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Sample records for charge transfer chemistry

  1. Charge-displacement analysis via natural orbitals for chemical valence: Charge transfer effects in coordination chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistoni, Giovanni; Rampino, Sergio; Tarantelli, Francesco; Belpassi, Leonardo

    2015-02-01

    We recently devised a simple scheme for analyzing on quantitative grounds the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson donation and back-donation in symmetric coordination complexes. Our approach is based on a symmetry decomposition of the so called Charge-Displacement (CD) function quantifying the charge flow, upon formation of a metal (M)-substrate (S) bond, along the M-S interaction axis and provides clear-cut measures of donation and back-donation charges in correlation with experimental observables [G. Bistoni et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 52, 11599 (2013)]. The symmetry constraints exclude of course from the analysis most systems of interest in coordination chemistry. In this paper, we show how to entirely overcome this limitation by taking advantage of the properties of the natural orbitals for chemical valence [M. Mitoraj and A. Michalak, J. Mol. Model. 13, 347 (2007)]. A general scheme for disentangling donation and back-donation in the CD function of both symmetric and non-symmetric systems is presented and illustrated through applications to M-ethyne (M = Au, Ni and W) coordination bonds, including an explicative study on substrate activation in a model reaction mechanism.

  2. Opposites Attract: Organic Charge Transfer Salts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Wouw, Heidi L.; Chamorro, Juan; Quintero, Michael; Klausen, Rebekka S.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that introduces second-year undergraduate organic chemistry students to organic electronic materials. The discovery of metallic conductivity in the charge transfer salt tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) is a landmark result in the history of organic electronics. The charge transfer…

  3. Surface chemistry and interfacial charge-transfer mechanisms in photoinduced oxygen exchange at O2-TiO2 interfaces.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Juan Felipe; Peral, José; Salvador, Pedro

    2011-04-01

    Experimental results obtained over the last three decades on photoinduced oxygen isotopic exchange (POIE) of TiO₂ oxygen atoms with those of adsorbed water molecules and gaseous O₂ are analyzed in the light of recent information from the literature on the interaction of water and O₂ species with the TiO₂ surface (obtained by application of surface spectroscopy techniques in combination with high-resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy). The analysis emphasizes the singular role that bridging oxygen ions and bridging oxygen vacancies play in TiO₂ surface chemistry and interfacial electron transfer at the gas phase-TiO₂ interface in the absence and presence of water. The observed competition between POIE and the photo-oxidation (PO) of organic compounds is analyzed in terms of the recently developed direct-indirect (D-I) kinetic model for heterogeneous photocatalysis (D. Monllor-Satoca et al., Catal. Today, 2007, 129, 247, and references therein). PMID:21442702

  4. Towards an ab initio description of the charge transfer between a proton and a lithium fluoride surface: A quantum chemistry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwald, P.; Gräfe, S.; Burgdörfer, J.; Wirtz, L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the non-adiabatic charge transfer dynamics during the collision of a slow proton with a lithium fluoride surface employing a quantum-chemistry based dynamics approach. The surface is modeled by an Li5F1 + H+ cluster embedded in a large matrix of point charges. Going beyond the adiabatic (or Born-Oppenheimer) approximation, we apply multi-reference configuration-interaction methods that allow for the calculation of ground and excited states of the embedded cluster as well as of the non-adiabatic couplings between them. This information serves as input for the determination of the neutralization probability of a proton scattered off a LiF surface using Tully's semi-classical surface hopping algorithm.

  5. Mechanochemical Synthesis of Two Polymorphs of the Tetrathiafulvalene-Chloranil Charge Transfer Salt: An Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wixtrom, Alex; Buhler, Jessica; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Mechanochemical syntheses avoid or considerably reduce the use of reaction solvents, thus providing green chemistry synthetic alternatives that are both environmentally friendly and economically advantageous. The increased solid-state reactivity generated by mechanical energy imparted to the reactants by grinding or milling can offer alternative…

  6. Computational chemistry and aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. M.; Jaffe, R. L.; Arnold, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the radiative heating phenomena encountered during a typical aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) trajectory was made to determine the potential impact of computational chemistry on AOTV design technology. Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation mechanisms were considered. This analysis showed that computational chemistry can be used to predict (1) radiative intensity factors and spectroscopic data; (2) the excitation rates of both atoms and molecules; (3) high-temperature reaction rate constants for metathesis and charge exchange reactions; (4) particle ionization and neutralization rates and cross sections; and (5) spectral line widths.

  7. Charge transferred in brush discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talarek, M.; Kacprzyk, R.

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatic discharges from surfaces of plastic materials can be a source of ignition, when appear in explosive atmospheres. Incendivity of electrostatic discharges can be estimated using the transferred charge test. In the case of brush discharges not all the energy stored at the tested sample is released and the effective surface charge density (or surface potential) crater is observed after the discharge. Simplified model, enabling calculation of a charge transferred during electrostatic brush discharge, was presented. Comparison of the results obtained from the simplified model and from direct measurements of transferred charge are presented in the paper.

  8. Charge Transfer Reactions Induce Born-Oppenheimer Breakdown in Surface Chemistry: Applications of Double Resonance Spectroscopy in Molecule-Surface Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodtke, Alec M.

    2013-06-01

    Atomic and molecular interactions constitute a many-body quantum problem governed fundamentally only by the Coulomb forces between many electrons and nuclei. While simple to state, computers are simply not fast enough to solve this problem by brute force, except for the simplest examples. Combining the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation (BOA) with Density Functional Theory (DFT), however, allows theoretical simulations of extraordinarily complex chemical systems including molecular interactions at solid metal surfaces, the physical basis of surface chemistry. This lecture describes experiments demonstrating the limits of the BOA/DFT approximation as it relates to molecules interacting with solid metal surfaces. One of the most powerful experimental tools at our disposal is a form of double resonance spectroscopy, which allows us to define the quantum state of the molecule both before and after the collision with the surface, providing a complete picture of the resulting energy conversion processes. With such data, we are able to emphasize quantitative measurements that can be directly compared to first principles theories that go beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. One important outcome of this work is the realization that Born-Oppenheimer breakdown can be induced by simple charge transfer reactions that are common in surface chemistry. J. D. White, J. Chen, D. Matsiev, D. J. Auerbach and A. M. Wodtke Nature {433}(7025), 503-505 (2005) Y. H. Huang, C. T. Rettner, D. J. Auerbach and A. M. Wodtke Science {290}(5489), 111-114 (2000) R. Cooper, I. Rahinov, Z. S. Li, D. Matsiev, D. J. Auerbach and A. M. Wodtke Chemical Science {1}(1), 55-61 (2010) J. Larue, T. Schäfer, D. Matsiev, L. Velarde, N. H. Nahler, D. J. Auerbach and A. M. Wodtke PCCP {13}(1), 97-99 (2011).

  9. Catalysis: Quantifying charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Trevor E.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2016-02-01

    Improving the design of catalytic materials for clean energy production requires a better understanding of their electronic properties, which remains experimentally challenging. Researchers now quantify the number of electrons transferred from metal nanoparticles to an oxide support as a function of particle size.

  10. Impact of nonadiabatic charge transfer on the rate of redox chemistry of carbon oxides on rutile TiO2 (110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Yeohoon; Wang, Yanggang; Rousseau, Roger J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra

    2015-03-06

    We present the results of a density functional theory (DFT) within the LDA+U approximation on large models of partially reduced TiO2 (110) rutile surface to investigate the nature of charge transfer and the role of non-adiabatic effects on three prototypical redox reactions: (i) O2 adsorption (ii) CO oxidation and (iii) CO2 reduction. Charge-constrained DFT (cDFT) is used to estimate kinetic parameters for a Marcus theory rate law that accounts for adiabatic coupling effects on reaction rates. We find that for O2 adsorption, the coupling between adiabatic states is strong, leading to fast charge transfer rates. The lowest energy structures at high coverage consist of two chemisorbed O2-, one adsorbed at a VO site and the other adsorbed at an adjacent Ti5C site. For CO oxidation, however, all reactions are kinetically hindered on the ground state due to the weak adiabatic coupling at the state crossing, such that one has to overcome two kinetically unfavorable charge transfer events to drive the process (non-adiabatically) on the thermal ground state. The process can be driven by photochemical means but would result in an adsorbed radical [OCOO-] intermediate species. Similarly, CO2 reduction also proceeds via a non-adiabatic charge transfer to form an adsorbed CO2- species followed by a second non-adiabatic charge transfer to produce CO. Our analysis provides important computational guidelines for modeling these types of processes. We thank Z. Dohnalek, M. Hendersen, G. Kimmel, H. Metieu, and N. Petrik for invaluable discussions. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences and performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the

  11. Contact charge-transfer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dharamsi, A.N.; Tulip, J.

    1981-07-01

    A mechanism for sustaining population inversions in contact charge-transfer complexes in which the ground electronic state is not bound is described. The mechanism relies on picosecond radiationless depletion of the lower laser state. This generates an inversion even when the ground-state potential curve, as plotted against the donor-acceptor distance, is not repulsive vertically below the excited state minimum. Contact charge-transfer lasers would offer high gain, high-energy density, and tunable sources of coherent radiation in the uv and visible. A method for pumping such a laser is examined and applied to the pyrrole-oxygen complex. A rate equation analysis is done and estimates for gain and energy density are presented.

  12. Charge Transfer and Catalysis at the Metal Support Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Lawrence Robert

    2012-07-31

    Kinetic, electronic, and spectroscopic characterization of model Pt–support systems are used to demonstrate the relationship between charge transfer and catalytic activity and selectivity. The results show that charge flow controls the activity and selectivity of supported metal catalysts. This dissertation builds on extensive existing knowledge of metal–support interactions in heterogeneous catalysis. The results show the prominent role of charge transfer at catalytic interfaces to determine catalytic activity and selectivity. Further, this research demonstrates the possibility of selectively driving catalytic chemistry by controlling charge flow and presents solid-state devices and doped supports as novel methods for obtaining electronic control over catalytic reaction kinetics.

  13. Charge-Transfer Versus Charge-Transfer-Like Excitations Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Barry; Sun, Haitao; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-07-14

    Criteria to assess charge-transfer (CT) and `CT-like' character of electronic excitations are examined. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with non-hybrid, hybrid, and tuned long-range corrected (LC) functionals is compared with with coupled-cluster (CC) benchmarks. The test set includes an organic CT complex, two `push-pull' donor-acceptor chromophores, a cyanine dye, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Proper CT is easily identified. Excitations with significant density changes upon excitation within regions of close spatial proximity can also be diagnosed. For such excitations, the use of LC functionals in TDDFT sometimes leads to dramatic improvements of the singlet energies, similar to proper CT, which has led to the concept of `CT-like' excitations. However, `CT-like' excitations are not like charge transfer, and the improvements are not obtained for the right reasons. The triplet excitation energies are underestimated for all systems, often severely. For the `CT-like' candidates, when going from a non-hybrid to an LC functional the error in the singlet-triplet (S/T) separation changes from negative to positive, providing error compensation. For the cyanine, the S/T separation is too large with all functionals, leading to the best error compensation for non-hybrid functionals.

  14. Velocity Map Imaging Study of Ion-Radical Chemistry: Charge Transfer and Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation in the Reactions of Allyl Radicals with C(.).

    PubMed

    Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M

    2016-08-11

    We present an experimental and computational study of the dynamics of collisions of ground state carbon cations with allyl radicals, C3H5, at a collision energy of 2.2 eV. Charge transfer to produce the allyl cation, C3H5(+), is exoergic by 3.08 eV and proceeds via energy resonance such that the electron transfer occurs without a significant change in nuclear velocities. The products have sufficient energy to undergo the dissociation process C3H5(+) → C3H4(+) + H. Approximately 80% of the reaction products are ascribed to charge transfer, with ∼40% of those products decaying via loss of a hydrogen atom. We also observe products arising from the formation of new carbon-carbon bonds. The experimental velocity space flux distributions for the four-carbon products are symmetric about the centroid of the reactants, providing direct evidence that the products are mediated by formation of a C4H5(+) complex living at least a few rotational periods. The primary four-carbon reaction products are formed by elimination of molecular hydrogen from the C4H5(+) complex. More than 75% of the nascent C4H3(+) products decay by C-H bond cleavage to yield a C4H2(+) species. Quantum chemical calculations at the MP2/6-311+g(d,p) level of theory support the formation of a nonplanar cyclic C4H5(+) adduct that is produced when the p-orbital containing the unpaired electron on C(+) overlaps with the unpaired spin density on the terminal carbon atoms in allyl. Product formation then occurs by 1,2-elimination of molecular hydrogen from the cyclic intermediate to form a planar cyclic C4H3(+) product. The large rearrangement in geometry as the C4H3(+) products are formed is consistent with high vibrational excitation in that product and supports the observation that the majority of those products decay to form the C4H2(+) species. PMID:27434380

  15. Long-range charge transfer in biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhova, T. Yu; Likhachev, V. N.; Vinogradov, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies on the charge transfer in biopolymers, namely, DNA and peptides, are presented. Conditions that ensure the efficient long-range charge transport (by several tens of nanometres) are considered. The known theoretical models of charge transfer mechanisms are discussed and the scopes of their application are analyzed. Attention is focused on the charge transport by the polaron mechanism. The bibliography includes 262 references.

  16. Ultrafast Measurement Confirms Charge Generation through Cold Charge Transfer States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Bhoj; Younts, Robert; Yan, Liang; Danilov, Evgeny; Ade, Harald; You, Wei; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2015-03-01

    The role of excess energy in generation and extraction of charges through charge transfer (CT) states in polymer solar cells is a subject of debate. There are reports suggesting increase of charge generation yield with excess energy based on ultrafast experiments. On the other hand time delayed collection field measurements shows that excess photon energy has no effect in photovoltaic efficiency. Here we resolved this discrepancy by studying the dynamics of CT excitons and polarons in blends of medium gap copolymers. We found that low-lying charge transfer (CT) excitons can generate charges over a long time period (nanosecond) and contribute photocurrent on the bulk heterojunction devices. By performing resonant CT excitation as well as above gap excitation transient absorption measurements we investigated that the charges are generated more efficiently through low-lying CT states in efficient devices independent of excitation energy. This work is supported by Office of Naval Research Grant N000141310526 P00002.

  17. Room Temperature Multiferroicity of Charge Transfer Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Chen, Xiaomin; Li, Huashan; Gong, Maogang; Yuan, Guoliang; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Wuttig, Manfred; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-09-22

    Room temperature multiferroics has been a frontier research field by manipulating spin-driven ferroelectricity or charge-order-driven magnetism. Charge-transfer crystals based on electron donor and acceptor assembly, exhibiting simultaneous spin ordering, are drawing significant interests for the development of all-organic magnetoelectric multiferroics. Here, we report that a remarkable anisotropic magnetization and room temperature multiferroicity can be achieved through assembly of thiophene donor and fullerene acceptor. The crystal motif directs the dimensional and compositional control of charge-transfer networks that could switch magnetization under external stimuli, thereby opening up an attractive class of all-organic nanoferronics. PMID:26257033

  18. Ultrafast charge transfer and atomic orbital polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Deppe, M.; Foehlisch, A.; Hennies, F.; Nagasono, M.; Beye, M.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Echenique, P. M.; Wurth, W.

    2007-11-07

    The role of orbital polarization for ultrafast charge transfer between an atomic adsorbate and a substrate is explored. Core hole clock spectroscopy with linearly polarized x-ray radiation allows to selectively excite adsorbate resonance states with defined spatial orientation relative to the substrate surface. For c(4x2)S/Ru(0001) the charge transfer times between the sulfur 2s{sup -1}3p*{sup +1} antibonding resonance and the ruthenium substrate have been studied, with the 2s electron excited into the 3p{sub perpendicular}* state along the surface normal and the 3p{sub parallel}* state in the surface plane. The charge transfer times are determined as 0.18{+-}0.07 and 0.84{+-}0.23 fs, respectively. This variation is the direct consequence of the different adsorbate-substrate orbital overlap.

  19. Charge-transfer magnetoelectrics of polymeric multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Jasion, Daniel; Chen, Xiaomin; Wuttig, Manfred; Ren, Shenqiang

    2014-04-22

    The renaissance of multiferroics has yielded a deeper understanding of magneto-electric coupling of inorganic single-phase multiferroics and composites. Here, we report charge-transfer polymeric multiferroics, which exhibit external field-controlled magnetic, ferroelectric, and microwave response, as well as magneto-dielectric coupling. The charge-transfer-controlled ferroic properties result from the magnetic field-tunable triplet exciton which has been validated by the dynamic polaron-bipolaron transition model. In addition, the temperature-dependent dielectric discontinuity and electric-field-dependent polarization confirms room temperature ferroelectricity of crystalline charge-transfer polymeric multiferroics due to the triplet exciton, which allows the tunability of polarization by the photoexcitation. PMID:24654686

  20. Spacecraft Charging in Geostationary Transfer Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard; Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    The 700 km x 5.8 Re orbit of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft provide a unique opportunity to investigate spacecraft charging in geostationary transfer orbits. We use records from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) plasma spectrometer to identify candidate surface charging events based on the "ion line" charging signature in the ion records. We summarize the energetic particle environment and the conditions necessary for charging to occur in this environment. We discuss the altitude, duration, and magnitude of events observed in the Van Allen Probes from the beginning of the mission to present time. In addition, we explore what information the dual satellites provide on the spatial and temporal variations in the charging environments.

  1. Variable Charge Soils: Mineralogy and Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Van Ranst, Eric; Noble, Andrew; Baert, Geert

    2003-11-01

    Soils rich in particles with amphoteric surface properties in the Oxisols, Ultisols, Alfisols, Spodosols and Andisols orders (1) are considered variable charge soils (2). The term “variable charge” is used to describe organic and inorganic soil constituents with reactive surface groups whose charge varies with pH, ionic concentration and composition of the soil solution. Such groups are the surface carboxyl, phenolic and amino functional groups of organic materials in soils, and surface hydroxyl groups of Fe and Al oxides, allophane and imogolite. The hydroxyl surface groups are also present on edges of some phyllosilicate minerals such as kaolinite, mica, and hydroxyl-interlayered vermiculite. The variable charge is developed on the surface groups as a result of adsorption or desorption of ions that are constituents of the solid phase, i.e., H+, and the adsorption or desorption of solid-unlike ions that are not constituents of the solid. Highly weathered soils usually undergo isoeletric weathering and reach a “zero net charge” stage during their development. They have a slightly acidic to acidic soil solution pH, which is close to either point of zero net charge (PZNC) (3) or point of zero salt effect (PZSE) (3). They are characterized by high abundances of minerals with a point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) (3) at neutral and slightly basic pHs; the most important being Fe and Al oxides and allophane. Under acidic conditions, the surfaces of these minerals are net positively charged. In contrast, the surfaces of permanent charge phyllosilicates are negatively charged regardless of ambient conditions. Variable charge soils therefore, are heterogeneous charge systems. The coexistence and interactions of oppositely charged surfaces or particles confers a different pattern of physical and chemical behavior on the soil, relatively to a homogeneously charged system of temperate regions. In some variable charge soils (Oxisols and some Ultisols developed on

  2. Biological charge transfer via flickering resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqi; Liu, Chaoren; Balaeff, Alexander; Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N

    2014-07-15

    Biological electron-transfer (ET) reactions are typically described in the framework of coherent two-state electron tunneling or multistep hopping. However, these ET reactions may involve multiple redox cofactors in van der Waals contact with each other and with vibronic broadenings on the same scale as the energy gaps among the species. In this regime, fluctuations of the molecular structures and of the medium can produce transient energy level matching among multiple electronic states. This transient degeneracy, or flickering electronic resonance among states, is found to support coherent (ballistic) charge transfer. Importantly, ET rates arising from a flickering resonance (FR) mechanism will decay exponentially with distance because the probability of energy matching multiple states is multiplicative. The distance dependence of FR transport thus mimics the exponential decay that is usually associated with electron tunneling, although FR transport involves real carrier population on the bridge and is not a tunneling phenomenon. Likely candidates for FR transport are macromolecules with ET groups in van der Waals contact: DNA, bacterial nanowires, multiheme proteins, strongly coupled porphyrin arrays, and proteins with closely packed redox-active residues. The theory developed here is used to analyze DNA charge-transfer kinetics, and we find that charge-transfer distances up to three to four bases may be accounted for with this mechanism. Thus, the observed rapid (exponential) distance dependence of DNA ET rates over distances of ≲ 15 Å does not necessarily prove a tunneling mechanism. PMID:24965367

  3. Pattern classification using charge transfer devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using charge transfer devices in the classification of multispectral imagery was investigated by evaluating particular devices to determine their suitability in matrix multiplication subsystem of a pattern classifier and by designing a protype of such a system. Particular attention was given to analog-analog correlator devices which consist of two tapped delay lines, chip multipliers, and a summed output. The design for the classifier and a printed circuit layout for the analog boards were completed and the boards were fabricated. A test j:g for the board was built and checkout was begun.

  4. Coronene-based charge-transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yukihiro; Isomura, Kazuhide; Kumagai, Yoshihide; Maesato, Mitsuhiko; Kishida, Hideo; Mizuno, Motohiro; Saito, Gunzi

    2016-08-01

    Recent developments in the arena of charge-transfer complexes composed of the D 6h-symmetric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, coronene, are highlighted with emphasis on the structural and physical properties of these complexes. Because of the dual electron-donating and -accepting abilities of coronene, this group involves structurally-defined four cation salts and three anion salts. The Jahn–Teller distortions and in-plane motion of coronene molecules in the solids, both of which are closely associated with the high symmetry of coronene molecules, and syntheses of clathrate-type complexes are also presented.

  5. Coronene-based charge-transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yukihiro; Isomura, Kazuhide; Kumagai, Yoshihide; Maesato, Mitsuhiko; Kishida, Hideo; Mizuno, Motohiro; Saito, Gunzi

    2016-08-01

    Recent developments in the arena of charge-transfer complexes composed of the D 6h-symmetric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, coronene, are highlighted with emphasis on the structural and physical properties of these complexes. Because of the dual electron-donating and -accepting abilities of coronene, this group involves structurally-defined four cation salts and three anion salts. The Jahn-Teller distortions and in-plane motion of coronene molecules in the solids, both of which are closely associated with the high symmetry of coronene molecules, and syntheses of clathrate-type complexes are also presented. PMID:27294380

  6. Nucleic Acid Charge Transfer: Black, White and Gray

    PubMed Central

    Venkatramani, Ravindra; Keinan, Shahar; Balaeff, Alexander; Beratan, David N.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical studies of charge transport in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) indicate that structure and dynamics modulate the charge transfer rates, and that different members of a structural ensemble support different charge transport mechanisms. Here, we review the influences of nucleobase geometry, electronic structure, solvent environment, and thermal conformational fluctuations on the charge transfer mechanism. We describe an emerging framework for understanding the diversity of charge transport mechanisms seen in nucleic acids. PMID:21528017

  7. Charge transfer processes: the role of optimized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Benjamin; Domingo, Alex; Krah, Tim; Robert, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    The influence of the molecular orbitals on charge transfer (CT) reactions is analyzed through wave function-based calculations. Characteristic CT processes in the organic radical 2,5-di-tert-butyl-6-oxophenalenoxyl linked with tetrathiafulvalene and the inorganic crystalline material LaMnO3 show that changes in the inner shells must be explicitly taken into account. Such electronic reorganization can lead to a reduction of the CT vertical transition energy up to 66%. A state-specific approach accessible through an adapted CASSCF (complete active space self-consistent field) methodology is capable of reaching good agreement with the experimental spectroscopy of CT processes. A partitioning of the relaxation energy in terms of valence- and inner-shells is offered and sheds light on their relative importance. This work paves the way to the intimate description of redox reactions using quantum chemistry methods. PMID:24781811

  8. Charge transfer reaction laser with preionization means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauderslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A helium-nitrogen laser is described in which energy in the visible range is emitted as a result of charge transfer reaction between helium ions and nitrogen molecules. The helium and nitrogen are present in a gas mixture at several atmospheres pressure, with a nitrogen partial pressure on the order of a pair of main discharge electrodes, the gas mixture is preionized to prevent arcing when the discharge pulse is applied. The preionization is achieved by the application of a high voltage across a pair of secondary electrodes which are spaced apart in a direction perpendicular to the spacing direction of the main discharge electrodes and the longitudinal axis of the space in which the gas mixture is contained. Feedback, by means of a pair of appropriately spaced mirrors, is provided, to produce coherent energy pulses at a selected wavelength.

  9. Charge transfer-mediated singlet fission.

    PubMed

    Monahan, N; Zhu, X-Y

    2015-04-01

    Singlet fission, the splitting of a singlet exciton into two triplet excitons in molecular materials, is interesting not only as a model many-electron problem, but also as a process with potential applications in solar energy conversion. Here we discuss limitations of the conventional four-electron and molecular dimer model in describing singlet fission in crystalline organic semiconductors, such as pentacene and tetracene. We emphasize the need to consider electronic delocalization, which is responsible for the decisive role played by the Mott-Wannier exciton, also called the charge transfer (CT) exciton, in mediating singlet fission. At the strong electronic coupling limit, the initial excitation creates a quantum superposition of singlet, CT, and triplet-pair states, and we present experimental evidence for this interpretation. We also discuss the most recent attempts at translating this mechanistic understanding into design principles for CT state-mediated intramolecular singlet fission in oligomers and polymers. PMID:25648486

  10. Charge Transfer-Mediated Singlet Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, N.; Zhu, X.-Y.

    2015-04-01

    Singlet fission, the splitting of a singlet exciton into two triplet excitons in molecular materials, is interesting not only as a model many-electron problem, but also as a process with potential applications in solar energy conversion. Here we discuss limitations of the conventional four-electron and molecular dimer model in describing singlet fission in crystalline organic semiconductors, such as pentacene and tetracene. We emphasize the need to consider electronic delocalization, which is responsible for the decisive role played by the Mott-Wannier exciton, also called the charge transfer (CT) exciton, in mediating singlet fission. At the strong electronic coupling limit, the initial excitation creates a quantum superposition of singlet, CT, and triplet-pair states, and we present experimental evidence for this interpretation. We also discuss the most recent attempts at translating this mechanistic understanding into design principles for CT state-mediated intramolecular singlet fission in oligomers and polymers.

  11. Charge Transfer Calculations and Database for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. G.; Stancil, P. C.; Rakovic, M.; Schultz, D. R.; Zygelman, B.

    2002-01-01

    A variety of theoretical approaches, having different but overlapping energy ranges of applicability, are applied to investigate charge transfer processes for collisions of atomic ions with atoms and molecules. The methods include quantal molecular-orbital close-coupling, classical trajectory Monte Carlo, and continuum distorted wave methods. Recent collision systems studied include S(+4) + H, S(+4) + He, N(+7) + He, H2O, CO, and CO2, O(+q)(q = 1 - 8) + H, H2, and S(+q)(q = 1 - 16) + H2. The database effort is concentrating on astrophysically important reactions of atomic ions X(+q)(X=H-Zn, q=1-4, and selected higher charges) with H, He, various metal atoms, H2, and other selected molecular targets. Existing data, much of it produced by us, has been compiled and critically evaluated. Data for many reactions missing in the literature are estimated using the multichannel Landau-Zener approximation. Fits to cross sections and rate coefficients using standard functions are provided as well as tabulations of the raw data. The database is available on the World Wide Web at cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/astro/ps/data.

  12. Solid-to-Liquid Charge Transfer for Generating Droplets with Tunable Charge.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yajuan; Huang, Xu; Soh, Siowling

    2016-08-16

    Charged liquid droplets are typically generated by a high-voltage power supply. Herein, a previously unreported method is used for charging liquid droplets: by transferring charge from an insulating solid surface charged by contact electrification to the droplets. Charging the solid surface by contact electrification involves bringing it into contact with another solid surface for generating static charge. Subsequently, water droplets that flow across the surface are found to be charged-thus, the charge is readily transferred from solid to liquid. The charge of the droplets can be tuned continuously from positive to negative by varying the way the solid surface is charged. The amount of charge generated is sufficient for manipulating, coalescing, and sorting the water droplets by solid surfaces charged by contact electrification. This method of generating charged droplets is general, simple, inexpensive, and does not need any additional equipment or power supply. PMID:27417888

  13. Charge-transfer excitons in DNA.

    PubMed

    Conwell, E M; McLaughlin, P M; Bloch, S M

    2008-02-21

    There have been a number of theoretical treatments of excitons in DNA, most neglecting both the intrachain and interchain wavefunction overlaps of the electron and hole, treating them as Frenkel excitons. Recently, the importance of the intrachain and interchain coupling has been highlighted. Experiments have shown that in (dA)n oligomers and in duplex (dA)n.(dT)n, to be abbreviated (A/T), where A is adenine and T is thymine, the exciton wavefunction is delocalized over several bases. In duplexes it is possible to have charge-transfer (CT) excitons. Theoretical calculations have suggested that CT excitons in DNA may have lower energy than single chain excitons. In all the calculations of excitons in DNA, the polarization of the surrounding water has been neglected. Calculations have shown, however, that polarization of the water by an excess electron or a hole in DNA lowers its energy by approximately 1/2 eV, causing it to become a polaron. It is therefore to be expected that polarization charge induced in the surrounding water has a significant effect on the properties of the exciton. In what follows, we present calculations of some properties CT excitons would have in an A/T duplex taking into account the wavefunction overlaps, the effect of the surrounding water, which results in the electron and hole becoming polarons, and the ions in the water. As expected, the CT exciton has lowest energy when the electron and hole polarons are directly opposite each other. By appropriate choice of the dielectric constant, we can obtain a CT exciton delocalized over the number of sites found in photoinduced absorption experiments. The absorption threshold that we then calculate for CT exciton creation in A/T is in reasonable agreement with the lowest singlet absorption deduced from available data. PMID:18232682

  14. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  15. Delayed thermal fluorescence in some charge-transfer crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozankiewicz, B.; Prochorow, J.

    1984-03-01

    Time-resolved spectra of long-lived emission of tetrachlorophthalic-hexamethylbenzene charge-transfer crystal were measured at different temperatures. The results give a clear evidence for the existence of E-type delayed fluorescence that results from thermal activation of trapped charge-transfer triplet excitone.

  16. Contributions of charge-density research to medicinal chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, Birger; Matta, Chérif F.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews efforts in accurate experimental charge-density studies with relevance to medicinal chemistry. Initially, classical charge-density studies that measure electron density distribution via least-squares refinement of aspherical-atom population parameters are summarized. Next, interaction density is discussed as an idealized situation resembling drug–receptor interactions. Scattering-factor databases play an increasing role in charge-density research, and they can be applied both to small-molecule and macromolecular structures in refinement and analysis; software development facilitates their use. Therefore combining both of these complementary branches of X-ray crystallography is recommended, and examples are given where such a combination already proved useful. On the side of the experiment, new pixel detectors are allowing rapid measurements, thereby enabling both high-throughput small-molecule studies and macromolecular structure determination to higher resolutions. Currently, the most ambitious studies compute intermolecular interaction energies of drug–receptor complexes, and it is recommended that future studies benefit from recent method developments. Selected new developments in theoretical charge-density studies are discussed with emphasis on its symbiotic relation to crystallography. PMID:25485126

  17. Transfer of Algebraic and Graphical Thinking between Mathematics and Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potgieter, Marietjie; Harding, Ansie; Engelbrecht, Johann

    2008-01-01

    Students in undergraduate chemistry courses find, as a rule, topics with a strong mathematical basis difficult to master. In this study we investigate whether such mathematically related problems are due to deficiencies in their mathematics foundation or due to the complexity introduced by transfer of mathematics to a new scientific domain. In the…

  18. Improved Charge-Transfer Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Improved charge-transfer fluorescent dyes have been developed for use as molecular probes. These dyes are based on benzofuran nuclei with attached phenyl groups substituted with, variously, electron donors, electron acceptors, or combinations of donors and acceptors. Optionally, these dyes could be incorporated as parts of polymer backbones or as pendant groups or attached to certain surfaces via self-assembly-based methods. These dyes exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields -- ranging from 0.2 to 0.98, depending upon solvents and chemical structures. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes of the fluorescence emitted by these dyes vary with (and, hence, can be used as indicators of) the polarities of solvents in which they are dissolved: In solvents of increasing polarity, fluorescence spectra shift to longer wavelengths, fluorescence quantum yields decrease, and fluorescence lifetimes increase. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes are also expected to be sensitive to viscosities and/or glass-transition temperatures. Some chemical species -- especially amines, amino acids, and metal ions -- quench the fluorescence of these dyes, with consequent reductions in intensities, quantum yields, and lifetimes. As a result, the dyes can be used to detect these species. Another useful characteristic of these dyes is a capability for both two-photon and one-photon absorption. Typically, these dyes absorb single photons in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum (wavelengths < 400 nm) and emit photons in the long-wavelength ultraviolet, visible, and, when dissolved in some solvents, near-infrared regions. In addition, these dyes can be excited by two-photon absorption at near-infrared wavelengths (600 to 800 nm) to produce fluorescence spectra identical to those obtained in response to excitation by single photons at half the corresponding wavelengths (300 to 400 nm). While many prior fluorescent dyes exhibit high quantum yields

  19. Charge transfer in collisions of C{sup 2+} carbon ions with CO and OH targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bene, E.; Martinez, P.; Halsaz, G. J.; Vibok, A.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M. C.

    2009-07-15

    The charge transfer in collisions of C{sup 2+} ions with the CO molecule and the OH radical has been studied theoretically by means of ab initio quantum chemistry molecular methods followed by a semiclassical dynamical treatment in the keV collision energy range. The comparison of the cross sections calculated for these two collision systems exhibits interesting features with regard to the anisotropy of these processes and the influence of the vibration of the molecular target.

  20. Charge transfer and emergent phenomena of oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanghui

    Charge transfer is a common phenomenon at oxide interfaces. We use first-principles calculations to show that via heterostructuring of transition metal oxides, the electronegativity difference between two dissimilar transition metal ions can lead to high level of charge transfer and induce substantial redistribution of electrons and ions. Notable examples include i) enhancing correlation effects and inducing a metal-insulator transition; ii) tailoring magnetic structures and inducing interfacial ferromagnetism; iii) engineering orbital splitting and inducing a non-cuprate single-orbital Fermi surface. Utilizing charge transfer to induce emergent electronic/magnetic/orbital properties at oxide interfaces is a robust approach. Combining charge transfer with quantum confinement and expitaxial strain provides an appealing prospect of engineering electronic structure of artificial oxide heterostructures. This research was supported by National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1120296.

  1. Charge transfer induced activity of graphene for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Anli; Xia, Weijun; Zhang, Lipeng; Dou, Shuo; Xia, Zhenhai; Wang, Shuangyin

    2016-05-01

    Tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), with its strong electron-accepting ability, was used to dope graphene as a metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The charge transfer process was observed from graphene to TCNE by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman characterizations. Our density functional theory calculations found that the charge transfer behavior led to an enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity for the ORR.

  2. Femtochemistry of Intramolecular Charge and Proton Transfer Reactions in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Douhal, Abderrazzak; Sanz, Mikel; Carranza, Maria Angeles; Organero, Juan Angel; Tormo, Laura

    2005-03-17

    We report on the first observation of ultrafast intramolecular charge- and proton-transfer reactions in 4'-dimethylaminoflavonol (DAMF) in solution. Upon femtosecond excitation of a non-planar structure of DMAF in apolar medium, the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) does not occur, and a slow (2 ps) proton motion takes place. However, in polar solvents, the ICT is very fast (100-200 fs) and the produced structure is stabilized that proton motion takes place in few or tens of ps.

  3. Screen charge transfer by grounded tip on ferroelectric surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Kim, J.; Buhlmann, S.; Hong, S.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, S.-H.; No, K.; Materials Science Division; Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology; Samsung Advanced Inst. of Technology; Inostek Inc.

    2008-03-01

    We have investigated polarization reversal and charge transfer effects by a grounded tip on 50 nm thick ferroelectric thin films using piezoelectric force microscopy and Kelvin force microscopy. We observed the polarization reversal in the center of written domains, and also identified another mechanism, which is the transfer of screen charges toward the grounded tip. In order to overcome these phenomena, we successfully applied a modified read/write scheme featuring a bias voltage.

  4. Charge-transfer gap and superexchange interaction in insulating cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Y.; Tohyama, T.; Maekawa, S. )

    1991-03-04

    A cluster-model analysis is made on the material dependence of the optical charge-transfer gap and antiferromagnetic superexchange interaction of a variety of insulating cuprates. It is shown that the electronic structure of cuprates typically of the charge-transfer type is characterized by the unique energy-level separation that reflects the three dimensionality of the crystal via the long-range Madelung potential; such characteristics are absent in the Mott-Hubbard regime.

  5. Measurement techniques and applications of charge transfer to aerospace research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A.

    1978-01-01

    A technique of developing high-velocity low-intensity neutral gas beams for use in aerospace research problems is described. This technique involves ionization of gaseous species with a mass spectrometer and focusing the resulting primary ion beam into a collision chamber containing a static gas at a known pressure and temperature. Equations are given to show how charge-transfer cross sections are obtained from a total-current measurement technique. Important parameters are defined for the charge-transfer process.

  6. Charge Transfer and Support Effects in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hervier, Antoine

    2011-12-21

    The kinetic, electronic and spectroscopic properties of two-dimensional oxide-supported catalysts were investigated in order to understand the role of charge transfer in catalysis. Pt/TiO2 nanodiodes were fabricated and used as catalysts for hydrogen oxidation. During the reaction, the current through the diode, as well as its I-V curve, were monitored, while gas chromatography was used to measure the reaction rate. The current and the turnover rate were found to have the same temperature dependence, indicating that hydrogen oxidation leads to the non-adiabatic excitation of electrons in Pt. A fraction of these electrons have enough energy to ballistically transport through Pt and overcome the Schottky barrier at the interface with TiO2. The yield for this phenomenon is on the order of 10-4 electrons per product molecule formed, similar to what has been observed for CO oxidation and for the adsorption of many different molecules. The same Pt/TiO2 system was used to compare currents in hydrogen oxidation and deuterium oxidation. The current through the diode under deuterium oxidation was found to be greater than under hydrogen oxidation by a factor of three. Weighted by the difference in turnover frequencies for the two isotopes, this would imply a chemicurrent yield 5 times greater for D2 compared to H2, contrary to what is expected given the higher mass of D2. Reversible changes in the rectification factor of the diode are observed when switching between D2 and H2. These changes are a likely cause for the differences in current between the two isotopes. In the nanodiode experiments, surface chemistry leads to charge flow, suggesting the possibility of creating charge flow to tune surface chemistry. This was done first by exposing a Pt/Si diode to visible light while using it as a catalyst for H2 oxidation. Absorption of the light in the Si, combined with

  7. Charge transfer during individual collisions in ice growing by riming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, Eldo E.; Caranti, Giorgio M.

    1991-01-01

    The charging of a target by riming in the wind was studied in the temperature range of (-10, -18 C). For each temperature, charge transfers of both signs are observed and, according to the environmental conditions, one of them prevails. The charge is more positive as the liquid water concentration is increased at any particular temperature. It is found that even at the low impact velocities used (5 m/s) there is abundant evidence of fragmentation following the collision.

  8. INTRAMOLECULAR CHARGE AND ENERGY TRANSFER IN MULTICHROMOPHORIC AROMATIC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward C. Lim

    2008-09-09

    A concerted experimental and computational study of energy transfer in nucleic acid bases and charge transfer in dialkylaminobenzonitriles, and related electron donor-acceptor molecules, indicate that the ultrafast photoprocesses occur through three-state conical interactions involving an intermediate state of biradical character.

  9. X-ray absorption structural study of a reversible, photoexcited charge-transfer state

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Bowman, M.K.; Norris, J.R. Univ. of Chicago, IL ); Montano, P.A. )

    1993-05-19

    Electron-transfer reactions can be accompanied by significant nuclear movements. Nuclear motion appears to be especially vital to the reversible, photoinduced charge-transfer chemistry of cyclopentadienylnickel nitrosyl (C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO). Although extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has recorded photoinduced changes in the ligation of myoglobins, similar X-ray studies of electron-transfer chemistry have not been reported. Here we examine reversible, photoinduced structural changes in C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO by EXAFS and propose a mechanism for the electron-transfer chemistry. This work demonstrates that EXAFS can measure distance changes accompanying photoinduced electron transfer to provide new details of the geometry of photoexcited state and suggests that electron transfer occurs in the transient, optically excited states of C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO and C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup CT] as dictated by NO movement that produces either C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup CT] or C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup GS]. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Charge transfer reactions in multiply charged ion-atom collisions. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms of hydrogen and/or helium may be rapid at thermal energies. If these reactions are rapid, they will suppress highly charged ions in H I regions and guarantee that the observed absorption features from such ions cannot originate in the interstellar gas. A discussion of such charge-transfer reactions is presented and compared with the available experimental data. The possible implications of these reactions for observations of the interstellar medium, H II regions, and planetary nebulae are outlined.

  11. Marcus wins nobel prize in chemistry for electron transfer theory

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Rudolf Marcus of Caltech leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry [open quotes]for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems.[close quotes] Applications of Marcus' theory include such diverse phenomena as photosynthesis, electrically conducting polymers, chemiluminescence, and corrosion. Historical aspects of his career are given. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Charge Transfer Dynamics from Photoexcited Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiming; Yang, Ye; Wu, Kaifeng; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-05-27

    Understanding photoinduced charge transfer from nanomaterials is essential to the many applications of these materials. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding charge transfer from quantum dots (QDs), an ideal model system for investigating fundamental charge transfer properties of low-dimensional quantum-confined nanomaterials. We first discuss charge transfer from QDs to weakly coupled acceptors within the framework of Marcus nonadiabatic electron transfer (ET) theory, focusing on the dependence of ET rates on reorganization energy, electronic coupling, and driving force. Because of the strong electron-hole interaction, we show that ET from QDs should be described by the Auger-assisted ET model, which is significantly different from ET between molecules or from bulk semiconductor electrodes. For strongly quantum-confined QDs on semiconductor surfaces, the coupling can fall within the strong coupling limit, in which case the donor-acceptor interaction and ET properties can be described by the Newns-Anderson model of chemisorption. We also briefly discuss recent progress in controlling charge transfer properties in quantum-confined nanoheterostructures through wavefunction engineering and multiple exciton dissociation. Finally, we identify a few key areas for further research. PMID:27215815

  13. Charge Transfer Dynamics from Photoexcited Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Haiming; Yang, Ye; Wu, Kaifeng; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-05-01

    Understanding photoinduced charge transfer from nanomaterials is essential to the many applications of these materials. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding charge transfer from quantum dots (QDs), an ideal model system for investigating fundamental charge transfer properties of low-dimensional quantum-confined nanomaterials. We first discuss charge transfer from QDs to weakly coupled acceptors within the framework of Marcus nonadiabatic electron transfer (ET) theory, focusing on the dependence of ET rates on reorganization energy, electronic coupling, and driving force. Because of the strong electron-hole interaction, we show that ET from QDs should be described by the Auger-assisted ET model, which is significantly different from ET between molecules or from bulk semiconductor electrodes. For strongly quantum-confined QDs on semiconductor surfaces, the coupling can fall within the strong coupling limit, in which case the donor-acceptor interaction and ET properties can be described by the Newns-Anderson model of chemisorption. We also briefly discuss recent progress in controlling charge transfer properties in quantum-confined nanoheterostructures through wavefunction engineering and multiple exciton dissociation. Finally, we identify a few key areas for further research.

  14. Coherent ultrafast charge transfer in an organic photovoltaic blend.

    PubMed

    Falke, Sarah Maria; Rozzi, Carlo Andrea; Brida, Daniele; Maiuri, Margherita; Amato, Michele; Sommer, Ephraim; De Sio, Antonietta; Rubio, Angel; Cerullo, Giulio; Molinari, Elisa; Lienau, Christoph

    2014-05-30

    Blends of conjugated polymers and fullerene derivatives are prototype systems for organic photovoltaic devices. The primary charge-generation mechanism involves a light-induced ultrafast electron transfer from the light-absorbing and electron-donating polymer to the fullerene electron acceptor. Here, we elucidate the initial quantum dynamics of this process. Experimentally, we observed coherent vibrational motion of the fullerene moiety after impulsive optical excitation of the polymer donor. Comparison with first-principle theoretical simulations evidences coherent electron transfer between donor and acceptor and oscillations of the transferred charge with a 25-femtosecond period matching that of the observed vibrational modes. Our results show that coherent vibronic coupling between electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom is of key importance in triggering charge delocalization and transfer in a noncovalently bound reference system. PMID:24876491

  15. What Controls the Rate of Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Charge Separation Efficiency in Organic Photovoltaic Blends.

    PubMed

    Jakowetz, Andreas C; Böhm, Marcus L; Zhang, Jiangbin; Sadhanala, Aditya; Huettner, Sven; Bakulin, Artem A; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H

    2016-09-14

    In solar energy harvesting devices based on molecular semiconductors, such as organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and artificial photosynthetic systems, Frenkel excitons must be dissociated via charge transfer at heterojunctions to yield free charges. What controls the rate and efficiency of charge transfer and charge separation is an important question, as it determines the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of these systems. In bulk heterojunctions between polymer donor and fullerene acceptors, which provide a model system to understand the fundamental dynamics of electron transfer in molecular systems, it has been established that the first step of photoinduced electron transfer can be fast, of order 100 fs. But here we report the first study which correlates differences in the electron transfer rate with electronic structure and morphology, achieved with sub-20 fs time resolution pump-probe spectroscopy. We vary both the fullerene substitution and donor/fullerene ratio which allow us to control both aggregate size and the energetic driving force for charge transfer. We observe a range of electron transfer times from polymer to fullerene, from 240 fs to as short as 37 fs. Using ultrafast electro-optical pump-push-photocurrent spectroscopy, we find the yield of free versus bound charges to be weakly dependent on the energetic driving force, but to be very strongly dependent on fullerene aggregate size and packing. Our results point toward the importance of state accessibility and charge delocalization and suggest that energetic offsets between donor and acceptor levels are not an important criterion for efficient charge generation. This provides design rules for next-generation materials to minimize losses related to driving energy and boost PCE. PMID:27538341

  16. Charge transfer in helium-rich supernova plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.

    1994-01-01

    Charge transfer rate coefficients are estimated using Landau-Zener and modified Demkov approximations. The coefficients, augmented by those available from the literature, are used in statistical equilibrium equations describing the state of helium-rich supernova plasma. Such a plasma may describe both Type Ib and Type Ic supernova ejecta. The hypothesis that extensive mixing of metals with helium in Type Ic supernovae may provide a catalyst for rapid charge transfer that weakens the helium line emission by altering the excitation balance is tested. It is shown that charge transfer as a mechanism for suppressing helium line emission is ineffective unless the metal abundance is comparable to or larger than the helium abundance. This result supports an earlier conclusion that Type Ic supernovae must be helium poor relative to Type Ib events.

  17. Direct experimental characterization of photoemission charge-transfer satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Conan; Rumaiz, Abdul; Woicik, Joseph

    Energy-loss satellites in photoelectron spectroscopy often arise due to different charge-transfer states in condensed matter systems. The specific characterization of these satellites, however, has been controversial, and different theoretical approaches may lead to contradictory characterizations. Here we demonstrate the ability of high energy resonant photoelectron spectroscopy to provide direct experimental evidence of the nature of charge transfer satellites. Analysis of the Ti 1 s core line in SrTiO3 reveals two satellites, located approximately 5 eV and 13 eV lower kinetic energy than the main line. High energy resonant photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that these two peaks originate from ligand 2 p t2 g to metal 3 d t2 g and ligand 2 p eg to metal 3 d eg charge-transfer excitations.

  18. Charge transfer properties of pentacene adsorbed on silver: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    N, Rekha T.; Rajkumar, Beulah J. M.

    2015-06-24

    Charge transfer properties of pentacene adsorbed on silver is investigated using DFT methods. Optimized geometry of pentacene after adsorption on silver indicates distortion in hexagonal structure of the ring close to the silver cluster and deviations in co-planarity of carbon atoms due to the variations in bond angles and dihedral angles. Theoretically simulated absorption spectrum has a symmetric surface plasmon resonance peak around 486nm corresponding to the transfer of charge from HOMO-2 to LUMO. Theoretical SERS confirms the process of adsorption, tilted orientation of pentacene on silver surface and the charge transfers reported. Localization of electron density arising from redistribution of electrostatic potential together with a reduced bandgap of pentacene after adsorption on silver suggests its utility in the design of electro active organic semiconducting devices.

  19. Dynamic salt effect on intramolecular charge-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jianjun; Ma Rong; Lu Yan; Stell, George

    2005-12-08

    The dynamic salt effect in charge-transfer reactions is investigated theoretically in this paper. Free-energy surfaces are derived based on a nonequilibrium free-energy functional. Reaction coordinates are clearly defined. The solution of the reaction-diffusion equation leads to a rate constant depending on the time correlation function of the reaction coordinates. The time correlation function of the ion-atmosphere coordinate is derived from the solution of the Debye-Falkenhagen equation. It is shown that the dynamic salt effect plays an important role in controlling the rate of charge-transfer reactions in the narrow-window limit but is balanced by the energetics and the dynamics of the polar-solvent coordinate. The simplest version of the theory is compared with an experiment, and the agreement is fairly good. The theory can also be extended to charge-transfer in the class of electrolytes that has come to be called 'ionic fluids'.

  20. Ga Nanoparticle/Graphene Platforms: Plasmonic and Charge Transfer Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Congwen; Kim, Tong-Ho; Yang, Yang; Losurdo, Maria; Brown, April S.

    2013-03-01

    Metal nanoparticle (NP) - graphene multifunctional platforms are of great interest for numerous applications, such as sensing and catalysis, and for fundamental studies on charge transfer and light-matter interactions. To understand platform-photon interactions, it is important to articulate the coupling of photon-based excitations, such as the interaction between plasmons in each of the material components, as well as their charge-based interactions dependent upon the energy alignment at the metal/graphene interface. Herein, we use liquid metal Ga nanoparticles, which can be deposited at 300K on graphene, to explore the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy modulation induced by the NPs,. The localized charge transfer between Ga NPs and graphene are investigated, and enhancement of the graphene Raman modes is correlated with metal coverage the transfer of electrons from Ga to graphene creating local regions of enhanced electron concentration which modify the electron-phonon interaction in graphene.

  1. Multiple-charge transfer and trapping in DNA dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, Sabine; Bulla, Ralf; Anders, Frithjof B.; Zwicknagl, Gertrud

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the charge transfer characteristics of one and two excess charges in a DNA base-pair dimer using a model Hamiltonian approach. The electron part comprises diagonal and off-diagonal Coulomb matrix elements such a correlated hopping and the bond-bond interaction, which were recently calculated by Starikov [E. B. Starikov, Philos. Mag. Lett. 83, 699 (2003)10.1080/0950083031000151374] for different DNA dimers. The electronic degrees of freedom are coupled to an ohmic or a superohmic bath serving as dissipative environment. We employ the numerical renormalization group method in the nuclear tunneling regime and compare the results to Marcus theory for the thermal activation regime. For realistic parameters, the rate that at least one charge is transferred from the donor to the acceptor in the subspace of two excess electrons significantly exceeds the rate in the single charge sector. Moreover, the dynamics is strongly influenced by the Coulomb matrix elements. We find sequential and pair transfer as well as a regime where both charges remain self-trapped. The transfer rate reaches its maximum when the difference of the on-site and intersite Coulomb matrix element is equal to the reorganization energy which is the case in a guanine/cytosine (GC)-dimer. Charge transfer is completely suppressed for two excess electrons in adenine/thymine (AT)-dimer in an ohmic bath and replaced by damped coherent electron-pair oscillations in a superohmic bath. A finite bond-bond interaction W alters the transfer rate: it increases as function of W when the effective Coulomb repulsion exceeds the reorganization energy (inverted regime) and decreases for smaller Coulomb repulsion.

  2. Orientation-dependent dissociative charge transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.; Prior, M.H.; Braeuning, H.

    1998-01-01

    Recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy and molecular fragment imaging techniques are combined to study dissociative electron capture from He by HeH{sup +} at 0.20-a.u. collision velocity. Groups of final HeH states which dissociate to ground or excited H and He atoms are separated. For each group, the experiment provides two-dimensional H fragment distributions with respect to the collision plane and for fixed transverse momentum transfer. These patterns show that the capture probability is highest for HeH{sup +} ions with their axis oriented normal to the scattering plane for two of the three groups populated. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Dielectric spectroscopy on organic charge-transfer salts.

    PubMed

    Lunkenheimer, P; Loidl, A

    2015-09-23

    This topical review provides an overview of the dielectric properties of a variety of organic charge-transfer salts, based on both, data reported in literature and our own experimental results. Moreover, we discuss in detail the different processes that can contribute to the dielectric response of these materials. We concentrate on the family of the 1D (TMTTF)2 X systems and the 2D BEDT-TTF-based charge-transfer salts, which in recent years have attracted considerable interest due to their often intriguing dielectric properties. We will mainly focus on the occurrence of electronic ferroelectricity in these systems, which also includes examples of multiferroicity. PMID:26325011

  4. Transfer ionization in collisions with a fast highly charged ion.

    PubMed

    Voitkiv, A B

    2013-07-26

    Transfer ionization in fast collisions between a bare ion and an atom, in which one of the atomic electrons is captured by the ion whereas another one is emitted, crucially depends on dynamic electron-electron correlations. We show that in collisions with a highly charged ion a strong field of the ion has a very profound effect on the correlated channels of transfer ionization. In particular, this field weakens (strongly suppresses) electron emission into the direction opposite (perpendicular) to the motion of the ion. Instead, electron emission is redirected into those parts of the momentum space which are very weakly populated in fast collisions with low charged ions. PMID:23931364

  5. Bioexcimers as Precursors of Charge Transfer and Reactivity in Photobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Olaso-González, Gloria; Rubio, Mercedes

    2007-11-01

    Accurate CASPT2//CASSCF calculations show that π-stacked interactions in different biochromophores such as DNA nucleobases or porphyrin-quinone pairs yield excimer-like situations which behave as precursors of processes like charge transfer or photoreactivity. Examples are the transfer of charge between a reduced pheophytin and an accepting quinone molecule, process that trigger the sequence of electron transfer phenomena in photosynthetic photosystem II, the electron transfer between adjacent DNA nucleobases in a strand of oligonucleotides, and the photodimerization taking place in cytosine pairs leading to cyclobutanecytosine mutants. These processes take place through nonadiabatic photochemical mechanisms whose evolution is determined by the presence and accessibility of conical intersections and other surface crossings between different electronic states.

  6. Bioexcimers as Precursors of Charge Transfer and Reactivity in Photobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano-Andres, Luis; Merchan, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuan, Daniel; Olaso-Gonzalez, Gloria; Rubio, Mercedes

    2007-11-29

    Accurate CASPT2//CASSCF calculations show that {pi}-stacked interactions in different biochromophores such as DNA nucleobases or porphyrin-quinone pairs yield excimer-like situations which behave as precursors of processes like charge transfer or photoreactivity. Examples are the transfer of charge between a reduced pheophytin and an accepting quinone molecule, process that trigger the sequence of electron transfer phenomena in photosynthetic photosystem II, the electron transfer between adjacent DNA nucleobases in a strand of oligonucleotides, and the photodimerization taking place in cytosine pairs leading to cyclobutanecytosine mutants. These processes take place through nonadiabatic photochemical mechanisms whose evolution is determined by the presence and accessibility of conical intersections and other surface crossings between different electronic states.

  7. Imaging charge and energy transfer in molecules using free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Charge and energy transfer reactions drive numerous important processes in physics, chemistry and biology, with applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics. Experimentally, the central goal in studies of transfer phenomena is to trace the spatial localization of charge at a given time. Because of their element and site sensitivity, ultrafast X-rays provide a promising tool to address this goal. In this talk I will discuss several experiments where free-electron lasers were employed to study charge and energy transfer dynamics in fragmenting molecules. In a first example, we used intense, 70 femtosecond 1.5 keV pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study distance dependence of electron transfer in laser-dissociated methyl iodide molecules. Inducing well-localized positive charge on the heavy iodine atom, we observe signature of electron transition from the separated methyl group up to the distances of 35 atomic units. In a complementary experiment, we studied charge exchange between two partners in a dissociating molecular iodine employing a pump-probe arrangement with two identical 90 eV pulses from the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). In both cases, the effective spatial range of the electron transfer can be reasonably described by a classical over-the-barrier model developed for ion-atom collisions. Finally, I will discuss a time-resolved measurement on non-local relaxation mechanism based on a long-range energy transfer, the so-called interatomic Coulombic decay. This work was supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy and by the Kansas NSF ``First Award'' program.

  8. Oxidation and Metal-Insertion in Molybdenite Surfaces: Evaluation of Charge-Transfer Mechanisms and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramana, Chintalapalle V.; Becker, U.; Shutthanandan, V.; Julien, C. M.

    2008-06-05

    Molybdenum sulfide (MoS2), an important representative member of the layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, has been of special importance to the research community of geochemistry, materials and environmental chemistry, and industrial science and technology. Understanding the oxidation behavior and charge-transfer mechanisms in MoS2 is important to gain better insight into the degradation of this mineral in the environment. On the other hand understanding the insertion of metals into molybdenite and evaluation of charge-transfer mechanism and dynamics is quite important to utilize these minerals in technological applications. Furthermore, such a detailed investigation of thermal oxidation behavior and intercalation process will provide a basis to further explore and model the mechanism of adsorption of metal ions on to geomedia. Therefore, the present work was performed to understand the oxidation and intercalation processes of molybdenite surfaces. The results obtained, using a wide variety of analytical techniques, are presented and discussed in this paper.

  9. Photodissociation and charge transfer dynamics of negative ions studied with femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanni, Martin T.

    1999-12-17

    This dissertation presents studies aimed at understanding the potential energy surfaces and dynamics of isolated negative ions, and the effects of solvent on each. Although negative ions play important roles in atmospheric and solution phase chemistry, to a large extent the ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of gas phase negative ions are poorly characterized, and solvent effects even less well understood. In an effort to fill this gap, the author's coworkers and the author have developed a new technique, anion femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy, and applied it to gas phase photodissociation and charge transfer processes. Studies are presented that (1) characterize the ground and excited states of isolated and clustered anions, (2) monitor the photodissociation dynamics of isolated and clustered anions, and (3) explore the charge-transfer-to-solvent states of atomic iodide clustered with polar and non-polar solvents.

  10. Enhancing SERS by Means of Supramolecular Charge Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Eric; Flood, Amar; Morales, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    In a proposed method of sensing small quantities of molecules of interest, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy would be further enhanced by means of intermolecular or supramolecular charge transfer. There is a very large potential market for sensors based on this method for rapid detection of chemical and biological hazards. In SERS, the Raman signals (vibrational spectra) of target molecules become enhanced by factors of the order of 108 when those molecules are in the vicinities of nanostructured substrate surfaces that have been engineered to have plasmon resonances that enhance local electric fields. SERS, as reported in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles and elsewhere, has remained a research tool and has not yet been developed into a practical technique for sensing of target molecules: this is because the short range (5 to 20 nm) of the field enhancement necessitates engineering of receptor molecules to attract target molecules to the nanostructured substrate surfaces and to enable reliable identification of the target molecules in the presence of interferants. Intermolecular charge-transfer complexes have been used in fluorescence-, photoluminescence-, and electrochemistry-based techniques for sensing target molecules, but, until now, have not been considered for use in SERS-based sensing. The basic idea of the proposed method is to engineer receptor molecules that would be attached to nanostructured SERS substrates and that would interact with the target molecules to form receptor-target supramolecular charge-transfer complexes wherein the charge transfer could be photoexcited.

  11. Primary cells utilize halogen-organic charge transfer complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, F.; Hermann, A. M.; Rembaum, A.

    1966-01-01

    Electrochemical cells with solid state components employ charge transfer complexes or donor-acceptor complexes in which the donor component is an organic compound and the acceptor component is a halogen. A minor proportion of graphite added to these composition helps reduce the resistivity.

  12. Multifunctional Charge-Transfer Single Crystals through Supramolecular Assembly.

    PubMed

    Xu, Beibei; Luo, Zhipu; Wilson, Andrew J; Chen, Ke; Gao, Wenxiu; Yuan, Guoliang; Chopra, Harsh Deep; Chen, Xing; Willets, Katherine A; Dauter, Zbigniew; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-07-01

    Centimeter-sized segregated stacking TTF-C60 single crystals are crystallized by a mass-transport approach combined with solvent-vapor evaporation for the first time. The intermolecular charge-transfer interaction in the long-range ordered superstructure enables the crystals to demonstrate external stimuli-controlled multifunctionalities and angle/electrical-potential-dependent luminescence. PMID:27146726

  13. Layered charge transfer complex cathodes or solid electrolyte cells

    SciTech Connect

    Louzos, D.V.

    1981-05-12

    Layered charge transfer complex cathodes for use in solid electrolyte cells are described wherein one layer of the cathode contains an electronic conductor which is isolated from the cell's solid electrolyte by a second layer of the cathode that does not contain an electronic conductor.

  14. Charge-transfer complexation between naphthalene diimides and aromatic solvents.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Chidambar; Periyasamy, Ganga; Balasubramanian, S; George, Subi J

    2014-07-28

    Naphthalene diimides (NDIs) form emissive ground-state charge-transfer (CT) complexes with various electron rich aromatic solvents like benzene, o-xylene and mesitylene. TD-DFT calculation of the complexes suggests CT interaction and accounts for the observed ground-state changes. PMID:24931833

  15. CORRELATING ELECTRONIC AND VIBRATIONAL MOTIONS IN CHARGE TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Munira

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.

  16. Infrared Spectroscopy of Charge Transfer Complexes of Purines and Pyrimidines

    SciTech Connect

    Rathod, Pravinsinh I.; Oza, A. T.

    2011-10-20

    The FTIR spectra of charge transfer complexes of purines and pyrimidines with organic acceptors such as TCNQ, TCNE, DDQ, chloranil and iodine are obtained and studied in the present work. Adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine and uracil are the purines and pyrimidines which are found as constituent of DNA and RNA. Charge transfer induced hydrogen bonding is concluded on the basis of indirect transitions observed in the infrared range in these CTCs. Some CTCs show gaussian bands revealing delocalization of charge carriers. The CTCs show interband transition in three-dimensions rather than two-dimensions unlike CTCs of amino acids. There is no extended hydrogen bonded network spanning the whole crystal. This leads to indirect transition due to locally deformed lattice furnishing a phonon-assisted transition.

  17. A tetrastable naphthalenediimide: anion induced charge transfer, single and double electron transfer for combinational logic gates.

    PubMed

    Ajayakumar, M R; Hundal, Geeta; Mukhopadhyay, Pritam

    2013-09-11

    Herein we demonstrate the formation of the first tetrastable naphthalenediimide (NDI, 1a) molecule having multiple distinctly readable outputs. Differential response of 1a to fluoride anions induces intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), single/double electron transfer (SET/DET) leading to a set of combinational logic gates for the first time with a NDI moiety. PMID:23752683

  18. Role of Double Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions in Atmospheric Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Sinha, Amitabha; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions are ubiquitous and play a crucial role in chemistries occurring in the atmosphere, biology, and industry. In the atmosphere, the most common and traditional HAT reaction is that associated with the OH radical abstracting a hydrogen atom from the plethora of organic molecules in the troposphere via R-H + OH → R + H2O. This reaction motif involves a single hydrogen transfer. More recently, in the literature, there is an emerging framework for a new class of HAT reactions that involves double hydrogen transfers. These reactions are broadly classified into four categories: (i) addition, (ii) elimination, (iii) substitution, and (iv) rearrangement. Hydration and dehydration are classic examples of addition and elimination reactions, respectively whereas tautomerization or isomerization belongs to a class of rearrangement reactions. Atmospheric acids and water typically mediate these reactions. Organic and inorganic acids are present in appreciable levels in the atmosphere and are capable of facilitating two-point hydrogen bonding interactions with oxygenates possessing an hydroxyl and/or carbonyl-type functionality. As a result, acids influence the reactivity of oxygenates and, thus, the energetics and kinetics of their HAT-based chemistries. The steric and electronic effects of acids play an important role in determining the efficacy of acid catalysis. Acids that reduce the steric strain of 1:1 substrate···acid complex are generally better catalysts. Among a family of monocarboxylic acids, the electronic effects become important; barrier to the catalyzed reaction correlates strongly with the pKa of the acid. Under acid catalysis, the hydration of carbonyl compounds leads to the barrierless formation of diols, which can serve as seed particles for atmospheric aerosol growth. The hydration of sulfur trioxide, which is the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfuric acid formation, also becomes barrierless under acid catalysis

  19. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  20. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  1. A Gating Charge Transfer Center in Voltage Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, X.; Lee, A; Limapichat, W; Dougherty, D; MacKinnon, R

    2010-01-01

    Voltage sensors regulate the conformations of voltage-dependent ion channels and enzymes. Their nearly switchlike response as a function of membrane voltage comes from the movement of positively charged amino acids, arginine or lysine, across the membrane field. We used mutations with natural and unnatural amino acids, electrophysiological recordings, and x-ray crystallography to identify a charge transfer center in voltage sensors that facilitates this movement. This center consists of a rigid cyclic 'cap' and two negatively charged amino acids to interact with a positive charge. Specific mutations induce a preference for lysine relative to arginine. By placing lysine at specific locations, the voltage sensor can be stabilized in different conformations, which enables a dissection of voltage sensor movements and their relation to ion channel opening.

  2. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  3. A Gating Charge Transfer Center in Voltage Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xiao; Lee, Alice; Limapichat, Walrati; Dougherty, Dennis A.; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2010-01-01

    Voltage sensors regulate the conformations of voltage-dependent ion channels and enzymes. Their nearly switch-like response as a function of membrane voltage comes from the movement of positively charged amino acids, arginine or lysine, across the membrane field. We used mutations with natural and unnatural amino acids, electrophysiological recordings and X-ray crystallography to identify a charge transfer center in voltage sensors that facilitates this movement. This center consists of a rigid cyclic ‘cap’ and two negatively charged amino acids to interact with a positive charge. Specific mutations induce a preference for lysine relative to arginine. By placing lysine at specific locations the voltage sensor can be stabilized in different conformations, thus enabling a dissection of voltage sensor movements and their relationship to ion channel opening. PMID:20360102

  4. Semiempirical and ab initio Calculations of Charged Species Used in the Physical Organic Chemistry Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliom, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    Concentrates on the semiempirical methods MINDO/3, MNDO, and AMI available in the program AMPAC from the Quantum Chemistry Program Exchange at Indiana University. Uses charged ions in the teaching of computational chemistry. Finds that semiempirical methods are accurate enough for the general use of the bench chemist. (MVL)

  5. Photoinduced charge and energy transfer in molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mélina; Albinsson, Bo

    2015-02-21

    Exploring charge and energy transport in donor-bridge-acceptor systems is an important research field which is essential for the fundamental knowledge necessary to develop future applications. These studies help creating valuable knowledge to respond to today's challenges to develop functionalized molecular systems for artificial photosynthesis, photovoltaics or molecular scale electronics. This tutorial review focuses on photo-induced charge/energy transfer in covalently linked donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) systems. Of utmost importance in such systems is to understand how to control signal transmission, i.e. how fast electrons or excitation energy could be transferred between the donor and acceptor and the role played by the bridge (the "molecular wire"). After a brief description of the electron and energy transfer theory, we aim to give a simple yet accurate picture of the complex role played by the bridge to sustain donor-acceptor electronic communication. Special emphasis is put on understanding bridge energetics and conformational dynamics effects on the distance dependence of the donor-acceptor electronic coupling and transfer rates. Several examples of donor-bridge-acceptor systems from the literature are described as a support to the discussion. Finally, porphyrin-based molecular wires are introduced, and the relationship between their electronic structure and photophysical properties is outlined. In strongly conjugated porphyrin systems, limitations of the existing electron transfer theory to interpret the distance dependence of the transfer rates are also discussed. PMID:25212903

  6. Charge transfer through a cytochrome multiheme chain: theory and simulation.

    PubMed

    Burggraf, Fabian; Koslowski, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    We study sequential charge transfer within a chain of four heme cofactors located in the c-type cytochrome subunit of the photoreaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis from a theoretical perspective. Molecular dynamics simulations of the thermodynamic integration type are used to compute two key energies of Marcus' theory of charge transfer, the driving force ∆G and the reorganization energy λ. Due to the small exposure of the cofactors to the solvent and to charged amino acids, the outer sphere contribution to the reorganization energy almost vanishes. Interheme effective electronic couplings are estimated using ab initio wave functions and a well-parameterized semiempirical scheme for long-range interactions. From the resulting charge transfer rates, we conclude that at most the two heme molecules closest to the membrane participate in a fast recharging of the photoreaction center, whereas the remaining hemes are likely to have a different function, such as intermediate electron storage. Finally, we suggest means to verify or falsify this hypothesis. PMID:24055674

  7. Charge-transfer crystallites as molecular electrical dopants

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Henry; Heimel, Georg; Winkler, Stefanie; Frisch, Johannes; Opitz, Andreas; Sauer, Katrein; Wegner, Berthold; Oehzelt, Martin; Röthel, Christian; Duhm, Steffen; Többens, Daniel; Koch, Norbert; Salzmann, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Ground-state integer charge transfer is commonly regarded as the basic mechanism of molecular electrical doping in both, conjugated polymers and oligomers. Here, we demonstrate that fundamentally different processes can occur in the two types of organic semiconductors instead. Using complementary experimental techniques supported by theory, we contrast a polythiophene, where molecular p-doping leads to integer charge transfer reportedly localized to one quaterthiophene backbone segment, to the quaterthiophene oligomer itself. Despite a comparable relative increase in conductivity, we observe only partial charge transfer for the latter. In contrast to the parent polymer, pronounced intermolecular frontier-orbital hybridization of oligomer and dopant in 1:1 mixed-stack co-crystallites leads to the emergence of empty electronic states within the energy gap of the surrounding quaterthiophene matrix. It is their Fermi–Dirac occupation that yields mobile charge carriers and, therefore, the co-crystallites—rather than individual acceptor molecules—should be regarded as the dopants in such systems. PMID:26440403

  8. Charge-transfer crystallites as molecular electrical dopants.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Henry; Heimel, Georg; Winkler, Stefanie; Frisch, Johannes; Opitz, Andreas; Sauer, Katrein; Wegner, Berthold; Oehzelt, Martin; Röthel, Christian; Duhm, Steffen; Többens, Daniel; Koch, Norbert; Salzmann, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Ground-state integer charge transfer is commonly regarded as the basic mechanism of molecular electrical doping in both, conjugated polymers and oligomers. Here, we demonstrate that fundamentally different processes can occur in the two types of organic semiconductors instead. Using complementary experimental techniques supported by theory, we contrast a polythiophene, where molecular p-doping leads to integer charge transfer reportedly localized to one quaterthiophene backbone segment, to the quaterthiophene oligomer itself. Despite a comparable relative increase in conductivity, we observe only partial charge transfer for the latter. In contrast to the parent polymer, pronounced intermolecular frontier-orbital hybridization of oligomer and dopant in 1:1 mixed-stack co-crystallites leads to the emergence of empty electronic states within the energy gap of the surrounding quaterthiophene matrix. It is their Fermi-Dirac occupation that yields mobile charge carriers and, therefore, the co-crystallites-rather than individual acceptor molecules-should be regarded as the dopants in such systems. PMID:26440403

  9. Coarse-Grained Theory of Biological Charge Transfer with Spatially and Temporally Correlated Noise.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoren; Beratan, David N; Zhang, Peng

    2016-04-21

    System-environment interactions are essential in determining charge-transfer (CT) rates and mechanisms. We developed a computationally accessible method, suitable to simulate CT in flexible molecules (i.e., DNA) with hundreds of sites, where the system-environment interactions are explicitly treated with numerical noise modeling of time-dependent site energies and couplings. The properties of the noise are tunable, providing us a flexible tool to investigate the detailed effects of correlated thermal fluctuations on CT mechanisms. The noise is parametrizable by molecular simulation and quantum calculation results of specific molecular systems, giving us better molecular resolution in simulating the system-environment interactions than sampling fluctuations from generic spectral density functions. The spatially correlated thermal fluctuations among different sites are naturally built-in in our method but are not readily incorporated using approximate spectral densities. Our method has quantitative accuracy in systems with small redox potential differences (chemistry, spatially correlated fluctuations enhance the charge delocalization and charge-transfer rates; however, in a system of units with different site energies, spatial correlations slow the fluctuations to bring units into degeneracy, in turn, slowing the charge-transfer rates. The spatial and temporal correlations of condensed phase medium fluctuations provide another source to control and tune the kinetics and dynamics of charge-transfer systems. PMID:27008541

  10. Relative charge transfer cross section from Rb (4d)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, M. H.; Camp, H. A.; Trachy, M. L.; Fléchard, X.; Gearba, M. A.; Nguyen, H.; Brédy, R.; Lundeen, S. R.; Depaola, B. D.

    2005-08-01

    Relative charge transfer cross section measurements for the excited state Rb(4d) with 7keV Na+ is reported. The specific channels reported are Na++Rb(4d5/2)→Na(nl)+Rb+ , where the dominant transfer cross sections channels were nl=3d and 4s . Using a combination of a magneto-optical trap and recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (MOTRIMS methodology), the cross sections were measured relative to the previously studied Na++Rb(5s,5p) systems at the same collision energy.

  11. Relative charge transfer cross section from Rb(4d)

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.H.; Camp, H.A.; Trachy, M.L.; De Paola, B.D.; Flechard, X.; Gearba, M.A.; Nguyen, H.; Bredy, R.; Lundeen, S.R.

    2005-08-15

    Relative charge transfer cross section measurements for the excited state Rb(4d) with 7 keV Na{sup +} is reported. The specific channels reported are Na{sup +}+Rb(4d{sub 5/2}){yields}Na(nl)+Rb{sup +}, where the dominant transfer cross sections channels were nl=3d and 4s. Using a combination of a magneto-optical trap and recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (MOTRIMS methodology), the cross sections were measured relative to the previously studied Na{sup +}+Rb(5s,5p) systems at the same collision energy.

  12. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Multiply Charged Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    2003-01-01

    The laser ablation/ion storage facility at the UNLV Physics Department has been dedicated to the study of atomic and molecular processes in low temperature plasmas. Our program focuses on the charge transfer (electron capture) of multiply charged ions and neutrals important in astrophysics. The electron transfer reactions with atoms and molecules is crucial to the ionization condition of neutral rich photoionized plasmas. With the successful deployment of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and the Chandra X-ray Observatory by NASA high resolution VUV and X-ray emission spectra fiom various astrophysical objects have been collected. These spectra will be analyzed to determine the source of the emission and the chemical and physical environment of the source. The proper interpretation of these spectra will require complete knowledge of all the atomic processes in these plasmas. In a neutral rich environment, charge transfer can be the dominant process. The rate coefficients need to be known accurately. We have also extended our charge transfer measurements to KeV region with a pulsed ion beam. The inclusion of this facility into our current program provides flexibility in extending the measurement to higher energies (KeV) if needed. This flexibility enables us to address issues of immediate interest to the astrophysical community as new observations are made by high resolution space based observatories.

  13. Charge-transfer complexes of phenylephrine with nitrobenzene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mossalamy, E. H.

    2004-04-01

    The molecular charge-transfer complexes of phenylephrine with picric acid and m-dinitrobenzene have been studied and investigated by IR, 1H NMR electronic spectra in organic solvents and buffer solutions, respectively. Simple and selective methods are proposed for the determination of phenylephrine hydrochloride in bulk form and in tablets. The two methods are based on the formation of charge-transfer complexes between drug base as a n-donor (D) and picric acid, m-dinitrobenzene as π-acceptor (A). The products exhibit absorption maxima at 497 and 560 nm in acetonitrile for picric acid and m-dinitrobenzene, respectively. The coloured product exhibits an absorption maximum at 650 nm in dioxane. The sensitive kinetic methods for the determination phynylephrine hydrochloride are described. The method is based upon a kinetic investigation of the oxidation reaction of the drug with alkaline potassium permanganate at room temperature for a fixed time at 20 min.

  14. Charge transfer and interface properties in inorganic superstructures and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyagina, I. S.; Petrov, A. A.; Pervov, V. S.

    2016-06-01

    The processes of charge transfer and electronic reconstruction at interfaces of inorganic superstructures and composites have not yet been adequately investigated. This review integrates and analyzes the results of theoretical and experimental studies of structural and electronic effects at interfaces of metal oxide or chalcogenide superstructures and composites. Charge transfer and, hence, change in interface properties compared to the properties of substructures are shown to be determined by the preparation method of composites and chemical nature of the superstructures, incommensurability of structural parameters and valence states of the constituent metals. The changes are maximal for nanoheterostructures, and the degree of change is related to electronic conductivity of substructures. The macroscopic properties of the composite materials depend on the amount of interfaces in their bulk. The bibliography includes 66 references.

  15. Charge transfer transitions within the octahedral uranate group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleijenberg, K. C.

    1980-07-01

    In this paper the excitation spectra of the luminescence of the octahedral uranate group (UO6-6) are presented for various uranium-doped compounds. The excitation bands have been assigned using the results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the spectroscopic properties of uranium hexafluoride which is isoelectronic with the octahedral uranate group. Charge transfer transitions from orbitals having mainly oxygen 2p character to orbitals having mainly uranium 5f charcter have been observed in the region 2.24-˜4 eV. Charge transfer transitions to orbitals having mainly uranium 6d character have been observed at 4.4 eV and at 5.4 eV.

  16. Negative ion-uranium hexafluoride charge transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Gerald E.; Newton, T. W.

    1980-10-01

    The flowing afterglow technique has been used to study the process of charge transfer from selected negative ions (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, SF6-) to UF6. The sole ionic product in all cases was observed to be UF6-. Data analysis was complicated by an unexpected coupling of chemical and diffusive ion loss processes when UF6- product ions were present. The rate coefficients for the charge transfer processes are (k in 10-9 cm3 molecule-1 s-1) F-, 1.3; Cl-, 1.1; Br-, 0.93; I-, 0.77; and SF6-, 0.69. The rate constants agree quite well with the classical Langevin predictions.

  17. Integrated Charge Transfer in Organic Ferroelectrics for Flexible Multisensing Materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Beibei; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-09-01

    The ultimate or end point of functional materials development is the realization of strong coupling between all energy regimes (optical, electronic, magnetic, and elastic), enabling the same material to be utilized for multifunctionalities. However, the integration of multifunctionalities in soft materials with the existence of various coupling is still in its early stage. Here, the coupling between ferroelectricity and charge transfer by combining bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene-C60 charge-transfer crystals with ferroelectric polyvinylidene fluoride polymer matrix is reported, which enables external stimuli-controlled polarization, optoelectronic and magnetic field sensing properties. Such flexible composite films also display a superior strain-dependent capacitance and resistance change with a giant piezoresistance coefficient of 7.89 × 10(-6) Pa(-1) . This mutual coupled material with the realization of enhanced couplings across these energy domains opens up the potential for multisensing applications. PMID:27378088

  18. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  19. Charge transfer magnetoexciton formation at vertically coupled quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Willian; Marin, Jairo H; Mikhailov, Ilia D

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is presented on the properties of charge transfer excitons at vertically coupled semiconductor quantum dots in the presence of electric and magnetic fields directed along the growth axis. Such excitons should have two interesting characteristics: an extremely long lifetime and a permanent dipole moment. We show that wave functions and the low-lying energies of charge transfer exciton can be found exactly for a special morphology of quantum dots that provides a parabolic confinement inside the layers. To take into account a difference between confinement potentials of an actual structure and of our exactly solvable model, we use the Galerkin method. The density of energy states is calculated for different InAs/GaAs quantum dots' dimensions, the separation between layers, and the strength of the electric and magnetic fields. A possibility of a formation of a giant dipolar momentum under external electric field is predicted. PMID:23092373

  20. Charge transfer magnetoexciton formation at vertically coupled quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is presented on the properties of charge transfer excitons at vertically coupled semiconductor quantum dots in the presence of electric and magnetic fields directed along the growth axis. Such excitons should have two interesting characteristics: an extremely long lifetime and a permanent dipole moment. We show that wave functions and the low-lying energies of charge transfer exciton can be found exactly for a special morphology of quantum dots that provides a parabolic confinement inside the layers. To take into account a difference between confinement potentials of an actual structure and of our exactly solvable model, we use the Galerkin method. The density of energy states is calculated for different InAs/GaAs quantum dots’ dimensions, the separation between layers, and the strength of the electric and magnetic fields. A possibility of a formation of a giant dipolar momentum under external electric field is predicted. PMID:23092373

  1. Charge-transfer-state photoluminescence in asymmetric coupled quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, T. B.; Vodjdani, N.; Vinter, B.; Weisbuch, C.; Mourou, G. A.

    1989-07-01

    We have performed continuous and time-resolved photoluminescence experiments on novel double-quantum-well structures in Schottky diodes. We have directly observed the buildup of a charge-transfer (CT) state in which the electrons and holes are in separate wells because of the fact that they tunnel in opposite directions. We have studied the effect of an electric field on the CT state formation, and have observed a strong, linear Stark shift of the CT luminescence.

  2. Charge transfer in energetic Li^2+ - H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancev, I.

    2008-07-01

    The total cross sections for charge transfer in Li^2+ - H collisions have been calculated, using the four-body first Born approximation with correct boundary conditions (CB1-4B) and four-body continuum distorted wave method (CDW-4B) in the energy range 10 - 5000 keV/amu. Present results call for additional experimental data at higher impact energies than presently available.

  3. Momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions yield fragments (Delta-Z = + 1) whose longitudinal momentum distributions are downshifted by larger values than those associated with the remaining fragments (Delta-Z = 1, -2,...). Kinematics alone cannot account for the observed downshifts; therefore, an additional contribution from collision dynamics must be included. In this work, an optical model description of collision momentum transfer is used to estimate the additional dynamical momentum downshift. Good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data is obtained.

  4. Charge transfer and atomic-level pressure in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jun; Cheng, Yongqiang

    2014-02-03

    This paper presents a systematic study on the charge transfer and ionicity in various metallic-glass forming systems, as well as its relationship with other atomic-level structure indicators, using the Bader analysis method and molecular dynamics simulation. It is shown that in a binary or multicomponent system, the chemical effects (when more than one elements present) appear to play a more important role in setting the absolute level of the atomic-level pressure, compared to the topological fluctuation.

  5. Interfacial Charge Transfer States in Condensed Phase Systems.

    PubMed

    Vandewal, Koen

    2016-05-27

    Intermolecular charge transfer (CT) states at the interface between electron-donating (D) and electron-accepting (A) materials in organic thin films are characterized by absorption and emission bands within the optical gap of the interfacing materials. CT states efficiently generate charge carriers for some D-A combinations, and others show high fluorescence quantum efficiencies. These properties are exploited in organic solar cells, photodetectors, and light-emitting diodes. This review summarizes experimental and theoretical work on the electronic structure and interfacial energy landscape at condensed matter D-A interfaces. Recent findings on photogeneration and recombination of free charge carriers via CT states are discussed, and relations between CT state properties and optoelectronic device parameters are clarified. PMID:26980308

  6. Charge Transfer Excitons at van der Waals Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyang; Monahan, Nicholas R; Gong, Zizhou; Zhu, Haiming; Williams, Kristopher W; Nelson, Cory A

    2015-07-01

    The van der Waals interfaces of molecular donor/acceptor or graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors are central to concepts and emerging technologies of light-electricity interconversion. Examples include, among others, solar cells, photodetectors, and light emitting diodes. A salient feature in both types of van der Waals interfaces is the poorly screened Coulomb potential that can give rise to bound electron-hole pairs across the interface, i.e., charge transfer (CT) or interlayer excitons. Here we address common features of CT excitons at both types of interfaces. We emphasize the competition between localization and delocalization in ensuring efficient charge separation. At the molecular donor/acceptor interface, electronic delocalization in real space can dictate charge carrier separation. In contrast, at the 2D semiconductor heterojunction, delocalization in momentum space due to strong exciton binding may assist in parallel momentum conservation in CT exciton formation. PMID:26001297

  7. Interfacial Charge Transfer States in Condensed Phase Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewal, Koen

    2016-05-01

    Intermolecular charge transfer (CT) states at the interface between electron-donating (D) and electron-accepting (A) materials in organic thin films are characterized by absorption and emission bands within the optical gap of the interfacing materials. CT states efficiently generate charge carriers for some D-A combinations, and others show high fluorescence quantum efficiencies. These properties are exploited in organic solar cells, photodetectors, and light-emitting diodes. This review summarizes experimental and theoretical work on the electronic structure and interfacial energy landscape at condensed matter D-A interfaces. Recent findings on photogeneration and recombination of free charge carriers via CT states are discussed, and relations between CT state properties and optoelectronic device parameters are clarified.

  8. Energy and charge transfer in ionized argon coated water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kočišek, J. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz Lengyel, J.; Fárník, M. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz; Slavíček, P. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz

    2013-12-07

    We investigate the electron ionization of clusters generated in mixed Ar-water expansions. The electron energy dependent ion yields reveal the neutral cluster composition and structure: water clusters fully covered with the Ar solvation shell are formed under certain expansion conditions. The argon atoms shield the embedded (H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters resulting in the ionization threshold above ≈15 eV for all fragments. The argon atoms also mediate more complex reactions in the clusters: e.g., the charge transfer between Ar{sup +} and water occurs above the threshold; at higher electron energies above ∼28 eV, an excitonic transfer process between Ar{sup +}* and water opens leading to new products Ar{sub n}H{sup +} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sup +}. On the other hand, the excitonic transfer from the neutral Ar* state at lower energies is not observed although this resonant process was demonstrated previously in a photoionization experiment. Doubly charged fragments (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sub 2}{sup 2+} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup 2+} ions are observed and Intermolecular Coulomb decay (ICD) processes are invoked to explain their thresholds. The Coulomb explosion of the doubly charged cluster formed within the ICD process is prevented by the stabilization effect of the argon solvent.

  9. Charge Transfer Models of Zinc and Magnesium in Water.

    PubMed

    Soniat, Marielle; Hartman, Lisa; Rick, Steven W

    2015-04-14

    Quantum mechanical studies point to the importance of polarization and charge transfer (CT) in zinc binding. A new CT force field is used to study these effects in ion-water dimers and in aqueous solution. Quantum mechanics calculations are carried out to determine amounts of CT. Models for zinc and magnesium are parametrized to reproduce solvation structure, hydration free energy, and CT properties. The new models are subjected to energy decomposition, in which the effects of polarization and CT are investigated. The importance of these multibody interactions in the liquid is also considered. We find that, for divalent cations, polarization and charge transfer both strongly affect binding to water. Though polarization increases the internal (self) energy of water and ions, this is more than compensated for by a stronger ion-water interaction energy. The direction of the charge transfer from the water to the cation weakens the ion-water interaction; this increase in energy is counteracted by a decrease in the system energy due to electron delocalization. PMID:26574375

  10. Theory of ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer: Contributions of direct charge transfer excitations to the absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luxia; Willig, Frank; May, Volkhard

    2007-04-01

    Absorption spectra related to heterogeneous electron transfer are analyzed with the focus on direct charge transfer transition from the surface attached molecule into the semiconductor band states. The computations are based on a model of reduced dimensionality with a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate but a complete account for the continuum of conduction band states. The applicability of this model to perylene on TiO2 has been demonstrated in a series of earlier papers. Here, based on a time-dependent formulation, the absorbance is calculated with the inclusion of charge transfer excitations. A broad parameter set inspired by the perylene TiO2 systems is considered. In particular, the description generalizes the Fano effect to heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. Preliminary simulations of measured spectra are presented for perylene-catechol attached to TiO2.

  11. Photochemistry and charge transfer chemistry of the platinum group elements

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.

    1992-12-01

    During the past 3 years, progress was made in elucidating the excited state structures of Pt(diimine)(dithiolate) complexes, while more recent efforts focused on the photochemistry of these complexes and electronic structure of other dithiolate systems. A carbonyl-Ir-maleonitrile dithiolate complex is also studied.

  12. Photochemistry and charge transfer chemistry of the platinum group elements

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.

    1991-12-01

    Significant progress has been made on the photochemistry and photophysics of platinum group element dithiolate complexes. The specific systems under investigation are square planar complexes of Pt(II) containing a dithiolate chelate and two other donor groups to complete the coordination sphere. The donor groups may be amines, imines, phosphines, phosphites or olefins, and they can be either monodentate or joined together as part of a chelate ring.

  13. Quantum information transfer between topological and conventional charge qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Li; Yan, Zou

    2016-02-01

    We propose a scheme to realize coherent quantum information transfer between topological and conventional charge qubits. We first consider a hybrid system where a quantum dot (QD) is tunnel-coupled to a semiconductor Majorana-hosted nanowire (MNW) via using gated control as a switch, the information encoded in the superposition state of electron empty and occupied state can be transferred to each other through choosing the proper interaction time to make measurements. Then we consider another system including a double QDs and a pair of parallel MNWs, it is shown that the entanglement information transfer can be realized between the two kinds of systems. We also realize long distance quantum information transfer between two quantum dots separated by an MNW, by making use of the nonlocal fermionic level formed with the pared Majorana feimions (MFs) emerging at the two ends of the MNW. Furthermore, we analyze the teleportationlike electron transfer phenomenon predicted by Tewari et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 027001 (2008)] in our considered system. Interestingly, we find that this phenomenon exactly corresponds to the case that the information encoded in one QD just returns back to its original place during the dynamical evolution of the combined system from the perspective of quantum state transfer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304031).

  14. Nanocontact electrification: patterned surface charges affecting adhesion, transfer, and printing.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jesse J; Barry, Chad R; Knuesel, Robert J; Wang, Xinyu; Jacobs, Heiko O

    2011-06-01

    Contact electrification creates an invisible mark, overlooked and often undetected by conventional surface spectroscopic measurements. It impacts our daily lives macroscopically during electrostatic discharge and is equally relevant on the nanoscale in areas such as soft lithography, transfer, and printing. This report describes a new conceptual approach to studying and utilizing contact electrification beyond prior surface force apparatus and point-contact implementations. Instead of a single point contact, our process studies nanocontact electrification that occurs between multiple nanocontacts of different sizes and shapes that can be formed using flexible materials, in particular, surface-functionalized poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps and other common dielectrics (PMMA, SU-8, PS, PAA, and SiO(2)). Upon the formation of conformal contacts and forced delamination, contacted regions become charged, which is directly observed using Kelvin probe force microscopy revealing images of charge with sub-100-nm lateral resolution. The experiments reveal chemically driven interfacial proton exchange as the dominant charging mechanism for the materials that have been investigated so far. The recorded levels of uncompensated charges approach the theoretical limit that is set by the dielectric breakdown strength of the air gap that forms as the surfaces are delaminated. The macroscopic presence of the charges is recorded using force-distance curve measurements involving a balance and a micromanipulator to control the distance between the delaminated objects. Coulomb attraction between the delaminated surfaces reaches 150 N/m(2). At such a magnitude, the force finds many applications. We demonstrate the utility of printed charges in the fields of (i) nanoxerography and (ii) nanotransfer printing whereby the smallest objects are ∼10 nm in diameter and the largest objects are in the millimeter to centimeter range. The printed charges are also shown to affect the electronic

  15. Oxidation and metal-insertion in molybdenite surfaces: evaluation of charge-transfer mechanisms and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ramana, CV; Becker, U; Shutthanandan, V; Julien, CM

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a layered transition-metal dichalcogenide, has been of special importance to the research community of geochemistry, materials and environmental chemistry, and geotechnical engineering. Understanding the oxidation behavior and charge-transfer mechanisms in MoS2 is important to gain better insight into the degradation of this mineral in the environment. In addition, understanding the insertion of metals into molybdenite and evaluation of charge-transfer mechanism and dynamics is important to utilize these minerals in technological applications. Furthermore, a detailed investigation of thermal oxidation behavior and metal-insertion will provide a basis to further explore and model the mechanism of adsorption of metal ions onto geomedia. The present work was performed to understand thermal oxidation and metal-insertion processes of molybdenite surfaces. The analysis was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Structural studies using SEM and TEM indicate the local-disordering of the structure as a result of charge-transfer process between the inserted lithium and the molybdenite layer. Selected area electron diffraction measurements indicate the large variations in the diffusivity of lithium confirming that the charge-transfer is different along and perpendicular to the layers in molybdenite. Thermal heating of molybenite surface in air at 400°C induces surface oxidation, which is slow during the first hour of heating and then increases significantly. The SEM results indicate that the crystals formed on the molybdenite surface as a result of thermal oxidation exhibit regular thin-elongated shape. The average size and density of the crystals on the surface is dependent on the time of annealing; smaller size and high density during the first one-hour and significant increase in

  16. An Electronic Structure Approach to Charge Transfer and Transport in Molecular Building Blocks for Organic Optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Heidi Phillips

    A fundamental understanding of charge separation in organic materials is necessary for the rational design of optoelectronic devices suited for renewable energy applications and requires a combination of theoretical, computational, and experimental methods. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD)DFT are cost effective ab-initio approaches for calculating fundamental properties of large molecular systems, however conventional DFT methods have been known to fail in accurately characterizing frontier orbital gaps and charge transfer states in molecular systems. In this dissertation, these shortcomings are addressed by implementing an optimally-tuned range-separated hybrid (OT-RSH) functional approach within DFT and TDDFT. The first part of this thesis presents the way in which RSH-DFT addresses the shortcomings in conventional DFT. Environmentally-corrected RSH-DFT frontier orbital energies are shown to correspond to thin film measurements for a set of organic semiconducting molecules. Likewise, the improved RSH-TDDFT description of charge transfer excitations is benchmarked using a model ethene dimer and silsesquioxane molecules. In the second part of this thesis, RSH-DFT is applied to chromophore-functionalized silsesquioxanes, which are currently investigated as candidates for building blocks in optoelectronic applications. RSH-DFT provides insight into the nature of absorptive and emissive states in silsesquioxanes. While absorption primarily involves transitions localized on one chromophore, charge transfer between chromophores and between chromophore and silsesquioxane cage have been identified. The RSH-DFT approach, including a protocol accounting for complex environmental effects on charge transfer energies, was tested and validated against experimental measurements. The third part of this thesis addresses quantum transport through nano-scale junctions. The ability to quantify a molecular junction via spectroscopic methods is crucial to their

  17. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: Charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2013-07-01

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D6h Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D2 eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D1, D2 (N+-Phenyl, N-Phenyl+). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled nuclear motion, one observes an

  18. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection.

    PubMed

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J; Robb, Michael A

    2013-07-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D6h Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D2 eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D1, D2 (N(+)-Phenyl, N-Phenyl(+)). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled nuclear motion, one observes an

  19. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: Charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection

    SciTech Connect

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2013-07-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D{sub 6h} Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D{sub 2} eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} (N{sup +}-Phenyl, N-Phenyl{sup +}). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled

  20. Charge transfer efficiency in proton damaged CCD`s

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, T. |; Murowinski, R.; Deen, M.J.

    1998-04-01

    The authors have performed detailed measurements of the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) in a thinned, backside-illuminated imaging charge-coupled device (CCD). The device had been damaged in three separate sections by proton radiation typical of that which a CCD would receive in space-borne experiments, nuclear imaging, or particle detection. They examined CTE as a function of signal level, temperature, and radiation dose. The dominant factor affecting the CTE in radiation-damaged CCD`s is seen to be trapping by bulk states. They present a simple physical model for trapping as a function of transfer rate, trap concentration, and temperature. They have made calculations using this model and arrived at predictions which closely match the measured results. The CTE was also observed to have a nonlinear dependence on signal level. Using two-dimensional device simulations to examine the distribution of the charge packets in the CCD channel over a range of signal levels, they were able to explain the observed variation.

  1. Highly Twisted Triarylamines for Photoinduced Intramoleculer ChargeTransfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chudomel, J. M.; Yang, B. Q.; Barnes, M. D.; Achermann, M.; Mague, J. T.; Lahti, P. M.

    2011-08-04

    9-(N,N-Dianisylamino)anthracene (9DAAA), 9-(N,N-dianisylamino)dinaphth([1,2-a:2'-1'-j]-anthracene (9DAAH), and 9,10-bis(N,N-dianisylamino)anthracene (910BAA) were synthesized as highly twisted triarylamines with potential for photoexcited internal charge transfer. Crystallography of 9DAAA shows its dianisylamino group to be twisted nearly perpendicular to its anthracene unit, similar to a report for 910BAA. The solution fluorescence spectra show strong bathochromic shifts for each of the three molecular systems with strongly decreased quantum efficiency in higher polarity solvents. Solution-phase (ensemble) time-resolved photoluminescence measurements show up to 4-fold decreases in fluorescence lifetime in acetonitrile compared to hexane. The combined results are consistent with photoinduced, transient intramolecular charge-transfer from the bis-anisylamine unit to the polycyclic aromatic unit. Computational modeling is in accord with intramolecular transfer of electron density from the bis-anisylamino unit to the anthracene, based on in comparisons of HOMO and LUMO.

  2. Tunable charge transfer properties in metal-phthalocyanine heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siles, P. F.; Hahn, T.; Salvan, G.; Knupfer, M.; Zhu, F.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2016-04-01

    Organic materials such as phthalocyanine-based systems present a great potential for organic device applications due to the possibility of integrating films of different organic materials to create organic heterostructures which combine the electrical capabilities of each material. This opens the possibility to precisely engineer and tune new electrical properties. In particular, similar transition metal phthalocyanines demonstrate hybridization and charge transfer properties which could lead to interesting physical phenomena. Although, when considering device dimensions, a better understanding and control of the tuning of the transport properties still remain in the focus of research. Here, by employing conductive atomic force microscopy techniques, we provide an insight about the nanoscale electrical properties and transport mechanisms of MnPc and fluorinated phthalocyanines such as F16CuPc and F16CoPc. We report a transition from typical diode-like transport mechanisms for pure MnPc thin films to space-charge-limited current transport regime (SCLC) for Pc-based heterostructures. The controlled addition of fluorinated phthalocyanine also provides highly uniform and symmetric-polarized transport characteristics with conductance enhancements up to two orders of magnitude depending on the polarization. We present a method to spatially map the mobility of the MnPc/F16CuPc structures with a nanoscale resolution and provide theoretical calculations to support our experimental findings. This well-controlled nanoscale tuning of the electrical properties for metal transition phthalocyanine junctions stands as key step for future phthalocyanine-based electronic devices, where the low dimension charge transfer, mediated by transition metal atoms could be intrinsically linked to a transfer of magnetic moment or spin.Organic materials such as phthalocyanine-based systems present a great potential for organic device applications due to the possibility of integrating films of

  3. Charge transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions under Debye plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of plasma environment on the 1s → nlm charge transfer, for arbitrary n, l, and m, in proton-hydrogen collisions has been investigated within the framework of a distorted wave approximation. The effect of external plasma has been incorporated using Debye screening model of the interacting charge particles. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogenic wave function, it has been possible to obtain the scattering amplitude in closed form. A detailed study has been made to investigate the effect of external plasma environment on the differential and total cross sections for electron capture into different angular momentum states for the incident energy in the range of 20–1000 keV. For the unscreened case, our results are in close agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  4. Charge transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions under Debye plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of plasma environment on the 1s → nlm charge transfer, for arbitrary n, l, and m, in proton-hydrogen collisions has been investigated within the framework of a distorted wave approximation. The effect of external plasma has been incorporated using Debye screening model of the interacting charge particles. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogenic wave function, it has been possible to obtain the scattering amplitude in closed form. A detailed study has been made to investigate the effect of external plasma environment on the differential and total cross sections for electron capture into different angular momentum states for the incident energy in the range of 20-1000 keV. For the unscreened case, our results are in close agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  5. Tunable charge transfer properties in metal-phthalocyanine heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Siles, P F; Hahn, T; Salvan, G; Knupfer, M; Zhu, F; Zahn, D R T; Schmidt, O G

    2016-04-28

    Organic materials such as phthalocyanine-based systems present a great potential for organic device applications due to the possibility of integrating films of different organic materials to create organic heterostructures which combine the electrical capabilities of each material. This opens the possibility to precisely engineer and tune new electrical properties. In particular, similar transition metal phthalocyanines demonstrate hybridization and charge transfer properties which could lead to interesting physical phenomena. Although, when considering device dimensions, a better understanding and control of the tuning of the transport properties still remain in the focus of research. Here, by employing conductive atomic force microscopy techniques, we provide an insight about the nanoscale electrical properties and transport mechanisms of MnPc and fluorinated phthalocyanines such as F16CuPc and F16CoPc. We report a transition from typical diode-like transport mechanisms for pure MnPc thin films to space-charge-limited current transport regime (SCLC) for Pc-based heterostructures. The controlled addition of fluorinated phthalocyanine also provides highly uniform and symmetric-polarized transport characteristics with conductance enhancements up to two orders of magnitude depending on the polarization. We present a method to spatially map the mobility of the MnPc/F16CuPc structures with a nanoscale resolution and provide theoretical calculations to support our experimental findings. This well-controlled nanoscale tuning of the electrical properties for metal transition phthalocyanine junctions stands as key step for future phthalocyanine-based electronic devices, where the low dimension charge transfer, mediated by transition metal atoms could be intrinsically linked to a transfer of magnetic moment or spin. PMID:27049842

  6. Charge transfer reaction of multi-charged oxygen ions with O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzscheiter, H. M.; Church, D. A.

    1981-10-01

    The reaction rates for charge transfer from O2 to doubly and triply charged oxygen atoms are measured in a demonstration of the measurement capabilities of a system at ultrahigh vacuum with low-energy magnetically confined ions. Ions were produced by electron impact ionization of gas within a Penning-type ion trap, with selective removal of unwanted ionization states by radio-frequency resonant excitation. Ion number mass-to-charge ratio spectra obtained at partial pressures of O2 from 9.9 x 10 to the -9th to 1.5 x 10 to the -7th torr yield rate constants of 1.0 x 10 to the -9th cu cm/sec and 2.5 x 10 to the -9th cu cm/sec for the O(2+) and O(3+) reactions, respectively. Measurements made at a 30% increase of the effective axial well depth of the trap demonstrate that the rate constant is essentially energy independent in the energy range studies, implying that the O(2+) cross section for charge transfer has an inverse velocity dependence of the Langevin type, despite a reaction rate lower than the Langevin valve.

  7. Polarization and charge transfer in the hydration of chloride ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Zhen; Rogers, David M.; Beck, Thomas L.

    2010-01-07

    A theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of the chloride ion and water molecules in the first hydration shell is presented. The calculations are performed on an ensemble of configurations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of a single chloride ion in bulk water. The simulations utilize the polarizable AMOEBA force field for trajectory generation and MP2-level calculations are performed to examine the electronic structure properties of the ions and surrounding waters in the external field of more distant waters. The ChelpG method is employed to explore the effective charges and dipoles on the chloride ions and first-shell waters. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is further utilized to examine charge transfer from the anion to surrounding water molecules. The clusters extracted from the AMOEBA simulations exhibit high probabilities of anisotropic solvation for chloride ions in bulk water. From the QTAIM analysis, 0.2 elementary charges are transferred from the ion to the first-shell water molecules. The default AMOEBA model overestimates the average dipole moment magnitude of the ion compared to the quantum mechanical value. The average magnitude of the dipole moment of the water molecules in the first shell treated at the MP2-level, with the more distant waters handled with an AMOEBA effective charge model, is 2.67 D. This value is close to the AMOEBA result for first-shell waters (2.72 D) and is slightly reduced from the bulk AMOEBA value (2.78 D). The magnitude of the dipole moment of the water molecules in the first solvation shell is most strongly affected by the local water-water interactions and hydrogen bonds with the second solvation shell, rather than by interactions with the ion.

  8. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects. PMID:27324814

  9. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects.

  10. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, L; Las Heras, U; Mezzacapo, A; Sanz, M; Solano, E; Lamata, L

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects. PMID:27324814

  11. Intramolecular charge transfer in donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Slama-Schwok, A.; Blanchard-Desce, M.; Lehn, J.M. )

    1990-05-17

    The photophysical properties of donor-acceptor molecules, push-pull polyenes and carotenoids, have been studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds bear various acceptor and donor groups, linked together by chains of different length and structure. The position of the absorption and fluorescence maxima and their variation in solvents of increasing polarity are in agreement with long-distance intramolecular charge-transfer processes, the linker acting as a molecular wire. The effects of the linker length and structure and of the nature of acceptor and donor are presented.

  12. Photoinduced charge-transfer materials for nonlinear optical applications

    DOEpatents

    McBranch, Duncan W.

    2006-10-24

    A method using polyelectrolyte self-assembly for preparing multi-layered organic molecular materials having individual layers which exhibit ultrafast electron and/or energy transfer in a controlled direction occurring over the entire structure. Using a high molecular weight, water-soluble, anionic form of poly-phenylene vinylene, self-assembled films can be formed which show high photoluminescence quantum efficiency (QE). The highest emission QE is achieved using poly(propylene-imine) (PPI) dendrimers as cationic binders. Self-quenching of the luminescence is observed as the solid polymer film thickness is increased and can be reversed by inserting additional spacer layers of transparent polyelectrolytes between each active conjugated layer, such that the QE grows with thickness. A red shift of the luminescence is also observed as additional PPV layers are added. This effect persists as self-quenching is eliminated. Charge transfer superlattices can be formed by additionally incorporating C.sub.60 acceptor layers.

  13. Photoinduced Charge and Energy Transfer Processes in Molecular Aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Endicott

    2009-10-20

    This project involved the experimental probing of the electronic excited states generated by photoinduced (center-to-center) electron and energy transfer processes in several classes of transition metal donor/acceptor (D/A) complexes. Some of the general properties inferred from these studies should be useful in the design of new systems for energy conversion applications. Pursuit of the project goals has involved the determination of electron transfer efficiencies and the detailed study of variations in the electronic spectra of D/A complexes. This has resulted in the study of some very fundamental issues of photoinduced charge transfer and the identification of some of the constraints on its efficiency. The experimental studies of the competition between the degradative non-radiative unimolecular relaxation of transition metal excited states and their transfer of charge from these excited states to external acceptors have involved a range of techniques such as transient decay kinetics, photoacoustic calorimetry and transient or stationary state spectroscopy. The substrates synthesized for these studies were selected to provide model systems, or series of model systems to probe the validity of models of electronic excited states and their reactivity. The work during the last few years has focused largely, but not exclusively, on the use of emission spectral band shapes to probe the properties of charge transfer (CT) excited states. Bandshape variations are one of the very few approaches for systematically probing electronic excited states and good band shape resolution is necessary in order to gain information about the structural variations that correlate with excited state reactivity. Differences in molecular structure correlate with differences in chemical reactivity, and the variations in emission bandshapes are well known to relate to variations in the molecular structural differences between the excited and ground electronic states. However, it is has been

  14. Thiolate versus Selenolate: Structure, Stability, and Charge Transfer Properties.

    PubMed

    Ossowski, Jakub; Wächter, Tobias; Silies, Laura; Kind, Martin; Noworolska, Agnieszka; Blobner, Florian; Gnatek, Dominika; Rysz, Jakub; Bolte, Michael; Feulner, Peter; Terfort, Andreas; Cyganik, Piotr; Zharnikov, Michael

    2015-04-28

    Selenolate is considered as an alternative to thiolate to serve as a headgroup mediating the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on coinage metal substrates. There are, however, ongoing vivid discussions regarding the advantages and disadvantages of these anchor groups, regarding, in particular, the energetics of the headgroup-substrate interface and their efficiency in terms of charge transport/transfer. Here we introduce a well-defined model system of 6-cyanonaphthalene-2-thiolate and -selenolate SAMs on Au(111) to resolve these controversies. The exact structural arrangements in both types of SAMs are somewhat different, suggesting a better SAM-building ability in the case of selenolates. At the same time, both types of SAMs have similar packing densities and molecular orientations. This permitted reliable competitive exchange and ion-beam-induced desorption experiments which provided unequivocal evidence for a stronger bonding of selenolates to the substrate as compared to the thiolates. Regardless of this difference, the dynamic charge transfer properties of the thiolate- and selenolate-based adsorbates were found to be nearly identical, as determined by the core-hole-clock approach, which is explained by a redistribution of electron density along the molecular framework, compensating the difference in the substrate-headgroup bond strength. PMID:25857927

  15. Charge transfer interactions in oligomer coated gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newmai, M. Boazbou; Kumar, Pandian Senthil

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoclusters were synthesized by a bottom-up synergistic approach of in-situ oligomerization of the monomer, N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP) and simultaneous weak reduction of Au-NVP complexes in the absence of any other external energy sources, thereby making these tiny gold clusters as the most elemental building blocks to construct further novel nano/microstructures with application potentials. It is well-known that metal clusters with less than 2 nm size do not show the usual surface plasmon band, because of the presence of a band-gap at the fermi level. Nevertheless, our present oligomer coated gold clusters show a discrete intense band at around 630 nm, which could very well be attributed to the charge transfer between the oligomer chain and the surface Au atoms. Such kind of sacrificial plasmon induced charge transfer interaction, observed for the very first time to the best of our knowledge, were also strongly corroborated through the enhancement / shifting of specific vibrational / rotational peaks as observed from the FTIR and Raman measurements as a function of the metal oxidation states, thus representing a new prototype for an efficient solar energy conversion probe.

  16. Dynamical Theory of Charge Transfer Between Complex Atoms and Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Basudev; Marston, Brad

    2000-03-01

    An existing dynamical quantum many-body theory of charge transfer(A. V. Onufriev and J. B. Marston, Phys. Rev. B 53), 13340 (1996); J. Merino and J. B. Marston, Phys. Rev. B 58, 6982 (1998). describes atoms with simple s-orbitals, such as alkalis and alkaline-earths, interacting with metal surfaces. The many-body equations of motion (EOM) are developed systematically as an expansion in the number of surface particle-hole excitations. Here we generalize this theory to describe atoms with richer orbital structures, such as atomic oxygen. In the simplest version of the model, only the single-particle p_z-orbitals of the atom, the ones oriented perpendicular to the surface, participate directly in resonant charge transfer as they have the largest overlap with the metallic wavefunctions. However, as the several-electron Russell-Saunders eigenstates, labeled by total angular momenta quantum numbers J, L, and S, are built out of products of single-particle orbitals, non-trivial matrix elements must be incorporated into the many-body EOM's. Comparison to recent experimental results(A. C. Lavery, C. E. Sosolik, and B. H. Cooper, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B 157), 42 (1999); A. C. Lavery et al. to appear in Phys. Rev. B. on the scattering of low-energy oxygen ions off Cu(001) surfaces is made.

  17. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-07-22

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa's for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  18. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  19. Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hei, T K; Chen, D J; Brenner, D J; Hall, E J

    1988-07-01

    The mutagenic potential of charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) was assessed using the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus (HGPRT) in primary human fibroblasts. Exponentially growing cultures of early passaged fibroblasts were grown as monolayers on thin mylar sheets and were irradiated with accelerated protons, deuterons or helium-3 ions. The mutation rates were compared with those generated by 137Cs gamma-rays. LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, using the track segment mode, ranged from 10 to 150 keV/micron. After irradiation, cells were trypsinized, subcultured and assayed for both cytotoxicity and 6-thioguanine resistance. For gamma-rays, and for the charged particles of lower LET, the dose-response curves for cell survival were characterized by a marked initial shoulder, but approximated to an exponential function of dose for higher LETs. Mutation frequencies, likewise, showed a direct correlation to LET over the dose range examined. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for mutagenesis, based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, ranged from 1.30 for 10 keV/micron protons to 9.40 for 150 keV/micron helium-3 ions. Results of the present studies indicate that high-LET radiations, apart from being efficient inducers of cell lethality, are even more efficient in mutation induction as compared to low-LET ionizing radiation. These data are consistent with results previously obtained with both rodent and human fibroblast cell lines. PMID:3383341

  20. Charge transfer and negative curvature energy in magnesium boride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hui; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2016-07-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we study the energetics and charge transfer effects in MgBx nanotubes and two-dimensional (2D) sheets. The behavior of adsorbed Mg on 2D boron sheets is found to depend on the amount of electron transfer between the two subsystems. The amount is determined by both the density of adsorbed Mg as well as the atomic-scale structure of the boron subsystem. The degree of transfer can lead to repulsive or attractive Mg-Mg interactions. In both cases, model MgBx nanotubes built from 2D MgBx sheets can display negative curvature energy: a relatively unusual situation in nanosystems where the energy cost to curve the parent 2D sheet into a small-diameter nanotube is negative. Namely, the small-diameter nanotube is energetically preferred over the corresponding flat sheet. We also discuss how these findings may manifest themselves in experimentally synthesized MgBx nanotubes.

  1. Electrical conduction in organic charge transfer complexes under pressure: A theoretical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yadunath

    2016-05-01

    We propose a theoretical view of temperature dependent electrical conductivity in organic charge transfer complexes and radical ion salts. Understanding of the basic conduction mechanism under high pressure in these systems is our aim. The mechanism is discussed mainly on the basis of molecular orbital overlap theory, role of charge transfer forces and charge density waves etc.

  2. Is dipole moment a valid descriptor of excited state's charge-transfer character?

    PubMed

    Petelenz, Piotr; Pac, Barbara

    2013-11-20

    In the ongoing discussion on excited states of the pentacene crystal, dipole moment values have been recently invoked to gauge the CT admixture to excited states of Frenkel parentage in a model cluster. In the present paper, a simple dimer model is used to show that, in general, the dipole moment is not a valid measure of the CT contribution. This finding eliminates some apparent disagreement between the computational results published by different research groups. The implications of our results and other related aspects of cluster-type quantum chemistry calculations are discussed in the context of the standing literature dispute concerning the mechanism of singlet fission in the pentacene crystal, notably the role of charge transfer contributions vs the involvement of an excimer-like doubly excited intermediate (D state). PMID:24138489

  3. Dual Fluorescence in GFP Chromophore Analogues: Chemical Modulation of Charge Transfer and Proton Transfer Bands.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tanmay; Mandal, Mrinal; Das, Ananya; Bhattacharyya, Kalishankar; Datta, Ayan; Mandal, Prasun K

    2016-04-14

    Dual fluorescence of GFP chromophore analogues has been observed for the first time. OHIM (o-hydroxy imidazolidinone) shows only a charge transfer (CT) band, CHBDI (p-cyclicamino o-hydroxy benzimidazolidinone) shows a comparable intensity CT and PT (proton transfer) band, and MHBDI (p-methoxy o-hydroxy benzimidazolidinone) shows a higher intensity PT band. It could be shown that the differential optical behavior is not due to conformational variation in the solid or solution phase. Rather, control of the excited state electronic energy level and excited state acidity constant by functional group modification could be shown to be responsible for the differential optical behavior. Chemical modification-induced electronic control over the relative intensity of the charge transfer and proton transfer bands could thus be evidenced. Support from single-crystal X-ray structure, NMR, femtosecond to nanosecond fluorescence decay analysis, and TDDFT-based calculation provided important information and thus helped us understand the photophysics better. PMID:26998908

  4. Charge-transfer optical absorption mechanism of DNA:Ag-nanocluster complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longuinhos, R.; Lúcio, A. D.; Chacham, H.; Alexandre, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    Optical properties of DNA:Ag-nanoclusters complexes have been successfully applied experimentally in Chemistry, Physics, and Biology. Nevertheless, the mechanisms behind their optical activity remain unresolved. In this work, we present a time-dependent density functional study of optical absorption in DNA:Ag4. In all 23 different complexes investigated, we obtain new absorption peaks in the visible region that are not found in either the isolated Ag4 or isolated DNA base pairs. Absorption from red to green are predominantly of charge-transfer character, from the Ag4 to the DNA fragment, while absorption in the blue-violet range are mostly associated to electronic transitions of a mixed character, involving either DNA-Ag4 hybrid orbitals or intracluster orbitals. We also investigate the role of exchange-correlation functionals in the calculated optical spectra. Significant differences are observed between the calculations using the PBE functional (without exact exchange) and the CAM-B3LYP functional (which partly includes exact exchange). Specifically, we observe a tendency of charge-transfer excitations to involve purines bases, and the PBE spectra error is more pronounced in the complexes where the Ag cluster is bound to the purines. Finally, our results also highlight the importance of adding both the complementary base pair and the sugar-phosphate backbone in order to properly characterize the absorption spectrum of DNA:Ag complexes.

  5. Magnetic ordering in fullerene charge-transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tohru; Yamabe, Tokio; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi

    1997-07-01

    We have determined the ground states of the charge-transfer (CT) complexes in which the energy levels of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of donors and the lowest unoccupied MO (LUMO) of acceptors are closely located, and examined some fullerene complexes consisting of C60, C70, tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene (TDAE), and 1,1',3,3'-tetramethyl-Δ2,2'-bi(imidazolidine) (TMBI). The observed magnetic properties of TDAE-C60, TMBI-C60, and TDAE-C70 can be accounted for by employing realistic parameters. The effective Hamiltonian including up to the fourth-order perturbation has also been derived in the fourfold degenerate model space. The effective Hamiltonian can plausibly reproduce the magnetic phase diagram obtained by the variational treatment of TDAE-C60. It has been shown that the third and the fourth processes contribute to the stabilization of the antiferromagnetic state.

  6. HST WFC3/UVIS: charge transfer efficiency monitoring and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia M.; Sosey, Megan L.; Anderson, Jay; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Bourque, Matthew; Bajaj, Varun; Khandrika, Harish G.; Martlin, Catherine; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Sabbi, Elena; WFC3 Team

    2016-01-01

    The harsh low-earth orbit environment is known to damage CCD devices and the HST WFC3/UVIS camera is no exception. One consequence of the radiation damage is charge-transfer efficiency (CTE) loss over time. We summarize the level of the CTE losses, the effect on science data, and the pre- and post-observation mitigation options available. Among them is the pixel-based CTE correction, which has been incorporated into the HST automatic data processing pipeline. The pipeline now provides both standard and CTE-corrected data products; observers with older data can re-retrieve their images via the the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to obtain the new products.

  7. Charge Transfer in C6+ Collisions with H and He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. G.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    Charge transfer cross sections are calculated for C6+ + H and C6+ + He collisions using a time-dependent close-coupling method in Cartesian coordinates. Capture cross sections into the 1 s , 2 l(l = 0 - 1) , 3 l(l = 0 - 2) , and 4 l(l = 0 - 3) subshells of C5+ are found for projectile energies ranging from 5.0 keV/amu to 15.0 keV/amu. Comparisons are made with previous calculations and recent experiments. The atomic collision data will be used to better understand the interaction of solar wind ions with interplanetary atoms. Work supported in part by grants from NSF, NASA, and DOE.

  8. Experimental study of low-energy charge transfer in nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A.

    1979-01-01

    Total charge transfer cross sections were obtained for the N2(+)-N2 system with relative translational ion energies between 9 and 441 eV. Data were obtained to examine the dependence of total cross section on ion energy. The effect of ion excitation on the cross sections was studied by varying the electron ionization energy in the mass spectrometer ion source over an electron energy range between 14.5 and 32.1 eV. The dependence of total cross section on the neutralization chamber gas pressure was examined by obtaining data at pressure values from 9.9 to 0.000199 torr. Cross section values obtained were compared with experimental and theoretical results of other investigations.

  9. Photoinduced Charge Transfer from Titania to Surface Doping Site.

    PubMed

    Inerbaev, Talgat; Hoefelmeyer, James D; Kilin, Dmitri S

    2013-05-16

    We evaluate a theoretical model in which Ru is substituting for Ti at the (100) surface of anatase TiO2. Charge transfer from the photo-excited TiO2 substrate to the catalytic site triggers the photo-catalytic event (such as water oxidation or reduction half-reaction). We perform ab-initio computational modeling of the charge transfer dynamics on the interface of TiO2 nanorod and catalytic site. A slab of TiO2 represents a fragment of TiO2 nanorod in the anatase phase. Titanium to ruthenium replacement is performed in a way to match the symmetry of TiO2 substrate. One molecular layer of adsorbed water is taken into consideration to mimic the experimental conditions. It is found that these adsorbed water molecules saturate dangling surface bonds and drastically affect the electronic properties of systems investigated. The modeling is performed by reduced density matrix method in the basis of Kohn-Sham orbitals. A nano-catalyst modeled through replacement defect contributes energy levels near the bottom of the conduction band of TiO2 nano-structure. An exciton in the nano-rod is dissipating due to interaction with lattice vibrations, treated through non-adiabatic coupling. The electron relaxes to conduction band edge and then to the Ru cite with faster rate than hole relaxes to the Ru cite. These results are of the importance for an optimal design of nano-materials for photo-catalytic water splitting and solar energy harvesting. PMID:23795229

  10. Photoinduced Charge Transfer from Titania to Surface Doping Site

    PubMed Central

    Inerbaev, Talgat; Hoefelmeyer, James D.; Kilin, Dmitri S.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate a theoretical model in which Ru is substituting for Ti at the (100) surface of anatase TiO2. Charge transfer from the photo-excited TiO2 substrate to the catalytic site triggers the photo-catalytic event (such as water oxidation or reduction half-reaction). We perform ab-initio computational modeling of the charge transfer dynamics on the interface of TiO2 nanorod and catalytic site. A slab of TiO2 represents a fragment of TiO2 nanorod in the anatase phase. Titanium to ruthenium replacement is performed in a way to match the symmetry of TiO2 substrate. One molecular layer of adsorbed water is taken into consideration to mimic the experimental conditions. It is found that these adsorbed water molecules saturate dangling surface bonds and drastically affect the electronic properties of systems investigated. The modeling is performed by reduced density matrix method in the basis of Kohn-Sham orbitals. A nano-catalyst modeled through replacement defect contributes energy levels near the bottom of the conduction band of TiO2 nano-structure. An exciton in the nano-rod is dissipating due to interaction with lattice vibrations, treated through non-adiabatic coupling. The electron relaxes to conduction band edge and then to the Ru cite with faster rate than hole relaxes to the Ru cite. These results are of the importance for an optimal design of nano-materials for photo-catalytic water splitting and solar energy harvesting. PMID:23795229

  11. Metal-Organic Coordination Number Determined Charge Transfer Magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hung-Hsiang; Chu, Yu-Hsun; Lu, Chun-I.; Yang, Tsung-Han; Yang, Kai-Jheng; Kaun, Chao-Cheng; Hoffmann, Germar; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2014-03-01

    By the appropriate choice of head groups and molecular ligands, various metal-organic coordination geometries can be engineered. Such metal-organic structures provide different chemical environments for molecules and give us templates to study the charge redistribution within the metal-organic interface. We created various metal-organic bonding environment by growing self-assembly nanostructures of Fe-PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride) chains and networks on a Au(111) surface. Bonding environment dependent frontier molecular orbital energies are acquired by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. By comparing the frontier energies with the molecular coordination environments, we conclude that the specific coordination affects the magnitude of charge transfer onto each PTCDA in the Fe-PTCDA hybridization system. H.-H. Yang, Y.-H. Chu, C.-I Lu, T.-H. Yang, K.-J. Yang, C.-C. Kaun, G. Hoffmann, and M.-T. Lin, ACS Nano 7, 2814 (2013).

  12. Doping graphene films via chemically mediated charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryousuke; Bando, Masashi; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2011-01-01

    Transparent conductive films (TCFs) are critical components of a myriad of technologies including flat panel displays, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. Graphene-based TCFs have attracted a lot of attention because of their high electrical conductivity, transparency, and low cost. Carrier doping of graphene would potentially improve the properties of graphene-based TCFs for practical industrial applications. However, controlling the carrier type and concentration of dopants in graphene films is challenging, especially for the synthesis of p-type films. In this article, a new method for doping graphene using the conjugated organic molecule, tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), is described. Notably, TCNQ is well known as a powerful electron accepter and is expected to favor electron transfer from graphene into TCNQ molecules, thereby leading to p-type doping of graphene films. Small amounts of TCNQ drastically improved the resistivity without degradation of optical transparency. Our carrier doping method based on charge transfer has a huge potential for graphene-based TCFs. PMID:21711624

  13. Charge Transfer Characteristics and Initiation Mechanisms of Long Delayed Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Cummer, S. A.; Lyons, W. A.; Nelson, T. E.

    2007-12-01

    Simultaneous measurements of high altitude optical emissions and the magnetic field produced by sprite-associated lightning discharges enable a close examination of the link between low altitude lightning process and high altitude sprite process. In this work, we report results of the coordinated analysis of high speed (1000--10000 frames per second) sprite video and wideband (0.1 Hz to 30 kHz) magnetic field measurements made simultaneously at the Yucca Ridge Field Station and Duke University during the June through August 2005 campaign period. During the observation period, the high speed camera detected 83 sprite events in 67 TLE sequences, which are caused by the same number of +CGs. 46% of these sprite events are delayed more than 10 ms after the lightning return stroke. With the estimated lightning source current moment waveform, we computed the continuing current amplitude and total charge transfer characteristics of the long delayed sprites (>10 ms delay). Our calculation shows the total charge moment change of the long delayed sprites can vary from several hundred C km to more than ten thousand C km. All the long delayed sprites are related with intense continuing current bigger than 2 kA. This continuing current provides about 50% to 90% of the total charge transfer. However, a bigger continuing current does not necessarily mean a shorter time delay. This indicates that other processes also involved in the sprite initiation for long delayed sprites. In our observations, the sferic burst, a high frequency noise caused by intra-cloud activity, is always accompanied by a slow intensification in the lightning source current before the time of sprite initiation. Thus we used the lightning source current as an input and employed a 2-D FDTD model to numerically simulate the electric field at different altitudes and compare it with the breakdown field. Including the effect of the electron mobility dependence on electric field, the simulation results showed that

  14. Charge transfer inefficiency in the pre- and post-irradiated Swept Charge Device CCD236

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. H.; Gow, J. P. D.; Pool, P.; Holland, A. D.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the mapping of spectral response of an e2v technologies Swept Charge Device (SCD) CCD236 pre and post irradiation with a 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence of 5.0 × 108 protons cm-2. The CCD236 is a large area (4.4 cm2) X-ray detector which will be used in India's Chandrayaan-2 Large Soft X-ray Spectrometer (CLASS) and China's Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT). To enable the suppression of surface dark current, clocking is performed continuously resulting in a linear readout. As such the flat field illumination used to measure any change in spectral response over a conventional Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) is not possible. An alternative masking technique has been used to expose pinpoint regions of the device to Mn-Kα and Mn-Kβ X-rays, enabling a local map of spectral response to be built up over the device. This novel approach allows for an estimation of the Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI) of the device to be made by allowing the creation of a CTI scatter plot similar to that typically observed in conventional CCDs.

  15. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-06-25

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced processes, are also described. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. The work described herein was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CHE-13-61293 (theory development), National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (soybean lipoxygenase), Center for Chemical Innovation of the National Science Foundation Solar Fuels Grant CHE-1305124 (cobalt catalysts), Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (nickel catalysts), and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Award No. FA9550-14-1-0295 (photoinduced PCET).

  16. Ab initio study of charge-transfer dynamics in collisions of C{sup 2+} ions with hydrogen chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsalyi, E.; Vibok, A.; Bene, E.; Halasz, G. J.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M. C.

    2011-05-15

    Ab initio quantum chemistry molecular calculations followed by a semiclassical dynamical treatment in the keV collision energy range have been developed for the study of the charge-transfer process in collisions of C{sup 2+} ions with hydrogen chloride. The mechanism has been investigated in detail in connection with avoided crossings between states involved in the reaction. A simple mechanism driven by a strong nonadiabatic coupling matrix element has been pointed out for this process. A comparative analysis with the halogen fluoride target corresponding to a similar electronic configuration shows a quite different charge-transfer mechanism leading to a very different behavior of the cross sections. Such behavior may be correlated to specific nonadiabatic interactions observed in these collision systems.

  17. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Silicon and Iron Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1996-01-01

    Charge transfer at electron-volt energies between multiply charged atomic ions and neutral atoms and molecules is of considerable importance in astrophysics, plasma physics, and in particular, fusion plasmas. In the year covered by this report, several major tasks were completed. These include: (1) the re-calibration of the ion gauge to measure the absolute particle densities of H2, He, N2, and CO for our current measurements; (2) the analysis of data for charge transfer reactions of N(exp 2 plus) ion and He, H2, N2, and CO; (3) measurement and data analysis of the charge transfer reaction of (Fe(exp 2 plus) ion and H2; (4) charge transfer measurement of Fe(exp 2 plus) ion and H2; and (5) redesign and modification of the ion detection and data acquisition system for the low energy beam facility (reflection time of flight mass spectrometer) dedicated to the study of state select charge transfer.

  18. Solvation-Driven Charge Transfer and Localization in Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus In any physicochemical process in liquids, the dynamical response of the solvent to the solutes out of equilibrium plays a crucial role in the rates and products: the solvent molecules react to the changes in volume and electron density of the solutes to minimize the free energy of the solution, thus modulating the activation barriers and stabilizing (or destabilizing) intermediate states. In charge transfer (CT) processes in polar solvents, the response of the solvent always assists the formation of charge separation states by stabilizing the energy of the localized charges. A deep understanding of the solvation mechanisms and time scales is therefore essential for a correct description of any photochemical process in dense phase and for designing molecular devices based on photosensitizers with CT excited states. In the last two decades, with the advent of ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopies, microscopic models describing the relevant case of polar solvation (where both the solvent and the solute molecules have a permanent electric dipole and the mutual interaction is mainly dipole–dipole) have dramatically progressed. Regardless of the details of each model, they all assume that the effect of the electrostatic fields of the solvent molecules on the internal electronic dynamics of the solute are perturbative and that the solvent–solute coupling is mainly an electrostatic interaction between the constant permanent dipoles of the solute and the solvent molecules. This well-established picture has proven to quantitatively rationalize spectroscopic effects of environmental and electric dynamics (time-resolved Stokes shifts, inhomogeneous broadening, etc.). However, recent computational and experimental studies, including ours, have shown that further improvement is required. Indeed, in the last years we investigated several molecular complexes exhibiting photoexcited CT states, and we found that the current description of the formation and

  19. Nematic and spin-charge orders driven by hole-doping a charge-transfer insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Mark H.; Wu, Si; Lawler, Michael; Paramekanti, Arun; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2014-09-01

    Recent experimental discoveries have brought a diverse set of broken symmetry states to the center stage of research on cuprate superconductors. Here, we focus on a thematic understanding of the diverse phenomenology by exploring a strong-coupling mechanism of symmetry breaking driven by frustration of antiferromagnetic (AFM) order. We achieve this through a variational study of a three-band model of the CuO2 plane with Kondo type exchange couplings between doped oxygen holes and classical copper spins. Two main findings from this strong-coupling multi-band perspective are (1) that the symmetry hierarchy of spin stripe, charge stripe, intra-unit-cell nematic order and isotropic phases are all accessible microscopically within the model, (2) many symmetry-breaking patterns compete with energy differences within a few meV per Cu atom to produce a rich phase diagram. These results indicate that the diverse phenomenology of broken-symmetry states in hole-doped AFM charge-transfer insulators may indeed arise from hole-doped frustration of antiferromagnetism.

  20. Ultrafast charge transfer processes in ordered molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Eric James Crane

    1998-11-01

    optical microscopy (NSOM) are used in conjunction with bulk absorption and fluorescence measurements to correlate the morphological and photophysical properties of titanyl phthalocyanine/perylene phenethylimide (TiOPc/PPEI) bilayer systems. Steady-state fluorescence intensity and fluorescence lifetime measurements are used as a measure of interfacial charge-transfer quenching efficiencies.

  1. Conditions for Directional Charge Transfer in CdSe Quantum Dots Functionalized by Ru(II) Polypyridine Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kilina, Svetlana; Cui, Peng; Fischer, Sean A; Tretiak, Sergei

    2014-10-16

    Thermodynamic conditions governing the charge transfer direction in CdSe quantum dots (QD) functionalized by either Ru(II)-trisbipyridine or black dye are studied using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT). Compared to the energy offsets of the isolated QD and the dye, QD-dye interactions strongly stabilize dye orbitals with respect to the QD states, while the surface chemistry of the QD has a minor effect on the energy offsets. In all considered QD/dye composites, the dyes always introduce unoccupied states close to the edge of the conduction band and control the electron transfer. Negatively charged ligands and less polar solvents significantly destabilize the dye's occupied orbitals shifting them toward the very edge of the valence band, thus, providing favorite conditions for the hole transfer. Overall, variations in the dye's ligands and solvent polarity can progressively adjust the electronic structure of QD/dye composites to modify conditions for the directed charge transfer. PMID:26278611

  2. Dynamic Peptide Library for the Discovery of Charge Transfer Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Berdugo, Cristina; Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Javid, Nadeem; Escuder, Beatriu; Miravet, Juan F; Ulijn, Rein V

    2015-11-25

    Coupling of peptide self-assembly to dynamic sequence exchange provides a useful approach for the discovery of self-assembling materials. In here, we demonstrate the discovery and optimization of aqueous, gel-phase nanostructures based on dynamically exchanging peptide sequences that self-select to maximize charge transfer of n-type semiconducting naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide bioconjugates with various π-electron-rich donors (dialkoxy/hydroxy/amino-naphthalene or pyrene derivatives). These gel-phase peptide libraries are characterized by spectroscopy (UV-vis and fluorescence), microscopy (TEM), HPLC, and oscillatory rheology and it is found that, of the various peptide sequences explored (tyrosine Y-NDI with tyrosine Y, phenylalanine F, leucine L, valine V, alanine A or glycine G-NH2), the optimum sequence is tyrosine-phenylalanine in each case; however, both its absolute and relative yield amplification is dictated by the properties of the donor component, indicating cooperativity of peptide sequence and donor/acceptor pairs in assembly. The methodology provides an in situ discovery tool for nanostructures that enable dynamic interfacing of supramolecular electronics with aqueous (biological) systems. PMID:26540455

  3. Quantum ferroelectricity in charge-transfer complex crystals.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Sachio; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kumai, Reiji; Minami, Nao; Kagawa, Fumitaka; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Quantum phase transition achieved by fine tuning the continuous phase transition down to zero kelvin is a challenge for solid state science. Critical phenomena distinct from the effects of thermal fluctuations can materialize when the electronic, structural or magnetic long-range order is perturbed by quantum fluctuations between degenerate ground states. Here we have developed chemically pure tetrahalo-p-benzoquinones of n iodine and 4-n bromine substituents (QBr4-nIn, n=0-4) to search for ferroelectric charge-transfer complexes with tetrathiafulvalene (TTF). Among them, TTF-QBr2I2 exhibits a ferroelectric neutral-ionic phase transition, which is continuously controlled over a wide temperature range from near-zero kelvin to room temperature under hydrostatic pressure. Quantum critical behaviour is accompanied by a much larger permittivity than those of other neutral-ionic transition compounds, such as well-known ferroelectric complex of TTF-QCl4 and quantum antiferroelectric of dimethyl-TTF-QBr4. By contrast, TTF-QBr3I complex, another member of this compound family, shows complete suppression of the ferroelectric spin-Peierls-type phase transition. PMID:26076656

  4. Quantum ferroelectricity in charge-transfer complex crystals

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Sachio; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kumai, Reiji; Minami, Nao; Kagawa, Fumitaka; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Quantum phase transition achieved by fine tuning the continuous phase transition down to zero kelvin is a challenge for solid state science. Critical phenomena distinct from the effects of thermal fluctuations can materialize when the electronic, structural or magnetic long-range order is perturbed by quantum fluctuations between degenerate ground states. Here we have developed chemically pure tetrahalo-p-benzoquinones of n iodine and 4–n bromine substituents (QBr4–nIn, n=0–4) to search for ferroelectric charge-transfer complexes with tetrathiafulvalene (TTF). Among them, TTF–QBr2I2 exhibits a ferroelectric neutral–ionic phase transition, which is continuously controlled over a wide temperature range from near-zero kelvin to room temperature under hydrostatic pressure. Quantum critical behaviour is accompanied by a much larger permittivity than those of other neutral–ionic transition compounds, such as well-known ferroelectric complex of TTF–QCl4 and quantum antiferroelectric of dimethyl–TTF–QBr4. By contrast, TTF–QBr3I complex, another member of this compound family, shows complete suppression of the ferroelectric spin-Peierls-type phase transition. PMID:26076656

  5. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds;

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G. K.; Deifel, N. P.; Cahill, C. L.

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3{sigma} ground state into the f{sub {delta}{phi}}, orbitals of uranyl. The Huang-Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck-Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  6. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guokui; Deifel, Nicholas P.; Cahill, Christopher L.; Zhurov, Vladimir V.; Pinkerton, A. Alan

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO₂)2+ in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3σ ground state into the fδ,Φ orbitals of uranyl. The Huang–Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck–Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  7. Charge transfer and in-cloud structure of large-charge-moment positive lightning strokes in a mesoscale convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gaopeng; Cummer, Steven A.; Li, Jingbo; Han, Feng; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Christian, Hugh J.

    2009-08-01

    Lightning observations in the very high frequency band and measurements of ultra low frequency magnetic fields are analyzed to investigate the charge transfer and in-cloud structure of eight positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) strokes in a mesoscale convective system. Although no high altitude images were recorded, these strokes contained large charge moment changes (1500-3200 C·km) capable of producing nighttime sprites. Even though the convective region of the storm was where the flashes originated and where the CG strokes could occur, the charge transferred to ground was mainly from the stratiform region. The post-stroke long continuing currents were connected to highly branched negative leader extension into the stratiform region. While the storm dissipated, the altitude of negative leader propagation in the stratiform area dropped gradually from 8 to 5 km, indicating that in some and perhaps all of these strokes, it was the upper positive charge in the stratiform region that was transferred.

  8. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai; Liang, Linagbo

    2016-05-10

    Here, the success of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures, made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides, and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that vdW heterostructues can exhibit ultra-fast charge transfer despite the weak binding of the heterostructure. Using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, we identify a strong dynamic coupling between the vdW layers associated with charge transfer. This dynamic coupling results in rapid nonlinear coherentmore » charge oscillations which constitute a purely electronic phenomenon and are shown to be a general feature of vdW heterostructures provided they have a critical minimum dipole coupling. Application to MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiment, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the

  9. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Chen; Damien, West; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Prof. Shengbai

    2016-01-01

    The success of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures, made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides, and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that vdW heterostructues can exhibit ultra-fast charge transfer despite the weak binding of the heterostructure. Using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, we identify a strong dynamic coupling between the vdW layers associated with charge transfer. This dynamic coupling results in rapid nonlinear coherent charge oscillations which constitute a purely electronic phenomenon and are shown to be a general feature of vdW heterostructures provided they have a critical minimum dipole coupling. Application to MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiment, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the interface. Application

  10. Bonding and charge transfer in nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes: insights from NEXAFS spectra.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, C D; Copping, Roy; Wang, Shuao; Janousch, Markus; Teat, Simon J; Tyliszcak, Tolek; Canning, Andrew; Shuh, David K; Prendergast, David

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the electronic structure of three newly synthesized nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes [(UO2)(H2bbp)Cl2], [(UO)2(Hbbp)(Py)Cl], and [(UO2)(bbp)(Py)2] using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy experiments and simulations. The complexes studied feature derivatives of the tunable tridentate N-donor ligand 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazyl)pyridine (bbp) and exhibit discrete chemical differences in uranyl coordination. The sensitivity of the N K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum to local bonding and charge transfer is exploited to systematically investigate the evolution of structural as well as electronic properties across the three complexes. A thorough interpretation of the measured experimental spectra is achieved via ab initio NEXAFS simulations based on the eXcited electron and Core-Hole (XCH) approach and enables the assignment of spectral features to electronic transitions on specific absorbing sites. We find that ligand-uranyl bonding leads to a signature blue shift in the N K-edge absorption onset, resulting from charge displacement toward the uranyl, while changes in the equatorial coordination shell of the uranyl lead to more subtle modulations in the spectral features. Theoretical simulations show that the flexible local chemistry at the nonbinding imidazole-N sites of the bbp ligand is also reflected in the NEXAFS spectra and highlights potential synthesis strategies to improve selectivity. In particular, we find that interactions of the bbp ligand with solvent molecules can lead to changes in ligand-uranyl binding geometry while also modulating the K-edge absorption. Our results suggest that NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with first-principles interpretation can offer insights into the coordination chemistry of analogous functionalized conjugated ligands. PMID:25330350

  11. Mechanism of Charge Transfer from Plasmonic Nanostructures to Chemically Attached Materials.

    PubMed

    Boerigter, Calvin; Aslam, Umar; Linic, Suljo

    2016-06-28

    Plasmonic metal nanoparticles can efficiently convert the energy of visible photons into the energy of hot charge carriers within the nanoparticles. These energetic charge carriers can transfer to molecules or semiconductors, chemically attached to the nanoparticles, where they can induce photochemical transformations. Classical models of photoinduced charge excitation and transfer in metals suggest that the majority of the energetic charge carriers rapidly decay within the metal nanostructure before they are transferred into the neighboring molecule or semiconductor, and therefore, the efficiency of charge transfer is low. Herein, we present experimental evidence that calls into question this conventional picture. We demonstrate a system where the presence of a molecule, adsorbed on the surface of a plasmonic nanoparticle, significantly changes the flow of charge within the excited plasmonic system. The nanoparticle-adsorbate system experiences high rates of direct, resonant flow of charge from the nanoparticle to the molecule, bypassing the conventional charge excitation and thermalization process taking place in the nanoparticle. This picture of charge transfer suggests that the yield of extracted hot electrons (or holes) from plasmonic nanoparticles can be significantly higher than the yields expected based on conventional models. We discuss a conceptual physical framework that allows us to explain our experimental observations. This analysis points us in a direction toward molecular control of the charge transfer process using interface and local field engineering strategies. PMID:27268233

  12. Wire transfer of charge packets using a CCD-BBD structure for charge-domain signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1991-02-01

    A structure for the virtual transfer of charge packets across metal wires is described theoretically and is experimentally verified. The structure is a hybrid of charge-coupled device (CCD) and bucket-brigade device (BBD) elements and permits the topological crossing of charge-domain signals in low power signal processing circuits. A test vehicle consisting of 8-, 32-, and 96-stage delay lines of various geometries implemented in a double-poly, double-metal foundry process is used to characterize the wire-transfer operation. Transfer efficiency ranging between 0.998 and 0.999 is obtained for surface n-channel devices with clock cycle times in the range from 40 ns to 0.3 ms. Transfer efficiency as high as 0.9999 is obtained for buried n-channel devices. Good agreement is found between experiment and simulation.

  13. The effects of charge transfer on the properties of liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Alexis J.; Rick, Steven W.

    2011-05-14

    A method for treating charge transfer interactions in classical potential models is developed and applied to water. In this method, a discrete amount of charge is transferred for each hydrogen bond formed. It is designed to be simple to implement, to be applicable to a variety of potential models, and to satisfy various physical requirements. The method does not transfer charge at large intramolecular distances, it does not result in a conductive liquid, and it can be easily parameterized to give the correct amount of charge transfer. Two charge transfer models are developed for a polarizable and a non-polarizable potential. The models reproduce many of the properties of liquid water, including the structure, the diffusion constant, and thermodynamic properties over a range of temperatures.

  14. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Liangbo; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-01-01

    The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the interface. Application to the MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiments, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs. PMID:27160484

  15. ARCHITECTURE OF A CHARGE-TRANSFER STATE REGULATING LIGHT HARVESTING IN A PLANT ANTENNA PROTEIN

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Graham; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-04-02

    Energy-dependent quenching of excess absorbed light energy (qE) is a vital mechanism for regulating photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. All of the physiological characteristics of qE have been positively correlated with charge-transfer between coupled chlorophyll and zeaxanthin molecules in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, we present evidence for charge-transfer quenching in all three of the individual minor antenna complexes of PSII (CP29, CP26, and CP24), and we conclude that charge-transfer quenching in CP29 involves a de-localized state of an excitonically coupled chlorophyll dimer. We propose that reversible conformational changes in CP29 can `tune? the electronic coupling between the chlorophylls in this dimer, thereby modulating the energy of the chlorophylls-zeaxanthin charge-transfer state and switching on and off the charge-transfer quenching during qE.

  16. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Liangbo; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-01-01

    The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the interface. Application to the MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiments, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs. PMID:27160484

  17. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Liangbo; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-05-01

    The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the interface. Application to the MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiments, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.

  18. Crystal growth of new charge-transfer salts based on π-conjugated donor molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morherr, Antonia; Witt, Sebastian; Chernenkaya, Alisa; Bäcker, Jan-Peter; Schönhense, Gerd; Bolte, Michael; Krellner, Cornelius

    2016-09-01

    New charge transfer crystals of π-conjugated, aromatic molecules (phenanthrene and picene) as donors were obtained by physical vapor transport. The melting behavior, optimization of crystal growth and the crystal structure are reported for charge transfer salts with (fluorinated) tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ-Fx, x=0, 2, 4), which was used as acceptor material. The crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Growth conditions for different vapor pressures in closed ampules were applied and the effect of these starting conditions for crystal size and quality is reported. The process of charge transfer was investigated by geometrical analysis of the crystal structure and by infrared spectroscopy on single crystals. With these three different acceptor strengths and the two sets of donor materials, it is possible to investigate the distribution of the charge transfer systematically. This helps to understand the charge transfer process in this class of materials with π-conjugated donor molecules.

  19. Understanding Charge Transfer Reactions at the Interface of Plasmas in Contact with Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, David

    2015-09-01

    Plasmas in and in contact with liquids offer a very rich physical and chemical environment where a multitude of species (electrons, ions, neutrals) and physical phenomena (light, electric fields) intersect. With emerging applications in medicine, environmental remediation, and materials synthesis, it has become paramount to understand the many processes occurring at the interface in order to design and optimize new technologies. Perhaps the most important plasma species is the electron, and it thus reasonable to assume it can play a critical role when plasmas are brought in contact with liquids as well. Over the past several years, our group has focused on deciphering the nature of electron transfer from a plasma to liquid and the subsequent chemistry the electrons induce. Our experimental configuration is the plasma equivalent of an electrochemical or electrolytic cell, where the cathode and anode are submerged in an electrolyte solution and current is carried by reduction reactions at the cathode and oxidation reactions at the anode. When the cathode is replaced by a plasma, the circuit is explicitly completed by the injection of plasma electrons into the solution where they stably solvate before inducing reduction reactions. Recently, we have demonstrated the first direct detection of these stably solvated electrons using a novel total internal reflection absorption spectroscopy experiment, resulting in the first measurement of the optical absorption spectrum for plasma-solvated electrons. Further, we have shown that the lifetime of these electrons can be significantly reduced if suitable solution- and plasma-phase scavengers are used to react quickly with these electrons. These results highlight the complexity of the plasma-liquid interface and how charge-transfer processes often compete with other chemistry that occurs at the plasma-liquid interface, such as the dissolution of plasma species into the liquid. This work was supported by the U.S. Army Research

  20. Charge Transfer Process During Collision of Riming Graupel Pellet with Small Ice Crystals within a Thundercloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Saswati; De, Utpal K.; Goswami, K.; Jones, Linwood

    1999-01-01

    A charge transfer process during the collision of a riming graupel pellet and an ice-crystal at low temperature is proposed. During riming, the surface structure of graupel deviates from perfect crystalline structure. A concept of quasi-solid layer (QSL) formation on the surface is introduced. This QSL contains defects formed during riming. In absence of impurities, positively charged X-defect abundance is considered in the outer layer. These defects are assumed to be the charge carriers during the charge transfer process. Some part of the QSL is stripped off by the colliding ice crystals, which thereby gain some positive charge, leaving the graupel pellet negatively charged. With the proposed model, fC to pC of charge transfer is observed per collision. A transition temperature between -10 C to -15 C is also noted beyond which the QSL concept does not hold. This transition temperature is dependent on the bulk liquid water content of the cloud.

  1. 46 CFR 35.35-35 - Duties of person in charge of transfer-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Duties of person in charge of transfer-TB/ALL. 35.35-35 Section 35.35-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Cargo Handling § 35.35-35 Duties of person in charge of transfer—TB/ALL. The person in charge of the transfer of liquid cargo in bulk, fuel oil in bulk,...

  2. Charge-transfer excitons at organic semiconductor surfaces and interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X-Y; Yang, Q; Muntwiler, M

    2009-11-17

    When a material of low dielectric constant is excited electronically from the absorption of a photon, the Coulomb attraction between the excited electron and the hole gives rise to an atomic H-like quasi-particle called an exciton. The bound electron-hole pair also forms across a material interface, such as the donor/acceptor interface in an organic heterojunction solar cell; the result is a charge-transfer (CT) exciton. On the basis of typical dielectric constants of organic semiconductors and the sizes of conjugated molecules, one can estimate that the binding energy of a CT exciton across a donor/acceptor interface is 1 order of magnitude greater than k(B)T at room temperature (k(B) is the Boltzmann constant and T is the temperature). How can the electron-hole pair escape this Coulomb trap in a successful photovoltaic device? To answer this question, we use a crystalline pentacene thin film as a model system and the ubiquitous image band on the surface as the electron acceptor. We observe, in time-resolved two-photon photoemission, a series of CT excitons with binding energies < or = 0.5 eV below the image band minimum. These CT excitons are essential solutions to the atomic H-like Schrodinger equation with cylindrical symmetry. They are characterized by principal and angular momentum quantum numbers. The binding energy of the lowest lying CT exciton with 1s character is more than 1 order of magnitude higher than k(B)T at room temperature. The CT(1s) exciton is essentially the so-called exciplex and has a very low probability of dissociation. We conclude that hot CT exciton states must be involved in charge separation in organic heterojunction solar cells because (1) in comparison to CT(1s), hot CT excitons are more weakly bound by the Coulomb potential and more easily dissociated, (2) density-of-states of these hot excitons increase with energy in the Coulomb potential, and (3) electronic coupling from a donor exciton to a hot CT exciton across the D

  3. Quantifying the intrinsic surface charge density and charge-transfer resistance of the graphene-solution interface through bias-free low-level charge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinglei; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2016-07-01

    Liquid-based bio-applications of graphene require a quantitative understanding of the graphene-liquid interface, with the surface charge density of adsorbed ions, the interfacial charge transfer resistance, and the interfacial charge noise being of particular importance. We quantified these properties through measurements of the zero-bias Faradaic charge-transfer between graphene electrodes and aqueous solutions of varying ionic strength using a reproducible, low-noise, minimally perturbative charge measurement technique. The measurements indicated that the adsorbed ions had a negative surface charge density of approximately -32.8 mC m-2 and that the specific charge transfer resistance was 6.5 ± 0.3 MΩ cm2. The normalized current noise power spectral density for all ionic concentrations tested collapsed onto a 1/fα characteristic with α = 1.1 ± 0.2. All the results are in excellent agreement with predictions of the theory for the graphene-solution interface. This minimally perturbative method for monitoring charge-transfer at the sub-pC scale exhibits low noise and ultra-low power consumption (˜fW), making it suitable for use in low-level bioelectronics in liquid environments.

  4. Laser driven hydrogen transfer reactions in atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Marsha I.

    2015-03-01

    Ozonolysis of alkenes, an important non-photolytic source of OH radicals in the troposphere, proceeds through energized Criegee intermediates that undergo unimolecular decay to produce OH radicals. In this work, infrared laser activation of cold methyl-substituted Criegee intermediates is utilized to drive hydrogen transfer from the methyl group to the terminal oxygen, followed by dissociation to OH radicals. State-selective excitation of the Criegee intermediates in the CH stretch overtone region combined with sensitive OH detection reveals the infrared spectra of CH3CHOO and (CH3)2 COO, effective barrier heights for the critical hydrogen transfer step, and rapid decay dynamics to OH products. Complementary theory provides insights on the infrared overtone spectra as well as vibrational excitations, structural changes, and energy required to move from the minimum energy configuration of the Criegee intermediates to the transition state for the hydrogen transfer reaction. Research supported by the National Science Foundation.

  5. Three-centered model of ultrafast photoinduced charge transfer: Continuum dielectric approach

    SciTech Connect

    Khohlova, Svetlana S.; Mikhailova, Valentina A.; Ivanov, Anatoly I.

    2006-03-21

    A theoretical description of photoinduced charge transfer involves explicit treating both the optical formation of the nuclear wave packet on the excited free energy surface and its ensuing dynamics. The reaction pathway constitutes two-stage charge transfer between three centers. Manifestations of fractional charge transfer at first stage are explored. An expression for time dependent rate constant of photoinduced charge transfer is found in the framework of the linear dielectric continuum model of the medium. The model involves both the intramolecular vibrational reorganization and the Coulombic interaction of the transferred charge with the medium polarization fluctuations and allows to express the rate in terms of intramolecular reorganization parameters and complex dielectric permittivity. The influence of the vibrational coherent motion in the locally excited state on the charge transfer dynamics has been explored. The dependence of the ultrafast photoinduced charge transfer dynamics on the excitation pulse carrier frequency (spectral effect) has been investigated. The spectral effect has been shown to depend on quantity of the fractional charge.

  6. Charge transfer in DNA: The role of thermal fluctuations and of symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orsogna, Maria-Rita Rosaria

    The DNA double helix is a linear one-dimensional molecule, and charge transfer occurs along the base-pairs stacked along its longitudinal axis. DNA, however, is highly subject to disruptions and modifications in its configurational stacking due, for instance, to thermal fluctuations. These departures from a rigid, crystal-like structure must be taken in account for a correct description of the charge transfer process, so that the usual solid-state tight-binding pictures of charge transfer along organic one-dimensional crystals, such as the Bechgaard salts, cannot be used. We propose a model Hamiltonian for charge transfer between the DNA base-pairs with temperature driven fluctuations in the base-pair positions acting as the rate limiting factor. The underlying idea is that charge tunneling between base-pairs that fluctuate significantly from their nominal configuration can occur only when an optimal base-pair relative configuration is reached. We focus on this aspect of the process by modeling two adjacent base pairs in terms of a classical damped oscillator subject to thermal fluctuations and charge transfer to the acceptor. The Fokker-Planck equation for the system yields an unusual two-stage process, with distinct initial and late-time charge transfer rates. This result is in agreement with experimental findings and is not contemplated by other charge transfer paradigms. Another known consequence of charge transfer between DNA base-pairs is the geometrical modification of the base-pairs after the addition or removal of the migrating charge. This structural deformation breaks the mirror symmetry of the original DNA base-pair, leading to two alternate, symmetry related, 'left' and 'right' ionic configurations. We study charge transfer between donor-acceptor molecules subject to a mirror symmetry constraint in the presence of a dissipative environment. The symmetry requirement leads to the breakdown of the standard single reaction-coordinate paradigm of charge

  7. Reversible Phase Transfer of Nanoparticles Based on Photoswitchable Host–Guest Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An azobenzene-containing surfactant was synthesized for the phase transfer of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD)-capped gold nanoparticles between water and toluene phases by host–guest chemistry. With the use of the photoisomerization of azobenzene, the reversible phase transfer of gold nanoparticles was realized by irradiation with UV and visible light. Furthermore, the phase transfer scheme was applied for the quenching of a reaction catalyzed by gold nanoparticles, as well as the recovery and recycling of the gold nanoparticles from aqueous solutions. This work will have significant impact on materials transfer and recovery in catalysis and biotechnological applications. PMID:24524295

  8. Probing the charge-transfer dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Matsutani, Eri; Maruyama, Atsushi; Majima, Tetsuro

    2011-10-01

    Photoinduced charge-transfer fluorescence quenching of a fluorescent dye produces the nonemissive charge-separated state, and subsequent charge recombination makes the reaction reversible. While the information available from the photoinduced charge-transfer process provides the basis for monitoring the microenvironment around the fluorescent dyes and such monitoring is particularly important in live-cell imaging and DNA diagnosis, the information obtainable from the charge recombination process is usually overlooked. When looking at fluorescence emitted from each single fluorescent dye, photoinduced charge-transfer, charge-migration, and charge recombination cause a "blinking" of the fluorescence, in which the charge-recombination rate or the lifetime of the charge-separated state (τ) is supposed to be reflected in the duration of the off time during the single-molecule-level fluorescence measurement. Herein, based on our recently developed method for the direct observation of charge migration in DNA, we utilized DNA as a platform for spectroscopic investigations of charge-recombination dynamics for several fluorescent dyes: TAMRA, ATTO 655, and Alexa 532, which are used in single-molecule fluorescence measurements. Charge recombination dynamics were observed by transient absorption measurements, demonstrating that these fluorescent dyes can be used to monitor the charge-separation and charge-recombination events. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of ATTO 655 modified DNA allowed the successful measurement of the charge-recombination dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level. Utilizing the injected charge just like a pulse of sound, such as a "ping" in active sonar systems, information about the DNA sequence surrounding the fluorescent dye was read out by measuring the time it takes for the charge to return. PMID:21875061

  9. Ligand dissociation mediated charge transfer observed at colloidal W18O49 nanoparticle interfaces.

    PubMed

    Grauer, David C; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2014-03-11

    Understanding charge transfer dynamics through the ligand shell of colloidal nanoparticles has been an important pursuit in solar energy conversion. While charge transport through ligand shells of nanoparticle films has been studied intensely in static dry and electrochemical systems, its influence on charge transfer kinetics in dispersed colloidal systems has received relatively less attention. This work reports the oxidation of amine passivated tungsten oxide nanoparticles by an organically soluble tris-(1,10-phenanthroline) iron(III) derivative. By following the rate of this oxidation optically via the production of the ferroin derivative under various reaction conditions and particle derivatizations, we are able to show that the fluxional ligand shells on dispersed, colloidal nanoparticles provide a separate and more facile pathway for charge transfer, in which the rate-limiting step for charge transfer is the ligand dissociation. Since such ligand shells are frequently required for nanoparticle stability, this observation has significant implications for colloidal nanoparticle photocatalysis. PMID:24564847

  10. The coordination and atom transfer chemistry of titanium porphyrin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, J.A.

    1993-11-05

    Preparation, characterization, and reactivity of ({eta}{sup 2}- alkyne)(meso-tetratolylpoprphrinato)titanium(II) complexes are described, along with inetermetal oxygen atom transfer reactions involving Ti(IV) and Ti(III) porphyrin complexes. The {eta}{sup 2}- alkyne complexes are prepared by reaction of (TTP)TiCl{sub 2} with LiAlH{sub 4} in presence of alkyne. Structure of (OEP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-Ph-C{triple_bond}C-Ph) (OEP=octaethylporphryin) was determined by XRD. The compounds undergo simple substitution to displace the alkyne and produce doubly substituted complexes. Structure of (TTP)Ti(4-picoline){sub 2} was also determined by XRD. Reaction of (TTP)Ti{double_bond}O with (OEP)Ti-Cl yields intermetal O/Cl exchange, which is a one-electron redox process mediated by O atom transfer. Also a zero-electron redox process mediated by atom transfer is observed when (TTP)TiCl{sub 2} is reacted with (OEP)Ti{double_bond}O.

  11. Electrospray Charging of Minerals: Surface Chemistry and Applications to High-Velocity Microparticle Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, T.; Call, S.; Austin, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Electrospray is a soft ionization technique commonly used to charge large biomolecules; it has, however, also been applied to inorganic compounds. We are extending this technique to mineral microparticles. Electrospray-charged mineral microparticles are interesting in the context of surface science because surface chemistry dictates where and how charge carriers can bond to mineral surfaces. In addition, using electrospray to charge mineral particles allows these particles to be electrostatically accelerated as projectiles in high- and hyper-velocity impacts. Since current techniques for producing high- and hyper-velocity microparticle impacts are largely limited to metal or metal-coated projectiles, using minerals as projectiles is a significant innovation. Electrospray involves three steps: creation of charged droplets containing solute/particles, evaporation and bifurcation of droplets, and desolvation of the solute/particles. An acidified solution is slowly pumped through a needle in a strong DC field, which causes the solution to break into tiny, charged droplets laden with protons. Solvent evaporates from the electrosprayed droplets as they move through the electric field toward a grounded plate, causing the charge on the droplet to increase relative to its mass. When the electrosprayed droplet’s charge becomes such that the droplet is no longer stable, it bifurcates, and each of the resulting droplets carries some of the original droplet’s charge. Evaporation and bifurcation continues until the solute particle is completely desolvated. The result is a protonated solute molecule or particle. We built an instrument that electrosprays particles into vacuum and measures them using an image charge detector. Mineral microparticles were prepared by grinding natural mineral samples to ~2 µm diameter. These microparticles are then added to a 4:1 methanol:water solution to create a 0.005% w/v suspension. The suspension is electrosprayed into vacuum, where the

  12. Failure of the charge-transfer hypothesis for superconductivity in YBa2Cu3Ox and in La2 - beta Sr beta CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackstead, Howard A.; Dow, John D.

    1997-05-01

    By extracting the layer-charges in YBa2Cu3Ox as functions of dopant oxygen content x from neutron diffraction data (using the bond-valence-sum method), we show that the charge-transfer hypothesis of high-temperature cuprate-plane superconductivity fails to describe the data. A similar failure occurs for La2-βSrβCuO4 as a function of Sr dopant concentration, and was implicitly predicted (before the charge-transfer hypothesis was enunciated) by self-consistent local-density-approximation calculations of R. V. Kasowski, M.-H. Tsai, J. D. Dow, and M. T. Czyzyk [Physica C 162, 1349 (1989)]. Both failures can be traced to difficulties the hypothesis has with (i) the rules of chemistry which require electronegative dopants such as oxygen to attract electrons, not holes, and (ii) the law of conservation of (neutral) charge in each unit cell.

  13. Transition-density-fragment interaction combined with transfer integral approach for excitation-energy transfer via charge-transfer states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J.

    2012-07-01

    A transition-density-fragment interaction (TDFI) combined with a transfer integral (TI) method is proposed. The TDFI method was previously developed for describing electronic Coulomb interaction, which was applied to excitation-energy transfer (EET) [K. J. Fujimoto and S. Hayashi, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 14152 (2009)] and exciton-coupled circular dichroism spectra [K. J. Fujimoto, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 124101 (2010)]. In the present study, the TDFI method is extended to the exchange interaction, and hence it is combined with the TI method for applying to the EET via charge-transfer (CT) states. In this scheme, the overlap correction is also taken into account. To check the TDFI-TI accuracy, several test calculations are performed to an ethylene dimer. As a result, the TDFI-TI method gives a much improved description of the electronic coupling, compared with the previous TDFI method. Based on the successful description of the electronic coupling, the decomposition analysis is also performed with the TDFI-TI method. The present analysis clearly shows a large contribution from the Coulomb interaction in most of the cases, and a significant influence of the CT states at the small separation. In addition, the exchange interaction is found to be small in this system. The present approach is useful for analyzing and understanding the mechanism of EET.

  14. Molecular orbital (SCF-X-α-SW) theory of Fe2+-Mn3+, Fe3+-Mn2+, and Fe3+-Mn3+ charge transfer and magnetic exchange in oxides and silicates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Metal-metal charge-transfer and magnetic exchange interactions have important effects on the optical spectra, crystal chemistry, and physics of minerals. Previous molecular orbital calculations have provided insight on the nature of Fe2+-Fe3+ and Fe2+-Ti4+ charge-transfer transitions in oxides and silicates. In this work, spin-unrestricted molecular orbital calculations on (FeMnO10) clusters are used to study the nature of magnetic exchange and electron delocalization (charge transfer) associated with Fe3+-Mn2+, Fe3+-Mn3+, and Fe2+-Mn3+ interactions in oxides and silicates. 

  15. Exceptional photosensitivity of a polyoxometalate-based charge-transfer hybrid material.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jian-Zhen; Wu, Chen; Wu, Xiao-Yuan; Deng, Shui-Quan; Lu, Can-Zhong

    2016-05-31

    An unusual room-temperature light sensitivity was realized in a polyoxometalate-based hybrid material due to cooperative multicomponent molecular charge-transfer interactions taking place in this material, mainly among POMs, NDIs, and other molecules. The functional π-acidic NDI linkers and POM clusters in the discussed hybrid material were individually designed as photosensors and electron reservoirs. To propose a photo-induced charge-transfer mechanism, EPR, XPS, UV-Vis and computational studies were carried out, and indicated the presence of active charge-transfer interactions among several of the components. PMID:27192943

  16. Charge-transfer-induced evaporation in collisions of Li2+31 clusters with Cs atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, C.; Cahuzac, Ph.; Concina, B.; Leygnier, J.; Ruiz, L. F.; Zarour, B.; Hervieux, P. A.; Hanssen, J.; Politis, M. F.; Martín, F.

    2003-12-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of dissociative charge transfer in collisions of slow Li2+31 clusters with Cs atoms. We provide a direct quantitative comparison between theory and experiment and show that good agreement is only found when the experimental time-of-flight and initial cluster temperature are taken into account in the theoretical modeling. This model explains evaporation as resulting from a collisional energy deposit due to cluster electronic excitation during charge transfer. We discuss in detail the basic mechanisms that are responsible for the charge-transfer reaction and different approximations to evaluate the energy deposit.

  17. An electron energy-loss study of picene and chrysene based charge transfer salts

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Eric; Mahns, Benjamin; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-05-14

    The electronic excitation spectra of charge transfer compounds built from the hydrocarbons picene and chrysene, and the strong electron acceptors F{sub 4}TCNQ (2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethan) have been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The corresponding charge transfer compounds have been prepared by co-evaporation of the pristine constituents. We demonstrate that all investigated combinations support charge transfer, which results in new electronic excitation features at low energy. This might represent a way to synthesize low band gap organic semiconductors.

  18. Fostering Analogical Transfer: The Multiple Components Approach to Algebra Word Problem Solving in a Chemistry Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing

    2012-01-01

    Holyoak and Koh (1987) and Holyoak (1984) propose four critical tasks for analogical transfer to occur in problem solving. A study was conducted to test this hypothesis by comparing a multiple components (MC) approach against worked examples (WE) in helping students to solve algebra word problems in chemistry classes. The MC approach incorporated…

  19. Intrinsic charge trapping in organic and polymeric semiconductors: a physical chemistry perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kaake, Loren; Barbara, Paul F.; Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2010-01-12

    We aim to understand the origins of intrinsic charge carrier traps in organic and polymeric semiconductor materials from a physical chemistry perspective. In crystalline organic semiconductors, we point out some of the inadequacies in the description of intrinsic charge traps using language and concepts developed for inorganic semiconductors. In π-conjugated polymeric semiconductors, we suggest the presence of a two-tier electronic energy landscape, a bimodal majority landscape due to two dominant structural motifs and a minority electronic energy landscape from intrinsic charged defects. The bimodal majority electronic energy landscape results from a combination of amorphous domains and microcrystalline or liquid-crystalline domains. The minority tier of the electronic density of states is comprised of deep Coulomb traps embedded in the majority electronic energy landscape. This minority electronic energy landscape may dominate transport properties at low charge carrier densities, such as those expected for organic photovoltaic devices, while the bimodal majority electronic energy landscape becomes significant at high carrier densities, that is, in organic field effect transistors.

  20. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  1. Topological Effects of Charge Transfer in Telomere G-Quadruplex Mechanism on Telomerase Activation and Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Liang, Shi-Dong

    2013-02-01

    We explore the charge transfer in the telomere G-Quadruplex (TG4) DNA theoretically by the nonequilibrium Green's function method, and reveal the topological effect of the charge transport in TG4 DNA. The consecutive TG4 (CTG4) is semiconducting with 0.2 0.3 eV energy gap. Charges transfer favorably in the CTG4, but are trapped in the nonconsecutive TG4 (NCTG4). The global conductance is inversely proportional to the local conductance for NCTG4. The topological structure transition from NCTG4 to CTG4 induces abruptly 3nA charge current, which provide a microscopic clue to understand the telomerase activated or inhibited by TG4. Our findings reveal the fundamental property of charge transfer in TG4 and its relationship with the topological structure of TG4.

  2. Integer versus Fractional Charge Transfer at Metal(/Insulator)/Organic Interfaces: Cu(/NaCl)/TCNE

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Semilocal and hybrid density functional theory was used to study the charge transfer and the energy-level alignment at a representative interface between an extended metal substrate and an organic adsorbate layer. Upon suppressing electronic coupling between the adsorbate and the substrate by inserting thin, insulating layers of NaCl, the hybrid functional localizes charge. The laterally inhomogeneous charge distribution resulting from this spontaneous breaking of translational symmetry is reflected in observables such as the molecular geometry, the valence and core density of states, and the evolution of the work function with molecular coverage, which we discuss for different growth modes. We found that the amount of charge transfer is determined, to a significant extent, by the ratio of the lateral spacing of the molecules and their distance to the metal. Therefore, charge transfer does not only depend on the electronic structure of the individual components but, just as importantly, on the interface geometry. PMID:25905769

  3. Resonant charge transfer of hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a metallic sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, J. A.; Softley, T. P.

    2016-06-01

    A wavepacket propagation study is reported for the charge transfer of low principal quantum number (n = 2) hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at an isolated metallic sphere. Such a sphere acts as a model for a nanoparticle. The three-dimensional confinement of the sphere yields discrete surface-localized ‘well-image’ states, the energies of which vary with sphere radius. When the Rydberg atom energy is degenerate with one of the quantized nanoparticle states, charge transfer is enhanced, whereas for off-resonant cases little to no charge transfer is observed. Greater variation in charge-transfer probability is seen between the resonant and off-resonant examples in this system than for any other Rydberg-surface system theoretically investigated thus far. The results presented here indicate that it may be possible to use Rydberg-surface ionization as a probe of the surface electronic structure of a nanoparticle, and nanostructures in general.

  4. The mechanisms of delayed fluorescence in charge-transfer crystal of tetracyanobenzene-hexamethylbenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozankiewicz, B.; Prochorow, J.

    1989-08-01

    Fluorescence, phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence emission characteristics of tetracyanobenzene-hexamethylbenzene (TCNB-HMB) charge-transfer crystal have been studied in the 1.7-340 K temperature range. Delayed fluorescence, originating from heterogeneous triplet-triplet annihilation indicates the presence of mobile charge-transfer triplet excitons at a temperature as low as 1.7 K. However, the behaviour of triplet excitons in TCNB-HMB crystal is strongly controlled by a very efficient trapping process in the whole temperature range investigated. It was found that thermally activated delayed fluorescence, which is a dominating emission of the crystal at elevated temperatures (>60 K), has a different origin (a different initial state) at different temperatures. These observations were analysed and interpreted in terms of a photokinetic model, which is considered to be typical for charge-transfer crystals with high charge-transfer character of triplet excitons.

  5. The role of charge-transfer states in energy transfer and dissipation within natural and artificial bacteriochlorophyll-proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wahadoszamen, Md.; Margalit, Iris; Ara, Anjue Mane; van Grondelle, Rienk; Noy, Dror

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how specific protein environments affect the mechanisms of non-radiative energy dissipation within densely assembled chlorophylls in photosynthetic protein complexes is of great interest to the construction of bioinspired solar energy conversion devices. Mixing of charge-transfer and excitonic states in excitonically interacting chlorophylls was implicated in shortening excited states lifetimes but its relevance to active control of energy dissipation in natural systems is under considerable debate. Here we show that the degree of fluorescence quenching in two similar pairs of excitonically interacting bacteriochlorophyll derivatives is directly associated with increasing charge transfer character in the excited state, and that the protein environment may control non-radiative dissipation by affecting the mixing of charge transfer and excitonic states. The capability of local protein environments to determine the fate of excited states, and thereby to confer different functionalities to excitonically coupled dimers substantiates the dimer as the basic functional element of photosynthetic enzymes. PMID:25342121

  6. Laser-plasma ion beams-experiments towards charge transfer x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Fill, E.E. ); Bruch, R. ); Schneider, D. )

    1993-06-05

    Laser plasmas produced at intensities of up to 10[sup 14] W/cm[sup 2] expand towards a secondary target a few millimeters away. The intense x-ray emission during the interaction plasma-target was recorded spectrally, spatially and time-resolved. A number of processes, like recombination and charge transfer may account for this strong radiation. The implications of these experiments to the design of a charge transfer x-ray laser are discussed.

  7. Picosecond spectroscopy of charge-transfer processes. Photochemistry of anthracene-tetranitromethane EDA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnovi, J. M.; Huffman, J. C.; Kochi, J. K.; Hilinski, E. F.; Rentzepis, P. M.

    1984-04-01

    The temporal sequence of events that follow 532 nm excitation of electron donor-acceptor, EDA, complexes of several substituted anthracenes with tetranitromethane is monitored by means of picosecond spectroscopy. Excitation of the charge-transfer band of these EDA complexes produces high yields of 1 : 1 adducts. Absorption spectra and kinetics of the transient species involved in these photochemical reactions provide the basis for elucidation of the reaction mechanism following charge-transfer excitation to the ion pairs.

  8. Quantum Plasmonics: Optical Monitoring of DNA-Mediated Charge Transfer in Plasmon Rulers.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Sarah; Reinhard, Björn M

    2016-03-01

    Plasmon coupling between DNA-tethered gold nanoparticles is investigated by correlated single-particle spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy for interparticle separations between 0.5 and 41 nm. Spectral characterization reveals a weakening of the plasmon coupling due to DNA-mediated charge transfer for separations up to 2.8 nm. Electromagnetic simulations indicate a coherent charge transfer across the DNA. PMID:26789736

  9. Charge transfer along DNA molecule within Peyrard-Bishop-Holstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edirisinghe, Neranjan; Apalkov, Vadym

    2010-03-01

    Charge transport through DNA molecule is important in many areas ranging from DNA damage repair to molecular nanowires. It is now widely accepted that a phonon mediated hopping of a charge carrier plays a major role in charge transport through DNA. In the present study we investigate system dynamics within Peyrard-Bishop-Holstein model for the charge transfer between donor and acceptor sites. We found that an escape time of a charge, trapped at the donor state of the DNA strand, is very sensitive to the initial value of H-bond stretching. This suggests importance of ensemble averaging. Moreover sharp phase transitions were observed for escape time in parameter space of transfer integrals and phonon-charge coupling constant.

  10. Spectroscopic and computational investigations on the origin of charge transfer between included neutral guest molecules and a functionalized anionic layered host.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dipak; Tummanapelli, Anil Kumar

    2016-08-10

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) or anionic clays are an important class of ion-exchange materials, well known for drug and gene delivery and several other applications including catalysis, bioactive nanocomposite, electroactive and photoactive materials. Their structure is based on positively charged brucite-like inorganic sheets with the interlamellar space being occupied by charge-compensating exchangeable anions. In spite of having a vast scope many of the applications of LDHs are restricted as their host-guest chemistry is limited to ion-exchange reactions. Recently we have shown for the first time that charge-transfer interactions can be used as a driving force for the insertion of neutral guest molecules (ortho- and para-chloranil) within the galleries of an Mg-Al LDH by forming a charge-transfer complex with aniline pre-intercalated as p-aminobenzoate anion. Here, we have performed quantum chemical calculations in combination with molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the nature of interactions, arrangement and the evaluation of electronic and Raman spectral signatures of the chloranil charge-transfer complex included within the galleries of the Mg-Al LDH. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been used to understand the nature and origin of the unidirectional charge-transfer that lead to the unusual insertion of chloranil in the galleries of the Mg-Al LDH. The NBO analysis reveals that a considerable amount of electronic charge redistribution occurs from the p-aminobenzoate to the chloranil during latter's insertion within the LDH galleries with a very negligible amount of back donation. This work is expected to pave the way for understanding the host-guest chemistry and targeted and controlled delivery of poorly soluble drugs. PMID:27461409

  11. Why are the Interaction Energies of Charge-Transfer Complexes Challenging for DFT?

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Piemontesi, Cyril; Delachat, Aurore; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2012-05-01

    The description of ground state charge-transfer complexes is highly challenging. Illustrative examples include large overestimations of charge-transfer by local and semilocal density functional approximations as well as inaccurate binding energies. It is demonstrated here that standard density functionals fail to accurately describe interaction energies of charge-transfer complexes not only because of the missing long-range exchange as generally assumed but also as a result of the neglect of weak interactions. Thus, accounting for the missing van der Waals interactions is of key importance. These assertions, based on the evaluation of the extent of stabilization due to dispersion using both DFT coupled with our recent density-dependent dispersion correction (dDsC) and high-level ab initio computations, reflect the imperfect error-cancellation between the overestimation of charge-transfer and the missing long-range interactions. An in-depth energy decomposition analysis of an illustrative series of four small ambidentate molecules (HCN, HNC, HF, and ClF) bound together with NF3 provides the main conclusions, which are validated on a prototypical organic charge-transfer complex (i.e., tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane, TTF-TCNQ). We establish that the interaction energies for charge-transfer complexes can only be properly described when using well-balanced functionals such as PBE0-dDsC, M06-2X, and LC-BOP-LRD. PMID:26593656

  12. Charge transfer and association of protons colliding with potassium from very low to intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. H.; Qu, Y. Z.; Wang, J. G.; Li, Y.; Buenker, R. J.

    2010-01-15

    The nonradiative charge-transfer process for H{sup +}+K(4s) collision is investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling method for collision energies from 1 eV to 10 keV. The radiative-decay and radiative charge transfer cross sections are calculated using the optical potential approach and the fully quantal method, respectively, for the energy range of 10{sup -5}-10 eV. The radiative-association cross sections are obtained by subtracting the radiative charge-transfer part from total radiative-decay cross sections. The relevant molecular data are calculated from the multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction approach. The nonradiative charge transfer is the dominant mechanism at energies above 2 eV, whereas the radiative charge transfer becomes primary in the low-energy region of E<1.5 eV. The present radiative-decay cross sections disagree with the calculations of Watanabe et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66, 044701 (2002)]. The total charge-transfer rate coefficient is obtained in the temperature range of 1-20000 K.

  13. Estimitation of Charge-Transfer Resistivity of Pt Cathode on YSZ Electrolyte Using Patterned Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Virkar, Anil V.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    2005-04-01

    YSZ Electrolyte discs with patterned LSM electrodes having different three phase boundary (TPB) lengths but the same electrode-electrolyte interface area, were prepared using photomicrolithography. Impedance spectra for half-cells were obtained under oxygen partial pressures, ranging from 10-3 to 1 atm and temperatures from 650 to 800oC. Area specific charge transfer resistance was found to vary inversely. While the charge transfer resistance is inversely proportional to consistent with the charge transfer reaction occurring mainly at the TPB, at 800oC some transport through LSM also appears to occur. The estimated value of charge transfer resistivity corresponding to the charge transfer reaction occurring at TPB, in air at 800oC is in good agreement with that estimated from actual fuel cell tests using quantitative stereological analysis of LSM-YSZ composite electrodes and were found to decrease with increasing and with increasing temperature. The activation energy for the overall charge transfer reaction was estimated to be ~1.5 eV.

  14. Potential curves for Na2/+/ and resonance charge transfer cross sections.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottcher, C.; Allison, A. C.; Dalgarno, A.

    1971-01-01

    A mode potential method, applied earlier to the positively charged diatomic lithium molecule Li2(+), is used to calculate the six lowest potential energy curves of Na2(+). Charge transfer cross sections are calculated for Li(+) on Li and for Na(+) on Na and found to be in reasonable agreement with experiment.

  15. Time delay and integration detectors using charge transfer devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccann, D. H.; White, M. H.; Turly, A. P.

    1981-01-01

    An imaging system comprises a multi-channel matrix array of CCD devices wherein a number of sensor cells (pixels) in each channel are subdivided and operated in discrete intercoupled groups of subarrays with a readout CCD shift register terminating each end of the channels. Clock voltages, applied to the subarrays, selectively cause charge signal flow in each subarray in either direction independent of the other subarrays. By selective application of four phase clock voltages, either one, two or all three of the sections subarray sections cause charge signal flow in one direction, while the remainder cause charge signal flow in the opposite direction. This creates a form of selective electronic exposure control which provides an effective variable time delay and integration of three, six or nine sensor cells or integration stages. The device is constructed on a semiconductor sustrate with a buried channel and is adapted for front surface imaging through transparent doped tin oxide gates.

  16. Conformationally Gated Charge Transfer in DNA Three-Way Junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqi; Young, Ryan M; Thazhathveetil, Arun K; Singh, Arunoday P N; Liu, Chaoren; Berlin, Yuri A; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Lewis, Frederick D; Ratner, Mark A; Renaud, Nicolas; Siriwong, Khatcharin; Voityuk, Alexander A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Beratan, David N

    2015-07-01

    Molecular structures that direct charge transport in two or three dimensions possess some of the essential functionality of electrical switches and gates. We use theory, modeling, and simulation to explore the conformational dynamics of DNA three-way junctions (TWJs) that may control the flow of charge through these structures. Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum calculations indicate that DNA TWJs undergo dynamic interconversion among "well stacked" conformations on the time scale of nanoseconds, a feature that makes the junctions very different from linear DNA duplexes. The studies further indicate that this conformational gating would control charge flow through these TWJs, distinguishing them from conventional (larger size scale) gated devices. Simulations also find that structures with polyethylene glycol linking groups ("extenders") lock conformations that favor CT for 25 ns or more. The simulations explain the kinetics observed experimentally in TWJs and rationalize their transport properties compared with double-stranded DNA. PMID:26266714

  17. Probing charge transfer and hot carrier dynamics in organic solar cells with terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Paul D.; Lane, Paul A.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Esenturk, Okan; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS) was used to explore charge generation, transfer, and the role of hot carriers in organic solar cell materials. Two model molecular photovoltaic systems were investigated: with zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) or alpha-sexathiophene (α-6T) as the electron donors and buckminsterfullerene (C60) as the electron acceptor. TRTS provides charge carrier conductivity dynamics comprised of changes in both population and mobility. By using time-resolved optical spectroscopy in conjunction with TRTS, these two contributions can be disentangled. The sub-picosecond photo-induced conductivity decay dynamics of C60 were revealed to be caused by auto-ionization: the intrinsic process by which charge is generated in molecular solids. In donor-acceptor blends, the long-lived photo-induced conductivity is used for weight fraction optimization of the constituents. In nanoscale multilayer films, the photo-induced conductivity identifies optimal layer thicknesses. In films of ZnPc/C60, electron transfer from ZnPc yields hot charges that localize and become less mobile as they thermalize. Excitation of high-lying Franck Condon states in C60 followed by hole-transfer to ZnPc similarly produces hot charge carriers that self-localize; charge transfer clearly precedes carrier cooling. This picture is contrasted to charge transfer in α-6T/C60, where hole transfer takes place from a thermalized state and produces equilibrium carriers that do not show characteristic signs of cooling and self-localization. These results illustrate the value of terahertz spectroscopic methods for probing charge transfer reactions.

  18. Incorporation of charge transfer into the explicit polarization fragment method by grand canonical density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Isegawa, Miho; Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular fragmentation algorithms provide a powerful approach to extending electronic structure methods to very large systems. Here we present a method for including charge transfer between molecular fragments in the explicit polarization (X-Pol) fragment method for calculating potential energy surfaces. In the conventional X-Pol method, the total charge of each fragment is preserved, and charge transfer between fragments is not allowed. The description of charge transfer is made possible by treating each fragment as an open system with respect to the number of electrons. To achieve this, we applied Mermin's finite temperature method to the X-Pol wave function. In the application of this method to X-Pol, the fragments are open systems that partially equilibrate their number of electrons through a quasithermodynamics electron reservoir. The number of electrons in a given fragment can take a fractional value, and the electrons of each fragment obey the Fermi–Dirac distribution. The equilibrium state for the electrons is determined by electronegativity equalization with conservation of the total number of electrons. The amount of charge transfer is controlled by re-interpreting the temperature parameter in the Fermi–Dirac distribution function as a coupling strength parameter. We determined this coupling parameter so as to reproduce the charge transfer energy obtained by block localized energy decomposition analysis. We apply the new method to ten systems, and we show that it can yield reasonable approximations to potential energy profiles, to charge transfer stabilization energies, and to the direction and amount of charge transferred. PMID:21895159

  19. 33 CFR 127.301 - Persons in charge of shoreside transfer operations: Qualifications and certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LNG may not use the services of any person, as a person in charge of shoreside transfer operations, unless that person— (1) Has at least 48 hours of LNG transfer experience; (2) Knows the hazards of LNG... at the waterfront facility handling LNG....

  20. 33 CFR 127.301 - Persons in charge of shoreside transfer operations: Qualifications and certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LNG may not use the services of any person, as a person in charge of shoreside transfer operations, unless that person— (1) Has at least 48 hours of LNG transfer experience; (2) Knows the hazards of LNG... at the waterfront facility handling LNG....

  1. Using metal complex-labeled peptides for charge transfer-based biosensing with semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Pons, Thomas; Trammell, Scott A.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2009-02-01

    Luminescent colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have unique optical and photonic properties and are highly sensitive to charge transfer in their surrounding environment. In this study we used synthetic peptides as physical bridges between CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and some of the most common redox-active metal complexes to understand the charge transfer interactions between the metal complexes and QDs. We found that QD emission underwent quenching that was highly dependent on the choice of metal complex used. We also found that quenching traces the valence or number of metal complexes brought into close proximity of the nanocrystal surface. Monitoring of the QD absorption bleaching in the presence of the metal complex provided insight into the charge transfer mechanism. The data suggest that two distinct charge transfer mechanisms can take place. One directly to the QD core states for neutral capping ligands and a second to surface states for negatively charged capping ligands. A basic understanding of the proximity driven charge-transfer and quenching interactions allowed us to construct proteolytic enzyme sensing assemblies with the QD-peptide-metal complex conjugates.

  2. Giant quantum Hall plateaus generated by charge transfer in epitaxial graphene.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Webber, J A; Huang, J; Maude, D K; Janssen, T J B M; Tzalenchuk, A; Antonov, V; Yager, T; Lara-Avila, S; Kubatkin, S; Yakimova, R; Nicholas, R J

    2016-01-01

    Epitaxial graphene has proven itself to be the best candidate for quantum electrical resistance standards due to its wide quantum Hall plateaus with exceptionally high breakdown currents. However one key underlying mechanism, a magnetic field dependent charge transfer process, is yet to be fully understood. Here we report measurements of the quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene showing the widest quantum Hall plateau observed to date extending over 50 T, attributed to an almost linear increase in carrier density with magnetic field. This behaviour is strong evidence for field dependent charge transfer from charge reservoirs with exceptionally high densities of states in close proximity to the graphene. Using a realistic framework of broadened Landau levels we model the densities of donor states and predict the field dependence of charge transfer in excellent agreement with experimental results, thus providing a guide towards engineering epitaxial graphene for applications such as quantum metrology. PMID:27456765

  3. Giant quantum Hall plateaus generated by charge transfer in epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander-Webber, J. A.; Huang, J.; Maude, D. K.; Janssen, T. J. B. M.; Tzalenchuk, A.; Antonov, V.; Yager, T.; Lara-Avila, S.; Kubatkin, S.; Yakimova, R.; Nicholas, R. J.

    2016-07-01

    Epitaxial graphene has proven itself to be the best candidate for quantum electrical resistance standards due to its wide quantum Hall plateaus with exceptionally high breakdown currents. However one key underlying mechanism, a magnetic field dependent charge transfer process, is yet to be fully understood. Here we report measurements of the quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene showing the widest quantum Hall plateau observed to date extending over 50 T, attributed to an almost linear increase in carrier density with magnetic field. This behaviour is strong evidence for field dependent charge transfer from charge reservoirs with exceptionally high densities of states in close proximity to the graphene. Using a realistic framework of broadened Landau levels we model the densities of donor states and predict the field dependence of charge transfer in excellent agreement with experimental results, thus providing a guide towards engineering epitaxial graphene for applications such as quantum metrology.

  4. Controllable Quantum State Transfer Between a Josephson Charge Qubit and an Electronic Spin Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Run-Ying; Wang, Hong-Ling; Feng, Zhi-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a theoretical scheme to implement controllable quantum state transfer between a superconducting charge qubit and an electronic spin ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers. By an electro-mechanical resonator acting as a quantum data bus, an effective interaction between the charge qubit and the spin ensemble can be achieved in the dispersive regime, by which state transfers are switchable due to the adjustable electrical coupling. With the accessible experimental parameters, we further numerically analyze the feasibility and robustness. The present scheme could provide a potential approach for transferring quantum states controllably with the hybrid system.

  5. Photophysics of charge transfer in a polyfluorene/violanthrone blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanillas-Gonzalez, J.; Virgili, T.; Lanzani, G.; Yeates, S.; Ariu, M.; Nelson, J.; Bradley, D. D. C.

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the photophysical and photovoltaic properties of blends of violanthrone in poly[9, 9-bis (2-ethylhexyl)-fluorene-2, 7-diyl ] (PF2/6) . Photoluminescence quenching and photocurrent measurements show moderate efficiencies for charge generation, characteristic of such polymer/dye blends. Pump-probe measurements on blend films suggest that while ˜47% of the total exciton population dissociates within 4ps of photoexcitation, only ˜32% subsequently results in the formation of dye anions. We attribute the discrepancy to the likely formation of complex species with long lifetimes, such as stabilized interface charge pairs or exciplexes. This conclusion is supported by the appearance of a long lifetime component of 2.4ns in the dynamics of the photoinduced absorption signal associated to polarons in photoinduced absorption bands centered at 560nm .

  6. Wire transfer of charge packets for on-chip CCD signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    A structure for the virtual transfer of charge packets across metal wires is described theoretically and is experimentally verified. The structure is a hybrid of charge-coupled device (CCD) and bucket-brigade device (BBD) elements and permits the topological crossing of charge-domain signals in low power signal processing circuits. A test vehicle consisting of 8-, 32- and 96-stage delay lines of various geometries implemented in a double-poly, double-metal foundry process was used to characterize the wire-transfer operation. Transfer efficiency ranging between 0.998 and 0.999 was obtained for surface n-channel devices with clock cycle times in the range from 40 nsec to 0.3 msec. Transfer efficiency as high as 0.9999 was obtained for buried n-channel devices. Good agreement is found between experiment and simulation.

  7. The effects of charge transfer on the aqueous solvation of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W.

    2012-07-28

    Ab initio-based charge partitioning of ionic systems results in ions with non-integer charges. This charge-transfer (CT) effect alters both short- and long-range interactions. Until recently, the effects of CT have been mostly neglected in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The method presented in this paper for including charge transfer between ions and water is consistent with ab initio charge partitioning and does not add significant time to the simulation. The ions of sodium, potassium, and chloride are parameterized to reproduce dimer properties and aqueous structures. The average charges of the ions from MD simulations (0.900, 0.919, and -0.775 for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -}, respectively) are consistent with quantum calculations. The hydration free energies calculated for these ions are in agreement with experimental estimates, which shows that the interactions are described accurately. The ions also have diffusion constants in good agreement with experiment. Inclusion of CT results in interesting properties for the waters in the first solvation shell of the ions. For all ions studied, the first shell waters acquire a partial negative charge, due to the difference between water-water and water-ion charge-transfer amounts. CT also reduces asymmetry in the solvation shell of the chloride anion, which could have important consequences for the behavior of chloride near the air-water interface.

  8. Kinetic-energy transfer in highly-charged-ion collisions with carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, R. E.; Arista, N. R.

    2015-11-01

    We present an accurate theoretical model for the charge dependence of kinetic energy transferred in collisions between slow highly charged ions (HCIs) and the atoms in a carbon solid. The model is in excellent agreement with experimental kinetic-energy-loss data for carbon nanomembrane and thin carbon foil targets. This study fills a notable gap in the literature of charged-particle energy loss in the regime of low incident velocity (vp≲2.188 ×106 m/s) where charge states greatly exceed the equilibrium values.

  9. The lowest-energy charge-transfer state and its role in charge separation in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Nan, Guangjun; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang

    2016-06-29

    Energy independent, yet higher than 90% internal quantum efficiency (IQE), has been observed in many organic photovoltaics (OPVs). However, its physical origin remains largely unknown and controversial. The hypothesis that the lowest charge-transfer (CT) state may be weakly bound at the interface has been proposed to rationalize the experimental observations. In this paper, we study the nature of the lowest-energy CT (CT1) state, and show conclusively that the CT1 state is localized in typical OPVs. The electronic couplings in the donor and acceptor are found to determine the localization of the CT1 state. We examine the geminate recombination of the CT1 state and estimate its lifetime from first principles. We identify the vibrational modes that contribute to the geminate recombination. Using material parameters determined from first principles and experiments, we carry out kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to examine the charge separation of the localized CT1 state. We find that the localized CT1 state can indeed yield efficient charge separation with IQE higher than 90%. Dynamic disorder and configuration entropy can provide the energetic and entropy driving force for charge separation. Charge separation efficiency depends more sensitively on the dimension and crystallinity of the acceptor parallel to the interface than that normal to the interface. Reorganization energy is found to be the most important material parameter for charge separation, and lowering the reorganization energy of the donor should be pursued in the materials design. PMID:27306609

  10. Impact of plasma induced liquid chemistry and charge on bacteria loaded aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, David; McDowell, David; Mariotti, Davide; Mahony, Charles; Diver, Declan; Potts, Hugh; Bennet, Euan; Maguire, Paul

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of living organisms, such as bacteria, into atmospheric pressure microplasmas offers a unique opportunity to study the local chemical and electrical effects on cell structure and viability. Individual bacteria, each encapsulated in an aerosol droplet, were successfully transmitted through a non-thermal equilibrium RF coaxial plasma, using a custom-design concentric double gas shroud interface and via adjustment of transit times and plasma parameters, we can control cell viability. Plasma electrical characteristics (ne ~ 1013 cm-3), droplet velocity profiles and aspects of plasma-induced droplet chemistry were determined in order to establish the nature of the bacteria in droplet environment. Plasma-exposed viable E coli cells were subsequently cultured and the growth rate curves (lag and exponential phase gradient) used to explore the effect of radical chemistry and electron bombardment on cell stress. The extent and nature of membrane disruption in viable and non-viable cells were investigated through genomic and protein/membrane lipid content estimation. We will also compare our results with simulations of the effect of bacterial presence on plasma induced droplet charging and evaporation. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  11. Charge transfers from Na atom in (H2O)n clusters and in water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozue, Takeshi; Hoshino, Junichi; Tsumuraya, Kazuo

    2006-03-01

    The charge state of sodium ions in water is an essential issue in both biophysical and physicochemical areas. Although the nominal charge state of sodium is +1 in water solution, the true charge is less than unity and will depend on the environments. We clarify the true charges states with ab initio density functional methods. There have been several methods to evaluate the charges that belong to each atom in molecules: Bader analysis divides up into regions where the dividing surfaces are at a minimum in the density. [1] The Bader charge analysis [2] has difficulty of finding all the critical points around the atom. Henkelman et al. have proposed a modified partition scheme. [3] We use a modified version of the Henkelman's scheme to integrate the core charge densities separately. The method gives the charge transfer from Na to H2O to be 0.167e and that to (H2O)2 to be 0.522e. The original Bader charge scheme gives 0.156e and 0.596e respectively. We present the transfers surrounded by a large number of water molecules and those in water solution in periodic system. [1]R.F.W.Bader, Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory, Clarendon:Oxford. 1990. [2]C.F.Guerra, et al., J.Comp.Chem. 25, 189(2003). [3]G.Henkelman, et al., Comp. Mat. Sci. in press.

  12. Ultrafast Charge- and Energy-Transfer Dynamics in Conjugated Polymer: Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystal Blends

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid nanocrystal–polymer systems are promising candidates for photovoltaic applications, but the processes controlling charge generation are poorly understood. Here, we disentangle the energy- and charge-transfer processes occurring in a model system based on blends of cadmium selenide nanocrystals (CdSe-NC) with poly[2-methoxy-5-(3′,7′-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MDMO-PPV) using a combination of time-resolved absorption and luminescence measurements. The use of different capping ligands (n-butylamine, oleic acid) as well as thermal annealing allows tuning of the polymer–nanocrystal interaction. We demonstrate that energy transfer from MDMO-PPV to CdSe-NCs is the dominant exciton quenching mechanism in nonannealed blends and occurs on ultrafast time scales (<1 ps). Upon thermal annealing electron transfer becomes competitive with energy transfer, with a transfer rate of 800 fs independent of the choice of the ligand. Interestingly, we find hole transfer to be much less efficient than electron transfer and to extend over several nanoseconds. Our results emphasize the importance of tuning the organic–nanocrystal interaction to achieve efficient charge separation and highlight the unfavorable hole-transfer dynamics in these blends. PMID:24490650

  13. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Liangbo; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai

    The success of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides, and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that vdW heterostructues can exhibit ultra-fast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, we find that the collective motion of excitons at the interface lead to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. Furthermore, instability of these oscillations explain the rapid charge transfer across the interface and are shown to be a general feature of vdW heterostructures provided they have a critical minimum dipole coupling. Application to the MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiment, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.

  14. Ultrafast holography and transient absorption spectroscopy in charge-transfer polymers

    SciTech Connect

    McBranch, D.W.; Maniloff, E.S.; Vacar, D.; Heeger, A.J.

    1997-10-01

    Charge-transfer polymers are a new class of nonlinear optical materials which can be used for generating femtosecond holographic gratings. Using semiconducting polymers sensitized with varying concentrations of C{sub 60}, holographic gratings were recorded by individual ultrafast laser pulses; the diffraction efficiency and time decay of the gratings were measured using non-degenerate four-wave mixing. Using a figure of merit for dynamic data processing, the temporal diffraction efficiency, this new class of materials exhibits between two and 12 orders of magnitude higher response than previous reports. The charge transfer range at polymer/C{sub 60} interfaces was further studied using transient absorption spectroscopy. The fact that charge-transfer occurs in the picosecond-time scale in bilayer structures (thickness 200 {angstrom}) implies that diffusion of localized excitations to the interface is not the dominant mechanism; the charge transfer range is a significant fraction of the film thickness. From analysis of the excited state decay curves, we estimate the charge transfer range to be 80 {angstrom} and interpret that range as resulting from quantum delocalization of the photoexcitations.

  15. Spectrophotometric study of the charge transfer complex between 2-amino-4-picoline with chloranilic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghanmi, Reem M.; Al-Attas, Amirah S.; Habeeb, Moustafa M.

    2013-02-01

    Charge transfer complex formation between 2-amino-4-picoline (2A4P) as the electron donor with chloranilic acid (CLA) as the electron acceptor has been studied spectrophotometrically in different polar solvents included acetone (AcN), ethanol (EtOH) and acetonitrile (AN). The molecular composition of the formed complex was recognized utilizing Job's, photometric and conductometric titration methods to be 1:1. The formation constants and molecular extinction coefficients were estimated using Benesi-Hildebrand equation; they recorded high values confirming high stability of the formed complex. Moreover, the results showed that the complex is more stable in acetone with lower electric permittivity compared with ethanol or acetonitrile of higher ones. The values of some spectroscopic physical parameters like oscillator strength f, transition dipole moment μ, resonance energy RN, charge transfer energy ECT, dissociation energy W, ionization potential IP and standard free energy ΔGo were determined and evaluated. The solid complex was isolated and its molecular composition was determined by elemental analysis to be 1:1. Furthermore, the solid complex was characterized using FTIR and 1H NMR measurements. They confirmed the presence of proton transfer beside charge transfer in the obtained complex. Molecular orbital calculations utilizing GAMESS computations were carried out to predict infrared spectra. They also confirmed the presence of proton transfer beside charge transfer in the formed complex.

  16. Charge transfer and charge conversion of K and N defect centers in Si3N4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Erbetta, Davide

    2000-06-01

    Charge traps in silicon nitride and their interaction have been studied by first principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The K0 (N3≡Si•) and N0 (Si2=N•) Si and N dangling bond centers, respectively, are electrically active paramagnetic point defects. They show an amphoteric behavior and convert into the more stable diamagnetic charged centers K- (N3≡Si-), K+ (N3≡Si+), N- (Si2=N-), and N+ (Si2=N+). The overcoordination of K+ and N+ and the electrostatic interaction with the K- or N- counterparts are important contributions to the negative-U character of the defects.

  17. Chemical Control of Charge Trapping and Charge Transfer Processes at the Organic-Inorganic Interface within Quantum Dot-Organic Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Emily A.

    2015-11-06

    Within the research program funded through the Early Career Research Award we designed complexes of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and organic molecules in which the interfacial chemistry controls the electronic structure and dynamics of the excitonic state of the QD. The program included two main projects; (1) investigation of the mechanisms by which organic surfactants control the quantum confinement of excitonic charge carriers; and (2) development of models for electron transfer between QDs and adsorbed molecules as a function of interfacial chemistry. This project was extremely successful in that our achievements in those two areas addressed the great majority of questions we outlined in the original proposal and answered questions I did not think to ask in that original proposal. Our work led to the discovery of “exciton delocalizing ligands”, which change the electronic structure of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals by altering, with small synthetic modifications to their surfaces, their most defining characteristic – the quantum confinement of their excited states. It also led to detailed, quantitative descriptions of how the surface chemistry of a QD dictates, thermodynamically and kinetically, the probability of exchange of electrons between the QD and a small molecule. We used two of the three major techniques in the proposal (transient photoluminescence and transient absorption). Electrogenerated chemiluminescence was also proposed, but was too technically difficult with these systems to be useful. Instead, NMR spectroscopy emerged as a major analytical tool in our studies. With the fundamental advancements we made with this project, we believe that we can design QDs to be the next great class of visible-light photocatalysts.

  18. DNA in a Dissipative Environment: A Charge Transfer Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnia, Sohrab; Fathizadeh, Samira; Akhshani, Afshin

    2015-08-01

    Conductivity properties of DNA molecule is investigated in a simple, chemically specific approach, that is intimately related to the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model. In the SSH model, the non-diagonal matrix element dependent on intersite displacements is considered and there is a coupling between the charge and lattice deformation along DNA helix. In order to study the evolution of the electrical current flowing through DNA in the presence of external electrical field, the electrical current is directly extracted from the dynamical equations. Ranges of electrical field and hopping constant value are estimated using MLE approach. The model is studied by means of I-V characteristic diagrams and the environmental effects is conducted through a phonon bath using different lengths of DNA. The NDR and quasi-Ohmic regions are observed.

  19. Charge transfer and electronic doping in nitrogen-doped graphene

    PubMed Central

    Joucken, Frédéric; Tison, Yann; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Tejeda, Antonio; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Conrad, Edward; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Ghijsen, Jacques; Sporken, Robert; Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, François; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the modification of the graphene’s electronic structure upon doping is crucial for enlarging its potential applications. We present a study of nitrogen-doped graphene samples on SiC(000) combining angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The comparison between tunneling and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra reveals the spatial inhomogeneity of the Dirac energy shift and that a phonon correction has to be applied to the tunneling measurements. XPS data demonstrate the dependence of the N 1s binding energy of graphitic nitrogen on the nitrogen concentration. The measure of the Dirac energy for different nitrogen concentrations reveals that the ratio usually computed between the excess charge brought by the dopants and the dopants’ concentration depends on the latter. This is supported by a tight-binding model considering different values for the potentials on the nitrogen site and on its first neighbors. PMID:26411651

  20. Evaluation of Bulk Charging in Geostationary Transfer Orbit and Earth Escape Trajectories Using the Numit 1-D Charging Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Coffey, Victoria N.; Parker, Linda N.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.; Jun, Insoo; Garrett, Henry B.

    2007-01-01

    The NUMIT 1-dimensional bulk charging model is used as a screening to ol for evaluating time-dependent bulk internal or deep dielectric) ch arging of dielectrics exposed to penetrating electron environments. T he code is modified to accept time dependent electron flux time serie s along satellite orbits for the electron environment inputs instead of using the static electron flux environment input originally used b y the code and widely adopted in bulk charging models. Application of the screening technique ts demonstrated for three cases of spacecraf t exposure within the Earth's radiation belts including a geostationa ry transfer orbit and an Earth-Moon transit trajectory for a range of orbit inclinations. Electric fields and charge densities are compute d for dielectric materials with varying electrical properties exposed to relativistic electron environments along the orbits. Our objectiv e is to demonstrate a preliminary application of the time-dependent e nvironments input to the NUMIT code for evaluating charging risks to exposed dielectrics used on spacecraft when exposed to the Earth's ra diation belts. The results demonstrate that the NUMIT electric field values in GTO orbits with multiple encounters with the Earth's radiat ion belts are consistent with previous studies of charging in GTO orb its and that potential threat conditions for electrostatic discharge exist on lunar transit trajectories depending on the electrical proper ties of the materials exposed to the radiation environment.

  1. Charge transfer and momentum exchange in exospheric D-H(+) and H-D(+) collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms that control the escape of deuterium from planetary exospheres include the acceleration of D(+) in the polar wind, and the production of suprathermal D atoms through nonthermal collisions. In this paper we examine the effects of neutral-ion interactions involving deuterium and hydrogen on the velocity distribution of neutral D. A two-center scattering approximation is used as the basis for calculations of the differential cross sections for charge transfer and elastic scatter in collision of H with D(+) and of D with H(+) for ionosphere-exosphere collision energies below 10 e V. These data are used to derive temperature dependent rate coefficients for the charge transfer branches of these interactions, and to determine the effects of ion-neutral temperature differences on the rate of generation of suprathermal D through charge transfer and elastic scatter.

  2. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Silicon and Iron Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1997-01-01

    The laser ablation/ion storage facility at the UNLV Physics Department is dedicated to the study of atomic processes in low temperature plasmas. Our current program is directed to the study of charge transfer of multiply charged ions and neutrals that are of importance to astrophysics at energies less than 1 eV (about 10(exp 4) K). Specifically, we measure the charge transfer rate coefficient of ions such as N(2+), Si(3+), Si(3+), with helium and Fe(2+) with molecular and atomic hydrogen. All these ions are found in a variety of astrophysical plasmas. Their electron transfer reactions with neutral atoms can affect the ionization equilibrium of the plasma.

  3. Photophysical properties of charge transfer pairs encapsulated inside macrocycle cage: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on three charge transfer donor-acceptor (D-A) molecular pairs, i.e. naphthalene-diamine (Naph) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) molecules as electron donors and benzene-diimide (Diimide) and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) as electron acceptors. Structural, charge transfer and optical properties of the systems have been studied. The D-A pairs then has been considered inside a macrocycle (cucurbit[8]uril) cavity and Naph-Diimide and TTF-Diimide pairs have been shown to exhibit changes in their structures and orientations, TTF-TCNQ pair does not show any significant structural change. Our work suggests that these changes in structures or orientations are result of electronic repulsion between the keto group oxygen atoms and it can lead to tuning of charge transfer and optical properties of the systems.

  4. Relation between geometry and charge transfer in low-dimensional organic salts

    SciTech Connect

    Umland, T.C.; Allie, S.; Kuhlmann, T.; Coppens, P.

    1988-11-03

    The Cambridge Data Base has been used to examine the relation between charge transfer and geometry in salts containing the TCNQ (tetracyanoquinodimethanide) anion and the TTF (tetrathiofulvalene), TSF (tetraselenofulvalene), and BEDT-TTF (bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiofulvalene) cations. The correlation is based on either a bond length ratio or a bond length difference function and is calculated both for an extended data set, including charge transfers based on stoichiometry, and on a more restricted set based on neutral molecules and experimentally measured charge transfers. A two-parameter linear least-squares fit is found to be adequate; inclusion of a third (quadratic) coefficient does not give a significant improvement with the data available. The bond length difference function tends to give somewhat smaller standard deviations in predictions based on the derived equations. The curves for BEDT-TTF are not significantly different from those for the larger TTF set of entries.

  5. Horizontal versus vertical charge and energy transfer in hybrid assemblies of semiconductor nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gotesman, Gilad; Guliamov, Rahamim

    2012-01-01

    Summary We studied the photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence from self-assembled bilayers of donor and acceptor nanoparticles (NPs) adsorbed on a quartz substrate through organic linkers. Charge and energy transfer processes within the assemblies were investigated as a function of the length of the dithiolated linker (DT) between the donors and acceptors. We found an unusual linker-length-dependency in the emission of the donors. This dependency may be explained by charge and energy transfer processes in the vertical direction (from the donors to the acceptors) that depend strongly on charge transfer processes occurring in the horizontal plane (within the monolayer of the acceptor), namely, parallel to the substrate. PMID:23019559

  6. Engineering the Charge Transfer in all 2D Graphene-Nanoplatelets Heterostructure Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Robin, A.; Lhuillier, E.; Xu, X. Z.; Ithurria, S.; Aubin, H.; Ouerghi, A.; Dubertret, B.

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional layered (i.e. van der Waals) heterostructures open up great prospects, especially in photodetector applications. In this context, the control of the charge transfer between the constituting layers is of crucial importance. Compared to bulk or 0D system, 2D materials are characterized by a large exciton binding energy (0.1–1 eV) which considerably affects the magnitude of the charge transfer. Here we investigate a model system made from colloidal 2D CdSe nanoplatelets and epitaxial graphene in a phototransistor configuration. We demonstrate that using a heterostructured layered material, we can tune the magnitude and the direction (i.e. electron or hole) of the charge transfer. We further evidence that graphene functionalization by nanocrystals only leads to a limited change in the magnitude of the 1/f noise. These results draw some new directions to design van der Waals heterostructures with enhanced optoelectronic properties. PMID:27143413

  7. Engineering the Charge Transfer in all 2D Graphene-Nanoplatelets Heterostructure Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Robin, A; Lhuillier, E; Xu, X Z; Ithurria, S; Aubin, H; Ouerghi, A; Dubertret, B

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional layered (i.e. van der Waals) heterostructures open up great prospects, especially in photodetector applications. In this context, the control of the charge transfer between the constituting layers is of crucial importance. Compared to bulk or 0D system, 2D materials are characterized by a large exciton binding energy (0.1-1 eV) which considerably affects the magnitude of the charge transfer. Here we investigate a model system made from colloidal 2D CdSe nanoplatelets and epitaxial graphene in a phototransistor configuration. We demonstrate that using a heterostructured layered material, we can tune the magnitude and the direction (i.e. electron or hole) of the charge transfer. We further evidence that graphene functionalization by nanocrystals only leads to a limited change in the magnitude of the 1/f noise. These results draw some new directions to design van der Waals heterostructures with enhanced optoelectronic properties. PMID:27143413

  8. Engineering the Charge Transfer in all 2D Graphene-Nanoplatelets Heterostructure Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, A.; Lhuillier, E.; Xu, X. Z.; Ithurria, S.; Aubin, H.; Ouerghi, A.; Dubertret, B.

    2016-05-01

    Two dimensional layered (i.e. van der Waals) heterostructures open up great prospects, especially in photodetector applications. In this context, the control of the charge transfer between the constituting layers is of crucial importance. Compared to bulk or 0D system, 2D materials are characterized by a large exciton binding energy (0.1–1 eV) which considerably affects the magnitude of the charge transfer. Here we investigate a model system made from colloidal 2D CdSe nanoplatelets and epitaxial graphene in a phototransistor configuration. We demonstrate that using a heterostructured layered material, we can tune the magnitude and the direction (i.e. electron or hole) of the charge transfer. We further evidence that graphene functionalization by nanocrystals only leads to a limited change in the magnitude of the 1/f noise. These results draw some new directions to design van der Waals heterostructures with enhanced optoelectronic properties.

  9. Charge transfer cross sections for Hg + , Xe + , and Cs + in collision with various metals and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, J. A.; Vroom, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Cross sections for charge transfer between Hg+, Xe+, and Cs+ and the atomic species Fe, Mo, Al, Ti, Ta, and C have been measured in the ion energy range from 1 to 5000 eV. In general, the cross sections for charge transfer were found to be less than 2×10-15 cm2 for most processes over the total energy range. The one exception is Hg+ in collision with Ti. The reactants are all open shell atomic species and in most cases where the charge transfer process is exothermic, several resonant pathways exist leading to the products. Some discussion of possible reaction paths is given. The techniques used to form neutral beams of the various species studied is included.

  10. Attosecond timing the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.

    2011-04-15

    By solving the three-dimensional, time-dependent Schroedinger equation, we have demonstrated that the ultrafast charge-transfer process in ion-atom collisions can be mapped out with attosecond extreme uv (xuv) pulses. During the dynamic-charge transfer from the target atom to the projectile ion, the electron coherently populates the two sites of both nuclei, which can be viewed as a 'short-lived' molecular state. A probing attosecond xuv pulse can instantly unleash the delocalized electron from such a ''transient molecule,'' so that the resulting photoelectron may exhibit a ''double-slit'' interference. On the contrary, either reduced or no photoelectron interference will occur if the attosecond xuv pulse strikes well before or after the collision. Therefore, by monitoring the photoelectron interference visibility, one can precisely time the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions with time-delayed attosecond xuv pulses.