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Sample records for charge radius change

  1. Proton radius of 14Be from measurement of charge-changing cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, S.; Tanihata, I.; Kanungo, R.; Estradé, A.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Neff, T.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Suzuki, Y.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Vargas, J.; Winfield, J. S.; Weick, H.

    2014-10-01

    The charge-changing cross sections of {}^{7,9-12,14}Be have been measured at 900AMeV on a carbon target. These cross sections are discussed both in terms of a geometrical and a Glauber model. From several different analyses of the cross sections, the proton distribution radius (proton radius) of {}^{14}Be is determined for the first time to be 2.41 ± 0.04 fm. A large difference in the proton and neutron radii is found. The proton radii are compared to the results of fermionic molecular dynamics (FMD) and antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) calculations.

  2. Proton Radius of 14Be from Measurement of Charge-Changing Cross Sections1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, S.; Tanihata, I.; Kanungo, R.; Estradé, A.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Neff, T.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Vargas, J.; Winfield, J. S.; Weick, H.

    Charge-changing cross sections for 7,9-12,14Be have been measured at ˜900A MeV on a carbon target. These cross sections are discussed both in terms of a geometrical and a Glauber model. From several different analyses of the cross sections, the proton distribution radius (proton radius) of 14Be was determined for the first time to be 2.41 ± 0.04 fm. A large difference in the proton and neutron radii is found. The charge-changing cross sections and the proton distribution radii are compared to the results of fermionic molecular dynamics (FMD) and antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) under the Glauber model.

  3. Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.; Gao, H.

    2016-03-01

    The puzzle of proton charge radius was recently raised by the measurement of muonic hydrogen Lamb shift at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), whose results were seven standard deviations smaller than the CODATA recommended value. To investigate this discrepancy, the PRad experiment was proposed and approved at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The experiment will extract the proton charge radius with a sub-percent accuracy by measuring the cross-sections of unpolarized electronproton elastic scattering in an unprecedented low Q2 region (2×10-4 GeV2/c2).

  4. Solar radius change between 1925 and 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S.; Dunham, D. W.; Dunham, J. B.; Fiala, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    From an analysis of numerous reports from different locations on the duration of totality of the solar eclipses on January 24, 1925, and February 26, 1979, it is found that the solar radius at the earlier date was 0.5 arcsec (or 375 km) larger than at the later date. The correction to the standard solar radius found for each eclipse is different when different subsets of the observations are used (for example, edge of path of totality timings compared with central timings). This is seen as suggesting the existence of systematic inaccuracies in our knowledge of the lunar figure. The differences between the corrections for both eclipses, however, are very similar for all subsets considered, indicating that changes of the solar size may be reliably inferred despite the existence of the lunar figure errors so long as there is proper consideration of the distribution of the observations. These results are regarded as strong evidence in support of the occurrence of solar radius changes on shorter than evolutionary time scales.

  5. Experimental bound on the charge radius of the electron neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.; Hausamann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Lu, X.; Mahler, H.J.; Potter, M.E.; Wang, K.C. ); Bowles, T.J.; Burman, R.L.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Frank, J.S.; Piasetzky, E.; Sandberg, V.D. ); Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A limit on the electron-neutrino charge radius {vert bar}{ital r}{vert bar} is derived from a measurement of the weak-neutral-current vector coupling constant {ital g}{sub {ital V}} obtained in electron-neutrino electron elastic scattering. The 90%-confidence interval for {ital g}{sub {ital V}} is {minus}0.177{lt}{ital g}{sub {ital V}}{lt}0.187, which for sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub {ital W}}=0.227 implies that the {nu}{sub {ital e}} mean-square charge radius is in the range {minus}2.74{times}10{sup {minus}32}{lt}{l angle}{ital r}{sup 2}{r angle}{lt}4.88{times}10{sup {minus}32} cm{sup 2}, or simply {vert bar}{ital r}{vert bar}{lt}2.2{times}10{sup {minus}16} cm. This is the first experimental bound on the {nu}{sub {ital e}} charge radius, and is the same order of magnitude as bounds for {nu}{sub {mu}} structure.

  6. Neutron charge radius and the neutron electric form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, T. R.; Crawford, C. B.

    2011-05-15

    For nearly forty years, the Galster parametrization has been employed to fit existing data for the neutron electric form factor, G{sub E}{sup n}, vs the square of the four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}. Typically this parametrization is constrained to be consistent with experimental data for the neutron charge radius. However, we find that the Galster form does not have sufficient freedom to accommodate reasonable values of the radius without constraining or compromising the fit. In addition, the G{sub E}{sup n} data are now at sufficient precision to motivate a two-parameter fit (or three parameters if we include thermal neutron data). Here we present a modified form of a two-dipole parametrization that allows this freedom and fits both G{sub E}{sup n} (including recent data at both low and high four-momentum transfer) and the charge radius well with simple, well-defined parameters. Analysis reveals that the Galster form is essentially a two-parameter approximation to the two-dipole form but becomes degenerate if we try to extend it naturally to three parameters.

  7. Pion loop contribution to the electromagnetic pion charge radius

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Bender, A.; Alkofer, R.

    1995-08-01

    There is a widely held misconception, based on a misrepresentation of the application of chiral perturbation theory, that the electromagnetic structure of the pion is dominated by the pion`s own pion-cloud. To clarify this the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), was used to calculate the electromagnetic charge radius of the pion. In this calculation the contributions from the quark core and pion loop were identified and compared. It was shown explicitly that the divergence of the charge radius in the chiral limit is due solely to the pion loop and that, at the physical value of the pion mass, this loop contributes less than 15% {l_angle}r{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{r_angle}; i.e. the quark core is the dominant determining characteristic for the pion. This suggests that quark-based models that fail to reproduce the m{sub {pi}} divergence of {l_angle}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{r_angle} nevertheless incorporate the dominant characteristic of the pion: its quark core. The result`s studylend further support to the contention that, away from resonances, the dominant determining characteristic of kinematic and dynamical properties of hadrons is their quark core. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication.

  8. Evaluation of the Proton Charge Radius from Electron–Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John; Sick, Ingo

    2015-09-15

    In light of the proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between measurements of the proton charge radius from muonic hydrogen and those from electronic hydrogen and electron–proton (e–p) scattering measurements, we re-examine the charge radius extractions from electron scattering measurements. We provide a recommended value for the proton root-mean-square charge radius, r{sub E} = 0.879 ± 0.011 fm, based on a global examination of elastic e–p scattering data. The uncertainties include contributions to account for tension between different data sets and inconsistencies between radii using different extraction procedures.

  9. Effective charge and effective radius of water droplet in dropwise cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlov, A. V.; Romanyuk, S. N.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2013-02-15

    A particle with large electric charge Z (Z Much-Greater-Than 1) and radius R{sub 0} inserted into plasma is surrounded by a plasma shell, which is stable to weak and short-term external exposures. As a result, during experiments the particle can reveal an effective charge Z* lower than the true one (Z*{<=} Z), and an effective radius R* larger than the true one (R*{>=} R{sub 0}). The effective electric charge and the effective radius of a water droplet in a dropwise cluster have been calculated using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It has been recognized that these parameters are not the function of a droplet's true charge, but are the function of a droplet's true size and the Debye's radius of the plasma. Experimental data on the droplet properties in a dropwise cluster have been explained.

  10. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; Rakhman, A.; Souder, P. A.; Dalton, M. M.; Liyanage, N.; Paschke, K. D.; Saenboonruang, K.; Silwal, R.; et al

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor FW(more » $$\\bar{q}$$), the weak charge radius RW, and the point neutron radius Rn, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $$\\bar{q}$$ = 0.475 fm-1. We find FW($$\\bar{q}$$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from FW($$\\bar{q}$$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in RW from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius Rn = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from RW. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find Rn to be slightly smaller than RW because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where Rp is the point proton radius.« less

  11. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi

    2013-11-01

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 {+-} 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7{sigma} smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these "electronic" determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup -4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  12. An Examination of Proton Charge Radius Extractions from e–p Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John

    2015-09-15

    A detailed examination of issues associated with proton radius extractions from elastic electron–proton scattering experiments is presented. Sources of systematic uncertainty and model dependence in the extractions are discussed, with an emphasis on how these may impact the proton charge and magnetic radii. A comparison of recent Mainz data to previous world data is presented, highlighting the difference in treatment of systematic uncertainties as well as tension between different data sets. We find several issues that suggest that larger uncertainties than previously quoted may be appropriate, but do not find any corrections which would resolve the proton radius puzzle.

  13. An Examination of Proton Charge Radius Extractions from e-p Scattering Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrington, John

    2015-09-01

    A detailed examination of issues associated with proton radius extractions from elastic electron-proton scattering experiments is presented. Sources of systematic uncertainty and model dependence in the extractions are discussed, with an emphasis on how these may impact the proton charge and magnetic radii. A comparison of recent Mainz data to previous world data is presented, highlighting the difference in treatment of systematic uncertainties as well as tension between different data sets. We find several issues that suggest that larger uncertainties than previously quoted may be appropriate, but do not find any corrections which would resolve the proton radius puzzle.

  14. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; Rakhman, A.; Souder, P. A.; Dalton, M. M.; Liyanage, N.; Paschke, K. D.; Saenboonruang, K.; Silwal, R.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Quinn, B.; Kumar, K. S.; McNulty, D.; Mercado, L.; Riordan, S.; Wexler, J.; Michaels, R. W.; Urciuoli, G. M.

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor FW($\\bar{q}$), the weak charge radius RW, and the point neutron radius Rn, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $\\bar{q}$ = 0.475 fm-1. We find FW($\\bar{q}$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from FW($\\bar{q}$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in RW from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius Rn = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from RW. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find Rn to be slightly smaller than RW because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where Rp is the point proton radius.

  15. Model-independent extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Richard J.; Paz, Gil

    2010-12-01

    Constraints from analyticity are combined with experimental electron-proton scattering data to determine the proton charge radius. In contrast to previous determinations, we provide a systematic procedure for analyzing arbitrary data without model-dependent assumptions on the form-factor shape. We also investigate the impact of including electron-neutron scattering data, and {pi}{pi}{yields}NN data. Using representative data sets we find r{sub E}{sup p}=0.870{+-}0.023{+-}0.012 fm using just proton scattering data; r{sub E}{sup p}=0.880{sub -0.020}{sup +0.017{+-}}0.007 fm adding neutron data; and r{sub E}{sup p}=0.871{+-}0.009{+-}0.002{+-}0.002 fm adding {pi}{pi} data. The analysis can be readily extended to other nucleon form factors and derived observables.

  16. Determination of the proton charge radius from elastic electron-proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbatsch, Marko; Hessels, Eric A.

    2016-05-01

    Precisely measured electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections are reanalyzed to evaluate their strength for determining the rms charge radius (RE) of the proton. More than half of the cross sections at lowest Q2 are fit using two single-parameter form-factor models, with the first based on a dipole parametrization, and the second on a linear fit to a conformal-mapping variable. These low-Q2 fits extrapolate the slope of the form factor to Q2 = 0 and determine RE values of approximately 0.84 and 0.89 fm, respectively. Fits spanning all Q2, in which the single constants are replaced with cubic splines at larger Q2, lead to similar results for RE. We conclude that the scattering data are consistent with RE ranging from at least 0.84 to 0.89 fm, and therefore is consistent with both of the discrepant determinations of RE made using muonic and electronic hydrogen-atom spectroscopy. NSERC Canada, Canada Research Chair Program.

  17. Sounding the Charge for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Brooke

    2011-01-01

    Lessons emerging now from successful schools have much to teach us about the practices of dynamic leaders. But if leaders can't talk about the what and the why of those practices in ways that inspire their staffs to action, they may change programs or policies, but they'll never change people. There are hard-charging school and district leaders…

  18. Effects of changes in convective efficiency on the solar radius and luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    A sequence of solar models has been constructed in order to investigate the sensitivity of the solar radius and luminosity to small changes in the ratio alpha of the mixing length lambda to the pressure-scale height Hp throughout the solar convective envelope. The basic procedure for determining this sensitivity was to impose a perturbation in alpha within the convective envelope and then to follow the resulting changes in the solar radius delta R and luminosity delta L for the next 10 to the 6th power yrs. These calculations gave the following results. (1) A perturbation in alpha produces immediate changes in the solar radius and luminosity. Initially delta L and delta alpha are related by delta L/L = 0.30 delta alpha/alpha. (2) The value of the ratio w = delta log R/delta log L is strongly time dependent. Its value just after the perturbation in alpha is 6.5 x 10 to the minus 4th power. (3) The ratio H = (delta log L) d delta log R/dt is much less time dependent and is a more suitable means for relating the changes in the solar radius and luminosity. (4) Both of these ratios imply that for any reasonable change in the solar luminosity the corresponding change in the solar radius is negligible.

  19. The role of charge and ionic radius on fission product segregation to a model UO2 grain boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Minki; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Andersson, David A.; Stanek, Christopher R.; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2013-04-01

    The segregation energies of a range of fission products in UO2 to a Σ5 symmetric tilt grain boundary have been calculated using empirical potentials and their dependency on site, charge, and ionic radius has been determined. Density functional theory calculations provide information about the detailed bonding environment around the segregates. While most of the fission products prefer to reside in sites with large free volume, there are some that form strong bonds with neighboring oxygen ions, and thus prefer sites with high oxygen coordination. This result provides insight into nuclear fuel design to enhance control of fission product retention.

  20. Epidemiology and changed surgical treatment methods for fractures of the distal radius

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The incidence of fractures of the distal radius may have changed over the last decade, and operative treatment has been commoner during that time. We investigated the incidence of fractures of the distal radius and changing trends in surgical treatment during the period 2004–2010. Patients and methods Registry data on 42,583 patients with a fracture of the distal radius from 2004 to 2010 were evaluated regarding diagnosis, age, sex, and surgical treatment. Results The crude incidence rate was 31 per 104 person-years with a bimodal distribution. After the age of 45 years, the incidence rate in women increased rapidly and leveled off first at a very high age. The incidence rate in postmenopausal women was lower than previously reported. In men, the incidence was low and it increased slowly until the age of 80 years, when it amounted to 31 per 104 person-years. The number of surgical procedures increased by more than 40% despite the fact that there was reduced incidence during the study period. In patients ≥ 18 years of age, the proportion of fractures treated with plating increased from 16% to 70% while the use of external fixation decreased by about the same amount. Interpretation The incidence rate of distal radius fractures in postmenopausal women appears to have decreased over the last few decades. There has been a shift in surgical treatment from external fixation to open reduction and plating. PMID:23594225

  1. Universal charge-radius relation for subatomic and astrophysical compact objects.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jes

    2008-04-18

    Electron-positron pair creation in supercritical electric fields limits the net charge of any static, spherical object, such as superheavy nuclei, strangelets, and Q balls, or compact stars like neutron stars, quark stars, and black holes. For radii between 4 x 10(2) and 10(4) fm the upper bound on the net charge is given by the universal relation Z=0.71R(fm), and for larger radii (measured in femtometers or kilometers) Z=7 x 10(-5)R_(2)(fm)=7 x 10(31)R_(2)(km). For objects with nuclear density the relation corresponds to Z approximately 0.7A(1/3)( (10(8)10(12)), where A is the baryon number. For some systems this universal upper bound improves existing charge limits in the literature. PMID:18518093

  2. Measurements of CP Violation and Neutral Kaon Charge Radius using K(L) --> pi+pi-e+e- Decays.

    SciTech Connect

    Golossanov, Alexander

    2005-05-01

    CP violation and K{sup 0} charge radius were measured using K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -} decays. Specifically, a unique CP-violating decay-plane asymmetry was measured along with the parameters of individual contributions to the decay invariant amplitude: (1) CP-conserving magnetic dipole direct emission form factor, (2) CP-conserving K{sup 0} charge radius transition amplitude and (3) an upper limit for the CP-violating electric dipole direct emission amplitude. The measurements were obtained from the data sample accumulated by KTeV experiment at Fermilab. KTeV had two major goals: the measurement of direct CP violation parameter Re({var_epsilon}{prime}/{var_epsilon}) and the study of rare kaon decays. The state of the art detector was constructed, commissioned, operated and maintained by an international collaboration of scientists from fourteen institutions. The K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} e{sup +}e{sup -} data was accumulated over the 1997 and 1999 running periods. During that time hundreds of billions K{sub L} decays took place in the KTeV fiducial decay region.

  3. Sharp bounds on the radius of relativistic charged spheres: Guilfoyle's stars saturate the Buchdahl-Andréasson bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, José P. S.; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2015-07-01

    Buchdahl, by imposing a few reasonable physical assumptions on matter, i.e., its density is a nonincreasing function of the radius and the fluid is a perfect fluid, and on the configuration, such as the exterior is the Schwarzschild solution, found that the radius r0 to mass m ratio of a star would obey the bound {{r}0}/m≥slant 9/4, the Buchdahl bound. He also noted that the bound was saturated by the Schwarzschild interior solution, i.e., the solution with {{ρ }m}(r)=constant, where {{ρ }m}(r) is the energy density of the matter at r, when the central central pressure blows to infinity. Generalizations of this bound in various forms have been studied. An important generalization was given by Andréasson, by including electrically charged matter and imposing a different set of conditions, namely, p+2{{p}T}≤slant {{ρ }m}, where p is the radial pressure and pT the tangential pressure. His bound is sharp and given by {{r}0}/m≥slant 9/{{(1+\\sqrt{1+3 {{q}2}/r02})}2}, the Buchdahl-Andréasson bound, with q being the total electric charge of the star. For q = 0 one recovers the Buchdahl bound. However, following Andréasson's proof, the configuration that saturates the Buchdahl bound is an uncharged shell, rather than the Schwarzschild interior solution. By extension, the configurations that saturate the electrically charged Buchdahl-Andréasson bound are charged shells. One could expect then, in turn, that there should exist an electrically charged equivalent to the interior Schwarzschild limit. We find here that this equivalent is provided by the equation {{ρ }m}(r)+{{Q}2}(r)/(8π {{r}4})=constant, where Q(r) is the electric charge at r. This equation was put forward by Cooperstock and de la Cruz, and Florides, and realized in Guilfoyle's stars. When the central pressure goes to infinity, Guilfoyle's stars are configurations that also saturate the Buchdahl-Andréasson bound. A proof in Buchdahl's manner, such that these configurations are the limiting

  4. Mercury's radius change estimates revisited using high incidence angle MESSENGER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Achille, G.; Popa, C.; Massironi, M.; Ferrari, S.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Zusi, M.; Cremonese, G.; Palumbo, P.

    2012-04-01

    Estimates of Mercury's radius decrease obtained using the amount of strain recorded by tectonics on the planet range from 0.5 km to 2 km. These latter figures appear too low with respect to the radius contraction (up to 5-6 km) predicted by the most accredited studies based on thermo-mechanical evolution models. For this reason, it has been suggested that there may be hidden strain accommodated by features yet unseen on Mercury. Indeed, as it has been already cautioned by previous studies, the identification of tectonic features on Mercury might be largely biased by the lighting geometry of the used basemaps. This limitation might have affected the results of the extrapolations for estimating the radius change. In this study, we mapped tectonic features at the terminator thus using images acquired at high sun incidence angle (>50°) that represents the optimal condition for their observation. In fact, images with long shadows enhance the topography and texture of the surface and are ideal to detect tectonic structures. This favorable illumination conditions allowed us to infer reliable measurements of spatial distribution (i.e. frequency, orientation, and areal density) of tectonic features which can be used to estimate the average contractional strain and planetary radius decrease. We digitized tectonic structures within a region extending for an area of about 12 million sq. km (~16% of planet's surface). More than 1300 tectonic lineaments were identified and interpreted to be compressional features (i.e. lobate scarps, wrinkle ridges, and high relief ridges) with a total length of more than 12300 km. Assuming that the extensional strain is negligible within the area, the average contractional strain calculated for the survey area is ~0.21-0.28% (~0.24% for θ=30°). This strain, extrapolated to the entire surface, corresponds to a contraction in radius of about 2.5-3.4 km (~2.9 km for θ=30°). Interestingly, the values of contractional strain and radius decrease

  5. Trace Element Partitioning under Crustal and Uppermost Mantle Conditions: The Influences of Ionic Radius, Cation Charge, Pressure, and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. J.; Blundy, J. D.

    2003-12-01

    The controls on partitioning of trace elements between crystals and silicate melts were initially the subject of crystal-chemical, rather than petrogenetic interest. Goldschmidt (1937) systematized his observations of elemental concentrations in minerals as a means of understanding and predicting element behavior during crystallization from liquids or gases. Thus, he proposed his three "rules" of element partitioning, which may be summarized as follows: (i) Any two ions of the same charge and very similar ionic radius have essentially the same crystal-liquid partition coefficient (D=[i]xtl/[i]liq, where [i] refers to the concentration of element i). (ii) If there is a small difference of ionic radius, the smaller ion enters the crystal preferentially, e.g., DMg2+>DFe2+, DK+>DRb+>DCs+. (iii) For ions of similar radius but different charges, the ion with the higher charge enters the crystal preferentially, i.e., DSc3+>DMg2+>DLi+, DCa2+>DNa+, and DBa2+>DK+. These principles were taught to generations of students and, as we will show below, under certain circumstances, retain a degree of validity. They are neither, however, universally correct nor do they have any quantitative applicability. The aim of this chapter is to summarize the ways in which Goldschmidt's work has been amplified through a combination of theory and experimental measurement in order to quantify crystal-liquid partitioning behavior.Since the development of accurate methods of determining element concentration at the ppm level, the trace-element contents of igneous rocks have frequently been used to model their chemical evolution. These studies use estimated crystal-liquid partition coefficients together with solutions for the differential equations describing, e.g., fractional crystallization or fractional melting (Schilling and Winchester, 1967; Gast, 1968; Shaw, 1970) to model evolution of the melt during precipitation or dissolution of the crystalline phases. Generally, because of lack of data

  6. Forward sum rule for the 2 γ -exchange correction to the charge-radius extraction from elastic electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail

    2014-11-01

    Two-photon-exchange (TPE) contributions to elastic electron-proton scattering in the forward regime in leading logarithmic ˜t ln|t | approximation in the momentum transfer t are considered. The imaginary part of the TPE amplitude in the forward kinematics is related to the total photoabsorption cross section. The real part of the TPE amplitude is obtained from an unsubtracted fixed-t dispersion relation. This allows a clean prediction of the real part of the TPE amplitude at forward angles with the leading term ˜t ln|t | . Numerical estimates are comparable with or exceed the experimental precision in extracting the charge radius from the experimental data.

  7. Charge Accretion Rate and Injection Radius of Ionized-Induced Injections in Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zheng-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Ionization-induced injection has recently been proved to be a stable injection method with several advantages in laser wakefield accelerators. However, the controlling of this injection process aiming at producing high quality electron beams is still challenging. In this paper, we examine the ionization injection processes and estimate the injection rate with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The injection rate is shown to increase linearly with the high-Z gas density as long as its ratio is smaller than some threshold in the mix gases. It is also shown that by changing the transverse mode of the driving lasers one can control the injection rate.

  8. Period and Disk Radius Changes in the Dwarf Nova Ip-Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Mantel, K. H.; Horne, K.; Barwig, H.; Schoembs, R.; Baernbantner, O.

    1993-06-01

    We present UBVRI observations of 49 eclipses of the dwarf nova IP Peg obtained during a long term observing campaign between July 1990 and December 1991. We combine these data with previously published ones in order to study long term period variations and to measure changes in disk radius associated with the dwarf nova outbursts. Analysis of white dwarf egress timings from 1984-1991 shows that the 3.8 h orbital period varies sinusoidally with a period of 4.7 years. This change can be explained by a third body (late M dwarf) with a most probable mass of 0.10 Msun. Attempts to explain the change in period by magnetic activity on the secondary star fail, because the required variation in luminosity of the secondary is not observed. From measurements of hot spot ingress and egress timings we determine a mass ratio q = M2/M1 of 0.6 and a steadily decreasing disk radius during decline from outburst.

  9. Phase transformations in the transition zone of the mantle and possible changes in the earth's radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukov, V. L.; Urusov, V. S.

    1982-12-01

    A survey of the sequence of phase transitions in the MgO-FeO-SiO2 system under the conditions of the earth's mantle shows that experimentally observed structural state transformations correctly explain the principal discontinuities encountered in the increase in density with depth within the earth. The properties of the ilmenite, corundum, and perovskite modifications of MgSiO3 are evaluated for what is believed to be the first time. It is shown that all the transformations occurring in the upper mantle and in the transition zone proceed with a positive slope of dP/dT, whereas the transition into a mixture of the perovskite modification and periclase (MgO), which explains the boundary between the transition zone and the lower mantle, has a negative slope. An assessment is made of the changes that may have occurred in the density of individual layers deep within the earth in response to the increasing depth of phase transformations. It is believed that this effect may have been responsible for increases in the earth's radius by 3-5% over the last two billion years.

  10. Observations of a probable change in the solar radius between 1715 and 1979.

    PubMed

    Dunham, D W; Sofia, S; Fiala, A D; Herald, D; Muller, P M

    1980-12-12

    Solar eclipses were observed from locations near both edges of the paths of totality in England in 1715, in Australia in 1976, and in North America in 1979. Analysis of these observations shows that the solar radius has contracted by 0.34 +/- 0.2 arc second in 264 years. PMID:17810770

  11. Palæomagnetic evidence relevant to a change in the earth's radius

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, Allan; Doell, Richard R.

    1961-01-01

    INTEREST in the hypothesis that the Earth's radius has increased during geological history has been renewed in recent years because of several sets of independent observations and interpretations. From studies of the deformation of mountain ranges and the distribution of faults and oceans, Carey1 proposes an increase in the Earth's area of 45 per cent since the Palæozoic era. Heezen2 similarly interprets submarine topography as indicating that the oceans may be immense rift valleys formed by a pulling apart of the continents as the Earth expanded. Using a different approach, Egyed3,4 infers a rate of increase of the Earth's radius of 0.4–0.8 mm. per year. This calculation is based on a decrease in the total amount of continental area covered by oceans during the past 400 million years, as determined palæographically. Egyed4 has also pointed out the desirability of using palæomagnetic data to test this hypothesis.

  12. Orientation illusions and heart-rate changes during short-radius centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, H.; Kavelaars, J.; Cheung, C. C.; Young, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    Intermittent short-radius centrifugation is a promising countermeasure against the adverse effects of prolonged weightlessness. To assess the feasibility of this countermeasure, we need to understand the disturbing sensory effects that accompany some movements carried out during rotation. We tested 20 subjects who executed yaw and pitch head movements while rotating at constant angular velocity. They were supine with their main body axis perpendicular to earth gravity. The head was placed at the centrifuge's axis of rotation. Head movements produced a transient elevation of heart-rate. All observers reported head-contingent sensations of body tilt although their bodies remained supine. Mostly, the subjective sensations conform to a model based on semicircular canal responses to angular acceleration. However, some surprising deviations from the model were found. Also, large inter-individual differences in direction, magnitude, and quality of the illusory body tilt were observed. The results have implications for subject screening and prediction of subjective tolerance for centrifugation.

  13. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  14. Motion of a charged particle in an axisymmetric longitudinal magnetic field that is inversely proportional to the radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabin, K.; Bonner, G.

    2015-04-01

    An exact solution to the equations of motion of a charged particle in an axisymmetric magnetic field inversely proportional to the distance from the axis of symmetry is described and a FORTRAN code computing this solution is provided. This solution involves only elementary mathematical functions, however, it requires finding a root of a transcendental equation numerically. Although not particularly complicated in principle, this process is tedious in implementation as it requires considering several distinct types of solutions determined by the initial conditions as well as developing procedures for selecting the correct branches of the inverse trigonometric functions at multiple turning points. While this exact solution has been mentioned in the literature, its detailed description has been lacking.

  15. 29 CFR 1917.157 - Battery charging and changing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Battery charging and changing. 1917.157 Section 1917.157..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.157 Battery charging and changing. (a) Only designated persons shall change or charge batteries. (b) Battery...

  16. 29 CFR 1917.157 - Battery charging and changing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Battery charging and changing. 1917.157 Section 1917.157..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.157 Battery charging and changing. (a) Only designated persons shall change or charge batteries. (b) Battery...

  17. 29 CFR 1917.157 - Battery charging and changing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Battery charging and changing. 1917.157 Section 1917.157..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.157 Battery charging and changing. (a) Only designated persons shall change or charge batteries. (b) Battery...

  18. 29 CFR 1917.157 - Battery charging and changing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Battery charging and changing. 1917.157 Section 1917.157..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.157 Battery charging and changing. (a) Only designated persons shall change or charge batteries. (b) Battery...

  19. 29 CFR 1917.157 - Battery charging and changing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Battery charging and changing. 1917.157 Section 1917.157..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.157 Battery charging and changing. (a) Only designated persons shall change or charge batteries. (b) Battery...

  20. 47 CFR 76.980 - Charges for customer changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Charges for customer changes. 76.980 Section 76... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.980 Charges for customer changes. (a... charge for customer changes in service tiers effected solely by coded entry on a computer terminal or...

  1. Thermally induced changes in the focal distance of composite mirrors - Composites with a zero coefficient of thermal expansion of the radius of curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the radius of curvature of the reflector face sheets made of a quasi-isotropic composite. It is shown that, upon cooling, the change of the CTE of the focal distance of the mirror is equal to that of the radius of the curvature of the reflector face sheet. The CTE of the radius of the curvature of a quasi-isotropic composite face sheet depends on both the in-plane and the out-of-plane CTEs. The zero in-plane CTE of a face sheet does not guarantee mirrors with no focal length changes.

  2. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clauser, C. F. Farengo, R.

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  3. Precision spectroscopy of 2S-nP transitions in atomic hydrogen for a new determination of the Rydberg constant and the proton charge radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Axel; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Khabarova, Ksenia; Matveev, Arthur; Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Kolachevsky, Nikolai

    2015-10-01

    Precision measurements of transition frequencies in atomic hydrogen provide important input for a number of fundamental applications, such as stringent tests of QED and the extraction of fundamental constants. Here we report on precision spectroscopy of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen with a reproducibility of a few parts in 1012. Utilizing a cryogenic beam of hydrogen atoms in the metastable 2S state reduces leading order systematic effects of previous experiments of this kind. A number of different systematic effects, especially line shape modifications due to quantum interference in spontaneous emission, are currently under investigation. Once fully characterized, our measurement procedure can be applied to higher lying 2S-nP transitions (n=6,8,9,10) and we hope to contribute to an improved determination of the Rydberg constant and the proton root mean square charge radius by this series of experiments. Ultimately, this improved determination will give deeper insight into ‘the proton size puzzle’ from the electronic hydrogen side.

  4. 47 CFR 76.1604 - Charges for customer service changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Charges for customer service changes. 76.1604 Section 76.1604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1604 Charges for customer service changes. If...

  5. 47 CFR 76.1604 - Charges for customer service changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Charges for customer service changes. 76.1604 Section 76.1604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1604 Charges for customer service changes. If...

  6. 47 CFR 76.1604 - Charges for customer service changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Charges for customer service changes. 76.1604 Section 76.1604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1604 Charges for customer service changes. If...

  7. 47 CFR 76.1604 - Charges for customer service changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Charges for customer service changes. 76.1604 Section 76.1604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1604 Charges for customer service changes. If...

  8. 47 CFR 76.1604 - Charges for customer service changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Charges for customer service changes. 76.1604 Section 76.1604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1604 Charges for customer service changes. If...

  9. Link between continuous stem radius changes and net ecosystem productivity of a subalpine Norway spruce forest in the Swiss Alps.

    PubMed

    Zweifel, R; Eugster, W; Etzold, S; Dobbertin, M; Buchmann, N; Häsler, R

    2010-08-01

    *Continuous stem radius changes (DR) include growth and water-related processes on the individual tree level. DR is assumed to provide carbon turnover information complementary to net ecosystem productivity (NEP) which integrates fluxes over the entire forest ecosystem. Here, we investigated the unexpectedly close relationship between NEP and DR and asked for causalities. *NEP (positive values indicate carbon sink) measured by eddy covariance over 11 yr was analysed at three time scales alongside automated point dendrometer DR data from a Swiss subalpine Norway spruce forest. *On annual and monthly scales, the remarkably close relationship between NEP and DR was positive, whereas on a half-hourly scale the relationship was negative. Gross primary production (GPP) had a similar explanatory power at shorter time scales, but was significantly less correlated with DR on an annual scale. *The causal explanation for the NEP-DR relationship is still fragmentary; however, it is partially attributable to the following: radial stem growth with a strong effect on monthly and annual increases in NEP and DR; frost-induced bark tissue dehydration with a parallel decrease in both measures on a monthly scale; and transpiration-induced DR shrinkage which is negatively correlated with assimilation and thus with NEP on a half-hourly scale. PMID:20497351

  10. Bursts of energetic electron induced large surface charging observed by Chang'E-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Zhang, A. B.; Zhang, X. G.; Reme, H.; Kong, L. G.; Zhang, S. Y.; Yu, D. J.; Wang, S. J.; Zhu, G. W.

    2012-10-01

    A relationship between surface charging and bursts of energetic electron (BEE) event is presented in this paper. In a 200 km lunar polar orbit, during quiet time, 0.1-2.0 MeV BEE events were observed by High Energetic Particles Detectors (HPD) on board Chang'E-1, on December 22, 2007, when the spacecraft was within the inner terrestrial magnetosheath. At the same time, a large surface charging of ∼-5.4 kV was observed by Chang'E-1, which was evidenced by increasing the ions energy observed by Solar Wind Ion Detectors (SWIDs). We found that the surface charging is strongly correlated with BEE events, and the potentials of spacecraft surface charging was experientially expressed as U≈3.6×10-5·fT (kV). The BEE events did occur in the solar wind, geomagnetic tail and magnetosheath alternately, whereas the surface charging during the BEE events is in the magnetosheath or transition region of boundaries. Though the observed surface charging was fewer than the BEE events, it is expected that the occurrence of the charging events caused by the bursts of energetic electrons should be more frequent than the Chang'E-1 observations. Meanwhile, the spacecraft charging indicates the lunar surface can be charged to negative kilovolt-scale by the BEE events even in quiet times.

  11. Large positive entropy change in several charge-ordering perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, N.; Cuong, D. H.; Tho, N. D.; Nhat, H. N.; Luong, N. H.; Cong, B. T.

    2004-05-01

    The Nd 0.5Sr 0.5Mn 1- xCu xO 3 ( x=0.00; 0.02; 0.10) and Nd 0.25Pr 0.25Sr 0.5MnO 3 perovskites have been prepared by solid reaction technology. The manganites are of single phase with orthorhombic structure. The FC and ZFC measurements show an evident existence of charge-ordering effect at low temperatures. At the charge-ordering temperature the magnetic entropy change, Δ S, is positive and the |Δ Smax| is larger than that determined at ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition temperature.

  12. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  13. Charge changing phosphorylated polymers: Proof of in situ mucoadhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Bonengel, Sonja; Jelkmann, Max; Oh, Sejin; Mahmood, Arshad; Ijaz, Muhammad; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to design a novel polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivative exhibiting mucus permeating and mucoadhesive properties. Therefore, the enzymatically degradable phosphate ester, phosphotyrosine (Ptyr) was covalently attached to PEG-diamine. The synthesized PEG-Ptyr was studied in terms of enzymatic degradability on Caco 2 cells and by isolated intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP). Furthermore, the influence of enzymatic degradation on charge distribution of the polymer as well as on mucus diffusion and mucoadhesion was investigated. Within this study, the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr could be cleaved on the cell monolayer and by the isolated IAP, whereby the degradation rate was 10-fold higher utilizing the isolated enzyme. Implementation of negative charges on PEG due to modification with Ptyr led to an increased electrophoretic mobility, which was reduced after enzymatic degradation of the phosphate ester, most likely due to the alterations in charge distribution on the polymeric backbone. Interactions with mucus components were determined within mucus diffusion studies and rheological investigations. Herein, PEG-Ptyr showed a 3-fold lower mucus diffusion, after incubation with IAP. Within rheological investigations, dynamic viscosities increased by the factor of 3, after the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr was degraded by IAP. Results obtained within these experiments provided evidence for the in situ mucoadhesive properties of charge changing phosphorylated polymers. The combination of mucus permeating and mucoadhesive features of phosphorylated PEGs could be a highly interesting tool for future applications, such as for coating nanoparticles. PMID:27320696

  14. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  15. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  16. Mirror with thermally controlled radius of curvature

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.

    2010-06-22

    A radius of curvature controlled mirror for controlling precisely the focal point of a laser beam or other light beam. The radius of curvature controlled mirror provides nearly spherical distortion of the mirror in response to differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces of the mirror. The radius of curvature controlled mirror compensates for changes in other optical components due to heating or other physical changes. The radius of curvature controlled mirror includes an arrangement for adjusting the temperature of the front surface and separately adjusting the temperature of the rear surface to control the radius of curvature. The temperature adjustment arrangements can include cooling channels within the mirror body or convection of a gas upon the surface of the mirror. A control system controls the differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces to achieve the desired radius of curvature.

  17. Electric Vehicle Charging Stations as a Climate Change Mitigation Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cave, Bridget; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to facilitate the use of electric vehicles at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), charging stations should be made available to LaRC employees. The implementation of charging stations would decrease the need for gasoline thus decreasing CO2 emissions improving local air quality and providing a cost savings for LaRC employees. A charging station pilot program is described that would install stations as the need increased and also presents a business model that pays for the electricity used and installation at no cost to the government.

  18. Screening of charged impurities as a possible mechanism for conductance change in graphene gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sang-Zi; Chen, Gugang; Harutyunyan, Avetik R.; Sofo, Jorge O.

    2014-09-01

    In carbon nanotube and graphene gas sensing, the measured conductance change after the sensor is exposed to target molecules has been traditionally attributed to carrier density change due to charge transfer between the sample and the adsorbed molecule. However, this explanation has many problems when it is applied to graphene: The increased amount of Coulomb impurities should lead to decrease in carrier mobility which was not observed in many experiments, carrier density is controlled by the gate voltage in the experimental setup, and there are inconsistencies in the energetics of the charge transfer. In this paper we explore an alternative mechanism. Charged functional groups and dipolar molecules on the surface of graphene may counteract the effect of charged impurities on the substrate. Because scattering of electrons with these charged impurities has been shown to be the limiting factor in graphene conductivity, this leads to significant changes in the transport behavior. A model for the conductivity is established using the random phase approximation dielectric function of graphene and the first-order Born approximation for scattering. The model predicts optimal magnitudes for the charge and dipole moment which maximally screen a given charged impurity. The dipole screening is shown to be generally weaker than the charge screening although the former becomes more effective with higher gate voltage away from the charge neutrality point. The model also predicts that with increasing amount of adsorbates, the charge impurities eventually become saturated and additional adsorption always lead to decreasing conductivity.

  19. Nuclear charge radii as signature for structural changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, I.; Marinova, K.

    2016-06-01

    The correlation of nuclear charge radii with other ground and excited state nuclear observables is considered. An empirical approach is used to deal with a large amount of experimental information, which is properly handled to obtain interesting correlations among different observables as one moves away from the line of stability. Especially the appearance of new magic numbers and/or disappearance of traditional ones as well as the onset of deformation in the region of light nuclei (A < 30) are discussed.

  20. The innermost inner core of the earth: evidence for a change in anisotropic behavior at the radius of about 300 km.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Miaki; Dziewoński, Adam M

    2002-10-29

    Since the discovery of the inner core in 1936, no additional spherical subshell of the Earth has been observed. Based on an extensive seismic data set, we propose the existence of an innermost inner core, with a radius of approximately 300 km, that exhibits a distinct transverse isotropy relative to the bulk inner core. Specifically, within the innermost inner core, the slowest direction of wave propagation is approximately 45 degrees from the east-west direction. In contrast, the direction of the slowest wave propagation in the overlying inner core is east-west. The distinct anisotropy at the center of the Earth may represent fossil evidence of a unique early history of inner-core evolution. PMID:12374869

  1. Proton radius from electron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Kabir, Al Amin; Lin, Vincent; Meekins, David; Norum, Blaine; Sawatzky, Brad

    2016-05-01

    Background: The proton charge radius extracted from recent muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements is significantly smaller than that extracted from atomic hydrogen and electron scattering measurements. The discrepancy has become known as the proton radius puzzle. Purpose: In an attempt to understand the discrepancy, we review high-precision electron scattering results from Mainz, Jefferson Lab, Saskatoon, and Stanford. Methods: We make use of stepwise regression techniques using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion to systematically determine the predictive variables to use for a given set and range of electron scattering data as well as to provide multivariate error estimates. Results: Starting with the precision, low four-momentum transfer (Q2) data from Mainz (1980) and Saskatoon (1974), we find that a stepwise regression of the Maclaurin series using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion justify using a linear extrapolation which yields a value for the proton radius that is consistent with the result obtained from muonic hydrogen measurements. Applying the same Maclaurin series and statistical criteria to the 2014 Rosenbluth results on GE from Mainz, we again find that the stepwise regression tends to favor a radius consistent with the muonic hydrogen radius but produces results that are extremely sensitive to the range of data included in the fit. Making use of the high-Q2 data on GE to select functions which extrapolate to high Q2, we find that a Padé (N =M =1 ) statistical model works remarkably well, as does a dipole function with a 0.84 fm radius, GE(Q2) =(1+Q2/0.66 GeV2) -2 . Conclusions: Rigorous applications of stepwise regression techniques and multivariate error estimates result in the extraction of a proton charge radius that is consistent with the muonic hydrogen result of 0.84 fm; either from linear extrapolation of the extremely-low-Q2 data or by use of the Padé approximant for extrapolation using a larger

  2. Parameter-free calculation of charge-changing cross sections at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Horiuchi, W.; Terashima, S.; Kanungo, R.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Estradé, A.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Tanihata, I.; Vargas, J.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2016-07-01

    Charge-changing cross sections at high energies are expected to provide useful information on nuclear charge radii. No reliable theory to calculate the cross section has yet been available. We develop a formula using Glauber and eikonal approximations and test its validity with recent new data on carbon isotopes measured at around 900 A MeV. We first confirm that our theory reproduces the cross sections of 12,13,14C+12C consistently with the known charge radii. Next we show that the cross sections of C-1912 on a proton target are all well reproduced provided the role of neutrons is accounted for. We also discuss the energy dependence of the charge-changing cross sections.

  3. Solvent-induced reversible solid-state colour change of an intramolecular charge-transfer complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Maier, Josef M; Hwang, Jungwun; Smith, Mark D; Krause, Jeanette A; Mullis, Brian T; Strickland, Sharon M S; Shimizu, Ken D

    2015-10-11

    A dynamic intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) complex was designed that displayed reversible colour changes in the solid-state when treated with different organic solvents. The origins of the dichromatism were shown to be due to solvent-inclusion, which induced changes in the relative orientations of the donor pyrene and acceptor naphthalenediimide units. PMID:26299357

  4. V-Band, Near-IR, and TiO Photometry of the Semi-Regular Red Supergiant TV Geminorum: Long-Term Quasi-Periodic Changes in Temperature, Radius, and Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasatonic, Richard P.; Guinan, Edward F.; Durbin, Allyn J.

    2015-10-01

    Seventeen years of V-band and intermediate Wing near-IR TiO (λ719-nm to λ1024-nm) time-series photometry of the M1-4 Iab supergiant TV Geminorum are presented. The observations were conducted from 1997 to 2014 with the primary goals of determining both long-term (years) and short-term (months) periodicities and estimating temporal changes in temperature, luminosity, and radius as the star varies in brightness. Our results suggest a dominant short-term V-band period of ~411 days (~1.12 years) that is superimposed on a long-term cycle of ~3137 days (~8.59 years). Over this long-term cycle, the effective temperature varies between ~3500 K to ~3850 K and, at an adopted distance of 1.5 ± 0.2 kpc, the luminosity varies from ~6.2 × 104 Lsolar to ~8.9 × 104 Lsolar and the radius varies from ~620 Rsolar to ~710 Rsolar. Variations in temperature and luminosity are indicative of a semi-regular long-term pulsation with imposed short-term periods similar to the V-band variations. However, the calculated radius variations are apparently not generally inversely correlated with respect to the long-term temperature and luminosity changes as typically found in Cepheids and Mira-type variables. This observation suggests other undetermined mechanisms, such as the formation and subsequent dissipation of supergranules or possible complex pulsations, are taking place in this evolved red supergiant to account for these variations. Like other young, massive luminous red supergiants such as Betelgeuse (α Orionis) and Antares (α Scorpii), TV Gem shows complicated light variations on time scales that range from months to several years. These evolved high massive stars are important to study because they are nearby, bright progenitors of core-collapsed Type II supernovae.

  5. Charge moment change of lightning discharge associated with terrestrial gamma-ray flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Uno, T.; Yoshida, A.; Yamasita, K.; Sato, M.

    2008-12-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray emission phenomena associated with lightning discharge. TGFs have a duration time of a few msec and an energy range of a few 10 keV-20 MeV. TGFs were firstly discovered by BATSE on CGRO satellite in 1994. RHESSI satellite observed over 170 TGFs per year from 2002 to 2005. The orbit of RHESSI is circular with an inclination of 38 degrees at an altitude of 600 km. So far the characteristics of lightning associated with TGFs have been investigated. However, the relationship between the TGF occurrence and the charge moment change of parent lightning discharge has not been examined in global scale. Tohoku University has been measuring ELF magnetic field in the frequency range of 1-100 Hz at 4 sites located globally, including Onagawa in Japan, Esrange in Sweden and Syowa in Antarctica. From these data, we can estimate the charge moment change, location, and polarity of lightning around the world. We derived the charge moment change of lightning discharge generating TGFs from the ELF waveforms and the timings of TGFs listed by RHESSI observation. 174 TGF events were observed by RHESSI in 2004. We analyzed 141 events whose ELF data at 3 stations are available. We estimated lightning location based on the time of arrival method. If the rise timing of lightning ELF pulse, called ELF sferics, is estimated within +/- 15 msec of the timing of TGFs observed by RHESSI and the estimated location of lightning discharge is within a range of 1500 km from the sub-satellite point, we regard it as parent lightning of TGFs. Detection Limit of the charge moment change with global uniformity was 175 C-km. We analyzed 141 events observed in 2004 and identified 9 TGFs with ELF sferics. We consider the other 132 TGF events are related to smaller lightning discharge whose charge change moment change are less than the detection limit of 175 C-km. The minimum charge moment change in 9 events is 176 C-km, and the maximum is 465 C-km. We derived

  6. Distal radius fractures: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Schneppendahl, Johannes; Windolf, Joachim; Kaufmann, Robert A

    2012-08-01

    Despite the frequency of distal radius fractures, the optimal treatment remains without consensus opinion. A trend toward increased distal radius fracture open reduction and internal fixation has been identified, with biomechanical and clinical studies suggesting treatment advantages of certain fixation methods over others. Well-controlled patient trials are still missing to lend objective findings to management algorithms. This article reviews the literature over the past 5 years to guide our management regarding this common upper-extremity injury. PMID:22763062

  7. Structural change during charge-discharge for iron substituted lithium manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabuchi, Mitsuharu; Kageyama, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Kei; Shibuya, Hideka; Doumae, Kyosuke; Kanno, Ryoji

    2016-06-01

    For this study, Fe-substituted Li2MnO3 (Li1+x(Fe0.25Mn0.75)1-xO2, 0 < x < 1/3) was prepared using coprecipitation-calcination. The change in the cation distribution was examined after charge-discharge using a monoclinic Li2MnO3 unit cell (C2/m). At the initial Li-extraction, Fe ion moved to the tetrahedral 8j site. At the end of charging, transition metals moved from 4g and 2b sites in (Mn, Fe)sbnd Li layer to 2c and 4h sites in the Li-layer via 4i and 8j sites. The cation random distribution was maintained after the end of discharging. The stability of layered rock-salt phase after cycle testing depended on the mode of charging; although the positive electrode decomposed to a mixture of layered rock-salt and spinel phases by typical galvanostatic charging, the positive electrode remained a single phase with a layered rock-salt structure by application of stepwise charging. Careful control of the charging mode at the initial cycle is important for Fe-substituted Li2MnO3 positive electrode material.

  8. The PRad experiment and the proton radius puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparian, Ashot H.

    2014-06-01

    New results from the recent muonic hydrogen experiments seriously questioned our knowledge of the proton charge radius, r_p. The new value, with its unprecedented less than sub-percent precision, is currently up to eight standard deviation smaller than the average value from all previous experiments, triggering the well-known "proton charge radius puzzle" in nuclear and atomic physics. The PRad collaboration is currently preparing a novel, magnetic-spectrometer-free ep scattering experiment in Hall B at JLab for a new independent r_p measurement to address this growing "puzzle" in physics.

  9. Changes in Surface Charge Density of Blood Cells in Fatal Accidental Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Szeremeta, Michał; Petelska, Aneta Dorota; Kotyńska, Joanna; Pepiński, Witold; Naumowicz, Monika; Figaszewski, Zbigniew Artur; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate postmortem changes concerning electric charge of human erythrocytes and thrombocytes in fatal accidental hypothermia. The surface charge density values were determined on the basis of the electrophoretic mobility measurements of the cells conducted at various pH values of electrolyte solution. The surface charge of erythrocyte membranes after fatal accidental hypothermia increased compared to the control group within whole range of experimental pH values. Moreover, a slight shift of the isoelectric point of erythrocyte membranes towards high pH values was observed. The surface charge of thrombocyte membranes in fatal accidental hypothermia decreased at low pH compared to the control group. However, at pH range 4-9, the values increased compared to the control group. The isoelectric point of thrombocyte membranes after fatal accidental hypothermia was slightly shifted towards low pH values compared to the control group. The observed changes are probably connected with the partial destruction and functional changes of the blood cell structure. PMID:26364031

  10. Synchrotron Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Quantitatively Detects Angstrom Level Changes in the Average Radius of Taxol-Stabilized Microtubules Decorated with the Microtubule-Associated-Protein Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myung Chul; Raviv, Uri; Li, Youli; Miller, Herbert P.; Needleman, Daniel J.; Kim, Mahn Won; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2011-01-01

    With the emerging proteomics era the scientific community is beginning the daunting task of understanding the structures and functions of a large number of self-assembling proteins. Here, our study was concerned with the effect of the microtubule-associated-protein (MAP) tau on the assembled structure of taxol-stabilized microtubules. Significantly, the synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) technique is able to quantitatively detect angstrom level changes in the average diameter of the microtubules modeled as a simple hollow nanotube with a fixed wall thickness. We show that the electrostatic binding of MAP tau isoforms to taxol-stabilized MTs leads to a controlled increase in the average radius of microtubules with increasing coverage of tau on the MT surface. The increase in the average diameter results from an increase in the distribution of protofilament numbers in MTs upon binding of MAP tau.

  11. Laser differential confocal radius measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiqian; Sun, Ruoduan; Qiu, Lirong; Sha, Dingguo

    2010-02-01

    A new laser differential confocal radius measurement (DCRM) is proposed for high precision measurement of radius. Based on the property of an axial intensity curve that the absolute zero precisely corresponds to the focus of the objective in a differential confocal system (DCS), DCRM uses the zero point of the DCS axial intensity curve to precisely identify the cat's-eye and confocal positions of the test lens, and measures the accurate distance between the two positions to achieve the high-precision measurement of radius of curvature (ROC). In comparison with the existing measurement methods, DCRM proposed has a high measurement precision, a strong environmental anti-interference capability and a low cost. The theoretical analyses and preliminary experimental results indicate that DCRM has a relative measurement error of better than 5 ppm. PMID:20174065

  12. Simulation of loss of uranium ions due to charge changing processes in the CSRm ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wen-Heng; Yang, Jian-Cheng; Li, Peng; Li, Zhong-Shan; Shang, Peng; Qu, Guo-Feng; Ge, Wen-Wen; Tang, Mei-Tang; Sha, Xiao-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Significant beam loss caused by the charge exchange processes and ion impact-induced outgassing may restrict the maximum number of accelerated heavy ions during the high intensity operation of an accelerator. In order to control beam loss due to charge exchange processes and confine the generated desorption gas, tracking of the beam loss distribution and installation of absorber blocks with low-desorption rate material at appropriate locations in the main Cooler Storage Ring (CSRm) at the Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, will be performed. The loss simulation of uranium ions with electron-loss is presented in this report and the conclusion is that most charge changed particles are lost in the second dipole of the super-period structure. The calculation of the collimation efficiency of the CSRm ring will be continued in the future. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305227)

  13. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, March 16, 1991--March 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  14. Interactions in hydrogen of relativistic neon to nickel projectiles: Total charge-changing cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Ferrando, P.; Fonte, R.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T.G.; Insolia, A.; Jones, F.C.; Knott, C.N.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Potenza, R.; Romanski, J.; Russo, G.V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tull, C.E.; Tuve, C.; Waddington, C.J.; Webber, W.R.; Wefel, J.P.; Zhang, X. Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Service d'Astrophysique, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, Cedex Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Corso Italia 57, I 95129-Catania NASA

    1994-06-01

    A liquid hydrogen target was used to study the nuclear fragmentation of beams of relativistic heavy ions, [sup 22]Ne to [sup 58]Ni, over an energy range 400 to 900 MeV/nucleon. The experiments were carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac HISS facility, using the charge-velocity-rigidity method to identify the charged fragments. Here we describe the general concept of the experiment and present total charge-changing cross sections obtained from 17 separate runs. These new measured cross sections display an energy dependence which follows semiempirical model predictions. The mass dependence of the cross sections behaves as predicted by optical models, but within the experimental energy range, the optical model parameters display a clear energy dependence. The isospin of the projectile nuclei also appears to be an important factor in the interaction process.

  15. Charge changing cross-sections for 300 A MeV Fe{sup 26+} ion beam in Al target

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Renu; Kumar, Ashavani

    2013-06-03

    In the present study, total and partial charge changing cross-sections of 300 A MeV Fe{sup 26+} ion beam in Al target were measured. The CR39 nuclear track detectors were used to identify the incident charged particles and their fragments using an automated image analyzer system installed with Leica QWin Plus software. The measured value of the total charge changing cross-section is {sigma}{sub tot}= (1663 {+-} 236) mb.

  16. Surgical exposures of the radius and ulna.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Louis W; Zlotolow, Dan A; Hitchcock, Phillip B; Shah, Suparna N; Barron, O Alton

    2011-07-01

    The forearm contains many muscles, nerves, and vascular structures that change position on forearm rotation. Exposure of the radial shaft is best achieved with the Henry (volar) or Thompson (dorsal) approach. The volar flexor carpi radialis approaches are used increasingly for exposure of the distal radius. Although the dorsal approach is a safe utilitarian option with many applications, its use for managing fracture of the distal radius has waned. Potential complications associated with radial exposure include injury to the superficial branch of the radial nerve, the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve, and the cephalic vein. Dorsal and ulnar proximal radial exposures are associated with increased risk of injury to the posterior interosseous nerve. With surgical exposure of the ulna, care is required to avoid injuring the dorsal cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve. PMID:21724922

  17. Diagnosing Meteorological Conditions Associated with Sprites and Lightning with Large Charge Moment Changes (CMC) over Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lang, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Sprites are a category of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the upper atmosphere above the tops of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). They are commonly associated with lightning that produce large charge moment changes (CMCs). Synergistic use of satellite and radar-retrieved observations together with sounding data, forecasts, and lightning-detection networks allowed the diagnosis and analysis of the meteorological conditions associated with sprites as well as large-CMC lightning over Oklahoma.

  18. Deducing lightning locations and charge moment change by ELF observations around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Hobara, Y.; Hayakawa, M.; Shiokawa, K.

    2011-12-01

    The electromagnetic radiations from lightning discharges have been intensively studied for a long time by using different frequency ranges. Recent observations of electromagnetic radiations from lightning in the ELF frequency range so-called ELF transients are recognized as a powerful tool not only to deduce the global lightning distribution but also to obtain one of the most important properties of lightning discharges such as charge moment changes (Qds). Although accurate Qds for the lightning discharges can be deduced from the static electric field measurement by using e.g. electric field mill, the detection ranges of this equipment is significantly limited in space (typically within few decade of km). Therefore Qds distributions of local thunderstorm activities over the spatial scale of Japan (within few thousands km) have not been studied yet. In this paper, we report the initial results of local ELF network observations (i.e. multiple observations over Japan) to deduce the spatio-temporal lightning discharge distributions with a charge moment change of the thunderstorm activity around Japan. The statistical properties of the charge moment changes will be presented as well.

  19. Radiation reaction and pitch-angle changes for a charge undergoing synchrotron losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-05-01

    In the derivation of synchrotron radiation formulae, it has been assumed that the pitch angle of a charge remains constant during the radiation process. However, from the radiation reaction formula, while the component of the velocity vector perpendicular to the magnetic field reduces in magnitude due to radiative losses, the parallel component does not undergo any change during radiation. Therefore, there is a change in the ratio of the two components, implying a change in the pitch angle. We derive the exact formula for the change in energy of radiating electrons by taking into account the change of the pitch angle due to radiative losses. From this, we derive the characteristic decay time of synchrotron electrons over which they turn from highly relativistic into mildly relativistic ones.

  20. Correlating Charge Movements with Local Conformational Changes of a Na+-Coupled Cotransporter

    PubMed Central

    Patti, Monica; Forster, Ian C.

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into the steady-state and dynamic characteristics of structural rearrangements of an electrogenic secondary-active cotransporter during its transport cycle, two measures of conformational change (pre-steady-state current relaxations and intensity of fluorescence emitted from reporter fluorophores) were investigated as a function of membrane potential and external substrate. Cysteines were substituted at three believed-new sites in the type IIb Na+-coupled inorganic phosphate cotransporter (SLC34A2 flounder isoform) that were predicted to be involved in conformational changes. Labeling at one site resulted in substantial suppression of transport activity, whereas for the other sites, function remained comparable to the wild-type. For these mutants, the properties of the pre-steady-state charge relaxations were similar for each, whereas fluorescence intensity changes differed significantly. Fluorescence changes could be accounted for by simulations using a five-state model with a unique set of apparent fluorescence intensities assigned to each state according to the site of labeling. Fluorescence reported from one site was associated with inward and outward conformations, whereas for the other sites, including four previously indentified sites, emissions were associated principally with one or the other orientation of the transporter. The same membrane potential change induced complementary changes in fluorescence at some sites, which suggested that the microenvironments of the respective fluorophores experience concomitant changes in polarity. In response to step changes in voltage, the pre-steady-state current relaxation and the time course of change in fluorescence intensity were described by single exponentials. For one mutant the time constants matched well with and without external Na+, providing direct evidence that this label reports conformational changes accompanying intrinsic charge movement and cation interactions. PMID:24739161

  1. Correlating charge movements with local conformational changes of a Na(+)-coupled cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Patti, Monica; Forster, Ian C

    2014-04-15

    To gain insight into the steady-state and dynamic characteristics of structural rearrangements of an electrogenic secondary-active cotransporter during its transport cycle, two measures of conformational change (pre-steady-state current relaxations and intensity of fluorescence emitted from reporter fluorophores) were investigated as a function of membrane potential and external substrate. Cysteines were substituted at three believed-new sites in the type IIb Na(+)-coupled inorganic phosphate cotransporter (SLC34A2 flounder isoform) that were predicted to be involved in conformational changes. Labeling at one site resulted in substantial suppression of transport activity, whereas for the other sites, function remained comparable to the wild-type. For these mutants, the properties of the pre-steady-state charge relaxations were similar for each, whereas fluorescence intensity changes differed significantly. Fluorescence changes could be accounted for by simulations using a five-state model with a unique set of apparent fluorescence intensities assigned to each state according to the site of labeling. Fluorescence reported from one site was associated with inward and outward conformations, whereas for the other sites, including four previously indentified sites, emissions were associated principally with one or the other orientation of the transporter. The same membrane potential change induced complementary changes in fluorescence at some sites, which suggested that the microenvironments of the respective fluorophores experience concomitant changes in polarity. In response to step changes in voltage, the pre-steady-state current relaxation and the time course of change in fluorescence intensity were described by single exponentials. For one mutant the time constants matched well with and without external Na(+), providing direct evidence that this label reports conformational changes accompanying intrinsic charge movement and cation interactions. PMID:24739161

  2. Dimensional changes as a function of charge injection for trans-polyacetylene: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guangyu; Kurti, Jeno; Kertesz, Miklos; Baughman, Ray H.

    2002-10-01

    Charge-induced dimensional changes allow conducting polymers and single walled carbon nanotubes to function as electromechanical actuators. The unit cell of the prototypical conducting polymer, trans-polyacetylene, was calculated as a function of charge injection using density functional theory in combination with ultrasoft pseudopotentials using the solid-state Vienna ab initio simulation package. Test calculations on the charged pyridinium molecular ion give results in good agreement with the experimental geometry. Strain versus charge relationships are predicted from dimensional changes calculated using a uniform background charge ("jellium") for representing the counterions, which we show provides results consistent with experiment for doped polyacetylenes. These jellium calculations are consistent with further presented calculations that include specific counterions, showing that hybridization between the guest dopant ions and the host polyacetylene chains is unimportant. The lack of guest-host orbital hybridization allows a qualitative rigid band interpretation of the amount of charge transfer for both acceptor and donor doping. For polyacetylene, asymmetry of strain along the chain with respect to the sign of the charge is predicted: negative charge elongates and positive charge shortens the polymer. For charge less than 0.05e per carbon, an approximately linear dependence is obtained for the dependence of chain-direction strain on the amount of injected charge.

  3. "Electrostructural Phase Changes" In Charged Particulate Clouds: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    charge sign over another. The random charges of both sign derive from natural grain-to-grain interactions that produce triboelectrification via charge exchange every time grain surfaces make contact with one another. The conversion from a random distribution of grains (upon which there are randomly distributed charges) into an organization of electrostatically-ordered aggregates, can be regarded (within the framework of granular-material science) as an "electrical or Coulombic phase change" of the particulate cloud. It is not totally dissimilar from the more normal phase-change concept in which, for example, a gas with long free-path-molecules suddenly becomes a solid as a result of structural ordering of the molecules (notably, also the result of electronic forces, albeit at a different scale). In both the gas-to-solid case, and the aerosol-to-aggregate case, the same materials and charges are present before and after the phase change, but their arrangement now has a higher degree of order and a lower-energy configuration. An input of energy into the system is required to reverse the situation. The aggregates in the USML experiments were observed to undergo at least two phase changes as noted above. The point about phase changes, and by implication, the "electrostructural" reorganizations in particulate clouds, is the following: (a) they can occur very rapidly, almost spontaneously, above a critical cloud density, (b) in going from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, they convert to a denser system, (c) energy must be required to reverse the situation, implying that energy is released during the high-to-low energy phase change. In applying this information to natural particulate clouds, some inferences can be made (it is stressed that reference is still to dielectric materials attracted by dipole forces). There are several natural settings to which the USML observations apply, and to which the phase-change implications likewise apply. Dense clouds of

  4. Solar Radius Measurements at Mount Wilson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, S.; Bertello, L.; Ulrich, R. K.; Boyden, J. E.; Rozelot, J.

    2004-12-01

    Variations of the solar radius are not only important for solar physics but they also play a fundamental role in the research of terrestrial climate. In fact, changes in the apparent size of the Sun could account for a significant fraction of the total irradiance variations, and solar irradiance is known to be a primary force in driving atmospheric circulation. While the MDI instrument aboard SOHO is likely to provide the most accurate constraint on possible solar radius variations, the radius measurements obtained from ground base observations represent a unique resource due to their long temporal coverage. Since 1970, the Mount Wilson synoptic programme of solar magnetic observations carried out at the 150-foot tower scans the solar disk using the radiation in the neutral iron line at 525.0 nm. For these images, the radius has been determined and results are presented on this paper. We show first the temporal behavior of these measurements. Secondly, if data are gathered by heliolatitude, the shape of the Sun differs from a perfect ellipsoid and shows solar distortions. We compare these results with others obtained with the heliometer at the Pic du Midi observatory in France. The comparison show a similitude in the shape with a bulge near the equator extending on 20-30 degrees followed by a depression at higher latitude near 60-70 degrees. These solar distortions needs to be confirmed by future space measurements (PICARD microsatellite) but it already raises the problem of a better understanding of the physics in the sub-surface layers.

  5. Consistency of electron scattering data with a small proton radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffioen, Keith; Carlson, Carl; Maddox, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    We determine the charge radius of the proton by analyzing the published low momentum transfer electron-proton scattering data from Mainz. We note that polynomial expansions of the form factor converge for momentum transfers squared below 4 mπ2 , where mπ is the pion mass. Expansions with enough terms to fit the data, but few enough not to overfit, yield proton radii smaller than the CODATA or Mainz values and in accord with the muonic atom results. We also comment on analyses using a wider range of data, and overall obtain a proton radius RE=0.840 (16 ) fm.

  6. Study of a non-intrusive electron beam radius diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; DeVolder, B.G.; Goldstein, J.C.; Snell, C.M.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have evaluated the usefulness and limitation of a non-intrusive beam radius diagnostic which is based on the measurement of the magnetic moment of a high-current electron beam in an axisymmetric focusing magnetic field, and relates the beam root-mean-square (RMS) radius to the change in magnetic flux through a diamagnetic loop encircling the beam. An analytic formula that gives the RMS radius of the electron beam at a given axial position and a given time is derived and compared with results from a 2-D particle-in-cell code. The study has established criteria for its validity and optimal applications.

  7. Large Charge Moment Change Lightning in an Oklahoma Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Cummer, Steven; Beasley, William; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lyons, Walt; MacGorman, Donald

    2014-01-01

    On 31 May 2013, a line of severe thunderstorms developed during the local afternoon in central Oklahoma, USA. One of the supercells produced the El Reno tornado, which caused significant damage and killed several people. During the 2300 UTC hour (during the mature supercell stage and just after the tornado began), the storm produced several positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning strokes that featured large (> 75 C km) impulse charge moment changes (iCMCs - charge moment during the first 2 ms after the return stroke). These discharges occurred mainly in convection, in contrast to the typical pattern of large-CMC and sprite-parent +CGs occurring mainly in stratiform precipitation regions. After this time, the line of thunderstorms evolved over several hours into a large mesoscale convective system (MCS). By the 0700 UTC hour on 1 June 2013, the large- CMC pattern had changed markedly. Large-CMC negative CGs, which were absent early in the storm's lifetime, occurred frequently within convection. Meanwhile, large- CMC +CGs had switched to occurring mainly within the broad stratiform region that had developed during the intervening period. The evolution of the large-CMC lightning in this case will be examined using a mix of polarimetric data from individual radars, national mosaics of radar reflectivity, the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA), the Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). A major goal of this study is understanding how storm structure and evolution affected the production of large-CMC lightning. It is anticipated that this will lead to further insight into how and why storms produce the powerful lightning that commonly causes sprites in the upper atmosphere.

  8. Large Charge Moment Change Lightning in an Oklahoma Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Cummer, Steven; Petersen, Danyal; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lyons, Walt; MacGorman, Donald; Beasley, William

    2014-01-01

    On 31 May 2013, a line of severe thunderstorms developed during the local afternoon in central Oklahoma, USA. One of the supercells produced the El Reno tornado, which caused significant damage and killed several people. During the 2300 UTC hour (during the mature supercell stage and just after the tornado began), the storm produced several positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning strokes that featured large (> 100 C km) impulse charge moment changes (iCMCs; charge moment during the first 2 ms after the return stroke). These discharges occurred mainly in convection, in contrast to the typical pattern of large-CMC and sprite-parent +CGs occurring mainly in stratiform precipitation regions. After this time, the line of thunderstorms evolved over several hours into a large mesoscale convective system (MCS). By the 0700 UTC hour on 1 June 2013, the large-CMC pattern had changed markedly. Large-CMC negative CGs, which were absent early in the storm's lifetime, occurred frequently within convection. Meanwhile, large-CMC +CGs had switched to occurring mainly within the broad stratiform region that had developed during the intervening period. The evolution of the large-CMC lightning in this case will be examined using a mix of national mosaics of radar reflectivity, the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA), the Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). A major goal of this study is understanding how storm structure and evolution affected the production of large-CMC lightning. It is anticipated that this will lead to further insight into how and why storms produce the powerful lightning that commonly causes sprites in the upper atmosphere.

  9. Ultrastructural changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus induced by positively charged silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Urbina, Dulce G; Lara, Humberto H; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Larios, Eduardo; Srinivasan, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Silver nanoparticles offer a possible means of fighting antibacterial resistance. Most of their antibacterial properties are attributed to their silver ions. In the present work, we study the actions of positively charged silver nanoparticles against both methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We use aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy to examine the bactericidal effects of silver nanoparticles and the ultrastructural changes in bacteria that are induced by silver nanoparticles. The study revealed that our 1 nm average size silver nanoparticles induced thinning and permeabilization of the cell wall, destabilization of the peptidoglycan layer, and subsequent leakage of intracellular content, causing bacterial cell lysis. We hypothesize that positively charged silver nanoparticles bind to the negatively charged polyanionic backbones of teichoic acids and the related cell wall glycopolymers of bacteria as a first target, consequently stressing the structure and permeability of the cell wall. This hypothesis provides a major mechanism to explain the antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus. Future research should focus on defining the related molecular mechanisms and their importance to the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:26734530

  10. Ultrastructural changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus induced by positively charged silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Romero-Urbina, Dulce G; Lara, Humberto H; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Larios, Eduardo; Srinivasan, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Yacamán, Miguel José

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles offer a possible means of fighting antibacterial resistance. Most of their antibacterial properties are attributed to their silver ions. In the present work, we study the actions of positively charged silver nanoparticles against both methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We use aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy to examine the bactericidal effects of silver nanoparticles and the ultrastructural changes in bacteria that are induced by silver nanoparticles. The study revealed that our 1 nm average size silver nanoparticles induced thinning and permeabilization of the cell wall, destabilization of the peptidoglycan layer, and subsequent leakage of intracellular content, causing bacterial cell lysis. We hypothesize that positively charged silver nanoparticles bind to the negatively charged polyanionic backbones of teichoic acids and the related cell wall glycopolymers of bacteria as a first target, consequently stressing the structure and permeability of the cell wall. This hypothesis provides a major mechanism to explain the antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus. Future research should focus on defining the related molecular mechanisms and their importance to the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:26734530

  11. Thermal Charging Study of Compressed Expanded Natural Graphite/Phase Change Material Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, Anne M; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The thermal charging performance of phase change materials, specifically paraffin wax, combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam is studied under constant heat flux and constant temperature conditions. By varying the heat flux between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 or maintaining a boundary temperature of 60 C for four graphite foam bulk densities, the impact on the rate of thermal energy storage is discussed. Thermal charging experiments indicate that thermal conductivity of the composite is an insufficient metric to compare the influence of graphite foam on the rate of thermal energy storage of the PCM composite. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to melt for various boundary conditions and graphite foam bulk densities, it is determined that bulk density selection is dependent on the applied boundary condition. A greater bulk density is advantageous for samples exposed to a constant temperature near the melting temperature as compared to constant heat flux conditions where a lower bulk density is adequate. Furthermore, the anisotropic nature of graphite foam bulk densities greater than 50 kg/m3 is shown to have an insignificant impact on the rate of thermal charging. These experimental results are used to validate a computational model for future use in the design of thermal batteries for waste heat recovery.

  12. Conformational Changes Followed by Complete Unzipping of DNA Double Helix by Charge-Tuned Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bera, Subhas C; Sanyal, Kasturi; Senapati, Dulal; Mishra, Padmaja P

    2016-05-12

    The complete unzipping of DNA double helix by small size gold nanoparticles having weakly positive surface charge has been monitored using ensemble and single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) techniques. We believe, as the gold nanoparticles have positive charge on the surface, the DNA and nanoparticles were pulled together to form two single strands. The positively charged ligands on the nanoparticles attached to the DNA, and the hydrophobic ligands of the nanoparticles became tangled with each other, pulling the nanoparticles into clusters. At the same time, the nanoparticles pulled the DNA apart. The conformational changes followed by unzipping have been investigated for long DNA (calf thymus DNA) as well as for short DNA (∼40 base pair) using ensemble methods like circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, fluorescence intercalation assay, viscometric method, and single molecule FRET imaging. This observation not only reveals a new aspect in the field of nano-bio interface but also provides additional information about DNA dynamics. PMID:27082012

  13. Fixed Lunate Flexion Deformity in Distal Radius Fractures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanglim; Yu, Jae-Ha; Jeon, Suk Ha

    2016-06-01

    Carpal malalignments in malunion of distal radius fracture are considered as an adaptive response of the carpus to loss of normal architecture of the distal radius. This condition leads to mechanical overload, ligament attenuation and progressive dynamic instability around the wrist joint. Radial corrective osteotomy is suggested as a treatment option of carpal malalignment after distal radius malunion. In radiocarpal malalignment, the lunate is usually observed in flexion in contrast to its extension posture in the more common midcarpal malalignment. We report two cases of fixed lunate flexion deformity after a distal radius fracture, in which reduction and fixation of fresh fracture or corrective osteotomy of malunion were not successful. Arthritic changes were observed in the radiolunate joint on arthroscopy. Thus, fixed flexion deformity of the lunate might be associated with posttraumatic arthritic change in the radiolunate joint. PMID:27247752

  14. Fixed Lunate Flexion Deformity in Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sanglim; Yu, Jae-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Carpal malalignments in malunion of distal radius fracture are considered as an adaptive response of the carpus to loss of normal architecture of the distal radius. This condition leads to mechanical overload, ligament attenuation and progressive dynamic instability around the wrist joint. Radial corrective osteotomy is suggested as a treatment option of carpal malalignment after distal radius malunion. In radiocarpal malalignment, the lunate is usually observed in flexion in contrast to its extension posture in the more common midcarpal malalignment. We report two cases of fixed lunate flexion deformity after a distal radius fracture, in which reduction and fixation of fresh fracture or corrective osteotomy of malunion were not successful. Arthritic changes were observed in the radiolunate joint on arthroscopy. Thus, fixed flexion deformity of the lunate might be associated with posttraumatic arthritic change in the radiolunate joint. PMID:27247752

  15. 77 FR 58591 - Report on Waste Burial Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Burial Facilities AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft NUREG; request for comment... document entitled: NUREG-1307 Revision 15, ``Report on Waste Burial Charges: Changes in Decommissioning... a document is referenced. The NUREG-1307, Revision 15 is available electronically under...

  16. Search for a fourth generation charge {minus}1/3 quark via flavor changing neutral currents

    SciTech Connect

    The D0 Collaboration

    1996-07-01

    There is some likelihood that a light (< m{sub t}) fourth generation charge -1/3 quark (b{prime}) would decay predominantly via loop induced flavor changing neutral currents. The charged current decay of b{prime} to charm would be highly Cabibbo suppressed due to the fact that it changes the generation number by two. The D0 experiment has searched for b{prime} pair production where one or both b{prime} quarks decays via b{prime} {r_arrow} b+{gamma}, giving signatures photon + three jets and two photons + two jets. WE don not see a significant excess of such events over background. In both modes, we set an upper limit on the cross section times branching ratio that is sufficient to rule out a standard sequential b{prime} decaying predominantly via FCNC in the mass range m{sub Z}/2 < m{sub b{prime}} < m{sub Z} + m{sub b}. For b{prime} masses larger than this, the dominant FCNC decay mode is expected to be b{prime} {r_arrow} b + Z. 14 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Coordinated changes of adenylate energy charge and ATP/ADP: use in ecotoxicological studies.

    PubMed

    Thébault, M T; Raffin, J P; Picado, A M; Mendonça, E; Skorkowski, E F; Le Gal, Y

    2000-05-01

    The coordinated variations of the adenylate energy charge and ATP/ADP ratio were modeled and a function that depends on the numerical value of the adenylate kinase-catalyzed reaction has been derived. The model allows sensitive detection of the effects of xenobiotics on adenylate kinase and its cellular environment and offers a robust estimation of the direct or indirect effects of pollutants on the adenylate kinase system: data obtained in laboratory studies on shrimp exposed to cadmium and in field studies on oysters either exposed to polychloro-biphenyl compounds or located in a heavily polluted area indicate that xenobiotics affect the adenylate kinase reaction directly or by changing its cellular environment. These results demonstrate that application of the model to the treatment of ecotoxicological data allows detection of energetic changes that would have been missed by simple analysis of the usual energetic parameters, and should overcome problems encountered in using energetic parameters during assessment of pollution monitoring. PMID:10805989

  18. Radius of curvature controlled mirror

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Rathke, John Wickham; Schultheiss, Thomas John; Shinn, Michelle D.; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-17

    A controlled radius of curvature mirror assembly comprising: a distortable mirror having a reflective surface and a rear surface; and in descending order from the rear surface; a counter-distortion plate; a flow diverter having a flow diverter aperture at the center thereof; a flow return plate having a flow return aperture at the center thereof; a thermal isolation plate having a thermal isolation plate aperture at the center thereof and a flexible heater having a rear surface and a flexible heater aperture at the center thereof; a double walled tube defining a coolant feed chamber and a coolant return chamber; said coolant feed chamber extending to and through the flow diverter aperture and terminating at the counter-distortion plate and the coolant return chamber extending to and through the thermal isolation backplate and terminating at the flow diverter; and a coolant feed and a coolant return exit at the rear of said flexible heater.

  19. Treatment of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Lichtman, David M; Bindra, Randipsingh R; Boyer, Martin I; Putnam, Matthew D; Ring, David; Slutsky, David J; Taras, John S; Watters, William C; Goldberg, Michael J; Keith, Michael; Turkelson, Charles M; Wies, Janet L; Haralson, Robert H; Boyer, Kevin M; Hitchcock, Kristin; Raymond, Laura

    2010-03-01

    The clinical practice guideline is based on a systematic review of published studies on the treatment of distal radius fractures in adults. None of the 29 recommendations made by the work group was graded as strong; most are graded as inconclusive or consensus; seven are graded as weak. The remaining five moderate-strength recommendations include surgical fixation, rather than cast fixation, for fractures with postreduction radial shortening >3 mm, dorsal tilt >10 degrees , or intra-articular displacement or step-off >2 mm; use of rigid immobilization rather than removable splints for nonsurgical treatment; making a postreduction true lateral radiograph of the carpus to assess dorsal radial ulnar joint alignment; beginning early wrist motion following stable fixation; and recommending adjuvant treatment with vitamin C to prevent disproportionate pain. PMID:20190108

  20. Charge moment change and lightning-driven electric fields associated with negative sprites and halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingbo; Cummer, Steven; Lu, Gaopeng; Zigoneanu, Lucian

    2012-09-01

    Sprites are structured high altitude optical emissions produced by lightning-driven electric fields. Both strong positive and negative cloud to ground flashes (CGs) are capable of initiating sprites. However, reported sprites are almost exclusively produced by +CGs. The very limited number of negative polarity sprites makes it difficult to reveal their morphologies and mechanisms. Since 2008, we have operated low light cameras at 5 locations in the United States to detect lightning-driven transient luminous events (TLEs). At Duke University, two pairs of magnetic sensors simultaneously record lightning-radiated magnetic fields. During 4 years of observations, the low light cameras collectively captured 1651 sprite events. Among them, 6 were produced by -CG lightning, which was confirmed by both the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and magnetic field measurements. All of these negative sprites show similar features in their morphology, lightning source current, and lightning-driven ambient electric fields. They all initiate within a few ms from their parent lightning discharges and always are accompanied by sprite halos. Compared to positive sprites, the downward streamers in negative sprites terminate at higher altitudes, about 55-60 km. The extracted source current of their parent lightning discharges is very impulsive and produces at least 450 C km charge moment change in 0.5 ms or less. Unlike most +CG strokes, essentially no continuing current follows these -CGs. Thus the uniformity of negative sprite morphology appears to reflect the uniformity of the characteristics of high charge transfer negative strokes. Numerical simulation shows these impulsive source currents produce very high (>2 Ek, where Ek is the local air breakdown field) but short-lived electric fields at halo altitudes between 70 km and 90 km. At streamer termination altitudes, the inferred background electric field is 0.2-0.3 Ek, which is close to but below the critical field (0.4 Ek

  1. Kinetic theory of plasma adiabatic major radius compression in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkova, M. V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Azizov, E. A.; Romannikov, A. N.; Herrmann, H. W.

    1998-05-01

    In order to understand the individual charged particle behavior as well as plasma macroparameters (temperature, density, etc.) during the adiabatic major radius compression (R-compression) in a tokamak, a kinetic approach is used. The perpendicular electric field from the Ohm's law at zero resistivity is made use of in order to describe particle motion during the R-compression. Expressions for both passing and trapped particle energy and pitch angle change are derived for a plasma with high aspect ratio and circular magnetic surfaces. The particle behavior near the passing trapped boundary during the compression is studied to simulate the compression-induced collisional losses of alpha particles. Qualitative agreement is obtained with the alphas loss measurements in deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [World Survey of Activities in Controlled Fusion Research [Nucl. Fusion special supplement (1991)] (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991)]. The plasma macroparameters evolution at the R-compression is calculated by solving the gyroaveraged drift kinetic equation.

  2. Thermal charging study of compressed expanded natural graphite/phase change material composites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mallow, Anne; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Jr., Samuel

    2016-08-12

    The thermal charging performance of paraffin wax combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam was studied for different graphite bulk densities. Constant heat fluxes between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 were applied, as well as a constant boundary temperature of 60 °C. Thermal charging experiments indicate that, in the design of thermal batteries, thermal conductivity of the composite alone is an insufficient metric to determine the influence of the graphite foam on the thermal energy storage. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to end of melt for each applied boundary condition, the energy storage performancemore » was calculated to show the effects of composite thermal conductivity, graphite bulk density, and latent heat capacity. For the experimental volume, the addition of graphite beyond a graphite bulk density of 100 kg/m3 showed limited benefit on the energy storage performance due to the decrease in latent heat storage capacity. These experimental results are used to validate a numerical model to predict the time to melt and for future use in the design of heat exchangers with graphite-foam based phase change material composites. As a result, size scale effects are explored parametrically with the validated model.« less

  3. ON THE CONSTANCY OF THE SOLAR RADIUS. III

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, R. I.; Emilio, M.; Kuhn, J. R. E-mail: memilio@uepg.b

    2010-06-20

    The Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory satellite has operated for over a sunspot cycle. This instrument is now relatively well understood and provides a nearly continuous record of the solar radius in combination with previously developed algorithms. Because these data are obtained from above Earth's atmosphere, they are uniquely sensitive to possible long-term changes of the Sun's size. We report here on the first homogeneous, highly precise, and complete solar-cycle measurement of the Sun's radius variability. Our results show that any intrinsic changes in the solar radius that are synchronous with the sunspot cycle must be smaller than 23 mas peak to peak. In addition, we find that the average solar radius must not be changing (on average) by more than 1.2 mas yr{sup -1}. If ground- and space-based measurements are both correct, the pervasive difference between the constancy of the solar radius seen from space and the apparent ground-based solar astrometric variability can only be accounted for by long-term changes in the terrestrial atmosphere.

  4. Diagnosing Meteorological Conditions Associated with Sprites and Lightning with Large Charge Moment Changes (CMC) over Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Lizxandra Flores; Lang, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Sprites are a category of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the upper atmosphere above the tops of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). They are commonly associated with lightning strokes that produce large charge moment changes (CMCs). Synergistic use of satellite and radar-retrieved observations together with sounding data, forecasts, and lightning-detection networks allowed the diagnosis and analysis of the meteorological conditions associated with sprites as well as large-CMC lightning over Oklahoma. One goal of the NASA-funded effort reported herein is the investigation of the potential for sprite interference with aerospace activities in the 20- 100km altitude range, including research balloons, space missions and other aviation transports.

  5. Changes in the mean square charge radii and electromagnetic moments of neutron-deficient Bi isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-10-01

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron deficient bismuth isotopes at the 306.77 nm atomic transition were carried out at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). New data on isotope shifts and hyperfine structure for 189-198, 211Bi isotopes and isomers were obtained. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and the magnetic moment values were deduced. Marked deviation from the nearly spherical behavior for ground states of bismuth isotopes at N < 109 is demonstrated, in contrast to the lead and thallium isotopic chains. The big isomer shift between I = 1/2 (intruder) and I = 9/2 (normal) states for odd Bi isotopes (A = 193, 195, 197) was found.

  6. Changes in the mean square charge radii and electromagnetic moments of neutron-deficient Bi isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barzakh, A. E. Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-10-15

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron deficient bismuth isotopes at the 306.77 nm atomic transition were carried out at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). New data on isotope shifts and hyperfine structure for {sup 189–198,} {sup 211}Bi isotopes and isomers were obtained. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and the magnetic moment values were deduced. Marked deviation from the nearly spherical behavior for ground states of bismuth isotopes at N < 109 is demonstrated, in contrast to the lead and thallium isotopic chains. The big isomer shift between I = 1/2 (intruder) and I = 9/2 (normal) states for odd Bi isotopes (A = 193, 195, 197) was found.

  7. Treatment of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jayson; Gross, Leeaht

    2013-08-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for treating distal radius fractures (DRF). Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The DRF AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from patient indications that generally accompany a DRF, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature. The 216 indications and 10 treatments were developed by the Writing Panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, the Review Panel, a separate group of volunteer physicians, independently reviewed these materials to ensure that they were representative of patient scenarios that clinicians are likely to encounter in daily practice. Finally, the multidisciplinary Voting Panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3). PMID:23908256

  8. Stabilization of Internal Charges in a Protein: Water Penetration or Conformational Change?

    PubMed Central

    Denisov, Vladimir P.; Schlessman, Jamie L.; García-Moreno E., Bertrand; Halle, Bertil

    2004-01-01

    The ionizable amino acid side chains of proteins are usually located at the surface. However, in some proteins an ionizable group is embedded in an apolar internal region. Such buried ionizable groups destabilize the protein and may trigger conformational changes in response to pH variations. Because of the prohibitive energetic cost of transferring a charged group from water to an apolar medium, other stabilizing factors must be invoked, such as ionization-induced water penetration or structural changes. To examine the role of water penetration, we have measured the 17O and 2H magnetic relaxation dispersions (MRD) for the V66E and V66K mutants of staphylococcal nuclease, where glutamic acid and lysine residues are buried in predominantly apolar environments. At neutral pH, where these residues are uncharged, we find no evidence of buried water molecules near the mutation site. This contrasts with a previous cryogenic crystal structure of the V66E mutant, but is consistent with the room-temperature crystal structure reported here. MRD measurements at different pH values show that ionization of Glu-66 or Lys-66 is not accompanied by penetration of long-lived water molecules. On the other hand, the MRD data are consistent with a local conformational change in response to ionization of the internal residues. PMID:15377517

  9. Experimental study of finite Larmor radius effects

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, K.W.

    1980-08-01

    Linear Z-pinches in Ar, Kr, Xe, N/sub 2/, and He are experimentally studied in regimes where strong finite Larmor radius effects could provide a significant stabilizing effect. Scaling arguments show that for deuterium such a pinch has an electron line density of order 2 x 10/sup 15//cm. For higher Z plasmas a higher line density is allowed, the exact value of which depends on the average ion charge. The pinch is formed by puffing gas axially through the cathode towards the anode of an evacuated pinch chamber. When the gas reaches the anode, the pinch bank is fired. The pinch current rises in 2 to 3 ..mu..sec to a maximum of 100 to 200 kA. The pinch bank capacitance is 900 ..mu..F, and the external inductance is 100 nH. Additionally, the bank is fused to increase dI/dt. The primary diagnostics are a framing camera, a spatially resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and X-ray absorption.

  10. Charge distributions due to paramagnetism and diamagnetism in thin mesoscopic superconducting rings [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bao-He; Zhou, Shi-Ping; Zha, Guo-Qiao; Yang, Kui

    2005-05-01

    The charge distribution in a thin mesoscopic superconducting ring is investigated by the phenomenological Ginzburg Landau theory. Considering a ring in a giant vortex state, we find that the charge near the inner radius may change its sign from negative to positive with increasing the applied field. It is also found that the charge distributions are due to the competition between the paramagnetic Meissner effect and the diamagnetic Meissner effect.

  11. Invariance of molecular charge transport upon changes of extended molecule size and several related issues

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary As a sanity test for the theoretical method employed, studies on (steady-state) charge transport through molecular devices usually confine themselves to check whether the method in question satisfies the charge conservation. Another important test of the theory’s correctness is to check that the computed current does not depend on the choice of the central region (also referred to as the “extended molecule”). This work addresses this issue and demonstrates that the relevant transport and transport-related properties are indeed invariant upon changing the size of the extended molecule, when the embedded molecule can be described within a general single-particle picture (namely, a second-quantized Hamiltonian bilinear in the creation and annihilation operators). It is also demonstrates that the invariance of nonequilibrium properties is exhibited by the exact results but not by those computed approximately within ubiquitous wide- and flat-band limits (WBL and FBL, respectively). To exemplify the limitations of the latter, the phenomenon of negative differential resistance (NDR) is considered. It is shown that the exactly computed current may exhibit a substantial NDR, while the NDR effect is absent or drastically suppressed within the WBL and FBL approximations. The analysis done in conjunction with the WBLs and FBLs reveals why general studies on nonequilibrium properties require a more elaborate theoretical than studies on linear response properties (e.g., ohmic conductance and thermopower) at zero temperature. Furthermore, examples are presented that demonstrate that treating parts of electrodes adjacent to the embedded molecule and the remaining semi-infinite electrodes at different levels of theory (which is exactly what most NEGF-DFT approaches do) is a procedure that yields spurious structures in nonlinear ranges of current–voltage curves. PMID:27335734

  12. Invariance of molecular charge transport upon changes of extended molecule size and several related issues.

    PubMed

    Bâldea, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    As a sanity test for the theoretical method employed, studies on (steady-state) charge transport through molecular devices usually confine themselves to check whether the method in question satisfies the charge conservation. Another important test of the theory's correctness is to check that the computed current does not depend on the choice of the central region (also referred to as the "extended molecule"). This work addresses this issue and demonstrates that the relevant transport and transport-related properties are indeed invariant upon changing the size of the extended molecule, when the embedded molecule can be described within a general single-particle picture (namely, a second-quantized Hamiltonian bilinear in the creation and annihilation operators). It is also demonstrates that the invariance of nonequilibrium properties is exhibited by the exact results but not by those computed approximately within ubiquitous wide- and flat-band limits (WBL and FBL, respectively). To exemplify the limitations of the latter, the phenomenon of negative differential resistance (NDR) is considered. It is shown that the exactly computed current may exhibit a substantial NDR, while the NDR effect is absent or drastically suppressed within the WBL and FBL approximations. The analysis done in conjunction with the WBLs and FBLs reveals why general studies on nonequilibrium properties require a more elaborate theoretical than studies on linear response properties (e.g., ohmic conductance and thermopower) at zero temperature. Furthermore, examples are presented that demonstrate that treating parts of electrodes adjacent to the embedded molecule and the remaining semi-infinite electrodes at different levels of theory (which is exactly what most NEGF-DFT approaches do) is a procedure that yields spurious structures in nonlinear ranges of current-voltage curves. PMID:27335734

  13. Ultrasound-Assisted Distal Radius Fracture Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Socransky, Steve; Skinner, Andrew; Bromley, Mark; Smith, Andrew; Anawati, Alexandre; Middaugh, Jeff; Ross, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Closed reduction of distal radius fractures (CRDRF) is a commonly performed emergency department (ED) procedure. The use of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) to diagnose fractures and guide reduction has previously been described. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the addition of PoCUS to CRDRF changed the perception of successful initial reduction. This was measured by the rate of further reduction attempts based on PoCUS following the initial clinical determination of achievement of best possible reduction. Methods  We performed a multicenter prospective cohort study, using a convenience sample of adult ED patients presenting with a distal radius fracture to five Canadian EDs. All study physicians underwent standardized PoCUS training for fractures. Standard clinically-guided best possible fracture reduction was initially performed. PoCUS was then used to assess the reduction adequacy. Repeat reduction was performed if deemed indicated. A post-reduction radiograph was then performed. Clinician impression of reduction adequacy was scored on a 5 point Likert scale following the initial clinically-guided reduction and following each PoCUS scan and the post-reduction radiograph. Results  There were 131 patients with 132 distal radius fractures. Twelve cases were excluded prior to analysis. There was no significant difference in the assessment of the initial reduction status by PoCUS as compared to the clinical exam (mean score: 3.8 vs. 3.9; p = 0.370; OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.46 to 1.72; p = 0.87). Significantly fewer cases fell into the uncertain category with PoCUS than with clinical assessment (2 vs 12; p = 0.008). Repeat reduction was performed in 49 patients (41.2%). Repeat reduction led to a significant improvement (p < 0.001) in the PoCUS determined adequacy of reduction (mean score: 4.3 vs 3.1; p < 0.001). In this group, the odds ratio for adequate vs. uncertain or inadequate reduction assessment using PoCUS was 12.5 (95% CI 3

  14. Ultrasound-Assisted Distal Radius Fracture Reduction.

    PubMed

    Socransky, Steve; Skinner, Andrew; Bromley, Mark; Smith, Andrew; Anawati, Alexandre; Middaugh, Jeff; Ross, Peter; Atkinson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Closed reduction of distal radius fractures (CRDRF) is a commonly performed emergency department (ED) procedure. The use of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) to diagnose fractures and guide reduction has previously been described. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the addition of PoCUS to CRDRF changed the perception of successful initial reduction. This was measured by the rate of further reduction attempts based on PoCUS following the initial clinical determination of achievement of best possible reduction. Methods  We performed a multicenter prospective cohort study, using a convenience sample of adult ED patients presenting with a distal radius fracture to five Canadian EDs. All study physicians underwent standardized PoCUS training for fractures. Standard clinically-guided best possible fracture reduction was initially performed. PoCUS was then used to assess the reduction adequacy. Repeat reduction was performed if deemed indicated. A post-reduction radiograph was then performed. Clinician impression of reduction adequacy was scored on a 5 point Likert scale following the initial clinically-guided reduction and following each PoCUS scan and the post-reduction radiograph. Results  There were 131 patients with 132 distal radius fractures. Twelve cases were excluded prior to analysis. There was no significant difference in the assessment of the initial reduction status by PoCUS as compared to the clinical exam (mean score: 3.8 vs. 3.9; p = 0.370; OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.46 to 1.72; p = 0.87). Significantly fewer cases fell into the uncertain category with PoCUS than with clinical assessment (2 vs 12; p = 0.008). Repeat reduction was performed in 49 patients (41.2%). Repeat reduction led to a significant improvement (p < 0.001) in the PoCUS determined adequacy of reduction (mean score: 4.3 vs 3.1; p < 0.001). In this group, the odds ratio for adequate vs. uncertain or inadequate reduction assessment using PoCUS was 12.5 (95% CI 3

  15. Void structure and density change of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Gazda, J.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine void structure, distribution, and density changes of several promising vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). Combined effects of dynamically charged helium and neutron damage on density change, void distribution, and microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy have been determined after irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degree}C in the DHCE, and the results compared with those from a non-DHCE in which helium generation was negligible.

  16. The Mass - Radius Relation of Giant Gas Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik Orhan, Zeynep; Kayhan, Cenk; Yildiz, Mutlu

    2016-07-01

    Thanks to CoRoT and Kepler space telescope, the thousand of exoplanets have been discovered. The only observational construct on planetary interior is planetary radius. Mass-radius relation is widely studied in the literature. Many mechanisms have been suggested in the literature to explain the inflated radii of these planets. In this study, our aim is to consider planet and host star interaction and assess the basic mechanisms responsible for excess in radius of transiting giant gas planets. We show that there is much more definite relation between radius and energy per gram per second (log (l- )). There is a good linear relation between planetary radius and log (l- ) for log (l- /l0 ) < 3.75. The relation changes if log (l- /l0 ) > 3.5. There is a relatively clump for the range log (l- /l0 ) > 3.75. The reason for the change in the relation may be related with the structure of the heated part of the planets. We focus on these inflated planet.

  17. Salt-dependent changes of 9-aminoacridine fluorescence as a measure of charge densities of membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chow, W S; Barber, J

    1980-09-01

    1. When negatively-charged membranes or particles are added to a solution containing 9-aminoacridine and only low concentrations of salts, fluorescence from the dye molecules is decreased. The quenching mechanism is a result of an increase in concentration of the positively charged dye molecule at the surface (Searle, G.F.W. and Barber, J. (1978) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 502, 309-320). 2. Fluorescence quenching is released on adding salts, the effectiveness being generally dependent on the valency of the action used: C3+ > C2+ > C+, in line with a decrease in the surface potential. 3. The differential effect of cations is analyzed according to the Gouy-Chapman theory to obtain estimates for sigma, the net charge per unit area on a number of different surfaces. 4. It was found that in some cases the estimated value of sigma was not constant for a particular membrane system, but increased with salt concentration. The variation was much diminished, though not eliminated, when more rigid surfaces were examined. 5. An alternative method based on the distribution of a divalent cation (methyl viologen) in the diffuse part of the double layer was also used to estimate the overall charge density. This technique gave values lower than those obtained from 9-aminoacridine fluorescence changes. 6. It is argued that 9-aminoacridine cations distribute near localized, charged areas of surfaces, and that the salt-dependent estimates of sigma partly reflect charge redistribution accompanying changes in electrostatic screening by cations. It appears that 9-aminoacridine is a convenient probe to monitor changes in the heterogeneity of charged membranes. PMID:7451810

  18. Controlling the Conformational Changes in Donor–Acceptor [4]-Dendralenes through Intramolecular Charge-Transfer Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Forgie, John C; McEntee, Greg J; Talpur, M Munsif A; Skabara, Peter J; Westgate, Thomas DJ; McDouall, Joseph JW; Auinger, Michael; Coles, Simon J; Hursthouse, Michael B

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of two [4]-dendralene compounds incorporating thiophene-(p-nitrophenyl) donor–acceptor units is presented. The dendralenes adopt two different conformers in solution and solid state and the transformation between the structures can be controlled by light and heat. The electron-donating components of the dendralenes are represented by bromothienyl (in 13) and ethylenedioxythiophene(EDOT)-thienyl (in 15) end-groups. The most facile transformation involves the isomerisation of donor–acceptor conjugated systems (a conformers) into structures in which only the thiophenes are conjugated (b conformers), and this process is driven by ambient light. The structures of the two conformers of compound 13 are confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies and the structural changes in both compounds have been monitored by 1H NMR spectroscopy and absorption studies. The transformations were found to be first-order processes with rate constants of k = 0.0027 s−1 and k = 0.00022 s−1 for 13 and 15, respectively. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G∗ level give credence to the proposed mechanism for the a→b conversion, which involves photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) as the key step. The EDOT derivative (15) can be polymerised by electrochemical oxidation and a combination of cyclic voltammetry and UV/Vis spectroelectrochemical experiments indicate that the a conformer can be trapped and stabilised in the solid state. PMID:19760710

  19. Proton Radius, Darwin-Foldy Term and Radiative Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    It is not an easy task to define the proton charge radius. Namely, by definition, the proton radius is the slope of the GESachs form factor of the proton at zero momentum transfer, provided one has subtracted from the scattering cross sections, all effects due to QED. That means that radiative corrections must be subtracted; these otherwise ``mask'' the proton structure from the surroundings. On the other hand, the self-energy of the proton (not of the electron or of the muon) also influence the spectrum of atomic hydrogen, or muonic hydrogen, respectively. In the talk, we shall review the difficulties faced by a consistent definition, offer a way to resolve them, and review the current status of Lamb shift predictions in muonic hydrogen, with a special reference to the current experimental-theoretical discrepancy, as reported by the CREMA collaboration.

  20. 75 FR 72845 - Notice of Availability; NUREG-1307, Revision 14, “Report on Waste Burial Charges Changes in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Availability; NUREG-1307, Revision 14, ``Report on Waste Burial Charges Changes in.... ACTION: Notice of Availability. SUMMARY: The NRC is announcing the completion and availability of NUREG.... ADDRESSES: NUREG-1307 may be purchased from The Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing...

  1. Changes in mitochondrial surface charge mediate recruitment of signaling molecules during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Heit, Bryan; Yeung, Tony; Grinstein, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions with negative lipids contribute to the subcellular localization of polycationic proteins. In situ measurements using cytosolic probes of surface charge indicate that normal mitochondria are not noticeably electronegative. However, during apoptosis mitochondria accrue negative charge and acquire the ability to attract cationic proteins, including K-Ras. The marked increase in the surface charge of mitochondria occurs early in apoptosis, preceding depolarization of their inner membrane, cytochrome c release, and flipping of phosphatidylserine across the plasmalemma. Using novel biosensors, we determined that the increased electronegativity of the mitochondria coincided with and was likely attributable to increased exposure of cardiolipin, which is dianionic. Ectopic (over)expression of cardiolipin-binding proteins precluded the increase in surface charge and inhibited apoptosis, implying that mitochondrial exposure of negatively charged lipids is required for progression of programmed cell death. PMID:20926778

  2. The radius distribution of planets around cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Timothy D.; Swift, Jonathan

    2014-08-10

    We calculate an empirical, non-parametric estimate of the shape of the period-marginalized radius distribution of planets with periods less than 150 days using the small yet well-characterized sample of cool (T{sub eff} < 4000 K) dwarf stars in the Kepler catalog. In particular, we present and validate a new procedure, based on weighted kernel density estimation, to reconstruct the shape of the planet radius function down to radii smaller than the completeness limit of the survey at the longest periods. Under the assumption that the period distribution of planets does not change dramatically with planet radius, we show that the occurrence of planets around these stars continues to increase to below 1 R{sub ⊕}, and that there is no strong evidence for a turnover in the planet radius function. In fact, we demonstrate using many iterations of simulated data that a spurious turnover may be inferred from data even when the true distribution continues to rise toward smaller radii. Finally, the sharp rise in the radius distribution below ∼3 R{sub ⊕} implies that a large number of planets await discovery around cool dwarfs as the sensitivities of ground-based transit surveys increase.

  3. Precision charging of microparticles in plasma via the Rayleigh instability for evaporating charged liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, Euan; Mahony, Charles M. O.; Potts, Hugh E.; Everest, Paul; Rutherford, David; Askari, Sadegh; Kelsey, Colin; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Hamilton, Neil; McDowell, David A.; Mariotti, Davide; Maguire, Paul; Diver, Declan A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we describe a novel method for delivering a precise, known amount of electric charge to a micron-sized solid target. Aerosolised microparticles passed through a plasma discharge will acquire significant electric charge. The fluid stability under evaporative stress is a key aspect that is core to the research. Initially stable charged aerosols subject to evaporation (i.e. a continually changing radius) may encounter the Rayleigh stability limit. This limit arises from the electrostatic and surface tension forces and determines the maximum charge a stable droplet can retain, as a function of radius. We demonstrate that even if the droplet charge is initially much less than the Rayleigh limit, the stability limit will be encountered as the droplet evaporates. The instability emission mechanism is strongly linked to the final charge deposited on the target, providing a mechanism that can be used to ensure a predictable charge deposit on a known encapsulated microparticle. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from EPSRC via Grant Numbers EP/K006142/1 and EP/K006088/1.

  4. Chondromyxoid Fibroma of Radius: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bagewadi, Rajakumar M.; Hippargi, Surekha B.

    2016-01-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour accounting to less than 1% of bone tumours. It is most commonly seen in lower extremity involving tibia. CMF of radius is rare. We report a rare case of CMF of proximal radius in a 37-year-old female who presented with swelling and pain over right elbow. Wide local excision of proximal radius along with radial head was done and above elbow POP slab was applied for one month. Elbow range of movement exercises started after one month. PMID:27437232

  5. Management of Complications of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Mathews, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Treating a fracture of the distal radius may require the surgeon to make a difficult decision between surgical treatment and nonsurgical management. The use of surgical fixation has recently increased owing to complications associated with conservative treatment. However, conservative action may be necessary depending on certain patient factors. The treating surgeon must be aware of the possible complications associated with distal radius fracture treatments to prevent their occurrence. Prevention can be achieved with a proper understanding of the mechanism of these complications. This article discusses the most recent evidence on how to manage and prevent complications following a fracture of the distal radius. PMID:25934197

  6. Chondromyxoid Fibroma of Radius: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bagewadi, Rajakumar M; Nerune, Savitri Mallikarjun; Hippargi, Surekha B

    2016-05-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour accounting to less than 1% of bone tumours. It is most commonly seen in lower extremity involving tibia. CMF of radius is rare. We report a rare case of CMF of proximal radius in a 37-year-old female who presented with swelling and pain over right elbow. Wide local excision of proximal radius along with radial head was done and above elbow POP slab was applied for one month. Elbow range of movement exercises started after one month. PMID:27437232

  7. Radius of gyration and intrinsic viscosity of polyelectrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Milas, M.; Borsali, R.; Rinaudo, M.

    1993-12-31

    Relatively low molecular weights polyelectrolytes (10{sup 4}-10{sup 6}) behave as worm-like chain when electrostatic repulsions are assumed to govern the excluded volume parameter. Under such conditions, predictions of chain expansion and effect of polyelectrolyte concentrations are made assuming that unperturbed dimensions could be obtained at infinite salt content. Experimental studies of an ionic polysaccharide, namely the Na-hyaluronate, were done and the values obtained for the radius of gyration as well as the intrinsic viscosity at different charge densities are in good agreement with the predictions.

  8. Progress towards a measurement of the proton radius in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutha, A. C.; Bezginov, N.; Ferchichi, I.; George, M. C.; Weel, M.; Storry, C. H.; Hessels, E. A.

    2014-05-01

    The proton's charge radius continues to have a 7 standard-deviation discrepancy between its CODATA value and determinations from muonic hydrogen measurements. Improved measurements in atomic hydrogen will shed light on this discrepancy. We present a novel experimental scheme, using frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields in standing-wave waveguides, to measure the n=2 Lamb shift in a fast metastable hydrogen beam. We report on our progress, including our first observations of microwave transitions in a fast metastable beam and high signal-to-noise ratio detection in a large-solid-angle photoionization detector. We acknowledge funding from NSERC, CFI, CRC, ORF, and NIST.

  9. Large-Larmor-radius interchange instability

    SciTech Connect

    Ripin, B.H.; McLean, E.A.; Manka, C.K.; Pawley, C.; Stamper, J.A.; Peyser, T.A.; Mostovych, A.N.; Grun, J.; Hassam, A.B.; Huba, J.

    1987-11-16

    We observe linear and nonlinear features of a strong plasma/magnetic field interchange Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the limit of large ion Larmor radius. The instability undergoes rapid linear growth culminating in free-streaming flute tips.

  10. Arthroscopic management of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, Ethan R; Chloros, George D; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Kuzma, Gary R

    2006-11-01

    Arthroscopy has the advantage of providing a direct and accurate assessment of the articular surfaces and detecting the presence of injuries associated with distal radius fractures. Current indications, although numerous and potentially expanding, also are controversial. This report presents a global view of the current status of arthroscopy in the management of distal radius fractures. The rationale of arthroscopic treatment, the available evidence, and finally the diagnosis and treatment are discussed. PMID:17095385

  11. Is the proton radius puzzle evidence of extra dimensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahia, F.; Lemos, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The proton charge radius inferred from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is not compatible with the previous value given by CODATA-2010, which, on its turn, essentially relies on measurements of the electron-proton interaction. The proton's new size was extracted from the 2S-2P Lamb shift in the muonic hydrogen, which showed an energy excess of 0.3 meV in comparison to the theoretical prediction, evaluated with the CODATA radius. Higher-dimensional gravity is a candidate to explain this discrepancy, since the muon-proton gravitational interaction is stronger than the electron-proton interaction and, in the context of braneworld models, the gravitational potential can be hugely amplified in short distances when compared to the Newtonian potential. Motivated by these ideas, we study a muonic hydrogen confined in a thick brane. We show that the muon-proton gravitational interaction modified by extra dimensions can provide the additional separation of 0.3 meV between the 2S and 2P states. In this scenario, the gravitational energy depends on the higher-dimensional Planck mass and indirectly on the brane thickness. Studying the behavior of the gravitational energy with respect to the brane thickness in a realistic range, we find constraints for the fundamental Planck mass that solve the proton radius puzzle and are consistent with previous experimental bounds.

  12. [Differential treatment of fractures of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Oestern, H J; Hüls, E

    1994-01-01

    Treatment of distal fractures of the radius has undergone considerable change during recent years. The cause for this lies primarily in the poor results of conservative treatments. In addition to osseous instability, the fractures of the radius are frequently combined with ligamentary instability as well, thereby exceeding the ability of conservative treatment. Among the many classifications, the AO classification of these fractures has proven to be the best and most widely accepted. This classification allows the recommendation of suitable procedures of treatment. The problem with inadequately healed fractures of the radius lies in the inherent unphysiological loading of the joint in the characteristic dorsal tilted position. This leads to a pathological displacement of the radius of flexion and extension and thereby to an overloading of the dorsal joint cartilage. The shortening of the radius leads to a mechanical impingement of the triangular fibrocartilagenous complex. The Kirschner wire fixation is particularly indicated in type A and type C fractures when combined with an external fixator. Of great importance here is the crossing of the K-wires, best accomplished by inserting an additional wire in a proximal to distal direction to achieve maximal mechanical stability. Biodegradable fixation devices are not yet in widespread use, as high costs and possible foreign body reactions have prevented their acceptance. The plate osteosynthesis has its domain in the treatment of volar luxation fractures (B3) and the partially articular fractures of the radius (B2). The domain of the external fixator, on the other hand, lies in the C2 and C3 fractures in combination with the K-wire osteosynthesis. Changing the mode of treatment to a plate osteosynthesis after two to three weeks allows a functional postoperative treatment. By use of a differentiated treatment regimen, the complication rate can be significantly reduced whose cause frequently lies in repeatedly attempted

  13. Electronegativity Equalization and Partial Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    This article elaborates the relationship between covalent radius, homonuclear bond energy, and electronegativity, and sets the background for bond energy calculation by discussing the nature of heteronuclear covalent bonding on the basis of electronegativity equalization and particle charge. (DT)

  14. Emittance growth from charge density changes in high-current beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.; Mills, R.S.

    1986-01-21

    We use the relation between field energy and rms emittance, together with the property of charge-density homogenization for intense nonuniform beams in linear focusing systems, to derive equations for emittance growth and minimum final emittance. We discuss three problems in which this charge redistribution mechnism is isolated: the 1-D continuous sheet beam, the 2-D continuous round beam, and the 3-D spherical bunch. For each of the three problems, we identify and compare scaling parameters tha determine the emittance growth and minimum final emittance as a function of beam current, emittance, and external focusing strength. Numerical simulations are used to test the equations, to show that the charge redistribution mechanism results in very rapid emittance growth, and to study the detailed time evolution of the beams.

  15. Medicare program; changes to the criteria for determination of reasonable charges--HCFA. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1987-03-01

    This rule revises the Medicare regulations governing reasonable charges for payment for the purchase of used durable medical equipment. This revision is intended to encourage the sale of used equipment to Medicare beneficiaries. In addition, to correct a program inequity and to simplify program administration, we are extending, for services furnished on or after January 1, 1987, one of the provisions of section 9304 of the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985. The provision we are extending deals with determining customary charges for physicians who have terminated their compensation agreements with a hospital. PMID:10301337

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillaspy, J. D.

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews some of the fundamental properties of highly charged ions, the methods of producing them (with particular emphasis on table-top devices), and their use as a tool for both basic science and applied technology. Topics discussed include: charge dependence and scaling laws along isoelectronic or isonuclear sequences (for wavefunction size or Bohr radius, ionization energy, dipole transition energy, relativistic fine structure, hyperfine structure, Zeeman effect, Stark effect, line intensities, linewidths, strength of parity violation, etc), changes in angular momentum coupling schemes, selection rules, interactions with surfaces, electron-impact ionization, the electron beam ion trap (EBIT), ion accelerators, atomic reference data, cosmic chronometers, laboratory x-ray astrophysics, vacuum polarization, solar flares, ion implantation, ion lithography, ion microprobes (SIMS and x-ray microscope), nuclear fusion diagnostics, nanotechnology, quantum computing, cancer therapy and biotechnology.

  17. Diagnosing the Meteorological Conditions Associated with Sprites and Lightning with Large Change Moment Charges (CMC) over Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera Lizxandra Flores; Lang, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Sprites are a category of Transient Luminous Events (TLE's) that occur in the upper atmosphere above the tops of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). They are commonly associated with lightning strokes that produce large charge moment changes (CMCs). Synergistic use of satellite and radar-retrieved observations together with sounding data, forecasts, and lightning-detection-networks allowed the diagnosis and analysis of the meteorological conditions associated with sprites as well as large-CMC lightning over Oklahoma

  18. Evolution and dynamics of charged aerosols in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diver, Declan; Bennet, Euan; Potts, Hugh; Mahony, Charles; Maguire, Paul; Mariotti, Davide

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the evolutionary processes governing the dynamics and stability of charged macroscopic droplets in a discharge plasma is a central component of an innovative collaborative project on bacteria detection. Aerosolized bacteria samples will be injected into a discharge to acquire significant electrical charge. Two key aspects are then core to research: (i) the fluid stability of the charged aerosols under evaporative stress, and (ii) the stochastic component of their motion. (i) Initially stable charged aerosols subject to evaporation (continuously changing radius) may encounter the Rayleigh limit governing the maximum charge QR as a function of radius, arising from the electrostatic and surface tension forces. Additionally, the maximum surface field before charge emission QE can impose further constraints. (ii) A droplet is in any event subject to Brownian motion just like any other small particle, buffeted by a mixture of (dominant) neutrals and plasma, with the latter forming a sheath around the particle. The Brownian motion induced forces the sheath around the grain to move, incurring changes in impacting ion flux that can represent an additional drag term, changing the classical Brownian diffusion. We present analysis for a variety of discharge conditions. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, EP/K006088, EP/K006142.

  19. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    PubMed

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope. PMID:26159097

  20. Mass and radius of cosmic balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yun

    1994-01-01

    Cosmic balloons are spherical domain walls with relativistic particles trapped inside. We derive the exact mass and radius relations for a static cosmic balloon using Gauss-Codazzi equations. The cosmic balloon mass as a function of its radius, M(R), is found to have a functional form similar to that of fermion soliton stars, with a fixed point at 2GM(R)/R approximately or equal to 0.486 which corresponds to the limit of infinite central density. We derive a simple analytical approximation for the mass density of a spherically symmetric relativistic gas star. When applied to the computation of the mass and radius of a cosmic balloon, the analytical approximation yields fairly good agreement with the exact numerical solutions.

  1. Total Charge Changing Cross-Sections of 300 MeV/A Fe26+ Ion Beam in Different Target Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Renu; Kumar, Ashavani

    Total charge changing cross-sections of 300 MeV/A Fe26+ ion beam in Al and combined media of CH2, CR39 and Al were calculated by CR39 track etch detectors using an image analysing system; DM6000 M optical microscope attached with a personal computer installed with Leica QWin Plus software. The CR39 nuclear track detectors were used to identify the incident charged particles and their fragments. Exposed CR39 detectors were etched in 6N NaOH solution + 1% ethyl alcohol at 70 ˚C to visualize the tracks produced by primary ion beam and its fragmentations under optical microscope. The temperature was kept constant throughout the etching within ± 0.1˚C. The present work shows better response of the CR39 track etch detector up to an improved threshold Z/β ˜ 4.6. The cone-diameter distributions were fitted by multiple Gaussians using ROOT software analysis toolkit. The numbers of incident and survived ions were determined within 99.7% confidence levels. The calculated values of total charge changing cross-section were (1663 ± 236) mb in Al target, (1219 ± 29) mb in combined target CH2+CR39+Al and (1020 ± 121) mb in combined target CH2+CR39.

  2. Inside the Bondi radius of M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H. R.; Fabian, A. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Broderick, A. E.

    2015-07-01

    Chandra X-ray observations of the nearby brightest cluster galaxy M87 resolve the hot gas structure across the Bondi accretion radius of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH), a measurement possible in only a handful of systems but complicated by the bright nucleus and jet emission. By stacking only short frame-time observations to limit pileup, and after subtracting the nuclear point spread function, we analysed the X-ray gas properties within the Bondi radius at 0.12-0.22 kpc (1.5-2.8 arcsec), depending on the black hole mass. Within 2 kpc radius, we detect two significant temperature components, which are consistent with constant values of 2 and 0.9 keV down to 0.15 kpc radius. No evidence was found for the expected temperature increase within ˜ 0.25 kpc due to the influence of the SMBH. Within the Bondi radius, the density profile is consistent with ρ ∝ r-1. The lack of a temperature increase inside the Bondi radius suggests that the hot gas structure is not dictated by the SMBH's potential and, together with the shallow density profile, shows that the classical Bondi rate may not reflect the accretion rate on to the SMBH. If this density profile extends in towards the SMBH, the mass accretion rate on to the SMBH could be at least two orders of magnitude less than the Bondi rate, which agrees with Faraday rotation measurements for M87. We discuss the evidence for outflow from the hot gas and the cold gas disc and for cold feedback, where gas cooling rapidly from the hot atmosphere could feed the cirumnuclear disc and fuel the SMBH. At 0.2 kpc radius, the cooler X-ray temperature component represents ˜20 per cent of the total X-ray gas mass and, by losing angular momentum to the hot gas component, could provide a fuel source of cold clouds within the Bondi radius.

  3. Distal radius fracture: diagnosis, treatment, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin Bo

    2014-07-01

    This article presents the diagnosis and treatment of distal radius fractures with emphasis on (1) current common principles, (2) the author's current practices, and (3) controversies. The author emphasizes that displaced distal radius fractures should be approached first with a trial of closed reduction, with or without percutaneous pinning. If this reduction is unstable or unsuccessful, open reduction is indicated. Early treatments include percutaneous pinning through the distal radioulnar joint, early or delayed reattachment/repair of the avulsed dorsal periphery of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), reattachment of the TFCC to the ulna fovea, and late reconstruction. PMID:24996466

  4. Exposure of the forearm and distal radius.

    PubMed

    Klausmeyer, Melissa A; Mudgal, Chaitanya

    2014-11-01

    Approaches to the forearm use internervous planes to allow adequate bone exposure and prevent muscle denervation. The Henry approach utilizes the plane between muscles supplied by the median and radial nerves. The Thompson approach utilizes the plane between muscles supplied by the radial and posterior interosseous nerves. The distal radius may be approached volarly. The extended flexor carpi radialis approach is useful for intraarticular fractures, subacute fractures, and malunions. The distal radius can be approached dorsally by releasing the third dorsal compartment and continuing the dissection subperiosteally. Choice of approach depends on the injury pattern and the need for exposure. PMID:25440071

  5. Effects of corner radius on periodic nanoantenna for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Bo-Kai; Lin, Shih-Che; Nien, Li-Wei; Li, Jia-Han; Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    2015-12-01

    Corner radius is a concept to approximate the fabrication limitation due to the effective beam broadening at the corner in using electron-beam lithography. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of corner radius on the electromagnetic field enhancement and resonance wavelength for three periodic polygon dimers of bowtie, twin square, and twin pentagon. The enhancement factor of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy due to the localized surface plasmon resonances in fabricated gold bowtie nanostructures was investigated using both Raman spectroscopy and finite-difference time-domain simulations. The simulated enhancement factor versus corner radius relation was in agreement with measurements and it could be fitted by a power-law relation. In addition, the resonance wavelength showed blue shift with the increasing corner radius because of the distribution of concentrated charges in a larger area. For different polygons, the corner radius instead of the tip angle is the dominant factor of the electromagnetic field enhancement because the surface charges tend to localize at the corner. Greater enhancements can be obtained by having both the smaller gap and sharper corner although the corner radius effect on intensity enhancement is less than the gap size effect.

  6. The Tidal Radius of the Arches Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosek, Matthew; Lu, Jessica R.; Anderson, Jay; Ghez, Andrea; Morris, Mark; Clarkson, William

    2015-08-01

    At a projected distance of just ˜26 pc from the center of the Milky Way, the Arches cluster allows us to examine the structure of a young massive cluster in the strong tidal environment of the Galactic center (GC). We use the HST WFC3IR camera to conduct an astrometric and photometric study of the outer region of the Arches cluster (R > 6.25”) in order to measure its radial profile. Using proper motions we separate cluster members from field stars down to F153M = 20 mag (˜2.5 M_sun) over a 120” x 120” field of view, covering an area 144 times larger than previous proper motion studies. This is a significant improvement over photometrically-determined cluster membership, which is complicated by the high degree of differential reddening across the field. Using cluster membership probabilities, a derived extinction map, and extensive completeness simulations, we construct the radial profile of the Arches cluster to a radius of ˜80” (˜3.1 pc assuming a distance of 8 kpc). Evidence of mass segregation out to this radius is observed, and no significant tidal tail structure is apparent. We find that the projected radial extent of the Arches cluster is significantly larger than its expected tidal radius. This result suggests either that the cluster is not as close to the GC as previously thought or that it is inflated beyond its nominal tidal radius.

  7. Temporal changes in charge content of cultured chondrocytes from bovine cartilaginous tissues.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, M P; Sinnaya, P; Derry, K; Murphy, W H; Preston, B N

    1997-03-01

    The effective charge content of the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes has been determined while the matrix is being synthesized by cells grown in culture for several weeks. The data were compared with estimates determined by chemical analysis. When measurements were performed after digestion of the matrix with papain, there was close agreement between results obtained from both techniques for proteoglycans synthesized by chondrocytes from nasal septum (a non-articular cartilage). By contrast, no such agreement was observed for proteoglycans synthesized by chondrocytes from articular cartilage, even after solubilization of the matrix with papain. While the charge calculated from chemical analysis showed a constant increase with time in culture, that measured by colloid titration showed a cyclical pattern, with maximal values occurring on days 7 and 24 of culture and a minimal value on day 14. This inability to detect all negative groups present in the matrix synthesized by articular chondrocytes would suggest the involvement of these groups in electrostatic interactions. Partial characterization of proteins synthesized by the pericellular matrix indicates that the decrease in charge content observed on day 14 could not be attributed to proteins of a particular molecular mass but possibly to an increase in the total amount of protein present. It is concluded that the marked difference in the availability of negative groups between chondrocytes cultured from articular and non-articular cartilages may reflect differences in the interaction of these negative groups with matrix components; these differences would lead to the distinct structural organization of these two cartilaginous tissues which possess different mechanical functions. PMID:9106160

  8. On solar radius measurements with PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Hauchecorne, A.; Corbard, T.; Hochedez, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Solar diameter measurements performed from the ground for several decades seem to indicate a relation between the solar diameter and the solar activity. If this relationship is confirmed, it would be possible to use measurements of solar diameter as a proxy of solar activity in the past since the 1715 solar eclipses, and to use this input for the reconstruction of solar irradiance in climate models. However the interpretation of ground observations is controversial, ground-based measurements being affected by refraction, by atmospheric turbulence, and perhaps by atmospheric aerosols scattering. The only way to be free from atmospheric effects is to measure from space. This is the reason why, since the beginning, the PICARD program included a space and a ground component set up at the Calern site of the Observatoire de la Côte dAzur. During the last 4 years, the PICARD space mission has been used for observing the apparent solar diameter. First results of the astrometry program include a study of the June 2012 Venus transit for solar diameter determination. From this, the value of the solar radius from one astronomical unit was found to be equal to 959.86 arc-seconds at 607.1 nm. However, concerning observed variations in time of the solar radius, instrumental effects affect the results. Space is known to represent a harsh environment for optical instruments. Nevertheless, we can use the PICARD data to monitor the solar radius variation. PICARD aims to perpetuate historical series of the solar radius measurements, in particular during the solar cycle 24. This paper presents solar radius measurements obtained with PICARD.

  9. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chen; Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Nevo Dinur, Nir; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-03-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  10. Large charge moment change lightning on 31 May to 1 June 2013, including the El Reno tornadic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Cummer, Steven A.; Petersen, Danyal; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lyons, Walter A.; MacGorman, Donald; Beasley, William

    2015-04-01

    On 31 May 2013, a line of severe tornadic thunderstorms (the El Reno event) developed during the local afternoon in central Oklahoma, USA. Within range of the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array, the evolution of the event can be separated into three distinct periods: an Early period (before 02:00 UTC on 1 June) when the storm consisted of discrete supercells, a Middle period (02:00-05:00 UTC) when the convection began merging into a linear feature and stratiform precipitation developed, and a Late period (after 05:00 UTC) featuring a mature mesoscale convective system (MCS). Each of these periods demonstrated distinct patterns in the large (>100 C km) charge moment change (CMC) lightning that was produced. During the Early period, large-CMC positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning was produced in the convective cores of supercells. These flashes were small in area (typically <500 km2) and were commonly associated with a sloping midlevel positive charge region in the echo overhang on the storm's forward flank. The Middle period featured a population of larger +CMCs (>500 km2, >300 C km) in the developing stratiform, similar to typical sprite-parent lightning in MCSs. During the Late period, convective large CMC +CGs ceased and instead large-CMC negative CGs were produced in and near the MCS convection. These flashes neutralized charge both in convection as well as in adjacent stratiform and anvil precipitation. The results suggest that the CMC metric has potential applications for studying tropospheric weather.

  11. Theory of the Color Change of NaxWO3 as a Function of Na-Charge Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, P.

    2009-01-01

    We report theoretical investigations of the coloration of WO{sub 3} upon charge insertion using sodium tungsten bronze (Na{sub x}WO{sub 3}) as a model system. Our results explain well the systematic color change of Na{sub x}WO{sub 3} from dark blue to violet, red-orange, and finally to golden yellow as sodium concentration x increases from 0.3 to unity. Proper accounts for both the interband and the intraband contributions to the optical response are found to be very important for a detailed understanding of the coloration mechanism in this system.

  12. Masses and Charge Radii of {sup 17-22}Ne and the Two-Proton-Halo Candidate {sup 17}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Keim, M.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.; Herfurth, F.; Yazidjian, C.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Blaum, K.; George, S.; Delahaye, P.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kowalska, M.; Herlert, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lievens, P.

    2008-12-19

    High-precision mass and charge radius measurements on {sup 17-22}Ne, including the proton-halo candidate {sup 17}Ne, have been performed with Penning trap mass spectrometry and collinear laser spectroscopy. The {sup 17}Ne mass uncertainty is improved by factor 50, and the charge radii of {sup 17-19}Ne are determined for the first time. The fermionic molecular dynamics model explains the pronounced changes in the ground-state structure. It attributes the large charge radius of {sup 17}Ne to an extended proton configuration with an s{sup 2} component of about 40%. In {sup 18}Ne the smaller radius is due to a significantly smaller s{sup 2} component. The radii increase again for {sup 19-22}Ne due to cluster admixtures.

  13. The climatology of lightning producing large impulse charge moment changes with an emphasis on mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavis, Nicholas

    The use of both total charge moment change (CMC) and impulse charge moment change (iCMC) magnitudes to assess the potential of a cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning stroke to induce a mesospheric sprite has been well described in literature. However, this work has primarily been carried out on a case study basis. To complement these previous case studies, climatologies of regional, seasonal, and diurnal observations of large-iCMC discharges are presented. In this study, large-iCMC discharges for thresholds > 100 and > 300 C km in both positive and negative polarities are analyzed on a seasonal basis using density maps of 2o by 2o resolution across the conterminous U.S. using data from the Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN). Also produced were local solar time diurnal distributions in eight different regions covering the lower 48 states as well as the Atlantic Ocean, including the Gulf Stream. In addition, National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) cloud-to-ground (CG) flash diurnal distributions were included. The seasonal maps show the predisposition of large positive iCMCs to dominate across the Northern Great Plains, with large negative iCMCs favored in the Southeastern U.S. year-round. During summer, the highest frequency of large positive iCMCs across the Upper Midwest aligns closely with the preferred tracks of nocturnal mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). As iCMC values increase above 300 C km, the maximum shifts eastward of the 100 C km maximum in the Central Plains. The Southwestern U.S. also experiences significant numbers of large-iCMC discharges in summer, presumably due to convection associated with the North American Monsoon (NAM). The Gulf Stream is active year round, with a bias towards more large positive iCMCs in winter. Diurnal distributions in the eight regions support these conclusions, with a nocturnal peak in large-iCMC discharges in the Northern Great Plains and Great Lakes, an early- to mid-afternoon peak in the Intermountain West and the

  14. MASS-RADIUS RELATIONSHIPS FOR EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D. C.; Eggert, J. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Hamel, S.; Caspersen, K.; Schwegler, E.; Collins, G. W.; Nettelmann, N.; Ackland, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    For planets other than Earth, particularly exoplanets, interpretation of the composition and structure depends largely on comparing the mass and radius with the composition expected given their distance from the parent star. The composition implies a mass-radius relation which relies heavily on equations of state calculated from electronic structure theory and measured experimentally on Earth. We lay out a method for deriving and testing equations of state, and deduce mass-radius and mass-pressure relations for key, relevant materials whose equation of state (EOS) is reasonably well established, and for differentiated Fe/rock. We find that variations in the EOS, such as may arise when extrapolating from low-pressure data, can have significant effects on predicted mass-radius relations and on planetary pressure profiles. The relations are compared with the observed masses and radii of planets and exoplanets, broadly supporting recent inferences about exoplanet structures. Kepler-10b is apparently 'Earth-like', likely with a proportionately larger core than Earth's, nominally 2/3 of the mass of the planet. CoRoT-7b is consistent with a rocky mantle over an Fe-based core which is likely to be proportionately smaller than Earth's. GJ 1214b lies between the mass-radius curves for H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4}, suggesting an 'icy' composition with a relatively large core or a relatively large proportion of H{sub 2}O. CoRoT-2b is less dense than the hydrogen relation, which could be explained by an anomalously high degree of heating or by higher than assumed atmospheric opacity. HAT-P-2b is slightly denser than the mass-radius relation for hydrogen, suggesting the presence of a significant amount of matter of higher atomic number. CoRoT-3b lies close to the hydrogen relation. The pressure at the center of Kepler-10b is 1.5{sup +1.2}{sub -1.0} TPa. The central pressure in CoRoT-7b is probably close to 0.8 TPa, though may be up to 2 TPa. These pressures are accessible by planar

  15. Motion perception during variable-radius swing motion in darkness.

    PubMed

    Rader, A A; Oman, C M; Merfeld, D M

    2009-10-01

    Using a variable-radius roll swing motion paradigm, we examined the influence of interaural (y-axis) and dorsoventral (z-axis) force modulation on perceived tilt and translation by measuring perception of horizontal translation, roll tilt, and distance from center of rotation (radius) at 0.45 and 0.8 Hz using standard magnitude estimation techniques (primarily verbal reports) in darkness. Results show that motion perception was significantly influenced by both y- and z-axis forces. During constant radius trials, subjects' perceptions of tilt and translation were generally almost veridical. By selectively pairing radius (1.22 and 0.38 m) and frequency (0.45 and 0.8 Hz, respectively), the y-axis acceleration could be tailored in opposition to gravity so that the combined y-axis gravitoinertial force (GIF) variation at the subject's ears was reduced to approximately 0.035 m/s(2) - in effect, the y-axis GIF was "nulled" below putative perceptual threshold levels. With y-axis force nulling, subjects overestimated their tilt angle and underestimated their horizontal translation and radius. For some y-axis nulling trials, a radial linear acceleration at twice the tilt frequency (0.25 m/s(2) at 0.9 Hz, 0.13 m/s(2) at 1.6 Hz) was simultaneously applied to reduce the z-axis force variations caused by centripetal acceleration and by changes in the z-axis component of gravity during tilt. For other trials, the phase of this radial linear acceleration was altered to double the magnitude of the z-axis force variations. z-axis force nulling further increased the perceived tilt angle and further decreased perceived horizontal translation and radius relative to the y-axis nulling trials, while z-axis force doubling had the opposite effect. Subject reports were remarkably geometrically consistent; an observer model-based analysis suggests that perception was influenced by knowledge of swing geometry. PMID:19625542

  16. Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung with generation change of the charged lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A.

    1984-03-01

    The ratio R/sub nunu-bar/equivalentsigma(l /sup A/Z..-->..l /sup A/Z summation/sub ..nu../..nu..nu-bar)/sigma(l /sup A/Z..-->..l' /sup A/Z..nu../sub l/nu-bar/sub lprime/), where l and l' are distinct charged leptons, is evaluated in the framework of the standard theory. The dependences on the number of generations, the helicity of the incoming lepton, and the lepton masses are analyzed. It is shown that in spite of the high energies considered lepton-mass effects are important, modifying the R/sub nunu-bar/ estimate for vanishing lepton masses by a factor of about three.

  17. Radius of the ρ meson determined from its decay constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutov, A. F.; Polezhaev, R. G.; Troitsky, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    We present a unified model describing electroweak properties of the π and ρ mesons. Using a general method of the relativistic parametrization of matrix elements of local operators, adjusted for the nondiagonal in the total angular momentum case, we calculate the ρ -meson lepton-decay constant fρ using the same parameters of free constituent quarks that have ensured exclusively good results for the π meson previously. The only free parameter, characterizing quark interactions, which include an additional spin-spin contribution and hence differ from the π -meson case, is fixed by matching the decay constant to its experimental value. The mean square charge radius is calculated, ⟨rρ2⟩=(0.56 ±0.04 ) fm2 . This result confirms, for the ρ -meson case, the conjecture of equality between electromagnetic and strong radii of hadrons. This conjecture was tested previously for proton, π and K mesons.

  18. Muonic bound systems, virtual particles, and proton radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.

    2015-07-01

    The proton radius puzzle questions the self-consistency of theory and experiment in light muonic and electronic bound systems. Here we summarize the current status of virtual particle models as well as Lorentz-violating models that have been proposed in order to explain the discrepancy. Highly charged one-electron ions and muonic bound systems have been used as probes of the strongest electromagnetic fields achievable in the laboratory. The average electric field seen by a muon orbiting a proton is comparable to hydrogenlike uranium and, notably, larger than the electric field in the most advanced strong-laser facilities. Effective interactions due to virtual annihilation inside the proton (lepton pairs) and process-dependent corrections (nonresonant effects) are discussed as possible explanations of the proton size puzzle. The need for more experimental data on related transitions is emphasized.

  19. Running with the radius in RS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Adam; May, Michael J.; Sundrum, Raman

    2003-01-01

    We derive a renormalization group formalism for the Randall-Sundrum scenario, where the renormalization scale is set by a floating compactification radius. While inspired by the AdS-CFT conjecture, our results are derived concretely within higher-dimensional effective field theory. Matching theories with different radii leads to running hidden brane couplings. The hidden brane Lagrangian consists of four-dimensional local operators constructed from the induced value of the bulk fields on the brane. We find hidden Lagrangians which are nontrivial fixed points of the RG flow. Calculations in RS1 can be greatly simplified by “running down” the effective theory to a small radius. We demonstrate these simplifications by studying the Goldberger-Wise stabilization mechanism. In this paper, we focus on the classical and tree-level quantum field theory of bulk scalar fields, which demonstrates the essential features of the RG in the simplest context.

  20. The Epidemiology of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nellans, Kate W.; Kowalski, Evan; Chung, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Distal radius fractures are one of the most common types of fractures, accounting for around 25% of fractures in the pediatric population and up to 18% of all fractures in the elderly age group. Although the pediatric and elderly populations are at the greatest risk for this injury, distal radius fractures still have a significant impact on the health and well-being of young adults. Data from the past 40 years has documented a trend towards an overall increase in the prevalence of this injury. For the pediatric population, this increase can likely be attributed to a surge in sports related activities. The growth of the elderly population and a rise in the number of active elderly are directly responsible for the increase seen in this age group. Understanding the epidemiology of this fracture is an important step towards the improvement of the treatment strategies and preventative measures which target this debilitating injury. PMID:22554654

  1. Natural oxidation of black carbon in soils: Changes in molecular form and surface charge along a climosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsin; Lehmann, Johannes; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate changes in molecular form and surface charge of black carbon (BC) due to long-term natural oxidation and to examine how climatic and soil factors affect BC oxidation. Black C was collected from 11 historical charcoal blast furnace sites with a geographic distribution from Quebec, Canada, to Georgia, USA, and compared to BC that was newly produced (new BC) using rebuilt historical kilns. The results showed that the historical BC samples were substantially oxidized after 130 years in soils as compared to new BC or BC incubated for one year. The major alterations by natural oxidation of BC included: (1) changes in elemental composition with increases in oxygen (O) from 7.2% in new BC to 24.8% in historical BC and decreases in C from 90.8% to 70.5%; (2) formation of oxygen-containing functional groups, particularly carboxylic and phenolic functional groups, and (3) disappearance of surface positive charge and evolution of surface negative charge after 12 months of incubation. Although time of exposure significantly increased natural oxidation of BC, a significant positive relationship between mean annual temperature (MAT) and BC oxidation (O/C ratio with r = 0.83; P < 0.01) explained that BC oxidation was increased by 87 mmole kg C -1 per unit Celsius increase in MAT. This long-term oxidation was more pronounced on BC surfaces than for entire particles, and responded 7-fold stronger to increases in MAT. Our results also indicated that oxidation of BC was more important than adsorption of non-BC. Thus, natural oxidation of BC may play an important role in the effects of BC on soil biogeochemistry.

  2. Natural Oxidation of Black Carbon in Soils: Changes in Molecular Form and Surface Charge along a Climosequence

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-Hsin; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate changes in molecular form and surface charge of black carbon (BC) due to longtermnatural oxidation and to examine how climatic and soil factors affect BC oxidation. Black C was collected from 11 historical charcoal blast furnace sites with a geographic distribution from Quebec, Canada, to Georgia, USA, and compared to BC that was newly produced (new BC) using rebuilt historical kilns. The results showed that the historical BC samples were substantially oxidized after 130 years in soils as compared to new BC or BC incubated for one year. The major alterations by natural oxidation of BC included: (1) changes in elemental composition with increases in oxygen (O) from 7.2% in new BC to 24.8% in historical BC and decreases in C from 90.8% to 70.5%; (2) formation of oxygen-containing functional groups, particularly carboxylic and phenolic functional groups, and (3) disappearance of surface positive charge and evolution of surface negative charge after 12 months of incubation. Although time of exposure significantly increased natural oxidation of BC, a significant positive relationship between mean annual temperature (MAT) and BC oxidation (O/C ratio with r = 0.83;P < 0.01) explained that BC oxidation was increased by 87 mmole kg C-1 per unit Celsius increase in MAT. This long-term oxidation was more pronounced on BC surfaces than for entire particles, and responded 7-fold stronger to increases in MAT. Our results also indicated that oxidation of BC was more important than adsorption of non-BC. Thus, natural oxidation of BC may play an important role in the effects of BC on soil biogeochemistry.

  3. Quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux models for fundamental vibrational intensity changes on H-bond formation of water and hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Arnaldo F.; Richter, Wagner E.; Bruns, Roy E.; Terrabuio, Luiz A.; Haiduke, Roberto L. A.

    2014-02-28

    The Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules/Charge-Charge Flux-Dipole Flux (QTAIM/CCFDF) model has been used to investigate the electronic structure variations associated with intensity changes on dimerization for the vibrations of the water and hydrogen fluoride dimers as well as in the water-hydrogen fluoride complex. QCISD/cc-pVTZ wave functions applied in the QTAIM/CCFDF model accurately provide the fundamental band intensities of water and its dimer predicting symmetric and antisymmetric stretching intensity increases for the donor unit of 159 and 47 km mol{sup −1} on H-bond formation compared with the experimental values of 141 and 53 km mol{sup −1}. The symmetric stretching of the proton donor water in the dimer has intensity contributions parallel and perpendicular to its C{sub 2v} axis. The largest calculated increase of 107 km mol{sup −1} is perpendicular to this axis and owes to equilibrium atomic charge displacements on vibration. Charge flux decreases occurring parallel and perpendicular to this axis result in 42 and 40 km mol{sup −1} total intensity increases for the symmetric and antisymmetric stretches, respectively. These decreases in charge flux result in intensity enhancements because of the interaction contributions to the intensities between charge flux and the other quantities. Even though dipole flux contributions are much smaller than the charge and charge flux ones in both monomer and dimer water they are important for calculating the total intensity values for their stretching vibrations since the charge-charge flux interaction term cancels the charge and charge flux contributions. The QTAIM/CCFDF hydrogen-bonded stretching intensity strengthening of 321 km mol{sup −1} on HF dimerization and 592 km mol{sup −1} on HF:H{sub 2}O complexation can essentially be explained by charge, charge flux and their interaction cross term. Atomic contributions to the intensities are also calculated. The bridge hydrogen atomic contributions alone

  4. Chondrosarcoma of the radius with distant metastasis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Boudrieau, R J; Schelling, S H; Pisanelli, E R

    1994-08-15

    A 9-year-old castrated male Doberman Pinscher was admitted for evaluation of lameness of the left forelimb. Radiography and examination of biopsy specimens revealed a moderately differentiated chondrosarcoma of the proximal portion of the radius. The dog was treated by local excision of the neoplasm, which involved resection of the radial head and proximal portion of the radius. Despite the large size of the dog and the weight-bearing forces exerted on the cubital joint, major problems with ambulation did not develop after surgery. Functional use of the limb returned slowly; however, substantial limb use was observed despite the development of mild degenerative changes of the joint and migration of the humeroulnar articulation. Six months after surgery, metastasis of a widely disseminated, poorly differentiated chondrosarcoma to the subcutaneous tissues and thoracic and abdominal cavities was diagnosed. Local redevelopment of the chondrosarcoma in the area of the cubital joint was not detected. Resection of the radial head and proximal portion of the radius may be considered a viable, alternative, limb-sparing technique. The biologically aggressive nature of this chondrosarcoma of the appendicular skeleton indicated that additional information was needed before a reliable prognosis could be established for this dog with this tumor type. Reports of low rates of metastasis have been based on insufficient numbers of dogs to adequately or accurately determine the long-term prognosis of dogs with chondrosarcoma of the appendicular skeleton. PMID:7961094

  5. Fractures of distal radius: an overview.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Sharma, Pankaj; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar; Dawar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of distal radius account for up to 20% of all fractures treated in emergency department. Initial assessment includes a history of mechanism of injury, associated injury and appropriate radiological evaluation. Treatment options include conservative management, internal fixation with pins, bridging and non-bridging external fixation, dorsal or volar plating with/without arthroscopy assistance. However, many questions regarding these fractures remain unanswered and good prospective randomized trials are needed. PMID:25657938

  6. Fractures of Distal Radius: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Sharma, Pankaj; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar; Dawar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of distal radius account for up to 20% of all fractures treated in emergency department. Initial assessment includes a history of mechanism of injury, associated injury and appropriate radiological evaluation. Treatment options include conservative management, internal fixation with pins, bridging and non-bridging external fixation, dorsal or volar plating with/without arthroscopy assistance. However, many questions regarding these fractures remain unanswered and good prospective randomized trials are needed. PMID:25657938

  7. Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy for Distal Radius Malunion

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Robin N.; Leversedge, Fraser J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Malunion is a common complication of distal radius fractures. Ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) may be an effective treatment for distal radius malunion when appropriate indications are observed. Methods The use of USO for treatment of distal radius fracture malunion is described for older patients (typically patients >50 years) with dorsal or volar tilt less than 20 degrees and no carpal malalignment or intercarpal or distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) arthritis. Description of Technique Preoperative radiographs are examined to ensure there are no contraindications to ulnar shortening osteotomy. The neutral posteroanterior (PA) radiograph is used to measure ulnar variance and to estimate the amount of ulnar shortening required. An ulnar, mid-sagittal incision is used and the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve is preserved. An USO-specific plating system with cutting jig is used to create parallel oblique osteotomies to facilitate shortening. Intraoperative fluoroscopy and clinical range of motion are checked to ensure adequate shortening and congruous reduction of the ulnar head within the sigmoid notch. Results Previous outcomes evaluation of USO has demonstrated improvement in functional activities, including average flexion-extension and pronosupination motions, and patient reported outcomes. Conclusion The concept and technique of USO are reviewed for the treatment of distal radius malunion when specific indications are observed. Careful attention to detail related to surgical indications and to surgical technique typically will improve range of motion, pain scores, and patient-reported outcomes and will reduce the inherent risks of the procedure, such as ulnar nonunion or the symptoms related to unrecognized joint arthritis. Level of Evidence: Level IV PMID:25097811

  8. Measurement of the Radius of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    A physical understanding of the behavior of cold ultra-dense matter -- at and above nuclear density -- can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars. The recent 1.97+/-0.04 Msun measurement for PSR 1614-2230 suggests that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of state (EoSs) are disfavored, in favor of hadronic EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, the latter EoSs produce lines of nearly constant radii (within about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. Our (preliminary) results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, in the range 7.5-10 km (90% confidence). The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to unmodelled spectrally hard components.

  9. Measurement of the Radius of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien; Rutledge, R. E.; Servillat, M.; Webb, N.

    2013-01-01

    A physical understanding of the behavior of cold ultra dense matter - at and above nuclear density - can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars. The recent 1.97 ± 0.04 M⊙ measurement for PSR 1614-2230 suggests that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of state (EoSs) are disfavored, in favor of hadronic EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, the latter EoSs produce lines of nearly constant radii (within about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. Our (preliminary) results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, in the range 7.5-10 km (90% confidence). The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to unmodeled spectrally hard components.

  10. Evolution of the solar radius during the solar cycle 24 rise time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, Mustapha

    2015-08-01

    One of the real motivations to observe the solar radius is the suspicion that it might be variable. Possible temporal variations of the solar radius are important as an indicator of internal energy storage and as a mechanism for changes in the total solar irradiance. Measurements of the solar radius are of great interest within the scope of the debate on the role of the Sun in climate change. Solar energy input dominates the surface processes (climate, ocean circulation, wind, etc.) of the Earth. Thus, it appears important to know on what time scales the solar radius and other fundamental solar parameters, like the total solar irradiance, vary in order to better understand and assess the origin and mechanisms of the terrestrial climate changes. The current solar cycle is probably going to be the weakest in 100 years, which is an unprecedented opportunity for studying the variability of the solar radius during this period. This paper presents more than four years of solar radius measurements obtained with a satellite and a ground-based observatory during the solar cycle 24 rise time. Our measurements show the benefit of simultaneous measurements obtained from ground and space observatories. Space observations are a priori most favourable, however, space entails also technical challenges, a harsh environment, and a finite mission lifetime. The evolution of the solar radius during the rising phase of the solar cycle 24 show small variations that are out of phase with solar activity.

  11. Electrode radius predicts lesion radius during radiofrequency energy heating. Validation of a proposed thermodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, D.E.; Watson, D.D.; Verow, A.F. )

    1990-07-01

    Myocardial heating by transcatheter delivery of radiofrequency (RF) energy has been proposed as an effective means of arrhythmia ablation. A thermodynamic model describing the radial temperature gradient at steady state during RF-induced heating is proposed. If one assumes that RF power output is adjusted to maintain a constant electrode-tissue interface temperature at all times, then this thermodynamic model predicts that the radius of the RF-induced lesion will be directly proportional to the electrode radius. A total of 76 RF-induced lesions were created in a model of isolated canine right ventricular free wall perfused and superfused with oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Electrode radius was varied between 0.75 and 2.25 mm. RF energy (500 kHz) was delivered for 90 seconds, and the power output was adjusted to maintain a constant electrode-tissue interface temperature of 60 degrees C. A strong linear correlation was observed between electrode radius and lesion radius in two dimensions: transverse (p = 0.0001, r = 0.85) and transmural (p = 0.0001, r = 0.89). With these data, the temperature correlation with irreversible myocardial injury in this model was calculated at 46.6-48.8 degrees C. Therefore, the proposed thermodynamic model closely predicts the observed relation between electrode radius and lesion size during RF myocardial heating.

  12. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, February 16, 1990--February 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from February 16, 1990 through February 15, 1993. This work involves the experimental investigation of atomic interactions in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron-correlation effects. The processes studied are of interest both from fundamental and applied points of view. In the latter case, results are obtained which are relevant to the understanding of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, highly-excited (Rydberg) and continuum states of atoms and ions, atomic structure effects, the interaction of ions with surfaces, and the development of heavy-ion storage-rings. The results obtained have provided the basis for several M.A. thesis projects at Western Michigan and several Ph.D. dissertation projects are currently underway. Summaries of work completed and work in progress are given below in Section II. This research has resulted in 26 papers (in print and in press), 12 invited presentations at national and international meetings, and 28 contributed presentations as detailed in Section III.

  13. Management of Intercarpal Ligament Injuries Associated with Distal Radius Fractures.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mihir J; Kamal, Robin N; Richard, Marc J

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of ligamentous injury associated with fractures of the distal radius is reported to be as high as 69% with injury to the scapholunate interosseous ligament and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament occurring in 16% to 40% and 8.5% to 15%, respectively. There is a lack of consensus on which patients should undergo advanced imaging, arthroscopy, and treatment and whether this changes their natural history. Overall, patients with high-grade intercarpal ligament injuries are shown to have longer-term disability and sequelae compared with those with lower-grade injuries. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment options for these injuries. PMID:26205702

  14. External fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, David J

    2007-12-01

    External fixation has been used for the treatment of distal radius fractures for more than 50 years. Although the fixator configurations have undergone considerable modification over time, the type of fixator itself is not as important as the underlying principles that provide the foundation for external fixation. Although volar plate fixation is currently in vogue, the indications for external fixation remain largely unchanged. Newer fixator designs have also expanded the traditional usage to include nonbridging applications that allow early wrist motion. The following discussion focuses on the myriad uses for external fixation as well as the shortcomings and potential pitfalls. PMID:18070654

  15. Initialization effects via the nuclear radius on transverse in-plane flow and its disappearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Rajni; Gautam, Sakshi

    2014-04-01

    We study the dependence of collective transverse flow and its disappearance on initialization effects via the nuclear radius within the framework of the Isospin-dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics (IQMD) model. We calculate the balance energy using different parametrizations of the radius available in the literature for the reaction of 12C+12C to explain its measured balance energy. A mass-dependent analysis of the balance energy through out the periodic table is also carried out by changing the default liquid drop IQMD radius.

  16. Scaling of charge-changing interaction cross sections and point-proton radii of neutron-rich carbon isotopes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Hachiuma, I; Kitagawa, A; Namihira, K; Sato, S; Suzuki, T; Tanihata, I; Fukuda, M

    2011-07-15

    Charge-changing cross sections σ(cc) of stable and unstable nuclei ((9-11)Be, (14-16)C, and (16-18)O) on a carbon target were investigated at 300  MeV/nucleon. A phenomenological analysis based on the Glauber theory indicates an approximate, but universal, scaling of σ(cc) over a wide range of A/Z. This allows the determination of the density distributions of protons tightly bound in the nuclei. An application to (16)C, which is considered to be an anomalously deformed nucleus, indicates a systematic evolution of proton root-mean-square radii and has revealed for the first time a neutron skin effect in carbon isotopes. Being complementary to isotope-shift and electron-scattering experiments, the present method can open up a new approach to explore the structure of exotic nuclei. PMID:21838353

  17. Minimization of first-turn losses by excited neutrals in charge-changing injection of accumulator rings

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.J.; Blind, B.; Channel, P.; Wang, Tai-Sen

    1994-07-01

    Substantial beam losses, due to production of excited neutrals by the foil stripper, have been observed to occur immediately after injection in accumulator rings that utilize charge-changing injection. A technique is proposed, based on experimental and theoretical results for excited-state production and stripping, that is potentially capable of reducing such losses by a factor greater than 10{sup 4}. In the technique, foil stripping occurs in a shaped magnetic field that resolves the excited atomic levels into immediately stripped states that are within ring acceptance and those that can be ejected from the ring. An added magnetic-mirror-field configuration is Proposed as an effective means of minimizing interactions between stripped electrons and the foil.

  18. [Arthroscopic treatment of distal radius fracture].

    PubMed

    Lindau, T

    2006-11-01

    The orthopaedic surgeons cannot predict the functional results after a distal intra articular radius fracture. The intra-articular incongruity of more than 1 mm is associated with the development of secondary osteoarthrosis. The wrist arthroscopy became an essential help for the reduction of these fractures. The hand is normally in an upright position with a traction of approximately 4-5 kg which facilitates the reduction of the extra-articular fracture component. It is possible to use a technique of horizontal traction. The arthroscopy allows the reduction and control of the fixing of the various fragments, but also the treatment associated lesions associated. One randomized study, which compared 34 arthroscopically treated fractures with 48 openly treated, concluded that the arthroscopy-treated group had better outcome, better reduction, better grip strength and better range of motion than the openly treated group. The treatment of intra articular distal radius fractures with arthroscopic assistance is thus the guaranteeing of the most anatomical reduction of articular surface. It allows the diagnosis and the treatment of the associated lesions, decreases the peripheral fibrous scars of soft tissues by avoiding initially extensive approaches and finally gives better functional results. PMID:17361885

  19. [Arthroscopic treatment of distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Lindau, T

    2006-11-01

    The orthopaedic surgeons cannot predict the functional results after a distal intra articular radius fracture. The intra-articular incongruity of more than 1 mm is associated with the development of secondary osteoarthrosis. The wrist arthroscopy became an essential help for the reduction of these fractures. The hand is normally in an upright position with a traction of approximately 4-5 kg which facilitates the reduction of the extra-articular fracture component. It is possible to use a technique of horizontal traction. The arthroscopy allows the reduction and control of the fixing of the various fragments, but also the treatment associated lesions associated. One randomized study, which compared 34 arthroscopically treated fractures with 48 openly treated, concluded that the arthroscopy-treated group had better outcome, better reduction, better grip strength and better range of motion than the openly treated group. The treatment of intra articular distal radius fractures with arthroscopic assistance is thus the guaranteeing of the most anatomical reduction of articular surface. It allows the diagnosis and the treatment of the associated lesions, decreases the peripheral fibrous scars of soft tissues by avoiding initially extensive approaches and finally gives better functional results. PMID:17349390

  20. Anisotropic charged core envelope star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafa Takisa, P.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We study a charged compact object with anisotropic pressures in a core envelope setting. The equation of state is quadratic in the core and linear in the envelope. There is smooth matching between the three regions: the core, envelope and the Reissner-Nordström exterior. We show that the presence of the electric field affects the masses, radii and compactification factors of stellar objects with values which are in agreement with previous studies. We investigate in particular the effect of electric field on the physical features of the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 in the core envelope model. The gravitational potentials and the matter variables are well behaved within the stellar object. We demonstrate that the radius of the core and the envelope can vary by changing the parameters in the speed of sound.

  1. Normal Age-Related Alterations on Distal Radius Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamid; Khaje, Rohallah

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study was designed to ascertain serial changes on distal radius radiographic parameters attributable to aging. Methods: In this prospective study, the sample consisted of 120 healthy individuals who were divided into four age groups each containing 15 males and 15 females. In the two below-20-year-old groups, only ulnar variance could be investigated. Wrist radiography was taken and then parameters of the distal radius were measured and compared based on age and sex. Results: Average UV was -2.48 mm and -1.6 mm in the 2-9 and 10-19-year-old age groups, respectively. Also, in the two above-20-year-old groups, the average radial inclination (RI), palmar tilt (PT), radial length (RL), and UV was 23.7º, 12.4º, 10.5 and +1.1 mm, respectively. Considering ulnar variance, no significant difference was found between the 2-9- and 10-19-year-old groups, as well as among the two above-20-year-old groups. However, a significant difference was observed between the below 20 and above 20 groups. The study results showed no significant differences between males and females in any of the study groups. Discussion: There is significant ulnar variance change toward less negative ulnar variance with aging until maturity. PMID:26550588

  2. Single CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals in an ion trap: charge and mass determination and photophysics evolution with changing mass, charge, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Howder, Collin R; Johnson, Ryan C; Anderson, Scott L

    2014-03-25

    We report measurements of fluorescence intermittency (blinking) and spectral behavior for single semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) isolated in the gas phase and discuss the effects on fluorescence of the QD charge state and heating to the point of sublimation. Core-shell CdSe/ZnS QDs were trapped in a quadrupole ion trap and detected by laser-induced fluorescence. The mass (M) and charge (Q) were determined nondestructively, and both were followed continuously over the course of hours or days. Emission spectra of the trapped QDs are significantly red-shifted relative to the solution-phase emission from the same particles. The temperature of the trapped QDs is determined by the balance between laser heating and collisional cooling and thermal emission, and it is possible to heat the particles to remove ligands or to the point of sublimation. QDs are observed to be emissive during sublimation, for up to 85% mass loss, with emission intensity roughly proportional to the surface area. Eventually, the fluorescence quantum yield drops suddenly, and the QDs begin to blink. The method used is versatile and will allow studies of quantum dot optical properties as a function of size, ligand removal, heating, surface oxidation, and other manipulations, where these properties are continuously correlated with the mass and charge. PMID:24410129

  3. Atomic radii for atoms with the 6s shell outermost: The effective atomic radius and the van der Waals radius from 55Cs to 80Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatewaki, Hiroshi; Hatano, Yasuyo; Noro, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi

    2015-06-01

    We consider, for atoms from 55Cs to 80Hg, the effective atomic radius (rear), which is defined as the distance from the nucleus at which the magnitude of the electric field is equal to that in He at one half of the equilibrium bond length of He2. The values of rear are about 50% larger than the mean radius of the outermost occupied orbital of 6s, . The value of rear decreases from 55Cs to 56Ba and undergoes increases and decreases with rising nuclear charge from 57La to 70Y b. In fact rear is understood as comprising two interlaced sequences; one consists of 57La, 58Ce, and 64Gd, which have electronic configuration (4fn-1)(5d1)(6s2), and the remaining atoms have configuration (4fn)(6s2). The sphere defined by rear contains 85%-90% of the 6s electrons. From 71Lu to 80Hg the radius rear also involves two sequences, corresponding to the two configurations 5dn+16s1 and 5dn6s2. The radius rear according to the present methodology is considerably larger than rvdW obtained by other investigators, some of who have found values of rvdW close to .

  4. [Distal radius fractures: conservative or surgical treatment?].

    PubMed

    Mark, G; Ryf, C

    1993-07-01

    The "classical" Colles fracture of the distal radius is the most common fracture in the adult. In order to reduce the still rather high rate of permanent disability, this fracture involving a functionally important joint requires accurate reduction. The AO-fracture classification introduced by Müller not only defines the severity of an injury, but also allows for decision-making as to the most adequate treatment. Besides the purely conservative management by closed reduction and plaster cast for the type-A fractures, we have a number of other treatment modalities for the more complex-B and C-type fractures, such as closed reduction and percutaneous K-wire application or the use of the small external fixator as well as open reduction and internal fixation by plates and screws for a few selected indications. PMID:8211844

  5. Understanding the mass-radius relation for sub-Neptunes: radius as a proxy for composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Eric D.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-09-01

    Transiting planet surveys like Kepler have provided a wealth of information on the distribution of planetary radii, particularly for the new populations of super-Earth- and sub-Neptune-sized planets. In order to aid in the physical interpretation of these radii, we compute model radii for low-mass rocky planets with hydrogen-helium envelopes. We provide model radii for planets 1-20 M {sub ⊕}, with envelope fractions 0.01%-20%, levels of irradiation 0.1-1000 times Earth's, and ages from 100 Myr to 10 Gyr. In addition we provide simple analytic fits that summarize how radius depends on each of these parameters. Most importantly, we show that at fixed H/He envelope fraction, radii show little dependence on mass for planets with more than ∼1% of their mass in their envelope. Consequently, planetary radius is to a first order a proxy for planetary composition, i.e., H/He envelope fraction, for Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized planets. We recast the observed mass-radius relationship as a mass-composition relationship and discuss it in light of traditional core accretion theory. We discuss the transition from rocky super-Earths to sub-Neptune planets with large volatile envelopes. We suggest ∼1.75 R {sub ⊕} as a physically motivated dividing line between these two populations of planets. Finally, we discuss these results in light of the observed radius occurrence distribution found by Kepler.

  6. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device. (a) Identification. A corneal radius measuring device is an AC-powered device intended to...

  7. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device. (a) Identification. A corneal radius measuring device is an AC-powered device intended to...

  8. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device. (a) Identification. A corneal radius measuring device is an AC-powered device intended to...

  9. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device. (a) Identification. A corneal radius measuring device is an AC-powered device intended to...

  10. Bilateral Distal Radius Fracture in Third Trimester of Pregnancy with Accelerated Union: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    TV, Ravikumar; P, Rahul; Samorekar, Bheemsingh

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral distal radius fracture is a rare entity. There is no literature reporting a bilateral distal radius fracture in pregnancy. Fracture healing is influenced by hormones. Hormonal changes of pregnancy will affect the healing of a fracture. A 28-year-old female at 34 wk of pregnancy sustained a bilateral distal radius fracture after a self fall. One side was managed conservatively and open reduction was done for the other side. Both fractures united at four weeks. This case is unique in three ways. First distal radius fractures commonly occur in elderly postmenopausal females due to oestrogen deficiency. In this case a distal radius fracture occurred following a self fall in third trimester of pregnancy – a hyperestrogenic state. Second the time taken for union was only four weeks signifying the hormonal effects on pregnancy on fracture healing. Third the occurrence of bilateral distal radius fracture itself is very rare in adults. In pregnancy there is a faster rate of fracture healing due to effects of oestrogen and increased cardiac output. Fractures in pregnancy require special attention. Surgical intervention should be done with a multidisciplinary approach. While management of fractures in pregnancy, effect of hormonal and physiological changes should be kept in mind. PMID:26023611

  11. Measurements of the Total Charge-Changing Cross Sections for Collisions of Fast Ions with Target Gas Using High Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, Michel Kireeff; Molvik, Arthur W.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Shnidman, Ariel; Vujic, Jasmina L.

    2009-04-13

    The sum of ionization and charge-exchange cross sections of several gas targets (H2, N2, He, Ne, Kr, Xe, Ar, and water vapor) impacted by 1MeV K+ beam are measured. In a high current ion beam, the self-electric field of the beam is high enough that ions produced from the gas ionization or charge exchange by the ion beam are quickly swept to the sides of accelerator. The flux of the expelled ions is measured by a retarding field analyzer. This allows accurate measuring of the total charge-changing cross sections (ionization plus charge exchange) of the beam interaction with gas. Cross sections for H2, He, and N2 are simulated using classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement.

  12. Correlation between multiple ionization and fragmentation of C2H6 in charge-changing collisions with 580 -keV C+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, T.; Murai, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Adachi, Y.; Yoshida, S. O.; Tsuchida, H.; Itoh, A.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate correlations between multiple ionization and fragmentation processes of the ethane molecule in collisions with 580 -keV C+ ions under single-electron capture and loss conditions. Employing an electron counting technique, we directly obtain number distributions of ionized electrons, which correspond to distributions of multiple ionization probabilities of ethane. In addition, fragmentation patterns as a function of the charge state r of intermediate parent ions C2H6 r +* are obtained from coincidence measurements between the time of flight of the product ions and the number of electrons emitted. Fragmentation patterns in the different charge-changing conditions reveal a crucial role of the internal excitation in the fragmentation processes. Also, we provide clear evidence of strong selectivity on the parent charge state for formation of the H3 + ion, which is exclusively generated through doubly charged parent ions C2H6 2 +* .

  13. A DFT study on the correlation between topology and Bader charges: Part IV, on the change of atomic charges in polymorphic transitions - A case study on CaCl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Horst P.

    2016-02-01

    Referring to the experimental results of high pressure experiments of Léger et al. (1998) we have calculated the energies of all phases observed for CaCl2 within the DFT formalism using the VASP package, and we have retrieved enthalpies and transition pressures. All phases can be considerably compressed or dilated without much change in energy. This energetic "softness" could even be quantified. We classify the high temperature TiO2-type structure and the PbCl2-type one at highest pressures as the energetically "softest" ones and the SrI2-type one as the "hardest". We furthermore discuss the energy density (E/V) of the different phases and redefine it as a fictive cohesive pressure within these structures. Pursuing our earlier approaches we have analysed the charges of the atoms in the different CaCl2 phases and their change on compression or dilation. On comparing the gradients of the charge curves we define a sort of "charge hardness" which will generally depend on the type of cation-anion pair but also on their topological connection in the respective structures. We speculate that exhausting the "charge softness or hardness" of individual ions in such arrangements may initiate the structural reorganization at the transition pressures.

  14. Long-term evolution of broken wakefields in finite-radius plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lotov, K V; Sosedkin, A P; Petrenko, A V

    2014-05-16

    A novel effect of fast heating and charging a finite-radius plasma is discovered in the context of plasma wakefield acceleration. As the plasma wave breaks, most of its energy is transferred to plasma electrons. The electrons gain substantial transverse momentum and escape the plasma radially, which gives rise to a strong charge-separation electric field and azimuthal magnetic field around the plasma. The slowly varying field structure is preserved for hundreds of wakefield periods and contains (together with hot electrons) up to 80% of the initial wakefield energy. PMID:24877943

  15. Reverberation measurements of the inner radius of the dust torus in 17 Seyfert galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Koshida, Shintaro; Minezaki, Takeo; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Sakata, Yu; Sugawara, Shota; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Suganuma, Masahiro; Enya, Keigo; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Peterson, Bruce A. E-mail: minezaki@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-06-20

    We present the results of a dust reverberation survey for 17 nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies, which provides the largest homogeneous data collection for the radius of the innermost dust torus. A delayed response of the K-band light curve after the V-band light curve was found for all targets, and 49 measurements of lag times between the flux variation of the dust emission in the K band and that of the optical continuum emission in the V band were obtained by the cross-correlation function analysis and also by an alternative method for estimating the maximum likelihood lag. The lag times strongly correlated with the optical luminosity in the luminosity range of M{sub V} = –16 to –22 mag, and the regression analysis was performed to obtain the correlation log Δt (days) = –2.11 – 0.2 M{sub V} assuming Δt∝L {sup 0.5}, which was theoretically expected. We discuss the possible origins of the intrinsic scatter of the dust lag-luminosity correlation, which was estimated to be approximately 0.13 dex, and we find that the difference of internal extinction and delayed response of changes in lag times to the flux variations could have partly contributed to intrinsic scatter. However, we could not detect any systematic change of the correlation with the subclass of the Seyfert type or the Eddington ratio. Finally, we compare the dust reverberation radius with the near-infrared interferometric radius of the dust torus and the reverberation radius of broad Balmer emission lines. The interferometric radius in the K band was found to be systematically larger than the dust reverberation radius in the same band by the about a factor of two, which could be interpreted by the difference between the flux-weighted radius and response-weighted radius of the innermost dust torus. The reverberation radius of the broad Balmer emission lines was found to be systematically smaller than the dust reverberation radius by about a factor of four to five, which strongly supports the unified

  16. Modulating alignment of membrane proteins in liquid-crystalline and oriented gel media by changing the size and charge of phospholipid bicelles

    PubMed Central

    Lorieau, Justin L; Maltsev, Alexander S.; Louis, John M; Bax, Ad

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that alignment of a structured peptide or small protein solubilized in mixed phospholipid:detergent micelles or bicelles, when embedded in a compressed gel or liquid crystalline medium, can be altered by either changing the phospholipid aggregate shape, charge, or both together. For the hemagglutinin fusion peptide solubilized in bicelles, we show that bicelle shape and charge do not change its helical hairpin structure but impact its alignment relative to the alignment medium, both in charged compressed acrylamide gel and in liquid crystalline d (GpG). The method can be used to generate sets of residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) that correspond to orthogonal alignment tensors, and holds promise for high-resolution structural refinement and dynamic mapping of membrane proteins. PMID:23508769

  17. Gas-solid difference in charge-changing cross sections for bare and H-like nickel ions at 200 MeV/u

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.; Sakamoto, N.; Tsuchida, H.; Geissel, H.; Fettouhi, A.; Knoebel, R. K.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Fritzsche, S.; Portillo, M.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Becker, F.; Boutin, D.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Muenzenberg, G.; Stadlmann, J.; Winkler, M.; Yao, N.; Shevelko, V. P.

    2007-02-15

    It is well known that the density of the target can have a crucial impact on charge-changing collisions of partially ionized heavy ions. However, the basic understanding of this experimental observation is hampered by the difficulty in knowing the charge-state evolution of projectiles inside solids. Therefore, the present experiments with 200 MeV/u bare and H-like nickel ions were performed to study charge-changing cross sections in different monatomic and compound gases and solids. The experimental results clearly demonstrate that the electron-loss cross sections in solids increase by about 40% compared to gases. The results support the Bohr-Lindhard model which predicts this gas-solid difference originating from enhanced ionization of excited ions. The experimental results are compared with recent theoretical estimates.

  18. Response of CR39 track etch detector to 10 A GeV Fe 26+ ion beam and total charge changing cross section measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Gupta, R.; Jalota, S.; Giacomelli, G.; Patrizii, L.; Togo, V.

    2012-01-01

    Total charge changing cross-section of 10 A GeV Fe 26+ ion beam on polyethylene and CR39 targets was measured. Charge of the fragments of projectiles was detected using CR39 nuclear track detectors by a new technique of one-side etching using an automated optical microscope with an image analysing software. The calculated value of total charge changing cross-section is σ tot = (2694 ± 142)mb and is in good agreement with the experimental values by other methods within error. The restricted energy loss ( REL) at energy 10 A GeV for all the fragments was theoretically calculated by using Bethe-Bloch equation and then obtained a calibration curve of reduced etch-rate ratio ( p) versus REL showing the response of CR39 track detectors to 10 A GeV Fe 26+ beam. The curve was fitted by a polynomial showing the relation between p and REL.

  19. EGCG in Green Tea Induces Aggregation of HMGB1 Protein through Large Conformational Changes with Polarized Charge Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xuan-Yu; Li, Baoyu; Liu, Shengtang; Kang, Hongsuk; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    As a major effective component in green tea, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)’s potential benefits to human health have been widely investigated. Recent experimental evidences indicate that EGCG can induce the aggregation of HMGB1 protein, a late mediator of inflammation, which subsequently stimulates the autophagic degradation and thus provides protection from lethal endotoxemia and sepsis. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the underlying molecular mechanism of this aggregation of HMGB1 facilitated by EGCG. Our simulation results reveal that EGCG firmly binds to HMGB1 near Cys106, which supports previous preliminary experimental evidence. A large HMGB1 conformational change is observed, where Box A and Box B, two homogenous domains of HMGB1, are repositioned and packed together by EGCG. This new HMGB1 conformation has large molecular polarity and distinctive electrostatic potential surface. We suggest that the highly polarized charge distribution leads to the aggregation of HMGB1, which differs from the previous hypothesis that two HMGB1 monomers are linked by the dimer of EGCG. Possible aggregating modes have also been investigated with potential of mean force (PMF) calculations. Finally, we conclude that the conformation induced by EGCG is more aggregation-prone with higher binding free energies as compared to those without EGCG. PMID:26899177

  20. Determination of the root-mean-square radius of the deuteron from present-day experimental data on neutron-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2008-10-15

    The correlation between the root-mean-square matter radius of the deuteron, r{sub m}, and its effective radius, {rho}, is investigated. A parabolic relationship between these two quantities makes it possible to determine the root-mean-square radius r{sub m} to within 0.01% if the effective radius {rho} is known. The matter (r{sub m}), structural (r{sub d}), and charge (r{sub ch}) radii of the deuteron are found with the aid of modern experimental results for phase shifts from the SAID nucleon-nucleon database, and their values are fully consistent with their counterparts deduced by using the experimental value of the effective deuteron radius due to Borbely and his coauthors. The charge-radius value of 2.124(6) fm, which was obtained with the aid of the SAID nucleon-nucleon database, and the charge-radius value of 2.126(12) fm, which was obtained with the aid of the experimental value of the effective radius {rho}, are in very good agreement with the present-day chargeradius value of 2.128(11) fm, which was deduced by Sick and Trautmann by processing world-average experimental data on elastic electron scattering by deuterons with allowance for Coulomb distortions.

  1. Photospheric Radius Expansion During Magnetar Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Anna L.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Göǧüş, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Klis, Michiel; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Harding, Alice K.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2010-08-01

    On 2008 August 24 the new magnetar SGR 0501+4516 (discovered by Swift) emitted a bright burst with a pronounced double-peaked structure in hard X-rays, reminiscent of the double-peaked temporal structure seen in some bright thermonuclear bursts on accreting neutron stars. In the latter case this is due to Photospheric Radius Expansion (PRE): when the flux reaches the Eddington limit, the photosphere expands and cools so that emission becomes softer and drops temporarily out of the X-ray band, re-appearing as the photosphere settles back down. We consider the factors necessary to generate double-peaked PRE events, and show that such a mechanism could plausibly operate in magnetar bursts despite the vastly different emission process. Identification of the magnetic Eddington limit in a magnetar would constrain magnetic field and distance and could, in principle, enable a measurement of gravitational redshift. It would also locate the emitting region at the neutron star surface, constraining the burst trigger mechanism. Conclusive confirmation of PRE events will require more detailed radiative models for bursts. However, for SGR 0501+4516 the predicted critical flux (using the magnetic field strength inferred from timing and the distance suggested by its probable location in the Perseus arm of our Galaxy) is consistent with that observed in the August 24 burst.

  2. 41 CFR 301-52.24 - Does mandatory use of the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change my obligation to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does mandatory use of the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change my obligation to pay my travel card bill by the due date? 301-52.24 Section 301-52.24 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY)...

  3. 41 CFR 301-71.214 - Does mandatory use of the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does mandatory use of the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's obligation to pay his/her travel card bill by the due date? 301-71.214 Section 301-71.214 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY...

  4. Measurement of super large radius optics in the detection of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Han, Sen; Wu, Quanying; Liang, Binming; Hou, Changlun

    2015-10-01

    The existence of Gravitational Wave (GW) is one of the greatest predictions of Einstein's relative theory. It has played an important part in the radiation theory, black hole theory, space explore and so on. The GW detection has been an important aspect of modern physics. With the research proceeding further, there are still a lot of challenges existing in the interferometer which is the key instrument in GW detection especially the measurement of the super large radius optics. To solve this problem, one solution , Fizeau interference, for measuring the super large radius has been presented. We change the tradition that curved surface must be measured with a standard curved surface. We use a flat mirror as a reference flat and it can lower both the cost and the test requirement a lot. We select a concave mirror with the radius of 1600mm as a sample. After the precision measurement and analysis, the experimental results show that the relative error of radius is better than 3%, and it can fully meet the requirements of the measurement of super large radius optics. When calculating each pixel with standard cylinder, the edges are not sharp because of diffraction or some other reasons, we detect the edge and calculate the diameter of the cylinder automatically, and it can improve the precision a lot. In general, this method is simple, fast, non-traumatic, and highly precision, it can also provide us a new though in the measurement of super large radius optics.

  5. The channel radius and energy of cloud-to-ground lightning discharge plasma with multiple return strokes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuejuan; Yuan, Ping; Cen, Jianyong; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Yajun

    2014-03-15

    Using the spectra of a cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flash with multiple return strokes and combining with the synchronous radiated electrical field information, the linear charge density, the channel radius, the energy per unit length, the thermal energy, and the energy of dissociation and ionization in discharge channel are calculated with the aid of an electrodynamic model of lightning. The conclusion that the initial radius of discharge channel is determined by the duration of the discharge current is confirmed. Moreover, the correlativity of several parameters has been analyzed first. The results indicate that the total intensity of spectra is positive correlated to the channel initial radius. The ionization and thermal energies have a linear relationship, and the dissociation energy is correlated positively to the ionization and thermal energies, the energy per unit length is in direct proportion to the square of initial radius in different strokes of one CG lightning.

  6. Tidal radius estimates for three open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, V. M.; Loktin, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    A new method is developed for estimating tidal radii and masses of open star clusters (OCL) based on the sky-plane coordinates and proper motions and/or radial velocities of cluster member stars. To this end, we perform the correlation and spectral analysis of oscillations of absolute values of stellar velocity components relative to the cluster mass center along three coordinate planes and along each coordinate axis in five OCL models. Mutual correlation functions for fluctuations of absolute values of velocity field components are computed. The spatial Fourier transform of the mutual correlation functions in the case of zero time offset is used to compute wavenumber spectra of oscillations of absolute values of stellar velocity components. The oscillation spectra of these quantities contain series of local maxima at equidistant wavenumber k values. The ratio of the tidal radius of the cluster to the wavenumber difference Δ k of adjacent local maxima in the oscillation spectra of absolute values of velocity field components is found to be the same for all five OCL models. This ratio is used to estimate the tidal radii and masses of the Pleiades, Praesepe, and M67 based on the proper motions and sky-plane coordinates of the member stars of these clusters. The radial dependences of the absolute values of the tangential and radial projections of cluster star velocities computed using the proper motions relative to the cluster center are determined, along with the corresponding autocorrelation functions and wavenumber spectra of oscillations of absolute values of velocity field components. The Pleiades virial mass is estimated assuming that the cluster is either isolated or non-isolated. Also derived are the estimates of the Pleiades dynamical mass assuming that it is non-stationary and non-isolated. The inferred Pleiades tidal radii corresponding to these masses are reported.

  7. Measurements of Total and Partial Charge-changing Cross Sections for 200-400 MeV/nucleon 12C in Water and Polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Sihver, L.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Komatsu, M.; Kubota, H.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Yoshida, J.; /Nagoya U. /Naruto U. of Education /NIRS, Chiba /SLAC /Toho U.

    2011-11-10

    We have studied charged nuclear fragments produced by 200 - 400 MeV/nucleon carbon ions, interacting with water and polycarbonate, using a newly developed emulsion detector. Total and partial charge-changing cross sections for the production of B, Be, and Li fragments were measured and compared with both previously published measurements, and model predictions. This study is of importance for validating and improving carbon ion therapy treatment planning systems, and for estimating the radiological risks for personnel on space missions, since carbon is a significant component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays.

  8. Measurements of total and partial charge-changing cross sections for 200- to 400-MeV/nucleon {sup 12}C on water and polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Sihver, L.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Komatsu, M.; Kubota, H.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.

    2007-05-15

    We have studied charged nuclear fragments produced by 200- to 400-MeV/nucleon carbon ions, interacting with water and polycarbonate, using a newly developed emulsion detector. Total and partial charge-changing cross sections for the production of B, Be, and Li fragments were measured and compared with both previously published measurements and model predictions. This study is of importance for validating and improving carbon-ion therapy treatment planning systems and for estimating the radiological risks for personnel on space missions, because carbon is a significant component of galactic cosmic rays.

  9. Contribution to the cloud droplet effective radius parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Pontikis, C.; Hicks, E. )

    1992-11-01

    An analytic cloud droplet effective radius expression is derived and validated by using field experiment microphysical data. This expression shows that the effective radius depends simultaneously upon the cloud liquid water content, droplet concentration and droplet spectral dispersion. It further suggests that the variability in these parameters present at all scales, due to turbulent mixing and secondary droplet activation, could limit the accuracy of the effective radius parameterizations used in climate models. 12 refs.

  10. Discharge coefficients of cooling holes with radiused and chamfered inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, N.; Spencer, A.

    1991-06-01

    The flow of cooling air within the internal passages of gas turbines is controlled and metered using holes in disks and casings. The effects of inlet radiusing and chamfering of these holes on the discharge coefficient are discussed. Experimental results for a range of radiusing and chamfering ratios for holes of different length to diameter ratios are presented, covering the range of pressure ratios of practical interest. The results indicate that radiusing and chamfering are both beneficial in increasing the discharge coefficient. Increases of 10-30 percent are possible. Chamfered holes give the more desirable performance characteristics in addition to being easier to produce than radiused holes.

  11. Improving optical bench radius measurements using stage error motion data

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Tony L.; Gardner, Neil; Vaughn, Matthew; Medicus, Kate; Davies, Angela

    2008-12-20

    We describe the application of a vector-based radius approach to optical bench radius measurements in the presence of imperfect stage motions. In this approach, the radius is defined using a vector equation and homogeneous transformation matrix formulism. This is in contrast to the typical technique, where the displacement between the confocal and cat's eye null positions alone is used to determine the test optic radius. An important aspect of the vector-based radius definition is the intrinsic correction for measurement biases, such as straightness errors in the stage motion and cosine misalignment between the stage and displacement gauge axis, which lead to an artificially small radius value if the traditional approach is employed. Measurement techniques and results are provided for the stage error motions, which are then combined with the setup geometry through the analysis to determine the radius of curvature for a spherical artifact. Comparisons are shown between the new vector-based radius calculation, traditional radius computation, and a low uncertainty mechanical measurement. Additionally, the measurement uncertainty for the vector-based approach is determined using Monte Carlo simulation and compared to experimental results.

  12. Extraction of the proton radius from electron-proton scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gabriel; Arrington, John R.; Hill, Richard J.

    2015-07-01

    We perform a new analysis of electron-proton scattering data to determine the proton electric and magnetic radii, enforcing model-independent constraints from form factor analyticity. A wide-ranging study of possible systematic effects is performed. An improved analysis is developed that rebins data taken at identical kinematic settings and avoids a scaling assumption of systematic errors with statistical errors. Employing standard models for radiative corrections, our improved analysis of the 2010 Mainz A1 Collaboration data yields a proton electric radius rE=0.895 (20 ) fm and magnetic radius rM=0.776 (38 ) fm . A similar analysis applied to world data (excluding Mainz data) implies rE=0.916 (24 ) fm and rM=0.914 (35 ) fm . The Mainz and world values of the charge radius are consistent, and a simple combination yields a value rE=0.904 (15 ) fm that is 4 σ larger than the CREMA Collaboration muonic hydrogen determination. The Mainz and world values of the magnetic radius differ by 2.7 σ , and a simple average yields rM=0.851 (26 ) fm . The circumstances under which published muonic hydrogen and electron scattering data could be reconciled are discussed, including a possible deficiency in the standard radiative correction model which requires further analysis.

  13. Electromagnetic charged and neutral kaon form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Burden, C.J.; Thomson, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    The electromagnetic form factor of the charged and neutral kaon is calculated using the approach applied in the successful study of the pion form factor, described above. The charged kaon form factor will be measured in forthcoming experiments at CEBAF. Our calculation involves the dressed strange quark propagator, to which F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}) is not sensitive, and hence it provides us with constraints on the strange-quark sector of QCD. Our preliminary results are encouraging. We find that the strange and up/down quark propagators are not too different, once the change in the current-quark-mass is accounted for. However, the difference that remains is important since it allows {l_angle}{bar s}s{r_angle}<{l_angle}{bar u}u{r_angle}. This calculation is the first to yield a value of f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} that is in good agreement with experiment and also yields r{sub K+}/r{sub {pi}} in good agreement with experiment. Our calculated charged kaon form factor provides a prediction that will be tested in the forthcoming CEBAF experiments. Our studies also show that K{sup 0} has a negative charge radius, as is to be expected. Our calculated value will be compared with that measured in K{sub s}{sup 0} regeneration from electrons.

  14. Study of photon emission by electron capture during solar nuclei acceleration, 1: Temperature-dependent cross section for charge changing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Laville, A.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    The study of charge changing cross sections of fast ions colliding with matter provides the fundamental basis for the analysis of the charge states produced in such interactions. Given the high degree of complexity of the phenomena, there is no theoretical treatment able to give a comprehensive description. In fact, the involved processes are very dependent on the basic parameters of the projectile, such as velocity charge state, and atomic number, and on the target parameters, the physical state (molecular, atomic or ionized matter) and density. The target velocity, may have also incidence on the process, through the temperature of the traversed medium. In addition, multiple electron transfer in single collisions intrincates more the phenomena. Though, in simplified cases, such as protons moving through atomic hydrogen, considerable agreement has been obtained between theory and experiments However, in general the available theoretical approaches have only limited validity in restricted regions of the basic parameters. Since most measurements of charge changing cross sections are performed in atomic matter at ambient temperature, models are commonly based on the assumption of targets at rest, however at Astrophysical scales, temperature displays a wide range in atomic and ionized matter. Therefore, due to the lack of experimental data , an attempt is made here to quantify temperature dependent cross sections on basis to somewhat arbitrary, but physically reasonable assumptions.

  15. Atomic radii for atoms with the 6s shell outermost: The effective atomic radius and the van der Waals radius from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Tatewaki, Hiroshi; Hatano, Yasuyo; Noro, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi

    2015-06-15

    We consider, for atoms from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg, the effective atomic radius (r{sub ear}), which is defined as the distance from the nucleus at which the magnitude of the electric field is equal to that in He at one half of the equilibrium bond length of He{sub 2}. The values of r{sub ear} are about 50% larger than the mean radius of the outermost occupied orbital of 6s, . The value of r{sub ear} decreases from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 56}Ba and undergoes increases and decreases with rising nuclear charge from {sub 57}La to {sub 70}Y b. In fact r{sub ear} is understood as comprising two interlaced sequences; one consists of {sub 57}La, {sub 58}Ce, and {sub 64}Gd, which have electronic configuration (4f{sup n−1})(5d{sup 1})(6s{sup 2}), and the remaining atoms have configuration (4f{sup n})(6s{sup 2}). The sphere defined by r{sub ear} contains 85%–90% of the 6s electrons. From {sub 71}Lu to {sub 80}Hg the radius r{sub ear} also involves two sequences, corresponding to the two configurations 5d{sup n+1}6s{sup 1} and 5d{sup n}6s{sup 2}. The radius r{sub ear} according to the present methodology is considerably larger than r{sub vdW} obtained by other investigators, some of who have found values of r{sub vdW} close to .

  16. The Origin of the Ionic-Radius Ratio Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2010-01-01

    In response to a reader query, this article traces the origins of the ionic-radius ratio rules and their incorrect attribution to Linus Pauling in the chemical literature and to Victor Goldschmidt in the geochemical literature. In actual fact, the ionic-radius ratio rules were first proposed within the context of the coordination chemistry…

  17. Determination of Radius of Curvature for Teeth With Cycloid Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatalov, E. V.; Efremenkov, E. A.; Shibinskiy, K. G.

    2016-04-01

    In the article the geometric determination of curvature radius is considered for teeth with cycloid profile. The equations are obtained for the determination of a radius of curvature with point coordinates of a cycloid profile. The conditions of convexo-concavity of a teeth profile are defined for transmission with intermediate rollers.

  18. Symmetry-related mutants in the quinone binding sites of the reaction center -- The effects of changes in charge distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.K.; Schiffer, M.

    1997-09-01

    To probe the structural elements that contribute to the functional asymmetries of the two ubiquinone{sub 10}binding pockets in the reaction center of Rhodobacter capsulatus, the authors targeted the L212Glu-L213Asp (near Q{sub B}) and the M246Ala-M247Ala (near Q{sub A}) pairs of symmetry-related residues for site-specific mutagenesis. They have constructed site-specific mutants that eliminate the sequence differences at these positions (L212Glu-L213Asp{yields}Ala-Ala or M246Ala-M247Ala{yields}Glu-Asp), and have reversed that asymmetry by constructing a quadruple-mutant strain, RQ (L212Glu-L213Asp-M246Ala-M247Ala{yields}Ala-Ala-Glu-Asp). The mutations were designed to change the charge distribution in the quinone-binding region of the reaction center; none of the strains is capable of photosynthetic growth. In photocomponent phenotypic revertants of the RQ strain, second-site mutations which affect Q{sub B} function are coupled to mutations in the Q{sub A} site which restore an Ala or substitute a Tyr at the M247 site; one strain carries an additional Met{yields}Glu substitution at M260 near Q{sub A}. All of the RQ revertants retain the engineered M246Ala{yields}Glu mutation in the Q{sub A} site as well as the L212Ala-L213Ala mutations in the Q{sub B} site. Kinetic characterization of the RQ revertants will give them an idea of what structural and functional elements are important for restoring efficiency to electron and proton transfer pathways in the RQRC, which is far from native. To date, these preliminary results underscore the importance of an asymmetric distribution of polar amino acids in the quinone binding pockets and its influence on the functional properties of the reaction center.

  19. VARIATION OF INNER RADIUS OF DUST TORUS IN NGC4151

    SciTech Connect

    Koshida, Shintaro; Sakata, Yu; Sugawara, Shota; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Minezaki, Takeo; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Suganuma, Masahiro; Enya, Keigo; Aoki, Tsutomu; Peterson, Bruce A.

    2009-08-01

    Long-term optical and near-infrared monitoring observations for a type 1 active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 4151 were carried out for six years from 2001 to 2006 by using the MAGNUM telescope, and delayed response of flux variations in the K(2.2 {mu}m) band to those in the V(0.55 {mu}m) band was clearly detected. Based on cross-correlation analysis, we precisely measured a lag time {delta}t for eight separate periods and we found that {delta}t is not constant, changing between 30 and 70 d during the monitoring period. Since {delta}t is the light travel time from the central energy source out to the surrounding dust torus, this is the first convincing evidence that the inner radius of the dust torus did change in an individual AGN. In order to relate such a change of {delta}t with a change of AGN luminosity L, we present a method of taking an average of the observed V-band fluxes that corresponds to the measured value of {delta}t, and we find that the time-changing track of NGC 4151 in the {delta}t versus L diagram during the monitoring period deviates from the relation {delta}t {proportional_to} L {sup 0.5} expected from dust reverberation. This result, combined with the elapsed time from period to period for which {delta}t was measured, indicates that the timescale of dust formation is about one year, which should be taken into account as a new constraint in future studies of dust evolution in AGNs.

  20. Limits on the effective quark radius from inclusive ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sukhonos, D.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    The high-precision HERA data allows searches up to TeV scales for beyond the Standard Model contributions to electron-quark scattering. Combined measurements of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections in neutral and charged current ep scattering corresponding to a luminosity of around 1 fb-1 have been used in this analysis. A new approach to the beyond the Standard Model analysis of the inclusive ep data is presented; simultaneous fits of parton distribution functions together with contributions of "new physics" processes were performed. Results are presented considering a finite radius of quarks within the quark form-factor model. The resulting 95% C.L. upper limit on the effective quark radius is 0.43 ṡ10-16 cm.

  1. The effect of perturbations of convective energy transport on the luminosity and radius of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Twigg, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    The response of solar models to perturbations of the efficiency of convective energy transport is studied for a number of cases. Such perturbations primarily effect the shallow superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope (at depth of approx. 1000 km below the photosphere). Independent of the details of the perturbation scheme, the resulting change in the solar radius is always very small compared to the change in luminosity. This appears to be true for any physical mechanism of solar variability which operates in the outer layers of the convection zone. Changes of the solar radius have been inferred from historical observations of solar eclipses. Considering the constraints on concurrent luminosity changes, this type of solar variability must be indicative of changes in the solar structure at substantial depths below the superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope.

  2. Decreasing the spectral radius of a graph by link removals.

    PubMed

    Van Mieghem, Piet; Stevanović, Dragan; Kuipers, Fernando; Li, Cong; van de Bovenkamp, Ruud; Liu, Daijie; Wang, Huijuan

    2011-07-01

    The decrease of the spectral radius, an important characterizer of network dynamics, by removing links is investigated. The minimization of the spectral radius by removing m links is shown to be an NP-complete problem, which suggests considering heuristic strategies. Several greedy strategies are compared, and several bounds on the decrease of the spectral radius are derived. The strategy that removes that link l=i~j with largest product (x(1))(i)(x(1))(j) of the components of the eigenvector x(1) belonging to the largest adjacency eigenvalue is shown to be superior to other strategies in most cases. Furthermore, a scaling law where the decrease in spectral radius is inversely proportional to the number of nodes N in the graph is deduced. Another sublinear scaling law of the decrease in spectral radius versus the number m of removed links is conjectured. PMID:21867251

  3. [Disorders of the distal radioulnar joint following fractures of the distal end of the radius].

    PubMed

    Prommersberger, K-J; van Schoonhoven, J

    2008-03-01

    After a fracture of the distal radius, whether healed in an anatomic position or malunited, many patients complain about problems on the ulnar side of the wrist with pain and decreased range of forearm rotation. In addition many patients are unhappy with the unpleasant appearance of the wrist joint. The complaints are related to tears of the triangular fibrocartilaginous complex, instability, and/or incongruity of the distal radioulnar joint and degenerative changes. Malunion of the distal radius must be taken into account when discussing treatment options. The purpose of this paper is to describe a treatment algorithm with respect to the clinical symptoms, the pathology as well as the presence or absence of a deformity of the distal radius. PMID:18283425

  4. ACTIVATION OF VANILLOID (VR1) RECEPTORS BY PARTICLE'S SURFACE CHARGE STIMULATES INFLAMMATORY CHANGES IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous research from our laboratory indicates that particulate matter air pollutants carry an electronegative surface charge, the degree of which correlates with IL-6 release in human respiratory epithelial cells. This study was designed to test the theory that the positive sur...

  5. State Educational Support, Student Enrollment, and Tuition Charges in Kentucky Public Higher Education, 1971-1980: A Decade of Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Robert L.

    State educational support, full-time-equivalent (FTE) enrollments, and tuition charges at the public colleges and universities in Kentucky from 1971 to 1980 were studied, using a comparative indexing technique. Financial data are presented in actual and indexed values, and are shown in both current and constant dollars. State educational support…

  6. Charge Influence on Mini Black Hole's Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraça, R. S.; Malheiro, M.

    In this work we study the electric charge effect on the cross section production of charged mini black holes (MBH) in accelerators. We analyze the charged MBH solution using the fat brane approximation in the context of the ADD model. The maximum charge-mass ratio condition for the existence of a horizon radius is discussed. We show that the electric charge causes a decrease in this radius and, consequently, in the cross section. This reduction is negligible for protons and light-ions but can be important for heavy-ions.

  7. On the Variation of Solar Radius in Rotation Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z. N.; Kong, D. F.; Xiang, N. B.; Feng, W.

    2015-01-01

    The Date Compensated Discrete Fourier Transform and CLEANest algorithm are used to study the temporal variations of the solar radius observed at Rio de Janeiro Observatory from 1998 March 2 to 2009 November 6. The CLEANest spectra show several significant periodicities around 400, 312, 93.5, 86.2, 79.4, 70.9, 53.2, and 26.3 days. Then, combining the data on the daily solar radius measured at Calern Observatory and Rio de Janeiro Observatory and the corresponding daily sunspot areas, we study the short-term periodicity of the solar radius and the role of magnetic field in the variation of the solar radius. The rotation period of the daily solar radius is determined to be statistically significant. Moreover, its temporal evolution is anti-phase with that of sunspot activity, and it is found anti-phase with solar activity. Generally, the stronger solar activity is, the more obvious is the anti-phase relation of radius with solar activity. This indicates that strong magnetic fields have a greater inhibitive effect than weak magnetic fields on the variation of the radius.

  8. ON THE VARIATION OF SOLAR RADIUS IN ROTATION CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Z. N.; Kong, D. F.; Xiang, N. B.; Feng, W.

    2015-01-10

    The Date Compensated Discrete Fourier Transform and CLEANest algorithm are used to study the temporal variations of the solar radius observed at Rio de Janeiro Observatory from 1998 March 2 to 2009 November 6. The CLEANest spectra show several significant periodicities around 400, 312, 93.5, 86.2, 79.4, 70.9, 53.2, and 26.3 days. Then, combining the data on the daily solar radius measured at Calern Observatory and Rio de Janeiro Observatory and the corresponding daily sunspot areas, we study the short-term periodicity of the solar radius and the role of magnetic field in the variation of the solar radius. The rotation period of the daily solar radius is determined to be statistically significant. Moreover, its temporal evolution is anti-phase with that of sunspot activity, and it is found anti-phase with solar activity. Generally, the stronger solar activity is, the more obvious is the anti-phase relation of radius with solar activity. This indicates that strong magnetic fields have a greater inhibitive effect than weak magnetic fields on the variation of the radius.

  9. Thermoconvective vortices in a cylindrical annulus with varying inner radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaño, D.; Navarro, M. C.; Herrero, H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper shows the influence of the inner radius on the stability and intensity of vertical vortices, qualitatively similar to dust devils and cyclones, generated in a cylindrical annulus non-homogeneously heated from below. Little relation is found between the intensity of the vortex and the magnitude of the inner radius. Strong stable vortices can be found for both small and large values of the inner radius. The Rankine combined vortex structure, that characterizes the tangential velocity in dust devils, is clearly observed when small values of the inner radius and large values of the ratio between the horizontal and vertical temperature differences are considered. A contraction on the radius of maximum azimuthal velocity is observed when the vortex is intensified by thermal mechanisms. This radius becomes then nearly stationary when frictional force balances the radial inflow generated by the pressure drop in the center, despite the vortex keeps intensifying. These results connect with the behavior of the radius of the maximum tangential wind associated with a hurricane.

  10. Thermoconvective vortices in a cylindrical annulus with varying inner radius.

    PubMed

    Castaño, D; Navarro, M C; Herrero, H

    2014-12-01

    This paper shows the influence of the inner radius on the stability and intensity of vertical vortices, qualitatively similar to dust devils and cyclones, generated in a cylindrical annulus non-homogeneously heated from below. Little relation is found between the intensity of the vortex and the magnitude of the inner radius. Strong stable vortices can be found for both small and large values of the inner radius. The Rankine combined vortex structure, that characterizes the tangential velocity in dust devils, is clearly observed when small values of the inner radius and large values of the ratio between the horizontal and vertical temperature differences are considered. A contraction on the radius of maximum azimuthal velocity is observed when the vortex is intensified by thermal mechanisms. This radius becomes then nearly stationary when frictional force balances the radial inflow generated by the pressure drop in the center, despite the vortex keeps intensifying. These results connect with the behavior of the radius of the maximum tangential wind associated with a hurricane. PMID:25554036

  11. Primary nonunion of the distal radius fractures in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook; Bae, Ki Cheor; Yeon, Chang Jin; Naik, Premal

    2016-03-01

    There are no published case series of nonunion of distal radius fractures in healthy children because of the rarity of its occurrence. We searched for all reported cases of this condition in Pubmed, Google scholar, and SCOPUS. We found three series, which included one previously reported by our group. The aim of the present study was to define the predisposing factors leading to nonunion after treatment of distal radius fractures in healthy children. We also aimed to emphasize that nonunion should be included in the list of complications of distal radius fractures in children and be mentioned in the textbook of pediatric trauma. PMID:26583931

  12. New Precision Measurement for Proton Zemach Radius with Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Ishida, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Matsuzaki, Y.; Oishi, Y.; Okada, S.; Sato, M.; Midorikawa, K.; Saito, N.; Wada, S.; Aikawa, S.; Kanda, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Takamine, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this proceeding, a new proposal aiming to improve the precision of the proton Zemach radius will be presented. A circularly polarized laser will be shed on a sample of muonic hydrogen in its ground state. By observing the maximum muon decay asymmetry during scanning laser wave length, the ground-state hyperfine splitting energy can be identified, which is directly related to Zemach radius.citedupays The precision of Zemach radius by this measurement is estimated to be three times better compared to PSI experiment. This result will contribute to the solution of proton size puzzle.

  13. An Asian perspective on the management of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Sebastin, Sandeep J; Chung, Kevin C

    2012-05-01

    There is limited data regarding the epidemiology, pathology, and management of distal radius fractures from centers in Asia. The advanced economies in Asia include Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan, whereas the prominent emerging economies are China, India, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand. This article examines the available epidemiological data from Asia, compares the management of distal radius fractures in the advanced and emerging Asian economies and how they compare with the current management in the west. It concludes by offering solutions for improving outcomes of distal radius fractures in Asia. PMID:22554658

  14. An Asian Perspective on the Management of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sebastin, Sandeep J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis There is little data with regards to the epidemiology, pathology, or management of distal radius fractures from centers in Asia. Asia includes five advanced economies, namely Hong Kong SAR, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan and a number of emerging economies prominent among which are China, India, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand. This article examines the available epidemiological data from Asia, and compares the management of distal radius fractures in the advanced and emerging Asian economies and how they match up to the current management in the west. It concludes by offering solutions for improving outcomes of distal radius fractures in both the advanced and emerging economies of Asia. PMID:22554658

  15. Flexible cobalt-phthalocyanine thin films with high charge carrier mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajay; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Ashwini; Samanta, Soumen; Debnath, Anil K.; Jha, Purushottam; Prasad, Rajeshwar; Salmi, Zakaria; Nowak, Sophie; Chehimi, Mohamed M.; Aswal, Dinesh K.; Gupta, Shiv K.

    2012-11-01

    The structural and charge transport characteristics of cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) films deposited on flexible bi-axially oriented polyethylene terephthalate (BOPET) substrates are investigated. CoPc films exhibited a preferential (200) orientation with charge carrier mobility of ˜118 cm2 V-1 s-1 (at 300 K). These films exhibited a reversible resistance changes upon bending them to different radius of curvature. The charge transport in CoPc films is governed by a bias dependent crossover from ohmic (J-V) to trap-free space-charge limited conduction (J-V2). These results demonstrate that CoPc films on flexible BOPET having high mobility and high mechanical flexibility are a potential candidate for flexible electronic devices.

  16. Flexible cobalt-phthalocyanine thin films with high charge carrier mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ajay; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Ashwini; Samanta, Soumen; Debnath, Anil K.; Jha, Purushottam; Prasad, Rajeshwar; Aswal, Dinesh K.; Gupta, Shiv K.; Salmi, Zakaria; Nowak, Sophie; Chehimi, Mohamed M.

    2012-11-26

    The structural and charge transport characteristics of cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) films deposited on flexible bi-axially oriented polyethylene terephthalate (BOPET) substrates are investigated. CoPc films exhibited a preferential (200) orientation with charge carrier mobility of {approx}118 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} (at 300 K). These films exhibited a reversible resistance changes upon bending them to different radius of curvature. The charge transport in CoPc films is governed by a bias dependent crossover from ohmic (J-V) to trap-free space-charge limited conduction (J-V{sup 2}). These results demonstrate that CoPc films on flexible BOPET having high mobility and high mechanical flexibility are a potential candidate for flexible electronic devices.

  17. Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A.

    2006-08-15

    An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar.

  18. Stability Radius as a Method for Comparing the Dynamics of Neuromechanical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Jeffrey T.; Ting, Lena H.

    2015-01-01

    Robust motor behaviors emerge from neuromechanical interactions that are nonlinear, have delays, and contain redundant neural and biomechanical components. For example, in standing balance a subject’s muscle activity (neural control) decreases as stance width (biomechanics) increases when responding to a lateral perturbation, yet the center-of-mass motion (behavior) is nearly identical regardless of stance width. We present stability radius, a technique from robust control theory, to overcome the limitations of classical stability analysis tools, such as gain margin, which are insufficient for predicting how concurrent changes in both biomechanics (plant) and neural control (controller) affect system behavior. We first present the theory and then an application to a neuromechanical model of frontal-plane standing balance with delayed feedback. We show that stability radius can quantify differences in the sensitivity of system behavior to parameter changes, and predict that narrowing stance width increases system robustness. We further demonstrate that selecting combinations of stance width (biomechanics) and feedback gains (neural control) that have the same stability radius produce similar center-of-mass behavior in simulation. Therefore, stability radius may provide a useful tool for understanding neuromechanical interactions in movement and could aid in the design of devices and therapies for improving motor function. PMID:23744699

  19. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device... small, hand held, single tube penscope or eye gauge magnifier. (b) Classification. Class I...

  20. Laser confocal radius measurement method for unpolished spheres.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Zhao, Weiqian; Qiu, Lirong; Yang, Shuai; Wang, Zhongyu

    2016-06-10

    A laser confocal radius measurement method for unpolished spheres (CRMUS) is proposed for measuring the radius of an unpolished sphere during optical sphere processing. CRMUS uses the laser confocal focusing technique to accurately identify the cat's eye and confocal positions of the unpolished sphere, and then uses the distance between the cat's eye and confocal positions measured by a distance measurement interferometer to derive the radius. The partially coherent optical theoretical model of the CRMUS derived indicates that the CRMUS is able to measure the radius of the unpolished sphere with a roughness of less than 0.15 μm. Using an unpolished sphere made of Schott BK7 as the test sphere, experimental results indicate that the CRMUS has a relative expanded uncertainty of less than 20 ppm. The CRMUS could greatly increase processing efficiency. PMID:27409012

  1. Rapid changes in diatom silica surface charge density, silanol abundance, and oxygen isotope values elucidate silica maturation processes in biogenic silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenheft, W.; Dodd, J. P.; Sunderlin, L.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen isotope values of biogenic silica are increasingly used as proxies of paleoenvironmental conditions. Numerous studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between the diatom silica and the temperature/oxygen isotope value of the formation water; however, some studies have indicated that early diagenesis of biogenic silica may alter the oxygen isotope values by several permil. Quantification of the maturation process has proven difficult since the mechanisms that drive post-mortem changes in the silica oxygen isotope values have not been well characterized. New silica maturation data from marine diatoms, Stephanopyxis turris, cultured in a controlled laboratory experiment demonstrate rapid post-mortem decline in silica reactivity. A decrease in relative abundance of surface silanol groups coincides with a decrease in the surface charge density (excess proton concentration) of freshly harvested frustules. Over a maturation period of 20 days at 85ºC, S. turris samples in a 0.7 M NaCl solution at a pH of 8.0 demonstrate a rapid decrease in the surface charge density from -380 μmoles/g to -16 μmoles/g (Figure 1). FTIR analyses reveal a decrease in the abundance of silanol groups (Si-OH) in the diatom frustules occurs over the same time period. It is important to note that the surface charge density and silanol relative abundance appear to have an asymptotic change through time, indicating that further alteration/reactivity is greatly reduced. Preliminary data indicate that post-mortem increases in the oxygen isotope values of diatom silica observed here and in other studies are coincident with a reduction in the surface charge density and silanol abundance. These experiments demonstrate that rapid post-mortem alteration of biogenic silica is occurring and provide a possible mechanism for alteration of oxygen isotope values in biogenic silica.

  2. Solid state cloaking for electrical charge carrier mobility control

    DOEpatents

    Zebarjadi, Mona; Liao, Bolin; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2015-07-07

    An electrical mobility-controlled material includes a solid state host material having a controllable Fermi energy level and electrical charge carriers with a charge carrier mobility. At least one Fermi level energy at which a peak in charge carrier mobility is to occur is prespecified for the host material. A plurality of particles are distributed in the host material, with at least one particle disposed with an effective mass and a radius that minimize scattering of the electrical charge carriers for the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy of peak charge carrier mobility. The minimized scattering of electrical charge carriers produces the peak charge carrier mobility only at the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy, set by the particle effective mass and radius, the charge carrier mobility being less than the peak charge carrier mobility at Fermi level energies other than the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy.

  3. LONG-TERM PERIODICITY VARIATIONS OF THE SOLAR RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Z. N.; Xie, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the long-term periodicity variations of the solar radius, daily solar radius data from 1978 February to 2000 September at the Calern Observatory are used. Continuous observations of the solar radius are difficult due to the weather, seasonal effects, and instrument characteristics. Thus, to analyze these data, we first use the Dixon criterion to reject suspect values, then we measure the cross-correlation between the solar radius and sunspot numbers. The result indicates that the solar radius is in complete antiphase with the sunspot numbers and shows lead times of 74 months relative to the sunspot numbers. The Lomb-Scargle and date compensated discrete Fourier transform methods are also used to investigate the periodicity of the solar radius. Both methods yield similar significance periodicities around {approx}1 yr, {approx}2.6 yr, {approx}3.6 yr, and {approx}11 yr. Possible mechanisms for these periods are discussed. The possible physical cause of the {approx}11 yr period is the cyclic variation of the magnetic pressure of the concentrated flux tubes at the bottom of the solar convection zone.

  4. Isolated Diaphyseal Fractures of the Radius in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guitton, Thierry G.; Van Dijk, Niek C.; Raaymakers, Ernst L.

    2009-01-01

    Diaphyseal radius fractures without associated ulna fracture or radioulnar dislocation (isolated fracture of the radius) are recognized in adults but are rarely described in skeletally immature patients. A search of our database (1974–2002) identified 17 pediatric patients that had an isolated fracture of the radius. Among the 13 patients with at least 1 year follow-up, ten were treated with manipulative reduction and immobilization in an above elbow cast and three had initial operative treatment with plate and screw fixation. These 13 patients were evaluated for an average of 18 months (range, 12 to 45 months) after injury using the system of Price and colleagues. The incidence of isolated diaphyseal radius fractures in skeletally immature patients was 0.56 per year in our database and represented 27% of the 63 patients with a diaphyseal forearm fracture. All 13 patients, with at least 1 year follow-up, regained full elbow flexion and extension and full forearm rotation. According to the classification system of Price, all 13 patients (100%) had an excellent result. As in adults, isolated radius fractures seem to occur in children more frequently than previously appreciated. Treatment of isolated radius fractures in skeletally immature patients has a low complication rate, and excellent functional outcomes are the rule. PMID:19859772

  5. Argon gas-puff radius optimiaztion for Saturn operating in the long-pulse mode.

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, John P.; Jackson, S. L.; Commisso, Robert J.; Weber, Bruce V.; Mosher, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    Argon gas puff experiments using the long pulse mode of Saturn (230-ns rise time) have promise to increase the coupled energy and simplify operations because the voltage is reduced in vacuum and the forward-going energy is higher for the same Marx charge. The issue addressed in this work is to determine if the 12-cm-diameter triple nozzle used in Saturn long-pulse-mode experiments to date provides maximum K-shell yield, or if a different-radius nozzle provides additional radiation. Long-pulse implosions are modeled by starting with measured density distributions from the existing 12-cm-diameter nozzle, and then varying the outer radius in an implosion-energy-conserving self-similar manner to predict the gas-puff diameter that results in the maximum K-shell yield. The snowplow-implosions and multi-zone radiation transport models used in the analysis are benchmarked against detailed measurements from the 12-cm-diameter experiments. These calculations indicate that the maximum K-shell emission is produced with very nearly the existing nozzle radius.

  6. Subtle Change in the Charge Distribution of Surface Residues May Affect the Secondary Functions of Cytochrome c*

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Simanta Sarani; Sil, Pallabi; Haldar, Shubhasis; Mitra, Samaresh; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2015-01-01

    Although the primary function of cytochrome c (cyt c) is electron transfer, the protein caries out an additional secondary function involving its interaction with membrane cardiolipin (CDL), its peroxidase activity, and the initiation of apoptosis. Whereas the primary function of cyt c is essentially conserved, its secondary function varies depending on the source of the protein. We report here a detailed experimental and computational study, which aims to understand, at the molecular level, the difference in the secondary functions of cyt c obtained from horse heart (mammalian) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). The conformational landscape of cyt c has been found to be heterogeneous, consisting of an equilibrium between the compact and extended conformers as well as the oligomeric species. Because the determination of relative populations of these conformers is difficult to obtain by ensemble measurements, we used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a method that offers single-molecule resolution. The population of different species is found to depend on multiple factors, including the protein source, the presence of CDL and urea, and their concentrations. The complex interplay between the conformational distribution and oligomerization plays a crucial role in the variation of the pre-apoptotic regulation of cyt c observed from different sources. Finally, computational studies reveal that the variation in the charge distribution at the surface and the charge reversal sites may be the key determinant of the conformational stability of cyt c. PMID:25873393

  7. Evidences of Changes in Surface Electrostatic Charge Distribution during Stabilization of HPV16 Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Juan F.; Vicente-Alique, Ernesto; Núñez-Ramírez, Rafael; Wang, Yang; Martínez-Salazar, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of human papillomavirus type 16 virus-like particles has been examined by means of different techniques including dynamic and static light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and electrophoretic mobility. All these techniques provide different and often complementary perspectives about the aggregation process and generation of stabilized virus-like particles after a period of time of 48 hours at a temperature of 298 K. Interestingly, static light scattering results point towards a clear colloidal instability in the initial systems, as suggested by a negative value of the second virial coefficient. This is likely related to small repulsive electrostatic interactions among the particles, and in agreement with relatively small absolute values of the electrophoretic mobility and, hence, of the net surface charges. At this initial stage the small repulsive interactions are not able to compensate binding interactions, which tend to aggregate the particles. As time proceeds, an increase of the size of the particles is accompanied by strong increases, in absolute values, of the electrophoretic mobility and net surface charge, suggesting enhanced repulsive electrostatic interactions and, consequently, a stabilized colloidal system. These results show that electrophoretic mobility is a useful methodology that can be applied to screen the stabilization factors for virus-like particles during vaccine development. PMID:26885635

  8. The effect of structural changes on charge transfer states in a light-harvesting carotenoid-diaryl-porphyrin-C60 molecular triad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olguin, Marco; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2014-05-01

    We present a detailed study of charge transfer (CT) excited states for a large number of configurations in a light-harvesting Carotenoid-diaryl-Porphyrin-C60 (CPC60) molecular triad. The chain-like molecular triad undergoes photoinduced charge transfer process exhibiting a large excited state dipole moment, making it suitable for application to molecular-scale opto-electronic devices. An important consideration is that the structural flexibility of the CPC60 triad impacts its dynamics in solvents. Since experimentally measured dipole moments for the triad of ˜110 D and ˜160 D strongly indicate a range in structural variability in the excited state, studying the effect of structural changes on the CT excited state energetics furthers the understanding of its charge transfer states. We have calculated the variation in the lowest CT excited state energies by performing a scan of possible variation in the structure of the triad. Some of these configurations were generated by incrementally scanning a 360° torsional (dihedral) twist at the C60-porhyrin linkage and the porphyrin-carotenoid linkage. Additionally, five different CPC60 conformations were studied to determine the effect of pi-conjugation and particle-hole Coulombic attraction on the CT excitation energies. Our calculations show that configurational changes in the triad induces a variation of ˜0.6 eV in CT excited state energies in the gas-phase. The corresponding calculated excited state dipoles show a range of 47 D-188 D. The absorption spectra and density of states of these structures show little variation except for the structures where the porphyrin and aryl conjugation is changed.

  9. The effect of structural changes on charge transfer states in a light-harvesting carotenoid-diaryl-porphyrin-C60 molecular triad.

    PubMed

    Olguin, Marco; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R; Baruah, Tunna

    2014-05-28

    We present a detailed study of charge transfer (CT) excited states for a large number of configurations in a light-harvesting Carotenoid-diaryl-Porphyrin-C60 (CPC60) molecular triad. The chain-like molecular triad undergoes photoinduced charge transfer process exhibiting a large excited state dipole moment, making it suitable for application to molecular-scale opto-electronic devices. An important consideration is that the structural flexibility of the CPC60 triad impacts its dynamics in solvents. Since experimentally measured dipole moments for the triad of ∼110 D and ∼160 D strongly indicate a range in structural variability in the excited state, studying the effect of structural changes on the CT excited state energetics furthers the understanding of its charge transfer states. We have calculated the variation in the lowest CT excited state energies by performing a scan of possible variation in the structure of the triad. Some of these configurations were generated by incrementally scanning a 360° torsional (dihedral) twist at the C60-porhyrin linkage and the porphyrin-carotenoid linkage. Additionally, five different CPC60 conformations were studied to determine the effect of pi-conjugation and particle-hole Coulombic attraction on the CT excitation energies. Our calculations show that configurational changes in the triad induces a variation of ∼0.6 eV in CT excited state energies in the gas-phase. The corresponding calculated excited state dipoles show a range of 47 D-188 D. The absorption spectra and density of states of these structures show little variation except for the structures where the porphyrin and aryl conjugation is changed. PMID:24880282

  10. The effect of structural changes on charge transfer states in a light-harvesting carotenoid-diaryl-porphyrin-C{sub 60} molecular triad

    SciTech Connect

    Olguin, Marco; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2014-05-28

    We present a detailed study of charge transfer (CT) excited states for a large number of configurations in a light-harvesting Carotenoid-diaryl-Porphyrin-C{sub 60} (CPC{sub 60}) molecular triad. The chain-like molecular triad undergoes photoinduced charge transfer process exhibiting a large excited state dipole moment, making it suitable for application to molecular-scale opto-electronic devices. An important consideration is that the structural flexibility of the CPC{sub 60} triad impacts its dynamics in solvents. Since experimentally measured dipole moments for the triad of ∼110 D and ∼160 D strongly indicate a range in structural variability in the excited state, studying the effect of structural changes on the CT excited state energetics furthers the understanding of its charge transfer states. We have calculated the variation in the lowest CT excited state energies by performing a scan of possible variation in the structure of the triad. Some of these configurations were generated by incrementally scanning a 360° torsional (dihedral) twist at the C{sub 60}-porhyrin linkage and the porphyrin-carotenoid linkage. Additionally, five different CPC{sub 60} conformations were studied to determine the effect of pi-conjugation and particle-hole Coulombic attraction on the CT excitation energies. Our calculations show that configurational changes in the triad induces a variation of ∼0.6 eV in CT excited state energies in the gas-phase. The corresponding calculated excited state dipoles show a range of 47 D–188 D. The absorption spectra and density of states of these structures show little variation except for the structures where the porphyrin and aryl conjugation is changed.