that have a large cross section for resonant charge-exchange collisions with cold trapped positrons. For each trial with 30 million trapped positrons, more than 700 000 of the created Ps* have trajectories near the axis of the apparatus, and are detected using Stark ionization. This number of Ps* is 500 times higher than realized in an earlier proof-of-principle demonstration (2004 Phys. Lett. B 597 257). A second charge exchange of these near-axis Ps* with trapped antiprotons could be used to produce cold antihydrogen, and this antihydrogen production is expected to be increased by a similar factor.

  7. Kinetic theory for charge-exchange spectroscopy: Effects of magnetic and electric fields on the distribution function after charge-exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K. H.; Munoz Burgos, J. M.

    2012-07-15

    In plasmas equipped with neutral beam injection, excitation of atomic spectral lines via charge-exchange with neutral atoms is the basis of one of the standard plasma diagnostic techniques for ion density, temperature, and velocity. In order to properly interpret the spectroscopic results, one must consider the effects of the energy dependence of the charge-exchange cross-section as well as the motion of the ion after charge-exchange during the period when it is still in the excited state. This motion is affected by the electric and magnetic fields in the plasma. The present paper gives results for the velocity distribution function of the excited state ions and considers in detail the cross-section and ion motion effects on the post charge-exchange velocity. The expression for this velocity in terms of the charge-exchange cross-section and the pre charge-exchange velocity allows that latter velocity to be determined. The present paper is the first to consider the effect of the electric as well as the magnetic field and demonstrates that electric field and diamagnetic terms appear in the expression for the inferred velocity. The present formulation also leads to a novel technique for assessing the effect of the energy dependence of the charge-exchange cross-section on the inferred ion temperature.

  8. Kinetic-energy transfer in highly-charged-ion collisions with carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, R. E.; Arista, N. R.

    2015-11-01

    We present an accurate theoretical model for the charge dependence of kinetic energy transferred in collisions between slow highly charged ions (HCIs) and the atoms in a carbon solid. The model is in excellent agreement with experimental kinetic-energy-loss data for carbon nanomembrane and thin carbon foil targets. This study fills a notable gap in the literature of charged-particle energy loss in the regime of low incident velocity (vp≲2.188 ×106 m/s) where charge states greatly exceed the equilibrium values.

  9. Localized charged-neutral fluctuations in 158A GeV Pb+Pb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnihotri, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A. L. S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefiev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T. C.; Baba, P. V. K. S.

    2001-07-01

    Localized fluctuations in the multiplicity of charged particles and photons produced in central 158A GeV/c Pb+Pb collisions are studied. The charged versus neutral correlations in common {eta}-{phi} phase space regions of varying azimuthal size are analyzed by two different methods. The analysis provides a model-independent demonstration of nonstatistical fluctuations in both charged particle and photon multiplicities in limited azimuthal regions. However, no correlated charge-neutral fluctuations are observed, contrary to expectations for the production of a disoriented chiral condensate. The result is not explained by the widely used VENUS model.

  10. Charge exchange between bare beryllium and boron with metastable hydrogen atoms at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Casaubon, J.I. )

    1993-11-01

    Theoretical results for [sup 9]Be[sup 4+]-H(2[ital s]) and [sup 11]B[sup 5+]-H(2[ital s]) partial and total charge-exchange cross sections at low relative velocities (0.027--0.32 a.u.) are given, using the Landau-Zener method. The necessary molecular parameters for this method are obtained from the exact one-electron diatomic molecule (OEDM) molecular energies. The partial cross sections which are mainly populated are those corresponding to the principal quantum number of separated atoms [ital n]=5 for Be[sup 3+] and [ital n]=6 for B[sup 4+]. The total cross sections show a rather strong increase with increasing collision energies and a quite large maximum. They lie between the cross sections corresponding to the neighbor reactions for the incident nuclei with [ital Z]=3 (Li), [ital Z]=6 (C), and [ital Z]=7 (N). The atomic collisions with beryllium are very important in plasma tokamaks.

  11. Internal Energy Exchange and Dissociation Probability in DSMC Molecular Collision Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabut, E.

    2008-12-01

    The present work is related to the gas—gas collision models used in DSMC. It especially concerns the relaxation rates and the reactivity for diatomic molecules (but most of the models can be extended to polyatomic molecules). The Larsen-Borgnakke [1] model is often used in DSMC to describe the way of redistribution of the energies during collisions. A lot of information is provided by literature about links existing between macroscopic collision number, the fraction of inelastic collisions and the probability for a molecule to exchange energy during a collision in a specific mode. We then expose the main relations able to reproduce macroscopic relaxation rates. During collisions, the energy brought by the collision partners can be sufficient to generate a chemical reaction. The problematic is at first to determine an energetic condition for a possible reaction: which energy we have to consider and which threshold we have to compare with; and in second how to calculate the reaction probabilities. Then we often use the experimental results which put in light some phenomena (vibration—dissociation coupling for example) to built a qualitative basis for the models and, in a quantitative point of view, we determine probabilities such they can reproduce the macroscopic experimental rates reflected by the modified Arrhenius law. Some of the different chemical models used in DSMC will be exposed as the "TCE" [2]-3], "EAE" [3], "ME" [4] and "VFD" [5] models.

  12. Vertical Charge Exchange Cell for Collinear Laser Spectroscopy at NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Andrew; Minamisono, Kei; Froemmgen, Nadja; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kraemer, Joerg; Krieger, Andreas; Levy, Phil; Mantica, Paul; Noertershaeuser, Wilfried; Vinnikova, Sophia

    2011-10-01

    A vertical charge exchange cell (CEC), originally developed at TRIUMF/ISAC, has been constructed at NSCL for the Beam Cooling and Laser Spectroscopy (BECOLA) system. The CEC was initially commissioned at the TRIGA-Laser facility at the University of Mainz by neutralizing a 10 keV Rb+ ion beam with K vapor. The neutralization efficiency was measured as a function of the CEC heater temperature. The line shape of the Rb D2 transition was also examined in relation to the neutral fraction of the Rb beam. Details of the CEC design and operation, as well as the results of the tests will be discussed. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY 06-06007.

  13. Extraction of Poloidal Velocity from Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    W.M. Solomon; K.H. Burrell; P. Gohil; R.J. Groebner; L.R. Baylor

    2004-07-16

    A novel approach has been implemented on DIII-D to allow the correct determination of the plasma poloidal velocity from charge exchange spectroscopy measurements. Unlike usual techniques, the need for detailed atomic physics calculations to properly interpret the results is alleviated. Instead, the needed atomic physics corrections are self-consistently determined directly from the measurements, by making use of specially chosen viewing chords. Modeling results are presented that were used to determine a set of views capable of measuring the correction terms. We present the analysis of a quiescent H-mode discharge, illustrating that significant modifications to the velocity profiles are required in these high ion temperature conditions. We also present preliminary measurements providing the first direct comparison of the standard cross-section correction to the atomic physics calculations.

  14. Charge-exchange reactions with a radioactive triton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenecke, J.

    1998-12-21

    A high-resolution (t, {sup 3}He) test experiment has been performed recently by making use of a secondary triton beam produced by fragmentation of {alpha}-particles. The purpose of this charge-exchange experiment was to achieve good energy resolution in an (n,p)-type reaction at intermediate bombarding energies. The experiment was carried out with the K1200 cyclotron at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the A1200 beam-analysis system and the S800 magnetic spectrometer. The beam-analysis system was used to transport the energy-dispersed radioactive triton beam from the production target to the target position, and the magnetic spectrometer was used to focus the dispersion-matched {sup 3}He particles from the (t, {sup 3}He) reaction at 0 degree sign onto the focal plane of the spectrometer. An energy resolution of 200-250 keV was achieved.

  15. Improved edge charge exchange recombination spectroscopy in DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chrystal, Colin; Burrell, K. H.; Grierson, Brian A.; Haskey, Shaun R.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, David H.; Briesemeister, Alexis R.

    2016-08-02

    The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak has been upgraded with the addition of more high radial resolution view chords near the edge of the plasma (r/a > 0.8). The additional views are diagnosed with the same number of spectrometers by placing fiber optics side-by-side at the spectrometer entrance with a precise separation that avoids wavelength shifted crosstalk without the use of bandpass filters. The new views improve measurement of edge impurity parameters in steep gradient, H-mode plasmas with many different shapes. The number of edge view chords with 8 mm radial separation has increased from 16more » to 38.As a result, new fused silica fibers have improved light throughput and clarify the observation of non-Gaussian spectra that suggest the ion distribution function can be non-Maxwellian in low collisionality plasmas.« less

  16. Cometary Solar Wind Charge Exchange Line Ratios: Source of X-rays in Comet C/2000 WM1 (linear)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Patrick Dean; Cumbee, Renata; Lyons, David; Gu, Liyi; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Shelton, Robin L.; Stancil, Phillip C.

    2016-06-01

    Cometary solar wind charge exchange (C-SWCX) occurs when highly charged projectile ions present in solar wind capture an electron from a target neutral species present in the cometary atmosphere. The availability of atomic and molecular data necessary for the X-ray emission modeling due to C-SWCX is limited; therefore, we apply multi-channel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) theory (Mullen et al. 2016) to generate cross section data and theoretical X-ray line ratios for a variety of bare and non-bare ion single electron capture (SEC) collisions. Namely, we consider collisions between the solar wind constituent H-like and He-like ions of C, N, O, Ne, Na, Al, and Si and the cometary neutrals H, H2O, CO, CO2, OH, and O. To exemplify the application of this data, we model the X-ray emission of comet C/2000 WM1 (linear) using the charge exchange package in SPEX (Gu et al. 2015) and find excellent agreement with observations made with the XMM-RGS detector. Our analyses show that the X-ray intensity is dominated by C-SWCX with H.Work at UGA was partially funded by NASA grant NNX13AF31G.References:Gu et al. 2016, A&A, accepted 22 January 2016Mullen et al. 2016, ApJS, in press

  17. Synthesis of N=127 isotones through (p,n) charge-exchange reactions induced by relativistic {sup 208}Pb projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, A. I.; Benlliure, J.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Casarejos, E.; Dragosavac, D.; Perez-Loureiro, D.; Verma, S.; Agramunt, J.; Molina, F.; Rubio, B.; Algora, A.; Alkhomashi, N.; Farrelly, G.; Gelletly, W.; Pietri, S.; Podolyak, Z.; Regan, P. H.; Steer, S. J.; Boutachkov, P.; Caceres, L. S.

    2011-07-15

    The production cross sections of four N=127 isotones ({sup 207}Hg, {sup 206}Au, {sup 205}Pt, and {sup 204}Ir) have been measured using (p,n) charge-exchange reactions, induced in collisions of a {sup 208}Pb primary beam at 1 A GeV with a Be target. These data allow one to investigate the use of a reaction mechanism to extend the limits of the chart of nuclides toward the important r-process nuclei in the region of the third peak of elemental abundance distribution.

  18. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.; FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  19. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-18

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  20. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.; FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-18

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  1. Bose—Einstein correlations of charged kaons in p + p collisions with the STAR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatkulov, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of charged kaon Bose-Einstein Correlations (BEC) measured in proton- proton collisions at √s =200 and 510 GeV with the STAR detector at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The one-dimensional correlation functions are studied as a function of the charged particle multiplicity. The femtoscopic radii, R, and the correlation strength, λ, are extracted. The dependence of the source radii and the correlation strengths on the particle multiplicity are investigated.

  2. Two-pion exchange contributions to nuclear charge asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, S.A.; Niskanen, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    An explicit 2{pi} exchange (TPE) potential based on non-relativistic {pi}NN and {pi}{Delta}N vertices with the baryon mass differences taken into account in the vertices is extended to the study of mirror nuclear systems. For the latter study, one must also include baryon mass differences in the intermediate state energy denominators. The TPE potential includes box and crossed box diagrams with two nucleons and those with one nucleon and one {Delta}. Nuclear charge asymmetry is characterized, in part, by a positive value for the difference {Delta}a = {vert_bar}a{sub nn}{vert_bar} {minus} {vert_bar}a{sub pp}{vert_bar} {approx} O(1 fm) and a positive value for the {sup 3}H - {sup 3}He binding energy difference {Delta}E {approx} O(100 keV). The charge asymmetry from baryon mass differences in the vertices is small on this scale and in the wrong direction compared to the empirical values. The contribution from baryon mass differences in the intermediate state energy denominators is positive and is of the order of the empirical scales, in contrast to the previous estimate of {Delta}a {approx} +0.3 fm obtained from an SU(2) symmetric covariant field theoretical potential. This discrepancy between models of TPE is being investigated.

  3. High-throughput charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system on MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, N. J.; Carolan, P. G.; McCone, J.; Walsh, M. J.; Wisse, M.

    2006-10-15

    A major upgrade to the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system on MAST has recently been implemented. The new system consists of a high-throughput spectrometer coupled to a total of 224 spatial channels, including toroidal and poloidal views of both neutral heating beams on MAST. Radial resolution is {approx}1 cm, comparable to the ion Larmor radius. The toroidal views are configured with 64 channels per beam, while the poloidal views have 32 channels per beam. Background channels for both poloidal and toroidal views are also provided. A large transmission grating is at the heart of the new spectrometer, with high quality single lens reflex lenses providing excellent imaging performance and permitting the full exploitation of the available etendue of the camera sensor. The charge-coupled device camera chosen has four-tap readout at a maximum aggregate speed of 8.8 MHz, and it is capable of reading out the full set of 224 channels in less than 4 ms. The system normally operates at 529 nm, viewing the C{sup 5+} emission line, but can operate at any wavelength in the range of 400-700 nm. Results from operating the system on MAST are shown, including impurity ion temperature and velocity profiles. The system's excellent spatial resolution is ideal for the study of transport barrier phenomena on MAST, an activity which has already been advanced significantly by data from the new diagnostic.

  4. Heliospheric x-rays due to solar wind charge exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Ina Piket

    X-ray emission due to charge transfer between heavy solar wind ions and interstellar and geocoronal neutrals has been predicted to exist in both the heliosphere and in the geocorona. The high charge state solar wind ions resulting from these collisions are left in highly excited states and emit extreme ultraviolet or soft x-ray photons. Models have been created to simulate this type of x-ray emission with interstellar and geocoronal neutrals. Time variations in the x-ray emissions were studied by using measured solar wind proton fluxes. The Fahr hot model was used to determine interstellar neutral densities. It was found that x-rays from interstellar hydrogen showed little variation in their intensities. The greatest variation was in geocoronal x-rays, although x-rays from interstellar helium can show considerable variation when the look direction is through the helium cone. Simulated images of Earth's geocorona as seen from an observation point outside the geocorona were created. The locations of the bow shock and magnetopause are evident in these images. Time independent maps were created that showed steady-state x-ray intensities due to the interaction between the solar wind and both interstellar neutrals and the geocoronal neutrals as a function of look direction and time of year. In all cases, the x-ray intensity is highest when the view direction is towards the Sun, but the intensity is also relatively high for view directions intersecting the gravitational focusing cone of interstellar helium. Measured solar wind proton fluxes are also directly compared with the LTE (long term enhancements) part of the soft x-ray background measured by the Rontgen satellite ROSAT. A significant positive correlation exists. We also show a heliospheric/geocoronal x-ray intensity map for the conditions used by Snowden in producing the 1/4 keV channel soft x-ray background map in galactic coordinates. Our preliminary conclusion is that very roughly 50% of the total background

  5. Two components in charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylinkin, A. A.; Chernyavskaya, N. S.; Rostovtsev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions are considered in terms of a recently introduced Two Component parameterization combining exponential ("soft") and power-law ("hard") functional forms. The charged hadron densities calculated separately for them are plotted versus number of participating nucleons, Npart. The obtained dependences are discussed and the possible link between the two component parameterization introduced by the authors and the two component model historically used for the case of heavy-ion collisions is established. Next, the variations of the parameters of the introduced approach with the center of mass energy and centrality are studied using the available data from RHIC and LHC experiments. The spectra shapes are found to show universal dependences on Npart for all investigated collision energies.

  6. Isotope effect in charge-transfer collisions of H with He{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Loreau, J.; Dalgarno, A.; Ryabchenko, S.

    2011-11-15

    We present a theoretical study of the isotope effect arising from the replacement of H by T in the charge-transfer collision H(n=2) + He{sup +}(1s) at low energy. Using a quasimolecular approach and a time-dependent wave-packet method, we compute the cross sections for the reaction including the effects of the nonadiabatic radial and rotational couplings. For H(2s) + He{sup +}(1s) collisions, we find a strong isotope effect at energies below 1 eV/amu for both singlet and triplet states. We find a much smaller isotopic dependence of the cross section for H(2p) + He{sup +}(1s) collisions in triplet states, and no isotope effect in singlet states. We explain the isotope effect on the basis of the potential energy curves and the nonadiabatic couplings, and we evaluate the importance of the isotope effect on the charge-transfer rate coefficients.

  7. Transverse momentum dependence of inclusive primary charged-particle production in p-Pb collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.

    2014-09-01

    The transverse momentum ($p_{\\mathrm T}$) distribution of primary charged particles is measured at midrapidity in minimum-bias p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=5.02$ TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC in the range $0.15collision scaling of particle production in pp collisions, leading to a nuclear modification factor consistent with unity for $p_{\\mathrm T}$ larger than 2 GeV/$c$, with a weak indication of a Cronin-like enhancement for $p_{\\rm T}$ around 4 GeV/$c$. The measurement is compared to theoretical calculations and to data in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76$ TeV.

  8. Causal diffusion and the survival of charge fluctuations in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Gavin, Sean

    2004-09-01

    Diffusion may obliterate fluctuation signals of the QCD phase transition in nuclear collisions at SPS and RHIC energies. We propose a hyperbolic diffusion equation to study the dissipation of net charge fluctuations. This equation is needed in a relativistic context, because the classic parabolic diffusion equation violates causality. We find that causality substantially limits the extent to which diffusion can dissipate these fluctuations.

  9. Surface charging and x-ray emission from insulator surfaces induced by collisions with highly charged ions : relevance to cometary and planetary sp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djuric, N.; Lozano, J. A.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2005-01-01

    Characteristic X-ray emission lines are detected from simulants of comet surfaces as they undergo collisions with highly charged ions (HCIs). The HCI projectiles are O+2-O+7. Ion energies are varied in the range (2-7)q keV, where q is the ion charge state. The targets are the insulator minerals olivine, augite, and quartz. It is found that the emission of characteristic K-L, K-M X-rays appears to proceed during positive charging of the surface by the HCI beam. When one uses low-energy, flood-gun electrons to neutralize the surface charge, the X-ray emission is eliminated or greatly reduced, depending on the flood-gun current. Acceleration of background electrons onto the charged surface results in excitation of elemental transitions, including the K-L2 and K-L3 target X-ray emission lines of Mg and Si located spectroscopically at 1253.6 and 1739.4 eV, respectively. Also observed are emission lines from O, Na, Ca, Al, and Fe atoms in the target and charge-exchange lines via surface extraction of electrons by the O+q electric field. Good agreement is found in the ratio of the measured X-ray yields for Mg and Si relative to the ratio of their electron-impact K-shell ionization cross sections. The present study may serve as a guide to astronomers as to specific observing X-ray energies indicative of solar/stellar wind or magnetospheric ion interactions with a comet, planetary surface, or circumstellar dust.

  10. Charge-exchange reaction by Reggeon exchange and W{sup +}W{sup −}-fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schicker, R.

    2015-04-10

    Charge-exchange reactions at high energies are examined. The existing cross section data on the Reggeon induced reaction pp → n + Δ{sup ++} taken at the ZGS and ISR accelerators are extrapolated to the energies of the RHIC and LHC colliders. The interest in the charge-exchange reaction induced by W{sup ±}-fusion is presented, and the corresponding QCD-background is examined.

  11. Vibrationally resolved charge transfer for proton collisions with CO and H collisions with CO{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C. Y.; Stancil, P. C.; Li, Y.; Gu, J. P.; Liebermann, H. P.; Buenker, R. J.; Kimura, M.

    2007-07-15

    Electron capture by protons following collisions with carbon monoxide, and the reverse process, is studied with a quantal molecular-orbital coupled-channel method utilizing the infinite order sudden approximation for collision energies between 0.5 and 1000 eV/u. The potential surfaces and couplings, computed with the multireference single- and double-excitation method for a range of H{sup +}-CO orientation angles and C-O separations, are adopted in the scattering calculations. Results including vibrationally resolved and orientation-angle-dependent cross sections are presented for a range of CO and CO{sup +} vibrational levels. Comparison with experiment is made where possible and the relevance of the reaction in astrophysics and atmospheric physics is discussed.

  12. Charge-transfer-induced evaporation in collisions of Li2+31 clusters with Cs atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, C.; Cahuzac, Ph.; Concina, B.; Leygnier, J.; Ruiz, L. F.; Zarour, B.; Hervieux, P. A.; Hanssen, J.; Politis, M. F.; Martín, F.

    2003-12-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of dissociative charge transfer in collisions of slow Li2+31 clusters with Cs atoms. We provide a direct quantitative comparison between theory and experiment and show that good agreement is only found when the experimental time-of-flight and initial cluster temperature are taken into account in the theoretical modeling. This model explains evaporation as resulting from a collisional energy deposit due to cluster electronic excitation during charge transfer. We discuss in detail the basic mechanisms that are responsible for the charge-transfer reaction and different approximations to evaluate the energy deposit.

  13. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. 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F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Kao, K. Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-05-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at , in the range and pseudorapidity in the proton-nucleon center-of-mass frame. For , the charged-particle production is asymmetric about , with smaller yield observed in the direction of the proton beam, qualitatively consistent with expectations from shadowing in nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDF). A pp reference spectrum at is obtained by interpolation from previous measurements at higher and lower center-of-mass energies. The distribution measured in pPb collisions shows an enhancement of charged particles with compared to expectations from the pp reference. The enhancement is larger than predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations that include antishadowing modifications of nPDFs.

  14. XMM-Newton Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton spectrum of diffuse X-ray emission from within the solar system. The spectrum is dominated by O VII and O VIII lines at 0.57 keV and 0.65 keV, O VIII (and possibly Fe XVII) lines at approximately 0.8 keV, Ne IX lines at approximately 0.92 keV, and Mg XI lines at approximately 1.35 keV. This spectrum is consistent with what is expected from charge exchange emission between the highly ionized solar wind and either interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere or material from Earth's exosphere. The emission is clearly seen as a low-energy ( E less than 1.5 keV) spectral enhancement in one of a series of observations of the Hubble Deep Field North. The X-ray enhancement is concurrent with an enhancement in the solar wind measured by the ACE satellite. The solar wind enhancement reaches a flux level an order of magnitude more intense than typical fluxes at 1 AU, and has ion ratios with significantly enhanced higher ionization states. Whereas observations of the solar wind plasma made at a single point reflect only local conditions which may only be representative of solar wind properties with spatial scales ranging from less than half of an Earth radii (approximately 10 s) to 100 Earth radii, X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange are remote sensing measurements which may provide observations which are significantly more global in character. Besides being of interest in its own right for studies of the solar system, this emission can have significant consequences for observations of more cosmological objects. It can provide emission lines at zero redshift which are of particular interest (e.g., O VII and O VIII) in studies of diffuse thermal emission, and which can therefore act as contamination in objects which cover the entire detector field of view. We propose the use of solar wind monitoring data, such as from the ACE and Wind spacecraft, as a diagnostic to screen for such possibilities.

  15. An electrostatic charge measurement of blowing snow particles focusing on collision frequency to the snow surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omiya, S.; Sato, A.

    2010-12-01

    Blowing snow particles are known to have an electrostatic charge. This charge may be a contributing factor in the formation of snow drifts and snow cornices and changing of the trajectory of blowing snow particles. These formations and phenomena can cause natural disaster such as an avalanche and a visibility deterioration, and obstruct transportation during winter season. Therefore, charging phenomenon of the blowing snow particles is an important issue in terms of not only precise understanding of the particle motion but disaster prevention. The primary factor of charge accumulation to the blowing snow particles is thought to be due to “saltation” of them. The “saltation” is one of movement forms of blowing snow: when the snow particles are transported by the wind, they repeat frictional collisions with the snow surface. In previous studies, charge-to-mass ratios measured in the field were approximately -50 to -10 μC/kg, and in the wind tunnel were approximately -0.8 to -0.1 μC/kg. While there were qualitatively consistent in sign, negative, there were huge gaps quantitatively between them. One reason of those gaps is speculated to be due to differences in fetch. In other words, the difference of the collision frequency of snow particles to the snow surface has caused the gaps. But it is merely a suggestion and that has not been confirmed. The purpose of this experiment is to measure the charge of blowing snow particles focusing on the collision frequency and clarify the relationship between them. Experiments were carried out in the cryogenic wind tunnel of Snow and Ice Research Center (NIED, JAPAN). A Faraday cage and an electrometer were used to measure the charge of snow particles. These experiments were conducted over the hard snow surface condition to prevent the erosion of the snow surface and the generation of new snow particles from the surface. The collision frequency of particle was controlled by changing the wind velocity (4.5 to 7 m/s) under

  16. Charge exchange of solar wind ions in the Comet Halley coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, E. G.; Ing-H. afgoldstein, B. E. AGGOLDSTEIN, R.; Ing-H. afgoldstein, B. E. AGGOLDSTEIN, R.

    1986-01-01

    The He(2+) and He(+) radial profiles measured by the Giotto mass spectrometer on the inbound trajectory to comet Halley are compared to a simple 1-dimensional charge exchange model. Results indicate that charge exchange alone cannot account for the observed radial profiles of He(2+) and He(+).

  17. Spin-Isospin responses via charge exchange reactions of RI beams at SHARAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, Susumu

    2012-11-12

    Nuclear spectroscopy via direct reactions of RI beams is discussed focusing on characteristics of charge-exchange reactions of RI beams. Recent experiments using the SHARAQ spectrometer at the RIBF are presented, where isovector spin monopole and spin-non-flip monopole responses are studied by charge exchange reaction of RI beams. Some experimental plans and perspectives are also presented.

  18. Numerical study of charge transfer in H+ + He+ and He2+ + Li2+ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, T.; Pindzola, M. S.; Lee, T.-G.; Schultz, D. R.

    2007-09-01

    The lattice time-dependent Schrödinger equation (LTDSE) and atomic orbital close coupling (AOCC) methods are applied to calculate the charge transfer cross sections for H+ + He+ and He2+ + Li2+ collisions in the velocity range of 0.5-4.0 atomic units. The comparison of the results is made with those of other theoretical methods and with measurements. This analysis is used to provide a test of the accuracy of LTDSE and AOCC, and to help establish a consensus of theoretical results in comparison with the measurements for these ion-ion collisions.

  19. Energy dependence of the transverse momentum distributions of charged particles in pp collisions measured by ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, K.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; D Erasmo, G.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goerlich, L.; Gomez, R.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.

    2013-12-01

    Differential cross sections of charged particles in inelastic pp collisions as a function of p T have been measured at at the LHC. The p T spectra are compared to NLO-pQCD calculations. Though the differential cross section for an individual cannot be described by NLO-pQCD, the relative increase of cross section with is in agreement with NLO-pQCD. Based on these measurements and observations, procedures are discussed to construct pp reference spectra at up to p T=50 GeV/ c as required for the calculation of the nuclear modification factor in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions.

  20. Charge Exchange, from the Laboratory to Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory; Hell, Natalie; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray emission due to charge exchange (CX) between solar wind ions and neutrals in comets and planetary atmospheres is ubiquitous in the solar system, and is also a significant foreground in all observations from low-Earth orbit. It is also possible that CX is common astrophysically, in any environment where hot plasma and cold gas interact. A current challenge is that theoretical models of CX spectra do not always accurately describe observations, and require further experimental verification. This is especially important to focus on now, as the recent launch of Astro-H is providing us with the first high-resolution spectra of extended x-ray sources. In order to improve our understanding and modeling of CX spectra, we take advantage of the laboratory astrophysics program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and use an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) to perform CX experiments, using the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer. We present experimental benchmarks that can be used to develop a more comprehensive and accurate CX theory. On the observational side, we also investigate the possibility of CX occurring in the filaments around the central galaxy of the Perseus cluster, NGC 1275. We use Chandra ACIS data, combined with what we know about laboratory CX spectra, to investigate the possibility of CX being a significant contributor to the x-ray emission.

  1. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, E. C.; Rowan, William L.

    2001-01-01

    The optical systems for charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) on Alcator C-Mod have been developed and installed. They will provide measurements of Ti, νθ, and νφ. With the addition of the motional Stark effect diagnostic to determine Bp, Er can be inferred from the ion pressure balance equation, Er=(Zenz)-1∇rpz+νφzBθ-νθzBφ. The optical systems are simple and have high throughput. In particular, the toroidally viewing systems must be designed for invessel installation close to the plasma where they are subject to large forces and are inaccessible between vacuum vents. Two optical systems, located invessel, provide 20 channels of Ti and νφ data from 67.3 cm

  2. Instability of the heliopause driven by charge exchange interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.; Zank, G. P.; Dasgupta, B.; Bhadoria, Shikha

    2014-08-20

    The stability of the heliopause that separates the tenuous hot magnetized heliosheath plasma from the dense cool local interstellar magnetized plasma is examined using a fully general model that includes all the essential physical processes. Charge exchange coupling between plasma protons and primary interstellar neutral atoms provides an effective gravity that drives Rayleigh-Taylor (RT)-like instabilities. The velocity difference or shear between the heliosheath and interstellar flows, when coupled to energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)-like instability on the heliopause. The shoulder region of the heliopause is unstable to a new instability that has characteristics of a mixed RT-KH-like mode. The instabilities are not stabilized by typical values of the magnetic fields in the inner and outer heliosheath (OHS). ENAs play an essential role in driving the KH-like instability, which is fully stabilized in their absence by magnetic fields. The nonlinear phase of these instabilities is briefly discussed. We also discuss the possibility that RT-like or mixed KH-RT-like instabilities drag outer heliosheath/very local interstellar medium (OHS/VLISM) magnetic field lines into the inner heliosheath (IHS) with the VLISM flow, and the possibility that IHS and VLISM magnetic field lines experience reconnection. Such reconnection may (1) greatly enhance the mixing of plasmas across the heliopause and (2) provide open magnetic field lines that allow easy ingress of galactic cosmic rays into the heliosphere and corresponding easy loss of anomalous cosmic rays from the heliosphere.

  3. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the T-10 tokamak.

    PubMed

    Klyuchnikov, L A; Krupin, V A; Nurgaliev, M R; Korobov, K V; Nemets, A R; Dnestrovskij, A Yu; Tugarinov, S N; Serov, S V; Naumenko, N N

    2016-05-01

    The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics on the T-10 tokamak is described. The system is based on a diagnostic neutral beam and includes three high etendue spectrometers designed for the ITER edge CXRS system. A combined two-channel spectrometer is developed for simultaneous measurements of two beam-induced spectral lines using the same lines of sight. A basic element of the combined spectrometer is a transmitting holographic grating designed for the narrow spectral region 5291 ± 100 Å. The whole CXRS system provides simultaneous measurements of two CXRS impurity spectra and Hα beam line. Ion temperature measurements are routinely provided using the C(6+) CXRS spectral line 5291 Å. Simultaneous measurements of carbon densities and one more impurity (oxygen, helium, lithium etc.) are carried out. Two light collecting systems with 9 lines of sight in each system are used in the diagnostics. Spatial resolution is up to 2.5 cm and temporal resolution of 1 ms is defined by the diagnostic neutral beam diameter and pulse duration, respectively. Experimental results are shown to demonstrate a wide range of the CXRS diagnostic capabilities on T-10 for investigation of impurity transport processes in tokamak plasma. Developed diagnostics provides necessary experimental data for studying of plasma electric fields, heat and particle transport processes, and for investigation of geodesic acoustic modes. PMID:27250422

  4. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Gerrit; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2003-04-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p T from 0.25 to 5 GeV/C is studied as a function of collision centrality. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  5. STUDIES OF X-RAY PRODUCTION FOLLOWING CHARGE EXCHANGE RECOMBINATION BETWEEN HIGHLY CHARGED IONS AND NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Thorn, D B; Wargelin, B J

    2008-08-28

    We have used microcalorimeters built by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Electron Beam Ion Trap to measure X-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between highly charged ions colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. Our measurements show the spectral dependence on neutral species and also show the distinct differences between spectra produced by charge exchange reactions and those produced by direct impact excitation. These results are part of an ongoing experimental investigation at the LLNL EBIT facility of charge exchange spectral signatures and can be used to interpret X-ray spectra produced by a variety of laboratory and celestial sources including cometary and planetary atmospheres, the Earth's magnetosheath, the heliosphere, and tokamaks.

  6. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  7. The Solar Wind Charge-exchange Production Factor for Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Collier, M. R.; Connor, H. K.; Cravens, T. E.; Koutroumpa, D.; Porter, F. S.; Robertson, I. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Snowden, S. L.; Thomas, N. E.; Walsh, B. M.

    2015-08-01

    The mean production factor, or broadband averaged cross-section, for solar wind charge-exchange (SWCX) with hydrogen producing emission in the ROSAT \\frac{1}{4} keV (R12) band is (3.8+/- 0.2)× {10}-20 count degree-2 cm4. The production factor is expected to be temporally variable, and that variation is roughly 15%. These values are derived from a comparison of the long-term (background) enhancements in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey with magnetohysdrodynamic simulations of the magnetosheath. This value is 1.8-4.5 times higher than values derived from limited atomic data, suggesting that those values may be missing a large number of faint lines. This production factor is important for deriving the exact amount of \\frac{1}{4} keV band flux that is due to the Local Hot Bubble, for planning future observations in the \\frac{1}{4} keV band, and for evaluating proposals for remote sensing of the magnetosheath. The same method cannot be applied to the \\frac{3}{4} keV band as that band, being composed primarily of the oxygen lines, is far more sensitive to the detailed abundances and ionization balance in the solar wind. We also show, incidentally, that recent efforts to correlate XMM-Newton observing geometry with magnetosheath SWCX emission in the oxygen lines have been, quite literally, misguided. Simulations of the inner heliosphere show that broader efforts to correlate heliospheric SWCX with local solar wind parameters are unlikely to produce useful results.

  8. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, R; Manikandan, N; Aravinthan, K

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices. PMID:26764780

  9. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Manikandan, N.; Aravinthan, K.

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices.

  10. Charge Transfer and Dissociation in Collisions of Metal Clusters with Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, C.; Cahuzac, Ph.; Concina, B.; Leygnier, J.; Ruiz, L. F.; Zarour, B.; Hervieux, P. A.; Hanssen, J.; Politis, M. F.; Martín, F.

    2002-10-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of charge transfer and dissociation in collisions of slow Li2+31 clusters with Cs atoms. We provide a direct quantitative comparison between theory and experiment and show that good agreement is found only when the exact experimental time of flight and initial cluster temperature are taken into account in the theoretical modeling. We demonstrate the validity of the simple physical image that consists in explaining evaporation as resulting from a collisional energy deposit due to cluster electronic excitation during charge transfer.

  11. Fragmentation of amino acids induced by collisions with low-energy highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarski, D. G.; Maclot, S.; Domaracka, A.; Adoui, L.; Alcamí, M.; Rousseau, P.; Díaz-Tendero, S.; Huber, B. A.; Martín, F.

    2014-04-01

    Fragmentation of amino acids NH2-(CH2)n-COOH (n=1 glycine; n=2 β-alanine and n=3 γ-aminobutyric acid GABA) following collisions with slow highly charged ions has been studied in the gas phase by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. In the experiments, a multi-coincidence detection method was used to deduce the charge state of the molecules before fragmentation. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out in the basis of the density functional theory and ab initio molecular dynamics. The combination of both methodologies is essential to unambiguously unravel the different fragmentation pathways.

  12. High Performance Non-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometers for Charge Exchange Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Frederick; Adams, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Karkatoua, D.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lautenagger, M.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the only measurements of cosmological charge exchange have been made using low resolution, non-dispersive spectrometers like the PSPC on ROSAT and the CCD instruments on Chandra and XMM/Newton. However, upcoming cryogenic spectrometers on Astro-H and IXO will add vast new capabilities to investigate charge exchange in local objects such as comets and planetary atmospheres. They may also allow us to observe charge exchange in extra-solar objects such as galactic supernova remnants. With low spectral resolution instruments such as CCDs, x-ray emission due to charge exchange recombination really only provides information on the acceptor species, such as the solar wind. With the new breed of x-ray calorimeter instruments, emission from charge exchange becomes highly diagnostic allowing one to uniquely determine the acceptor species, ionization state, donor species and ionization state, and the relative velocity of the interaction. We will describe x-ray calorimeter instrumentation and its potential for charge exchange measurements in the near term. We will also touch on the instrumentation behind a decade of high resolution measurements of charge exchange using an x-ray calorimeter at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Charged-particle multiplicity in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiete Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan; Reygers, Klaus

    2010-08-01

    This review summarizes and critically reviews measurements of charged-particle multiplicity distributions and pseudorapidity densities in p+p(\\bar{p}) collisions between \\sqrt{s} = 23.6 {\\;GeV} and \\sqrt{s} = 1.8\\;TeV. Related theoretical concepts are briefly introduced. Moments of multiplicity distributions are presented as a function of \\sqrt{s}. Feynman scaling, KNO scaling as well as the description of multiplicity distributions with a single negative binomial distribution and with combinations of two or more negative binomial distributions is discussed. Moreover, similarities between the energy dependence of charged-particle multiplicities in p+p(\\bar{p}) and e+e- collisions are studied. Finally, various predictions for pseudorapidity densities, average multiplicities in full phase space and multiplicity distributions of charged particles in p+p(\\bar{p}) collisions at the LHC energies of \\sqrt{s} = 7\\;TeV, 10\\;TeV and 14 TeV are summarized and compared.

  14. Scaling of charged particle production in d+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wolfs, F. L.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2005-09-01

    The measured pseudorapidity distributions of primary charged particles over a wide pseudorapidity range of |η|≤5.4 and integrated charged particle multiplicities in d+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200GeV are presented as a function of collision centrality. The longitudinal features of d+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200GeV are found to be very similar to those seen in p+A collisions at lower energies. The total multiplicity of charged particles is found to scale with the total number of participants according to NdAuch=1/2Nppch, and the energy dependence of the density of charged particles produced in the fragmentation region exhibits extended longitudinal scaling.

  15. Charged particle multiplicity fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200\\, {\\rm GeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Krzysztof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the first PHOBOS results on charged particle multiplicity fluctuations measured for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy within a wide pseudorapidity range of |eegr| < 3. The dependence on collision geometry is removed in the analysis by using the normalized difference between the number of particles in separate eegr bins. We compare our data to HIJING model predictions.

  16. On charge exchange and knock-on processes in the exosphere of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.

    1982-01-01

    One direct consequence of magnetospheric interaction of Io is the strong dynamical coupling of its neutral atmosphere with the corotating plasma. The absorption of the thermal ions and the associated neutral injection is an improtant issue not yet explored. As far as nonthermal escape of the neutral atmosphere is concerned, three processes stand out. That is, apart from sputtering, exospheric interactions like atom-ion knock-on collision and charge exchange recombination could be a significant source of the neutral clouds in the Jovian system. Using a current electrodynamic model of Io, both the absorption rate of the corotating thermal plasma and the production rates of new exospheric ions and the fast neutrals are considered. It is found that the source strength of the neutral atoms and molecules with speeds of about 100 km/sec could amount to 10 to the 26th/sec whereas exospheric neutrals emitted at lower speed (of about 10 km/sec) amounts to 4 x 10 to the 25th/sec. The generation of the new ions in connection with the streaming of the magnetospheric plasma around Io could also produce an asymmetric sputtering with a neutral flux of about 10 to the 27th/sec emitted from the region of Io which faces Jupiter. These results may be related to a number of sodium observations.

  17. CAN CHARGE EXCHANGE EXPLAIN ANOMALOUS SOFT X-RAY EMISSION IN THE CYGNUS LOOP?

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbee, R. S.; Henley, D. B.; Stancil, P. C.; Shelton, R. L.; Nolte, J. L.; Wu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.

    2014-06-01

    Recent X-ray studies have shown that supernova shock models are unable to satisfactorily explain X-ray emission in the rim of the Cygnus Loop. In an attempt to account for this ''anomalously'' enhanced X-ray flux, we fit the region with a model including theoretical charge exchange (CX) data along with shock and background X-ray models. The model includes the CX collisions of O{sup 8} {sup +}, O{sup 7} {sup +}, N{sup 7} {sup +}, N{sup 6} {sup +}, C{sup 6} {sup +}, and C{sup 5} {sup +} with H with an energy of 1 keV u{sup –1} (438 km s{sup –1}). The observations reveal a strong emission feature near 0.7 keV that cannot fully be accounted for by a shock model, nor the current CX data. Inclusion of CX, specifically O{sup 7} {sup +} + H, does provide for a statistically significant improvement over a pure shock model.

  18. Charge exchange spectroscopy of multiply charged ions for the development of the EUV light source for the next generation photo lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Hajime

    2015-09-01

    As a candidate of an extreme ultra-violet (EUV) light source for a next generation lithography, laser produced plasmas (LPP) of Xe and Sn have been investigated intensively in this decade because these plasmas have a strong emission around 13.5 nm which had been determined as the wavelength for the EUV lithography. This emission was considered to be due to multiply charged Xe and Sn ions in hot plasmas. However, the detail atomic spectroscopic data of these multiply charged heavy ions had not been reported yet. To provide atomic data for the understanding and development of the LPP as the EUV light source, we have observed the EUV emission spectra from individual charge states of Xe and Sn ions by means of a charge exchange spectroscopy method. Multiply charged Xeq+ (q = 7-23) and Snq+ (q = 5-21) ions were produced with a 14.25 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, and a charge-selected ion beam was directed into a collision chamber, where the ion interact with a target gas of He and Xe. EUV emissions from the collision center were observed with a compact flat-field grazing-incident spectrometer equipped with a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In experiments using Xe ions, we have found only Xe XI has a strong UTA (unresolved transition array) around 13.5 nm. On the other hand, various charge states of Sn from VIII to XIV contribute to the 13.5 nm emission. Identification of the transition lines was carried out by calculations using the Hebrew university Livermore laboratory atomic physics code and the Cowan code. Most of the emissions in the EUV region are attributed to the 4p-4d and 4d- nl (nl = 4f, 5p, and 5f) transitions. However, the 4d-4f transitions have approximately constant differences of about 0.5 nm between the experimental and theoretical results. This can be explained by considering the strong configuration interactions in the n=4 subshells. Using the experimental transition wavelengths of multiply charged Sn ions, theoretical modeling of

  19. Invited Parallel Talk: Forward pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction and Regge constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei; Sibirtsev, A.; Krewald, S.; Hanhart, C.; Haidenbauer, J.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2009-12-01

    We present our recent study of pion-nucleon charge exchange amplitudes above 2 GeV. We analyze the forward pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction data in a Regge model and compare the resulting amplitudes with those from the Karlsruhe-Helsinki and George-Washington-University partial-wave analyses. We explore possible high-energy constraints for theoretical baryon resonance analyses in the energy region above 2 GeV. Our results show that for the pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction, the appropriate energy region for matching meson-nucleon dynamics to diffractive scattering should be around 3 GeV for the helicity flip amplitude.

  20. Production of intense beams of polarized negative hydrogen ions by double charge exchange in alkali vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruëbler, W.; Schmelzbach, P. A.

    1983-07-01

    The intensity of the polarized negative hydrogen ion beam of the ETHZ atomic beam polarized ion source has been substantially improved by a new double charge exchange device. Increasing the diameter of the charge exchange canal to 1.4 cm results in a beam output of the source of 6 μA of polarized negative hydrogen ions. Further improvements of the charge exchanger are proposed and discussed. With an updated design of the atomic beam apparatus, beams of 0.5 mA polarized negative hydrogen ions may be obtained from such a source.

  1. Carbon charge exchange analysis in the ITER-like wall environment

    SciTech Connect

    Menmuir, S.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Biewer, T. M.; Coffey, I. H.; Delabie, E.; Sertoli, M.

    2014-11-15

    Charge exchange spectroscopy has long been a key diagnostic tool for fusion plasmas and is well developed in devices with Carbon Plasma-Facing Components. Operation with the ITER-like wall at JET has resulted in changes to the spectrum in the region of the Carbon charge exchange line at 529.06 nm and demonstrates the need to revise the core charge exchange analysis for this line. An investigation has been made of this spectral region in different plasma conditions and the revised description of the spectral lines to be included in the analysis is presented.

  2. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Lee, J. W.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-01-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. The spectra were measured for transverse momenta pT from 0.25 to 4.5 GeV/c in a pseudorapidity range of 0.2<η<1.4. The evolution of the spectra is studied as a function of collision centrality, from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. The results are compared to data from proton-antiproton collisions and Au+Au collisions at lower RHIC energies. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and semi-peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing semi-peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at high pT exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  3. Plasma code for astrophysical charge exchange emission at X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liyi; Kaastra, Jelle; Raassen, A. J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Charge exchange X-ray emission provides unique insight into the interactions between cold and hot astrophysical plasmas. Besides its own profound science, this emission is also technically crucial to all observations in the X-ray band, since charge exchange with the solar wind often contributes a significant foreground component that contaminates the signal of interest. By approximating the cross sections resolved to n and l atomic subshells and carrying out complete radiative cascade calculation, we have created a new spectral code to evaluate the charge exchange emission in the X-ray band. Compared to collisional thermal emission, charge exchange radiation exhibits enhanced lines from large-n shells to the ground, as well as large forbidden-to-resonance ratios of triplet transitions. Our new model successfully reproduces an observed high-quality spectrum of comet C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), which emits purely by charge exchange between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. It demonstrates that a proper charge exchange model will allow us to probe the ion properties remotely, including charge state, dynamics, and composition, at the interface between the cold and hot plasmas.

  4. Nucleon exchange mechanism in heavy-ion collisions at near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, B.; Ayik, S.; Lacroix, D.

    2011-06-15

    Nucleon drift and diffusion mechanisms in central collisions of asymmetric heavy ions at near-barrier energies are investigated in the framework of a stochastic mean-field approach. Expressions for diffusion and drift coefficients for nucleon transfer deduced from the stochastic mean-field approach in the semiclassical approximation have similar forms familiar from the phenomenological nucleon exchange model. The variance of fragment mass distribution agrees with the empirical formula {sigma}{sub AA}{sup 2}(t)=N{sub exc}(t). The comparison with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations shows that below barrier energies, the drift coefficient in the semiclassical approximation underestimates the mean number of nucleon transfer obtained in the quantal framework. Motion of the window in the dinuclear system has a significant effect on the nucleon transfer in asymmetric collisions.

  5. Energy and charge transfer in O/sup +//sub 2/ on O/sub 2/ collisions: Effects of a ''vibrational rainbow''

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee K.B. Jr.; Hozack, R.S.

    1985-12-01

    The efficient conversion of up to eight vibrational quanta into translational energy is found to occur during O/sup +//sub 2/ --O/sub 2/ collisions. The high efficiency and low deflection angle which are observed in the experiment reported are explained by the occurrence of multiple crossings of the O/sup +//sub 2/ --O/sub 2/ system interaction potentials, specifically the attractive and repulsive symmetry potentials. The energy and charge transfer model evolved from the experimental data proposes that energy transfer in symmetric molecule--ion collisions takes place at very large intermolecular separations. It differs in an important way from previous concepts which suggest that impulsive momentum transfer at relatively short distances is necessary to the exchange of vibrational energy. To explain the data, a distortion of the electron cloud surrounding the colliding systems is conceived to produce charge-transfer oscillations whose frequencies at the crossing points are multiples of molecular vibration frequencies. Such resonances are similar to the more familiar rainbows often observed in molecular collisions. The ease with which energy has been found to be transferred between modes of motion in charged systems affects the thermal, optical, and other properties of plasmas.

  6. Spectral Signatures Of Charge Exchange In K-shell X-ray Spectra Of Ar, P, And S Measured With The LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Koutroumpa, D.; Porter, F. S.

    2010-02-01

    Charge exchange is an important process in numerous astrophysical contexts, including the interaction of the solar wind with neutral material throughout the solar system, which is hypothesized to contribute a large fraction of the soft X-ray background, and is thus highly relevant to studies of diffuse X-ray emission from the warm-hot phase of the intergalactic medium. It may also be important in supernova remnants, as hot, shocked gas interacts with the surrounding neutral ISM. It will be increasingly important to understand charge exchange in the near future, when the Micro-X rocket mission and the Astro-H SXS become the first imaging high-resolution X-ray spectrometers, allowing observations of highly extended sources with sufficient spectral resolution to easily detect spectral signatures of charge exchange. Charge exchange in the limit of low collision energy is still poorly understood, and measurements benchmarking theoretical predictions of cross-sections and spectra are desirable. We present high resolution K-shell X-ray spectra of highly ionized Ar, P, and S produced by low collision energy charge exchange in the LLNL electron beam ion trap and measured by the NASA/GSFC EBIT calorimeter spectrometer (ECS) and XRS/EBIT instruments. We investigate the scaling of the hardness ratios of the hydrogenic spectra with atomic number, as well as their dependence on the neutral electron donor species. We also find that the He-like triplet line ratios are strongly diagnostic of the neutral electron donor species. Part of this work was prepared by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Recent Excitation, Charge Exchange, and Lifetime Results in Highly Charged Ions Relevant to Stellar, Interstellar, Solar and Comet Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Hossain, S.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Smith, S. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent JPL absolute excitation and charge exchange cross sections, and measurements of lifetimes of metastable levels in highly-charged ions (HCIs) are reported. These data provide benchmark comparisons to results of theoretical calculations. Theoretical approaches can then be used to calculate the vast array of data which cannot be measured due to experimental constraints. Applications to the X-ray emission from comets are given.

  8. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, March 16, 1991--March 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  9. Charge transfer cross sections for Hg + , Xe + , and Cs + in collision with various metals and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, J. A.; Vroom, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Cross sections for charge transfer between Hg+, Xe+, and Cs+ and the atomic species Fe, Mo, Al, Ti, Ta, and C have been measured in the ion energy range from 1 to 5000 eV. In general, the cross sections for charge transfer were found to be less than 2×10-15 cm2 for most processes over the total energy range. The one exception is Hg+ in collision with Ti. The reactants are all open shell atomic species and in most cases where the charge transfer process is exothermic, several resonant pathways exist leading to the products. Some discussion of possible reaction paths is given. The techniques used to form neutral beams of the various species studied is included.

  10. Beam energy dependence of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sumit; Nayak, Tapan K.; Datta, Kaustuv

    2016-06-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN probe matter at extreme conditions of temperature and energy density. Most of the global properties of the collisions can be extracted from the measurements of charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity (η ) distributions. We have shown that the available experimental data on beam energy and centrality dependence of η distributions in heavy-ion (Au +Au or Pb +Pb ) collisions from √{sNN}=7.7 GeV to 2.76 TeV are reasonably well described by the AMPT model, which is used for further exploration. The nature of the η distributions has been described by a double Gaussian function using a set of fit parameters, which exhibit a regular pattern as a function of beam energy. By extrapolating the parameters to a higher energy of √{sNN}=5.02 TeV, we have obtained the charged-particle multiplicity densities, η distributions, and energy densities for various centralities. Incidentally, these results match well with some of the recently published data by the ALICE Collaboration.

  11. Inclusive pion double charge exchange in light p-shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, W.; Matthews, J. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Kinney, E. R.; Soos, T.; Wang, M. Y.; Wood, S. A.; Gram, P. A. M.; Rebka, G. A. Jr.; Roberts, D. A.

    2007-06-15

    We report the results of a series of measurements of the differential cross sections for inclusive pion double charge exchange in {sup 6,7}Li, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 12}C for positive and negative incident pions of energies 120, 180, and 240 MeV. The data are compared with the predictions of an intranuclear cascade model and a model based on two sequential single charge exchange processes.

  12. Beam-Energy Dependence of Charge Separation along the Magnetic Field in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a quark-gluon plasma which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect. The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this Letter, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au +Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. This implies the dominance of hadronic interactions over partonic ones at lower collision energies.

  13. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a quark-gluon plasma which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect. The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this Letter, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. This implies the dominance of hadronic interactions over partonic ones at lower collision energies. PMID:25126911

  14. Neutral atomic oxygen beam produced by ion charge exchange for Low Earth Orbital (LEO) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Rutledge, Sharon; Brdar, Marko; Olen, Carl; Stidham, Curt

    1987-01-01

    A low energy neutral atomic oxygen beam system was designed and is currently being assembled at the Lewis Research Center. The system utilizes a 15 cm diameter Kaufman ion source to produce positive oxygen ions which are charge exchange neutralized to produce low energy (variable from 5 to 150 eV) oxygen atoms at a flux simulating real time low Earth orbital conditions. An electromagnet is used to direct only the singly charged oxygen ions from the ion source into the charge exchange cell. A retarding potential grid is used to slow down the oxygen ions to desired energies prior to their charge exchange. Cryogenically cooled diatomic oxygen gas in the charge exchange cell is then used to transfer charge to the oxygen ions to produce a neutral atomic oxygen beam. Remaining non-charge exchanged oxygen ions are then swept from the beam by electromagnetic or electrostatic deflection depending upon the desired experiment configuration. The resulting neutral oxygen beam of 5 to 10 cm in diameter impinges upon target materials within a sample holder fixture that can also provide for simultaneous heating and UV exposure during the atomic oxygen bombardment.

  15. SELF-CONSISTENT LANGEVIN SIMULATION OF COULOMB COLLISIONS IN CHARGED-PARTICLE BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    J. QIANG; R. RYNE; S. HABIB

    2000-05-01

    In many plasma physics and charged-particle beam dynamics problems, Coulomb collisions are modeled by a Fokker-Planck equation. In order to incorporate these collisions, we present a three-dimensional parallel Langevin simulation method using a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach implemented on high-performance parallel computers. We perform, for the first time, a fully self-consistent simulation, in which the friction and diffusion coefficients are computed from first principles. We employ a two-dimensional domain decomposition approach within a message passing programming paradigm along with dynamic load balancing. Object oriented programming is used to encapsulate details of the communication syntax as well as to enhance reusability and extensibility. Performance tests on the SGI Origin 2000 and the Cray T3E-900 have demonstrated good scalability. Work is in progress to apply our technique to intrabeam scattering in accelerators.

  16. Identified charged hadron production in Pb-Pb collisions with event shape engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangaro, Marco Antonio; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The Event Shape Engineering technique allows the selection of different event shapes for a definite centrality and colliding system. The event selection is based on the azimuthal distribution of produced particles, using the so-called flow vector. For such shape selected events, the elliptic flow coefficient (v2) is significantly different with respect to the unbiased events. Moreover, recent Monte-Carlo studies show a strong correlation between the (final state) event shape selection and the (initial state) eccentricity of the collision. This opens the opportunity to characterize events according to the initial geometry. An approach to select the eccentricity of the event with the Event Shape Engineering is presented. Then the effect of this selection on identified particle spectra, mean transverse momentum and v2 of charged particles in heavy-ion collisions at \\sqrt{sNN} = 2.76 TeV center-of-mass energy is discussed.

  17. Fluctuations of conserved charges in relativistic heavy ion collisions: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Masayuki; Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2016-09-01

    Bulk fluctuations of conserved charges measured by event-by-event analysis in relativistic heavy ion collisions are observables which are believed to carry significant amount of information on the hot medium created by the collisions. Active studies have been done recently experimentally, theoretically, and on the lattice. In particular, non-Gaussianity of the fluctuations has acquired much attention recently. In this review, we give a pedagogical introduction to these issues, and survey recent developments in this field of research. Starting from the definition of cumulants, basic concepts in fluctuation physics, such as thermal fluctuations in statistical mechanics and time evolution of fluctuations in diffusive systems, are described. Phenomena which are expected to occur in finite temperature and/or density QCD matter and their measurement by event-by-event analyses are also elucidated.

  18. Resonance charge transfer, transport cross sections, and collision integrals for N(+)(3P)-N(4S0) and O(+)(4S0)-O(3P) interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    N2(+) and O2(+) potential energy curves have been constructed by combining measured data with the results from electronic structure calculations. These potential curves have been employed to determine accurate charge exchange cross sections, transport cross sections, and collision integrals for ground state N(+)-N and O(+)-O interactions. The cross sections have been calculated from a semiclassical approximation to the scattering using a computer code that fits a spline curve through the discrete potential data and incorporates the proper long-range behavior of the interactions forces. The collision integrals are tabulated for a broad range of temperatures 250-100,000 K and are intended to reduce the uncertainty in the values of the transport properties of nonequilibrium air, particularly at high temperatures.

  19. Transverse energy distribution, charged particle multiplicities and spectra in /sup 16/O-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sunier, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The HELIOS (High Energy Lepton and Ion Spectrometer) experiment, installed at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron, proposes to examine in details the physical properties of a state of high energy created in nuclei by ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. It is generally believed that, at high densities or temperatures, a phase transition to a plasma of quark and gluons will occur. The dynamic of the expansion of such a plasma and its subsequent condensation into a hadron gas should markedly affect the composition and momentum distribution of the emerging particles and photons. The HELIOS experimental setup therefore combines 4..pi.. calorimetric coverage with measurements of inclusive particle spectra, two particle correlations, low and high mass lepton pairs and photons. The emphasis is placed on transverse energy flow (E/sub T/) measurements with good energy resolution, and the ability to trigger the acquisition of data in a variety of E/sub T/ ranges, thereby selecting the impact parameter or the violence of the collisions. This short note presents HELIOS results, for the most part still preliminary, on /sup 16/O-nucleus collisions at the incident energies of 60 and 200 GeV per nucleon. The E/sub T/ distributions from Al, Ag and W targets are discussed and compared to the associated charged particle multiplicities from W. Charged particle and (converted) photon spectra measured with the external magnetic spectrometer are compared for /sup 16/O + W and p + W collisions at 200 GeV per nucleon. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Measurement of charged jet suppression in Pb-Pb collisions at = 2 .76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A. Ahmad; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Pedrosa, F. Baltasar Dos Santos; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Boehmer, F. V.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Roman, V. Canoa; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Díaz, A. Casanova; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; del Valle, Z. Conesa; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Cortese, P.; Maldonado, I. Cortés; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Albino, R. Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dorheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Majumdar, A. K. Dutta; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.

    2014-03-01

    A measurement of the transverse momentum spectra of jets in Pb-Pb collisions at = 2 .76TeV is reported. Jets are reconstructed from charged particles using the anti- k T jet algorithm with jet resolution parameters R of 0 .2 and 0 .3 in pseudo-rapidity | η| < 0 .5. The transverse momentum p T of charged particles is measured down to 0 .15 GeV/ c which gives access to the low p T fragments of the jet. Jets found in heavy-ion collisions are corrected event-by-event for average background density and on an inclusive basis (via unfolding) for residual background fluctuations and detector effects. A strong suppression of jet production in central events with respect to peripheral events is observed. The suppression is found to be similar to the suppression of charged hadrons, which suggests that substantial energy is radiated at angles larger than the jet resolution parameter R = 0 .3 considered in the analysis. The fragmentation bias introduced by selecting jets with a high p T leading particle, which rejects jets with a soft fragmentation pattern, has a similar effect on the jet yield for central and peripheral events. The ratio of jet spectra with R = 0 .2 and R = 0 .3 is found to be similar in Pb-Pb and simulated PYTHIA pp events, indicating no strong broadening of the radial jet structure in the reconstructed jets with R < 0 .3. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Nonadiabatic couplings and charge transfer study in H + CS+ collision using time-dependent quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajwant; Dhilip Kumar, T. J.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments have reported the high stability of HCS+ ion and inhibit to decompose over the range of collision energies. In this study, the various energy transfer channels of atomic H collision with CS+ molecular ion has been performed by ab initio computations at the multireference configuration interaction/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory. The ground and several low-lying excited electronic state potential energy surfaces in three different molecular orientations, namely, two collinear configurations with, (1) H approaching the S atom (γ = 0°), (2) H approaching the C atom (γ = 180°) and one perpendicular configuration, (3) H approaching the centre of mass of CS (γ = 90°) with the diatom fixed at the equilibrium bond length, have been obtained. Nonadiabatic effects with Landau-Zener coupling leading to avoided crossings are observed between the ground- and the first-excited states in γ = 90° orientation, and also between the first- and second-excited states in γ = 180° orientation. Quantum dynamics have been performed to study the charge transfer using time-dependent wave packet method on the diabatic potential energy surfaces. The probability of charge transfer is found to be highest with 42% in γ = 180°. The high charge transfer probability result in the formation of H+ + CS channel which ascertains the high stability of HCS+ ion.

  2. Studies of negative ions by collision-induced decomposition and hydrogen-deuterium exchange techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, D F; Sethi, S K; Shabanowitz, J

    1980-01-01

    Development of two new techniques for studying the gas phase chemistry of negative ions is reported. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of (M-1)- ions has been accomplished in a newly constructed triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometer. This instrument was assembled by adding two additional Finnigan quadrupole mass filters to a Finnigan Model 3200 CI mass spectrometer. Generation of (M-1)- ions is accomplished by allowing OH- and sample to react under CI conditions in the ion source. The first quadrupole mass filter, Q1, is then employed to selectively pass the (M-1)- ion into a second quadrupole filter containing argon or neon at 10(-3) torr. On collision with the inert gas the (M-1)- ions dissociate into fragments which are then mass analyzed in the third quadrupole filter, CID spectra of (M-1)- ions from twelve carbonyl compounds are presented in this paper. Ion molecule isotope exchange reactions in the CI ion source can be used to count the number of hydrogen atoms in many different chemical environments. Collisions between sample (M-1)- ions and deuterium-labeled reagent gases (ND3, D2O, EtOD) facilitate incorporation of deuterium into the negative ion if the basicities of the sample and reagent anions are similar. Thus it is possible to selectively incorporate deuterium into many organic samples by controlling the exothermicity of the acid base, ion-molecule chemistry. PMID:7428745

  3. Significance of anion exchange in pentachlorophenol sorption by variable-charge soils.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seunghun; Lee, Linda S; Rao, P Suresh C

    2003-01-01

    Sorption data and subsequent predictive models for evaluating acidic pesticide behavior on variable-charge soils are needed to improve pesticide management and environmental stewardship. Previous work demonstrated that sorption of pentachlorophenol (PCP), a model organic acid, was adequately modeled by accounting for pH-and pKa-dependent chemical speciation and using two organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficients; one each for the neutral and anionic species. Such models do not account for organic anion interaction to positively charged surface sites, which can be significant for variable-charge minerals present in weathered soils typical of tropical and subtropical regions. The role of anion exchange in sorption of ionizable chemicals by variable-charge soils was assessed by measuring sorption of PCP by several variable-charge soils from aqueous solutions of CaCl2, CaSO4, Ca(H2PO4)2 as a function of pH. Differences in sorption from phosphate and chloride electrolyte solutions were attributed to pentachlorophenolate interactions with anion exchange sites. Suppression of PCP sorption by phosphate ranged from negligible in a soil with essentially no positively charge sites, as measured by negligible anion exchange capacity, to as much as 69% for variable-charge soils. Pentachlorophenolate exchange correlated well with the ratio of pH-dependent anion exchange capacity to net surface charge. Sorption reversibility of PCP by both CaCl2 and Ca(H2PO4)2 solutions was also demonstrated. Results for PCP clearly demonstrate that sorption to anion exchange sites in variable-charge soils should be considered in assessing pesticide mobility and that phosphate fertilizer application may increase the mobility of acidic pesticides. PMID:12809297

  4. N(+)-N long-range interaction energies and resonance charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.; Partridge, H.

    1985-01-01

    The aerothermodynamic studies of proposed space missions require atmospheric charge-transfer data. N2(+) eigenstate energies are calculated with use of the complete-active-space self-consistent-field method with an extended Gaussian basis set. The N(+)-N charge-exchange cross section, determined from these energies, agrees with merged-beam measurements. This contradicts the previous theoretical conclusion. A simple physical description of the long-range interaction is presented and should expedite future charge-transfer studies.

  5. X-ray Signature of Charge Exchange in the Spectra of L-shell Iron Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Schweikhard, L; Liebisch, P; Brown, G V

    2007-01-05

    The X-ray signature of charge exchange between highly charged L-shell iron ions and neutral gas atoms was studied in the laboratory in order to assess its diagnostic utility. Significant differences with spectra formed by electron-impact excitation were observed. In particular, a strong enhancement was found of the emission corresponding to n {le} 4 {yields} n = 2 transitions relative to the n = 3 {yields} n = 2 emission. This enhancement was detectable even with relatively low-resolution X-ray instrumentation (E/{Delta}E {approx} 10) and may enable future identification of charge exchange as a line-formation mechanism in astrophysical spectra.

  6. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-01

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. PMID:12791989

  7. Charge Exchange-induced X-Ray Emission of Fe xxv and Fe xxvI via a Streamlined Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, P. D.; Cumbee, R. S.; Lyons, D.; Stancil, P. C.

    2016-06-01

    Charge exchange (CX) is an important process for the modeling of X-ray spectra obtained by the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku X-ray observatories, as well as the anticipated Astro-H mission. The understanding of the observed X-ray spectra produced by many astrophysical environments is hindered by the current incompleteness of available atomic and molecular data—especially for CX. Here, we implement a streamlined program set that applies quantum defect methods and the Landau–Zener theory to generate total, n-resolved, and n{\\ell }S-resolved cross sections for any given projectile ion/target CX collision. By using these data in a cascade model for X-ray emission, theoretical spectra for such systems can be predicted. With these techniques, Fe25+ and Fe26+ CX collisions with H, He, H2, N2, H2O, and CO are studied for single-electron capture (SEC). These systems have been selected because they illustrate computational difficulties for high projectile charges. Furthermore, Fe xxv and Fe xxvi emission lines have been detected in the Galactic center and Galactic ridge. Theoretical X-ray spectra for these collision systems are compared to experimental data generated by an electron-beam ion trap study. Several ℓ-distribution models have been tested for Fe25+ and Fe26+ SEC. Such analyses suggests that commonly used ℓ-distribution models struggle to accurately reflect the true distribution of electron capture as understood by more advanced theoretical methods.

  8. Charge transfer in energetic Li2+-H and He+-He+ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, I.

    2009-02-01

    The total cross sections for charge transfer in Li2+-H and He+-He+ collisions have been calculated, using the four body first Born approximation with correct boundary conditions (CB1-4B) and four body continuum distorted wave method (CDW-4B) in the energy range 10-5000 keV/amu. The role of dynamic electron correlations is examined as a function of the impact energy. The present results call for additional experimental data at higher impact energies than presently available.

  9. Energy losses of fast heavy multiply charged structural ions in collisions with complex atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, V. I.; Sidorov, D. B.

    2007-07-01

    A nonperturbatve theory of energy losses of fast heavy multiply charged structural ions in collisions with neutral complex atoms is elaborated with allowance for simultaneous excitations of ionic and atomic electron shells. Formulas for the effective deceleration that are similar to the well-known Bethe-Bloch formulas are derived. By way of example, the energy lost by partially stripped U q+ ions (10 ≤ q ≤ 70) colliding with argon atoms and also the energy lost by Au, Pb, and Bi ions colliding with various targets are calculated. The results of calculation are compared with experimental data.

  10. Charged Higgs searches in ATLAS 13 TeV center of mass pp collision data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Justin; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    This talk will summarize the search for a charged Higgs that decays to a hadronically decaying tau lepton and its associated neutrino. At high tan β, a Charged Higgs will decay primarily to a t b or τν final state. In such scenarios, the Charged Higgs will be produced in association with a top quark. The final state in this search consists of a hadronically decaying top, at least one b-quark initiated jet, a hadronically decaying tau lepton, and large missing transverse energy from the associated tau neutrinos. The results of Run 1 charged higgs searches at ATLAS will be briefly summarized, including H+ --> c s , t b , W+ Z , and τν . The proton-proton center-of-mass energy increase from Run 1 leads to an increase of the theoretical cross sections by a factor of 4-10, depending on the mass of the charged Higgs. Due to this increase, the run 2 sensitivity is expected to exceed the Run 1 sensitivity with only 3.2 fb-1 of 13 TeV collisions data. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics.

  11. Projectile charge dependence of ionization and dissociation of CO in fast collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthi, Vidhya; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Carnes, K. D.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study how changes in the interaction strength (defined as q/vb) of a fast ion-molecule colision affect the ionization and dissociation of the molecular target, in this case CO. The coincidence time-of-flight technique was used for collisions at fixed velocity (energy of 1 MeV/amu). The interaction strength was changed by varying the charge of the projectile ion. The cross sections for single and multiple ionization of CO increase rapidly for small q, approximately as q2n (where n is the number of ionized electrons), and more slowly for larger values of q. A rather simple theoretical model based on the independent electron approximation and perturbation theory is in good agreement with the data [1]. The dissociation patterns of the transient COQ+ molecular ions also exhibit a dependence on the projectile charge which is qualitatively explained by the same model.

  12. Measurement of the W boson production charge asymmetry in p pbar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bo-Young; /Rochester U.

    2008-05-01

    We present a measurement of the W boson production charge asymmetry using the W {yields} e{nu} decay channel. We use data collected the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected up to February 2006 (Run II) and represent an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1}. The experimental measurement of W production charge asymmetry is compared to higher order QCD predictions generated using MRST2006 and CTEQ6 parton distribution functions (PDF). The asymmetry provides new input on the momentum fraction dependence of the u and d quark parton distribution functions (PDF) within the proton over the fraction of proton's momentum range from 0.002 < x < 0.8 corresponding to -3.0 < y{sub W} < 3.0 at Q{sup 2} {approx} M{sub W}{sup 2}.

  13. Production of leading charged particles and leading charged-particle jets at small transverse momenta in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.

    2015-12-01

    The per-event yield of the highest transverse momentum charged particle and charged-particle jet, integrated above a given pTmin threshold starting at pTmin=0.8 and 1 GeV, respectively, is studied in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV . The particles and the jets are measured in the pseudorapidity ranges |η | <2.4 and 1.9, respectively. The data are sensitive to the momentum scale at which parton densities saturate in the proton, to multiple partonic interactions, and to other key aspects of the transition between the soft and hard QCD regimes in hadronic collisions.

  14. 78 FR 6263 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Department used an ``activity-based costing'' (ABC) approach to develop a sustainable model to align the... ``activity-based costing'' (ABC) approach to develop a sustainable model to align the associated costs of the.... According to legislative and regulatory guidance, user charges should be based on the full cost to...

  15. Fluctuations in charged particle multiplicities in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Basu, Sumit; Choudhury, Subikash; Nayak, Tapan K.

    2016-08-01

    Multiplicity distributions of charged particles and their event-by-event fluctuations have been compiled for relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the available experimental data at Brookhaven National Laboratory and CERN and also by the use of an event generator. Multiplicity fluctuations are sensitive to QCD phase transition and to the presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram. In addition, multiplicity fluctuations provide baselines for other event-by-event measurements. Multiplicity fluctuation expressed in terms of the scaled variance of the multiplicity distribution is an intensive quantity, but is sensitive to the volume fluctuation of the system. The importance of the choice of narrow centrality bins and the corrections of the centrality bin-width effect for controlling volume fluctuations have been discussed. It is observed that the mean and width of the multiplicity distributions monotonically increase as functions of increasing centrality at all collision energies, whereas the multiplicity fluctuations show minimal variations with centrality. The beam-energy dependence shows that the multiplicity fluctuations have a slow rise at lower collision energies and remain constant at higher energies.

  16. Database for inelastic collisions of sodium atoms with electrons, protons, and multiply charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Igenbergs, K.; Schweinzer, J.; Bray, I.; Bridi, D.; Aumayr, F.

    2008-11-15

    The available experimental and theoretical cross section data for inelastic collision processes of ground (3s) and excited (3p, 4s, 3d, 4p, 5s, 4d, and 4f) state Na atoms with electrons, protons, and multiply charged ions have been collected and critically assessed. In addition to existing data, electron-impact cross sections, for both excitation and ionization, have been calculated using the convergent close-coupling approach. In the case of proton-impact cross section, the database was enlarged by new atomic-orbital close-coupling calculations. Both electron-impact and proton-impact processes include excitation from the ground state and between excited states (n = 3-5). For electron-impact, ionization from all states is also considered. In the case of proton-impact electron loss, cross sections (the sum of ionization and single-electron charge transfer) are given. Well-established analytical formulae used to fit cross sections, published by Wutte et al. and Schweinzer et al. for collisions with lithium atoms, were adapted to sodium. The 'recommended cross sections' for the processes considered have been critically evaluated and fitted using the adapted analytical formulae. For each inelastic process the fit parameters determined are tabulated. We also present the assessed data in graphical form. The criteria for comprehensively evaluating the accuracy of the experimental data, theoretical calculations, and procedures used in determining the recommended cross sections are discussed.

  17. Azimuthal Single-Spin Asymmetries of Charged Pions in Jets in p↑ p Collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Kevin; STAR Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The transversity distribution h1(x), which describes the transverse spin structure of quarks inside of transversely polarized protons, is only accessible through channels that couple h1(x) to another chiral odd distribution, such as the Collins fragmentation function (ΔD(z,kT)). Significant Collins asymmetries of charged pions have been observed in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) data. These SIDIS asymmetries combined with e+e- process asymmetries from Belle have allowed for the extraction of h1(x) and ΔD(z ,kT). Uncertainties on h1(x) remain large due to the limited statistics and kinematic reach of the available data. In transversely polarized hadronic collisions, Collins asymmetries may be isolated and extracted by measuring the spin dependent azimuthal distributions of charged pions in jets. This presentation will show the first significant midrapditiy (| η | < 1) Collins asymmetries measured in √{ s} = 200 and 500 GeV p↑ p collisions. These results access higher momentum scales than the existing SIDIS data and will allow for a comprehensive study of evolution and factorization of the Collins channel.

  18. First Observation of Collins Asymmetries for Charged Pions in Jets in p↑ p Collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Kevin; STAR Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The transversity distribution (h1 x), which describes the transverse polarization of quarks in transversely polarized protons, is only accessible through channels that couple h1 x to another chiral odd distribution, such as the Collins fragmentation function (ΔN D z ,kT). Significant Collins asymmetries of charged pions have been observed in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) data. These SIDIS asymmetries combined with e+e- process asymmetries from Belle and BaBar have allowed for the extraction of h1 x and ΔN D z ,kT . Uncertainties on h1 x remain large due to the limited statistics and kinematic reach of the available data. In transversely polarized hadronic collisions, Collins asymmetries may be isolated and extracted by measuring the spin dependent azimuthal distributions of charged pions in jets. This presentation will show the first observation of midrapditiy (| η | < 1) Collins asymmetries measured in √{ s} = 200 and 500 GeV p↑ p collisions. These results access higher momentum scales than the existing SIDIS data and will allow for a comprehensive study of evolution and factorization of the Collins channel.

  19. The velocity dependence of X-ray emission due to Charge Exchange: Applications in the Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, Renata; Lyons, David; Mullen, Patrick; Shelton, Robin L.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Schultz, David R.

    2016-04-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere [1], planetary exospheres [2], and supernova remnants [3,4]. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly-excited, high charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays.To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate high-energy astrophysical environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross-sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities. Collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2 are considered. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant will be shown as an example with ion velocity dependence.[1] Henley, D. B. & Shelton, R. L. 2010, ApJSS, 187, 388[2] Dennerl, K. et al. 2002, A&A 386, 319[3] Katsuda, S. et al. 2011, ApJ 730 24[4] Cumbee, R. S. et al. 2014, ApJ 787 L31

  20. A review of studies on ion thruster beam and charge-exchange plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Various experimental and analytical studies of the primary beam and charge-exchange plasmas of ion thrusters are reviewed. The history of plasma beam research is recounted, emphasizing experiments on beam neutralization, expansion of the beam, and determination of beam parameters such as electron temperature, plasma density, and plasma potential. The development of modern electron bombardment ion thrusters is treated, detailing experimental results. Studies on charge-exchange plasma are discussed, showing results such as the relationship between neutralizer emission current and plasma beam potential, ion energies as a function of neutralizer bias, charge-exchange ion current collected by an axially moving Faraday cup-RPA for 8-cm and 30-cm ion thrusters, beam density and potential data from a 15-cm ion thruster, and charge-exchange ion flow around a 30-cm thruster. A 20-cm thruster electrical configuration is depicted and facility effects are discussed. Finally, plasma modeling is covered in detail for plasma beam and charge-exchange plasma.

  1. Charge Transfer in Collisions of Lithium Ions with Beryllium through Oxygen Ions at Energies Below 32 keV/amu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, S.; Shirai, T.; Shimakura, N.

    The charge transfer cross sections of Li+ (1s2) ions in collisions with B5+ , C6+, N5+ (1s2), and O6+ (1s2) ions, and of Li2+ (1s) ions with Be+ (1s22s) ions are calculated in the collision energy range of 0.02-32 keV/amu by using a semi-classical close-coupling method with molecular-state expansion.

  2. Hydrodynamics with chiral anomaly and charge separation in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yi; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    Matter with chiral fermions is microscopically described by theory with quantum anomaly and macroscopically described (at low energy) by anomalous hydrodynamics. For such systems in the presence of external magnetic field and chirality imbalance, a charge current is generated along the magnetic field direction - a phenomenon known as the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME). The quark-gluon plasma created in relativistic heavy ion collisions provides an (approximate) example, for which the CME predicts a charge separation perpendicular to the collisional reaction plane. Charge correlation measurements designed for the search of such signal have been done at RHIC and the LHC for which the interpretations, however, remain unclear due to contamination by background effects that are collective flow driven, theoretically poorly constrained, and experimentally hard to separate. Using anomalous (and viscous) hydrodynamic simulations, we make a first attempt at quantifying contributions to observed charge correlations from both CME and background effects in one and same framework. The implications for the search of CME are discussed.

  3. Polarization effects in low-energy electron-CH sub 4 elastic collisions in an exact exchange treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.; Weatherford, C.A. ); Thompson, D.G.; McNaughten, P. )

    1989-12-01

    We have investigated the polarization effects in very-low-energy (below 1 eV) electron- CH{sub 4} collisions in an exact-exchange treatment. The two models of the parameter-free polarization potential are employed; one, the {ital V}{sub pol}{sup JT} potential, introduced by Jain and Thompson (J. Phys. B 15, L631 (1982)), is based on an approximate polarized-orbital method, and two, the correlation-polarization potential {ital V}{sub pol}{sup CP}, first proposed by O'Connel and Lane (Phys. Rev. A 27, 1893 (1983)), is given as a simple analytic form in terms of the charge density of the target. In this rather very low-energy region, the polarization effects play a decisive role, particularly in creating structure in the differential cross section (DCS) and producing the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in the total cross section. Our DCS at 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 eV are compared with recent measurements. We found that a local parameter-free approximation for the polarization potential is quite successful if it is determined under the polarized-orbital-type technique rather than based on the correlation-polarization approach.

  4. Pseudorapidity distribution of charged hadrons in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Kamel, M.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Mohammed, Y.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The pseudorapidity distribution of charged hadrons in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV is measured using a data sample obtained with the CMS detector, operated at zero magnetic field, at the CERN LHC. The yield of primary charged long-lived hadrons produced in inelastic pp collisions is determined in the central region of the CMS pixel detector (| η | < 2) using both hit pairs and reconstructed tracks. For central pseudorapidities (| η | < 0.5), the charged-hadron multiplicity density is dNch / dη | | η | < 0.5 = 5.49 ± 0.01(stat) ± 0.17(syst), a value obtained by combining the two methods. The result is compared to predictions from Monte Carlo event generators and to similar measurements made at lower collision energies.

  5. Charged-Particle Pseudorapidity Density Distributions from Au+Au Collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2001-09-01

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density dNch/dη has been measured for Au+Au collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV at RHIC, using the PHOBOS apparatus. The total number of charged particles produced for the 3% most-central Au+Au collisions for \\|η\\|<=5.4 is found to be 4200+/-470. The evolution of dNch/dη with centrality is discussed, and compared to model calculations and to data from proton-induced collisions. The data show an enhancement in charged-particle production at midrapidity, while in the fragmentation regions, the results are consistent with expectations from pp and pA scattering.

  6. A measurement of charged particle ratios at high transverse momentum in an ultra-relativistic heavy ion collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, Matthew Allen

    Ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions taking place at RHIC are thought to create conditions favorable for the creation of a quark gluon plasma (QGP). It is the main goal of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to create and provide a definitive characterization of the quark-gluon plasma believed to be created in high energy heavy ion collisions. A determination of the initial conditions leading to the formation of a QGP is an important part of understanding its properties. Information about the evolution of the system formed during a heavy ion collision can be obtained by investigating charged particle ratios. The charged pion and kaon particle ratios as well as the anti-proton-to-proton ratio have been measured at high transverse momentum using a RICH detector, Comparisons have been made to previous measurements made with smaller collision systems and are found to be consistent with expectations derived from these smaller systems. The transverse momentum dependence of the charged particle ratios is consistent with being constant over the range measured, 0.75 < p⊥[GeV/c] < 2.5 and can be described within a thermodynamical model of the collision and is an indication that chemical equilibrium was achieved over the course of the collision.

  7. Removal of charged micropollutants from water by ion-exchange polymers -- effects of competing electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Bäuerlein, Patrick S; Ter Laak, Thomas L; Hofman-Caris, Roberta C H M; de Voogt, Pim; Droge, Steven T J

    2012-10-15

    A wide variety of environmental compounds of concern, e.g. pharmaceuticals or illicit drugs, are acids or bases that may predominantly be present as charged species in drinking water sources. These charged micropollutants may prove difficult to remove by currently used water treatment steps (e.g. UV/H(2)O(2), activated carbon (AC) or membranes). We studied the sorption affinity of some ionic organic compounds to both AC and different charged polymeric materials. Ion-exchange polymers may be effective as additional extraction phases in water treatment, because sorption of all charged compounds to oppositely charged polymers was stronger than to AC, especially for the double-charged cation metformin. Tested below 1% of the polymer ion-exchange capacity, the sorption affinity of charged micropollutants is nonlinear and depends on the composition of the aqueous medium. Whereas oppositely charged electrolytes do not impact sorption of organic ions, equally charged electrolytes do influence sorption indicating ion-exchange (IE) to be the main sorption mechanism. For the tested polymers, a tenfold increased salt concentration lowered the IE-sorption affinity by a factor two. Different electrolytes affect IE with organic ions in a similar way as inorganic ions on IE-resins, and no clear differences in this trend were observed between the sulphonated and the carboxylated cation-exchanger. Sorption of organic cations is five fold less in Ca(2+) solutions compared to similar concentrations of Na(+), while that of anionic compounds is three fold weaker in SO(4)(2-) solutions compared to equal concentrations of Cl(-). PMID:22818952

  8. The diurnal and solar cycle variation of the charge exchange induced hydrogen escape flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of ion temperature and density data at specific points and times in June 1969 provided by the OGO 6 satellite, and altitude profiles of the ion and electron temperature and concentration provided by the Arecibo radar facility over the period February 1972-April 1974, the diurnal and solar cycle variation of the charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux was investigated. It was calculated that for low to moderate solar activity at Arecibo, the diurnal ratio of the maximum-to-minimum charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux was approximately 6 with a peak around noon and a minimum somewhere between 0100 and 0300 h LT. This study of a limited amount of OGO 6 and Arecibo data seems to indicate that the charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux increases as the F(10.7) flux increases for low to moderate solar activity.

  9. The influence of charge exchange on the velocity distribution of hydrogen in the Venus exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Richard R., Jr.; Tinsley, Brian A.

    1986-01-01

    The simulation of the exosphere of Venus by a Monte Carlo technique has been extended to provide velocity distribution profiles that can be used with radiative transfer simulation to model the Lyman-alpha emission seen by spacecraft. The line profiles show a narrow core due to the exobase thermal source of hydrogen superimposed on the broad profile of hot hydrogen from charge exchange with hot ions in the nighttime ionosphere. Nightside radial profiles show long tails of upward flowing, escaping atoms. There are some downward and lateral superescape signatures, because the charge exchange source extends well above the exobase. At higher altitudes, flattening and even shallow central valleys appear in the transverse profiles. The planetary average escape rate due to charge exchange was found to be 2.8 x 10 to the 7th/sq cm per s, which is several times larger than escape rates for other candidate mechanisms.

  10. Ion temperatures in HIP-1 and SUMMA from charge-exchange neutral optical emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures were obtained from observations of the H sub alpha, D sub alpha, and He 587.6 nm lines emitted from hydrogen, deuterium, and helium plasmas in the SUMMA and HIP-1 mirror devices at Lewis Research Center. Steady state discharges were formed by applying a radially inward dc electric field between cylindrical or annular anodes and hollow cathodes located at the peaks of the mirrors. The ion temperatures were found from the Doppler broadening of the charge-exchange components of spectral lines. A statistical method was developed for obtaining scaling relations of ion temperature as a function of current, voltage, and magnetic flux density. Derivations are given that take into account triangular monochromator slit functions, loss cones, and superimposed charge-exchange processes. In addition, the Doppler broadening was found to be sensitive to the influence of drift on charge-exchange cross section. The effects of finite ion-cyclotron radius, cascading, and delayed emission are reviewed.

  11. Atomic hydrogen escape rate due to charge exchange with hot plasmaspheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data on ion and electron temperatures and concentrations to several thousand kilometers of altitude were obtained from the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite for 1974 and to 850 km from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements. These data were used to normalize diffusive equilibrium profiles. From these profiles and by using the neutral atmospheric model of Jacchia (1971) and a new hydrogen model, the charge-exchange-induced neutral hydrogen escape fluxes for equatorial and middle latitudes were calculated. The data confirm earlier estimates that the charge exchange loss is more important than Jeans escape for the earth. It is also found that inside the plasmapause this charge exchange process with hot plasmapheric ions is the major production and loss process for the satellite population in the hydrogen geocorona.

  12. Pion single charge exchange in three body nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to present new experimental information about modifications to the pion-nucleon single charge exchange interaction, {pi}{sup +}n {yields}{pi}{sup 0} p or {pi}{sup {minus}} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}n, due to the presence of other nucleons. The results of two experimental studies of pion single charge exchange in the three nucleon system near the {triangle}-resonance are presented. Both of these experiments were performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), a division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Each explored different aspects of pion single charge exchange in three body nuclei--{sup 3}He and {sup 3}H. Since the nuclear wavefunctions of the three nucleon systems are believed to be well understood, it should be possible to perform theoretical calculations of pion interactions with this system and compare their predictions with the experimental results.

  13. Experimental discovery of charge-exchange-caused dips in spectral lines from laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Leboucher-Dalimier, E; Oks, E; Dufour, E; Sauvan, P; Angelo, P; Schott, R; Poquerusse, A

    2001-12-01

    We report the first experimental observation of charge-exchange-caused dips (also called x dips) in spectral lines of multicharged ions in laser-produced plasmas. Specifically, in the process of a laser irradiation of targets made out of aluminum carbide, we observed two x dips in the Ly(gamma) line of Al XIII perturbed by fully stripped carbon. From the practical point of view, this opens up a way to experimentally produce not-yet-available fundamental data on charge exchange between multicharged ions, virtually inaccessible by other experimental methods. From the theoretical viewpoint, the results are important because the x dips are the only one signature of charge exchange in profiles of spectral lines emitted by plasmas and they are the only one quasimolecular phenomenon that could be observed at relatively "low" densities of laser-produced plasmas. PMID:11736229

  14. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-04-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  15. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27126470

  16. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  17. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.-M. Rax

    2002-01-18

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation.

  18. Interaction of a solar array with an ion thruster due to the charge-exchange plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    The generation of a charge exchange plasma by a thruster, the transport of this plasma to the solar array, and the interaction of the solar array with the plasma after it arrives are all described. The generation of this plasma is described accurately from thruster geometry and operating conditions. The transport of the charge exchange plasma was studied experimentally with a 15 cm thruster. A model was developed for simple thruster array configurations. A variety of experiments were surveyed for the interaction of the plasma at the solar array.

  19. Fast ion charge exchange spectroscopy adapted for tangential viewing geometry in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.; Osakabe, M.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Goto, M.; Isobe, M.; Toi, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Okamura, S.; Murakami, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Ogawa, K.

    2010-10-15

    A tangential Fast Ion Charge eXchange Spectroscopy is newly applied on a Large Helical Device (LHD) for co/countercirculating fast ions, which are produced by high energy tangential negative-ion based neutral beam injection. With this new observation geometry, both the tangential-neutral beam (NB) and a low-energy radial-NB based on positive ions can be utilized as probe beams of the measurement. We have successfully observed Doppler-shifted H-alpha lights due to the charge exchange process between the probing NB and circulating hydrogen ions of around 100 keV in LHD plasmas.

  20. Charge exchange of laser-produced ions in a pulsed gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Antonov, V. M.; Boyarintsev, E. L.; Posukh, V. G.; Melekhov, A. V.

    2007-10-01

    Results of an experiment on the interaction of laser-produced plasma with a pulsed gas jet are reported. A resonant charge-exchange pumping of the n=3 level of the C3+ ion was observed. A spatial structure of the region of intensive interaction was obtained by a short time imaging of filtered plasma radiation. According to independent probe measurements, the interaction was realized at densities of ions and gas particles in excess of 1016 cm-3. The obtained data provide a prospect for future experiments on laser gain in the EUV spectral range based on charge-exchange pumping of the C5+ ion.

  1. Simulation of charge exchange plasma propagation near an ion thruster propelled spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Kaufman, H. R.; Winder, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    A model describing the charge exchange plasma and its propagation is discussed, along with a computer code based on the model. The geometry of an idealized spacecraft having an ion thruster is outlined, with attention given to the assumptions used in modeling the ion beam. Also presented is the distribution function describing charge exchange production. The barometric equation is used in relating the variation in plasma potential to the variation in plasma density. The numerical methods and approximations employed in the calculations are discussed, and comparisons are made between the computer simulation and experimental data. An analytical solution of a simple configuration is also used in verifying the model.

  2. Measurement of anomalously strong emission from the 1s-9p transition in the spectrum of H-like phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Leutenegger, M A; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S

    2010-08-01

    We have measured K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized argon and phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen at low collision energy in an electron beam ion trap using an x-ray calorimeter array with ∼6  eV resolution. We find that the emission at the high end of the Lyman series is greater by a factor of 2 for phosphorus than for argon, even though the measurement was performed concurrently and the atomic numbers are similar. This does not agree with current theoretical models and deviates from the trend observed in previous measurements. PMID:20867978

  3. Measurement of Anomalously Strong Emission from the 1s-9p Transition in the Spectrum of H-like Phosphorus Following Charge Exchange with Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized argon and phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen at low collision energy in an electron beam ion trap using an x-ray calorimeter array with approx.6 eV resolution. We find that the emission at the high-end of the Lyman series is greater by a factor of two for phosphorus than for argon, even though the measurement was performed concurrently and the atomic numbers are similar. This does not agree with current theoretical models and deviates from the trend observed in previous measurements.

  4. Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charge Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, B.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed research uses the electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study the X-ray emission from charge-exchange recombination of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data fill a void in the existing experimental and theoretical data and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the Galactic Ridge, solar and stellar winds, the Galactic Center, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae.

  5. Stopping power in insulators and metals without charge exchange.

    PubMed

    Møller, S P; Csete, A; Ichioka, T; Knudsen, H; Uggerhøj, U I; Andersen, H H

    2004-07-23

    The slowing-down process of pointlike charged particles in matter has been investigated by measuring the stopping power for antiprotons in materials of qualitatively very different nature. Whereas the velocity-proportional stopping power observed for metal-like targets such as aluminum over a wide energy range of 1-50 keV is in agreement with expectations, it is surprising that the same velocity dependence is seen for a large band-gap insulator such as LiF. The validity of these observations is supported by several measurements with protons and several checks of the target properties. The observations call for both a qualitative explanation and a quantitative theoretical model. PMID:15323754

  6. Unfolding of event-by-event net-charge distributions in heavy-ion collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, P.; Mishra, D. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohanty, B.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss a method to obtain the true event-by-event net-charge multiplicity distributions from a corresponding measured distribution which is subjected to detector effects such as finite particle counting efficiency. The approach is based on the Bayes method for the unfolding of distributions. We are able to faithfully unfold back the measured distributions to match their corresponding true distributions obtained for a widely varying underlying particle production mechanism, beam energy and collision centrality. Particularly the mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis and their products and ratios of net-charge distributions from the event generators are shown to be successfully unfolded from the measured distributions constructed to mimic a real experimental distribution. We demonstrate the necessity to account for detector effects before associating the higher moments of net-charge distributions with physical quantities or phenomena. The advantage of this approach is that one need not construct new observables to cancel out detector effects which lose their ability to be connected to physical quantities calculable in standard theories.

  7. Study of the production of charged pions, kaons, and protons in pPb collisions at 5.02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Van der Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Dildick, S.; Garcia, G.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Selvaggi, M.; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Martins Junior, M. Correa; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. 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C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Tikvica, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. 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C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. 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H.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Martschei, D.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Saxena, P.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Mehdiabadi, S. Paktinat; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Kanishchev, F. K.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Mazza, G.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Son, D. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Grigelionis, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de La Cruz, I. Heredia; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Linares, E. Casimiro; Pineda, A. Morelos; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Butt, J.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; Da Cruz E Silva, C. Beirão; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Nguyen, F.; Antunes, J. Rodrigues; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Korotkikh, V.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Vardanyan, I.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcarez Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Llatas, M. Chamizo; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Lopez, O. Gonzalez; Lopez, S. Goy; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pelayo, J. Puerta; Quinario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzales Caballero, I.; Iglesias, L. Lloret; Gomez, J. Piedra; Cifuentes, J. A. Brochero; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Campderros, J. Duarte; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Sanchez, F. J. Munoz; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Cortabitarte, R. Vilar; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bendavid, J.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Perez, J. A. Coarasa; Colafranceschi, S.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y.-J.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orsini, L.; Cortezon, E. Palencia; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; del Arbol, P. Martinez Ruiz; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Kilminster, B.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Taroni, S.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wang, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Bahtiyar, H.; Barlas, E.; Cankocak, K.; Günaydin, Y. O.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Yücel, M.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Bryer, A. Guneratne; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Felcini, M.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Takasugi, E.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Jandir, P.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Kcira, D.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Lopez, E. Luiggi; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Outschoorn, V. I. Martinez; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Ratnikova, N.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Lacroix, F.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Suarez, R. Gonzalez; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Wan, Z.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alagoz, E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Mozer, M. U.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2014-06-01

    Spectra of identified charged hadrons are measured in pPb collisions with the CMS detector at the LHC at . Charged pions, kaons, and protons in the transverse-momentum range -1.7 and laboratory rapidity are identified via their energy loss in the silicon tracker. The average increases with particle mass and the charged multiplicity of the event. The increase of the average with charged multiplicity is greater for heavier hadrons. Comparisons to Monte Carlo event generators reveal that Epos Lhc, which incorporates additional hydrodynamic evolution of the created system, is able to reproduce most of the data features, unlike Hijing and Ampt. The spectra and integrated yields are also compared to those measured in pp and PbPb collisions at various energies. The average transverse momentum and particle ratio measurements indicate that particle production at LHC energies is strongly correlated with event particle multiplicity.

  8. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in d+Au and p+p collisions at {\\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = \\rm {200 \\;GeV} }

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouicer, Rachid; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wyslouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-08-01

    The measured pseudorapidity distributions of primary charged particles are presented for d+Au and p+p collisions at {\\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = \\rm {200\\;GeV} } over a wide pseudorapidity range of |eegr|les 5.4. The results for d+Au collisions are presented for minimum-bias events and as a function of collision centrality. The measurements for p+p collisions are shown for minimum-bias events. The ratio of the charged particle multiplicity in d+Au and p+A collisions relative to that for inelastic p+p collisions is found to depend only on langNpartrang, and it is remarkably independent of collision energy and system mass. The deuteron and gold fragmentation regions in d+Au collisions are in good agreement with proton nucleus data at lower energies.

  9. Nitroxide spin exchange due to re-encounter collisions in a series of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kurban, Mark R; Peric, Miroslav; Bales, Barney L

    2008-08-14

    Bimolecular collisions between perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-l-oxyl molecules in three alkanes have been studied by measuring the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectral changes induced by spin exchange. We define an "encounter" to be a first-time collision followed by a series of re-encounters prior to the diffusing pair's escaping each other's presence. The present work stems from a recent proposal [B. L. Bales et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 9086 (2003)] that an unexpected linear dependence of the spin-exchange-induced EPR line shifts on spin-exchange frequency can be explained by re-encounters of the same probe pair during one encounter. By employing nonlinear least-squares fitting, full use of the information available from the spectral changes allows us to study encounters and re-encounters separately. The encounter rate constants appear to be dominated by hydrodynamic forces, forming a common curve for hexane, decane, and hexadecane when plotted against T/eta, where eta is the shear viscosity. Unexpectedly, encounters are not dependent on the ratio mu = a/a(s), where a and a(s) are the van der Waals radii of the nitroxide probe and the solvent, respectively. It is argued that the near coincidence of the resulting encounter rate constant with the hydrodynamic prediction is likely due to a near cancellation of terms in the general diffusion coefficient. Thus, the semblance of hydrodynamic behavior is coincidental rather than intrinsic. In contrast, the mean times between re-encounters do depend on the relative sizes of probe and solvent. For hexane at lower temperatures, the Stokes-Einstein equation apparently describes re-encounters well; however, at higher temperatures and for decane and hexadecane, departures from the hydrodynamic prediction become larger as mu becomes smaller. This is in qualitative agreement with the theory of microscopic diffusion of Hynes et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 70, 1456 (1979)]. These departures are well

  10. Nitroxide spin exchange due to re-encounter collisions in a series of n-alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Kurban, Mark R.; Peric, Miroslav; Bales, Barney L.

    2008-01-01

    Bimolecular collisions between perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-l-oxyl molecules in three alkanes have been studied by measuring the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectral changes induced by spin exchange. We define an “encounter” to be a first-time collision followed by a series of re-encounters prior to the diffusing pair’s escaping each other’s presence. The present work stems from a recent proposal [B. L. Bales , J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 9086 (2003)] that an unexpected linear dependence of the spin-exchange-induced EPR line shifts on spin-exchange frequency can be explained by re-encounters of the same probe pair during one encounter. By employing nonlinear least-squares fitting, full use of the information available from the spectral changes allows us to study encounters and re-encounters separately. The encounter rate constants appear to be dominated by hydrodynamic forces, forming a common curve for hexane, decane, and hexadecane when plotted against T∕η, where η is the shear viscosity. Unexpectedly, encounters are not dependent on the ratio μ=a∕as, where a and as are the van der Waals radii of the nitroxide probe and the solvent, respectively. It is argued that the near coincidence of the resulting encounter rate constant with the hydrodynamic prediction is likely due to a near cancellation of terms in the general diffusion coefficient. Thus, the semblance of hydrodynamic behavior is coincidental rather than intrinsic. In contrast, the mean times between re-encounters do depend on the relative sizes of probe and solvent. For hexane at lower temperatures, the Stokes–Einstein equation apparently describes re-encounters well; however, at higher temperatures and for decane and hexadecane, departures from the hydrodynamic prediction become larger as μ becomes smaller. This is in qualitative agreement with the theory of microscopic diffusion of Hynes [J. Chem. Phys. 70, 1456 (1979)]. These departures are well correlated