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Sample records for charge-free etching process

  1. High-energy negative ion beam obtained from pulsed inductively coupled plasma for charge-free etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-06-01

    Negative ions in conventional inductively coupled plasma are often more chemically active than positive ions (for example, in CF4 or SF6 plasmas), but inconveniently they are trapped inside the sheath and cannot be used for high-energy surface etching in sources with a grid-type acceleration system. In this work we describe a method of positive and negative ion extraction that allows the energy and flux of oppositely charged particles to be varied independently. Then by scattering the ions off from a metal surface, it is possible to form a high-energy beam of neutrals from the negative ions by using the low-energy positive component of the beam current for better charge compensation.

  2. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.; Gerardo, J.B.

    1987-08-25

    The surfaces of solids are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing a substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g., a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrence of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic substrates, e.g., LiNbO/sub 3/, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  3. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.; Gerardo, James B.

    1989-01-01

    The surfaces of solid ionic substrates are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing an ionic substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g. a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrance of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic salt substrates, e.g., a solid inorganic salt such as LiNbO.sub.3, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  4. Graphene nanoribbons: Relevance of etching process

    SciTech Connect

    Simonet, P. Bischoff, D.; Moser, A.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.

    2015-05-14

    Most graphene nanoribbons in the experimental literature are patterned using plasma etching. Various etching processes induce different types of defects and do not necessarily result in the same electronic and structural ribbon properties. This study focuses on two frequently used etching techniques, namely, O{sub 2} plasma ashing and O{sub 2 }+ Ar reactive ion etching (RIE). O{sub 2} plasma ashing represents an alternative to RIE physical etching for sensitive substrates, as it is a more gentle chemical process. We find that plasma ashing creates defective graphene in the exposed trenches, resulting in instabilities in the ribbon transport. These are probably caused by more or larger localized states at the edges of the ashed device compared to the RIE defined device.

  5. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Ginley, D.S.

    1994-10-18

    An etching process is described using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstrom range may be achieved by this method. 1 fig.

  6. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Ginley, David S.

    1994-01-01

    An etching process using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstom range may be achieved by this method.

  7. Process capability of etched multilayer EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Kosuke; Iida nee Sakurai, Noriko; Kamo, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Hayashi, Naoya

    2015-10-01

    With shrinking pattern size at 0.33NA EUV lithography systems, mask 3D effects are expected to become stronger, such as horizontal/vertical shadowing, best focus shifts through pitch and pattern shift through focus. Etched multilayer EUV mask structures have been proposed in order to reduce mask 3D effects. It is estimated that etched multilayer type mask is also effective in reducing mask 3D effects at 0.33NA with lithographic simulation, and it is experimentally demonstrated with NXE3300 EUV Lithography system. We obtained cross-sectional TEM image of etched multilayer EUV mask pattern. It is observed that patterned multilayer width differs from pattern physical width. This means that effective reflecting width of etched multilayer pattern is smaller than pattern width measured by CD-SEM. In this work, we evaluate mask durability against both chemical and physical cleaning process to check the feasibility of etched multilayer EUV mask patterning against mask cleaning for 0.33NA EUV extension. As a result, effective width can be controlled by suitable cleaning chemicals because sidewall film works as a passivation film. And line and space pattern collapse is not detected by DUV mask pattern inspection tool after mask physical cleaning that includes both megasonic and binary spray steps with sufficient particle removal efficiency.

  8. The research on conformal acid etching process of glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kepeng; Guo, Peiji

    2014-08-01

    A series of experiments have been done to explore the effect of different conditions on the hydrofluoric acid etching. The hydrofluoric acid was used to etch the glass ceramic called "ZERODUR", which is invented by SCHOTT in Germany. The glass ceramic was processed into cylindrical samples. The hydrofluoric acid etching was done in a plastic beaker. The concentration of hydrofluoric acid and the etching time were changed to measure the changes of geometric tolerance and I observed the surface using a microscope in order to find an appropriate condition of hydrofluoric acid etching.

  9. Dry etched SiO2 Mask for HgCdTe Etching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Deng, L. G.; Zhang, S.; Xing, W.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-04-01

    A highly anisotropic etching process with low etch-induced damage is indispensable for advanced HgCdTe (MCT) infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) detectors. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) enhanced reactive ion etching technique has been widely adopted in manufacturing HgCdTe IRFPA devices. An accurately patterned mask with sharp edges is decisive to accomplish pattern duplication. It has been reported by our group that the SiO2 mask functions well in etching HgCdTe with high selectivity. However, the wet process in defining the SiO2 mask is limited by ambiguous edges and nonuniform patterns. In this report, we patterned SiO2 with a mature ICP etching technique, prior to which a thin ZnS film was deposited by thermal evaporation. The SiO2 film etching can be terminated at the auto-stopping point of the ZnS layer thanks to the high selectivity of SiO2/ZnS in SF6 based etchant. Consequently, MCT etching was directly performed without any other treatment. This mask showed acceptable profile due to the maturity of the SiO2 etching process. The well-defined SiO2 pattern and the etched smooth surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. This new mask process could transfer the patterns exactly with very small etch-bias. A cavity with aspect-ratio (AR) of 1.2 and root mean square roughness of 1.77 nm was achieved first, slightly higher AR of 1.67 was also get with better mask profile. This masking process ensures good uniformity and surely benefits the delineation of shrinking pixels with its high resolution.

  10. Dry etched SiO2 Mask for HgCdTe Etching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Deng, L. G.; Zhang, S.; Xing, W.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-09-01

    A highly anisotropic etching process with low etch-induced damage is indispensable for advanced HgCdTe (MCT) infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) detectors. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) enhanced reactive ion etching technique has been widely adopted in manufacturing HgCdTe IRFPA devices. An accurately patterned mask with sharp edges is decisive to accomplish pattern duplication. It has been reported by our group that the SiO2 mask functions well in etching HgCdTe with high selectivity. However, the wet process in defining the SiO2 mask is limited by ambiguous edges and nonuniform patterns. In this report, we patterned SiO2 with a mature ICP etching technique, prior to which a thin ZnS film was deposited by thermal evaporation. The SiO2 film etching can be terminated at the auto-stopping point of the ZnS layer thanks to the high selectivity of SiO2/ZnS in SF6 based etchant. Consequently, MCT etching was directly performed without any other treatment. This mask showed acceptable profile due to the maturity of the SiO2 etching process. The well-defined SiO2 pattern and the etched smooth surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. This new mask process could transfer the patterns exactly with very small etch-bias. A cavity with aspect-ratio (AR) of 1.2 and root mean square roughness of 1.77 nm was achieved first, slightly higher AR of 1.67 was also get with better mask profile. This masking process ensures good uniformity and surely benefits the delineation of shrinking pixels with its high resolution.

  11. Automated process control for plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeown, Margaret; Arshak, Khalil I.; Murphy, Eamonn

    1992-06-01

    This paper discusses the development and implementation of a rule-based system which assists in providing automated process control for plasma etching. The heart of the system is to establish a correspondence between a particular data pattern -- sensor or data signals -- and one or more modes of failure, i.e., a data-driven monitoring approach. The objective of this rule based system, PLETCHSY, is to create a program combining statistical process control (SPC) and fault diagnosis to help control a manufacturing process which varies over time. This can be achieved by building a process control system (PCS) with the following characteristics. A facility to monitor the performance of the process by obtaining and analyzing the data relating to the appropriate process variables. Process sensor/status signals are input into an SPC module. If trends are present, the SPC module outputs the last seven control points, a pattern which is represented by either regression or scoring. The pattern is passed to the rule-based module. When the rule-based system recognizes a pattern, it starts the diagnostic process using the pattern. If the process is considered to be going out of control, advice is provided about actions which should be taken to bring the process back into control.

  12. Alternative process for thin layer etching: Application to nitride spacer etching stopping on silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Posseme, N. Pollet, O.; Barnola, S.

    2014-08-04

    Silicon nitride spacer etching realization is considered today as one of the most challenging of the etch process for the new devices realization. For this step, the atomic etch precision to stop on silicon or silicon germanium with a perfect anisotropy (no foot formation) is required. The situation is that none of the current plasma technologies can meet all these requirements. To overcome these issues and meet the highly complex requirements imposed by device fabrication processes, we recently proposed an alternative etching process to the current plasma etch chemistries. This process is based on thin film modification by light ions implantation followed by a selective removal of the modified layer with respect to the non-modified material. In this Letter, we demonstrate the benefit of this alternative etch method in term of film damage control (silicon germanium recess obtained is less than 6 A), anisotropy (no foot formation), and its compatibility with other integration steps like epitaxial. The etch mechanisms of this approach are also addressed.

  13. Particle reduction and control in EUV etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, JeaYoung; Ha, TaeJoong; Kim, SangPyo; Yim, DongGyu

    2014-10-01

    As the device design rule shrinks, photomask manufacturers need to have advanced defect controllability during the ARC (Anti-Reflection Coating) and ABS (Absorber) etch in an EUV (extreme ultraviolet) mask. Therefore we studied etching techniques of EUV absorber film to find out the evasion method of particle generation. Usually, Particles are generated by plasma ignition step in etching process. When we use the standard etching process, ARC and ABS films are etched step by step. To reduce the particle generation, the number of ignition steps need to decrease. In this paper, we present the experimental results of in-situ EUV dry etching process technique for ARC and ABS, which reduces the defect level significantly. Analysis tools used for this study are as follows; TEM (for cross-sectional inspection) , SEM (for in-line monitoring ) and OES (for checking optical emission spectrum)

  14. Development and characterization of multilevel metal interconnection etch process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Kim

    1997-08-01

    A more robust chlorine chemistry based reactive ion etch (RIE) process was developed, characterized and optimized to anisotropically etch the interconnecting metal layers for use in the fabrication of CMOS and BiCMOS IC devices, using the Lam 4600 single wafer etcher. The titanium nitride and titanium silicide buried layer, used in the metal 1 structure, present unique constraints on etch selectivity to the underlying film. The process must clear metal stringers with minimal lateral etching of the aluminum during the tiN/Ti etch and overetch steps. The new optimized process meets all requirements imposed by advanced technologies, such as vertical metal sidewalls, wide process latitude, tight CD control, minimal of TEOS oxide underlayer, less sensitivity to photoresist pattern, excellent reliability and reproducibility, and lower level of polymer (reaction by- product) build-up in reactor chamber which could lead to metal corrosion and cluster defects.

  15. Chemical etching for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical etching for automatic processing of integrated circuits is discussed. The wafer carrier and loading from a receiving air track into automatic furnaces and unloading onto a sending air track are included.

  16. Novel Surface Reaction Model in Dry-Etching Process Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misaka, Akio; Harafuji, Kenji; Kubota, Masafumi; Nomura, Noboru

    1992-12-01

    A new surface reaction model has been presented to simulate topological evolutions by taking into account the existence of adsorbed radicals on the substrate surface. The model treats the etching rate as a function of the coverage ratio by adsorbed radicals on the surface. Based on the model, a two-dimensional topography simulator has been developed. The simulator is applied to silicon-dioxide trench etchings made by hydrofluorocarbon gases. First, micro-loading effects in an important ion-assisted etching process are studied. It is confirmed that the micro-loading effect is due to the shortage of supplied active radicals inside the trench structure. Secondly, the competitive process between etching and deposition is examined. The side-wall protection phenomena resulting from the process are well simulated.

  17. Characterization and Control of Etch Processes Using Multiple Metrologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushman, Scott; Celii, Francis; Martin, Scott; Tristan, Luis

    2005-09-01

    The integration of embedded ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM) into a standard CMOS flow requires significant control and characterization of the etch process. Current qualification and control of the etch process for the TiAlN hardmask and Ir/PZT/Ir capacitor film stack relies on several metrologies to evaluate performance (etch rate, critical dimension, sidewall angle, etc). Profilometry is currently used for monitoring hardmask etch rate, but is fraught with difficulties such as low throughput and low reproducibility. Here we compare options for determining hardmask etch rate, including Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), profilometry, and scatterometry. Wafers with a range of film stacks were generated to test each measurement technique's robustness in etch rate determination. A robust, precise, short cycle time, fully automated process monitor of etch rate is required to make qualification of the etch process manufacturable. Scatterometry is a non-destructive optical metrology based on the analysis of light scattered from a periodic sample. It is a faster technique than either profilometry or AFM because of the optical nature of the measurement, and provides measurements of patterned grating structures. However, a detailed film model is required to estimate parameters of interest. The scatterometry model for this investigation includes four adjustable parameters: TiAlN material index of refraction, thickness, linewidth and sidewall angle. The results show good agreement between the scatterometry measurements and the AFM across the range of step-heights available on the wafers. In addition, the practical aspects of the method, such as the modeling time and estimation of material parameters required to generate the signature library as well as measurement speed are presented.

  18. Advanced Simulation Technology to Design Etching Process on CMOS Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Prediction and control of plasma-induced damage is needed to mass-produce high performance CMOS devices. In particular, side-wall (SW) etching with low damage is a key process for the next generation of MOSFETs and FinFETs. To predict and control the damage, we have developed a SiN etching simulation technique for CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma processes using a three-dimensional (3D) voxel model. This model includes new concepts for the gas transportation in the pattern, detailed surface reactions on the SiN reactive layer divided into several thin slabs and C-F polymer layer dependent on the H/N ratio, and use of ``smart voxels''. We successfully predicted the etching properties such as the etch rate, polymer layer thickness, and selectivity for Si, SiO2, and SiN films along with process variations and demonstrated the 3D damage distribution time-dependently during SW etching on MOSFETs and FinFETs. We confirmed that a large amount of Si damage was caused in the source/drain region with the passage of time in spite of the existing SiO2 layer of 15 nm in the over etch step and the Si fin having been directly damaged by a large amount of high energy H during the removal step of the parasitic fin spacer leading to Si fin damage to a depth of 14 to 18 nm. By analyzing the results of these simulations and our previous simulations, we found that it is important to carefully control the dose of high energy H, incident energy of H, polymer layer thickness, and over-etch time considering the effects of the pattern structure, chamber-wall condition, and wafer open area ratio. In collaboration with Masanaga Fukasawa and Tetsuya Tatsumi, Sony Corporation. We thank Mr. T. Shigetoshi and Mr. T. Kinoshita of Sony Corporation for their assistance with the experiments.

  19. Scatterometry measurements for process monitoring of polysilicon gate etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushman, Scott; Farrer, Steve

    1997-08-01

    This paper presents results from a prototype scatterometer which show that distinctly different zeroth-order diffraction signatures are produced for wafers processed under different etch conditions. We present comparisons between the profiles estimated using the scatterometer signatures and those measured using atomic force microscopy, in-line scanning electron microscopy, and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy. We found that all the metrology techniques investigated provided useful information about the profile characteristics, but only the atomic force microscope and the scatterometer are suitable as in-line measurements of critical dimension profiles -- and only scatterometry provides estimates of the underlying film structure. In this study, the wafers consisted of patterned photoresist over blanket layers of a deep-ultravoilet anti-reflection coating, polysilicon, and silicon dioxide. These wafers were intentionally varied at the lithography step and intentionally misprocessed at the gate etch step to produce a wide range of process variation. Scatterometry measurements were made on multiple dies per wafer and estimates of feature profile information such as film thickness and critical dimension were generated by comparing the experimental signature to a library of theoretical solutions. We found that the scatterometer was capable of showing signal differences for different wafer processing conditions, and can be used as an in-line measurement of profile characteristics suitable for closed- loop process control of lithographic and etch processes.

  20. Polymeric protective coatings for MEMS wet-etch processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruben, Kimberly A.; Flaim, Tony D.; Li, Chenghong

    2004-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device manufacturers today are faced with the challenge of protecting electronic circuitry and other sensitive device structures during deep silicon wet-etch processes. Etch processes of this nature require prolonged exposure of the device to harsh corrosive mixtures of aqueous acids and bases at higher than ambient temperatures. A need exists for a spin-applied polymeric coating to prevent the exposure of such circuitry against the corrosive etchants. The challenge exists in developing protective coatings that will not decompose or dissolve in the etchants during the etch process. Such coatings require superior adhesion to the substrate without destroying the sensitive features below. Brewer Science, Inc., has developed a multilayer coating system for basic etchants which is compatible with a variety of semiconductor materials and offers protection against concentrated potassium hydroxide (KOH) etchants at prolonged exposure times of more than 8 hours. In addition, a second multilayer coating system is being developed for use with strong hydrofluoric and other various mixed acid etchants (MAEs) for exposures of 30 minutes or longer. These materials are specifically designed to protect circuitry subjected to concentrated MAEs during the wafer thinning processes used by MEMS device manufacturers.

  1. Polymer protective coating for wet deep silicon etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Mary; Ruben, Kim; Li, Chenghong; Williams, Paul; Flaim, Tony D.

    2003-01-01

    A need exists for spin-applied polymeric coatings to protect electronic circuitry and other sensitive structures on MEMS devices during deep silicon wet etching processes involving corrosive mixtures of aqueous acids and bases. The challenge exists in developing protective coatings that do not decompose or dissolve in the harsh etchants and, more importantly, that maintain good adhesion to the substrate during the sometimes long etching processes. We have developed a multilayer coating system that is stable and adheres well to silicon nitride and other semiconductor materials and affords chemical protection for at least eight hours in hot potassium hydroxide etchant. The same coating system is also compatible with concentrated hydrofluoric acid etchants, which can diffuse rapidly through many polymeric materials to attack the device substrate.

  2. Etching-limiting process and origin of loading effects in silicon etching with hydrogen chloride gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, Naoya; Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2014-01-01

    The etching-limiting step in slow Si etching with HCl/H2 at atmospheric pressure was investigated. The etching was performed at a low etching rate below 10 nm/min in the temperature range of 1000-1100 °C. In the case of bare Si etching, it was confirmed that the etching rate showed little temperature dependence and was proportional to the equilibrium pressure of the etching by-product SiCl2 calculated by thermochemical analysis. In addition, the etching rates of Si(100) and (110) faces were almost the same. These results indicate that SiCl2 diffusion in the gas phase is the rate-limiting step. In the etching of the Si surface with SiO2 mask patterns, a strong loading effect (mask/opening pattern dependence of the etching rate) was observed. The simulation of the diffusion of gas species immediately above the Si surface revealed that the loading effect was attributed to the pattern-dependent diffusion of SiCl2.

  3. Carrier-lifetime-controlled selective etching process for semiconductors using photochemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Myers, David R.

    1992-01-01

    The minority carrier lifetime is significantly much shorter in semiconductor materials with very high impurity concentrations than it is in semiconductor materials with lower impurity concentration levels. This phenomenon of reduced minority carrier lifetime in semiconductor materials having high impurity concentration is utilized to advantage for permitting highly selective semiconductor material etching to be achieved using a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. Various means may be employed for increasing the local impurity concentration level in specific near-surface regions of a semiconductor prior to subjecting the semiconductor material to a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. The regions having the localized increased impurity concentration form a self-aligned mask inhibiting photochemical etching at such localized regions while the adjacent regions not having increased impurity concentrations are selectively photochemically etched. Liquid- or gas-phase etching may be performed.

  4. Optical and electrical diagnostics of fluorocarbon plasma etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul

    1999-05-01

    This article reviews recent work concerning the role of CF and CF2 radicals in etching and polymerization processes occurring in capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasmas in fluorocarbon gases used for the selective etching of SiO2 layers in microelectronic device fabrication. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used to determine time-resolved axial concentration profiles of these species in continuous and pulse-modulated CF4 and C2F6 plasmas. Calibration techniques, including broad-band UV absorption spectroscopy, were developed to put the LIF measurements on an absolute scale. A novel technique was used to determine the ion flux to the reactor walls in these polymerizing environments. The mass distribution of the ions arriving at the reactor walls was determined using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It was found that CFx radicals are produced predominantly by the reflection of neutralized and dissociated CFx+ ions at the powered electrode surface. When the fluorine atom concentration is high, the CFx radicals are destroyed effectively by recombination catalysed by the reactor walls. When the fluorine atom concentration is lowered, the CF2 concentration rises markedly, and it participates in gas-phase oligomerization processes, forming large CxFy molecules and, after ionization, large CxFy+ ions. These species appear to be the true polymer precursors. This mechanism explains the well known correlation between high CF2 concentrations, polymer deposition and SiO2 over Si etch selectivity.

  5. Pattern Freezing Process Free Litho-Litho-Etch Double Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Tomoyuki; Takeshita, Masaru; Takasu, Ryoichi; Yoshii, Yoshihiro; Iwashita, Jun; Matsumaru, Shogo; Abe, Sho; Iwai, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    Double patterning technology based on existing ArF immersion lithography is considered as the most viable option for complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) node of 32 nm and below. Most of double patterning approaches previously described requires intermediate processing step such as hard mask etching, spacer material deposition, and resist pattern freezing. The requirement of these additional steps is now leading way to requests for throughput reduction and low cost for production for double patterning technology applications. In this paper, litho-litho-etch (LLE) double patterning without any intermediate processing steps is investigated to achieve narrow pitch resist imaging. The LLE options examined in this work are combinations of positive tone-negative tone and positive tone-positive tone photoresist double patterning process. These are the alternative processes in pattern freezing process free LLE double patterning. The goals of this work are to determine witch of these approaches is the most viable for future application and to confirm the patterning potential for 32 nm and below half pitch resist imaging.

  6. Inductively coupled plasma etch of DUV MoSi photomasks: a designed study of etch chemistries and process results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantine, Chris; Johnson, David J.; Westerman, Russell J.; Hourd, Andrew C.

    1998-12-01

    The continuing requirements for high resolution, critical dimension control and linearity on photomasks necessitates highly anisotropic and uniform etching of the absorber material. Plasma etching has seen strong increases in popularity to improve the above mentioned requirements. Also recently popular is the inclusion of Embedded Phase Shift materials such as Molybdenum Silicide (MoSi); these materials allow for an engineered 180 degree shift in the phase of the exposure light at the wafer pane, affording enhanced contrast at the edges of a line or feature. This article studies the effect of ICP-based plasma conditions on the CD Uniformity, MoSi etch rate and post-etch Quartz roughness of 6 X 6 DUV MoSi Embedded Phase Shift mask structures through use of carefully Designed Experiments. This Design of Experiment (DOE) makes it possible to screen plasma chemistry, optimize resultant plasma parameters and present an overlayed Simultaneous Solution which is used as a centerpoint for Device Plate etch tuning. The high plasma density, independent ion energy control and low pressure operation of Inductively Coupled Plasmas make this technology well suited to minimizing undercut of the MoSi and affords a vehicle for the realization of a zero-basis etch process.

  7. Performance enhancement of IPMC by anisotropic plasma etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seok Hwan; Kim, Chul-Jin; Hwang, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Sung-Joo; Yang, Hyun-Seok; Park, No-Cheol; Park, Young-Pil; Park, Kang-Ho; Lee, Hyung-Kun; Choi, Nak-Jin

    2009-03-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMCs) of EAP actuators is famous for its good property of response and durability. The performance of Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMCs) is an important issue which is affected by many factors. There are two factors for deciding the performance of IPMC. By treating anisotropic plasma etching process to 6 models of the IPMCs, enhanced experimental displacement and force results are obtained. Plasma patterning processes are executed by changing the groove and the land length of 6 patterns. The purpose of the present investigation is to find out the major factor which mainly affects the IPMC performance. Simulations using ANSYS have been executed to compare with the experimental results about the values and the tendency of data. Experimental and simulating data of the performances seem to have similar tendency. In the next part of the paper, we observed the other properties like capacitance, resistance and stiffness of 6 plasma patterned IPMCs. And we observed that the stiffness is the major factor which affects the performance of IPMCs. As we seen, our problem has been reduced to investigate about the property of stiffness. We suggest that the stiffness is largely changed mainly because of the different thickness of Platinum stacked of the groove and the land part which are produced by anisotropic plasma etching processes. And we understand that anisotropic plasma patterned IPMCs of better performance can be applied to various applications.

  8. Optimization of silver-assisted nano-pillar etching process in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhari, Ayu Wazira; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Desa, Mohd Khairunaz Mat; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a respond surface methodology (RSM) model is developed using three-level Box-Behnken experimental design (BBD) technique. This model is developed to investigate the influence of metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process variables on the nanopillars profiles created in single crystalline silicon (Si) substrate. Design-Expert® software (version 7.1) is employed in formulating the RSM model based on five critical process variables: (A) concentration of silver (Ag), (B) concentration of hydrofluoric acid (HF), (C) concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), (D) deposition time, and (E) etching time. This model is supported by data from 46 experimental configurations. Etched profiles as a function of lateral etching rate, vertical etching rate, height, size and separation between the Si trenches and etching uniformity are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). A quadratic regression model is developed to correlate critical process variables and is validated using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) methodology. The model exhibits near-linear dependence of lateral and vertical etching rates on both the H2O2 concentration and etching time. The predicted model is in good agreement with the experimental data where R2 is equal to 0.80 and 0.67 for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. The optimized result shows minimum lateral etching with the average pore size of about 69 nm while the maximum etching rate is estimated at around 360 nm/min. The model demonstrates that the etching process uniformity is not influenced by either the etchant concentration or the etching time. This lack of uniformity could be attributed to the surface condition of the wafer. Optimization of the process parameters show adequate accuracy of the model with acceptable percentage errors of 6%, 59%, 1.8%, 38% and 61% for determination of the height, separation, size, the pore size and the etching rate respectively.

  9. Porous siliconformation and etching process for use in silicon micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.; Kelly, Michael J.; Martin, Jr., Samuel B.; Stevenson, Joel O.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    A reproducible process for uniformly etching silicon from a series of micromechanical structures used in electrical devices and the like includes providing a micromechanical structure having a silicon layer with defined areas for removal thereon and an electrochemical cell containing an aqueous hydrofluoric acid electrolyte. The micromechanical structure is submerged in the electrochemical cell and the defined areas of the silicon layer thereon are anodically biased by passing a current through the electrochemical cell for a time period sufficient to cause the defined areas of the silicon layer to become porous. The formation of the depth of the porous silicon is regulated by controlling the amount of current passing through the electrochemical cell. The micromechanical structure is then removed from the electrochemical cell and submerged in a hydroxide solution to remove the porous silicon. The process is subsequently repeated for each of the series of micromechanical structures to achieve a reproducibility better than 0.3%.

  10. 450mm etch process development and process chamber evaluation using 193i DSA guided pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collison, Wenli; Lin, Yii-Cheng; Dunn, Shannon; Takikawa, Hiroaki; Paris, James; Chen, Lucy; Detrick, Troy; Belen, Jun; Stojakovic, George; Goss, Michael; Fish, Norman; Park, Minjoon; Sun, Chih-Ming; Kelling, Mark; Lin, Pinyen

    2016-03-01

    In the Global 450mm Equipment Development Consortium (G450C), a 193i guided directed self-assembly (DSA) pattern has been used to create structures at the 14nm node and below. The first guided DSA patterned wafer was ready for etch process development within a month of the G450C's first 193i patterned wafer availability with one litho pass. Etch processes were scaled up from 300mm to 450mm for a 28nm pitch STI stack and a 40nm pitch M1 BEOL stack. The effects of various process parameters were investigated to fine tune each process. Overall process window has been checked and compared. Excellent process stability results were shown for current etch chambers.

  11. Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) of High Aspect Ratio SiC Microstructures using a Time-Multiplexed Etch-Passivate Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.; Beheim, Glenn M.

    2006-01-01

    High aspect ratio silicon carbide (SiC) microstructures are needed for microengines and other harsh environment micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Previously, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of low aspect ratio (AR less than or = 1) deep (greater than 100 micron) trenches in SiC has been reported. However, existing DRIE processes for SiC are not well-suited for definition of high aspect ratio features because such simple etch-only processes provide insufficient control over sidewall roughness and slope. Therefore, we have investigated the use of a time-multiplexed etch-passivate (TMEP) process, which alternates etching with polymer passivation of the etch sidewalls. An optimized TMEP process was used to etch high aspect ratio (AR greater than 5) deep (less than 100 micron) trenches in 6H-SiC. Power MEMS structures (micro turbine blades) in 6H-SiC were also fabricated.

  12. Advanced simulation technology for etching process design for CMOS device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    Plasma etching is a critical process for the realization of high performance in the next generation of CMOS devices. To predict and control fluctuations in the etching properties accurately during mass production, it is essential that etching process simulation technology considers fluctuations in the plasma chamber wall conditions, the effects of by-products on the critical dimensions, the Si recess dependence on the wafer open area ratio and local pattern structure, and the time-dependent plasma-induced damage distribution associated with the three-dimensional feature scale profile at the 100 nm level. This consideration can overcome the issues with conventional simulations performed under the assumed ideal conditions, which are not accurate enough for practical process design. In this article, these advanced process simulation technologies are reviewed, and, from the results of suitable process simulations, a new etching system that automatically controls the etching properties is proposed to enable stable CMOS device fabrication with high yields.

  13. Summary of Chalcogenide Glass Processing: Wet-Etching and Photolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a study designed to explore the different properties of two different chalcogenide materials, As2S3 and As24S38Se38, when subjected to photolithographic wet-etching techniques. Chalcogenide glasses are made by combining chalcogen elements S, Se, and Te with Group IV and/or V elements. The etchant was selected from the literature and was composed of sodium hydroxide, isopropyl alcohol, and deionized water and the types of chalcogenide glass for study were As2S3 and As24S38Se38. The main goals here were to obtain a single variable etch rate curve of etch depth per time versus NaOH overall solution concentration in M and to see the difference in etch rate between a given etchant when used on the different chalcogenide stoichiometries. Upon completion of these two goals, future studies will begin to explore creating complex, integrated photonic devices via these methods.

  14. Investigation of etching techniques for superconductive Nb/Al-Al2O3/Nb fabrication processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberger, A. W.; Lea, D. M.; Lloyd, F. L.

    1993-01-01

    Wet etching, CF4 and SF6 reactive ion etching (RIE), RIE/wet hybrid etching, Cl-based RIE, ion milling, and liftoff techniques have been investigated for use in superconductive Nb/Al-Al2O3/Nb fabrication processes. High-quality superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junctions have been fabricated using a variety of these etching methods; however, each technique offers distinct tradeoffs for a given process an wafer design. In particular, it was shown that SF6 provides an excellent RIE chemistry for low-voltage anisotropic etching of Nb with high selectivity to Al. The SF6 tool has greatly improved the trilevel resist junction insulation process. Excellent repeatability, selectivity with respect to quartz, and submicron resolution make Cl2 + BCl3 + CHCl3 RIE a very attractive process for trilayer patterning.

  15. Deep Etching Process Developed for the Fabrication of Silicon Carbide Microsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn M.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), because of its superior electrical and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, is a nearly ideal material for the microminiature sensors and actuators that are used in harsh environments where temperatures may reach 600 C or greater. Deep etching using plasma methods is one of the key processes used to fabricate silicon microsystems for more benign environments, but SiC has proven to be a more difficult material to etch, and etch depths in SiC have been limited to several micrometers. Recently, the Sensors and Electronics Technology Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field developed a plasma etching process that was shown to be capable of etching SiC to a depth of 60 mm. Deep etching of SiC is achieved by inductive coupling of radiofrequency electrical energy to a sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) plasma to direct a high flux of energetic ions and reactive fluorine atoms to the SiC surface. The plasma etch is performed at a low pressure, 5 mtorr, which together with a high gas throughput, provides for rapid removal of the gaseous etch products. The lateral topology of the SiC microstructure is defined by a thin film of etch-resistant material, such as indium-tin-oxide, which is patterned using conventional photolithographic processes. Ions from the plasma bombard the exposed SiC surfaces and supply the energy needed to initiate a reaction between SiC and atomic fluorine. In the absence of ion bombardment, no reaction occurs, so surfaces perpendicular to the wafer surface (the etch sidewalls) are etched slowly, yielding the desired vertical sidewalls.

  16. Process for Smoothing an Si Substrate after Etching of SiO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Tasha; Wu, Chi

    2003-01-01

    A reactive-ion etching (RIE) process for smoothing a silicon substrate has been devised. The process is especially useful for smoothing those silicon areas that have been exposed by etching a pattern of holes in a layer of silicon dioxide that covers the substrate. Applications in which one could utilize smooth silicon surfaces like those produced by this process include fabrication of optical waveguides, epitaxial deposition of silicon on selected areas of silicon substrates, and preparation of silicon substrates for deposition of adherent metal layers. During etching away of a layer of SiO2 that covers an Si substrate, a polymer becomes deposited on the substrate, and the substrate surface becomes rough (roughness height approximately equal to 50 nm) as a result of over-etching or of deposition of the polymer. While it is possible to smooth a silicon substrate by wet chemical etching, the undesired consequences of wet chemical etching can include compromising the integrity of the SiO2 sidewalls and undercutting of the adjacent areas of the silicon dioxide that are meant to be left intact. The present RIE process results in anisotropic etching that removes the polymer and reduces height of roughness of the silicon substrate to less than 10 nm while leaving the SiO2 sidewalls intact and vertical. Control over substrate versus sidewall etching (in particular, preferential etching of the substrate) is achieved through selection of process parameters, including gas flow, power, and pressure. Such control is not uniformly and repeatably achievable in wet chemical etching. The recipe for the present RIE process is the following: Etch 1 - A mixture of CF4 and O2 gases flowing at rates of 25 to 75 and 75 to 125 standard cubic centimeters per minute (stdcm3/min), respectively; power between 44 and 55 W; and pressure between 45 and 55 mtorr (between 6.0 and 7.3 Pa). The etch rate lies between approximately equal to 3 and approximately equal to 6 nm/minute. Etch 2 - O2 gas

  17. Study of the ICP etching process on InGaAs/InP array devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaochen; Deng, Jun; Shi, Yanli; Tian, Ying; Zou, Deshu

    2014-11-01

    It was very different between the etching rate of large patterns and narrow grooves on InGaAs/InP materials by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) technology. With the aim of high etching rate, good morphology, smooth interfaces and fewer defects, the etching mechanisms of ICP via changing gas flow rate, chamber pressure and RF power have been analyzed. Some recipes have been found to achieve a narrow stripe and deep groove with good uniformity, interface and morphology via high etching rate and good selectivity. The different phenomena during etching the large patterns and narrow grooves have been explained and the sets of parameters have been summarized that is adapted to the array device on InGaAs/InP materials during the ICP process.

  18. Etch Process Sensitivity To An Inductively Coupled Plasma Etcher Treated With Fluorine-Based Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Songlin; Sun, Zhiwen; Qian, Xueyu; Yin, Gerald

    1997-10-01

    Significant etch rate drop after the treatment of an etch chamber with Fluorine-based plasma has been found for some silicon etch processes on an inductively coupled plasma reactor, which might cause problems in IC production line once the etch chamber runs alternative processes with F-based and F-free chemistry, or needs frequent cleaning with F-plasma. In this work, a systematic study of the root cause of process sensitivity to the etch chamber treated with F-plasma has been conducted. The experimental results show that pressure is a key factor to affect the etch rate drop. Processes at high pressure are more sensitive than those at low pressure because the quenching of neutral reactive species becomes more severe after the F-treatment. O2 addition also increases the etch rate sensitivity, basically due to higher O2(subscript: )concentration after F-treatment which enhances the oxidation of silicon. The EDX and XPS elemental analysis of the chamber interior wall reveals a significant composition change after the interaction with F-plasma, the altered surface might accelerate the recombination of free radical species.

  19. A Silicon-Based, Sequential Coat-and-Etch Process to Fabricate Nearly Perfect Substrate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkarimi, P B; Spiller, E; Baker, S L; Stearns, D G; Robinson, J C; Olynick, D L; Salmassi, F; Liddle, J A; Liang, T; Stivers, A R

    2005-07-05

    For many thin-film applications substrate imperfections such as particles, pits, scratches, and general roughness, can nucleate film defects which can severely detract from the coating's performance. Previously we developed a coat-and-etch process, termed the ion beam thin film planarization process, to planarize substrate particles up to {approx} 70 nm in diameter. The process relied on normal incidence etching; however, such a process induces defects nucleated by substrate pits to grow much larger. We have since developed a coat-and-etch process to planarize {approx}70 nm deep by 70 nm wide substrate pits; it relies on etching at an off-normal incidence angle, i.e., an angle of {approx} 70{sup o} from the substrate normal. However, a disadvantage of this pit smoothing process is that it induces defects nucleated by substrate particles to grow larger. Combining elements from both processes we have been able to develop a silicon-based, coat-and-etch process to successfully planarize {approx}70 nm substrate particles and pits simultaneously to at or below 1 nm in height; this value is important for applications such as extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) masks. The coat-and-etch process has an added ability to significantly reduce high-spatial frequency roughness, rendering a nearly perfect substrate surface.

  20. EUV process establishment through litho and etch for N7 node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Yuhei; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Kubota, Minoru; Matsunaga, Koichi; Nafus, Kathleen; Foubert, Philippe; Mao, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technology is steadily reaching high volume manufacturing for 16nm half pitch node and beyond. However, some challenges, for example scanner availability and resist performance (resolution, CD uniformity (CDU), LWR, etch behavior and so on) are remaining. Advance EUV patterning on the ASML NXE:3300/ CLEAN TRACK LITHIUS Pro Z- EUV litho cluster is launched at imec, allowing for finer pitch patterns for L/S and CH. Tokyo Electron Ltd. and imec are continuously collabo rating to develop manufacturing quality POR processes for NXE:3300. TEL's technologies to enhance CDU, defectivity and LWR/LER can improve patterning performance. The patterning is characterized and optimized in both litho and etch for a more complete understanding of the final patterning performance. This paper reports on post-litho CDU improvement by litho process optimization and also post-etch LWR reduction by litho and etch process optimization.

  1. New Deep Reactive Ion Etching Process Developed for the Microfabrication of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.; Beheim, Glenn M.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising material for harsh environment sensors and electronics because it can enable such devices to withstand high temperatures and corrosive environments. Microfabrication techniques have been studied extensively in an effort to obtain the same flexibility of machining SiC that is possible for the fabrication of silicon devices. Bulk micromachining using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) is attractive because it allows the fabrication of microstructures with high aspect ratios (etch depth divided by lateral feature size) in single-crystal or polycrystalline wafers. Previously, the Sensors and Electronics Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center developed a DRIE process for SiC using the etchant gases sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and argon (Ar). This process provides an adequate etch rate of 0.2 m/min and yields a smooth surface at the etch bottom. However, the etch sidewalls are rougher than desired, as shown in the preceding photomicrograph. Furthermore, the resulting structures have sides that slope inwards, rather than being precisely vertical. A new DRIE process for SiC was developed at Glenn that produces smooth, vertical sidewalls, while maintaining an adequately high etch rate.

  2. High-Reliability Copper Interconnects through Dry Etching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Yasushi; Yamanobe, Tomomi; Ito, Toshio

    1995-02-01

    A modified high-temperature dry etching technique, which enables anisotropic patterning with a high etching selectivity and self-aligned passivation of a sidewall of an interconnect simultaneously, has been developed for fabrication of sub-quarter-micron Cu interconnects. Resistivities of the resulting Cu interconnects are in the range of 1.7 to 2.2 µΩ· cm for the linewidth of 0.2-3.0 µ m. As a result of electromigration (EM) tests, it has been observed that median time to failure (MTF) of the Cu interconnects depends on their linewidth. This behavior is considered to be caused by their grain structure, such as a bamboo-type structure for linewidths narrower than 0.3 µ m. In comparison with a MTF of a conventional Al-1%Si line, these Cu interconnects have at least 100 times longer lifetime. Activation energy for EM damage of the 0.7-µ m-wide line is 0.88 eV.

  3. Electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Myers, D.R.; Vook, F.L.

    1988-06-16

    An electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process for carrying out patterning and selective removing of material in semiconductor device fabrication includes the steps of selective ion implanting, photochemical dry etching, and thermal annealing, in that order. In the selective ion implanting step, regions of the semiconductor material in a desired pattern are damaged and the remainder of the regions of the material not implanted are left undamaged. The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is increased in the damaged regions of the pattern compared to undamaged regions. In the photochemical dry etching step which follows ion implanting step, the material in the undamaged regions of the semiconductor are removed substantially faster than in the damaged regions representing the pattern, leaving the ion-implanted, damaged regions as raised surface structures on the semiconductor material. After completion of photochemical dry etching step, the thermal annealing step is used to restore the electrical conductivity of the damaged regions of the semiconductor material.

  4. Electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Myers, David R.; Vook, Frederick L.

    1989-01-01

    An electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process for carrying out patterning and selective removing of material in semiconductor device fabrication includes the steps of selective ion implanting, photochemical dry etching, and thermal annealing, in that order. In the selective ion implanting step, regions of the semiconductor material in a desired pattern are damaged and the remainder of the regions of the material not implanted are left undamaged. The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is increased in the damaged regions of the pattern compared to undamaged regions. In the photochemical dry etching step which follows ion implanting step, the material in the undamaged regions of the semiconductor are removed substantially faster than in the damaged regions representing the pattern, leaving the ion-implanted, damaged regions as raised surface structures on the semiconductor material. After completion of photochemical dry etching step, the thermal annealing step is used to restore the electrical conductivity of the damaged regions of the semiconductor material.

  5. Silicon homojunction solar cells via a hydrogen plasma etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, S. Q.; Xu, S.; Zhou, H. P.; Wei, D. Y.; Huang, S. Y.; Xu, L. X.; Sern, C. C.; Guo, Y. N.; Khan, S.; Xu, Y.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the one-step formation of an efficient Si homojunction solar cell produced by a simple exposure of p-type Si wafers to low-temperature inductively coupled hydrogen plasma. The formation of oxygen thermal donors during hydrogen plasma treatment is responsible for the conductivity type conversion and the final formation of Si homojunction. The hydrogen plasma etching with suppressed heavy ion bombardment results in a relatively flat surface, which is favourable for deposition of passivation layers such as silicon nitride. The integrated Si homojunction solar cell consisting of Al/p-c-Si/n-c-Si/SiN/Al-grid has demonstrated a maximum photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.6%.

  6. Effects of wet etch processing on laser-induced damage of fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Battersby, C.L.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Sheehan, L.M.

    1998-12-22

    Laser-induced damage of transparent fused silica optical components by 355 nm illumination occurs primarily at surface defects produced during the grinding and polishing processes. These defects can either be surface defects or sub-surface damage.Wet etch processing in a buffered hydrogen fluoride (HF) solution has been examined as a tool for characterizing such defects. A study was conducted to understand the effects of etch depth on the damage threshold of fused silica substrates. The study used a 355 nm, 7.5 ns, 10 Hz Nd:YAG laser to damage test fused silica optics through various wet etch processing steps. Inspection of the surface quality was performed with Nomarski microscopy and Total Internal Reflection Microscopy. The damage test data and inspection results were correlated with polishing process specifics. The results show that a wet etch exposes subsurface damage while maintaining or improving the laser damage performance. The benefits of a wet etch must be evaluated for each polishing process.

  7. Plasma surface kinetics studies of silicon dioxide etch process in inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Won-Seok; Yu, Dong-Hun; Cho, Deog-Gyun; Yook, Yeong-Geun; Chun, Poo-Reum; Lee, Se-Ah; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Im, Yeon-Ho

    2013-09-01

    With continuous decrease of nanoscale design rule, plasma etching processes to form high aspect ratio contact hole still remains a challenge to overcome their inherent drawbacks such as bowing and twisted feature. Due to their complexities there still exist big gaps between current research status and predictable modeling of this process. To address this issue, we proposed a surface kinetic model of silicon nitride etch process under inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas. For this work, the cut-off probe and quadrapole mass spectroscopy were used for measuring electrical plasma properties, the ion and neutral radical species. Furthermore, the systematic surface analysis was performed to investigate the thickness and chemical bonding of polymer passivation layer during the etch process. The proposed semi-global surface kinetic model can consider deposition of polymer passivation layer and silicon nitride etching self-consistently. The predicted modeling results showed good agreement with experimental data. We believe that our research will provide valuable information to avoid the empirical development of plasma etching process.

  8. Investigation of the neutral-solution etch process for refractive SOE antireflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Maish, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    Antireflection of optically clear glass used in photovoltaic concentrator refractive secondary optical elements (SOE's) was investigated using the neutral-solution etch process developed by Schott Glass. Test coupons and SOE's made from barium zinc glass, which does not solarize under ultraviolet exposure, were successfully etched at the center point process variable conditions of 87{degrees}C and 24 hours. Reflectance of the plano-plano dropped from 7.7% to 0.8%, with a corresponding increase in transmission from 91.7% to 98.5%. The etching process uses non-hydrofluoric, relatively non-toxic chemicals in a low-cost process well suited for use by photovoltaic system manufacturers during production. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Reaction ion etching process for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surface.

    PubMed

    Sun, Laixi; Liu, Hongjie; Huang, Jin; Ye, Xin; Xia, Handing; Li, Qingzhi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Yang, Liming; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-01-11

    Laser induced damage of fused silica optics occurs primarily on optical surface or subsurface resulting from various defects produced during polishing/grinding process. Many new kinds of surface treatment processes are explored to remove or control the defects on fused silica surface. In this study, we report a new application of reaction ion etching (RIE)-based surface treatment process for manufacture of high quality fused silica optics. The influence of RIE processes on laser damage resistance as a function of etching depth and the evolution of typical defects which are associated with laser damage performance were investigated. The results show that the impurity element defects and subsurface damage on the samples surface were efficiently removed and prevented. Pure silica surface with relatively single-stable stoichiometry and low carbon atomic concentration was created during the etching. The laser damage resistance of the etched samples increased dramatically. The increase of roughness and ODC point defect with deeper etching are believed to be the main factors to limit further increase of the damage resistance of fused silica. The study is expected to contribute to the development of fused silica optics with high resistance to laser induced degradation in the future. PMID:26832251

  10. Dry etching of metallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollinger, D.

    1983-01-01

    The production dry etch processes are reviewed from the perspective of microelectronic fabrication applications. The major dry etch processes used in the fabrication of microelectronic devices can be divided into two categories - plasma processes in which samples are directly exposed to an electrical discharge, and ion beam processes in which samples are etched by a beam of ions extracted from a discharge. The plasma etch processes can be distinguished by the degree to which ion bombardment contributes to the etch process. This, in turn is related to capability for anisotropic etching. Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) and Ion Beam Etching are of most interest for etching of thin film metals. RIE is generally considered the best process for large volume, anisotropic aluminum etching.

  11. Modified photoresist etch mask process for InP channeled substrate lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, D.T.C.; Yan, M.F.; Wynn, J.D.; Wilt, D.P.

    1989-03-01

    The authors develop a new photoresist etch mask process to etch (001) InP wafers to obtain (111) B-faceted v-grooves for channeled substrate laser applications. They investigate the use of HCl and HF solutions to remove native oxide layers prior to v-groove etching. They also study the relationship between the photoresist mask undercutting and the bath temperature used for native oxide removal. The degree of undercutting in photoresist mask can be reduced about two times by increasing the HF bath temperature from room temperature to 48/sup 0/C during the oxide removal process. They also identify two important factors that control the mask undercutting rates as (i) the thickness of native oxide on InP surface and (ii) the chemical reaction between InP and the oxide removal bath solution.

  12. Finding practical phenomenological models that include both photoresist behavior and etch process effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunwook; Do, Thuy; Sturtevant, John

    2015-03-01

    For more than five decades, the semiconductor industry has overcome technology challenges with innovative ideas that have continued to enable Moore's Law. It is clear that multi-patterning lithography is vital for 20nm half pitch using 193i. Multi-patterning exposure sequences and pattern multiplication processes can create complicated tolerance accounting due to the variability associated with the component processes. It is essential to ensure good predictive accuracy of compact etch models used in multipatterning simulation. New modelforms have been developed to account for etch bias behavior at 20 nm and below. The new modeling components show good results in terms of global fitness and some improved predication capability for specific features. We've also investigated a new methodology to make the etch model aware of 3D resist profiles.

  13. HF-based etching processes for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Steele, R A; Shen, N; Monticelli, M V; Feit, M D; Laurence, T A; Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Wong, L L

    2010-02-23

    The effect of various HF-based etching processes on the laser damage resistance of scratched fused silica surfaces has been investigated. Conventionally polished and subsequently scratched fused silica plates were treated by submerging in various HF-based etchants (HF or NH{sub 4}F:HF at various ratios and concentrations) under different process conditions (e.g., agitation frequencies, etch times, rinse conditions, and environmental cleanliness). Subsequently, the laser damage resistance (at 351 or 355 nm) of the treated surface was measured. The laser damage resistance was found to be strongly process dependent and scaled inversely with scratch width. The etching process was optimized to remove or prevent the presence of identified precursors (chemical impurities, fracture surfaces, and silica-based redeposit) known to lead to laser damage initiation. The redeposit precursor was reduced (and hence the damage threshold was increased) by: (1) increasing the SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-} solubility through reduction in the NH4F concentration and impurity cation impurities, and (2) improving the mass transport of reaction product (SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-}) (using high frequency ultrasonic agitation and excessive spray rinsing) away from the etched surface. A 2D finite element crack-etching and rinsing mass transport model (incorporating diffusion and advection) was used to predict reaction product concentration. The predictions are consistent with the experimentally observed process trends. The laser damage thresholds also increased with etched amount (up to {approx}30 {micro}m), which has been attributed to: (1) etching through lateral cracks where there is poor acid penetration, and (2) increasing the crack opening resulting in increased mass transport rates. With the optimized etch process, laser damage resistance increased dramatically; the average threshold fluence for damage initiation for 30 {micro}m wide scratches increased from 7 to 41 J/cm{sup 2}, and the statistical

  14. Fabrication of micro-structure on glass surface using micro-indentation and wet etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Shinya; Miki, Atsushi; Inomata, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Takeshi; Kasai, Hiroaki

    2008-09-01

    In order to improve the new micro-fabrication technology using micro-indentation and wet etching, in which the etching rate drastically decrease at the indented area and consequently micro-structure can be formed on the glass surface, the effect of the applying load on the etching rate change was investigated. The extent of the etching rate change was found to be almost constant irrespective of the amount of the applying load. Therefore, the height of the structure could be controlled simply by the etching depth as far as the densified portion remains beneath the glass surface. And some example micro-patterns were fabricated in this process. Various kinds of indentation methods were employed, including scanning a pointed tool under a load and wet abrasive blast. The patterns can be freely drawn by the use of numerical control (NC) machine. Mold pattern can be also applied, which enables drawing many lines simultaneously. In every method, the heights of the patterns were confirmed to be very uniform. This new type of the micro-fabrication method was referred to as "SMIL (Stress Masked Image Lithography)".

  15. A Simple Single Step diffusion and Emitter Etching Process for High Efficiency Gallium Antimonide Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rajagopalan; N.S. Reddy; E. Ehsani; I.B. Bhat; P.S. Dutta; R.J. Gutmann; G. Nichols; G.W. Charache; O. Sulima

    2003-08-29

    A single step diffusion followed by precise etching of the diffused layer has been developed to obtain a diffusion profile appropriate for high efficiency GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells. The junction depth was controlled through monitoring of light current-voltage (I-V) curves (photovoltaic response) during the post diffusion emitter etching process. The measured photoresponses (prior to device fabrication) have been correlated with the quantum efficiencies and the open circuit voltages in the fabricated devices. An optimum junction depth for obtaining highest quantum efficiency and open circuit voltage is presented based on diffusion lengths (or monitoring carrier lifetimes), carrier mobility and typical diffused impurity profile in GaSb.

  16. Optimization of an electron cyclotron resonance plasma etch process for n{sup +} polysilicon: HBr process chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, G.D.; Blain, M.G.; Westerfield, P.L.; Trutna, L.S.; Maxwell, K.L.

    1993-08-01

    Designed experiments were employed to characterize a process for etching phosphorus doped polycrystalline silicon with HBr in a close-coupled ECR plasma reactor configured for 200 mm wafers. A fractional factorial screening experiment was employed to determine the principal input factors and the main etch effects. Linear models of the process responses indicate RF power, O{sub 2} flow rate, and the position of the resonance zone (with respect to the wafer) as the three strongest factors influencing process performance. Response surfaces generated using data from a follow-on response surface methodology (RSM) experiment predicted an optimum operating region characterized by relatively low RF power, a small O{sub 2} flow, and a resonance zone position close to the wafer. The optimized process demonstrated a polysilicon etch rate of 270 nm/min, an etch rate non-uniformity of 2.2% (1s), an etch selectivity to oxide greater than 100:1, and anisotropic profiles. Particle test results for the optimized process indicated that careful selection of the O{sub 2} fraction is required to avoid polymer deposition and particle formation.

  17. Quantum cascade laser based monitoring of CF2 radical concentration as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, M.; Lang, N.; Zimmermann, S.; Schulz, S. E.; Buchholtz, W.; Röpcke, J.; van Helden, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric etching plasma processes for modern interlevel dielectrics become more and more complex by the introduction of new ultra low-k dielectrics. One challenge is the minimization of sidewall damage, while etching ultra low-k porous SiCOH by fluorocarbon plasmas. The optimization of this process requires a deeper understanding of the concentration of the CF2 radical, which acts as precursor in the polymerization of the etch sample surfaces. In an industrial dielectric etching plasma reactor, the CF2 radical was measured in situ using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) around 1106.2 cm-1. We measured Doppler-resolved ro-vibrational absorption lines and determined absolute densities using transitions in the ν3 fundamental band of CF2 with the aid of an improved simulation of the line strengths. We found that the CF2 radical concentration during the etching plasma process directly correlates to the layer structure of the etched wafer. Hence, this correlation can serve as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes. Applying QCL based absorption spectroscopy opens up the way for advanced process monitoring and etching controlling in semiconductor manufacturing.

  18. Process optimization for lattice-selective wet etching of crystalline silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald G.; Guthrie, William F.; Allen, Richard A.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Cresswell, Michael W.; Murabito, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Lattice-selective etching of silicon is used in a number of applications, but it is particularly valuable in those for which the lattice-defined sidewall angle can be beneficial to the functional goals. A relatively small but important niche application is the fabrication of tip characterization standards for critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs). CD-AFMs are commonly used as reference tools for linewidth metrology in semiconductor manufacturing. Accurate linewidth metrology using CD-AFM, however, is critically dependent upon calibration of the tip width. Two national metrology institutes and at least two commercial vendors have explored the development of tip calibration standards using lattice-selective etching of crystalline silicon. The National Institute of Standards and Technology standard of this type is called the single crystal critical dimension reference material. These specimens, which are fabricated using a lattice-plane-selective etch on (110) silicon, exhibit near vertical sidewalls and high uniformity and can be used to calibrate CD-AFM tip width to a standard uncertainty of less than 1 nm. During the different generations of this project, we evaluated variations of the starting material and process conditions. Some of our starting materials required a large etch bias to achieve the desired linewidths. During the optimization experiment described in this paper, we found that for potassium hydroxide etching of the silicon features, it was possible to independently tune the target linewidth and minimize the linewidth nonuniformity. Consequently, this process is particularly well suited for small-batch fabrication of CD-AFM linewidth standards.

  19. Improve the laser damage resistance of fused silica by wet surface cleaning and optimized HF etch process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Liu, Ying; Rao, Huanle; Fu, Shaojun

    2013-07-01

    Fabrication-induced metal contaminations and subsurface damage are generally identified as the laser damage initiators that are responsible for the laser induced damage in fused silica. In this paper, the removal of those two initiators are realized by two methods: wet chemical surface cleaning and optimized HF-based etch process. Two kinds of chemical leaching are used to removing the Ce and other metal impurities respectively. In order prevent the redeposition of the reactive byproducts during HF etch process, we optimized the traditional HF etch process in two ways: absence of NH4F in etch solution and presence of megasonic and ultrasonic agitation during and after etch respectively. And laser damage tests show that these two treatments greatly improve the laser damage resistance of fused silica.

  20. Crackless linear through-wafer etching of Pyrex glass using liquid-assisted CO2 laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C. K.; Sung, Y. C.; Huang, G. R.; Hsiao, E. J.; Lin, W. H.; Lin, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    Pyrex glass etching is an important technology for the microfluid application to lab-on-a-chip devices, but suffers from very low etching rate and mask-requiring process in conventional HF/BOE wet or plasma dry etching as well as thermal induced crack surface by CO2 laser processing. In this paper, we applied the liquid-assisted laser processing (LALP) method for linear through-wafer deep etching of Pyrex glass without mask materials to obtain a crackless surface at very fast etching rates up to 25 μm/s for a 20 mm long trench. The effect of laser scanning rate and water depth on the etching of the 500 μm thick Pyrex glass immersed in liquid water was investigated. The smooth surface without cracks can be achieved together with the much reduced height of bulge via an appropriate parameter control. A mechanism of thermal stress reduction in water and shear-force-enhanced debris removal is discussed. The quality improvement of glass etching using LALP is due to the cooling effect of the water to reduce the temperature gradient for a crackless surface and natural convection during etching to carry away the debris for diminishing bulge formation.

  1. Challenges in the Plasma Etch Process Development in the sub-20nm Technology Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kaushik

    2013-09-01

    For multiple generations of semiconductor technologies, RF plasmas have provided a reliable platform for critical and non-critical patterning applications. The electron temperature of processes in a RF plasma is typically several electron volts. A substantial portion of the electron population is within the energy range accessible for different types of electron collision processes, such as electron collision dissociation and dissociative electron attachment. When these electron processes occur within a small distance above the wafer, the neutral species, radicals and excited molecules, generated from these processes take part in etching reactions impacting selectivity, ARDE and micro-loading. The introduction of finFET devices at 22 nm technology node at Intel marks the transition of planar devices to 3-dimensional devices, which add to the challenges to etch process in fabricating such devices. In the sub-32 nm technology node, Back-end-of-the-line made a change with the implementation of Trench First Metal Hard Mask (TFMHM) integration scheme, which has hence gained traction and become the preferred integration of low-k materials for BEOL. This integration scheme also enables Self-Aligned Via (SAV) patterning which prevents via CD growth and confines via by line trenches to better control via to line spacing. In addition to this, lack of scaling of 193 nm Lithography and non-availability of EUV based lithography beyond concept, has placed focus on novel multiple patterning schemes. This added complexity has resulted in multiple etch schemes to enable technology scaling below 80 nm Pitches, as shown by the memory manufacturers. Double-Patterning and Quad-Patterning have become increasingly used techniques to achieve 64 nm, 56 nm and 45 nm Pitch technologies in Back-end-of-the-line. Challenges associated in the plasma etching of these multiple integration schemes will be discussed in the presentation. In collaboration with A. Ranjan, TEL Technology Center, America

  2. Sampling plan optimization for detection of lithography and etch CD process excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Richard C.; Nurani, Raman K.; Lee, Sung Jin; Ortiz, Luis G.; Preil, Moshe E.; Shanthikumar, J. G.; Riley, Trina; Goodwin, Greg A.

    2000-06-01

    Effective sample planning requires a careful combination of statistical analysis and lithography engineering. In this paper, we present a complete sample planning methodology including baseline process characterization, determination of the dominant excursion mechanisms, and selection of sampling plans and control procedures to effectively detect the yield- limiting excursions with a minimum of added cost. We discuss the results of our novel method in identifying critical dimension (CD) process excursions and present several examples of poly gate Photo and Etch CD excursion signatures. Using these results in a Sample Planning model, we determine the optimal sample plan and statistical process control (SPC) chart metrics and limits for detecting these excursions. The key observations are that there are many different yield- limiting excursion signatures in photo and etch, and that a given photo excursion signature turns into a different excursion signature at etch with different yield and performance impact. In particular, field-to-field variance excursions are shown to have a significant impact on yield. We show how current sampling plan and monitoring schemes miss these excursions and suggest an improved procedure for effective detection of CD process excursions.

  3. Microlens array production in a microtechnological dry etch and reflow process for display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knieling, T.; Shafi, M.; Lang, W.; Benecke, W.

    2012-03-01

    The fabrication of arrays consisting of densely ordered circular convex microlenses with diameters of 126 mum made of quartz glass in a photoresist reflow and dry etch structure transition process is demonstrated. The rectangular lens arrays with dimensions of 6 mm x 9 mm were designed for focussing collimated light on the pixel center regions of a translucent interference display, which also was produced in microtechnological process steps. The lenses focus light on pixel centers and thus serve for increasing display brightness and contrast since incoming collimated light is partially blocked by opaque metallic ring contacts at the display pixel edges. The focal lengths of the lenses lie between 0.46 mm and 2.53 mm and were adjusted by varying ratio of the selective dry etch rate of photoresist and quartz glass. Due to volume shrinking and edge line pinning of the photoresist structures the lenses curvatures emerge hyperbolic, leading to improved focussing performance.

  4. The magnetic properties and microstructure of Co-Pt thin films using wet etching process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyoung; Cho, Young-Lae; Lee, Won-Pyo; Suh, Su-Jeong

    2014-11-01

    Perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) is a promising candidate for high density magnetic recording and has already been applied to hard disk drive (HDD) systems. However, media noise still limits the recording density. To reduce the media noise and achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in hard disk media, the grains of the magnetic layer must be magnetically isolated from each other. This study examined whether sputter-deposited Co-Pt thin films can have adjacent grains that are physically isolated. To accomplish this, the effects of the sputtering conditions and wet etching process on magnetic properties and the microstructure of the films were investigated. The film structure was Co-Pt (30 nm)/Ru (30 nm)/NiFe (10 nm)/Ta (5 nm). The composition of the Co-Pt thin films was Co-30.7 at.% Pt. The Co-Pt thin films were deposited in Ar gas at 5, 10, 12.5, and 15 mTorr. Wet etching process was performed using 7% nitric acid solution at room temperature. These films had high out-of-plane coercivity of up to 7032 Oe, which is twice that of the as-deposited film. These results suggest that wet etched Co-Pt thin films have weaker exchange coupling and enhanced out-of-plane coercivity, which would reduce the medium noise. PMID:25958585

  5. The effects of polymer side-chain structure on roughness formation of ArF photoresist in plasma etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesugi, Takuji; Okada, Takeru; Wada, Akira; Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Maeda, Shinichi; Samukawa, Seiji

    2012-02-01

    Low etching resistance and roughness formation of ArF photoresist during plasma etching are serious problems. We have previously found that decisive factors affecting the plasma resistance and roughness formation in an ArF photoresist are determined by ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet radiation and roughness formation is dominated by chemical reactions. In this paper, on the basis of our previous findings on the interaction between radiation species from plasma and ArF photoresist polymers, we investigated the polymer structural dependence for the degradation mechanism of ArF photoresist in the plasma etching processes. The etching resistance of ArF photoresist was improved by controlling the elemental ratio of oxygen atoms and ring structures in photoresist polymer. Furthermore, lactone C=O bond is found to be a key factor for roughness formation during the etching process. We have revealed the importance of the molecular structure of ArF photoresist for improving the surface roughness and etching resistance during the plasma etching process.

  6. Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    NREL scientists have invented the 'black silicon' nanocatalytic wet-chemical etch, an inexpensive, one-step process that literally turns the solar cells black, allowing them to absorb more than 98% of incident sunlight. The process costs just a few cents per watt of solar-cell power-producing capacity. Increases in manufactured cell efficiencies of up to 0.8% are possible because of the reduced reflectance of black silicon. This would reduce silicon solar module costs by $5-$10 per module.

  7. Use of inorganic salts during the etching process in the fabrication of chemically modified capillaries for open tubular electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Pesek, Joseph J; Matyska, Maria T; Velpula, Sunandini

    2005-05-01

    Capillaries for use in electrophoretic analyses are etched with ammonium bifluoride and in some cases a second inorganic salt is included in the process. The effects of the presence of these inorganic components in the surface matrix on the electromigration of heterocyclic aromatic amines and enkephalins are evaluated. Resolution, efficiency, and peak shape are used to compare the various columns. In one instance, the etched surface is then modified by the addition of an octadecyl moiety using a silanization/hydrosilation procedure. The surface properties of the various etched capillaries are also compared by electroosmotic flow measurements. PMID:15938182

  8. Nanotexturing process on microtextured surfaces of silicon solar cells by SF6/O2 reactive ion etching.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hyungyong; Choi, Jaeho; Lim, Gyoungho; Parida, Bhaskar; Kim, Keunjoo; Jo, Jung Hee; Kim, Hong Seub

    2013-12-01

    We investigated a nanotexturing process on the microtextured surface of single crystalline silicon solar cell by the reactive ion etching process in SF6/O2 mixed gas ambient. P-type Si wafer samples were prepared using a chemical wet etching process to address saw damage removal and achieve microtexturing. The microtextured wafers were further processed for nanotexturing by exposure to reactive ions within a circular tray of wafer carrier containing many small holes for uniform etching. As the dry etching times were increased to 2, 4 and finally to 8 min, surface structures were observed in a transition from nanoholes to nanorods, and a variation in wafer color from dark blue to black. The surface nanostructures showed a lowered photoreflectance and enhanced quantum efficiency within the visible light region with wavelengths of less than 679 nm. The nanohole structure etched for 2 min showed enhanced conversion efficiency when compared to the bare sample; however, the nanorod structure etched for 8 min exhibited the decreased efficiency with a reduced short circuit current, indicating that the surface nanostructural damage with the enlarged nanoperimetric surface area is sensitive to surface passivation from the surface recombination process. PMID:24266144

  9. Simplified Etching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saranovitz, Norman S.

    1969-01-01

    The process for making a celluoid etching (drypaint technique) is feasible for the high school art room because the use of acid is avoided. The procedure outlined includes; 1) preparation of the plate, 2) inking the plate, 3) printing the plate, 4) tools necessary for the preceding. (BF)

  10. Characterization of the high density plasma etching process of CCTO thin films for the fabrication of very high density capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamore, C.; Tringali, C.; Sparta', N.; Di Marco, S.; Grasso, A.; Ravesi, S.

    2010-02-01

    In this work the feasibility of CCTO (Calcium Copper Titanate) patterning by etching process is demonstrated and fully characterized in a hard to etch materials etcher. CCTO sintered in powder shows a giant relative dielectric constant (105) measured at 1 MHz at room temperature. This feature is furthermore coupled with stability from 101 Hz to 106 Hz in a wide temperature range (100K - 600K). In principle, this property can allow to fabricate very high capacitance density condenser. Due to its perovskite multi-component structure, CCTO can be considered a hard to etch material. For high density capacitor fabrication, CCTO anisotropic etching is requested by using high density plasma. The behavior of etched CCTO was studied in a HRe- (High Density Reflected electron) plasma etcher using Cl2/Ar chemistry. The relationship between the etch rate and the Cl2/Ar ratio was also studied. The effects of RF MHz, KHz Power and pressure variation, the impact of HBr addiction to the Cl2/Ar chemistry on the CCTO etch rate and on its selectivity to Pt and photo resist was investigated.

  11. Etching process for improving the strength of a laser-machined silicon-based ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Copley, S.M.; Tao, H.; Todd-Copley, J.A.

    1991-06-11

    A process is disclosed for improving the strength of laser-machined articles formed of a silicon-based ceramic material such as silicon nitride, in which the laser-machined surface is immersed in an etching solution of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid for a duration sufficient to remove substantially all of a silicon film residue on the surface but insufficient to allow the solution to unduly attack the grain boundaries of the underlying silicon nitride substrate. This effectively removes the silicon film as a source of cracks that otherwise could propagate downwardly into the silicon nitride substrate and significantly reduce its strength. 1 figure.

  12. Etching process for improving the strength of a laser-machined silicon-based ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Copley, Stephen M.; Tao, Hongyi; Todd-Copley, Judith A.

    1991-01-01

    A process for improving the strength of laser-machined articles formed of a silicon-based ceramic material such as silicon nitride, in which the laser-machined surface is immersed in an etching solution of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid for a duration sufficient to remove substantially all of a silicon film residue on the surface but insufficient to allow the solution to unduly attack the grain boundaries of the underlying silicon nitride substrate. This effectively removes the silicon film as a source of cracks that otherwise could propagate downwardly into the silicon nitride substrate and significantly reduce its strength.

  13. Ion-Assisted Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Daniel; Abraham-Shrauner, Barbara

    1996-11-01

    We analyze plasma etching of two-dimensional, long trenches where directed ions modeled by drifted Maxwellian distribution functions and isotropic neutral molecules contribute to the etch rate. Analytic expressions for the etch rates enable the user to plot the etch profiles by using standard computer packages for nonlinear first-order ordinary differential equations for the point and its slope. First, etch profiles are shown for ion-assisted etching where the thermal etching of the neutrals is enhanced by the ions. Second, we show etch profiles of a multiple layer device where one layer is n-type silicon (arsenic doped) that etches isotropically (G.S. Oehrlein, "Reactive Ion Etching," Handbook of Plasma Processing, Technology, Ed. S.M. Rossnagel, et al., Noyes Pub., NJ, 1990) The etch rates for the other layers are in the ion flux-limited regime. The lateral etching of the n-type silicon illustrates the necessity of sidewall passivation for this structure.

  14. High-etching selectivity of spin-on-carbon hard mask process for 22nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwao, Fumiko; Shimura, Satoru; Kyouda, Hideharu; Oyama, Kenichi; Yamauchi, Shohei; Hara, Arisa; Natori, Sakurako; Yaegashi, Hidetami

    2012-03-01

    As part of the trend toward finer semiconductor design rules, the resist film thickness is getting thinner, and the etching technology that uses resist masking is getting more difficult. To solve such a problem in recent years, the film structure used in the resist process also is changing from the single-layer process (BARC and resist stacked film) to the multi-layer process (Carbon hard-mask, middle layer and resist stacked film) The carbon hard-mask of multi-layer process can be divided into two kinds, which are the CVD-carbon (CVD-C) that uses the chemical vapor deposition method and Spin-on-carbon (SOC) that uses the spin-coating method. CVD-C is very attractive for ensuring the high etching selection ratio, but still has major challenges in particle reduction, lower planarization of substrate and high process cost. On the other hand, SOC is very attractive for low cost process, high level of planarization of substrate and no particles. Against this background, we verify the development of the SOC that had the high etch selection ratio by improving etching condition, material and SOC cure condition. Moreover, we can fabricate below 30nm SiO2 patterning and the possibility of development with extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) was suggested. This paper reports on the results of a comprehensive process evaluation of a SOC based multi-layer technology using lithography clusters, etching tools.

  15. Power ultrasound irradiation during the alkaline etching process of the 2024 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutarlier, V.; Viennet, R.; Rolet, J.; Gigandet, M. P.; Hihn, J. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Prior to any surface treatment on an aluminum alloy, a surface preparation is necessary. This commonly consists in performing an alkaline etching followed by acid deoxidizing. In this work, the use of power ultrasound irradiation during the etching step on the 2024 aluminum alloy was studied. The etching rate was estimated by weight loss, and the alkaline film formed during the etching step was characterized by glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The benefit of power ultrasound during the etching step was confirmed by pitting potential measurement in NaCl solution after a post-treatment (anodizing).

  16. Pattern scaling with directed self assembly through lithography and etch process integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathsack, Benjamen; Somervell, Mark; Hooge, Josh; Muramatsu, Makoto; Tanouchi, Keiji; Kitano, Takahiro; Nishimura, Eiichi; Yatsuda, Koichi; Nagahara, Seiji; Hiroyuki, Iwaki; Akai, Keiji; Hayakawa, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) has the potential to extend scaling for both line/space and hole patterns. DSA has shown the capability for pitch reduction (multiplication), hole shrinks, CD self-healing as well as a pathway towards line edge roughness (LER) and pattern collapse improvement [1-4]. The current challenges for industry adoption are materials maturity, practical process integration, hardware capability, defect reduction and design integration. Tokyo Electron (TEL) has created close collaborations with customers, consortia and material suppliers to address these challenges with the long term goal of robust manufacturability. This paper provides a wide range of DSA demonstrations to accommodate different device applications. In collaboration with IMEC, directed line/space patterns at 12.5 and 14 nm HP are demonstrated with PS-b-PMMA (poly(styrene-b-methylmethacrylate)) using both chemo and grapho-epitaxy process flows. Pre-pattern exposure latitudes of >25% (max) have been demonstrated with 4X directed self-assembly on 300 mm wafers for both the lift off and etch guide chemo-epitaxy process flows. Within TEL's Technology Development Center (TDC), directed selfassembly processes have been applied to holes for both CD shrink and variation reduction. Using a PS-b-PMMA hole shrink process, negative tone developed pre-pattern holes are reduced to below 30 nm with critical dimension uniformity (CDU) of 0.9 nm (3s) and contact edge roughness (CER) of 0.8 nm. To generate higher resolution beyond a PS-b-PMMA system, a high chi material is used to demonstrate 9 nm HP line/ space post-etch patterns. In this paper, TEL presents process solutions for both line/space and hole DSA process integrations.

  17. Influence of Interface Structure on Chemical Etching Process for Air Gap of Microelectromechanical System Based on Surface Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young; Kim, Joon; Polla, Dennis.; Shin, Young

    1998-12-01

    This paper analyses the problems posed by the interface structure during chemical etching by Hydro-fluoric (HF) acid for creating air gaps in microelectromechnical system (MEMS) devices using PZT(53/47) films and surface micromachining techniques. In order to investigate the influence of interface structure on the HF chemical etching process, Pt/PZT/Pt/Ti/TiO2/polysilicon/Si3N4/PSG/Si (Samples A and C) and Pt/PZT/RuO2/Ru/Si3N4/PSG/Si (Sample B) structures were fabricated. These structures are selected for a microcantilever beam and/or an uncooled IR detectors fabricated with PZT piezoelectric/pyroelectric films based on the surface micromachining technique. Both need etching for the removal of phosphor silicate glass (PSG) to create an air gap. If the devices had a poor interface structure, they would fail during the HF chemical etching process because the poor interface structure would act as a kind of penetration path for etching acid leading to unwanted etching. Therefore, it is very important to investigate the interface structure to fabricate efficient MEMS devices. In this study two different solutions have been suggested to improve the interface structure. The first is post thermal annealing at 900°C for 30 min. after deposition of polycrystalline silicon for sample A. Secondly, a RuO2/Ru hybrid electrode was deposited on Si3N4 directly instead of on the Pt/Ti/TiO2/Polysilicon electrode, which has Pt/PZT/RuO2/Ru/Si3N4/PSG/Si as the device structure. These two solutions suggest that a dense interface structure increases enhances of success of the chemical etching process of MEMS devices fabricated using PZT films and surface micromachining techniques.

  18. Novel ArF photoresist polymer to suppress the roughness formation in plasma etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Maeda, Shin-ichi; Uesugi, Takuji; Okada, Takeru; Wada, Akira; Samukawa, Seiji

    2013-03-01

    The serious problem associated with 193-nm lithography using an ArF photoresist is roughness formation of photoresist polymer during plasma processes. We have previously investigated the mechanism of roughness formation caused by plasma. The main deciding factor for roughness formation is a chemical reaction between photoresist polymer and reactive species from plasma. The lactone group in photoresist polymer is highly chemically reactive, and shrinking the lactone structure enhances the roughness formation. In this paper, on the basis of the mechanism of roughness formation, we propose a novel ArF photoresist polymer. The roughness formation was much more suppressed in the novel photoresist polymer during plasma etching process than in the previous type. In the novel photoresist polymer, chemical reactions were spread evenly on the photoresist film surface by adding the polar structure. As a result, decreases in the lactone group were inhibited, leading to suppressing ArF photoresist roughness.

  19. Scalable shape-controlled fabrication of curved microstructures using a femtosecond laser wet-etching process.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hao; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Liu, Hewei; Du, Guangqing; Deng, Zefang; Si, Jinhai; Yun, Feng; Hou, Xun

    2013-07-01

    Materials with curvilinear surface microstructures are highly desirable for micro-optical and biomedical devices. However, realization of such devices efficiently remains technically challenging. This paper demonstrates a facile and flexible method to fabricate curvilinear microstructures with controllable shapes and dimensions. The method composes of femtosecond laser exposures and chemical etching process with the hydrofluoric acid solutions. By fixed-point and step-in laser irradiations followed by the chemical treatments, concave microstructures with different profiles such as spherical, conical, bell-like and parabola were fabricated on silica glasses. The convex structures were replicated on polymers by the casting replication process. In this work, we used this technique to fabricate high-quality microlens arrays and high-aspect-ratio microwells which can be used in 3D cell culture. This approach offers several advantages such as high-efficient, scalable shape-controllable and easy manipulations. PMID:23623098

  20. Charge-free method of forming nanostructures on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Hoffbauer; Mark , Akhadov; Elshan

    2010-07-20

    A charge-free method of forming a nanostructure at low temperatures on a substrate. A substrate that is reactive with one of atomic oxygen and nitrogen is provided. A flux of neutral atoms of least one of oxygen and nitrogen is generated within a laser-sustained-discharge plasma source and a collimated beam of energetic neutral atoms and molecules is directed from the plasma source onto a surface of the substrate to form the nanostructure. The energetic neutral atoms and molecules in the beam have an average kinetic energy in a range from about 1 eV to about 5 eV.

  1. Alkaline etch system qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Goldammer, S.E.; Pemberton, S.E.; Tucker, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    Based on the data from this qualification activity, the Atotech etch system, even with minimum characterization, was capable of etching production printed circuit products as good as those from the Chemcut system. Further characterization of the Atotech system will improve its etching capability. In addition to the improved etch quality expected from further characterization, the Atotech etch system has additional features that help reduce waste and provide for better consistency in the etching process. The programmable logic controller and computer will allow operators to operate the system manually or from pre-established recipes. The evidence and capabilities of the Atotech system made it as good as or better than the Chemcut system for etching WR products. The Printed Wiring Board Engineering Department recommended that the Atotech system be released for production. In December 1995, the Atotech system was formerly qualified for production.

  2. XAFS studies of monodisperse Au nanoclusters formation in the etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Huang, Ting; Liu, Wei; Bao, Jie; Huang, Yuanyuan; Cao, Yuanjie; Yao, Tao; Sun, Zhihu; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the formation mechanism of gold nanoclusters is essential to the development of their synthetic chemistry. Here, by using x-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, UV-Vis and MS spectra, the formation process of monodisperse Au13 nanoclusters is investigated. We find that a critical step involving the formation of smaller Au8-Au11 metastable intermediate clusters induced by the HCl + HSR etching of the polydisperse Aun precursor clusters occurs firstly. Then these intermediate species undergo a size-growth to Au13 cores, followed by a slow structure rearrangement to reach the final stable structure. This work enriches the understanding of cluster formation chemistry and may guide the way towards the design and the controllable synthesis of nanoclusters.

  3. Environmentally benign etching process of amorphous silicon and tungsten using species evaporated from polytetrafluoroethylene and fluorinated ethylene propylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Kazushi; Hori, Masaru; Goto, Toshio; Ito, Masafumi

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally benign etching process of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and tungsten (W) by using a plasma process with an evaporation of solid materials system has been developed for replacing a conventional plasma process using green house gases, such as SF6 gas and perfluorocompound gases causing global warming. The evaporation system was designed to generate fluorocarbon species from solid materials by a CO2 laser irradiation. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma using O2 accompanied with injection of species evaporated from solid materials has been applied to a-Si and W etching for cleaning process in chemical vapor deposition chamber. Fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are selected as the solid material and the etching characteristics between FEP and PTFE have been compared. Furthermore, the etching of a-Si and W films has been performed in the divergent magnetic field ECR downstream plasma [electron density (ne); ~1010 cm-3, electron temperature (Te); 1.5-2.8 eV] and a planar ECR plasma [ne ~1010 cm-3, Te 3.4-4.4 eV] using O2 gas with FEP evaporation. As a result, high etching rates of a-Si and W films of above 100 nm/min were successfully obtained at a substrate temperature of 400 °C in the planar ECR plasma of higher electron temperature. CFx (x=1-3) radical densities and F atom density in plasmas were measured by an infrared diode laser absorption spectroscopy and an actinometric optical emission spectroscopy, respectively. On the basis of these measurements of species, the etching mechanisms of a-Si and W films are discussed.

  4. Materials for single-etch double patterning process: surface curing agent and thermal cure resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Young C.; Liu, Yi; Cardolaccia, Thomas; McDermott, John C.; Trefonas, Peter; Spizuoco, Ken; Reilly, Michael; Pikon, Amandine; Joesten, Lori; Zhang, Gary G.; Barclay, George G.; Simon, Julia; Gaurigan, Stéphanie

    2009-03-01

    Two different pattern curing techniques were developed to stabilize first lithographic images for the single-etch double patterning process. The first method uses a surface curing agent (SCA) that is coated on top of the patterned surface to form a protective coating layer during the curing bake process. It was found that the surface curing process with SCA offers minimum CD changes before and after the double patterning process. Virtually no CD change was observed with the first lithographic images at various curing bake temperatures ranging from 120 ~160°C indicating the curing reaction is limited on the patterned surface. The second method uses a thermal cure resist (TCR) that is a special 193nm photoresist with a crosslinkable functional group to form an insoluble network upon heating at higher temperature. A single-step curing process of the first lithographic images was achieved using TCR by baking the patterned images at 180°C for 60sec. A cross-line contact hole double patterning method was used to evaluate these two different curing techniques and both SCA and TCR successfully demonstrated their capability to print 45nm contact holes with excellent CD uniformity in immersion lithography (1.35NA) with a 45nm half pitch mask. It was also confirmed that both SCA and TCR can be extended to the top-coat free immersion double patterning process using an embedded barrier layer technique.

  5. High speed optical metrology solution for after etch process monitoring and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charley, Anne-Laure; Leray, Philippe; Pypen, Wouter; Cheng, Shaunee; Verma, Alok; Mattheus, Christine; Wisse, Baukje; Cramer, Hugo; Niesing, Henk; Kruijswijk, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring and control of the various processes in the semiconductor require precise metrology of relevant features. Optical Critical Dimension metrology (OCD) is a non-destructive solution, offering the capability to measure profiles of 2D and 3D features. OCD has an intrinsic averaging over a larger area, resulting in good precision and suppression of local variation. We have studied the feasibility of process monitoring and control in AEI (after etch inspection) applications, using the same angular resolved scatterometer as used for CD, overlay and focus metrology in ADI (after develop inspection) applications1. The sensor covers the full azimuthal-angle range and a large angle-of-incidence range in a single acquisition. The wavelength can be selected between 425nm and 700nm, to optimize for sensitivity for the parameters of interest and robustness against other process variation. In this paper we demonstrate the validity of the OCD data through the measurement and comparison with the reference metrology of multiple wafers at different steps of the imec N14 fabrication process in order to show that this high precision OCD tool can be used for process monitoring and control.

  6. Electromigration study of copper lines on steps prepared by a plasma-based etch process

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chi-Chou; Kuo Yue

    2012-03-15

    The electromigration phenomenon of the copper line etched with a plasma-based process over the SiN{sub x} step has been investigated. Two important factors, i.e., the dielectric topography and the stress temperature, were examined using the accelerated isothermal electromigration method. The activation energy of 0.73 eV to 0.89 eV indicates two possible mass transport pathways: interfacial and copper surface diffusions. The copper line on the SiN{sub x} step has a shorter lifetime and a smaller activation energy than the copper line on the flat surface has. For the former, voids were formed at the cusp region and perpendicular to the current flow direction. For the latter, voids were formed in series and parallel to the current flow direction. The ''neck'' structure at the cusp region, which is a result of the inappropriate etching condition, further decreased the lifetime and the activation energy. The lifetime of the ''neck-free'' copper line over the SiN{sub x} step was estimated to be 7.1 x 10{sup 9} s under the high-speed IC operation condition. The thermal stress mismatch between the copper layer and TiW barrier layer as well as the underneath dielectric layer facilitated the void formation. The step effect on the lifetime was reduced when the test temperature was high because of the change of the local stress. In summary, the topography and the test temperature are critical factors for the copper line's lifetime.

  7. The etching process of boron nitride by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides under high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, W.; Ma, H.A.; Jia, X.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Appropriate etch processes of hBN and cBN under HPHT are proposed. • The degree of the crystallization of hBN was decreased. • A special cBN growth mechanism with a triangular unit is proposed. • Plate-shape cBN crystals with large ratio of length to thickness were obtained. • A strategy provides useful guidance for controlling the cBN morphology. - Abstract: Some new etching processes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) under high pressure and high temperature in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth fluorides have been discussed. It is found that hBN is etched distinctly by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the morphology of hBN is significantly changed from plate-shape to spherical-shape. Based on the “graphitization index” values of hBN, the degree of the crystallization of hBN under high pressure and high temperature decreases in the sequence of LiF > CaF{sub 2} > MgF{sub 2}. This facilitates the formation of high-quality cBN single crystals. Different etch steps, pits, and islands are observed on cBN surface, showing the strong etching by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the tendency of layer-by-layer growth. A special layer growth mechanism of cBN with a triangular unit has been found. Furthermore, the morphologies of cBN crystals are apparently affected by a preferential surface etching of LiF, CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2}. Respectively, the plate-shape and tetrahedral cBN crystals can be obtained in the presence of different alkali and alkaline earth fluorides.

  8. A Dry-Etch Process for Low Temperature Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors for Far Infrared Bolometer Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christine A.; Chervenak, James A.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; McClanahan, Richard A.; Miller, Timothy M.; Mitchell, Robert; Moseley, S. Harvey; Staguhn, Johannes; Stevenson, Thomas R.

    2003-01-01

    The next generation of ultra-low power bolometer arrays, with applications in far infrared imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry, utilizes a superconducting bilayer as the sensing element to enable SQUID multiplexed readout. Superconducting transition edge sensors (TES s) are being produced with dual metal systems of superconductinghormal bilayers. The transition temperature (Tc) is tuned by altering the relative thickness of the superconductor with respect to the normal layer. We are currently investigating MoAu and MoCu bilayers. We have developed a dry-etching process for MoAu TES s with integrated molybdenum leads, and are working on adapting the process to MoCu. Dry etching has the advantage over wet etching in the MoAu system in that one can achieve a high degree of selectivity, greater than 10, using argon ME, or argon ion milling, for patterning gold on molybdenum. Molybdenum leads are subsequently patterned using fluorine plasma.. The dry-etch technique results in a smooth, featureless TES with sharp sidewalls, no undercutting of the Mo beneath the normal metal, and Mo leads with high critical current. The effects of individual processing parameters on the characteristics of the transition will be reported.

  9. Efficient process development for bulk silicon etching using cellular automata simulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, James; He, Yie; Than, Olaf; Akkaraju, Sandeep

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes cellular automata simulation techniques used to predict the anisotropic etching of single-crystal silicon. In particular, this paper will focus on the application of wet etching of silicon wafers using typical anisotropic etchants such as KOH, TMAH, and EDP. Achieving a desired final 3D geometry of etch silicon wafers often is difficult without requiring a number of fabrication design iterations. The result is wasted time and resources. AnisE, a tool to simulate anisotropic etching of silicon wafers using cellular automata simulation, was developed in order to efficiently prototype and manufacture MEMS devices. AnisE has been shown to effectively decrease device development time and costs by up to 50% and 60%, respectively.

  10. Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    The NREL "black silicon" nanocatalytic wet-chemical etch is an inexpensive, one-step method to minimize reflections from crystalline silicon solar cells. The technology enables high-efficiency solar cells without the use of expensive antireflection coatings.

  11. Quantum cascade laser based monitoring of CF{sub 2} radical concentration as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hübner, M.; Lang, N.; Röpcke, J.; Helden, J. H. van; Zimmermann, S.; Schulz, S. E.; Buchholtz, W.

    2015-01-19

    Dielectric etching plasma processes for modern interlevel dielectrics become more and more complex by the introduction of new ultra low-k dielectrics. One challenge is the minimization of sidewall damage, while etching ultra low-k porous SiCOH by fluorocarbon plasmas. The optimization of this process requires a deeper understanding of the concentration of the CF{sub 2} radical, which acts as precursor in the polymerization of the etch sample surfaces. In an industrial dielectric etching plasma reactor, the CF{sub 2} radical was measured in situ using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) around 1106.2 cm{sup −1}. We measured Doppler-resolved ro-vibrational absorption lines and determined absolute densities using transitions in the ν{sub 3} fundamental band of CF{sub 2} with the aid of an improved simulation of the line strengths. We found that the CF{sub 2} radical concentration during the etching plasma process directly correlates to the layer structure of the etched wafer. Hence, this correlation can serve as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes. Applying QCL based absorption spectroscopy opens up the way for advanced process monitoring and etching controlling in semiconductor manufacturing.

  12. Absolute intensities of the vacuum ultraviolet spectra in oxide etch plasma processing discharges

    SciTech Connect

    WOODWORTH,JOSEPH R.; RILEY,MERLE E.; AMATUCCI,VINCENT A.; HAMILTON,THOMAS W.; ARAGON,BEN P.

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, the authors report the absolute intensities of ultraviolet light between 4.9 eV and 24 eV ( 250 nm to 50 mn ) striking a silicon wafer in a number of oxide-etch processing discharges. The emphasis is on photons with energies greater than 8.8 eV, which have enough energy to damage SiO{sub 2}. These discharges were in an inductively-driven Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell which had been modified to more closely resemble commercial etching tools. Comparisons of measurements made through a side port in the cell and through a hole in the wafer indicate that the VUV light in these discharges is strongly trapped. For the pure halocarbon gases examined in these experiments (C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, CHF{sub 3}, C{sub 4}F{sub 8}), the fluxes of VUV photons to the wafer varied from 1 x 10{sup 15} to 3 x 10{sup 15} photons/cm{sup 2} sec or equivalently from 1.5 to 5 mW/cm{sup 2}. These measurements imply that 0.1% to 0.3% of the rf source power to these discharges ends up hitting the wafer as VUV photons for the typical 20 mT, 200 W rf discharges. For typical ashing discharges containing pure oxygen, the VUV intensities are slightly higher--about 8 mW/cm{sup 2} . As argon or hydrogen diluents are added to the fluorocarbon gases, the VUV intensities increase dramatically, with a 10/10/10 mixture of Ar/C{sub 2}F{sub 6}/H{sub 2} yielding VUV fluxes on the wafer 26 mW/cm{sup 2} and pure argon discharges yielding 52 mW/cm{sup 2} . Adding an rf bias to the wafer had only a small effect on the VUV observed through a side-port of the GEC cell.

  13. Charging-free electrochemical system for harvesting low-grade thermal energy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuan; Lee, Seok Woo; Ghasemi, Hadi; Loomis, James; Li, Xiaobo; Kraemer, Daniel; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi; Chen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and low-cost systems are needed to harvest the tremendous amount of energy stored in low-grade heat sources (<100 °C). Thermally regenerative electrochemical cycle (TREC) is an attractive approach which uses the temperature dependence of electrochemical cell voltage to construct a thermodynamic cycle for direct heat-to-electricity conversion. By varying temperature, an electrochemical cell is charged at a lower voltage than discharge, converting thermal energy to electricity. Most TREC systems still require external electricity for charging, which complicates system designs and limits their applications. Here, we demonstrate a charging-free TREC consisting of an inexpensive soluble Fe(CN)63−/4− redox pair and solid Prussian blue particles as active materials for the two electrodes. In this system, the spontaneous directions of the full-cell reaction are opposite at low and high temperatures. Therefore, the two electrochemical processes at both low and high temperatures in a cycle are discharge. Heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 2.0% can be reached for the TREC operating between 20 and 60 °C. This charging-free TREC system may have potential application for harvesting low-grade heat from the environment, especially in remote areas. PMID:25404325

  14. Dependence of electric potentials at trench surfaces on ion angular distribution in plasma etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palov, A. P.; Mankelevich, Yu A.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Baklanov, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    Ion-stimulated etching of dielectrics in radio frequency plasma results in positive charging of a trench bottom because of the significant difference in the angular distribution functions of ions and electrons. They are anisotropic for ions and quasi-isotropic for electrons. The charging leads to a decrease in the energy of the ions bombarding the trench bottom and to undesirable sputtering of the walls near the trench bottom because of the curving of the ion trajectories. This process is normally investigated by Monte Carlo methods in the absence of experimental data. In this paper the analytical dependence of the ion flux bombarding the trench bottom on a trench aspect ratio and ion angular distribution function is obtained. Numerical calculations of the electric potential on the trench bottom for a set of trench aspect ratios and angles of the ion angular distribution function were performed based on a Monte Carlo method to demonstrate the ion flux and electric potential correlated well with each other. The proposed formula for an ion flux is suggested to be helpful for analyzing charging the trenches with different aspect ratios in plasma with an arbitrary angular ion distribution function.

  15. Controlled etching of hexagonal ZnO architectures in an alcohol thermal process

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Junshu; Xue, Dongfeng

    2010-03-15

    An alcohol thermal technique was applied to the controlled growth of hexagonal ZnO architectures via selective chemical etching. ZnO microdisks were produced first under mild alcohol thermal conditions in presence of formamide. Due to a higher surface energy/atomic density of Zn{sup 2+} {l_brace}0 0 0 1{r_brace} than that of the other faces, hexagonal ZnO microring was obtained by selectively etching positive polar surface of disk-like precursor with a high density of planar defects at the center. The selective etching of ZnO is related to its crystallographic characteristics of surface polarity and chemical activities, which opens a new opportunity for the shape-controlled synthesis of wurtzite-structured materials.

  16. Chemical vapour etching-based porous silicon and grooving: Application in silicon solar cells processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Rabha, M.; Boujmil, M. F.; Saadoun, M.; Bessaïs, B.

    2005-06-01

    Sponge like porous silicon (PS) was formed by a simple and low cost chemical vapour etching (CVE) method and applied in polycrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells processing. The CVE method consists of exposing Si wafers to HNO3/HF vapours. It was shown that 8 min of HNO3/HF CVE (volume ratio = 1/7) is sufficient to form optimized PS layers on the emitter of mc-Si cells. The CVE-based PS can simultaneously passivate the Si surface and serves as an effective antireflection coating (ARC). As a result, the reflectivity decreases by about 60% of its initial value and the internal quantum efficiency is improved, particularly in the short wavelength region. For acid vapours rich in HNO3 (HNO3/HF >1/4), the CVE method favours the formation of a (NH4)2SiF6 powder, which is highly soluble in water. These findings let us achieve anisotropic grooving that enables to groove mc-Si wafers locally and in depth using an adequate anti-acid mask. The CVE - based grooving technique was used to form buried metallic contacts on the rear and frontal surface of the Si wafer in order to improve the current collection in mc-Si solar cells. No alteration of the spectral response in the long wavelength range was observed in mc-Si cells with rear-buried contacts. Adjustments of theoretical spectral responses to experimental ones show an increase in the effective electron diffusion length (Ln), which was attributed to Al gettering (passivation) at grain boundaries and to the reduction of the effective thickness of the base of the cells.

  17. High-resolution tri-level process by downstream-microwave rf-biased etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangelow, Ivo W.

    1991-03-01

    In this paper we discuss some properties of a novel dry etching system for high resolution transfer of e-beam generated pattern for a viable submicron lithography. In order to achieve pattern transfer by an e-beam lithography a tn-layer system has been used. The submicron pattern which has been generated in a 300 nm PBS-layer (imaging layer) was transfered into a 300 nm anorganic intermediate layer (Si3N4) by RIE with a CHF3-plasma. The underlayer of 1 micron polyimid was etched in a microwave downstream RF-biased etching system developed by Plasma Technology Ltd (UK). E-beam lithography generated structures of 75 nm size with very low image size bias were etched in Si3N4. After patterning in the polyimid layer structures with very high aspect ratio (10) could be achieved. It was observed that anisotropy is enhanced by crack-products that originate from the microwave downstream oxygen plasma and the CHF3+CH4 mixture in the space between the parallel-plate electrodes.

  18. Chemical downstream etching of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Jarecki, R.L.; Simonson, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The downstream etching of tungsten and tungsten oxide has been investigated. Etching of chemical vapor deposited tungsten and e-beam deposited tungsten oxide samples was performed using atomic fluorine generated by a microwave discharge of argon and NF{sub 3}. Etching was found to be highly activated with activation energies approximated to be 6.0{plus_minus}0.5thinspkcal/mol and 5.4{plus_minus}0.4thinspkcal/mol for W and WO{sub 3}, respectively. In the case of F etching of tungsten, the addition of undischarged nitric oxide (NO) directly into the reaction chamber results in the competing effects of catalytic etch rate enhancement and the formation of a nearly stoichiometric WO{sub 3} passivating tungsten oxide film, which ultimately stops the etching process. For F etching of tungsten oxide, the introduction of downstream NO reduces the etch rate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  19. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes.

    PubMed

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11kg/m(3) of copper and 1.35kg/m(3) of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100-500nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. PMID:26918838

  20. Etching and Growth of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seabaugh, A. C.; Mattauch, R., J.

    1983-01-01

    In-place process for etching and growth of gallium arsenide calls for presaturation of etch and growth melts by arsenic source crystal. Procedure allows precise control of thickness of etch and newly grown layer on substrate. Etching and deposition setup is expected to simplify processing and improve characteristics of gallium arsenide lasers, high-frequency amplifiers, and advanced integrated circuits.

  1. Absolute Intensities of the Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectra in a Metal-Etch Plasma Processing Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, B.P.; Blain, M.G.; Hamilton, T.W.; Jarecki, R.L.; Woodworth, J.R.

    1998-12-09

    In this paper we report absolute intensities of vacuum ultraviolet and near ultraviolet emission lines (4.8 eV to 18 eV ) for aluminum etching discharges in an inductively coupled plasma reactor. We report line intensities as a function of wafer type, pressure, gas mixture and rf excitation level. IrI a standard aluminum etching mixture containing C12 and BC13 almost all the light emitted at energies exceeding 8.8 eV was due to neutral atomic chlorine. Optical trapping of the WV radiation in the discharge complicates calculations of VUV fluxes to the wafer. However, we see total photon fluxes to the wailer at energies above 8.8 eV on the order of 4 x 1014 photons/cm2sec with anon- reactive wafer and 0.7 x 10 `4 photons/cm2sec with a reactive wtier. The maj ority of the radiation observed was between 8.9 and 9.3 eV. At these energies, the photons have enough energy to create electron-hole pairs in Si02, but may penetrate up to a micron into the Si02 before being absorbed. Relevance of these measurements to vacuum-W photon-induced darnage of Si02 during etching is discussed.

  2. Absolute intensities of the vacuum ultraviolet spectra in a metal-etch plasma processing discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, J.R.; Blain, M.G.; Jarecki, R.L.; Hamilton, T.W.; Aragon, B.P.

    1999-11-01

    In this article we report absolute intensities of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and near ultraviolet emission lines (4.8{endash}18 eV) for discharges used to etch aluminum in a commercial inductively coupled plasma reactor. We report line intensities as functions of wafer type, pressure, gas mixture, and radio frequency excitation level. In a standard aluminum etching mixture containing Cl{sub 2} and BCl{sub 3} almost all the light emitted at energies exceeding 8.8 eV was due to neutral atomic chlorine. Optical trapping of the VUV radiation in the discharge complicates calculations of VUV fluxes to the wafer. However, we measured total photon fluxes to the wafer at energies above 8.8 eV on the order of 4{times}10{sup 14}&hthinsp;photons/cm{sup 2}&hthinsp;s with a nonreactive wafer and 0.7{times}10{sup 14}&hthinsp;photons/cm{sup 2}&hthinsp;s with a reactive wafer. The majority of the radiation was between 8.9 and 9.3 eV. At these energies, the photons have enough energy to create electron-hole pairs in SiO{sub 2} and may penetrate up to a micron into the SiO{sub 2} before being absorbed. Relevance of these measurements to VUV photon-induced damage of SiO{sub 2} during etching is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  3. Real-time control of ion density and ion energy in chlorine inductively coupled plasma etch processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cheng-Hung; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, Chaung; Lin, Tsan-Lang; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Chuen-Horng

    2003-07-01

    In this study, we have experimentally demonstrated the real-time closed-loop control of both ion density and ion energy in a chlorine inductively coupled plasma etcher. To measure positive ion density, the trace rare gases-optical emission spectroscopy is used to measure the chlorine positive ion density. An rf voltage probe is adopted to measure the root-mean-square rf voltage on the electrostatic chuck which is linearly dependent on sheath voltage. One actuator is a 13.56 MHz rf generator to drive the inductive coil seated on a ceramic window. The second actuator is also a 13.56 MHz rf generator to power the electrostatic chuck. The closed-loop controller is designed to compensate for process drift, process disturbance, and pilot wafer effect and to minimize steady-state error of plasma parameters. This controller has been used to control the etch process of unpatterned polysilicon. The experimental results showed that the closed-loop control had a better repeatability of plasma parameters compared with open-loop control. The closed-loop control can eliminate the process disturbance resulting from reflected power. In addition, experimental results also demonstrated that closed-loop control has a better reproducibility in etch rate as compared with open-loop control.

  4. Formation of textured sapphire substrates by self-arrangement process and wet etching for InGaAlN LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakharov, A. V.; Lundin, W. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Sinitsyn, M. A.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Lundina, E. Yu.; Tsatsulnikov, A. F.

    2008-11-01

    We report a method of profiled sapphire substrate preparation and growth of InGaAlN light-emitting diode (LED) structures over these substrates. Sapphire substrates with textured front surface were prepared by the simple method of nanoscale gold drops formation on sapphire surface followed by etching in hot H 3PO 4 acid. Comparison of blue LEDs grown on standard (flat) and profiled sapphire substrates in one epitaxial process shows significant increase in output power due to increased light extraction without deterioration of other LED characteristics.

  5. Agile dry etching of compound semiconductors for science-based manufacturing using in-situ process control

    SciTech Connect

    ASHBY,CAROL I.; VAWTER,GREGORY A.; BREILAND,WILLIAM G.; BRUSKAS,LARRY A.; WOODWORTH,JOSEPH R.; HEBNER,GREGORY A.

    2000-02-01

    In-situ optical diagnostics and ion beam diagnostics for plasma-etch and reactive-ion-beam etch (RIBE) tools have been developed and implemented on etch tools in the Compound Semiconductor Research Laboratory (CSRL). The optical diagnostics provide real-time end-point detection during plasma etching of complex thin-film layered structures that require precision etching to stop on a particular layer in the structure. The Monoetch real-time display and analysis program developed with this LDRD displays raw and filtered reflectance signals that enable an etch system operator to stop an etch at the desired depth within the desired layer. The ion beam diagnostics developed with this LDRD will permit routine analysis of critical ion-beam profile characteristics that determine etch uniformity and reproducibility on the RIBE tool.

  6. Movable-mask reactive ion etch process for thickness control in devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, R. L.; Pezeshki, B.; Agahi, F.; Martel, R.; Crockett, J. G.

    1996-10-01

    By moving the substrate relative to a shadow mask in a reactive ion etching system, we are able to precisely tailor the thickness of critical layers. To minimize disturbing the plasma, all the mechanical components are kept below the anode. The system is highly reproducible, and can be programmed to yield arbitrary vertical profiles along one horizontal axis. Using silicon-on-insulator substrates, the resonance wavelength was modified as a function of position with better than 1 nm control in the vertical dimension. This technique should prove useful for optical devices where the thickness of the layers controls the device characteristics.

  7. Enhancing hydrophilicity and water permeability of PET track-etched membranes by advanced oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, Ilya V.; Mashentseva, Anastassiya A.; Güven, Olgun; Zdorovets, Maxim V.; Taltenov, Abzal A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present results on the application of advanced oxidation systems for effective and non-toxic oxidation of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track-etched membranes (PET TeMs) to improve their wettability and water transport properties. Two oxidizing systems: H2O2 under UV irradiation (H2O2/UV) and Fenton system under visible light (Fenton/H2O2/Vis) were compared. The surface of functionalized PET TeMs was characterized by using colorimetric assay, contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results clearly showed that water permeability of PET TeMs treated with H2O2/UV was improved by 28 ± 5% compared with etched-only membrane, the same parameter was found to increase by 13 ± 4% in the case of Fenton/H2O2/Vis treatment. The proposed oxidation technique is very simple, environment friendly and not requiring special equipment or expensive chemicals. The surface hydrophilicity of the membranes stored for 360 days in air between paper sheets was analyzed by contact angle test, colorimetric assay to measure concentration of carboxylic groups on the surface with toluidine blue and XPS analysis. The hydrophilic properties of oxidized PET TeMs were found to be stable for a long period of time.

  8. Photomask etch system and process for 10nm technology node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrachood, Madhavi; Grimbergen, Michael; Yu, Keven; Leung, Toi; Tran, Jeffrey; Chen, Jeff; Bivens, Darin; Yalamanchili, Rao; Wistrom, Richard; Faure, Tom; Bartlau, Peter; Crawford, Shaun; Sakamoto, Yoshifumi

    2015-10-01

    While the industry is making progress to offer EUV lithography schemes to attain ultimate critical dimensions down to 20 nm half pitch, an interim optical lithography solution to address an immediate need for resolution is offered by various integration schemes using advanced PSM (Phase Shift Mask) materials including thin e-beam resist and hard mask. Using the 193nm wavelength to produce 10nm or 7nm patterns requires a range of optimization techniques, including immersion and multiple patterning, which place a heavy demand on photomask technologies. Mask schemes with hard mask certainly help attain better selectivity and hence better resolution but pose integration challenges and defectivity issues. This paper presents a new photomask etch solution for attenuated phase shift masks that offers high selectivity (Cr:Resist > 1.5:1), tighter control on the CD uniformity with a 3sigma value approaching 1 nm and controllable CD bias (5-20 nm) with excellent CD linearity performance (<5 nm) down to the finer resolution. The new system has successfully demonstrated capability to meet the 10 nm node photomask CD requirements without the use of more complicated hard mask phase shift blanks. Significant improvement in post wet clean recovery performance was demonstrated by the use of advanced chamber materials. Examples of CD uniformity, linearity, and minimum feature size, and etch bias performance on 10 nm test site and production mask designs will be shown.

  9. High aspect ratio silicon etch: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Banqiu; Kumar, Ajay; Pamarthy, Sharma

    2010-09-01

    High aspect ratio (HAR) silicon etch is reviewed, including commonly used terms, history, main applications, different technological methods, critical challenges, and main theories of the technologies. Chronologically, HAR silicon etch has been conducted using wet etch in solution, reactive ion etch (RIE) in low density plasma, single-step etch at cryogenic conditions in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) combined with RIE, time-multiplexed deep silicon etch in ICP-RIE configuration reactor, and single-step etch in high density plasma at room or near room temperature. Key specifications are HAR, high etch rate, good trench sidewall profile with smooth surface, low aspect ratio dependent etch, and low etch loading effects. Till now, time-multiplexed etch process is a popular industrial practice but the intrinsic scalloped profile of a time-multiplexed etch process, resulting from alternating between passivation and etch, poses a challenge. Previously, HAR silicon etch was an application associated primarily with microelectromechanical systems. In recent years, through-silicon-via (TSV) etch applications for three-dimensional integrated circuit stacking technology has spurred research and development of this enabling technology. This potential large scale application requires HAR etch with high and stable throughput, controllable profile and surface properties, and low costs.

  10. X-Ray Mask Fabrication Process Using Cr Mask and ITO Stopper in the Dry Etching of W Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Takeshi; Sasaki, Kei; Marumoto, Kenji; Yabe, Hideki; Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Watakabe, Yaichiro

    1992-12-01

    An X-ray mask fabrication technology using a tungsten (W) absorber with a chromium (Cr) mask and indium titanium oxide (ITO) stopper was developed. When SF6 was used as the dry etching gas, substantial side etching occurred because the F radical reacts with W on the sidewall. In order to prevent side etching, a SF6 and CHF3 gas mixture was applied; however, the ratio of dry etching rate of W to that of resist is low. Furthermore, the underlying layer such as that of silicon dioxide (SiO2), which was used as the etching stopper, was easily damaged. Instead of a resist mask and SiO2 stopper, a Cr layer as the etching mask and ITO layer as the stopper layer were applied. By the use of these structures and etching procedures, high aspect ratio W patterns with vertical sidewalls have been successfully fabricated.

  11. Use of silane-based primer on silicon wafers to enhance adhesion of edge-protective coatings during wet etching: application of the TALON Wrap process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi-Malhotra, J.; Brand, G. J.; Zhong, X.-F.

    2007-02-01

    Hydrolyzed silane primer solutions were made of an organosilane in glycolether diluted with a large amount of water with or without an acid as a catalyst. The newly developed primer compositions exhibited an extended shelf life of 3 months or more. The compositions were specially designed to accommodate ProTEK TM. layer adhesion in the TALON Wrap. process. In this application, a spin-coatable polymeric material, ProTEK TM., is applied as the protective coating to coat the top, edge, and underside rim of the wafer in preparation for backside etching. By applying an underlayer of primer and an overlayer of ProTEK TM. coating to the top, edge and the bottom side rim of the wafer, an effective encapsulation of the wafer was achieved by using a custom-designed baffle. Each layer was applied by spin coating followed by baking at a wide temperature range. Thermal processing was followed by wet etching in KOH at an elevated temperature for . 10 hr. Post-etched wafers were rinsed with deionized (DI) water. Excellent edge profiles without "knife-edges" were obtained after etching the unprotected areas of the wafer. The process is fully automated because it is carried out in the TALON TM automated wafer-processing tool. Intact films with no lifting or peeling were obtained during or after the KOH etch process/DI rinse for silicon substrates.

  12. Gate-first GaN MOSFET based on dry-etching-assisted non-annealing ohmic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingpeng; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Jiaqi; Li, Liuan; Kawaharada, Kazuya; Wang, Dejun; Ao, Jin-Ping

    2015-04-01

    We report on a gate-first GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) based on a non-annealing ohmic process. The device was formed on an n+-GaN (30 nm, 1 × 1019 cm-3)/semi-insulating GaN wafer. The source and drain (Ti/Al/Ti/Au) were deposited after the contact region was treated using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) dry etching system. Ohmic contact with a contact resistance of 0.48 Ω mm was realized at room temperature. A device fabricated by a gate-first process shows good pinch-off characteristics and a maximum field-effect mobility of 163.8 cm2 V-1 s-1.

  13. Cross-Sectional Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells: Effects of Etching and Back-Contact Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C.-S.; Gessert, T.; Duda, A.; Young, M.; Metzger, W. K.; Li, X.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the etching processes using bromine and nitric-phosphoric acid solutions, as well as of Cu, in the bulk electrical conductivity of CdTe/CdS solar cells using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). Although the etching process can create a conductive layer on the surface of the CdTe, the layer is very shallow. In contrast, the addition of a thin layer of Cu to the surface creates a conductive layer inside the CdTe that is not uniform in depth, is concentrated at grains boundaries, and may short circuit the device if the CdTe is too thin. The etching process facilitates the Cu diffusion and results in thicker conductive layers. The existence of this inhomogeneous conductive layer directly affects the current transport and is probably the reason for needing thick CdTe in these devices.

  14. Cross-Sectional Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells: Effects of Etching and Back-Contact Processes; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C.-S.; Gessert, T. A.; Duda, A. M.; Young, M.; Metzger, W. K.; Li, X.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effects of the etching processes using bromine and nitric-phosphoric acid solutions, as well as of Cu, in the bulk electrical conductivity of CdTe/CdS solar cells using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). Although the etching process can create a conductive layer on the surface of the CdTe, the layer is very shallow. In contrast, the addition of a thin layer of Cu to the surface creates a conductive layer inside the CdTe that is not uniform in depth, is concentrated at grains boundaries, and may short circuit the device if the CdTe is too thin. The etching process facilitates the Cu diffusion and results in thicker conductive layers. The existence of this inhomogeneous conductive layer directly affects the current transport and is probably the reason for needing thick CdTe in these devices.

  15. A Study on Selective Etching for Elevated PtSi Salicide Process and Work Function Modulation of PtSi Alloying with Hf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Shun-Ichiro; Gao, Jun

    The selective etching process for elevated self-aligned silicide (salicide) utilizing PtSi has been investigated. We have developed novel selective etching process utilizing a diluted aqua regia followed by a diluted HF light etching. It was found that the residual Pt-rich silicide layers on the sidewall have been successfully removed. We have also investigated a work function modulation of PtSi alloying with Hf. The barrier height for electron of PtSi has been reduced approximately 0.1 eV for PtxHf1-xSi formed by the silicidation of Pt(17 nm)/Hf(4 nm)/Si(100) stacked layer structures.

  16. Enhancement on photocatalytic activity of an amorphous titanium oxide film with nano-textured surface by selective-fluorination etching process

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Pin-Chun; Huang, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Tai-Hong; Lai, Li-Wen; Lu, Yi-Shan; Liu, Day-Shan

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • The amorphous TiO{sub x} film surface was modified via selective fluorination etching process. • The resulting nano-textured surface markedly enriched the specific surface area and surface acidity. • The photocatalytic activity was comparable to an annealed TiO{sub x} film with anatase structure. - Abstract: A selective-fluorination etching process achieved by an UV light pre-irradiation and the subsequently fluorination etching was developed to enhance the photocatalytic activity of a low-temperature deposited amorphous titanium oxide (a-TiO{sub x}) film. Textured surface on the a-TiO{sub x} films formed by this process were investigated using atomic force microscope and field emission scanning electron microscope. Evidence of the fluorine ions introduced into the a-TiO{sub x} films was examined using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The etching thickness of the a-TiO{sub x} film was found to be deeply relevant to the film pre-irradiated by the UV light. An a-TiO{sub x} film with nano-textured surface, which was favorable to enlarge the specific surface area, thus was obtainable from the notable etching selectivity of the film pre-irradiated by UV light through a nano-sized mask. In addition, the surface acidity of the a-TiO{sub x} film was enhanced by the formation of the Ti-F chemical bonds originating from the fluorination etching process, which also was functional to facilitate the production of surface OH free radicals. Accordingly, the resulting fluorinated a-TiO{sub x} film with nano-textured surface performed a quality photocatalytic activity comparable to that of the high-temperature achieved TiO{sub x} film with anatase structures.

  17. Individualized Learning Package about Etching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Michael J.

    An individualized learning package provides step-by-step instruction in the fundamentals of the etching process. Thirteen specific behavioral objectives are listed. A pretest, consisting of matching 15 etching terms with their definitions, is provided along with an answer key. The remainder of the learning package teaches the 13 steps of the…

  18. Ion beam sputter etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1986-01-01

    An ion beam etching process which forms extremely high aspect ratio surface microstructures using thin sputter masks is utilized in the fabrication of integrated circuits. A carbon rich sputter mask together with unmasked portions of a substrate is bombarded with inert gas ions while simultaneous carbon deposition occurs. The arrival of the carbon deposit is adjusted to enable the sputter mask to have a near zero or even slightly positive increase in thickness with time while the unmasked portions have a high net sputter etch rate.

  19. Characterization of the effect of etch process operating environment on the perfluoroelastomer chamber seal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chinchao; Reichl, Gary

    2015-03-01

    Based on semiconductor process conditions such as power, gas, temperature and pressure, proper elastomer seal material selection is vital to maximizing the performance and productivity of wafer process production systems. Numerous metrology and test methods are used to measure the combined performance of elastomer seals. It is extremely important to take into consideration several performance parameters because minute shifts or modifications to process conditions can have detrimental effects on the production process. Weight loss, FTIR, SEM, Laser Confocal Microscope, and ICP/MS are some of the test methods used by Greene, Tweed to predict, with high confidence, the performance of elastomer seals for specific process conditions. This methodology is used to support the semiconductor research and process development community.

  20. Etching process mills PH 14-8 Mo alloy steel to precise tolerances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, B. L.; Mulland, P. W.

    1966-01-01

    Chemical milling process, which combines an aqua regia etchant with a sulfonate wetting agent, produces finishes on PH 14-8 molybdenum alloy steel to precise tolerances. This process permits precision removal of excess metal from the steel in annealed and/or aged conditions.

  1. Submicron patterned metal hole etching

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.; Contolini, Robert J.; Liberman, Vladimir; Morse, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    A wet chemical process for etching submicron patterned holes in thin metal layers using electrochemical etching with the aid of a wetting agent. In this process, the processed wafer to be etched is immersed in a wetting agent, such as methanol, for a few seconds prior to inserting the processed wafer into an electrochemical etching setup, with the wafer maintained horizontal during transfer to maintain a film of methanol covering the patterned areas. The electrochemical etching setup includes a tube which seals the edges of the wafer preventing loss of the methanol. An electrolyte composed of 4:1 water: sulfuric is poured into the tube and the electrolyte replaces the wetting agent in the patterned holes. A working electrode is attached to a metal layer of the wafer, with reference and counter electrodes inserted in the electrolyte with all electrodes connected to a potentiostat. A single pulse on the counter electrode, such as a 100 ms pulse at +10.2 volts, is used to excite the electrochemical circuit and perform the etch. The process produces uniform etching of the patterned holes in the metal layers, such as chromium and molybdenum of the wafer without adversely effecting the patterned mask.

  2. Influence of etching processes on electronic transport in mesoscopic InAs/GaSb quantum well devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Atindra Nath; Müller, Susanne; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Tschirky, Thomas; Charpentier, Christophe; Wegscheider, Werner

    2015-07-15

    We report the electronic characterization of mesoscopic Hall bar devices fabricated from coupled InAs/GaSb quantum wells sandwiched between AlSb barriers, an emerging candidate for two-dimensional topological insulators. The electronic width of the etched structures was determined from the low field magneto-resistance peak, a characteristic signature of partially diffusive boundary scattering in the ballistic limit. In case of dry-etching the electronic width was found to decrease with electron density. In contrast, for wet etched devices it stayed constant with density. Moreover, the boundary scattering was found to be more specular for wet-etched devices, which may be relevant for studying topological edge states.

  3. Experimental optimization of an anisotropic etching process for random texturization of silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.L.; Buck, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    A multifactor experimental investigation of silicon surface texturing was conducted in Sandia's Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory using aqueous potassium-hydroxide (KOH) solutions with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) added as a complexing agent. Czochralski, magnetic-Czochralski, and float-zone silicon wafers of different resistivities with both polished and lapped surfaces were included in the experiment. Process variables considered were solution temperature, time in solution, degree of mechanical mixing, KOH concentration, and IPA concentration. Using hemispherical reflectance as the primary gauge of success, process variables were identified that resulted in an effective surface texture with reflectance less than 12% prior to anti-reflection coating. Of particular interest was a low temperature (70 {degrees}C) process with less than 2% concentration of both KOH and IPA and wide process variable tolerances. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Design and fabrication of MEMS devices using the integration of MUMPs, trench-refilled molding, DRIE and bulk silicon etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mingching; Fang, Weileun

    2005-03-01

    This work integrates multi-depth DRIE etching, trench-refilled molding, two poly-Si layers MUMPs and bulk releasing to improve the variety and performance of MEMS devices. In summary, the present fabrication process, named MOSBE II, has three merits. First, this process can monolithically fabricate and integrate poly-Si thin-film structures with different thicknesses and stiffnesses, such as the flexible spring and the stiff mirror plate. Second, multi-depth structures, such as vertical comb electrodes, are available from the DRIE processes. Third, a cavity under the micromachined device is provided by the bulk silicon etching process, so that a large out-of-plane motion is allowed. In application, an optical scanner driven by the self-aligned vertical comb actuator was demonstrated. The poly-Si micromachined components fabricated by MOSBE II can further integrate with the MUMPs devices to establish a more powerful MOEMS platform.

  5. Etching Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1983-01-01

    20-page report reviews methods available for etching specific layers on wafers and discusses automation techniques and features on one particular automated system. Compares two major etching methods, chemical (wet) and plasma (dry), and discusses areas in need of development. Methods covered include "dip-and-dunk" manual method of chemical etching, automated chemical etching, and plasma etching.

  6. Reactive Ion Etching of Polymers in Oxygen Based Plasmas: a Study of Etch Mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Sandra Wolterman

    The reactive ion etching of polymers has been studied in oxygen-based plasmas in an effort to understand the contributions of various mechanisms to the etching of these materials. Of the four active etch mechanisms; surface damage promoted etching, chemical sputtering, chemically enhanced physical sputtering, and direct reactive ion etching; the emphasis of this work has been on determining the relative contribution of direct reactive ion etching to the overall etching process. The etching of photoresist, polyimide, and amorphous carbon in O_2-CF_4 plasmas was studied in an asymmetrical reactive ion etcher at pressures ranging from 5 to 100 mtorr. Etch yield, ion flux, and oxygen atom concentration data were collected. The fit of this data to a linear model proposed by Joubert et al. (J. Appl. Phys., 65, 1989, 5096) was compared to the fit of the data to a nonlinear model proposed by the author. The linear model accounts for contribution due to three of the four etch mechanisms, but does not include contributions due to direct reactive ion etching. The nonlinear model accounts for contributions due to all four etch mechanisms. Experimental results indicate that the nonlinear model provides a better fit to the data than does the linear model. The relative contribution of direct reactive ion etching to the etching of photoresist ranges from 27% to 81% as the pressure decreases from 100 to 5 mtorr. Similar results are obtained for polyimide and amorphous carbon.

  7. Large-scale micro- and nanopatterns of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells by mold-assisted chemical-etching process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Chung; Cheng, Hsiang-Ying; Yen, Yu-Ting; Wu, Tsung-Ta; Hsu, Cheng-Hung; Tsai, Hung-Wei; Shen, Chang-Hong; Shieh, Jia-Min; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2015-04-28

    A reactive mold-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process through an easy-to-make agarose stamp soaked in bromine methanol etchant to rapidly imprint larger area micro- and nanoarrays on CIGS substrates was demonstrated. Interestingly, by using the agarose stamp during the MACE process with and without additive containing oil and triton, CIGS microdome and microhole arrays can be formed on the CIGS substrate. Detailed formation mechanisms of microstructures and the chemical composition variation after the etching process were investigated. In addition, various microand nanostructures were also demonstrated by this universal approach. The microstructure arrays integrated into standard CIGS solar cells with thinner thickness can still achieve an efficiency of 11.22%, yielding an enhanced efficiency of ∼18% compared with that of their planar counterpart due to an excellent absorption behavior confirmed by the simulation results, which opens up a promising way for the realization of high-efficiency micro- or nanostructured thin-film solar cells. Finally, the complete dissolution of agarose stamp into hot water demonstrates an environmentally friendly method by the mold-assisted chemical etching process through an easy-to-make agarose stamp. PMID:25769317

  8. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Cross, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by hyperthermal atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2 to 20 eV, preferably 1 to 10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask protected areas.

  9. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Koontz, Steven L.; Cross, Jon B.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2-20 eV, preferably 1-10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal (kinetic energy>1 eV) oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask-protected areas.

  10. Photosensitive etch protection coating for silicon wet-etch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi-Malhotra, J.; Zhong, X. F.; Planje, C.

    2008-02-01

    A spin-on polymeric material has been developed to replace the silicon nitride mask used in the MEMS industry for silicon wet-etch processing. Built-in photosensitivity eliminates the need for additional photoresists in the system. The process consists of applying an organosilane-based primer layer onto a silicon wafer, followed by spin coating the photosensitive layer. After a soft bake, the coating is imaged by exposing it to ultraviolet light. After a post-exposure bake, the coating is developed by a solvent. After a final bake, the prepared wafer is then etched in a hot concentrated alkaline solution to complete the pattern transfer. The polymer-coated area remains protected with insignificant and controllable undercut after extended hours of wet etching. Etch protection performance was characterized as a ratio of undercut (u) to etch depth (h). The polymeric mask allows silicon substrates to be etched anisotropically in the same way as silicon nitride masks although more undercut occurs when KOH or NaOH are used as etchants. With use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) as an etchant, a consistent 1-2% undercut ratio (u/h×100%) was obtained. The effects of various parameters such as use of different etchants and the effects of etchant concentration and delayed processing on undercut ratio are investigated.

  11. Metal etching composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otousa, Joseph E. (Inventor); Thomas, Clark S. (Inventor); Foster, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a chemical etching composition for etching metals or metallic alloys. The composition includes a solution of hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, ethylene glycol, and an oxidizing agent. The etching composition is particularly useful for etching metal surfaces in preparation for subsequent fluorescent penetrant inspection.

  12. Plasma etching of chromium films in the fabrication of photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Thomas P.; Buck, Peter D.

    1995-12-01

    To meet the advanced CD uniformity and resolution requirements of state-of-the-art maskmaking, dry chrome etch processing may be required. Dry etching is a more anisotropic process, significantly reducing etch undercut. The absence of undercutting allows the lithographer to image the resist at the iso-focal point, eliminating the need to underexpose to maintain CDs. Also, dry etch parameters can be precisely controlled via a microprocessor- controlled etch system with a highly accurate parameter-metering system that ensures greater process control. Using design-of-experiment methodologies, a chrome plasma etch process (using OCG-895i) was developed. This work proves the feasibility of plasma etching chromium patterns on photomasks. The results show an etch that has excellent uniformity, is anisotropic, and has excellent edge quality. Also, resist selectivity is high for the etching of thin chrome films. SEM results show a significant reduction in the bias needed to achieve nominal CDs. As with many dry etch processes, loading and microloading effects (i.e., localized pattern density effect on etch rates) are a concern. Initial investigations of loading and microloading effects were conducted. Results suggest that due to the high anisotropy of the etch, microloading is not an issue. However, plate loading (or the amount of chrome removed) increases etch times and can result in radial etch patterns. Loading effects must be minimized or eliminated to optimize etch uniformity.

  13. The tailored inner space of TiO2 electrodes via a 30 second wet etching process: high efficiency solid-state perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jeong; Kim, Sung June; Park, Jong Hyoek

    2015-06-01

    We fabricated a perovskite solar cell with enhanced device efficiency based on the tailored inner space of the TiO2 electrode by utilizing a very short chemical etching process. It was found that the mesoporous TiO2 photoanode treated with a HF solution exhibited remarkably enhanced power conversion efficiencies under simulated AM 1.5G one sun illumination. The controlled inner space and morphology of the etched TiO2 electrode provide an optimized space for perovskite sensitizers and infiltration of a hole transport layer without sacrificing its original electron transport ability, which resulted in higher JSC, FF and VOC values. This simple platform provides new opportunities for tailoring the microstructure of the TiO2 electrode and has great potential in various optoelectronic devices utilizing metal oxide nanostructures.We fabricated a perovskite solar cell with enhanced device efficiency based on the tailored inner space of the TiO2 electrode by utilizing a very short chemical etching process. It was found that the mesoporous TiO2 photoanode treated with a HF solution exhibited remarkably enhanced power conversion efficiencies under simulated AM 1.5G one sun illumination. The controlled inner space and morphology of the etched TiO2 electrode provide an optimized space for perovskite sensitizers and infiltration of a hole transport layer without sacrificing its original electron transport ability, which resulted in higher JSC, FF and VOC values. This simple platform provides new opportunities for tailoring the microstructure of the TiO2 electrode and has great potential in various optoelectronic devices utilizing metal oxide nanostructures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01714a

  14. Etching anisotropy mechanisms lead to morphology-controlled silicon nanoporous structures by metal assisted chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bing; Li, Meicheng; Liang, Yu; Bai, Yang; Song, Dandan; Li, Yingfeng; Luo, Jian

    2016-02-01

    The etching anisotropy induced by the morphology and rotation of silver particles controls the morphology of silicon nanoporous structures, through various underlying complex etching mechanisms. The level of etching anisotropy can be modulated by controlling the morphology of the silver catalyst to obtain silicon nanoporous structures with straight pores, cone-shaped pores and pyramid-shaped pores. In addition, the structures with helical pores are obtained by taking advantage of the special anisotropic etching, which is induced by the rotation and revolution of silver particles during the etching process. An investigation of the etching anisotropy during metal assisted chemical etching will promote a deep understanding of the chemical etching mechanism of silicon, and provide a feasible approach to fabricate Si nanoporous structures with special morphologies. PMID:26785718

  15. UV laser activated digital etching of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Meguro, T.; Aoyagi, Y.

    1996-12-31

    The self-limited etching characteristics of digital etching employing an UV laser/Cl{sub 2}/GaAs system are presented. The self-limiting nature is the key mechanism and plays an important role in digital etching for obtaining etch rates independent of etching parameters. Surface processes based on photodissociation of physisorbed chlorine on GaAs with diffusion of negatively charged Cl into GaAs are also discussed.

  16. A Multi-Scale Study on Silicon-Oxide Etching Processes in C4F8/Ar Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Jiaxing; Zhang, Saiqian; Liu, Zeng; Yan, Jun; Dai, Zhongling

    2016-06-01

    A multi-scale numerical method coupled with the reactor, sheath and trench model is constructed to simulate dry etching of SiO2 in inductively coupled C4F8 plasmas. Firstly, ion and neutral particle densities in the reactor are decided using the CFD-ACE+ commercial software. Then, the ion energy and angular distributions (IEDs and IADs) are obtained in the sheath model with the sheath boundary conditions provided with CFD-ACE+. Finally, the trench profile evolution is simulated in the trench model. What we principally focus on is the effects of the discharge parameters on the etching results. It is found that the discharge parameters, including discharge pressure, radio-frequency (rf) power, gas mixture ratios, bias voltage and frequency, have synergistic effects on IEDs and IADs on the etched material surface, thus further affecting the trench profiles evolution. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11375040) and the Important National Science & Technology Specific Project of China (No. 2011ZX02403-002)

  17. In-Plasma Photo-Assisted Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Demetre

    2015-09-01

    A methodology to precisely control the ion energy distribution (IED) on a substrate allowed the study of silicon etching as a function of ion energy at near-threshold energies. Surprisingly, a substantial etching rate was observed, independent of ion energy, when the ion energy was below the ion-assisted etching threshold (~ 16 eV for etching silicon with chlorine plasma). Careful experiments led to the conclusion that this ``sub-threshold'' etching was due to photons, predominately at wavelengths <1700 Å. Among the plasmas investigated, photo-assisted etching (PAE) was lowest in Br2/Ar gas mixtures and highest in HBr/Cl2/Ar. Above threshold etching rates scaled with the square root of ion energy. PAE rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy (SEM and AFM) revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. In-plasma PAE may be be a complicating factor for processes that require low ion energies, such as atomic layer etching. On the other hand PAE could produce sub-10 nm high aspect ratio (6:1) features by highly selective plasma etching to transfer nascent nanopatterns in silicon. Work supported by DOE Plasma Science Center and NSF.

  18. Method of etching zirconium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, L.S.; Kwiatkowski, B.

    1988-03-31

    The invention described herein may be manufactured, used, and licensed by or for the Government for governmental purposes without the payment to us of any royalty thereon. This invention relates in general to a method of etching, zirconium diboride(ZrB/sub 2/) and, in particular, to a method of dry etching a thin film of ZrB/sub 2/ that has been deposited onto a substrate and patterned using photolithography. U.S. patent application S.N. 156, 124, filed 16 February, 1988, of Linda S. Heath for Method of Etching Titanium Diboride and assigned to a common assignee and with which this application is copending describes and claims a method of etching titanium diboride with a dry etch. Zirconium diboride, like titanium diboride, TiB/sub 2/, has become of interest in laboratory research because of its resistance to change or degradation at high temperatures. By adjusting the process parameters, one is able to attain etch rates of 67 to 140 A/min for ZrB/sub 2/. This is useful for patterning ZrB/sub 2/ as a diffusion barrier or a Schottky contact to semiconductors. The ZrB/sub 2/ film may be on a GaAs substrate.

  19. Dry etching technologies for reflective multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Yoshinori; Karyu, Makoto; Ita, Hirotsugu; Kase, Yoshihisa; Yoshimori, Tomoaki; Muto, Makoto; Nonaka, Mikio; Iwami, Munenori

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a highly integrated methodology for patterning Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) mask, which has been highlighted for the lithography technique at the 14nm half-pitch generation and beyond. The EUV mask is characterized as a reflective-type mask which is completely different compared with conventional transparent-type of photo mask. And it requires not only patterning of absorber layer without damaging the underlying multi reflective layers (40 Si/Mo layers) but also etching multi reflective layers. In this case, the dry etch process has generally faced technical challenges such as the difficulties in CD control, etch damage to quartz substrate and low selectivity to the mask resist. Shibaura Mechatronics ARESTM mask etch system and its optimized etch process has already achieved the maximal etch performance at patterning two-layered absorber. And in this study, our process technologies of multi reflective layers will be evaluated by means of optimal combination of process gases and our optimized plasma produced by certain source power and bias power. When our ARES™ is used for multilayer etching, the user can choose to etch the absorber layer at the same time or etch only the multilayer.

  20. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., George W.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  1. Ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires fabricated with plasma etching: plasma processing, mechanical stability analysis against adhesion and capillary forces and oleophobicity.

    PubMed

    Zeniou, A; Ellinas, K; Olziersky, A; Gogolides, E

    2014-01-24

    Room-temperature deep Si etching using time-multiplexed deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) processes is investigated to fabricate ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires (SiNWs) perpendicular to the silicon substrate. Nanopatterning is achieved using either top-down techniques (e.g. electron beam lithography) or colloidal polystyrene (PS) sphere self-assembly. The latter is a faster and more economical method if imperfections in diameter and position can be tolerated. We demonstrate wire radii from below 100 nm to several micrometers, and aspect ratios (ARs) above 100:1 with etching rates above 1 μm min(-1) using classical mass flow controllers with pulsing rise times of seconds. The mechanical stability of these nanowires is studied theoretically and experimentally against adhesion and capillary forces. It is shown that above ARs of the order of 50:1 for spacing 1 μm, SiNWs tend to bend due to adhesion forces between them. Such large adhesion forces are due to the high surface energy of silicon. Wetting the SiNWs with water and drying also gives rise to capillary forces. We find that capillary forces may be less important for SiNW collapse/bending compared to adhesion forces of dry SiNWs, contrary to what is observed for polymeric nanowires/nanopillars which have a much lower surface energy compared to silicon. Finally we show that SiNW arrays have oleophobic and superoleophobic properties, i.e. they exhibit excellent anti-wetting properties for a wide range of liquids and oils due to the re-entrant profile produced by the DRIE process and the well-designed spacing. PMID:24346308

  2. Ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires fabricated with plasma etching: plasma processing, mechanical stability analysis against adhesion and capillary forces and oleophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeniou, A.; Ellinas, K.; Olziersky, A.; Gogolides, E.

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature deep Si etching using time-multiplexed deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) processes is investigated to fabricate ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires (SiNWs) perpendicular to the silicon substrate. Nanopatterning is achieved using either top-down techniques (e.g. electron beam lithography) or colloidal polystyrene (PS) sphere self-assembly. The latter is a faster and more economical method if imperfections in diameter and position can be tolerated. We demonstrate wire radii from below 100 nm to several micrometers, and aspect ratios (ARs) above 100:1 with etching rates above 1 μm min-1 using classical mass flow controllers with pulsing rise times of seconds. The mechanical stability of these nanowires is studied theoretically and experimentally against adhesion and capillary forces. It is shown that above ARs of the order of 50:1 for spacing 1 μm, SiNWs tend to bend due to adhesion forces between them. Such large adhesion forces are due to the high surface energy of silicon. Wetting the SiNWs with water and drying also gives rise to capillary forces. We find that capillary forces may be less important for SiNW collapse/bending compared to adhesion forces of dry SiNWs, contrary to what is observed for polymeric nanowires/nanopillars which have a much lower surface energy compared to silicon. Finally we show that SiNW arrays have oleophobic and superoleophobic properties, i.e. they exhibit excellent anti-wetting properties for a wide range of liquids and oils due to the re-entrant profile produced by the DRIE process and the well-designed spacing.

  3. Etching characteristics of LiNbO3 in reactive ion etching and inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Z.; Heard, P. J.; Marshall, J. M.; Thomas, P. A.; Yu, S.

    2008-02-01

    The etching characteristics of congruent LiNbO3 single crystals including doped LiNbO3 and proton-changed LiNbO3 have been studied in reactive ion etching (RIE) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching tools, using different recipes of gas mixtures. The effects of parameters including working pressure, RIE power, and ICP power are investigated and analyzed by measurement of etching depth, selectivity, uniformity, etched surface state, and sidewall profile by means of focused ion beam etching, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and surface profilometry. The effects of a sample carrier wafer coating have also been investigated. Optimized processes with high etching rates, good mask selectivity, and a near-vertical profile have been achieved. Ridge waveguides on proton-exchanged LiNbO3 have been fabricated and optically measured.

  4. Gas Cluster Ion Beam Etching under Acetic Acid Vapor for Etch-Resistant Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Hinoura, Ryo; Toyoda, Noriaki; Hara, Ken-ichi; Yamada, Isao

    2013-05-01

    Gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) etching of etch-resistant materials under acetic acid vapor was studied for development of new manufacturing process of future nonvolatile memory. Etching depths of various etch-resistant materials (Pt, Ru, Ta, CoFe) with acetic acid vapor during O2-GCIB irradiations were 1.8-10.7 times higher than those without acetic acid. Also, etching depths of Ru, Ta, CoFe by Ar-GCIB with acetic acid vapor were 2.2-16.1 times higher than those without acetic acid. Even after etching of Pt, smoothing of Pt was realized using O2-GCIB under acetic acid. From XPS and angular distribution of sputtered Pt, it was shown that PtOx layer was formed on Pt after O2-GCIB irradiation. PtOx reacted with acetic acid by GCIB bombardments; as a result, increase of etching depth was observed.

  5. Recovery of Multilayer-Coated Zerodur and ULE Optics for Extreme-Ultraviolet Lithography by Recoating, Reactive-Ion Etching, and Wet-Chemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Mirkarimi, P B; Baker, S L; Montcalm, C; Folta, J A

    2001-01-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet lithography requires expensive multilayer-coated Zerodur or ULE optics with extremely tight figure and finish specifications. Therefore it is desirable to develop methods to recover these optics if they are coated with a nonoptimum multilayer films or in the event that the coating deteriorates over time owing to long-term exposure to radiation, corrosion, or surface contamination. We evaluate recoating, reactive-ion etching, and wet-chemical techniques for the recovery of Mo/Si and Mo/Be multilayer films upon Zerodur and ULE test optics. The recoating technique was successfully employed in the recovery of Mo/Si-coated optics but has the drawback of limited applicability. A chlorine-based reactive-ion etch process was successfully used to recover Mo/Si-coated optics, and a particularly large process window was observed when ULE optics were employed; this is an advantageous for large, curved optics. Dilute HCl wet-chemical techniques were developed and successfully demonstrated for the recovery of Mo/Be-coated optics as well as for Mo/Si-coated optics when Mo/Be release layers were employed; however, there are questions about the extendability of the HCl process to large optics and multiple coat and strip cycles. The technique of using carbon barrier layers to protect the optic during removal of Mo/Si in HF:HNO(3) also showed promise. PMID:18356974

  6. An experimental study on fabricating an inverted mesa-type quartz crystal resonator using a cheap wet etching process.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinxing; Huang, Jia; Zhang, Tian; Zhang, Jing; Li, Xuefeng; Ueda, Toshitsugu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a miniaturized high fundamental frequency quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is fabricated for sensor applications using a wet etching technique. The vibration area is reduced in the fabrication of the high frequency QCM with an inverted mesa structure. To reduce the complexity of the side wall profile that results from anisotropic quartz etching, a rectangular vibration area is used instead of the conventional circular structure. QCMs with high Q values exceeding 25,000 at 47 MHz, 27,000 at 60 MHz, 24,000 at 73 MHz and 25,000 at 84 MHz are fabricated on 4 × 4 mm2 chips with small vibration areas of 1.2 × 1.4 mm2. A PMMA-based flow cell is designed and manufactured to characterize the behavior of the fabricated QCM chip in a liquid. Q values as high as 1,006 at 47 MHz, 904 at 62 MHz, 867 at 71 MHz and 747 at 84 MHz are obtained when one side of the chip is exposed to pure water. These results show that fabricated QCM chips can be used for bio- and chemical sensor applications in liquids. PMID:24025559

  7. Facile large-scale synthesis of brain-like mesoporous silica nanocomposites via a selective etching process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Qihua; Wang, Tingmei

    2015-10-21

    The core-shell structured mesoporous silica nanomaterials (MSNs) are experiencing rapid development in many applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, bio-imaging and drug delivery wherein a large pore volume is desirable. We develop a one-pot method for large-scale synthesis of brain-like mesoporous silica nanocomposites based on the reasonable change of the intrinsic nature of the -Si-O-Si- framework of silica nanoparticles together with a selective etching strategy. The as-synthesized products show good monodispersion and a large pore volume of 1.0 cm(3) g(-1). The novelty of this approach lies in the use of an inorganic-organic hybrid layer to assist the creation of large-pore morphology on the outermost shell thereby promoting efficient mass transfer or storage. Importantly, the method is reliable and grams of products can be easily prepared. The morphology on the outermost silica shell can be controlled by simply adjusting the VTES-to-TEOS molar ratio (VTES: triethoxyvinylsilane, TEOS: tetraethyl orthosilicate) as well as the etching time. The as-synthesized products exhibit fluorescence performance by incorporating rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC) covalently into the inner silica walls, which provide potential application in bioimaging. We also demonstrate the applications of as-synthesized large-pore structured nanocomposites in drug delivery systems and stimuli-responsive nanoreactors for heterogeneous catalysis. PMID:26394819

  8. An Experimental Study on Fabricating an Inverted Mesa-Type Quartz Crystal Resonator Using a Cheap Wet Etching Process

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jinxing; Huang, Jia; Zhang, Tian; Zhang, Jing; Li, Xuefeng; Ueda, Toshitsugu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a miniaturized high fundamental frequency quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is fabricated for sensor applications using a wet etching technique. The vibration area is reduced in the fabrication of the high frequency QCM with an inverted mesa structure. To reduce the complexity of the side wall profile that results from anisotropic quartz etching, a rectangular vibration area is used instead of the conventional circular structure. QCMs with high Q values exceeding 25,000 at 47 MHz, 27,000 at 60 MHz, 24,000 at 73 MHz and 25,000 at 84 MHz are fabricated on 4 × 4 mm2 chips with small vibration areas of 1.2 × 1.4 mm2. A PMMA-based flow cell is designed and manufactured to characterize the behavior of the fabricated QCM chip in a liquid. Q values as high as 1,006 at 47 MHz, 904 at 62 MHz, 867 at 71 MHz and 747 at 84 MHz are obtained when one side of the chip is exposed to pure water. These results show that fabricated QCM chips can be used for bio- and chemical sensor applications in liquids. PMID:24025559

  9. Rapid, Non-Mechanical, Damage Free Figuring Of Optical Surfaces Using Plasma Assisted Chemical Etching (PACE): Part Ii Theory & Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarowin, C. B.; Bollinger, L. D.

    1989-01-01

    We describe an application of Plasma Assisted Chemical Etching (PACE) to rapid and controllable figuring and smoothing of optical surfaces without mechanical contact. This removes the usual constraints on the design of optical elements imposed by mechanical pro-cesses, such as substrate deformation, edge distortion and subsurface damage or contamination. This process employs a process originally developed to pattern microelectronic circuits by ion enhanced chemical etching of a solid (Si02, Si, Al, Au, etc.) through a relatively nonerodeable photolithographically patterned mask1,-2. The PACE process shapes the optical surface by removing material in a small area under a confined reactive gas plasma (a "puck") moved over this surface. Rates of removal of such processes in microelectronic applications are as high as 10 pm per minute and are very accurately controllable and repeatable. The removal "footprint" of PACE may be varied during the process and it inherently smooths or polishes while exposing a virgin surface free of process generated contamination and subsurface damage. It can operate in two modes: (1) in "contact" with the plasma, where the chemical reaction is driven by the kinetic energy given up at the reacting surface by short lived species such as ions; and (2) downstream of the plasma, by the stored energy freed at the surface by longer lived species such as excited metastable neutrals. Since control of this process is so important to this application, we sketch the generic physics and chemi hi stry1,2 of the PACE figuring and smoothing process, identifying the quantitative relations between the plasma and chemical parameters that control it:rf power density reactive gas pressure reactive gas flow the reactor surface temperatures and the pertinent transport chemistry.

  10. Etching Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang

    2014-11-01

    The etching treatment is an important process step in influencing the surface quality of anodized aluminum alloy extrusions. The aim of etching is to produce a homogeneously matte surface. However, in the etching process, further surface imperfections can be generated on the extrusion surface due to uneven materials loss from different microstructural components. These surface imperfections formed prior to anodizing can significantly influence the surface quality of the final anodized extrusion products. In this article, various factors that influence the materials loss during alkaline etching of aluminum alloy extrusions are investigated. The influencing variables considered include etching process parameters, Fe-rich particles, Mg-Si precipitates, and extrusion profiles. This study provides a basis for improving the surface quality in industrial extrusion products by optimizing various process parameters.

  11. Fabrication of high-k/metal-gate MoS2 field-effect transistor by device isolation process utilizing Ar-plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, Naruki; Mori, Takahiro; Uchida, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Tsuya, Daiju; Moriyama, Satoshi; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Ando, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    We investigated a device isolation process for MoS2-based devices and fabricated high-k/metal-gate MoS2 MOSFETs. An Ar-ion etching process was utilized for the device isolation process. It circumvents damage in the device channel, as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. A top-gate MoS2 MOSFET was fabricated with a HfO2 thin film 16 nm thick as the gate insulator. Utilizing capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements, the capacitance equivalent thickness (CET) was estimated to be 5.36 nm, which indicates that a gate stack with the sufficiently thin insulator was successfully realized. The device exhibited a mobility of 25.3 cm2/(V·s), a subthreshold swing (SS) of 86.0 mV/decade, and an ON/OFF ratio of 107. This satisfactory device performance demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed device isolation process.

  12. Improvement of process uniformity in recessed gate AlGaN/GaN HFET by selective etching of in-situ SixNy on AlGaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hwa-Young; Park, Jinhong; Lee, Hojung; Jo, Youngje; Song, Misun; Jang, T.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of in-situ SixNy etching were investigated by comparing the uniformity of threshold voltage on recessed gate AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistor (HFET) devices with in-situ grown SixNy passivation. By varying O2 ratio in total gas flow, etch rate and selectivity of SixNy and AlGaN were changed significantly. The etch rate of AlGaN was reduced by adding O2 in gas mixture, which caused the formation of AlOx and GaOx on the surface during etching process. The etch rate of in-situ SixNy was decreased with increasing O2 ratio. By this relationship, the highest selectivity was obtained with 30% O2 ratio in total gas flow and selectivity was increased from 5 : 1 to 100 : 1. Using this optimized etching condition, the standard deviation of threshold voltage on AlGaN/GaN recess gate HFET was improved from 0.60 to 0.18 on 6-in. processed wafer.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Black silicon method X: a review on high speed and selective plasma etching of silicon with profile control: an in-depth comparison between Bosch and cryostat DRIE processes as a roadmap to next generation equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, H V; de Boer, M J; Unnikrishnan, S; Louwerse, M C; Elwenspoek, M C

    2009-03-01

    An intensive study has been performed to understand and tune deep reactive ion etch (DRIE) processes for optimum results with respect to the silicon etch rate, etch profile and mask etch selectivity (in order of priority) using state-of-the-art dual power source DRIE equipment. The research compares pulsed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. Bosch technique) and mixed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. cryostat technique). In both techniques, an inhibitor is added to fluorine-based plasma to achieve directional etching, which is formed out of an oxide-forming (O2) or a fluorocarbon (FC) gas (C4F8 or CHF3). The inhibitor can be introduced together with the etch gas, which is named a mixed-mode DRIE process, or the inhibitor can be added in a time-multiplexed manner, which will be termed a pulsed-mode DRIE process. Next, the most convenient mode of operation found in this study is highlighted including some remarks to ensure proper etching (i.e. step synchronization in pulsed-mode operation and heat control of the wafer). First of all, for the fabrication of directional profiles, pulsed-mode DRIE is far easier to handle, is more robust with respect to the pattern layout and has the potential of achieving much higher mask etch selectivity, whereas in a mixed-mode the etch rate is higher and sidewall scalloping is prohibited. It is found that both pulsed-mode CHF3 and C4F8 are perfectly suited to perform high speed directional etching, although they have the drawback of leaving the FC residue at the sidewalls of etched structures. They show an identical result when the flow of CHF3 is roughly 30 times the flow of C4F8, and the amount of gas needed for a comparable result decreases rapidly while lowering the temperature from room down to cryogenic (and increasing the etch rate). Moreover, lowering the temperature lowers the mask erosion rate substantially (and so the mask selectivity improves). The pulsed-mode O2 is FC-free but shows only tolerable anisotropic results at -120 °C. The

  14. Copper-assisted, anti-reflection etching of silicon surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard

    2014-08-26

    A method (300) for etching a silicon surface (116) to reduce reflectivity. The method (300) includes electroless deposition of copper nanoparticles about 20 nanometers in size on the silicon surface (116), with a particle-to-particle spacing of 3 to 8 nanometers. The method (300) includes positioning (310) the substrate (112) with a silicon surface (116) into a vessel (122). The vessel (122) is filled (340) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface (116). The etching solution (124) includes an oxidant-etchant solution (146), e.g., an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silicon surface (116) is etched (350) by agitating the etching solution (124) with, for example, ultrasonic agitation, and the etching may include heating (360) the etching solution (124) and directing light (365) onto the silicon surface (116). During the etching, copper nanoparticles enhance or drive the etching process.

  15. Damage-free back channel wet-etch process in amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors using a carbon-nanofilm barrier layer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dongxiang; Zhao, Mingjie; Xu, Miao; Li, Min; Chen, Zikai; Wang, Lang; Zou, Jianhua; Tao, Hong; Wang, Lei; Peng, Junbiao

    2014-07-23

    Amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors (IZO-TFTs) with damage-free back channel wet-etch (BCE) process were investigated. A carbon (C) nanofilm was inserted into the interface between IZO layer and source/drain (S/D) electrodes as a barrier layer. Transmittance electron microscope images revealed that the 3 nm-thick C nanofilm exhibited a good corrosion resistance to a commonly used H3PO4-based etchant and could be easily eliminated. The TFT device with a 3 nm-thick C barrier layer showed a saturated field effect mobility of 14.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), a subthreshold swing of 0.21 V/decade, an on-to-off current ratio of 8.3 × 10(10), and a threshold voltage of 2.0 V. The favorable electrical performance of this kind of IZO-TFTs was due to the protection of the inserted C to IZO layer in the back-channel-etch process. Moreover, the low contact resistance of the devices was proved to be due to the graphitization of the C nanofilms after annealing. In addition, the hysteresis and thermal stress testing confirmed that the usage of C barrier nanofilms is an effective method to fabricate the damage-free BCE-type devices with high reliability. PMID:24969359

  16. Enhancement of RIE: etched Diffractive Optical Elements surfaces by using Ion Beam Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J.; Bischoff, Ch.; Rädel, U.; Grau, M.; Wallrabe, U.; Völklein, F.

    2015-09-01

    Shaping of laser light intensities by using Diffractive Optical Elements allows the adaption of the incident light to its application. Fused silica is used where for example UV-light or high temperatures are mandatory. For high diffraction efficiency the quality of the etched surface areas is important. The investigation of different process parameters for Ion Beam and Reactive Ion Etching reveals that only Ion Beam Etching provides surfaces with optical quality. Measurements of the influence of the surface quality on the diffraction efficiencies prove that the surfaces generated by Reactive Ion Etching are not suitable. Due to the high selectivity of the process Reactive Ion Etching is nevertheless a reasonable choice for the fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements. To improve the quality of the etched surfaces a post processing with Ion Beam Etching is developed. Simulations in MATLAB display that the angle dependent removal of the surface during the Ion Beam Etching causes a smoothing of the surface roughness. The positive influence of a post processing on the diffraction efficiency is outlined by measurements. The ion beam post processing leads to an increase of the etching depth. For the fabrication of high efficient Diffractive Optical Elements this has to be taken into account. The relation is investigated and transferred to the fabrication of four-level gratings. Diffraction efficiencies up to 78 % instead of the ideal 81 % underline the practicability of the developed post processing.

  17. Facile large-scale synthesis of brain-like mesoporous silica nanocomposites via a selective etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Qihua; Wang, Tingmei

    2015-10-01

    The core-shell structured mesoporous silica nanomaterials (MSNs) are experiencing rapid development in many applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, bio-imaging and drug delivery wherein a large pore volume is desirable. We develop a one-pot method for large-scale synthesis of brain-like mesoporous silica nanocomposites based on the reasonable change of the intrinsic nature of the -Si-O-Si- framework of silica nanoparticles together with a selective etching strategy. The as-synthesized products show good monodispersion and a large pore volume of 1.0 cm3 g-1. The novelty of this approach lies in the use of an inorganic-organic hybrid layer to assist the creation of large-pore morphology on the outermost shell thereby promoting efficient mass transfer or storage. Importantly, the method is reliable and grams of products can be easily prepared. The morphology on the outermost silica shell can be controlled by simply adjusting the VTES-to-TEOS molar ratio (VTES: triethoxyvinylsilane, TEOS: tetraethyl orthosilicate) as well as the etching time. The as-synthesized products exhibit fluorescence performance by incorporating rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC) covalently into the inner silica walls, which provide potential application in bioimaging. We also demonstrate the applications of as-synthesized large-pore structured nanocomposites in drug delivery systems and stimuli-responsive nanoreactors for heterogeneous catalysis.The core-shell structured mesoporous silica nanomaterials (MSNs) are experiencing rapid development in many applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, bio-imaging and drug delivery wherein a large pore volume is desirable. We develop a one-pot method for large-scale synthesis of brain-like mesoporous silica nanocomposites based on the reasonable change of the intrinsic nature of the -Si-O-Si- framework of silica nanoparticles together with a selective etching strategy. The as-synthesized products show good monodispersion and a large pore volume

  18. Multilayer Badges Indicate Depths Of Ion Sputter Etches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Matossian, J. N.; Garvin, H. L.

    1994-01-01

    Multilayer badges devised to provide rapid, in-place indications of ion sputter etch rates. Badges conceived for use in estimating ion erosion of molybdenum electrodes used in inert-gas ion thrustors. Concept adapted to measure ion erosion in industrial sputter etching processes used for manufacturing of magnetic, electronic, and optical devices. Badge etched when bombarded by energetic ions. Badge layers exposed using mask. Contrast between layers facilitates counting of layers to determine etch depth.

  19. Silicon Nanowire Array Solar Cell Prepared by Metal-Induced Electroless Etching with a Novel Processing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han-Don Um,; Jin-Young Jung,; Hong-Seok Seo,; Kwang-Tae Park,; Sang-Won Jee,; S. A. Moiz,; Jung-Ho Lee,

    2010-04-01

    We inexpensively fabricated vertically aligned Si nanowire solar cells using metal-induced electroless etching and a novel doping technique. Co-doping of boron and phosphorus was achieved using a spin-on-doping method for the simultaneous formation of a front-side emitter and a back surface field in a one-step thermal cycle. Nickel electroless deposition was also performed in order to form a continuous metal grid electrode on top of an array of vertically aligned Si nanowires. A highly dense array of Si nanowires with low reflectivity was obtained using Ag nanoparticles of optimal size (60-90 nm). We also obtained an open circuit voltage of 544 mV, a short circuit current of 14.68 mA/cm2, and a cell conversion efficiency of 5.25% at 1.5AM illumination. The improved photovoltaic performance was believed to be the result of the excellent optical absorption of the Si nanowires and the improved electrical properties of the electroless deposited electrode.

  20. Dry Etching of Organic Low Dielectric Constant Film without Etch Stop Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumura, Michinobu; Fukuyama, Ryouji; Oomoto, Yutaka

    2002-04-01

    We investigated the trade-off between the increase of etch rate and the control of subtrenching in H2/N2 etching of a SiLK film (SiLK is a trademark of The Dow Chemical Company) without an etch stop layer for a Cu/low-k dual damascene structure. Based on our results, it is clear that the re-incident distribution of the reaction product influenced the mechanism of subtrenching strongly. As H etchant had the ability to remove the reaction product efficiently, we have successfully obtained good etching performance (an average etch rate of 128 nm/min, no subtrenching, and an etch rate uniformity of 8.9% within a 200 mm wafer) using an H2 high-flow-rate process in order to increase the amount of H etchant.

  1. Characterization of silicon isotropic etch by inductively coupled plasma etcher for microneedle array fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jing; Tay, Francis E. H.; Miao, Jianmin; Sun, Jianbo

    2006-04-01

    This work investigates the isotropic etching properties in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher for microneedle arrays fabrication. The effects of process variables including powers, gas and pressure on needle structure generation are characterized by factorial design of experiment (DOE). The experimental responses of vertical etching depth, lateral etching length, ratio of vertical etching depth to lateral etching length and photoresist etching rate are reported. The relevance of the etching variables is also presented. The obtained etching behaviours for microneedle structure generation will be applied to develop recipes to fabricate microneedles in designed dimensions.

  2. Steric stabilization of "charge-free" cellulose nanowhiskers by grafting of poly(ethylene glycol).

    PubMed

    Araki, Jun; Mishima, Shiho

    2015-01-01

    A sterically stabilized aqueous suspension of "charge-free" cellulose nanowhiskers was prepared by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis of cotton powders and subsequent surface grafting of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG). The preparation scheme included carboxylation of the terminal hydroxyl groups in mPEG via oxidation with silica gel particles carrying 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-pyperidinyloxyl (TEMPO) moieties and subsequent esterification between terminal carboxyls in mPEG and surface hydroxyl groups of cellulose nanowhiskers, mediated by 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI) in dimethyl sulfoxide or dimethylacetamide. Some of the prepared PEG-grafted samples showed remarkable flow birefringence and enhanced stability after 24 h, even in 0.1 M NaCl, suggesting successful steric stabilization by efficient mPEG grafting. Actual PEG grafting via ester linkages was confirmed by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. In a typical example, the amount of grafted mPEG was estimated as ca. 0.3 g/g cellulose by two measurements, i.e., weight increase after grafting and weight loss after alkali cleavage of ester linkages. Transmission electron microscopy indicated unchanged nanowhisker morphology after mPEG grafting. PMID:25547722

  3. Research on wet etching at MEMS torsion mirror optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jifeng; Luo, Yuan

    2002-10-01

    Etching is a very important technique at MEMS micromachining. There are two kinds of etching processing, the one is wet etching and the other is dry etching. In this paper, wet selective etching with KOH and tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) etchants is researched in order to make a torsion mirror optical switch. The experiments results show that TMAH with superphosphate is more suitable at MEMS torsion mirror optical switch micromachining than KOH, and it also has good compatibility with IC processing. Also our experiments results show some different with other reported research data. More work will be done to improve the yield rate of MEMS optical switch.

  4. Design and application of a metal wet-etching post-process for the improvement of CMOS-MEMS capacitive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Han; Sun, Chih-Ming; Liu, Yu-Chia; Wang, Chuanwei; Fang, Weileun

    2009-10-01

    This study presents a process design methodology to improve the performance of a CMOS-MEMS gap-closing capacitive sensor. In addition to the standard CMOS process, the metal wet-etching approach is employed as the post-CMOS process to realize the present design. The dielectric layers of the CMOS process are exploited to form the main micro mechanical structures of the sensor. The metal layers of the CMOS process are used as the sensing electrodes and sacrificial layers. The advantages of the sensor design are as follows: (1) the parasitic capacitance is significantly reduced by the dielectric structure, (2) in-plane and out-of-plane sensing gaps can be reduced to increase the sensitivity, and (3) plate-type instead of comb-type out-of-plane sensing electrodes are available to increase the sensing electrode area. To demonstrate the feasibility of the present design, a three-axis capacitive CMOS-MEMS accelerometers chip is implemented and characterized. Measurements show that the sensitivities of accelerometers reach 11.5 mV G-1 (in the X-, Y-axes) and 7.8 mV G-1 (in the Z-axis), respectively, which are nearly one order larger than existing designs. Moreover, the detection of 10 mG excitation using the three-axis accelerometer is demonstrated for both in-plane and out-of-plane directions.

  5. Enhanced ferro-actuator with a porosity-controlled membrane using the sol-gel process and the HF etching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, KiSu; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a ferro-actuator using a porous polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane. In detail, we fabricated the silica-embedded PVDF membrane using a sol-gel process with PVDF solution and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) solution, where the size of the silica was determined by the ratio of the PVDF and TEOS solutions. Using hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching, the silica were removed from the silica-embedded PVDF membrane, and porous PVDF membranes with different porosities were obtained. Finally, through absorption of a ferrofluid on the porous PVDF membrane, the proposed ferro-actuator using porous PVDF membranes with different porosities was fabricated. We executed the characterization and actuation test as follows. First, the silica size of the silica-embedded PVDF membrane and the pore size of the porous PVDF membrane were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. Second, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis showed that the silica had clearly been removed from the silica-embedded PVDF membrane by HF etching. Third, through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) of the ferro-actuators, we found that more ferrofluids were absorbed by the porous PVDF membrane when the pore of the membrane was smaller and uniformly distributed. Finally, we executed tip displacement and a blocking force test of the proposed ferro-actuator using the porous PVDF membrane. Similar to the VSM result, the ferro-actuator that used a porous PVDF membrane with smaller pores exhibited better actuation performance. The ferro-actuator that used a porous PVDF membrane displayed a tip displacement that was about 7.2-fold better and a blocking force that was about 6.5-fold better than the ferro-actuator that used a pure PVDF membrane. Thus, we controlled the pore size of the porous PVDF membrane and enhanced the actuation performance of the ferro-actuator using a porous PVDF membrane.

  6. Fe-catalyzed etching of graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guangjun; Calizo, Irene; Hight Walker, Angela; PML, NIST Team

    We investigate the Fe-catalyzed etching of graphene layers in forming gas. Fe thin films are deposited by sputtering onto mechanically exfoliated graphene, few-layer graphene (FLG), and graphite flakes on a Si/SiO2 substrate. When the sample is rapidly annealed in forming gas, particles are produced due to the dewetting of the Fe thin film and those particles catalyze the etching of graphene layers. Monolayer graphene and FLG regions are severely damaged and that the particles catalytically etch channels in graphite. No etching is observed on graphite for the Fe thin film annealed in nitrogen. The critical role of hydrogen indicates that this graphite etching process is catalyzed by Fe particles through the carbon hydrogenation reaction. By comparing with the etched monolayer and FLG observed for the Fe film annealed in nitrogen, our Raman spectroscopy measurements identify that, in forming gas, the catalytic etching of monolayer and FLG is through carbon hydrogenation. During this process, Fe particles are catalytically active in the dissociation of hydrogen into hydrogen atoms and in the production of hydrogenated amorphous carbon through hydrogen spillover.

  7. Plasma damage mechanisms for low-k porous SiOCH films due to radiation, radicals, and ions in the plasma etching process

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Saburo; Takashima, Seigo; Hori, Masaru; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Ohshima, Keiji; Nagahata, Kazunori; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2008-04-01

    Low dielectric constant (low-k) films have been widely used as insulating materials in ultra-large-scale integrated circuits. Low-k films receive heavy damage during the plasma processes of etching or ashing, resulting in an increase in their dielectric constant. In order to realize damage-free plasma processes for low-k films, it is essential to determine the influence of radiation, radicals, and ions emitted in the plasma process on the characteristics of low-k films. We have developed a technique to evaluate the influence of radiation, radicals, ions, and their synergies on films in real plasma processes and have named it pallet for plasma evaluation (PAPE). Using the PAPE, plasma-induced damage on porous SiOCH films were investigated in dual-frequency capacitively coupled H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasmas. The damage was characterized by ellipsometry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy. On the basis of the results, the damage mechanisms associated with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and UV radiation, radicals, and ions were clarified. The damage was caused not only by ions and radicals but also by VUV and UV radiation emitted by the plasmas. Moreover, it was found that the synergy between the radiation and the radicals enhanced the damage.

  8. High density plasma etching of magnetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kee Bum

    Magnetic materials such as NiFe (permalloy) or NiFeCo are widely used in the data storage industry. Techniques for submicron patterning are required to develop next generation magnetic devices. The relative chemical inertness of most magnetic materials means they are hard to etch using conventional RIE (Reactive Ion Etching). Therefore ion milling has generally been used across the industry, but this has limitations for magnetic structures with submicron dimensions. In this dissertation, we suggest high density plasmas such as ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) and ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma) for the etching of magnetic materials (NiFe, NiFeCo, CoFeB, CoSm, CoZr) and other related materials (TaN, CrSi, FeMn), which are employed for magnetic devices like magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAM), magnetic read/write heads, magnetic sensors and microactuators. This research examined the fundamental etch mechanisms occurring in high density plasma processing of magnetic materials by measuring etch rate, surface morphology and surface stoichiometry. However, one concern with using Cl2-based plasma chemistry is the effect of residual chlorine or chlorinated etch residues remaining on the sidewalls of etched features, leading to a degradation of the magnetic properties. To avoid this problem, we employed two different processing methods. The first one is applying several different cleaning procedures, including de-ionized water rinsing or in-situ exposure to H2, O2 or SF6 plasmas. Very stable magnetic properties were achieved over a period of ˜6 months except O2 plasma treated structures, with no evidence of corrosion, provided chlorinated etch residues were removed by post-etch cleaning. The second method is using non-corrosive gas chemistries such as CO/NH3 or CO2/NH3. There is a small chemical contribution to the etch mechanism (i.e. formation of metal carbonyls) as determined by a comparison with Ar and N2 physical sputtering. The discharge should be NH3

  9. Structure dependent hydrogen induced etching features of graphene crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraja, Amutha; Shinde, Sachin M.; Kalita, Golap; Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Sharma, Kamal P.; Tanemura, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    H2 induced etching of graphene is of significant interest to understand graphene growth process as well as to fabricate nanoribbons and various other structures. Here, we demonstrate the structure dependent H2 induced etching behavior of graphene crystals. We synthesized graphene crystals on electro-polished Cu foil by an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition process, where some of the crystals showed hexagonal shaped snowflake-dendritic morphology. Significant differences in H2 induced etching behavior were observed for the snowflake-dendritic and regular graphene crystals by annealing in a gas mixture of H2 and Ar. The regular graphene crystals were etched anisotropically creating hexagonal holes with pronounced edges, while etching of all the dendritic crystals occurred from the branches of lobs creating symmetrical fractal structures. The etching behavior provides important clue of graphene nucleation and growth as well as their selective etching to fabricate well-defined structures for nanoelectronics.

  10. Chemically assisted ion beam etching of polycrystalline and (100)tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles

    1987-01-01

    A chemically assisted ion-beam etching technique is described which employs an ion beam from an electron-bombardment ion source and a directed flux of ClF3 neutrals. This technique enables the etching of tungsten foils and films in excess of 40 microns thick with good anisotropy and pattern definition over areas of 30 sq mm, and with a high degree of selectivity. (100) tungsten foils etched with this process exhibit preferred-orientation etching, while polycrystalline tungsten films exhibit high etch rates. This technique can be used to pattern the dispenser cathode surfaces serving as electron emitters in traveling-wave tubes to a controlled porosity.

  11. Plasma and ion etching for failure analysis. Part 1: Review of current theory and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardman, M.; Mapper, D.; Farren, J.; Stephen, J. H.

    1985-07-01

    The state-of-the-art for the etching of semiconductor device materials, as applied to failure analysis, is reviewed. The basic mechanisms and techniques of dry etching were studied. Process parameters, such as rf power, gas mixture, pressure, and temperature and their effect on the etch process are reported. The Giga-Etch 100 E method of dry etching is recommended. Equipment available on the market is listed.

  12. Inorganic deterioration affecting the Altamira Cave, N Spain: quantitative approach to wall-corrosion (solutional etching) processes induced by visitors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moral, S; Soler, V; Cañaveras, J C; Sanz-Rubio, E; Van Grieken, R; Gysels, K

    1999-12-15

    In order to study the wall corrosion processes induced by visitors in the Altamira Cave (northern Spain), a multidisciplinary study was conducted in the cave. For a period of 1 year, a microclimate monitoring system, measuring the temperature, relative humidity, CO2 and 222Rn concentrations was operated. Host rock samples were collected as well as indoor and outdoor atmospheric particulate matter. These data are used for a quantitative assessment of the wall corrosion processes. The presence of visitors was found to enhance the corrosion processes up to 78 times in comparison with the natural processes. Outdoor air pollution did not have a significant affect. PMID:10635591

  13. On the dynamic response of pressure transmission lines in the research of helium-charged free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric L.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The signal distortion inherent to pressure transmission lines in free-piston Stirling engine research is discussed. Based on results from classical analysis, guidelines are formulated to describe the dynamic response properties of a volume-terminated transmission tube for applications involving the helium-charged free-piston Stirling engines. The underdamped flow regime is described, the primary resonance frequency is derived, and the pressure phase and amplitude distortion are discussed. The scope and limitation of the dynamic response analysis are considered.

  14. Excimer Laser Etching

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Longmire, Hu Foster; Rouleau, Christopher M; Gray, Allison S

    2008-04-01

    Excimer laser radiation at a wavelength of = 248 nm represents a new etching method for the preparation of metallographic specimens. The method is shown to be particularly effective for enhancing the contrast between different phases in a multiphase metallographic specimen.

  15. Application of an RF Biased Langmuir Probe to Etch Reactor Chamber Matching, Fault Detection and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Douglas; Booth, Jean-Paul; Benjamin, Neil; Thorgrimsson, Chris; Brooks, Mitchell; Nagai, Mikio; Albarede, Luc; Kim, Jung

    2008-10-01

    Semiconductor device manufacturing typically occurs in an environment of both increasing equipment costs and per unit sale price shrinkage. Profitability in such a conflicted economic environment depends critically on yield, throughput and cost-of-ownership. This has resulted in increasing interest in improved fault detection, process diagnosis, and advanced process control. Achieving advances in these areas requires an integrated understanding of the basic physical principles driving the processes of interest and the realities of commercial manufacturing. Following this trend, this work examines the usefulness of an RF-biased planar Langmuir probe^1. This method delivers precise real-time (10 Hz) measurements of ion flux and tail weighted electron temperature. However, it is also mechanically non-intrusive, reliable and insensitive to contamination and deposition on the probe. Since the measured parameters are closely related to physical processes occurring at the wafer-plasma interface, significant improvements in process control, chamber matching and fault detection are achieved. Examples illustrating the improvements possible will be given. ^1J.P. Booth, N. St. J. Braithwaite, A. Goodyear and P. Barroy, Rev.Sci.Inst., Vol.71, No.7, July 2000, pgs. 2722-2727.

  16. Sloped niobium etching using CF sub 4 and O sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sasserath, J.N.; Vivalda, J. )

    1990-11-01

    A sloped etching process for Nb is developed for pilot line operations. Reactive ion etching and plasma processes are compared for a CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} parallel plate etch system. The higher pressure etches were found to have better characteristics for the numerous combinations of independent variables examined. Process settings tested include rf power, chamber pressure, and etchant flow rates. Higher Nb etch rates, photoresist:niobium etch rate selectivity of 1:1, and adequate selectivity over SiO{sub 2} were obtained with the plasma etches. For both types of processes, control of plasma loading affects were determined to be crucial to accomplish successful patterning. Finally, mathematical models of the etch process were derived from the data and used to determine basic etch mechanisms occurring within the reactor.

  17. Etching characteristics of LiNbO{sub 3} in reactive ion etching and inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Z.; Yu, S.; Heard, P. J.; Marshall, J. M.; Thomas, P. A.

    2008-02-01

    The etching characteristics of congruent LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals including doped LiNbO{sub 3} and proton-changed LiNbO{sub 3} have been studied in reactive ion etching (RIE) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching tools, using different recipes of gas mixtures. The effects of parameters including working pressure, RIE power, and ICP power are investigated and analyzed by measurement of etching depth, selectivity, uniformity, etched surface state, and sidewall profile by means of focused ion beam etching, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and surface profilometry. The effects of a sample carrier wafer coating have also been investigated. Optimized processes with high etching rates, good mask selectivity, and a near-vertical profile have been achieved. Ridge waveguides on proton-exchanged LiNbO{sub 3} have been fabricated and optically measured.

  18. Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Weckwerth, Mark V.; Baca, Wes E.

    2000-01-01

    A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

  19. Metal assisted anodic etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chang Quan; Zheng, Wen; Choi, W. K.; Thompson, Carl V.

    2015-06-01

    Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P+-type and N+-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed, including solid Si nanowires, porous Si nanowires, a porous Si layer without Si nanowires, and porous Si nanowires on a thick porous Si layer. Formation of wires was the result of selective etching at the Au-Si interface. It was found that when the anodic contact was made through P-type or P+-type Si, regular anodic etching due to electronic hole injection leads to formation of porous silicon simultaneously with metal assisted anodic etching. When the anodic contact was made through N-type or N+-type Si, generation of electronic holes through processes such as impact ionization and tunnelling-assisted surface generation were required for etching. In addition, it was found that metal assisted anodic etching of Si with the anodic contact made through the patterned Au film essentially reproduces the phenomenology of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE), in which holes are generated through metal assisted reduction of H2O2 rather than current flow. These results clarify the linked roles of electrical and chemical processes that occur during electrochemical etching of Si.Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P+-type and N+-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed

  20. Characterization of deep wet etching of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Chen, Bangtao; Tay, Francis E. H.; Xu, Guolin; Miao, Jianmin

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a characterization of wet etching of glass in HF-based solutions with a focus on etching rate, masking layers and quality of the generated surface. The first important factor that affects the deep wet etching process is the glass composition. The presence of oxides such as CaO, MgO or Al IIO 3 that give insoluble products after reaction with HF can generate rough surface and modify the etching rate. A second factor that influences especially the etch rate is the annealing process (560°C / 6 hours in N II environment). For annealed glass samples an increase of the etch rate with 50-60% was achieved. Another important factor is the concentration of the HF solution. For deep wet etching of Pyrex glass in hydrofluoric acid solution, different masking layers such as Cr/Au, PECVD amorphous silicon, LPCVD polysilicon and silicon carbide are analyzed. Detailed studies show that the stress in the masking layer is a critical factor for deep wet etching of glass. A low value of compressive stress is recommended. High value of tensile stress in the masking layer (200-300 MPa) can be an important factor in the generation of the pinholes. Another factor is the surface hydrophilicity. A hydrophobic surface of the masking layer will prevent the etching solution from flowing through the deposition defects (micro/nano channels or cracks) and the generation of pinholes is reduced. The stress gradient in the masking layer can also be an important factor in generation of the notching defects on the edges. Using these considerations a special multilayer masks Cr/Au/Photoresist (AZ7220) and amorphous silicon/silicon carbide/Photoresist were fabricated for deep wet etching of a 500 μm and 1mm-thick respectively Pyrex glass wafers. In both cases the etching was performed through wafer. From our knowledge these are the best results reported in the literature. The quality of the generated surface is another important factor in the fabrication process. We notice that the

  1. Fabrication and characterization of back-side illuminated InGaN/GaN solar cells with periodic via-holes etching and Bragg mirror processes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-An; Chen, Fang-Ming; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Chang, Ching-Wen; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Li, Shan-Rong; Lu, Tien-Chang; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Kuo, Yen-Kuang; Yu, Peichen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Tu, Li-Wei

    2014-08-25

    In this study, the design and fabrication schemes of back-side illuminated InGaN/GaN solar cells with periodic via-holes etching and Bragg mirror processes are presented. Compared to typical front-side illuminated solar cells, the improvements of open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) from 1.88 to 1.94 V and short-circuit current density (J(sc)) from 0.84 to 1.02 mA/cm(2) are observed. Most significantly, the back-side illuminated InGaN/GaN solar cells exhibit an extremely high fill factor up to 85.5%, leading to a conversion efficiency of 1.69% from 0.66% of typical front-side illuminated solar cells under air mass 1.5 global illuminations. Moreover, the effects of bottom Bragg mirrors on the photovoltaic characteristics of back-side illuminated solar cells are studied by an advanced simulation program. The results show that the J(sc) could further be improved with a factor of 10% from the original back-side illuminated solar cell by the structure optimization of bottom Bragg mirrors. PMID:25322188

  2. Effect of crystal orientation on anisotropic etching and MOCVD growth of grooves on GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Grooves can be formed on GaAs by wet-chemical anisotropic etching of surfaces masked by photoresist stripes. The effect of crystal orientation on the shape of the grooves etched and on subsequent epitaxial growth by MOCVD is presented. The polar lattice increases the complexity of the etching and growth processes. The slow-etch planes defined by anisotropic etching are not always the same as the growth facets produced during MOCVD deposition, especially for deposition on higher order planes.

  3. Metal assisted anodic etching of silicon.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang Quan; Zheng, Wen; Choi, W K; Thompson, Carl V

    2015-07-01

    Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P(+)-type and N(+)-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed, including solid Si nanowires, porous Si nanowires, a porous Si layer without Si nanowires, and porous Si nanowires on a thick porous Si layer. Formation of wires was the result of selective etching at the Au-Si interface. It was found that when the anodic contact was made through P-type or P(+)-type Si, regular anodic etching due to electronic hole injection leads to formation of porous silicon simultaneously with metal assisted anodic etching. When the anodic contact was made through N-type or N(+)-type Si, generation of electronic holes through processes such as impact ionization and tunnelling-assisted surface generation were required for etching. In addition, it was found that metal assisted anodic etching of Si with the anodic contact made through the patterned Au film essentially reproduces the phenomenology of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE), in which holes are generated through metal assisted reduction of H2O2 rather than current flow. These results clarify the linked roles of electrical and chemical processes that occur during electrochemical etching of Si. PMID:26059556

  4. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry based Scatterometry enabling 193nm Litho and Etch process control for the 110nm technology node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingst, Thomas; Marschner, Thomas; Moert, Manfred; Homilius, Jan; Guevremont, Marco; Hopkins, John; Elazami, Assim

    2003-05-01

    In the production of sub 140nm electronic devices, CD metrology is becoming more critical due to the increased demands placed on process control. CD metrology using CD-SEM is approaching its limits especially with respect to precision, resolution and depth of field. Potentially, scatterometry can measure structures down to 50nm with the appropriate precision. Additionally, as scatterometry is a model based technique it allows a full reconstruction of the line profile and the film stack. In this work we use SE based scatterometry in the control of a 110nm DRAM WSix Gate process at the Litho and the Mask Open step. We demonstrate the use of a single trapezoid as a basic shape model in FEM and field mapping applications as well as in a high volume production test. The scatterometry results are compared to CD-SEM data. We show that for the GC Litho application, n&k variations in some of the stack materials do not affect the scatterometry CD measurement significantly.

  5. Metallographic examination of TD-nickel base alloys. [thermal and chemical etching technique evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Petrovic, J. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques are evaluated for chemical, electrochemical, and thermal etching of thoria dispersed (TD) nickel alloys. An electrochemical etch is described which yielded good results only for large grain sizes of TD-nickel. Two types of thermal etches are assessed for TD-nickel: an oxidation etch and vacuum annealing of a polished specimen to produce an etch. It is shown that the first etch was somewhat dependent on sample orientation with respect to the processing direction, the second technique was not sensitive to specimen orientation or grain size, and neither method appear to alter the innate grain structure when the materials were fully annealed prior to etching. An electrochemical etch is described which was used to observe the microstructures in TD-NiCr, and a thermal-oxidation etch is shown to produce better detail of grain boundaries and to have excellent etching behavior over the entire range of grain sizes of the sample.

  6. Experiment and Results on Plasma Etching of SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Im, Do; Peshl, J.; Vuskovic, Leposova; Popovic, Svetozar; Valente, Anne-Marie; Phillips, H. Lawrence

    2015-09-01

    The inner surfaces of SRF cavities are currently chemically treated (etched or electropolished) to achieve the state of the art RF performance. We designed an apparatus and developed a method for plasma etching of the inner surface for SRF cavities. The process parameters (pressure, power, gas concentration, diameter and shape of the inner electrode, temperature and positive dc bias at inner electrode) are optimized for cylindrical geometry. The etch rate non-uniformity has been overcome by simultaneous translation of the gas point-of-entry and the inner electrode during the processing. A single cell SRF cavity has been centrifugally barrel polished, chemically etched and RF tested to establish a baseline performance. This cavity is plasma etched and RF tested afterwards. The effect of plasma etching on the RF performance of this cavity will be presented and discussed.

  7. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  8. Extreme ultraviolet lithography mask etch study and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Banqiu; Kumar, Ajay; Chandrachood, Madhavi; Sabharwal, Amitabh

    2013-04-01

    An overview of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask etch is presented and a EUVL mask etch study was carried out. Today, EUVL implementation has three critical challenges that hinder its adoption: extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source power, resist resolution-line width roughness-sensitivity, and a qualified EUVL mask. The EUVL mask defect challenges result from defects generated during blank preparation, absorber and multilayer deposition processes, as well as patterning, etching and wet clean processes. Stringent control on several performance criteria including critical dimension (CD) uniformity, etch bias, micro-loading, profile control, defect control, and high etch selectivity requirement to capping layer is required during the resist pattern duplication on the underlying absorber layer. EUVL mask absorbers comprise of mainly tantalum-based materials rather than chrome- or MoSi-based materials used in standard optical masks. Compared to the conventional chrome-based absorbers and phase shift materials, tantalum-based absorbers need high ion energy to obtain moderate etch rates. However, high ion energy may lower resist selectivity, and could introduce defects. Current EUVL mask consists of an anti-reflective layer on top of the bulk absorber. Recent studies indicate that a native oxide layer would suffice as an anti-reflective coating layer during the electron beam inspection. The absorber thickness and the material properties are optimized based on optical density targets for the mask as well as electromagnetic field effects and optics requirements of the patterning tools. EUVL mask etch processes are modified according to the structure of the absorber, its material, and thickness. However, etch product volatility is the fundamental requirement. Overlapping lithographic exposure near chip border may require etching through the multilayer, resulting in challenges in profile control and etch selectivity. Optical proximity correction is applied to further

  9. On the dynamic response of pressure transmission lines in the research of helium-charged free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric L.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1989-01-01

    In free piston Stirling engine research the integrity of both amplitude and phase of the dynamic pressure measurements is critical to the characterization of cycle dynamics and thermodynamics. It is therefore necessary to appreciate all possible sources of signal distortion when designing pressure measurement systems for this type of research. The signal distortion inherent to pressure transmission lines is discussed. Based on results from classical analysis, guidelines are formulated to describe the dynamic response properties of a volume-terminated transmission tube for applications involving helium-charged free piston Stirling engines. The scope and limitations of the dynamic response analysis are considered.

  10. Masking Technique for Ion-Beam Sputter Etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Improved process for fabrication of integrated circuits developed. Technique utilizes simultaneous ion-beam sputter etching and carbon sputter deposition in conjunction with carbon sputter mask or organic mask decomposed to produce carbon-rich sputter-mask surface. Sputter etching process replenishes sputter mask with carbon to prevent premature mask loss.

  11. LDRD final report : on the development of hybrid level-set/particle methods for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Musson, Lawrence Cale

    2005-01-01

    Two methods for creating a hybrid level-set (LS)/particle method for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes are developed and tested. The first method supplements the LS method by introducing Lagrangian marker points in regions of high curvature. Once both the particle set and the LS function are advanced in time, minimization of certain objective functions adjusts the LS function so that its zero contour is in closer alignment with the particle locations. It was found that the objective-minimization problem was unexpectedly difficult to solve, and even when a solution could be found, the acquisition of it proved more costly than simply expanding the basis set of the LS function. The second method explored is a novel explicit marker-particle method that we have named the grid point particle (GPP) approach. Although not a LS method, the GPP approach has strong procedural similarities to certain aspects of the LS approach. A key aspect of the method is a surface rediscretization procedure--applied at each time step and based on a global background mesh--that maintains a representation of the surface while naturally adding and subtracting surface discretization points as the surface evolves in time. This method was coded in 2-D, and tested on a variety of surface evolution problems by using it in the ChISELS computer code. Results shown for 2-D problems illustrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight some notable advantages in accuracy over the LS method. Generalizing the method to 3D is discussed but not implemented.

  12. Dynamic observation of electrochemical etching in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, F.M.; Searson, P.C.

    1995-03-01

    The authors have designed and constructed a TEM specimen holder in order to observe the process of pore formation in silicon. The holder incorporates electrical feedthroughs and a sealed reservoir for the electrolyte and accepts lithographically patterned silicon specimens. The authors describe the system and present preliminary, ex situ observations of the etching process.

  13. TRAVIT: software tool to simulate dry etch in maskmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, S.; Bay, K.; Okulovsky, S.

    2005-06-01

    A software tool, TRAVIT, has been developed to simulate dry etch in maskmaking. The software predicts the etch profile, etched critical dimensions (CDs), and CD-variation for any pattern of interest. The software also takes into account microloading effect that is pattern dependent and contributes to CD variation. Once CD variation is known, it can then be applied to correct the CD-error. Examples of simulations including variable ICP power, physical and chemical etch components, and optimization of a bias and CD variation are presented. Incorporating simulation into the maskmaking process can save cost and shorten the time to production.

  14. Etching fission tracks in zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.

    1969-01-01

    A new technique has been developed whereby fission tracks can be etched in zircon with a solution of sodium hydroxide at 220??C. Etching time varied between 15 minutes and 5 hours. Colored zircon required less etching time than the colorless varieties.

  15. Multiple-mask chemical etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, D. L.

    1969-01-01

    Multiple masking techniques use lateral etching to reduce the total area of the high etch-rate oxide exposed to the chemical etchant. One method uses a short-term etch to remove the top layer from the silicon oxide surface, another acts before the top layer is grown.

  16. Advanced deep reactive-ion etching technology for hollow microneedles for transdermal blood sampling and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yufei; Eng, Pay F; Guy, Owen J; Roberts, Kerry; Ashraf, Huma; Knight, Nick

    2013-06-01

    Using an SPTS Technologies Ltd. Pegasus deep reactive-ion etching (DRIE) system, an advanced two-step etching process has been developed for hollow microneedles in applications of transdermal blood sampling and drug delivery. Because of the different etching requirements of both narrow deep hollow and large open cavity, hollow etch and cavity etch steps have been achieved separately. This novel two-step etching process is assisted with a bi-layer etching mask. Results show that the etch rate of silicon during this hollow etch step was about 7.5 microm/min and the etch rate of silicon during this cavity etch step was about 8-10 microm/min, using the coil plasma etching power between 2.0 and 2.8 kW. Especially for the microneedle bores etch, the deeper it etched, the slower the etch rate was. The microneedle bores have successfully been obtained 75-150 microm in inner diametre and 700-1000 microm long with high aspect ratio DRIE, meanwhile, the vertical sidewall structures have been achieved with the high etch load exposed area over 70% for the cavity etch step. PMID:24046906

  17. Dry-wet digital etching of Ge1-xSnx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Colleen K.; Wang, Vivian; Chen, Robert; Gupta, Suyog; Huang, Yi-Chiau; Pao, James J.; Huo, Yijie; Sanchez, Errol; Kim, Yihwan; Kamins, Theodore I.; Harris, James S.

    2016-02-01

    The development of a precise micromachining process for Ge1-xSnx has the potential to enable both the fabrication and optimization of Ge1-xSnx-based devices in photonics and microelectromechanical systems. We demonstrate a digital etching scheme for Ge0.922Sn0.078 based on a two-stage, highly selective CF4 plasma dry etch and HCl wet etch. Using X-Ray Reflectivity, we show consistent etch control as low as 1.5 nm per cycle, which is defined as one dry etch step followed by one wet etch step. The etch rate increases to 3.2 nm per cycle for a longer dry etch time due to physical sputtering contributions, accompanied by an increase in RMS surface roughness. By operating within a regime with minimal sputtering, we demonstrate that good digital etch depth control and surface quality can be achieved using this technique.

  18. Isotropic plasma etching of Ge Si and SiNx films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Henry, Michael David; Douglas, Erica Ann

    2016-05-01

    This study reports on selective isotropic dry etching of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Ge thin film, release layers using a Shibaura chemical downstream etcher (CDE) with NF3 and Ar based plasma chemistry. Relative etch rates between Ge, Si and SiNx are described with etch rate reductions achieved by adjusting plasma chemistry with O2. Formation of oxides reducing etch rates were measured for both Ge and Si, but nitrides or oxy-nitrides created using direct injection of NO into the process chamber were measured to increase Si and SiNx etch rates while retarding Ge etching.

  19. Nanoscale dry etching of germanium by using inductively coupled CF4 plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Kyu-Hwan; Yang, Ha Yong; Kil, Yeon-Ho; Yang, Hyeon Deok; Yang, Jong-Han; Hong, Woong-Ki; Kang, Sukill; Jeong, Tae Soo; Kim, Taek Sung

    2012-08-01

    The nanoscale dry etching of germanium was investigated by using inductively coupled CF4 plasma and electron-beam lithography. The optimal dose of PMMA as E-beam lithography resist was ˜200 mC/cm2. When ICP Power was 200W, CF4 gas flow rate was 40 sccm, and process pressure was 20 mTorr, it had a smooth surface and good etch rate. The etching selectivity of Ge wafer to PMMA resist was as low as ˜1.5. Various sub-100 nm dry-etching patterns have been obtained. SEM pictures showed good profile qualities with a smooth etching sidewall and ultrasmall etching features.

  20. Modeling of the angular dependence of plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Wei; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2009-11-15

    An understanding of the angular dependence of etching yield is essential to investigate the origins of sidewall roughness during plasma etching. In this article the angular dependence of polysilicon etching in Cl{sub 2} plasma was modeled as a combination of individual angular-dependent etching yields for ion-initiated processes including physical sputtering, ion-induced etching, vacancy generation, and removal. The modeled etching yield exhibited a maximum at {approx}60 degree sign off-normal ion angle at low flux ratio, indicative of physical sputtering. It transformed to the angular dependence of ion-induced etching with the increase in the neutral-to-ion flux ratio. Good agreement between the modeling and the experiments was achieved for various flux ratios and ion energies. The variation of etching yield in response to the ion angle was incorporated in the three-dimensional profile simulation and qualitative agreement was obtained. The surface composition was calculated and compared to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The modeling indicated a Cl areal density of 3x10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2} on the surface that is close to the value determined by the XPS analysis. The response of Cl fraction to ion energy and flux ratio was modeled and correlated with the etching yields. The complete mixing-layer kinetics model with the angular dependence effect will be used for quantitative surface roughening analysis using a profile simulator in future work.

  1. Pulsed plasma etching for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-07-01

    Power-modulated (pulsed) plasmas have demonstrated several advantages compared to continuous wave (CW) plasmas. Specifically, pulsed plasmas can result in a higher etching rate, better uniformity, and less structural, electrical or radiation (e.g. vacuum ultraviolet) damage. Pulsed plasmas can also ameliorate unwanted artefacts in etched micro-features such as notching, bowing, micro-trenching and aspect ratio dependent etching. As such, pulsed plasmas may be indispensable in etching of the next generation of micro-devices with a characteristic feature size in the sub-10 nm regime. This work provides an overview of principles and applications of pulsed plasmas in both electropositive (e.g. argon) and electronegative (e.g. chlorine) gases. The effect of pulsing the plasma source power (source pulsing), the electrode bias power (bias pulsing), or both source and bias power (synchronous pulsing), on the time evolution of species densities, electron energy distribution function and ion energy and angular distributions on the substrate is discussed. The resulting pulsed plasma process output (etching rate, uniformity, damage, etc) is compared, whenever possible, to that of CW plasma, under otherwise the same or similar conditions.

  2. In-situ diagnostics and characterization of etch by-product deposition on chamber walls during halogen etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastgar, Neema; Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Marsh, Ricky; Paterson, Alex

    2014-10-01

    Plasma etching is a critical technology for nanoelectronics fabrication, but the use of a vacuum chamber limits the number of in-situ, real-time diagnostics measurements that can be performed during an etch process. Byproduct deposition on chamber walls during etching can affect the run-to-run performance of an etch process if there is build-up or change of wall characteristics with time. Knowledge of chamber wall evolution and the composition of wall-deposited films are critical to understanding the performance of plasma etch processes, and an in-situ diagnostics measurement is useful for monitoring the chamber walls in real time. We report the use of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to perform in-situ diagnostics of a vacuum chamber's walls during plasma etching. Using ATR-FTIR, we are able to monitor the relative thickness and makeup of chamber wall deposits in real time. We then use this information to develop a chamber wall cleaning process in order to maintain reproducible etching conditions from wafer to wafer. In particular, we report mid-IR (4000-650 cm-1) absorption spectra of chamber wall-deposited silicon byproducts formed during halogen etching of silicon wafers.

  3. Litho-freeze-litho-etch (LFLE) enabling dual wafer flow coat/develop process and freeze CD tuning bake for >200wph immersion ArF photolithography double patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczulewski, Charles N.; Rosslee, Craig A.

    2009-12-01

    The SOKUDO DUO track system incorporates a dual-path wafer flow to reduce the burden on the wafer handling unit and enables high-throughput coat/develop/bake processing in-line with semiconductor photolithography exposure (scanner) equipment. Various photolithography-based double patterning process flows were modeled on the SOKUDO DUO system and it was confirmed to be able to process both Litho-Process-Litho-Etch (LPLE)*2 and negative-tone develop process wafers at greater than 200 wafer-per-hour (wph) capability for each litho-pass through the in-line exposure tool. In addition, it is demonstrated that Biased Hot Plates (BHP) with "cdTune" software improves litho pattern #1 and litho pattern #2 within wafer CD uniformity. Based primarily on JSR Micro materials for Litho-Freeze- Litho-Etch (LFLE) the coat, develop and bake process CD uniformity improvement results are demonstrated on the SOKUDO RF3S immersion track in-line with ASML XT:1900Gi system at IMEC, Belgium.

  4. Etched profile control in anisotropic etching of silicon by TMAH+Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Prem; Gosálvez, M. A.; Sato, K.

    2012-06-01

    The adverse effect of mechanical agitation (magnetic bead stirring) as well as galvanic interaction between the evolving facets of the etch front on the amount of undercutting during anisotropic etching of Si{1 0 0} wafers in surfactant-added tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) is studied by etching different mask patterns in magnetically stirred and nonstirred solutions. Triton X-100, with formula C14H22O(C2H4O)n, where n = 9-10, is used as the surfactant. The stirring results conclude that the adsorption of the surfactant on the etched silicon surfaces is predominantly physical in nature rather than chemical (physisorption versus chemisorption). The proposed model to account for the galvanic interaction between the evolving facets indicates that the underlying chemical etching process can be significantly surpassed by the onset of an electrochemical etching contribution when the relative area of the exposed {1 0 0} surface becomes relatively small in comparison to that of the developed {1 1 1} sidewalls. This study is useful for engineering applications where surfactant-added TMAH is used for the fabrication of silicon MEMS structures that should contain negligible undercutting.

  5. Atomic precision etch using a low-electron temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L.; Wang, J.-C.; Rauf, S.; Zhang, Y.; Agarwal, A.; Kenney, J.; Ramaswamy, K.; Collins, K.

    2016-03-01

    Sub-nm precision is increasingly being required of many critical plasma etching processes in the semiconductor industry. Accurate control over ion energy and ion/radical composition is needed during plasma processing to meet these stringent requirements. Described in this work is a new plasma etch system which has been designed with the requirements of atomic precision plasma processing in mind. In this system, an electron sheet beam parallel to the substrate surface produces a plasma with an order of magnitude lower electron temperature Te (~ 0.3 eV) and ion energy Ei (< 3 eV without applied bias) compared to conventional radio-frequency (RF) plasma technologies. Electron beam plasmas are characterized by higher ion-to-radical fraction compared to RF plasmas, so a separate radical source is used to provide accurate control over relative ion and radical concentrations. Another important element in this plasma system is low frequency RF bias capability which allows control of ion energy in the 2-50 eV range. Presented in this work are the results of etching of a variety of materials and structures performed in this system. In addition to high selectivity and low controllable etch rate, an important requirement of atomic precision etch processes is no (or minimal) damage to the remaining material surface. It has traditionally not been possible to avoid damage in RF plasma processing systems, even during atomic layer etch. The experiments for Si etch in Cl2 based plasmas in the aforementioned etch system show that damage can be minimized if the ion energy is kept below 10 eV. Layer-by-layer etch of Si is also demonstrated in this etch system using electrical and gas pulsing.

  6. Software to simulate dry etch in photomask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, Sergey; Bay, Konstantin; Okulovsky, Sergey

    2004-12-01

    Dry etch in maskmaking is one of the major contributors to variation of critical dimensions (CD) which is caused primarily by the microloading and macroloading effects. CD variation during etch depends on the type of pattern involved. It would be highly desirable to run a pattern through the software to predict CD variation due to dry etch and decide if the variation is within the prescribed tolerance or if the pattern needs additional correction, and to what degree. In this paper, a dry etch simulation tool TRAVIT is introduced that is capable of simulating etch profile, CD, and CD errors. Using a set of desired process conditions, the software runs the simulation for the pattern of interest that helps to optimize sidewall, bias, and CD variation. Incorporating simulation into the maskmaking process can save cost and shorten the time to production.

  7. Optical diagnostic instrument for monitoring etch uniformity during plasma etching of polysilicon in a chlorine-helium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hareland, W.A.; Buss, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    Nonuniform etching is a serious problem in plasma processing of semiconductor materials and has important consequences in the quality and yield of microelectronic components. In many plasmas, etching occurs at a faster rate near the periphery of the wafer, resulting in nonuniform removal of specific materials over the wafer surface. This research was to investigate in situ optical diagnostic techniques for monitoring etch uniformity during plasma processing of microelectronic components. We measured 2-D images of atomic chlorine at 726 nm in a chlorine-helium plasma during plasma etching of polysilicon in a parallel-plate plasma etching reactor. The 3-D distribution of atomic chlorine was determined by Abel inversion of the plasma image. The experimental results showed that the chlorine atomic emission intensity is at a maximum near the outer radius of the plasma and decreases toward the center. Likewise, the actual etch rate, as determined by profilometry on the processed wafer, was approximately 20% greater near the edge of the wafer than at its center. There was a direct correlation between the atomic chlorine emission intensity and the etch rate of polysilicon over the wafer surface. Based on these analyses, 3-D imaging would be a useful diagnostic technique for in situ monitoring of etch uniformity on wafers.

  8. Reactive ion etching of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay, D.P.; Desu, S.B.; Pan, W. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    One of the key processing concerns in the integration of PbZr[sub x]Ti[sub 1[minus]x]O[sub 3](PZT) thin film capacitors into the existing VLSI for ferroelectric or dynamic random access memory applications is the patterning of these films and the electrodes. In this work, the authors have identified a suitable etch gas (CCl[sub 2]F[sub 2]) for dry etching of PZT thin films on RuO[sub 2] electrodes. The etch rate and anisotropy have been studied as a function of etching conditions. The trends in the effect on the etch rate of the gas pressure, RF power and O[sub 2] additions to the etch gas have been determined and an etching mechanism has been proposed. It was found that ion bombardment effects are primarily responsible for the etching of both PZT and RuO[sub 2] thin films. Etch rates of the order of 20--30 nm/min were obtained for PZT thin films under low gas pressure and high RF power conditions. The etch residues and the relative etch rates of the components of the PZT solid solution were determined using XPS. The results show that the etching of PbO is the limiting factor in the etch process.

  9. Porous silicon formation during Au-catalyzed etching

    SciTech Connect

    Algasinger, Michael; Bernt, Maximilian; Koynov, Svetoslav; Stutzmann, Martin

    2014-04-28

    The formation of “black” nano-textured Si during the Au-catalyzed wet-chemical etch process was investigated with respect to photovoltaic applications. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images recorded at different stages of the etch process exhibit an evolution of a two-layer structure, consisting of cone-like Si hillocks covered with a nano-porous Si (np-Si) layer. Optical measurements confirm the presence of a np-Si phase which appears after the first ∼10 s of the etch process and continuously increases with the etch time. Furthermore, the etch process was investigated on Si substrates with different doping levels (∼0.01–100 Ω cm). SEM images show a transition from the two-layer morphology to a structure consisting entirely of np-Si for higher doping levels (<0.1 Ω cm). The experimental results are discussed on the basis of the model of a local electrochemical etch process. A better understanding of the metal-catalyzed etch process facilitates the fabrication of “black” Si on various Si substrates, which is of significant interest for photovoltaic applications.

  10. Technique for etching monolayer and multilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Conley, Raymond P.; Divan, Ralu; Macrander, Albert

    2015-10-06

    A process is disclosed for sectioning by etching of monolayers and multilayers using an RIE technique with fluorine-based chemistry. In one embodiment, the process uses Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) alone or in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) using fluorine-based chemistry alone and using sufficient power to provide high ion energy to increase the etching rate and to obtain deeper anisotropic etching. In a second embodiment, a process is provided for sectioning of WSi.sub.2/Si multilayers using RIE in combination with ICP using a combination of fluorine-based and chlorine-based chemistries and using RF power and ICP power. According to the second embodiment, a high level of vertical anisotropy is achieved by a ratio of three gases; namely, CHF.sub.3, Cl.sub.2, and O.sub.2 with RF and ICP. Additionally, in conjunction with the second embodiment, a passivation layer can be formed on the surface of the multilayer which aids in anisotropic profile generation.

  11. Chemical etching and organometallic chemical vapor deposition on varied geometries of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Results of micron-spaced geometries produced by wet chemical etching and subsequent OMCVD growth on various GaAs surfaces are presented. The polar lattice increases the complexity of the process. The slow-etch planes defined by anisotropic etching are not always the same as the growth facets produced during MOCVD deposition, especially for deposition on higher-order planes produced by the hex groove etching.

  12. Anisotropic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} waveguide etching using inductively coupled plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Muttalib, Muhammad Firdaus A. Chen, Ruiqi Y.; Pearce, Stuart J.; Charlton, Martin D. B.

    2014-07-01

    Smooth and vertical sidewall profiles are required to create low loss rib and ridge waveguides for integrated optical device and solid state laser applications. In this work, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching processes are developed to produce high quality low loss tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) waveguides. A mixture of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} and O{sub 2} gas are used in combination with chromium (Cr) hard mask for this purpose. In this paper, the authors make a detailed investigation of the etch process parameter window. Effects of process parameters such as ICP power, platen power, gas flow, and chamber pressure on etch rate and sidewall slope angle are investigated. Chamber pressure is found to be a particularly important factor, which can be used to tune the sidewall slope angle and so prevent undercut.

  13. Disilane-based cyclic deposition/etch of Si, Si:P and Si1-yCy:P layers: I. The elementary process steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, J. M.; Benevent, V.; Barnes, J. P.; Veillerot, M.; Deguet, C.

    2013-02-01

    We have benchmarked the 550 °C, 20 Torr growth of Si:P and Si1-yCy:P using SiH4 and Si2H6. P segregation has prevented us from reaching P+ ion concentrations in Si higher than a few 1019 cm-3 using SiH4; the resulting surface ‘poisoning’ led to a severe growth rate reduction. Meanwhile, [P+] increased linearly with the phosphine flow when using Si2H6 as the Si precursor; values as high as 1.7 × 1020 cm-3 were obtained. The Si:P growth rate using Si2H6 was initially stable then increased as the PH3 flow increased. Mono-methylsilane flows 6.5-10 times higher were needed with Si2H6 than with SiH4 to reach the same substitutional C concentrations in intrinsic Si1-yCy layers ([C]subst. up to 1.9%). Growth rates were approximately six times higher with Si2H6 than with SiH4, however. 30 nm thick Si1-yCy layers became rough as [C]subst. exceeded 1.6% (formation of increasing numbers of islands). We have also studied the structural and electrical properties of ‘low’ and ‘high’ C content Si1-yCy:P layers (˜ 1.5 and 1.8%, respectively) grown with Si2H6. Adding significant amounts of PH3 led to a reduction of the tensile strain in the films. This was due to the incorporation of P atoms (at the expense of C atoms) in the substitutional sites of the Si matrix. Si1-yCy:P layers otherwise became rough as the PH3 flow increased. Resistivities lower than 1 mΩ cm were nevertheless associated with those Si1-yCy:P layers, with P atomic concentrations at most 3.9 × 1020 cm-3. Finally, we have quantified the beneficial impact of adding GeH4 to HCl for the low-temperature etching of Si. Etch rates 12-36 times higher with HCl + GeH4 than with pure HCl were achieved at 20 Torr. Workable etch rates close to 1 nm min-1 were obtained at 600 °C (versus 750 °C for pure HCl), enabling low-temperature cyclic deposition/etch strategies for the selective epitaxial growth of Si, Si:P and Si1-yCy:P layers on patterned wafers.

  14. Selective Etching of Semiconductor Glassivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, N.

    1982-01-01

    Selective etching technique removes portions of glassivation on a semi-conductor die for failure analysis or repairs. A periodontal needle attached to a plastic syringe is moved by a microprobe. Syringe is filled with a glass etch. A drop of hexane and vacuum pump oil is placed on microcircuit die and hexane is allowed to evaporate leaving a thin film of oil. Microprobe brings needle into contact with area of die to be etched.

  15. Effects of mask imperfections on InP etching profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, D.T.C.; Yan, M.F.; Wynn, J.D.; Wilt, D.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the quality of etch masks has a significant effect on the InP etching profiles. In particular, the authors have shown that mask imperfections can cause defective etching profiles, such as vertical sidewalls and extra mask undercutting in InP. The authors also discovered that the geometry of these defective profiles is determined by the orientation of the substrate relative to the direction of the mask imperfections. Along a {l angle}110{r angle} line mask defect, the downward etching process changes the {l angle}110{r angle} v-grooves to vertical sidewalls without extra undercutting. For v-grooves aligned along the {l angle}110{r angle} direction, defects on the mask give a significant extra undercutting without changing the etching profile.

  16. Consideration of VT5 etch-based OPC modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, ChinTeong; Temchenko, Vlad; Kaiser, Dieter; Meusel, Ingo; Schmidt, Sebastian; Schneider, Jens; Niehoff, Martin

    2008-03-01

    Including etch-based empirical data during OPC model calibration is a desired yet controversial decision for OPC modeling, especially for process with a large litho to etch biasing. While many OPC software tools are capable of providing this functionality nowadays; yet few were implemented in manufacturing due to various risks considerations such as compromises in resist and optical effects prediction, etch model accuracy or even runtime concern. Conventional method of applying rule-based alongside resist model is popular but requires a lot of lengthy code generation to provide a leaner OPC input. This work discusses risk factors and their considerations, together with introduction of techniques used within Mentor Calibre VT5 etch-based modeling at sub 90nm technology node. Various strategies are discussed with the aim of better handling of large etch bias offset without adding complexity into final OPC package. Finally, results were presented to assess the advantages and limitations of the final method chosen.

  17. Reactive ion etching of quartz and Pyrex for microelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeze, D. A.; Forrest, R. D.; Carey, J. D.; Cox, D. C.; Robertson, I. D.; Weiss, B. L.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2002-10-01

    The reactive ion etching of quartz and Pyrex substrates was carried out using CF4/Ar and CF4/O2 gas mixtures in a combined radio frequency (rf)/microwave (μw) plasma. It was observed that the etch rate and the surface morphology of the etched regions depended on the gas mixture (CF4/Ar or CF4/O2), the relative concentration of CF4 in the gas mixture, the rf power (and the associated self-induced bias) and microwave power. An etch rate of 95 nm/min for quartz was achieved. For samples covered with a thin metal layer, ex situ high resolution scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging indicated that, during etching, surface roughness is produced on the surface beneath the thin metallic mask. Near vertical sidewalls with a taper angle greater than 80° and smooth etched surfaces at the nanometric scale were fabricated by carefully controlling the etching parameters and the masking technique. A simulation of the electrostatic field distribution was carried out to understand the etching process using these masks for the fabrication of high definition features.

  18. Dry etching technologies for the advanced binary film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Yoshinori; Karyu, Makoto; Ita, Hirotsugu; Yoshimori, Tomoaki; Azumano, Hidehito; Muto, Makoto; Nonaka, Mikio

    2011-11-01

    ABF (Advanced Binary Film) developed by Hoya as a photomask for 32 (nm) and larger specifications provides excellent resistance to both mask cleaning and 193 (nm) excimer laser and thereby helps extend the lifetime of the mask itself compared to conventional photomasks and consequently reduces the semiconductor manufacturing cost [1,2,3]. Because ABF uses Ta-based films, which are different from Cr film or MoSi films commonly used for photomask, a new process is required for its etching technology. A patterning technology for ABF was established to perform the dry etching process for Ta-based films by using the knowledge gained from absorption layer etching for EUV mask that required the same Ta-film etching process [4]. Using the mask etching system ARES, which is manufactured by Shibaura Mechatronics, and its optimized etching process, a favorable CD (Critical Dimension) uniformity, a CD linearity and other etching characteristics were obtained in ABF patterning. Those results are reported here.

  19. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Based Chemically Assisted Plasma Etching Of Silicon in CF4/Ar Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, R. K.; Angra, S. K.; Bajpai, R. P.; Lal, Madan; Bharadwaj, Lalit M.

    2005-09-01

    Etching of silicon in Chemical Assisted Plasma Etching mode with CF4 gas being sprayed on the surface of wafer in process chamber and Ar fed to ECR cavity in Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) source was carried out. The plasma source was 2.45 GHz microwave source superimposed with mirror type magnetic field configuration to have resonance. Effect of CF4/Ar ratio and substrate bias on etching rate of silicon and anisotropy of etched profile has been investigated. The variation of etch rate and anisotropy has been correlated to the availability of fluorine atoms and other radicals available for etching. Optimum parameters required for etching of silicon in chemical assisted plasma etching with self-assembled ECR plasma source has been established.

  20. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Based Chemically Assisted Plasma Etching Of Silicon in CF4/Ar Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, R.K.; Angra, S.K.; Bajpai, R.P.; Lal, Madan; Bharadwaj, Lalit M.

    2005-09-09

    Etching of silicon in Chemical Assisted Plasma Etching mode with CF4 gas being sprayed on the surface of wafer in process chamber and Ar fed to ECR cavity in Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) source was carried out. The plasma source was 2.45 GHz microwave source superimposed with mirror type magnetic field configuration to have resonance. Effect of CF4/Ar ratio and substrate bias on etching rate of silicon and anisotropy of etched profile has been investigated. The variation of etch rate and anisotropy has been correlated to the availability of fluorine atoms and other radicals available for etching. Optimum parameters required for etching of silicon in chemical assisted plasma etching with self-assembled ECR plasma source has been established.

  1. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis of Si sidewall surface etched by deep-reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro; Nishioka, Kunio; Sato, Mina

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the composition of a passivation film on a sidewall etched by deep-reactive ion etching (RIE) using SF6/O2 and C4F8 plasma, by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. It was found that the compositions of carbon and fluorine in the passivation film on the etched sidewall depend on the width and depth of the etched trench. It is important to understand both the plasma behavior and the passivation film composition to carry out fabrication by deep-RIE. We consider that these results of the EDX analysis of an etched sidewall will be useful for understanding plasma behavior in order to optimize the process conditions of deep-RIE.

  2. Structural and magnetic etch damage in CoFeB

    SciTech Connect

    Krayer, L.; Lau, J. W.; Kirby, B. J.

    2014-05-07

    A detailed understanding of the interfacial properties of thin films used in magnetic media is critical for the aggressive component scaling required for continued improvement in storage density. In particular, it is important to understand how common etching and milling processes affect the interfacial magnetism. We have used polarized neutron reflectometry and transmission electron microscopy to characterize the structural and magnetic properties of an ion beam etched interface of a CoFeB film. We found that the etching process results in a sharp magnetic interface buried under a nanometer scale layer of non-magnetic, compositionally distinct material.

  3. Spectrometric analysis of process etching solutions of the photovoltaic industry--determination of HNO3, HF, and H2SiF6 using high-resolution continuum source absorption spectrometry of diatomic molecules and atoms.

    PubMed

    Bücker, Stefan; Acker, Jörg

    2012-05-30

    The surface of raw multicrystalline silicon wafers is treated with HF-HNO(3) mixtures in order to remove the saw damage and to obtain a well-like structured surface of low reflectivity, the so-called texture. The industrial production of solar cells requires a consistent level of texturization for tens of thousands of wafers. Therefore, knowing the actual composition of the etch bath is a key element in process control in order to maintain a certain etch rate through replenishment of the consumed acids. The present paper describes a novel approach to quantify nitric acid (HNO(3)), hydrofluoric acid (HF), and hexafluosilicic acid (H(2)SiF(6)) using a high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace absorption spectrometer. The concentrations of Si (via Si atom absorption at the wavelength 251.611 nm, m(0),(Si)=130 pg), of nitrate (via molecular absorption of NO at the wavelength 214.803 nm, [Formula: see text] ), and of total fluoride (via molecular absorption of AlF at the wavelength 227.46 nm, m(0,F)=13 pg) were measured against aqueous standard solutions. The concentrations of H(2)SiF(6) and HNO(3) are directly obtained from the measurements. The HF concentration is calculated from the difference between the total fluoride content, and the amount of fluoride bound as H(2)SiF(6). H(2)SiF(6) and HNO(3) can be determined with a relative uncertainty of less than 5% and recoveries of 97-103% and 96-105%, respectively. With regards to HF, acceptable results in terms of recovery and uncertainty are obtained for HF concentrations that are typical for the photovoltaic industry. The presented procedure has the unique advantage that the concentration of both, acids and metal impurities in etch solutions, can be routinely determined by a single analytical instrument. PMID:22608457

  4. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOEpatents

    Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Tarte, L.A.

    1996-01-23

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment. 6 figs.

  5. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOEpatents

    Contolini, Robert J.; Mayer, Steven T.; Tarte, Lisa A.

    1996-01-01

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment.

  6. Etch Profile Simulation Using Level Set Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Etching and deposition of materials are critical steps in semiconductor processing for device manufacturing. Both etching and deposition may have isotropic and anisotropic components, due to directional sputtering and redeposition of materials, for example. Previous attempts at modeling profile evolution have used so-called "string theory" to simulate the moving solid-gas interface between the semiconductor and the plasma. One complication of this method is that extensive de-looping schemes are required at the profile corners. We will present a 2D profile evolution simulation using level set theory to model the surface. (1) By embedding the location of the interface in a field variable, the need for de-looping schemes is eliminated and profile corners are more accurately modeled. This level set profile evolution model will calculate both isotropic and anisotropic etch and deposition rates of a substrate in low pressure (10s mTorr) plasmas, considering the incident ion energy angular distribution functions and neutral fluxes. We will present etching profiles of Si substrates in Ar/Cl2 discharges for various incident ion energies and trench geometries.

  7. Study of 193-nm resist degradation under various etch chemistries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, Arnaud; May, Michael; Pargon, Erwine; Mortini, Benedicte; Joubert, Olivier

    2007-03-01

    The effectivity of 193nm photoresists as dry etch masks is becoming more and more critical as the size of integrated devices shrinks. 193nm resists are known to be much less resistant to dry etching than 248nm resists based on a poly(hydroxystyrene) polymer backbone. The decrease in the resist film budget implies a better etch resistance to use single layer 193nm photoresists for the 65nm node and beyond. In spite of significant improvements made in the past decade regarding the etch resistance of photoresists, much of the fundamental chemistry and physics that could explain the behaviour of these materials has to be better understood. Such knowledge is necessary in order to propose materials and etch processes for the next technology nodes (45nm and below). In this paper, we report our studies on the etch behaviour of different 193nm resist materials as a function of etch chemistry. In a first step, we focus our attention on the interactions between photoresists and the reactive species of a plasma during a dry etch step. Etch experiments were carried out in a DPS (Decoupled Plasma Source) high density chamber. The gas chemistry in particular was changed to check the role of the plasma reactive species on the resist. O II, Cl II, CF 4, HBr and Ar gas were used. Etch rates and chemical modifications of different materials were quantified by ellipsometry, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-Ray Photoelectrons Spectroscopy (XPS). We evaluated different materials including 248nm model polymer backbones (pure PHS or functionalized PHS), and 193nm model polymers (PMMA and acrylate polymers) or resist formulations. Besides the influence of resist chemistry, the impact of plasma parameters was addressed.

  8. Ultrasonic metal etching for metallographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.

    1971-01-01

    Ultrasonic etching delineates microstructural features not discernible in specimens prepared for metallographic analysis by standard chemical etching procedures. Cavitation bubbles in ultrasonically excited water produce preferential damage /etching/ of metallurgical phases or grain boundaries, depending on hardness of metal specimens.

  9. Study of ICP-RIE etching on CdZnTe substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Pengxiao; Qiao, Hui; Wang, Ren; Lan, Tianyi; Liu, Shijia; Wang, Nili; Zhou, Qin; Xu, Bin; Liu, Xiujuan; Lu, Yidan; Wang, Li-wei; Chang, Chao; Zhang, Kefeng; Li, Xiangyang

    2014-11-01

    CdZnTe is the most suitable epitaxial substrate material of HgCdTe infrared detectors, because its lattice constant is able to achieve full match with HgCdTe's lattice constant. It is always needed to etch CdZnTe substrate during the process of device separation or when we want to fabricate micro optical device on CdZnTe substrate. This paper adopts the more advanced method, Inductive Coupled Plasma-Reactive Ion Etching(ICP-RIE). The etching conditions of ICP-RIE on CdZnTe substrate are explored and researched. First of all, a set of comparative experiments is designed. All of CdZnTe samples with the same component are polished by chemical mechanical polishing before etching. Then all samples are etched by different types of etching gases(CH4/H2/N2/Ar) and different ratios of gases as we designed. The etching time is all set to 30 minutes. After that, the surface roughness, etching rate, etching damage and the profile of etched mesas are tested and characterized by optical microscope, step profiler and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), respectively. It is found that, Ar gas plays the role of physical etching, but the etching rate will decline when the concentration of Ar gas is too high. The results also show that, the introduction of N2 causes more etching damage. Finally, combination of CH4/H2/Ar is used to etch CdZnTe substrate. The ratio of these gases is 2sccm/2sccm/10sccm. The testing results of optimized etching show that, the maximum etching rate reaches up to 20μm/h and the etched CdZnTe surface is smooth with very low etching damage. At last, aimed at the shortcoming of photoresist's degeneration after long-time etching, the ICP etching process of CdZnTe deep mesa is studied. Double-layer or triple-layer photoresist are spin-coated on CdZnTe substrate during the process of lithography. Then ICP etching is carried out with the optimized condition. It is seen that there is no more phenomena of degeneration.

  10. Laser etching of polymer masked leadframes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. K.; Man, H. C.; Yue, T. M.; Yuen, C. W.

    1997-02-01

    A typical electroplating production line for the deposition of silver pattern on copper leadframes in the semiconductor industry involves twenty to twenty five steps of cleaning, pickling, plating, stripping etc. This complex production process occupies large floor space and has also a number of problems such as difficulty in the production of rubber masks and alignment, generation of toxic fumes, high cost of water consumption and sometimes uncertainty on the cleanliness of the surfaces to be plated. A novel laser patterning process is proposed in this paper which can replace many steps in the existing electroplating line. The proposed process involves the application of high speed laser etching techniques on leadframes which were protected with polymer coating. The desired pattern for silver electroplating is produced by laser ablation of the polymer coating. Excimer laser was found to be most effective for this process as it can expose a pattern of clean copper substrate which can be silver plated successfully. Previous working of Nd:YAG laser ablation showed that 1.06 μm radiation was not suitable for this etching process because a thin organic and transparent film remained on the laser etched region. The effect of excimer pulse frequency and energy density upon the removal rate of the polymer coating was studied.

  11. Development of chemically assisted etching method for GaAs-based optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.; Rhallabi, A.; Elmonser, L.; Talneau, A.; Pommereau, F.; Pagnod-Rossiaux, Ph.; Bouadma, N.

    2005-03-01

    Chemically assisted ion beam etching of GaAs-based materials using Cl{sub 2} reactive gas was has been experimentally and theoretically examined. The primary effort was the design of an etching system for high reproducibility and improved throughput. Characteristics of the etching process, i.e., etch rate, etch profiles, and surface morphology as a function of etching parameters, i.e., substrate temperature, Cl{sub 2} flow rate, ion current density, and energy are reported. In addition, we have analyzed the etched surfaces qualitatively by Auger electron spectroscopy, and quantitatively by atomic force microscopy. The developed process yielded stoichiometric and smooth GaAs surfaces. Moreover, in order to understand the mechanism of the Cl{sub 2} etching reaction with GaAs, a simulation of the etch profile evolution with time as function of etching parameters was carried out. Simulations were compared with experimentally derived data and were found to be in good agreement. Finally, the developed process was successfully applied to the fabrication of ridge waveguides GaAs/GaAlAs lasers with cw optical characteristics similar to wet chemical etched lasers.

  12. High-Density Plasma Etching of Group-III Nitride Films for Device Application

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Crawford, M.H.; Han, J.; Lester, L.F.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.; Zolper, J.C.

    1999-02-17

    As III-V nitride device structures become more complicated and design rules shrink, well-controlled etch processes are necessary. Due to limited wet chemical etch results for the group-III nitrides, a significant amount of effort has been devoted to the development of dry etch processing. Dry etch development was initially focused on mesa structures where high etch rates, anisotropic profiles, smooth sidewalls, and equi-rate etching of dissimilar materials were required. For example, commercially available LEDs and laser facets for GaN-based laser diodes have been patterned using reactive ion etching (RIE). With the recent interest in high power, high temperature electronic devices, etch characteristics may also require smooth surface morphology, low plasma-induced damage, and selective etching of one layer over another. The principal criteria for any plasma etch process is its utility in the fabrication of a device. In this study, we will report plasma etch results for the group-III nitrides and their application to device structures.

  13. Optical properties of micromachined polysilicon reflective surfaces with etching holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Byrne, Colin; Liu, Chang; Brady, David J.

    1998-08-01

    MUMPS (Multi-User MEMS Process) is receiving increasingly wide use in micro optics. We have investigated the optical properties of the polysilicon reflective surface in a typical MUMPS chip within the visible light spectrum. The effect of etching holes on the reflected laser beam is studied. The reflectivity and diffraction patterns at five different wavelengths have been measured. The optical properties of the polysilicon reflective surface are greatly affected by the surface roughness, the etching holes, as well as the material. The etching holes contribute to diffraction and reduction of reflectivity. This study provides a basis for optimal design of micromachined free-space optical systems.

  14. Laser etching of metals in neutral salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, M.; Romankiw, L. T.; Vigliotti, D. R.; von Gutfeld, R. J.

    1987-12-01

    We report new findings that relate to rapid maskless laser etching of steel and stainless steel in neutral solutions of sodium chloride, sodium nitrate, and potassium sulfate. Etch rates have been determined as a function of laser power, laser on-time, and solution concentration. The morphology of laser-etched holes obtained in these solutions was compared with holes obtained in pure water. Results indicate that some controlled melting occurs under certain laser conditions in addition to the metal dissolution process induced by the locally intense heat of the laser beam.

  15. Reactive Plasma Etching of SiC in a Tetrafluoroethane / Oxygen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Heather C.; Radican, Kevin P.; Donnelly, David; Koeck, Deborah C.

    2003-03-01

    The etch rate as a function of oxygen concentration was investigated in the RF magnetron plasma etching of SiC with tetrafluoroethane gas. The etch rate and surface roughness was measured with atomic force microscopy, while evidence of polymer deposition was analyzed with FTIR. Etch rates of > 10 nm/sec can be achieved with high selectivity with respect to an aluminum mask, near infinite selectivity with respect to silicon. This has also been found to be compatible with some low-k dielectric films. Tetrafluoroethane is of interest due to its high fluorine content. It is also a nontoxic, ozone friendly gas with a short atmospheric lifetime. The role of oxygen in the etching process will be discussed and this etching process will be compared to other SiC etches that have been previously reported

  16. Fabrication of resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector focal plane array by inductively coupled plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jason; Choi, Kwong-Kit

    2016-02-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching has distinct advantages over reactive ion etching in that the etching rates are considerably higher, the uniformity is much better, and the sidewalls of the etched material are highly anisotropic due to the higher plasma density and lower operating pressure. Therefore, ICP etching is a promising process for pattern transfer required during microelectronic and optoelectronic fabrication. Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors (R-QWIPs) are the next generation of QWIP detectors that use resonances to increase the quantum efficiency (QE). To fabricate R-QWIP focal plane arrays (FPAs), two optimized ICP etching processes are developed. Using these etching techniques, we have fabricated R-QWIP FPAs of several different formats and pixel sizes with the required dimensions and completely removed the substrates of the FPAs. Their QE spectra were tested to be 30 to 40%. The operability and spectral nonuniformity of the FPA is ˜99.5 and 3%, respectively.

  17. Reactive etching by ClF3–Ar neutral cluster beam with scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Toshio; Yoshino, Yu; Senoo, Takehiko; Koike, Kunihiko; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuo, Jiro

    2016-06-01

    A reactive gas cluster injection system with a scanning function was developed in order to increase the processing area. High-precision anisotropic etching with an aspect ratio of 7 was achieved for ClF3 cluster etching without scanning. However, with scanning, the aspect ratio for etching decreased to 1.5 because the side walls were etched by the gas retained in the trench. By reducing the source gas pressure, increasing the target distance, and mixing He in the source gas, anisotropic etching with an aspect ratio of about 6.3 was achieved with this apparatus.

  18. Ion beam sputtering of fluoropolymers. [etching polymer films and target surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Ion beam sputter processing rates as well as pertinent characteristics of etched targets and films are described. An argon ion beam source was used to sputter etch and deposit the fluoropolymers PTFE, FEP, and CTFE. Ion beam energy, current density, and target temperature were varied to examine effects on etch and deposition rates. The ion etched fluoropolymers yield cone or spire-like surface structures which vary depending upon the type of polymer, ion beam power density, etch time, and target temperature. Sputter target and film characteristics documented by spectral transmittance measurements, X-ray diffraction, ESCA, and SEM photomicrographs are included.

  19. LOW TEMPERATURE PLASMA ETCHING OF COPPER FOR MINIMIZING SIZE EFFECTS IN SUB-100 NM FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Tamirisa, Prabhakar; Levitin, Galit; Kasica, Richard J; Hess, Dennis W

    2006-01-01

    A low temperature plasma etching process for patterning copper interconnects is proposed as a solution to the size effect issue in the resistivity of copper. Key features of this etching process based on a previous thermochemical analysis of the Cu-Cl-H system are discussed. Potential benefits of a subtractive etching scheme based on this process in comparison with the damascene scheme for copper-based interconnect processing in sub-100 nm features are presented in the context of the ITRS roadmap. Preliminary experimental work on plasma etching of Cu thin films using the proposed process is discussed.

  20. Photonic devices based on preferential etching.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Bob; Larchanché, Jean-François; Vilcot, Jean-Pierre; Decoster, Didier; Beccherelli, Romeo; d'Alessandro, Antonio

    2005-11-20

    We introduce a design concept of optical waveguides characterized by a practical and reproducible process based on preferential etching of crystalline silicon substrates. Low-loss waveguides, spot-size converters, and power dividers have been obtained with polymers. We have also aligned liquid crystals in the waveguides and demonstrated guided propagation. Therefore this technology is a suitable platform for soft-matter photonics and heterogeneous integration. PMID:16318190

  1. Inductively coupled plasma etching of BZN thin films in SF6/Ar plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Li, Ping; Zhang, Guojun; Li, Wei; Dai, Liping; Jiang, Jing

    2013-03-01

    Etching mechanisms and characteristics of bismuth zinc niobate (BZN) thin films were investigated in inductively coupled SF6/Ar plasmas. The influences of various etching parameters including the gas flow ratio, process pressure, and ICP power on the etching results were analyzed. It is found that the chemical etching with F radicals was more effective than the physical sputtering etching with Ar ions for the inductively coupled plasma etching of BZN thin films. The mechanism of ion assisted chemical etching of BZN thin films in SF6/Ar plasmas was proposed. A maximum etch rate of approximately 43.15 nm/min for the BZN thin film was obtained at the optimum etching conditions: 3/2 for the SF6/Ar gas flow ratio, 10 mTorr for the process pressure, and 600 W for the ICP power. The surface morphology of the etched BZN thin film was observed, where was smooth and clean and no post-etch residues were remained.

  2. Novel spin-on organic hardmask with high plasma etch resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chang-Il; Lee, Jin-Kuk; Kim, Min-Soo; Yoon, Kyong-Ho; Cheon, Hwan-Sung; Tokareva, Nataliya; Song, Jee-Yun; Kim, Jong-Seob; Chang, Tu-Won

    2008-03-01

    In recent years for memory devices under 70nm using ArF lithography, spin-on organic hardmask has become an attractive alternative process to amorphous carbon layer hardmark (ACL) in mass production due to ACL hardmask's limited capacity, high cost-of-ownership, and low process efficiency in spite of its excellent etch performance. However, insufficient plasma etch resistance of spin-on hardmask makes the etch process an issue resulting in inadequate vertical profiles, large CD bias, and narrow etch process window compared to ACL hardmask. In order to be able to apply these spin on hardmasks to varies layers including critical layers, the aforementioned problems need to be resolved and verified using several evaluation methods including etch pattern evaluation. In this paper, we report the synthesis of novel organic spin-on hardmasks (C-SOH) that incorporate various fused aromatic moieties into polymer chain and the evaluation of etch performance using dry etch tools. Organic spin-on hardmasks with 79-90 wt% carbon contents were synthesized in-house. Oxygen and fluorine based plasma etch processes were used to evaluate the etch resistance of the C-SOH. The results show our 3rd generation C-SOH has etch profiles comparable to that of ACL in a 1:1 dense pattern.

  3. ChISELS 1.0: theory and user manual :a theoretical modeler of deposition and etch processes in microsystems fabrication.

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, Steven James; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Ho, Pauline; Musson, Lawrence Cale

    2006-09-01

    Chemically Induced Surface Evolution with Level-Sets--ChISELS--is a parallel code for modeling 2D and 3D material depositions and etches at feature scales on patterned wafers at low pressures. Designed for efficient use on a variety of computer architectures ranging from single-processor workstations to advanced massively parallel computers running MPI, ChISELS is a platform on which to build and improve upon previous feature-scale modeling tools while taking advantage of the most recent advances in load balancing and scalable solution algorithms. Evolving interfaces are represented using the level-set method and the evolution equations time integrated using a Semi-Lagrangian approach [1]. The computational meshes used are quad-trees (2D) and oct-trees (3D), constructed such that grid refinement is localized to regions near the surface interfaces. As the interface evolves, the mesh is dynamically reconstructed as needed for the grid to remain fine only around the interface. For parallel computation, a domain decomposition scheme with dynamic load balancing is used to distribute the computational work across processors. A ballistic transport model is employed to solve for the fluxes incident on each of the surface elements. Surface chemistry is computed by either coupling to the CHEMKIN software [2] or by providing user defined subroutines. This report describes the theoretical underpinnings, methods, and practical use instruction of the ChISELS 1.0 computer code.

  4. Note: Electrochemical etching of cylindrical nanoprobes using a vibrating electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yufeng; Zeng, Yongbin Qu, Ningsong; Zhu, Di

    2015-07-15

    An electrochemical etching process using a vibrating electrolyte of potassium hydroxide to prepare tungsten cylindrical nanotips is developed. The vibrating electrolyte eases the effects of a diffusion layer and extends the etching area, which aid in the production of cylindrical nanotips. Larger amplitudes and a vibration frequency of 35 Hz are recommended for producing cylindrical nanotips. Nanotips with a tip radius of approximately 43 nm and a conical angle of arctan 0.0216 are obtained.

  5. CDU improvement technology of etching pattern using photo lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, Masahide; Shinozuka, Shinichi; Jyousaka, Megumi; Ogata, Kunie; Morimoto, Tamotsu; Konishi, Yoshitaka

    2008-03-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing technology has shifted towards finer design rules, and demands for critical dimension uniformity (CDU) of resist patterns have become greater than ever. One of the methods for improving Resist Pattern CDU is to control post-exposure bake (PEB) temperature. When ArF resist is used, there is a certain relationship between critical dimension (CD) and PEB temperature. By utilizing this relationship, Resist Pattern CDU can be improved through control of within-wafer temperature distribution in the PEB process. Resist Pattern CDU improvement contributes to Etching Pattern CDU improvement to a certain degree. To further improve Etching Pattern CDU, etcher-specific CD variation needs to be controlled. In this evaluation, 1. We verified whether etcher-specific CD variation can be controlled and consequently Etching Pattern CDU can be further improved by controlling resist patterns through PEB control. 2. Verifying whether Etching Pattern CDU improvement through has any effect on the reduction in wiring resistance variation. The evaluation procedure is as follows.1. Wafers with base film of Doped Poly-Si (D-Poly) were prepared. 2. Resist patterns were created on them. 3. To determine etcher-specific characteristics, the first etching was performed, and after cleaning off the resist and BARC, CD of etched D-Poly was measured. 4. Using the obtained within-wafer CD distribution of the etching patterns, within-wafer temperature distribution in the PEB process was modified. 5. Resist patterns were created again, followed by the second etching and cleaning, which was followed by CD measurement. We used Optical CD Measurement (OCD) for measurement of resist patterns and etching patterns as OCD is minimally affected by Line Edge Roughness (LER). As a result, 1. We confirmed the effect of Resist Pattern CD control through PEB control on the reduction in etcher-specific CD variation and the improvement in Etching Pattern CDU. 2. The improvement in Etching

  6. Sputter etching of hemispherical bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiesser, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Technique was developed for fabricating three dimensional pumping grooves on gas bearings by sputter etching. Method eliminates problems such as groove nonuniformity, profile, and finish, which are associated with normal grooving methods.

  7. Vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Porter, John D.; Yoshiyama, James M.; Contolini, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    A process involving vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials for creating high aspect ratio (i.e., length much greater than diameter), isolated cylindrical holes in dielectric materials that have been exposed to high-energy atomic particles. The process includes cleaning the surface of the tracked material and exposing the cleaned surface to a vapor of a suitable etchant. Independent control of the temperatures of the vapor and the tracked materials provide the means to vary separately the etch rates for the latent track region and the non-tracked material. As a rule, the tracked regions etch at a greater rate than the non-tracked regions. In addition, the vapor-etched holes can be enlarged and smoothed by subsequent dipping in a liquid etchant. The 20-1000 nm diameter holes resulting from the vapor etching process can be useful as molds for electroplating nanometer-sized filaments, etching gate cavities for deposition of nano-cones, developing high-aspect ratio holes in trackable resists, and as filters for a variety of molecular-sized particles in virtually any liquid or gas by selecting the dielectric material that is compatible with the liquid or gas of interest.

  8. Etching of photoresist with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew; van der Schans, Marc; Xu, Cigang; Gans, Timo; Cooke, Mike; Wagenaars, Erik

    2014-10-01

    Low-pressure oxygen plasmas are commonly used in semiconductor industry for removing photoresist from the surface of processed wafers; a process known as plasma ashing or plasma stripping. The possible use of atmospheric-pressure plasmas instead of low-pressure ones for plasma ashing is attractive from the point of view of reduction in equipment costs and processing time. We present investigations of photoresist etching with an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) in helium gas with oxygen admixtures driven by radio-frequency power. In these experiments, the neutral, radical rich effluent of the APPJ is used for etching, avoiding direct contact between the active plasma and the sensitive wafer, while maintaining a high etch rate. Photoresist etch rates and etch quality are measured for a range of plasma operating parameters such as power input, driving frequency, flow rate and wafer temperature. Etch rates of up to 10 micron/min were achieved with modest input power (45 W) and gas flow rate (10 slm). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that the quality of the photoresist removal was comparable to traditional plasma ashing techniques. This work was supported by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Grant EP/K018388/1.

  9. Controlled in situ etch-back

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Seabaugh, A. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A controlled in situ etch-back technique is disclosed in which an etch melt and a growth melt are first saturated by a source-seed crystal and thereafter etch-back of a substrate takes place by the slightly undersaturated etch melt, followed by LPE growth of a layer by the growth melt, which is slightly supersaturated.

  10. Distributed etched diffraction grating demultiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Amir

    This doctoral thesis studies the concept of a distributed etched diffraction grating (DEDG) and presents a methodology to engineer the spectral response of the device. The design which incorporates a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) at the facets of a conventional etched diffraction grating demultiplexer promises for a superior performance in multiple aspects. Where in a conventional etched diffraction grating, smooth vertical deep etched walls are required in order to realize a low insertion loss device; in the DEDG such requirement is significantly mitigated. Deep etched walls are replaced with shallowly etched diffraction grating facets followed by a DBR structure and as a result devices with significantly lower insertion loss are achievable. The feasibility of the application of DEDG as a wavelength demultiplexer was demonstrated through fabrication and characterization of a prototype device. The proof of concept device was fabricated using the state of the art deep UV optical lithography and reactive ion etching in a nano-photonic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) material platform. The fabricated device was then characterized in the lab. Furthermore, incorporation of the DBR structure at the facets of the conventional etched diffraction grating decouples the reflection and diffraction functionalities, rendering the DEDG suitable for spectral response engineering. According to the application, the output spectral response of the device can be tailored through careful design and optimization of the incorporated DBR. In this thesis, through numerical simulations we have shown that functionalities such as polarization independent performance and at top insertion loss envelop are viable. A methodology to engineer the spectral response of the DEDG is discussed in details.