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Sample records for charged colloidal rods

  1. Phase diagrams of charged colloidal rods: Can a uniaxial charge distribution break chiral symmetry?

    PubMed

    Drwenski, Tara; Dussi, Simone; Hermes, Michiel; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2016-03-01

    We construct phase diagrams for charged rodlike colloids within the second-virial approximation as a function of rod concentration, salt concentration, and colloidal charge. Besides the expected isotropic-nematic transition, we also find parameter regimes with a coexistence between a nematic and a second, more highly aligned nematic phase including an isotropic-nematic-nematic triple point and a nematic-nematic critical point, which can all be explained in terms of the twisting effect. We compute the Frank elastic constants to see if the twist elastic constant can become negative, which would indicate the possibility of a cholesteric phase spontaneously forming. Although the twisting effect reduces the twist elastic constant, we find that it always remains positive. In addition, we find that for finite aspect-ratio rods the twist elastic constant is also always positive, such that there is no evidence of chiral symmetry breaking due to a uniaxial charge distribution. PMID:26957177

  2. Phase diagrams of charged colloidal rods: Can a uniaxial charge distribution break chiral symmetry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drwenski, Tara; Dussi, Simone; Hermes, Michiel; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2016-03-01

    We construct phase diagrams for charged rodlike colloids within the second-virial approximation as a function of rod concentration, salt concentration, and colloidal charge. Besides the expected isotropic-nematic transition, we also find parameter regimes with a coexistence between a nematic and a second, more highly aligned nematic phase including an isotropic-nematic-nematic triple point and a nematic-nematic critical point, which can all be explained in terms of the twisting effect. We compute the Frank elastic constants to see if the twist elastic constant can become negative, which would indicate the possibility of a cholesteric phase spontaneously forming. Although the twisting effect reduces the twist elastic constant, we find that it always remains positive. In addition, we find that for finite aspect-ratio rods the twist elastic constant is also always positive, such that there is no evidence of chiral symmetry breaking due to a uniaxial charge distribution.

  3. Columnar versus smectic order in systems of charged colloidal rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensink, H. H.

    2007-05-01

    We study the stability of inhomogeneous liquid crystalline states in systems of monodisperse, stiff, charged rods. By means of a bifurcation analysis applied to the Onsager free energy for charged rods in strongly nematic states, we investigate nematic-smectic and nematic-columnar instabilities as a function of the Debye screening length κ-1. While the nematic-smectic transition clearly preempts the nematic-columnar one in the regime of strong screening (i.e., small κ-1) a marked stability of hexagonal columnar order is observed at larger screening lengths. The theoretical results are substantiated by Brownian dynamics computer simulation results based on the Yukawa site model. Our connect to experiments on tobacco mosaic virus rods, in particular, but might be relevant for soft rodlike mesogens in strong external directional fields in general.

  4. The effect of charge separation on the phase behavior of dipolar colloidal rods.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, David M; Velev, Orlin D; Klapp, Sabine H L; Hall, Carol K

    2016-06-14

    Colloids with anisotropic shape and charge distribution can assemble into a variety of structures that could find use as novel materials for optical, photonic, electronic and structural applications. Because experimental characterization of the many possible types of multi-shape and multipolar colloidal particles that could form useful structures is difficult, the search for novel colloidal materials can be enhanced by simulations of colloidal particle assembly. We have simulated a system of dipolar colloidal rods at fixed aspect ratio using discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD) to investigate how the charge separation of an embedded dipole affects the types of assemblies that occur. Each dipolar rod is modeled as several overlapping spheres fixed in an elongated shape to represent excluded volume and two smaller, embedded spheres to represent the charges that make up the extended dipole. Large charge separations predominately form structures where the rods link head-to-tail while small charge separations predominately form structures where the rods stack side-by-side. Rods with small charge separations tend to form dense aggregates while rods with large charge separations tend to form coarse gel-like structures. Structural phase boundaries between fluid, string-fluid, and "gel" (networked) phases are mapped out and characterized as to whether they have global head-to-tail or global side-by-side order. A structural coarsening transition is observed for particles with large charge separations in which the head-tail networks thicken as temperature is lowered due to an increased tendency to form side-by-side structures. Triangularly connected networks form at small charge separations; these may be useful for encapsulating smaller particles. PMID:27151445

  5. Charge carrier transport in thin films of colloidal CdSe quantum rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persano, A.; Leo, G.; Manna, L.; Cola, A.

    2008-10-01

    Phototransport properties of organically capped colloidal CdSe quantum rod thin films deposited by spin coating are studied in air at room temperature in planar electrode configuration. Under optical excitation, the observed current-voltage characteristics and current transients are well described by a resonant tunneling model. A significant and irreversible current quenching of the photoresponse occurs with either the aging of the samples or the flowing of the current itself when above few picoamperes. The process, which is still interpreted in the frame of the model, can be attributed to the charge trapping by the defect states at the barrier between rods with a consequent increase in the barrier height.

  6. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size. PMID:27253725

  7. Electric Field Driven Self-Assembly of Colloidal Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Jaime; Chaudhary, Kundan; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve; Lewis, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    The ability to assemble anisotropic colloidal building blocks into ordered configurations is of both scientific and technological importance. We are studying how electric field-induced interactions guide the self-assembly of these blocks into well aligned microstructures. Specifically, we present observations of the assembly of colloidal silica rods (L/D ˜ 4) within planar electrode cells as a function of different electric field parameters. Results from video microscopy and image analysis demonstrate that aligned microstructures form due to the competition between equilibrium interactions of induced dipoles and non-equilibrium processes (i.e., electro-osmosis). Under the appropriate electric field conditions (˜ kHZ AC fields), aligned colloidal rod fluids form over large areas on the electrode surface. The superposition of a DC electric field to this aligned colloidal rod fluid initiates their condensation into a vertically oriented crystalline phase. Ongoing work is now focused on exploring how temporal changes to electric fields influence colloidal rod dynamics and, hence, the assembly kinetics of aligned colloidal monolayers.

  8. Small bright charged colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Liu, Heng; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2014-01-28

    Using electrochemical charge injection, the fluorescence lifetimes of negatively charged core/shell CdTe/CdSe QDs are measured as a function of core size and shell thickness. It is found that the ensemble negative trion lifetimes reach a maximum (∼4.5 ns) for an intermediate shell thickness. This leads to the smallest particles (∼4.5 nm) with the brightest trion to date. Single dot measurements show that the negative charge suppresses blinking and that the trion can be as bright as the exciton at room temperature. In contrast, the biexciton lifetimes remain short and exhibit only a monotonous increase with shell thickness, showing no correlation with the negative trion decays. The suppression of the Auger process in small negatively charged CdTe/CdSe quantum dots is unprecedented and a significant departure from prior results with ultrathick CdSe/CdS core/shell or dot-in-rod structures. The proposed reason for the optimum shell thickness is that the electron-hole overlap is restricted to the CdTe core while the electron is tuned to have zero kinetic energy in the core for that optimum shell thickness. The different trend of the biexciton lifetime is not explained but tentatively attributed to shorter-lived positive trions at smaller sizes. These results improve our understanding of multiexciton recombination in colloidal quantum dots and may lead to the design of bright charged QDs for more efficient light-emitting devices. PMID:24350673

  9. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  10. Direct determination of absorption anisotropy in colloidal quantum rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, John Sundar; Gomes, Raquel; Hens, Zeger; Karvar, Masoumeh; Neyts, Kristiaan; Compernolle, Sien; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    We propose a direct method to determine absorption anisotropy of colloidal quantum rods. In this method, the rods are aligned in solution by using an alternating electric field and we measure simultaneously the resulting average change in absorption. We show that a frequency window for the electric field exists in which the change in absorbance as a function of field strength can be analyzed in terms of the quantum-rod dipole moment and the absorption coefficient for light that is polarized parallel or perpendicular to the long axis of the rod. The approach is verified by measuring the absorbance change of CdSe rods at 400 nm as a function of field strength, where we demonstrate excellent agreement between experiment and theory. This enables us to propose improved values for the CdSe quantum-rod extinction coefficient. Next, we analyze CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods and find that the absorption of the first exciton transition is fully anisotropic, with a vanishing absorption coefficient for light that is polarized perpendicularly to the long axis of the rods.

  11. Transport in charged colloids driven by thermoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Würger, Alois

    2008-09-01

    We study the thermal diffusion coefficient D{T} of a charged colloid in a temperature gradient, and find that it is to a large extent determined by the thermoelectric response of the electrolyte solution. The thermally induced salinity gradient leads in general to a strong increase with temperature. The difference of the heat of transport of coions and counterions gives rise to a thermoelectric field that drives the colloid to the cold or to the warm, depending on the sign of its charge. Our results provide an explanation for recent experimental findings on thermophoresis in colloidal suspensions. PMID:18851262

  12. Fluorescent colloidal silica rods - synthesis and phase behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Although the experimental study of spherical colloids has been extensive, similar studies on rod-like particles are rare because suitable model systems are scarce. To fulfill this need, we present the synthesis of monodisperse rod-like silica colloids with tunable dimensions. Rods were produced with diameters of 200 nm and larger and lengths up to 10 µm, which resulted in aspect ratios ranging from 1 to 25. The growth mechanism of these rods involves emulsion droplets of water in pentanol, inside which silica condensation takes place. Since the silica nucleus is attached to the water/pentanol interface, the supply of reactants to the nucleus is anisotropic, causing it to grow on one side only, which results in rod formation. The rods were made suitable for quantitative real-space studies by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Several methods of fluorescent labeling are presented that resulted in constant fluorescence levels, gradients from one rod-end to the other, and even patterns of two colors. Single particle imaging was achieved by creating core-shell rods that had a fluorescent core and a non-fluorescent shell. Alternatively, the rods could be dispersed in a solvent with a low dielectric constant to induce micron-sized double layers. To enable quantitative measurements, a tracking algorithm was developed that identifies the rods' positions and orientations. The newly developed model system was used to study the phase behavior of rods. By combining real-space confocal laser scanning microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering methods, a phase diagram depending on concentration and aspect ratio was constructed, which shows good qualitative agreement with simulation results in literature. This phase diagram includes nematic and smectic phases for the higher aspect ratios. Also, the effect of external fields (electric fields, shear and templates) on the phase behavior was studied. In an electric field, rods aligned themselves with the applied field due to an

  13. Colloids with continuously tunable surface charge.

    PubMed

    van Ravensteijn, Bas G P; Kegel, Willem K

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present a robust way to tune the surface potential of polystyrene colloids without changing the pH, ionic strength, etc. The colloids are composed of a cross-linked polystyrene core and a cross-linked vinylbenzyl chloride layer. Besides the chlorine groups, the particle surface contains sulfate/sulfonate groups (arising from the polymerization initiators) that provide a negative surface potential. Performing a Menschutkin reaction on the surface chlorine groups with tertiary amines allows us to introduce quaternary, positively charged amines. The overall charge on the particles is then determined by the ratio between the sulfate/sulfonate moieties and the quaternary amines. Using this process, we were able to invert the charge in a continuous manner without losing colloidal stability upon passing the isoelectric point. The straightforward reaction mechanism together with the fact that the reaction could be quenched rapidly resulted in a colloidal system in which the ζ potential can be tuned between -80 and 45 mV. As proof of principle, the positively charged particles were used in heterocoagulation experiments with nanometer- and micrometer-sized negatively charged silica particles to create geometrically well-defined colloidal (nano) clusters. PMID:25127340

  14. Do multilayer crystals nucleate in suspensions of colloidal rods?

    PubMed

    Patti, Alessandro; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2009-03-27

    We study the isotropic-to-crystal transformation in a mixture of colloidal hard rods and nonabsorbing polymer using computer simulations. We determine the height of the nucleation barrier and find that the critical cluster consists of a single crystalline layer growing laterally for all polymer fugacities considered. At lower supersaturation, the free energy of a single hexagonally packed layer increases monotonically with size, while the nucleation barrier of a second crystalline layer is extremely high. Hence, the nucleation of multilayer crystals is never observed. Multilayer crystals form only in the spinodal decomposition regime, either where, in an intermediate stage, single crystalline membranes coalesce into multilayer clusters or where, at higher polymer fugacity, smaller clusters of rods stack on top of each other to form long filaments. Eventually, these transient structures evolve into a thermodynamically stable bulk crystal phase. PMID:19392328

  15. Statistical thermodynamics of charge-stabilized colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Valderrama, A.

    2008-06-01

    This thesis is a theoretical study of equilibrium statistical thermodynamic properties of colloidal systems in which electrostatic interactions play a dominant role, namely, charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. Such systems are fluids consisting of a mixture of a large number of mesoscopic particles and microscopic ions which interact via the Coulomb force, suspended in a molecular fluid. Quantum statistical mechanics is essential to fully understand the properties and stability of such systems. A less fundamental but for many purposes, sufficient description, is provided by classical statistical mechanics. In such approximation the system is considered as composed of a great number of charged classical particles with additional hard-core repulsions. The kinetic energy or momentum integrals become independent Gaussians, and hence their contribution to the free energy can be trivially evaluated. The contribution of the potential energy to the free energy on the other hand, depends upon the configuration of all the particles and becomes highly non-trivial due to the long-range character of the Coulomb force and the extremely different length scales involved in the problem. Using the microscopic model described above, we focus on the calculation of equilibrium thermodynamic properties (response functions), correlations (structure factors), and mechanical properties (forces and stresses), which can be measured in experiments and computed by Monte Carlo simulations. This thesis is divided into three parts. In part I, comprising chapters 2 and 3, we focus on finite-thickness effects in colloidal platelets and rigid planar membranes. In chapter 2 we study electrolyte-mediated interactions between two of such colloidal objects. Several aspects of these interactions are considered including the nature (attractive or repulsive) of the force between the objects, the osmotic properties for different types of surfaces and image charge effects. In part II, which includes

  16. Foam analogy in charged colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Kung, William; Ziherl, P; Kamien, Randall D

    2002-05-01

    We model charged colloidal suspensions using an analogy with foams. We study the solid-solid phase transitions of these systems as a function of particle volume fraction and ionic strength. The screened-Coulomb interaction is replaced by an interaction between walls of the Voronoi cells around each particle. We fit the surface charge to reproduce the phase diagram for the charged suspension studied by Sirota et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 1524 (1989)]. With this fit parameter we are able to calculate the elastic moduli of the system and find good agreement with the available data. PMID:12059512

  17. Oppositely charged colloids out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, T.

    2010-11-01

    Colloids are particles with a size in the range of a few nanometers up to several micrometers. Similar to atomic and molecular systems, they can form gases, liquids, solids, gels and glasses. Colloids can be used as model systems because, unlike molecules, they are sufficiently large to be studied directly with light microscopy and move sufficiently slow to study their dynamics. In this thesis, we study binary systems of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) colloidal particles suspended in low-polar solvent mixtures. Since the ions can still partially dissociate, a surface charge builds up which causes electrostatic interactions between the colloids. By carefully tuning the conditions inside the suspension, we make two kinds of particles oppositely charged. To study our samples, we use Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). The positively and negatively charged particles can be distinguished by a different fluorescent dye. Colloids constantly experience a random motion resulting from random kicks of surrounding solvent molecules. When the attractions between the oppositely charged particles are weak, the particles can attach and detach many times and explore a lot of possible configurations and the system can reach thermodynamic equilibrium. For example, colloidal ‘ionic’ crystals consisting of thousands to millions of particles can form under the right conditions. When the attractions are strong, the system can become kinetically trapped inside a gel-like state. We observe that when the interactions change again, crystals can even emerge again from this gel-like phase. By using local order parameters, we quantitatively study the crystallization of colloidal particles and identify growth defects inside the crystals. We also study the effect of gravity on the growth of ionic crystals by using a rotating stage. We find that sedimentation can completely inhibit crystal growth and plays an important role in crystallization from the gel-like state. The surface

  18. Phase behavior of mixtures of colloidal rods and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Marie Elizabeth

    In this thesis we study entropy driven order in mixtures of rods and spheres. Systems of rod-like particles, as pure systems, exhibit rich liquid crystalline phase behavior. We chose to work with aqueous suspensions of either TMV or fd virus particles, both rod-like lyotropic systems. We complicate the phase behavior by adding a second component, colloidal spheres (PEG/PEO, BSA, polystyrene latex, or Dextran). Our first paper explores the phase behavior of TMV mixed with BSA or PEO, mapping out a phase diagram based on optical microscopy observations. We found our qualitative observations of TMV mixtures to be consistent with theoretical models of the depletion force. The second paper extends our study of phase behavior to mixtures of fd virus and polystyrene latex spheres. We qualitatively observe bulk demixing for very small diameter added spheres and for very large diameter added spheres. In addition, we observed microphase separation morphologies, such as lamellar and columnar structures, which formed for fd mixed with polystyrene latex spheres 0.1 microns in diameter. All of these microphase samples were viewed with differential interference microscopy (a few samples were further investigated using electron microscopy). Both our data and theoretical calculations illustrated that 0.1 micron diameter spheres have a stabilizing effect on the smectic phase. Our final work focused on fd virus mixed with Dextran. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the effect of added polymer on the isotropic-cholesteric co-existence region. I-Ch samples were prepared and fd and Dextran concentrations were measured using a spectrophotometer. Several conditions were explored, including two different molecular weights of Dextran and a range of ionic strengths. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the I-Ch coexistence region widens with added Dextran with the polymer preferentially partioned into the isotropic phase.

  19. Electric-field Induced Microdynamics of Charged Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyongok

    2014-12-01

    Electric-field induced phase/state transitions are observed in AC electric fields with small amplitudes and low frequencies in suspensions of charged fibrous viruses (fd), which are model systems for highly charged rod-like colloids. Texture- and particle-dynamics in these field-induced states, and on crossing transition lines, are explored by image time-correlation and dynamic light scattering, respectively. At relatively low frequencies, starting from a system within the isotropic-nematic coexistence region, a transition from a nematic to a chiral nematic is observed, as well as a dynamical state where nematic domains melt and reform. These transitions are preliminary due to field-induced dissociation/association of condensed ions. At higher frequencies a uniform state is formed that is stabilized by hydrodynamic interactions through field-induced electro-osmotic flow where the rods align along the field direction. There is a point in the field-amplitude versus frequency plane where various transition lines meet. This point can be identified as a “non-equilibrium critical point”, in the sense that a length scale and a time scale diverge on approach of that point. The microscopic dynamics exhibits discontinuities on crossing transition lines that were identified independently by means of image and signal correlation spectroscopy.

  20. Thermoelectricity and thermodiffusion in charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B. T.; Roger, M.; Bonetti, M.; Salez, T. J.; Wiertel-Gasquet, C.; Dubois, E.; Cabreira Gomes, R.; Demouchy, G.; Mériguet, G.; Peyre, V.; Kouyaté, M.; Filomeno, C. L.; Depeyrot, J.; Tourinho, F. A.; Perzynski, R.; Nakamae, S.

    2015-08-01

    The Seebeck and Soret coefficients of ionically stabilized suspension of maghemite nanoparticles in dimethyl sulfoxide are experimentally studied as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction. In the presence of a temperature gradient, the charged colloidal nanoparticles experience both thermal drift due to their interactions with the solvent and electric forces proportional to the internal thermoelectric field. The resulting thermodiffusion of nanoparticles is observed through forced Rayleigh scattering measurements, while the thermoelectric field is accessed through voltage measurements in a thermocell. Both techniques provide independent estimates of nanoparticle's entropy of transfer as high as 82 meV K-1. Such a property may be used to improve the thermoelectric coefficients in liquid thermocells.

  1. Colloid Titration--A Rapid Method for the Determination of Charged Colloid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Keihei; Kina, Ken'yu

    1985-01-01

    "Colloid titration" is a volumetric method for determining charged polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions. The principle of colloid titration, reagents used in the procedure, methods of endpoint detection, preparation of reagent solutions, general procedure used, results obtained, and pH profile of colloid titration are considered. (JN)

  2. Anomalous columnar order of charged colloidal platelets.

    PubMed

    Morales-Anda, L; Wensink, H H; Galindo, A; Gil-Villegas, A

    2012-01-21

    Monte Carlo computer simulations are carried out for a model system of like-charged colloidal platelets in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble (NpT). The aim is to elucidate the role of electrostatic interactions on the structure of synthetic clay systems at high particle densities. Short-range repulsions between particles are described by a suitable hard-core model representing a discotic particle. This potential is supplemented with an electrostatic potential based on a Yukawa model for the screened Coulombic potential between infinitely thin disklike macro-ions. The particle aspect-ratio and electrostatic parameters were chosen to mimic an aqueous dispersion of thin, like-charged, rigid colloidal platelets at finite salt concentration. An examination of the fluid phase diagram reveals a marked shift in the isotropic-nematic transition compared to the hard cut-sphere reference system. Several statistical functions, such as the pair correlation function for the center-of-mass coordinates and structure factor, are obtained to characterize the structural organization of the platelets phases. At low salinity and high osmotic pressure we observe anomalous hexagonal columnar structures characterized by interpenetrating columns with a typical intercolumnar distance corresponding to about half of that of a regular columnar phase. Increasing the ionic strength leads to the formation of glassy, disordered structures consisting of compact clusters of platelets stacked into finite-sized columns. These so-called "nematic columnar" structures have been recently observed in systems of charge-stabilized gibbsite platelets. Our findings are corroborated by an analysis of the static structure factor from a simple density functional theory. PMID:22280777

  3. Thermoelectricity and thermodiffusion in charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Huang, B T; Roger, M; Bonetti, M; Salez, T J; Wiertel-Gasquet, C; Dubois, E; Cabreira Gomes, R; Demouchy, G; Mériguet, G; Peyre, V; Kouyaté, M; Filomeno, C L; Depeyrot, J; Tourinho, F A; Perzynski, R; Nakamae, S

    2015-08-01

    The Seebeck and Soret coefficients of ionically stabilized suspension of maghemite nanoparticles in dimethyl sulfoxide are experimentally studied as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction. In the presence of a temperature gradient, the charged colloidal nanoparticles experience both thermal drift due to their interactions with the solvent and electric forces proportional to the internal thermoelectric field. The resulting thermodiffusion of nanoparticles is observed through forced Rayleigh scattering measurements, while the thermoelectric field is accessed through voltage measurements in a thermocell. Both techniques provide independent estimates of nanoparticle's entropy of transfer as high as 82 meV K(-1). Such a property may be used to improve the thermoelectric coefficients in liquid thermocells. PMID:26254665

  4. Enhanced color conversion from colloidal CdSe/CdS dot/rods by vertical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pühringer, H.; Roither, J.; Kovalenko, M. V.; Eibelhuber, M.; Schwarzl, T.; Talapin, D. V.; Heiss, W.

    2010-09-01

    Colloidal CdSe/CdS dot/rods exhibit efficient photoluminescence from the spherical CdSe dots at wavelengths well below the absorption edge of the rod material. This property makes dot/rods advantageous for color conversion applications, especially when they are embedded in optical microcavities to improve light extraction in forward direction. Here, surface emitting half-wavelength microcavities are demonstrated containing films of dot/rods as active material, exhibiting luminescence enhancement factors of up to 21 at the resonator wavelengths, whereas with conventional CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals only half of this value is obtained.

  5. Interactions and collective behavior of attractive colloidal rods and microspheres grafted with filamentous bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei

    Interactions and collective behavior are investigated for two systems of attractive colloidal rods and colloidal stars. Attractive colloidal rods are constructed by grafting the temperature-sensitive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) to the surface of the semi-flexible filamentous fd virus. The phase diagram of fd-PNIPAM system becomes independent of ionic strength at high salt concentration and low temperature, i.e., the rods are sterically stabilized by the polymer. However, the network of rods undergoes a sol-gel transition as the temperature is raised. The viscoelastic moduli of fd and fd-PNIPAM suspensions are compared as a function of temperature, and the effect of ionic strength on the gelling behavior of fd-PNIPAM solution is measured. For all fluidlike and solidlike samples, the frequency-dependant linear viscoelastic moduli can be scaled onto universal master curves. Colloidal stars are constructed by grafting to 1 mum polystyrene beads a dense brush of 1 mum long and 10 nm wide semi-flexible filamentous viruses. The pair interaction potentials of colloidal stars are measured using an experimental implementation of umbrella sampling, a technique originally developed in computer simulations in order to probe rare events. The influence of ionic strength and grafting density on the interaction is measured. Good agreements are found between the measured interactions and theoretical predictions based upon the osmotic pressure of counterions.

  6. Synthesis of Cone-Shaped Colloids from Rod-Like Silica Colloids with a Gradient in the Etching Rate.

    PubMed

    Hagemans, Fabian; van der Wee, Ernest B; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2016-04-26

    We present the synthesis of monodisperse cone-shaped silica colloids and their fluorescent labeling. Rod-like silica colloids prepared by ammonia-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate in water droplets containing polyvinylpyrrolidone cross-linked by citrate ions in pentanol were found to transform into cone-shaped particles upon mild etching by NaOH in water. The diameter and length of the resulting particles were determined by those of the initial rod-like silica colloids. The mechanism responsible for the cone-shape involves silica etching taking place with a varying rate along the length of the particle. Our experiments thus also lead to new insights into the variation of the local particle structure and composition. These are found to vary gradually along the length of the rod, as a result of the way the rod grows out of a water droplet that keeps itself attached to the flat end of the bullet-shaped particles. Subtle differences in composition and structure could also be resolved by high-resolution stimulated emission depletion confocal microscopy on fluorescently labeled particles. The incorporation of a fluorescent dye chemically attached to an amine-based silane coupling agent resulted in a distribution of fluorophores mainly on the outside of the rod-shaped particles. In contrast, incorporation of the silane coupling agent alone resulted in a homogeneous distribution. Additionally, we show that etching rods, where a silane coupling agent alone was incorporated and subsequently coupled to a fluorescent dye, resulted in fluorescent silica cones, the orientation of which can be discerned using super-resolution confocal microscopy. PMID:27046046

  7. Synthesis and Liquid-Crystal Behavior of Bent Colloidal Silica Rods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Chen, Guangdong; Martinez-Miranda, Luz J; Yu, Hua; Liu, Kun; Nie, Zhihong

    2016-01-13

    The design and assembly of novel colloidal particles are of both academic and technological interest. We developed a wet-chemical route to synthesize monodisperse bent rigid silica rods by controlled perturbation of emulsion-templated growth. The bending angle of the rods can be tuned in a range of 0-50° by varying the strength of perturbation in the reaction temperature or pH in the course of rod growth. The length of each arm of the bent rods can be individually controlled by adjusting the reaction time. For the first time we demonstrated that the bent silica rods resemble banana-shaped liquid-crystal molecules and assemble into ordered structures with a typical smectic B2 phase. The bent silica rods could serve as a visualizable mesoscopic model for exploiting the phase behaviors of bent molecules which represent a typical class of liquid-crystal molecules. PMID:26700616

  8. Thermoreversible Gels Composed of Colloidal Silica Rods with Short-Range Attractions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ryan P; Hong, Kunlun; Wagner, Norman J

    2016-08-23

    Dynamic arrest transitions of colloidal suspensions containing nonspherical particles are of interest for the design and processing of various particle technologies. To better understand the effects of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on gel and glass formation, we present a colloidal model system of octadecyl-coated silica rods, termed as adhesive hard rods (AHR), which enables control of rod aspect ratio and temperature-dependent interactions. The aspect ratios of silica rods were controlled by varying the initial TEOS concentration following the work of Kuijk et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 2346-2349) and temperature-dependent attractions were introduced by coating the calcined silica rods with an octadecyl-brush and suspending in tetradecane. The rod length and aspect ratio were found to increase with TEOS concentration as expected, while other properties such as the rod diameter, coating coverage, density, and surface roughness were nearly independent of the aspect ratio. Ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering measurements revealed temperature-dependent attractions between octadecyl-coated silica rods in tetradecane, as characterized by a low-q upturn in the scattered intensity upon thermal quenching. Lastly, the rheology of a concentrated AHR suspension in tetradecane demonstrated thermoreversible gelation behavior, displaying a nearly 5 orders of magnitude change in the dynamic moduli as the temperature was cycled between 15 and 40 °C. The adhesive hard rod model system serves as a tunable platform to explore the combined influence of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on the dynamic arrest transitions in colloidal suspensions with thermoreversible, short-range attractions. PMID:27466883

  9. Determination of colloidal particle surface charge from dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Marko; Nuansri, Rittirong; Mazza, Jacob; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Electrophoresis (EP) is used to determine colloidal particle surface charge. However, when the Debye length is comparable to or larger than the particle size, electrophoresis cannot be reliably used to determine the surface charge due to counter ion retardation flow. Alexander et al. developed a theory relating colloidal osmotic pressure and particle surface charge. We use dielectrophoresis (DEP) to obtain a potential landscape based on the number density distribution of the particles in a non-uniform AC electric field. We determine the osmotic pressure from the DEP force and density profiles using Einstein's osmotic equilibrium equation. Surface charge obtained by DEP (thermodynamics) will be compared to that obtained by EP (electrokinetics).

  10. Charged hydrophobic colloids at an oil-aqueous phase interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Colm P.; Wang, Anna; Guerrero-García, Guillermo Iván; Hollingsworth, Andrew D.; Guerra, Rodrigo E.; Krishnatreya, Bhaskar Jyoti; Grier, David G.; Manoharan, Vinothan N.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) colloidal particles, when dispersed in oil with a relatively high dielectric constant, can become highly charged. In the presence of an interface with a conducting aqueous phase, image-charge effects lead to strong binding of colloidal particles to the interface, even though the particles are wetted very little by the aqueous phase. We study both the behavior of individual colloidal particles as they approach the interface and the interactions between particles that are already interfacially bound. We demonstrate that using particles which are minimally wetted by the aqueous phase allows us to isolate and study those interactions which are due solely to charging of the particle surface in oil. Finally, we show that these interactions can be understood by a simple image-charge model in which the particle charge q is the sole fitting parameter.

  11. Condensation and dissolution of nematic droplets in dispersions of colloidal rods with thermo–sensitive depletants

    PubMed Central

    Modlińska, Anna; Alsayed, Ahmed M.; Gibaud, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nematic droplets are droplets composed of elongated molecules that tend to point in the same direction but do not have any positional order. Such droplets are well known to adopt a spindle shape called tactoid. How such droplets condensate or melt and how the orientational symmetry is broken remains however unclear. Here we use a colloidal system composed of filamentous viruses as model rod–like colloids and pnipam microgel particles to induce thermo–sensitive depletion attraction between the rods. Microscopy experiments coupled to particle tracking reveal that the condensation of a nematic droplet is preceded by the formation of a new phase, an isotropic droplet. As the viruses constitute an excellent experimental realization of hard rods, it follows that the phenomenology we describe should be relevant to diverse micro- and nano-sized rods that interact through excluded volume interactions. This transition between isotropic and nematic droplets provides a new and reversible pathway to break the symmetry and order colloidal rods within a droplet with an external stimulus, and could constitute a benchmark experiment for a variety of technologies relying on reconfigurable control of rods. PMID:26656207

  12. Depletion induced isotropic-isotropic phase separation in suspensions of rod-like colloids.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, S; Tuinier, R; Binder, K; Schilling, T

    2007-12-28

    When non-adsorbing polymers are added to an isotropic suspension of rod-like colloids, the colloids effectively attract each other via depletion forces. We performed Monte Carlo simulations to study the phase diagram of such rod-polymer mixture. The colloidal rods were modeled as hard spherocylinders; the polymers were described as spheres of the same diameter as the rods. The polymers may overlap with no energy cost, while the overlap of polymers and rods is forbidden. Large amounts of depletant cause phase separation of the mixture. We estimated the phase boundaries of isotropic-isotropic coexistence both in the bulk and in confinement. To determine the phase boundaries we applied the grand canonical ensemble using successive umbrella sampling [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 10925 (2004)], and we performed a finite size scaling analysis to estimate the location of the critical point. The results are compared with predictions of the free volume theory developed by Lekkerkerker and Stroobants [Nuovo Cimento D 16, 949 (1994)]. We also give estimates for the interfacial tension between the coexisting isotropic phases and analyze its power-law behavior on the approach of the critical point. PMID:18163708

  13. Three-Phase Coexistence in Colloidal Rod-Plate Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Woolston, Phillip; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2015-09-01

    Aqueous suspensions of clay particles, such as montmorillonite (MMT) platelets and sepiolite (Sep) rods, tend to form gels at concentrations around 1 vol %. For Sep rods, adsorbing sodium polyacrylate to the surface allows for an isotropic-nematic phase separation to be seen instead. Here, MMT is added to such Sep suspensions, resulting in a complex phase behavior. Across a range of clay concentrations, separation into three phases is observed: a lower, nematic phase dominated by Sep rods, a MMT-rich middle layer, which is weakly birefringent and probably a gel, and a dilute top phase. Analysis of phase volumes suggests that the middle layer may contain as much as 6 vol % MMT. PMID:26262770

  14. Thermal Analog of Gimbal Lock in a Colloidal Ferromagnetic Janus Rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yongxiang; Balin, Andrew Kaan; Dullens, Roel P. A.; Yeomans, Julia M.; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    We report an entropy-driven orientational hopping transition in a magnetically confined colloidal Janus rod. In a magnetic field, the sedimented rod randomly hops between horizontal and vertical states: the latter state comes at a substantial gravitational cost at no reduction of magnetic potential energy. The probability distribution over the angles of the rod shows that the presence of an external magnetic field leads to the emergence of a metastable vertical state separated from the ground state by an effective barrier. This barrier does not come from the potential energy but rather from the vast gain in phase space available to the rod as it approaches the vertical state. The loss of rotational degree of freedom that gives rise to this effect is a statistical mechanical analogue of the phenomenon of gimbal lock from classical mechanics.

  15. Thermal Analog of Gimbal Lock in a Colloidal Ferromagnetic Janus Rod.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongxiang; Balin, Andrew Kaan; Dullens, Roel P A; Yeomans, Julia M; Aarts, Dirk G A L

    2015-12-11

    We report an entropy-driven orientational hopping transition in a magnetically confined colloidal Janus rod. In a magnetic field, the sedimented rod randomly hops between horizontal and vertical states: the latter state comes at a substantial gravitational cost at no reduction of magnetic potential energy. The probability distribution over the angles of the rod shows that the presence of an external magnetic field leads to the emergence of a metastable vertical state separated from the ground state by an effective barrier. This barrier does not come from the potential energy but rather from the vast gain in phase space available to the rod as it approaches the vertical state. The loss of rotational degree of freedom that gives rise to this effect is a statistical mechanical analogue of the phenomenon of gimbal lock from classical mechanics. PMID:26705660

  16. A Landau-de Gennes theory for hard colloidal rods: Defects and tactoids.

    PubMed

    Everts, J C; Punter, M T J J M; Samin, S; van der Schoot, P; van Roij, R

    2016-05-21

    We construct a phenomenological Landau-de Gennes theory for hard colloidal rods by performing an order parameter expansion of the chemical-potential dependent grand potential. By fitting the coefficients to known results of Onsager theory, we are not only able to describe the isotropic-nematic phase transition as function of density, including the well-known density jump, but also the isotropic-nematic planar interface. The resulting theory is applied in calculations of the isotropic core size in a radial hedgehog defect, the density dependence of linear defects of hard rods in square confinement, and the formation of a nematic droplet in an isotropic background. PMID:27208968

  17. A Landau-de Gennes theory for hard colloidal rods: Defects and tactoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everts, J. C.; Punter, M. T. J. J. M.; Samin, S.; van der Schoot, P.; van Roij, R.

    2016-05-01

    We construct a phenomenological Landau-de Gennes theory for hard colloidal rods by performing an order parameter expansion of the chemical-potential dependent grand potential. By fitting the coefficients to known results of Onsager theory, we are not only able to describe the isotropic-nematic phase transition as function of density, including the well-known density jump, but also the isotropic-nematic planar interface. The resulting theory is applied in calculations of the isotropic core size in a radial hedgehog defect, the density dependence of linear defects of hard rods in square confinement, and the formation of a nematic droplet in an isotropic background.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of electrophoresis of charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang; Nakayama, Yasuya; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2006-05-26

    We propose a numerical method to simulate electrohydrodynamic phenomena in charged colloidal dispersions. This method enables us to compute the time evolutions of colloidal particles, ions, and host fluids simultaneously by solving Newton, advection-diffusion, and Navier-Stokes equations so that the electrohydrodynamic couplings can be fully taken into account. The electrophoretic mobilities of charged spherical particles are calculated in several situations. The comparisons with approximation theories show quantitative agreements for dilute dispersions without any empirical parameters; however, our simulation predicts notable deviations in the case of dense dispersions. PMID:16803214

  19. Solidification of a Charged Colloidal Dispersion Investigated Using Microfluidic Pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Ziane, Nadia; Salmon, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-07-28

    We investigate the dynamics of solidification of a charged colloidal dispersion using an original microfluidic technique referred to as micropervaporation. This technique exploits pervaporation within a microfluidic channel to extract the solvent of a dilute colloidal dispersion. Pervaporation concentrates the colloids in a controlled way up to the tip of the channel until a wet solid made of closely packed colloids grows and invades the microfluidic channel. For the charged dispersion under study, we however evidence a liquid to solid transition (LST) preceding the formation of the solid, owing to the presence of long-range electrostatic interactions. This LST is associated with the nucleation and growth of domains confined in the channel. These domains are then compacted anisotropically up to forming a wet solid of closely packed colloids. This solid then invades the whole channel as in directional drying with a growth rate which depends on the microfluidic geometry. In the final steps of the solidification, we observed the occurrence of cracks and shear bands, the delamination of the wet solid from the channel walls, and its invasion by a receding air front. Interestingly, this air front follows specific patterns within the solid which reveal different microscopic colloidal organizations. PMID:26131999

  20. Active colloids propelled by induced-charge electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ming; Luijten, Erik

    Populations of motile organisms exhibit a variety of collective behaviors, ranging from bacterial colony formation to the flocking of birds. Current understanding of these active motions, which are typically far from equilibrium and based on the collective behavior of self-propelled entities, is far from complete. One approach is to reproduce these observations in systems of synthetic active colloids. However, one of the standard self-propulsion mechanisms, induced-charge electrophoresis (ICEP) of a dielectric Janus colloid remains not fully understood by itself, especially the strong dependence of the resultant particle motion on the frequency of the external field. Resolution of this outstanding problem requires detailed study of the time-resolved dielectric response of the colloid and the dynamics of the electric double layer. Through molecular dynamics simulations coupled with an efficient dielectric solver, we elucidate the underlying mechanism of the frequency dependence of ICEP and the polarization of a metallodielectric Janus colloid.

  1. From soft to hard rod behavior in liquid crystalline suspensions of sterically stabilized colloidal filamentous particles.

    PubMed

    Grelet, Eric; Rana, Richa

    2016-05-18

    The liquid crystalline phase behavior of a colloidal system of sterically stabilized rods is reported. Our colloidal suspensions consist of highly monodisperse, semi-flexible filamentous viruses which have been coated with neutral hydrophilic polymers by irreversibly binding poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to the surface of the virus particles. Depending on the size of the grafted polymer, up to three different phase transitions are observed (isotropic-to-chiral nematic, chiral nematic-to-smectic, and smectic-to-columnar). Each phase transition is shown to be independent of ionic strength, confirming the steric stabilization of the viral colloids. A direct, i.e. without any free parameters, comparison with theory and computer simulations of the volume fraction associated with the phase transition can be performed, showing a quantitative agreement with hard rod behavior at a low polymer chain size, and some deviation stemming from soft repulsion by increasing the polymer thickness coating of the rod. Specifically, we demonstrate that the columnar mesophase is not stabilized by electrostatic repulsion, and we discuss the conditions of its existence. PMID:27108523

  2. Phase behavior of a suspension of colloidal hard rods and nonadsorbing polymer.

    PubMed

    Savenko, S V; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2006-06-21

    We study the phase behavior of a mixture of colloidal hard rods with a length-to-diameter ratio of L/sigma(c)=5 and nonadsorbing ideal polymer. We map our binary mixture onto an effective one-component system by integrating out the degrees of freedom of the polymer coils. We derive a formal expression for the exact effective Hamiltonian of the colloidal rods, i.e., it includes all effective many-body interactions and it is related to the exact free volume available for the polymer. We determine numerically on a grid the free volume available for the ideal polymer coils "on the fly" for each colloidal rod configuration during our Monte Carlo simulations. This allows us to go beyond first-order perturbation theory, which employs the pure hard-rod system as reference state. We perform free energy calculations for the isotropic, nematic, smectic, and crystal phase using thermodynamic integration and common tangent constructions are used at fixed polymer fugacities to map out the phase diagram. The phase behavior is determined for size ratios q=sigma(p)/sigma(c)=0.15, 0.5, and 1, where sigma(p) is the diameter of the polymer coils. The phase diagrams based on the full effective Hamiltonian are compared with those obtained from first-order perturbation theory, from simulations using the effective pair potential approximation to the effective Hamiltonian, and with those based on an empiric effective depletion potential for the rods. We find that the many-body character of the effective interactions stabilizes the nematic and smectic phases for large q, while the effective pair potential description overestimates the attractive interactions and favors, hence, a broad isotropic-crystal coexistence. PMID:16821948

  3. Liquid-glass transition in charge-stabilized colloidal dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, S. K.; Wang, G. F.; Peng, W. P.

    2000-06-01

    We model the inter-colloidal interactions in a charge-stabilized colloidal dispersion by a hard-core Yukawa potential φ(r)=σ0γ exp(-κr)/r, r>σ0 and apply the rescaled mean spherical approximation to calculate its static structure factor. In conjunction with the idealized mode-coupling theory, we determine the loci of the liquid-glass transition phase boundary for a salt-free suspension of charged colloids evaluated at different counter-ion environment (characterized by the κ) in terms of the macro-ion parameters: volume fraction ɛ, charge Z0 and size σ0. The calculated parametric phase diagrams are quite general since the results, with slight and straightforward modification, can be utilized to study the glass transition in a more realistic colloidal solution such as an aqueous monodisperse suspension of polystyrene charged spheres with an added electrolyte. Confining our discussion, then, to the simplest salt-free colloidal liquids, we extract from our analysis of the calculated liquid-glass transition boundaries some succinct features. Specifically, we show in this work that given a range of interaction Vkgr=κσ0<~3.8, there is a possibility of observing the liquid⇋glass⇋liquid⇋glass(LGLG) re-entrant phenomenon in restrictive regions of the phase diagram ɛ-σ0 or ɛ-Z0 for a monodisperse charge-stabilized solution. However, as the σ0 increases above a critical size, the LGLG re-entrant behavior vanishes. To delve into this re-entrant phenomenon, we compare, for a given Vkgr, the glassy Debye-Waller factor, static structure factor and their spatial counterparts for two cases-nnone for lower-Z0 colloids at a high ɛ and the other for higher-Z0 colloids at a low ɛ. For the former, the glassification is basically driven by the geometric restriction while that, for the latter, it is mainly induced by the Coulomb force. We conclude from this comparison that under the same screening environment both the excluded volume and the electrostatic effects are

  4. Charge renormalization in nominally apolar colloidal dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Daniel J.; Hollingsworth, Andrew D.; Grier, David G.

    2016-04-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of the pair interactions between dielectric spheres dispersed in a fluid medium with a low dielectric constant. Despite the absence of charge control agents or added organic salts, these measurements reveal strong and long-ranged repulsions consistent with substantial charges on the particles whose interactions are screened by trace concentrations of mobile ions in solution. The dependence of the estimated charge on the particles' radii is consistent with charge renormalization theory and, thus, offers insights into the charging mechanism in this interesting class of model systems. The measurement technique, based on optical-tweezer manipulation and artifact-free particle tracking, makes use of optimal statistical methods to reduce measurement errors to the femtonewton frontier while covering an extremely wide range of interaction energies.

  5. Spontaneous formation of stringlike clusters and smectic sheets for colloidal rods confined in thin wedgelike gaps.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideatsu; Maeda, Yoshiko

    2013-08-20

    Monodispersed colloidal rods of β-FeOOH with sizes ranging from 270 to 580 nm in length and 50 to 80 nm in width were synthesized. Narrow wedgelike gaps (0 to 700 nm in height) were formed around the inner bottom edge of the suspension glass cells. Optical microscopic observations revealed the formation of stringlike clusters of the rods and smectic sheets (by spontaneous side-by-side clustering of the strings) in the isotropic phase of the rod suspensions confined in narrow gaps; the electrolyte (HCl) concentrations of the suspensions are 5-40 mM, at which inter-rod interactions are attractive. The strings exhibit different colors that were used to investigate the structures of the strings with the help of interference color theory for thin films. The results are as follows. (1) The rods, lying flat on the gap bottom, are connected side-by-side and stacked upward to form stringlike clusters with different thicknesses depending on the gap height. (2) The stacking numbers (N(sr)) of the rods are estimated to be 1-5. With N(sr) increasing from 2 to 5, the volume fractions (ϕ) of the rods in the strings increased typically from 0.25-0.3 to 0.35-0.42 to reach limiting values (close to the ϕ values of the rods in the bulk smectic phase). (3) Unexpected low-ϕ strings are found in regions with an intermediate height in the gaps. These behaviors of ϕ may be caused by thermal fluctuations of the strings. PMID:23876087

  6. Controlling colloid charge in nonpolar liquids with surfactants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gregory N; Eastoe, Julian

    2013-01-14

    The formation of ions in nonpolar solvents (with relative permittivity ε(r) of approximately 2) is more difficult than in polar liquids; however, these charged species play an important role in many applications, such as electrophoretic displays. The low relative permittivities of these solvents mean that charges have to be separated by large distances to be stable (approximately 28 nm or 40 times that in water). The inverse micelles formed by surfactants in these solvents provide an environment to stabilize ions and charges. Common surfactants used are sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT or AOT), polyisobutylene succinimide, sorbitan oleate, and zirconyl 2-ethyl hexanoate. The behavior of charged inverse micelles has been studied on both the bulk and on the microscopic scale and can be used to determine the motion of the micelles, their structure, and the nature of the electrostatic double layer. Colloidal particles are only weakly charged in the absence of surfactant, but in the presence of surfactants, many types, including polymers, metal oxides, carbon blacks, and pigments, have been observed to become positively or negatively charged. Several mechanisms have been proposed as the origin of surface charge, including acid-base reactions between the colloid and the inverse micelle, preferential adsorption of charged inverse micelles, or dissolution of surface species. While most studies vary only the concentration of surfactant, systematic variation of the particle surface chemistry or the surfactant structure have provided insight into the origin of charging in nonpolar liquids. By carefully varying system parameters and working to understand the interactions between surfactants and colloidal surfaces, further advances will be made leading to better understanding of the origin of charge and to the development of more effective surfactants. PMID:23187453

  7. Directing Colloidal Assembly and a Metal-Insulator Transition Using a Quench-Disordered Porous Rod Template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadrich, Ryan B.; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2014-11-01

    Replica and effective-medium theory methods are employed to elucidate how to massively reconfigure a colloidal assembly to achieve globally homogeneous, strongly clustered, and percolated equilibrium states of high electrical conductivity at low physical volume fractions. A key idea is to employ a quench-disordered, large-mesh rigid-rod network as a templating internal field. By exploiting bulk phase separation frustration and the tunable competing processes of colloid adsorption on the low-dimensional network and fluctuation-driven colloid clustering in the pore spaces, two distinct spatial organizations of greatly enhanced particle contacts can be achieved. As a result, a continuous, but very abrupt, transition from an insulating to metallic-like state can be realized via a small change of either the colloid-template or colloid-colloid attraction strength. The approach is generalizable to more complicated template or colloidal architectures.

  8. Alternating strings and clusters in suspensions of charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Everts, J C; van der Linden, M N; van Blaaderen, A; van Roij, R

    2016-08-21

    We report the formation of alternating strings and clusters in a binary suspension of repulsive charged colloids with double layers larger than the particle size. Within a binary cell model we include many-body and charge-regulation effects under the assumption of a constant surface potential, and consider their repercussions on the two-particle interaction potential. We find that the formation of induced dipoles close to a charge-reversed state may explain the formation of these structures. Finally, we will touch upon the formation of dumbbells and small clusters in a one-component system, where the effective electrostatic interaction is always repulsive. PMID:27439990

  9. Numerical study of cluster formation in binary charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuzono, Tohru; Odai, Kana; Masuda, Tatsuhiro; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-07-01

    Cluster formation of oppositely charged colloidal particles is studied numerically. A simple Brownian dynamics method with a screened-Coulomb (Yukawa) potential is employed for numerical simulations. An equilibrium phase which consists of clusters and unassociated particles is obtained. It is shown that the equilibrium association number of clusters and their shapes are determined by charge numbers and charge ratio of the binary particles. The phase diagram of cluster formation for various charge numbers and their ratios is obtained. A simple relation between the association number and the charge ratio is found. It is demonstrated that in the case of high charge ratio the cluster takes a multilayer structure which is highly symmetric. It is also pointed out that the cluster-particle interaction changes dynamically in the cluster formation process, which is involved in the selection of final cluster structure.

  10. Numerical study of cluster formation in binary charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Okuzono, Tohru; Odai, Kana; Masuda, Tatsuhiro; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-07-01

    Cluster formation of oppositely charged colloidal particles is studied numerically. A simple Brownian dynamics method with a screened-Coulomb (Yukawa) potential is employed for numerical simulations. An equilibrium phase which consists of clusters and unassociated particles is obtained. It is shown that the equilibrium association number of clusters and their shapes are determined by charge numbers and charge ratio of the binary particles. The phase diagram of cluster formation for various charge numbers and their ratios is obtained. A simple relation between the association number and the charge ratio is found. It is demonstrated that in the case of high charge ratio the cluster takes a multilayer structure which is highly symmetric. It is also pointed out that the cluster-particle interaction changes dynamically in the cluster formation process, which is involved in the selection of final cluster structure. PMID:27575181

  11. Polydiacetylenes in solution; charged rods and neutral coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacher, Robert A.

    1990-08-01

    We report experimental results on several polydiacetylenes and a polythiophene in solution which demonstrate a change in charge state associated with solvatochromic and thermochromic transitions. The planar conformations are charged and the nonplanar conformations are neutral. When fields of ≊600 V/cm were applied to solutions of polymer in chloroform-hexane mixtures or toluene (i.e., the polymer is in the extended state), the polymers plated out on one electrode. We have measured the current as a function of time associated with the deposition of the polymer to determine the quantity of charge per polymer. The time dependence of the current had two regimes which can be associated with two types of charged material in the solution: the charged polymer, which plates out, and an unidentified charge transfer species which does not plate out. Polydiacetylenes 4BCMU and 3BCMU in solutions of chloroform/hexane became positively charged. Poly-3-hexyl-thiophene also became positively charged. PDA-9PA and PDA-92NA became negatively charged. We found a charge of 3×10-4 e/monomer for 4BCMU, 7×10-3 e/monomer for 3BCMU, and 4×10-2 e/monomer for PDA-9PA. Using this effect, we can demonstrate that both rod and coil segments coexist on the same polymer chain in the intermediate stages of the rod-coil transition. We suggest a mechanism which can qualitatively account for this unusual behavior. We also describe novel experiments in which an electric field was used to drive the polymers across a boundary between two nonmiscible solvents. When the polymer crosses the boundary, it changes color. The possibility of using the plating effect for precise fractionation by electrophoresis is suggested.

  12. Colloidal Brazil-nut effect in sediments of binary charged suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esztermann, A.; Löwen, H.

    2004-10-01

    Equilibrium sedimentation density profiles of charged binary colloidal suspensions are calculated by computer simulations and density-functional theory. For deionized samples, we predict a colloidal "Brazil nut" effect: heavy colloidal particles sediment on top of the lighter ones provided that their mass per charge is smaller than that of the lighter ones. This effect is verifiable in settling experiments.

  13. Interaction modes between asymmetrically and oppositely charged rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antila, Hanne S.; Van Tassel, Paul R.; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of oppositely and asymmetrically charged rods in salt—a simple model of (bio)macromolecular assembly—is observed via simulation to exhibit two free energy minima, separated by a repulsive barrier. In contrast to similar minima in the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, the governing mechanism includes electrostatic attraction at large separation, osmotic repulsion at close range, and depletion attraction near contact. A model accounting for ion condensation and excluded volume is shown to be superior to a mean-field treatment in predicting the effect of charge asymmetry on the free-energy profile.

  14. Charged colloids and polyelectrolytes: from statics to electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, H.; Esztermann, A.; Wysocki, A.; Allahyarov, E.; Messina, R.; Jusufi, A.; Hoffmann, N.; Gottwald, D.; Kahl, G.; Konieczny, M.; Likos, C. N.

    2005-01-01

    A review is given on recent studies of charged colloidal suspensions and polyelectrolytes both in static and non-equilibrium situations. As far as static equilibrium situations are concerned, we discuss three different problems: 1) Sedimentation density profiles in charged suspensions are shown to exhibit a stretched non-bariometric wing at large heights and binary suspensions under gravity can exhibit an analog of the brazil-nut effect known from granular matter, i.e. the heavier particles settle on top of the lighter ones. 2) Soft polyelectrolyte systems like polyelectrolyte stars and microgels show an ultra-soft effective interaction and this results into an unusual equilibrium phase diagram including reentrant melting transitions and stable open crystalline lattices. 3) The freezing transition in bilayers of confined charged suspensions is discussed and a reentrant behaviour is obtained. As far as nonequilibrium problems are concerned, we discuss an interface instability in oppositely driven colloidal mixtures and discuss possible approaches to simulate electrokinetic effects in charged suspensions.

  15. Charged micelle depletion attraction and interfacial colloidal phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Iracki, Tara D; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J; Eichmann, Shannon L; Bevan, Michael A

    2010-12-21

    Ensemble total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) is used to directly measure the evolution of colloid-surface depletion attraction with increasing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration near the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Measured potentials are well described by a modified Asakura-Oosawa (AO) depletion potential in addition to electrostatic and van der Waals contributions. The modified AO potential includes effects of electrostatic interactions between micelles and surfaces via effective depletant dimensions in an excluded volume term and partitioning in an osmotic pressure term. Directly measured colloid-surface depletion potentials are used in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to capture video microscopy (VM) measurements of micelle-mediated quasi-two-dimensional phase behavior including fluid, crystal, and gel microstructures. Our findings provide information to develop more rigorous and analytically simple models of depletion attraction in charged micellar systems. PMID:21077612

  16. Novel kinetic trapping in charged colloidal clusters due to self-induced surface charge organization

    PubMed Central

    Klix, Christian L.; Murata, Ken-ichiro; Tanaka, Hajime; Williams, Stephen R.; Malins, Alex; Royall, C. Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal clusters are an unusual state of matter where tunable interactions enable a sufficient reduction in their degrees of freedom that their energy landscapes can become tractable — they form a playground for statistical mechanics and promise unprecedented control of structure on the submicron lengthscale. We study colloidal clusters in a system where a short-ranged polymer-induced attraction drives clustering, while a weak, long-ranged electrostatic repulsion prevents extensive aggregation. We compare experimental yields of cluster structures with theory which assumes simple addition of competing isotropic interactions between the colloids. Here we show that for clusters of size 4 ≤ m ≤ 7, the yield of minimum energy clusters is much less than expected. We attribute this to an anisotropic self-organized surface charge distribution which leads to unexpected kinetic trapping. We introduce a model for the coupling between counterions and binding sites on the colloid surface with which we interpret our findings. PMID:23797807

  17. Colloidal rod-sphere mixtures: fluid-fluid interfaces and the Onsager limit.

    PubMed

    Brader, Joseph M; Esztermann, Ansgar; Schmidt, Matthias

    2002-09-01

    Using a geometry-based density functional theory we investigate the free interface between demixed bulk fluid phases of a colloidal mixture of hard spheres and vanishingly thin needles. Results are presented for the spatial and orientational density distributions of the particles, as well as for the interface tension. Density profiles display oscillations on the sphere-rich side of the interface provided the sphere liquid phase is on the oscillatory side of the Fisher-Widom line in the bulk phase diagram. Needles tend to align parallel (perpendicular) to the interface on the needle-rich (sphere-rich) side displaying biaxial (uniaxial) order. Furthermore, we generalize the theory to the Onsager limit for interacting rods, and give explicit expressions for the functional in simple geometries. PMID:12366111

  18. Denser fluids of charge-stabilized colloids form denser sediments.

    PubMed

    Nanikashvili, Pilkhaz M; Butenko, Alexander V; Liber, Shir R; Zitoun, David; Sloutskin, Eli

    2014-07-21

    Granular matter, where solid-like elasticity emerges in the absence of crystalline order, has been actively studied over the last few decades, targeting fundamental physical understanding of granular packings and glasses, abundant in everyday life and technology. We employ charge-stabilized sub-micron particles in a solvent, known as colloids, to form granular packings through a well-controlled process, where initially homogeneous and thermodynamically equilibrated colloidal fluids form solid sediments, when subjected to an effective gravity in a centrifuge. We demonstrate that particles' volume fraction φj in these sediments increases linearly with that in the initial fluid φ0, setting an upper limit φRCP≈ 0.64 on both φj and φ0, where φRCP coincides with the well-known, yet highly controversial, 'random close packing' density of spheres, providing new insight into the physics of granular packings. The observed φj(φ0) dependence is similar to the one recently reported for colloidal hard spheres, sterically stabilized by surface-linked polymer combs (S. R. Liber, et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2013, 110, 5769-5773). However, the lower limit on sediment densities drops to φj≈ 0.49 in the present work, suggesting that sedimented charge-stabilized silica are able to overcome mutual electrostatic repulsions, forming gel-like structures stabilized by occasional van der Waals contacts. Finally, by introducing particle size polydispersity, which significantly modifies fluid structure and sedimentation dynamics, we almost completely diminish the φj(φ0) dependence, bringing φj(0) close to its value in frictionless systems. PMID:24870013

  19. Non-additivity of pair interactions in charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Samuel D.; Bartlett, Paul

    2016-07-01

    It is general wisdom that the pair potential of charged colloids in a liquid may be closely approximated by a Yukawa interaction, as predicted by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We experimentally determine the effective forces in a binary mixture of like-charged particles, of species 1 and 2, with blinking optical tweezers. The measured forces are consistent with a Yukawa pair potential but the (12) cross-interaction is not equal to the geometric mean of the (11) and (22) like-interactions, as expected from DLVO. The deviation is a function of the electrostatic screening length and the size ratio, with the cross-interaction measured being consistently weaker than DLVO predictions. The corresponding non-additivity parameter is negative and grows in magnitude with increased size asymmetry.

  20. One-component plasma of point charges and of charged rods

    SciTech Connect

    Hatlo, Marius M.; Karatrantos, Argyrios; Lue, Leo

    2009-12-15

    An approximate theory is developed to describe the properties of mobile particles with extended charge distributions in the presence of a neutralizing fixed background charge. Long-wavelength fluctuations of the electric potential are handled within a variational perturbation approximation, and the short-wavelength fluctuations are handled within a cumulant (fugacity) expansion. The distinct treatment of these two contributions to the free energy enables the theory to provide quantitative predictions for the properties of these systems from the weak- to the strong-coupling regimes. With this theory, we study three different variations in the classical one-component plasma model: a plasma of point charges, a plasma of particles consisting of 8 linearly bonded point charges (8-mer), and a plasma of line charges. The theory was found to agree well with the available computer simulation data for the electrostatic interaction energy of these systems for all values of the plasma coupling parameter examined (GAMMA=0 to 400). In addition, we find that both the 8-mer rod and the line charge systems form a strongly ordered nematic phase, which is entirely driven by electrostatic interactions. The nematic phase only exists within a finite range of lengths of the charged particles. If the particles are too short or too long, the nematic phase does not appear. Finally, we find that the nematic phase is stable over a broader range of conditions for the line charge system than for the 8-mer rod system; consequently, the phase behavior of the one-component plasma is sensitive to the manner in which the charge is distributed on the particles.

  1. Experimental investigation on the use of highly charged nanoparticles to improve the stability of weakly charged colloidal system.

    PubMed

    Zubir, Mohd Nashrul Mohd; Badarudin, A; Kazi, S N; Misran, Misni; Amiri, Ahmad; Sadri, Rad; Khalid, Solangi

    2015-09-15

    The present work highlighted on the implementation of a unique concept for stabilizing colloids at their incipiently low charge potential. A highly charged nanoparticle was introduced within a coagulated prone colloidal system, serving as stabilizer to resist otherwise rapid flocculation and sedimentation process. A low size asymmetry of nanoparticle/colloid serves as the new topic of investigation in addition to the well-established large size ratio nanoparticle/microparticle study. Highly charged Al2O3 nanoparticles were used within the present research context to stabilize TiO2 and Fe3O4 based colloids via the formation of composite structures. It was believed, based on the experimental evidence, that Al2O3 nanoparticle interact with the weakly charged TiO2 and Fe3O4 colloids within the binary system via absorption and/or haloing modes to increase the overall charge potential of the respective colloids, thus preventing further surface contact via van der Waal's attraction. Series of experimental results strongly suggest the presence of weakly charged colloids in the studied bimodal system where, in the absence of highly charged nanoparticle, experience rapid instability. Absorbance measurement indicated that the colloidal stability drops in accordance to the highly charged nanoparticle sedimentation rate, suggesting the dominant influence of nanoparticles to attain a well-dispersed binary system. Further, it was found that the level of colloidal stability was enhanced with increasing nanoparticle fraction within the mixture. Rheological observation revealed that each hybrid complexes demonstrated behavior reminiscence to water with negligible increase in viscosity which serves as highly favorable condition particularly in thermal transport applications. PMID:26048724

  2. Mobile colloid generation induced by a cementitious plume: mineral surface-charge controls on mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I; Roberts, Kimberly A; Seaman, John C

    2012-03-01

    Cementitious materials are increasingly used as engineered barriers and waste forms for radiological waste disposal. Yet their potential effect on mobile colloid generation is not well-known, especially as it may influence colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. Whereas previous papers have studied the introduction of cement colloids into sediments, this study examined the influence of cement leachate chemistry on the mobilization of colloids from a subsurface sediment collected from the Savannah River Site, USA. A sharp mobile colloid plume formed with the introduction of a cement leachate simulant. Colloid concentrations decreased to background concentrations even though the aqueous chemical conditions (pH and ionic strength) remained unchanged. Mobile colloids were mainly goethite and to a lesser extent kaolinite. The released colloids had negative surface charges and the mean particle sizes ranged primarily from 200 to 470 nm. Inherent mineralogical electrostatic forces appeared to be the controlling colloid removal mechanism in this system. In the background pH of ~6.0, goethite had a positive surface charge, whereas quartz (the dominant mineral in the immobile sediment) and kaolinite had negative surface charges. Goethite acted as a cementing agent, holding kaolinite and itself onto the quartz surfaces due to the electrostatic attraction. Once the pH of the system was elevated, as in the cementitious high pH plume front, the goethite reversed to a negative charge, along with quartz and kaolinite, then goethite and kaolinite colloids were mobilized and a sharp spike in turbidity was observed. Simulating conditions away from the cementitious source, essentially no colloids were mobilized at 1:1000 dilution of the cement leachate or when the leachate pH was ≤ 8. Extreme alkaline pH environments of cementitious leachate may change mineral surface charges, temporarily promoting the formation of mobile colloids. PMID:22316126

  3. Electrostatic correlations in colloidal suspensions: Density profiles and effective charges beyond the Poisson-Boltzmann theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Alexandre P.; Diehl, Alexandre; Levin, Yan

    2009-03-01

    A theory is proposed which allows us to calculate the distribution of the multivalent counterions around a colloidal particle using the cell model. The results are compared with the Monte Carlo simulations and are found to be very accurate in the two asymptotic regimes, close to the colloidal particle and far from it. The theory allows to accurately calculate the osmotic pressure and the effective charge of colloidal particles with multivalent counterions.

  4. Interaction of Charged Colloidal Particles at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Matheus; Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Levin, Yan

    2016-07-01

    We study, using Monte Carlo simulations, the interaction between charged colloidal particles confined to the air-water interface. The dependence of force on ionic strength and counterion valence is explored. For 1:1 electrolyte, we find that the electrostatic interaction at the interface is very close to the one observed in the bulk. On the other hand, for salts with multivalent counterions, an interface produces an enhanced attraction between like charged colloids. Finally, we explore the effect of induced surface charge at the air-water interface on the interaction between colloidal particles. PMID:26551757

  5. Ligand dissociation mediated charge transfer observed at colloidal W18O49 nanoparticle interfaces.

    PubMed

    Grauer, David C; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2014-03-11

    Understanding charge transfer dynamics through the ligand shell of colloidal nanoparticles has been an important pursuit in solar energy conversion. While charge transport through ligand shells of nanoparticle films has been studied intensely in static dry and electrochemical systems, its influence on charge transfer kinetics in dispersed colloidal systems has received relatively less attention. This work reports the oxidation of amine passivated tungsten oxide nanoparticles by an organically soluble tris-(1,10-phenanthroline) iron(III) derivative. By following the rate of this oxidation optically via the production of the ferroin derivative under various reaction conditions and particle derivatizations, we are able to show that the fluxional ligand shells on dispersed, colloidal nanoparticles provide a separate and more facile pathway for charge transfer, in which the rate-limiting step for charge transfer is the ligand dissociation. Since such ligand shells are frequently required for nanoparticle stability, this observation has significant implications for colloidal nanoparticle photocatalysis. PMID:24564847

  6. Electrostatic Charging of Insulating Rods and Resulting Particle Transport in the Columbia Non-neutral Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senter, Aaron; Rath, Nikolaus; Brenner, Paul; Sarasola, Xabier; Pedersen, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    The Columbia Non-neutral Torus (CNT) is a stellarator created to study non-neutral plasmas confined on magnetic surfaces. To create and diagnose the electron plasma, filaments supported by ceramic rods are inserted into the plasma. These rods charge negatively allowing particles to E xB drift across the confining magnetic surfaces and out of the plasma. A simple model of this process has yielded good qualitative agreement with experimentally observed radial transport[1]. However, when the rod is retracted, it perturbs the plasma more than expected. To better understand the rod perturbations, externally biased conducting rods are now being used. We find the effect of the ceramic rods by measuring the increase in filament emission current with a rod installed. Comparing the radial transport rates of the ceramic and conducting rods, we aim to understand the charge distribution on the former, and to minimize the rod driven transport. Initial experiments show that a uniformly biased rod does not reproduce the transport observed. Experiments using a rod with a varying radial potential profile are being conducted and will be reported on. [1] J.W. Berkery et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 062503 (2007).

  7. Testing the relevance of effective interaction potentials between highly-charged colloids in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobnikar, J.; Castañeda-Priego, R.; von Grünberg, H. H.; Trizac, E.

    2006-11-01

    Combining cell and Jellium model mean-field approaches, Monte Carlo together with integral equation techniques, and finally more demanding many-colloid mean-field computations, we investigate the thermodynamic behaviour, pressure and compressibility of highly-charged colloidal dispersions, and at a more microscopic level, the force distribution acting on the colloids. The Kirkwood Buff identity provides a useful probe to challenge the self-consistency of an approximate effective screened Coulomb (Yukawa) potential between colloids. Two effective parameter models are put to the test: cell against renormalized Jellium models.

  8. Spatial inhomogeneities in ionic liquids, charged proteins, and charge stabilized colloids from collective variables theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsahan, O.; Ciach, A.

    2012-09-01

    Effects of size and charge asymmetry between oppositely charged ions or particles on spatial inhomogeneities are studied for a large range of charge and size ratios. We perform a stability analysis of the primitive model of ionic systems with respect to periodic ordering using the collective variables-based theory. We extend previous studies [Ciach , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.75.051505 75, 051505 (2007)] in several ways. First, we employ a nonlocal approximation for the reference hard-sphere fluid which leads to the Percus-Yevick pair direct correlation functions for the uniform case. Second, we use the Weeks-Chandler-Anderson regularization scheme for the Coulomb potential inside the hard core. We determine the relevant order parameter connected with the periodic ordering and analyze the character of the dominant fluctuations along the λ lines. We show that the above-mentioned modifications produce large quantitative and partly qualitative changes in the phase diagrams obtained previously. We discuss possible scenarios of the periodic ordering for the whole range of size and charge ratios of the two ionic species, covering electrolytes, ionic liquids, charged globular proteins or nanoparticles in aqueous solutions, and charge-stabilized colloids.

  9. Colloidal deposition and aggregation in the presence of charged collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Behnam; Rajendran, Arvind; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Colloids; complex fluid laboratory Team

    2014-11-01

    The transport of colloidal particles in porous media is of great importance in sub-surface environments. These colloidal particles facilitate transport of contaminants, low-soluble compounds and metals in groundwater. Here, we have studied transport dynamics of colloids inside porous medium using a combination of column experiments and batch studies. Polystyrene latex beads (100 nm), as colloidal agents, and soda lime glass beads, as porous medium, are employed in this work. On the one hand, batch experiments are undertaken to better understand concurrent aggregation and deposition of particles. On the other hand, column experiments are performed to understand the flow induced deposition of colloidal particles in the interstitial voids. Effect of collector surface preparation, pH, colloidal suspension concentration and collector beads mass is studied. Chemical release and shear field are revealed as two significant factors lying behind the coagulation of colloidal particles. These findings help us to better distinguish mechanisms responsible for the transport of colloids inside porous medium. We are collaborators. Behnam Sadri is master of science student while two other professor are supervising his research work.

  10. Topological colloids.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Liu, Qingkun; He, Sailing; Kamien, Randall D; Kusner, Robert B; Lubensky, Tom C; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2013-01-10

    Smoke, fog, jelly, paints, milk and shaving cream are common everyday examples of colloids, a type of soft matter consisting of tiny particles dispersed in chemically distinct host media. Being abundant in nature, colloids also find increasingly important applications in science and technology, ranging from direct probing of kinetics in crystals and glasses to fabrication of third-generation quantum-dot solar cells. Because naturally occurring colloids have a shape that is typically determined by minimization of interfacial tension (for example, during phase separation) or faceted crystal growth, their surfaces tend to have minimum-area spherical or topologically equivalent shapes such as prisms and irregular grains (all continuously deformable--homeomorphic--to spheres). Although toroidal DNA condensates and vesicles with different numbers of handles can exist and soft matter defects can be shaped as rings and knots, the role of particle topology in colloidal systems remains unexplored. Here we fabricate and study colloidal particles with different numbers of handles and genus g ranging from 1 to 5. When introduced into a nematic liquid crystal--a fluid made of rod-like molecules that spontaneously align along the so-called 'director'--these particles induce three-dimensional director fields and topological defects dictated by colloidal topology. Whereas electric fields, photothermal melting and laser tweezing cause transformations between configurations of particle-induced structures, three-dimensional nonlinear optical imaging reveals that topological charge is conserved and that the total charge of particle-induced defects always obeys predictions of the Gauss-Bonnet and Poincaré-Hopf index theorems. This allows us to establish and experimentally test the procedure for assignment and summation of topological charges in three-dimensional director fields. Our findings lay the groundwork for new applications of colloids and liquid crystals that range from

  11. Long-Ranged Oppositely Charged Interactions for Designing New Types of Colloidal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirörs, Ahmet Faik; Stiefelhagen, Johan C. P.; Vissers, Teun; Smallenburg, Frank; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Imhof, Arnout; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2015-04-01

    Getting control over the valency of colloids is not trivial and has been a long-desired goal for the colloidal domain. Typically, tuning the preferred number of neighbors for colloidal particles requires directional bonding, as in the case of patchy particles, which is difficult to realize experimentally. Here, we demonstrate a general method for creating the colloidal analogs of molecules and other new regular colloidal clusters without using patchiness or complex bonding schemes (e.g., DNA coating) by using a combination of long-ranged attractive and repulsive interactions between oppositely charged particles that also enable regular clusters of particles not all in close contact. We show that, due to the interplay between their attractions and repulsions, oppositely charged particles dispersed in an intermediate dielectric constant (4 <ɛ <10 ) provide a viable approach for the formation of binary colloidal clusters. Tuning the size ratio and interactions of the particles enables control of the type and shape of the resulting regular colloidal clusters. Finally, we present an example of clusters made up of negatively charged large and positively charged small satellite particles, for which the electrostatic properties and interactions can be changed with an electric field. It appears that for sufficiently strong fields the satellite particles can move over the surface of the host particles and polarize the clusters. For even stronger fields, the satellite particles can be completely pulled off, reversing the net charge on the cluster. With computer simulations, we investigate how charged particles distribute on an oppositely charged sphere to minimize their energy and compare the results with the solutions to the well-known Thomson problem. We also use the simulations to explore the dependence of such clusters on Debye screening length κ-1 and the ratio of charges on the particles, showing good agreement with experimental observations.

  12. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons–Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi–Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states.

  13. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-06-22

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons-Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi-Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states. PMID:27115342

  14. Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged colloids: Stability and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christdoss Pushpam, Sam David; Basavaraj, Madivala G.; Mani, Ethayaraja

    2015-11-01

    A binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids can be used to stabilize water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsions. A Monte Carlo simulation study to address the effect of charge ratio of colloids on the stability of Pickering emulsions is presented. The colloidal particles at the interface are modeled as aligned dipolar hard spheres, with attractive interaction between unlike-charged and repulsive interaction between like-charged particles. The optimum composition (fraction of positively charged particles) required for the stabilization corresponds to a minimum in the interaction energy per particle. In addition, for each charge ratio, there is a range of compositions where emulsions can be stabilized. The structural arrangement of particles or the pattern formation at the emulsion interface is strongly influenced by the charge ratio. We find well-mixed isotropic, square, and hexagonal arrangements of particles on the emulsion surface for different compositions at a given charge ratio. The distribution of coordination numbers is calculated to characterize structural features. The simulation study is useful for the rational design of Pickering emulsifications wherein oppositely charged colloids are used, and for the control of pattern formation that can be useful for the synthesis of colloidosomes and porous shells derived thereof.

  15. The Orbit of Water Droplets around Charged Rod

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferstl, Andrew; Burns, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The motion of charges around a centrally charged object is often compared to gravitational orbits (such as satellites around planets). Recently, a video taken by astronaut Don Pettit onboard the International Space Station shows water droplets orbiting a charged knitting needle. Here we attempt to model this motion and estimate the charges on the…

  16. The Orbit of Water Droplets Around Charged Rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferstl, Andrew; Burns, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    The motion of charges around a centrally charged object is often compared to gravitational orbits (such as satellites around planets). Recently, a video taken by astronaut Don Pettit onboard the International Space Station shows water droplets orbiting a charged knitting needle. Here we attempt to model this motion and estimate the charges on the objects involved in this system.

  17. Phase Behavior of Charged Colloids and the Effect of External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynninen, A.-P.

    2005-12-01

    Colloids are particles with a size in the nano- to micrometer range that are dispersed in a solvent, and that due to collisions from the solvent molecules, undergo Brownian motion. In most cases, the surface of the colloid acquires a net charge due to dissociation of chemical groups at the surface. In this thesis, we present results of computer simulations on the phase behavior of charged colloidal suspensions using various levels of description: Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, DLVO theory with effective many-body interactions, and the primitive model. We make two attempts to amend the DLVO theory to include many-body interactions: (i) density-dependent truncation and (ii) three-body interactions. In the case of three-body interactions, we find at low salt concentration a very broad coexistence between a fluid and a dense face-centered-cubic (fcc) phase, while at intermediate salt concentration a broad body-centered-cubic (bcc)-fcc coexistence regime appears. However, in our primitive model calculations, we did not find any broad coexistence regions or any other manifestations of three-body interactions. Thus, the effective Hamiltonian of charged colloids seems to be better described by the standard pairwise DLVO potential, than by a Hamiltonian including a density-dependent truncation or three-body interactions. We study the gas-liquid critical point of asymmetric electrolyte mixtures consisting of large multivalent macroions and small monovalent co- and counterions. The system can be seen as a binary mixture of colloids with their counterions and salt at strong electrostatic coupling. We calculate the critical point locus that connects the salt-free state consisting of macroions and counterions with the pure salt state. We calculate the ground-state phase diagram of a mixture of large and small (size ratio 0.31) oppositely charged colloids. The phase diagram displays novel structures, but also colloidal analogs of simple-salt structures and of

  18. Electrostatic Deformation of Liquid Surfaces by a Charged Rod and a Van De Graaff Generator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slisko, Josip; García-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Authors of physics textbooks frequently use the deflection of a thin, vertically falling water jet by a charged balloon, comb, or rod as a visually appealing and conceptually relevant example of electrostatic attraction. Nevertheless, no attempts are made to explore whether these charged bodies could cause visible deformation of a horizontal water…

  19. Surface treatment of silica nanoparticles for stable and charge-controlled colloidal silica

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Won-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Tae-il; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Paek, Seung-Min; Oh, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made to control the surface charge of colloidal silica nanoparticles with 20 nm and 100 nm diameters. Untreated silica nanoparticles were determined to be highly negatively charged and have stable hydrodynamic sizes in a wide pH range. To change the surface to a positively charged form, various coating agents, such as amine containing molecules, multivalent metal cation, or amino acids, were used to treat the colloidal silica nanoparticles. Molecules with chelating amine sites were determined to have high affinity with the silica surface to make agglomerations or gel-like networks. Amino acid coatings resulted in relatively stable silica colloids with a modified surface charge. Three amino acid moiety coatings (L-serine, L-histidine, and L-arginine) exhibited surface charge modifying efficacy of L-histidine > L-arginine > L-serine and hydrodynamic size preservation efficacy of L-serine > L-arginine > L-histidine. The time dependent change in L-arginine coated colloidal silica was investigated by measuring the pattern of the backscattered light in a Turbiscan™. The results indicated that both the 20 nm and 100 nm L-arginine coated silica samples were fairly stable in terms of colloidal homogeneity, showing only slight coalescence and sedimentation. PMID:25565824

  20. Electrostatic Deformation of Liquid Surfaces by a Charged Rod and a Van de Graaff Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slisko, Josip; García-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel

    2014-05-01

    Authors of physics textbooks frequently use the deflection of a thin, vertically falling water jet by a charged balloon, comb, or rod as a visually appealing and conceptually relevant example of electrostatic attraction. Nevertheless, no attempts are made to explore whether these charged bodies could cause visible deformation of a horizontal water surface. That being so, we were quite surprised when we discovered that a 19th-century French book10 contained a drawing showing an appreciable deformation of an oil surface caused by a charged rod. When we initially tried to recreate this electrostatics demonstration, we didn't succeed in reproducing the effect with a charged rod. Despite the initial unsuccessful try, we were not discouraged and we modified the demonstration a little bit, finding that it was possible to cause visible deformations of different liquid surfaces by using a Van de Graaff generator, as we will explain later.

  1. Simulation of electric double layers around charged colloids in aqueous solution of variable permittivity.

    PubMed

    Fahrenberger, Florian; Xu, Zhenli; Holm, Christian

    2014-08-14

    The ion distribution around charged colloids in solution has been investigated intensely during the last decade. However, few theoretical approaches have included the influence of variation in the dielectric permittivity within the system, let alone in the surrounding solvent. In this article, we introduce two relatively new methods that can solve the Poisson equation for systems with varying permittivity. The harmonic interpolation method approximately solves the Green's function in terms of a spherical harmonics series, and thus provides analytical ion-ion potentials for the Hamiltonian of charged systems. The Maxwell equations molecular dynamics algorithm features a local approach to electrostatics, allowing for arbitrary local changes of the dielectric constant. We show that the results of both methods are in very good agreement. We also found that the renormalized charge of the colloid, and with it the effective far field interaction, significantly changes if the dielectric properties within the vicinity of the colloid are changed. PMID:25134594

  2. Like-charge interactions between colloidal particles are asymmetric with respect to sign†

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Esther W.; Clack, Nathan G.; Wu, Hung-Jen; Groves, Jay T.

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional dispersions of colloidal particles with a range of surface chemistries and electrostatic potentials are characterized under a series of solution ionic strengths. A combination of optical imaging techniques are employed to monitor both the colloid structure and the electrostatic surface potential of individual particles in situ. We find that like-charge multiparticle interactions can be tuned from exclusively repulsive to long-range attractive by changing the particle surface composition. This behavior is strongly asymmetric with respect to the sign of the surface potential. Collective long-range attractive interactions are only observed among negatively charged particles. PMID:25221611

  3. Spatial configurations of charged rod-like particles in external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisina, I.; Lisin, E.; Vaulina, O.

    2016-03-01

    Formation of different spatial configurations for system of charged rod-like particles is considered theoretically and numerically, including formation of layered structures in the external electric field. Analytical model for a determination of the angle between the axis of a rod and the symmetry axis of electric trap is presented. New algorithm is proposed here for a dynamical simulation of many interacting non-spherical particles. Conditions for a correct replacement of the interaction between uniformly charged rods by the interaction of "bipoles" (i.e., by two similar point charges) are obtained. Study was performed in a wide range of parameters that are similar to conditions of laboratory experiments in a dusty plasma.

  4. Investigating forces between charged particles in the presence of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes with the multi-particle colloidal probe technique.

    PubMed

    Borkovec, Michal; Szilagyi, Istvan; Popa, Ionel; Finessi, Marco; Sinha, Prashant; Maroni, Plinio; Papastavrou, Georg

    2012-11-01

    Direct force measurements are used to obtain a comprehensive picture of interaction forces acting between charged colloidal particles in the presence of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. These measurements are achieved by the multi-particle colloidal probe technique based on the atomic force microscope (AFM). This novel extension of the classical colloidal probe technique offers three main advantages. First, the technique works in a colloidal suspension with a huge internal surface area of several square meters, which simplifies the precise dosing of the small amounts of the polyelectrolytes needed and makes this approach less sensitive to impurities. Second, the particles are attached in-situ within the fluid cell, which avoids the formation of nanobubbles on the latex particles used. Third, forces between two similar particles from the same batch are being measured, which allows an unambiguous determination of the surface potential due to the symmetry of the system. Based on such direct force measurements involving positively and negatively charged latex particles and different polyelectrolytes, we find the following forces to be relevant. Repulsive electrostatic double-layer forces and attractive van der Waals forces as described by the theory of Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) are both important in these systems, whereby the electrostatic forces dominate away from the isoelectric point (IEP), while at this point they vanish. Additional non-DLVO attractive forces are operational, and they have been identified to originate from the electrostatic interactions between the patch-charge heterogeneities of the adsorbed polyelectrolyte films. Highly charged polyelectrolytes induce strong patch-charge attractions, which become especially important at low ionic strengths and high molecular mass. More weakly charged polyelectrolytes seem to form more homogeneous films, whereby patch-charge attractions may become negligible. Individual bridging events

  5. Thermoreversible crystallization of charged colloids due to adsorption/desorption of ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Murakado, Ai; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Nagano, Ryota; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    We report that charged colloids exhibit thermoreversible crystallization via the adsorption of ionic surfactants onto particle surfaces. Due to the temperature dependence of the adsorption quantity, the colloids crystallized upon cooling and melted upon heating. To clarify the influences of surfactant adsorption on the crystallization, polystyrene (PS) particles dispersed in ethylene glycol (EG)/water mixtures were employed, enabling continuous tuning of the adsorption quantity by changing the EG concentration. The thermoreversible crystallization/melting behavior was found to be mainly attributable to changes in the ionic strength of the medium resulting from variation in the concentration of the non-adsorbed ionic surfactant molecules with temperature. We expect that the present findings will be useful for fine control of colloidal crystallization and the further study of colloidal crystallization in low permittivity media. PMID:26674236

  6. A common neighbor analysis of crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charged spherical colloids.

    PubMed

    Urrutia Bañuelos, Efraín; Contreras Aburto, Claudio; Maldonado Arce, Amir

    2016-03-01

    The topological analysis tool known as the common neighbor analysis (CNA) is used for the first time in this work to analyze crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. For this purpose, Brownian dynamics computer simulations are implemented to investigate the crystallization kinetics of homogeneously melted colloidal crystals that are composed of hard-core-screened-Coulomb interacting particles. The results are in agreement with recent static structure factor measurements that could indicate the presence of icosahedral units in the metastable melt, and with the fact that weakly screened charged colloids crystallize into body-centered-cubic (bcc) ordering. A two-step crystallization pathway is found, in which the population of bcc-subunit CNA-pairs satisfactorily obeys a Verhulst model. Moreover, the CNA helped to unveil that the excess entropy obeys a quasi-universal functional form, relating the behavior of colloidal, molecular, and metallic liquid systems. The work contributes to the scientific understanding of the crystallization pathway of charged colloids, and to the development of new ways to assess the degree of crystalline order, starting from the excess entropy. PMID:26957168

  7. A common neighbor analysis of crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charged spherical colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia Bañuelos, Efraín; Contreras Aburto, Claudio; Maldonado Arce, Amir

    2016-03-01

    The topological analysis tool known as the common neighbor analysis (CNA) is used for the first time in this work to analyze crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. For this purpose, Brownian dynamics computer simulations are implemented to investigate the crystallization kinetics of homogeneously melted colloidal crystals that are composed of hard-core-screened-Coulomb interacting particles. The results are in agreement with recent static structure factor measurements that could indicate the presence of icosahedral units in the metastable melt, and with the fact that weakly screened charged colloids crystallize into body-centered-cubic (bcc) ordering. A two-step crystallization pathway is found, in which the population of bcc-subunit CNA-pairs satisfactorily obeys a Verhulst model. Moreover, the CNA helped to unveil that the excess entropy obeys a quasi-universal functional form, relating the behavior of colloidal, molecular, and metallic liquid systems. The work contributes to the scientific understanding of the crystallization pathway of charged colloids, and to the development of new ways to assess the degree of crystalline order, starting from the excess entropy.

  8. Evaporation of sessile drops containing colloidal rods: coffee-ring and order-disorder transition.

    PubMed

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2015-03-01

    Liquid drops containing insoluble solutes when dried on solid substrates leave distinct ring-like deposits at the periphery or along the three-phase contact line-a phenomena popularly known as the coffee-ring or the coffee stain effect. The formation of such rings as well as their suppression is shown to have applications in particle separation and disease diagnostics. We present an experimental study of the evaporation of sessile drops containing silica rods to elucidate the structural arrangement of particles in the ring, an effect of the addition of surfactant and salt. To this end, the evaporation of aqueous sessile drops containing model rod-like silica particles of aspect ratio ranging from ∼4 to 15 on a glass slide is studied. We first show that when the conditions such as (1) solvent evaporation, (2) nonzero contact angle, (3) contact line pinning, (4) no surface tension gradient driven flow, and (5) repulsive particle-particle/particle-substrate interactions, that are necessary for the formation of the coffee-ring are met, the suspension drops containing silica rods upon evaporation leave a ring-like deposit. A closer examination of the ring deposits reveals that several layers of silica rods close to the edge of the drop are ordered such that the major axis of the rods are oriented parallel to the contact line. After the first few layers of ordered arrangement of particles, a random arrangement of particles in the drop interior is observed indicating an order-disorder transition in the ring. We monitor the evolution of the ring width and particle velocity during evaporation to elucidate the mechanism of the order-disorder transition. Moreover, when the evaporation rate is lowered, the ordering of silica rods is observed to extend over large areas. We demonstrate that the nature of the deposit can be tuned by the addition of a small quantity of surfactant or salt. PMID:25521279

  9. Phase behaviour of a dispersion of charge-stabilised colloidal spheres with added non-adsorbing interacting polymer chains.

    PubMed

    Gögelein, C; Tuinier, R

    2008-10-01

    We present a theory for the phase behaviour of mixtures of charge-stabilised colloidal spheres plus interacting polymer chains in good and theta -solvents within the framework of free-volume theory. We use simple but accurate combination rules for the depletion thickness around a colloidal particle and for the osmotic pressure up to the semi-dilute concentration regime. Hence, we obtain expressions for the free energy for mixtures of charged colloidal particles and non-adsorbing interacting polymers. From that, we calculate the phase behaviour, and discuss its topology in dependence on the competition between the charge-induced repulsion and the polymer-induced attraction. The homogeneous mixture of colloids and polymers becomes more stabilised against demixing when increasing the electrostatic repulsion. This charge-induced stabilisation is strongest for small polymer-to-colloid size ratios and is more pronounced for charged colloids mixed with polymers in a good solvent than for polymers in a theta -solvent. For the weakly charged regime we find that the phase diagram becomes salt-concentration-independent in the protein limit for charged colloids plus polymers in a theta -solvent. The liquid window, i.e., the concentration regimes where a colloidal liquid exists, is narrowed down upon increasing the charge-induced repulsion. Also this effect is more pronounced when charged colloids are mixed with polymer chains in a good solvent. In summary, we demonstrate that the solvent quality significantly influences the phase behaviour of mixtures of charged colloids plus non-adsorbing polymers if the range of the screened electrostatic repulsion becomes of the order of the range of the depletion-induced attraction. PMID:18791755

  10. Effect of three-body interactions on the phase behavior of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Hynninen, A-P; Dijkstra, M; van Roij, R

    2004-06-01

    We study numerically the effect of attractive triplet interactions on the phase behavior of suspensions of highly charged colloidal particles at low salinity. In our computer simulations, we employ the pair and triplet potentials that were obtained from a numerical Poisson-Boltzmann study [Phys. Rev. E 66, 011402 (2002)

  11. Dumping topological charges on neighbors: ice manifolds for colloids and vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. It has been found experimentally and numerically that both colloids and vortices exhibit ice or quasi-ice manifolds. However, the frustration of colloids and vortices differs essentially from spin ice at the vertex level. We show that the effective vertex energetics of the colloidal/vortex systems is made identical to that of spin ice materials by the contribution of an emergent field associated to the topological charge of the vertex. The similarity extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, where the effect of geometric hard constraints can be subsumed into the spatial modulation of the emergent field, which mediates an entropic interaction between topological charges. There, as in spin ice materials, genuine ice manifolds enter a Coulomb phase, whereas quasi-ice manifolds posses a well defined screening length, provided by a plasma of embedded topological charges. We also show that such similarities break down in lattices of mixed coordination because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices. This opens interesting perspective for extensions beyond physics, to social and economical networks.

  12. Anion-Dependent Aggregate Formation and Charge Behavior of Colloidal Fullerenes (n-C60)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate and transport of colloidal fullerenes (n-C60) in the environment is likely to be guided by electrokinetic and aggregation behavior. In natural water bodies inorganic ions exert significant effects in determining the size and charge of n-C60 nanoparticles. Although the ef...

  13. Mixtures of charged colloid and neutral polymer: influence of electrostatic interactions on demixing and interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Denton, Alan R; Schmidt, Matthias

    2005-06-22

    The equilibrium phase behavior of a binary mixture of charged colloids and neutral, nonadsorbing polymers is studied within free-volume theory. A model mixture of charged hard-sphere macroions and ideal, coarse-grained, effective-sphere polymers is mapped first onto a binary hard-sphere mixture with nonadditive diameters and then onto an effective Asakura-Oosawa model [S. Asakura and F. Oosawa, J. Chem. Phys. 22, 1255 (1954)]. The effective model is defined by a single dimensionless parameter-the ratio of the polymer diameter to the effective colloid diameter. For high salt-to-counterion concentration ratios, a free-volume approximation for the free energy is used to compute the fluid phase diagram, which describes demixing into colloid-rich (liquid) and colloid-poor (vapor) phases. Increasing the range of electrostatic interactions shifts the demixing binodal toward higher polymer concentration, stabilizing the mixture. The enhanced stability is attributed to a weakening of polymer depletion-induced attraction between electrostatically repelling macroions. Comparison with predictions of density-functional theory reveals a corresponding increase in the liquid-vapor interfacial tension. The predicted trends in phase stability are consistent with observed behavior of protein-polysaccharide mixtures in food colloids. PMID:16035820

  14. Surface charges and optical characteristic of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with an average diameter of 4.4 nm have been fabricated by anisotropic wet chemical etching of microsized cubic SiC powder. Fourier transform infrared spectra show that these cubic SiC nanocrystals contain carboxylic acid, SiH, CH, and CHx groups. UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy clearly indicate that water and ethanol colloidal suspensions of the as-fabricated colloidal samples exhibit strong and above band gap blue and blue-green emissions. The cubic SiC nanocrystals show different surface charges in water and ethanol solutions due to the interaction of water molecules with polar Si-terminated surfaces of cubic SiC nanocrystals. The results explain the distinctive optical characteristics of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals in water and ethanol, and reveal that quantum confinement and surface charges play a great role in determining the optical characteristics of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals. PMID:21762496

  15. Surface charges and optical characteristic of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Chen, Changxin; Li, Jiang-Tao; Yang, Yun; Lin, Zhi-Ming

    2011-07-01

    Colloidal cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with an average diameter of 4.4 nm have been fabricated by anisotropic wet chemical etching of microsized cubic SiC powder. Fourier transform infrared spectra show that these cubic SiC nanocrystals contain carboxylic acid, SiH, CH, and CHx groups. UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy clearly indicate that water and ethanol colloidal suspensions of the as-fabricated colloidal samples exhibit strong and above band gap blue and blue-green emissions. The cubic SiC nanocrystals show different surface charges in water and ethanol solutions due to the interaction of water molecules with polar Si-terminated surfaces of cubic SiC nanocrystals. The results explain the distinctive optical characteristics of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals in water and ethanol, and reveal that quantum confinement and surface charges play a great role in determining the optical characteristics of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals.

  16. Liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase separation and flocculation for a charged colloidal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Lai, S K; Wu, K L

    2002-10-01

    We model the intercolloidal interaction by a hard-sphere Yukawa repulsion to which is added the long-range van der Waals attraction. In comparison with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek repulsion, the Yukawa repulsion explicitly incorporates the spatial correlations between colloids and small ions. As a result, the repulsive part can be expressed analytically and has a coupling strength depending on the colloidal volume fraction. By use of this two-body potential of mean force and in conjunction with a second-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, we construct the colloidal Helmholtz free energy and use it to calculate the thermodynamic quantities, pressure and chemical potential, needed in the determination of the liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase diagrams. We examine, in an aqueous charged colloidal dispersion, the effects of the Hamaker constant and particle size on the conformation of a stable liquid-liquid phase transition calculated with respect to the liquid-solid coexistence phases. We find that there exists a threshold Hamaker constant or particle size whose value demarcates the stable liquid-liquid coexistence phases from their metastable counterparts. Applying the same technique and using the energetic criterion, we extend our calculations to study the flocculation phenomenon in aqueous charged colloids. Here, we pay due attention to determining the loci of a stability curve stipulated for a given temperature T0, and obtain the parametric phase diagram of the Hamaker constant vs the coupling strength or, at given surface potential, the particle size. By imposing T0 to be the critical temperature T(c), i.e., setting k(B)T0 (=k(B)T(c)) equal to a reasonable potential barrier, we arrive at the stability curve that marks the irreversible/reversible phase transition. The interesting result is that there occurs a minimum size for the colloidal particles below (above) which the colloidal dispersion is driven to an irreversible (reversible) phase

  17. Recrystallization and zone melting of charged colloids by thermally induced crystallization.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Mariko; Toyotama, Akiko; Suzuki, Misaki; Sugao, Yukihiro; Okuzono, Tohru; Uchida, Fumio; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2013-08-01

    We examined the application of recrystallization and zone-melting crystallization methods, which have been used widely to fabricate large, high-purity crystals of atomic and molecular systems, to charged colloidal crystals. Our samples were aqueous dispersions of colloidal silica (with particle diameters of d = 108 or 121 nm and particle volume fractions of ϕ = 0.035-0.05) containing the weak base pyridine. The samples crystallized upon heating because of increases in the particle charge numbers, and they melted reversibly on cooling. During the recrystallization experiments, the polycrystalline colloids were partially melted in a Peltier cooling device and then were crystallized by stopping the cooling and allowing the system to return to ambient temperature. The zone-melting crystallization was carried out by melting a narrow zone (millimeter-sized in width) of the polycrystalline colloid samples and then moving the sample slowly over a cooling device to recrystallize the molten region. Using both methods, we fabricated a few centimeter-sized crystals, starting from millimeter-sized original polycrystals when the crystallization rates were sufficiently slow (33 μm/s). Furthermore, the optical quality of the colloidal crystals, such as the half-band widths of the diffraction peaks, was significantly improved. These methods were also useful for refining. Small amounts of impurity particles (fluorescent polystyrene particles, d = 333 nm, ϕ = 5 × 10(-5)), added to the colloidal crystals, were excluded from the crystals when the crystallization rates were sufficiently slow (∼0.1 μm/s). We expect that the present findings will be useful for fabricating large, high-purity colloidal crystals. PMID:23841755

  18. Modified Mason number for charged paramagnetic colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Di; Hilou, Elaa; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of magnetorheological fluids have typically been described by the Mason number, a governing parameter defined as the ratio between viscous and magnetic forces in the fluid. For most experimental suspensions of magnetic particles, surface forces, such as steric and electrostatic interactions, can significantly influence the dynamics. Here we propose a theory of a modified Mason number that accounts for surface forces and show that this modified Mason number is a function of interparticle distance. We demonstrate that this modified Mason number is accurate in describing the dynamics of a rotating pair of paramagnetic colloids of identical or mismatched sizes in either high or low salt solutions. The modified Mason number is confirmed to be pseudoconstant for particle pairs and particle chains undergoing a stable-metastable transition during rotation. The interparticle distance term can be calculated using theory or can be measured experimentally. This modified Mason number is more applicable to magnetorheological systems where surface forces are not negligible.

  19. Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on the stability of dispersions of weakly charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Herman, David; Walz, John Y

    2015-05-01

    The stability behavior of dispersions of weakly charged silica colloids was studied in the presence of highly charged metal oxide nanoparticles. Experiments were performed using 5 nm zirconia as well as 10 nm alumina nanoparticles (both positively charged), which were added to 0.1 vol % suspensions of 1.0 μm silica microparticles at the silica IEP. Both types of nanoparticles provided effective stabilization of the silica; i.e., the silica suspensions were stabilized for longer than the observation period (greater than 12 h). Stability was observed at zirconia concentrations as low as 10(-4) vol % and at an alumina concentration of 10(-2) vol %. The nanoparticles adsorbed onto the microparticle surfaces (confirmed via SEM imaging), which increased the zeta-potential of the silica. Force profile measurements performed with colloidal probe atomic force microscopy showed that the adsorption was effectively irreversible. PMID:25860256

  20. Anharmonic and screening corrections to the melting of a two-dimensional charged colloidal crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Enson; Hone, Daniel W.

    1988-01-01

    The Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young theory of melting is applied to a two-dimensional charged colloidal crystal. The renormalization of elastic constants due to anharmonic and dislocation pair-screening effects is calculated. For colloidal spheres ('polyballs') suspended in a thin film of water confined between two glass plates whose surfaces are highly charged, as in recent experimental configurations, the corrections to the harmonic results simply require an altered effective polyball charge to reproduce virtually the identical melting curve of the harmonic approximation (which agrees well with experiment). The effect on the melting curve of added salt is also calculated; the corresponding experiments have yet to be performed. For a film between uncharged surfaces the anharmonic correction again softens the lattice significantly. Dislocation pair screening causes an additional but minor reduction of the elastic constants. Neither correction eliminates a nonmelting behavior characteristic of the two-dimensional screened Coulomb system in this configuration.

  1. Thermodiffusion in positively charged magnetic colloids: influence of the particle diameter.

    PubMed

    Sehnem, A L; Aquino, R; Campos, A F C; Tourinho, F A; Depeyrot, J; Figueiredo Neto, A M

    2014-03-01

    The Soret coefficient (ST) of positively charged magnetic colloids was measured as a function of the nanoparticles' diameter. The Z-scan technique and the generalization of the thermal lens model proved to be a reliable technique to measure ST. We show that ST is negative and increases with the particle's diameter, being best described by a functional dependence of the type ST∝d0. Potentiometric and conductometric experiments show that the particle's surface charge decreases as the temperature increases, changing the electrostatic interaction between the nanoparticles. The temperature gradient imposed in the ferrofluid by the Gaussian laser beam leads to the formation of the particle's concentration gradient. The origin of this phenomenon is discussed in terms of the decrease of the particle's surface charge in the hottest region of the sample and the thermoelectric field due to the inhomogeneous distribution of hydrogenous ions present in the colloidal suspension. PMID:24730843

  2. Charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Xing, Xiaochen; Li, Ye; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2014-05-01

    The physical behavior of solid colloids trapped at a fluid-fluid interface remains in itself an open fundamental issue. Here, we show that the gradients of surface tension can induce particles to jet towards the oil/water interface with velocities as high as ~ 60 mm/s when particle suspensions come in contact with the interface. We hypothesize that rubbing between the particles and oil lead to the spontaneous accumulation of negative charges on the hemisphere of those interfacial particles that contact the oil phase by means of triboelectrification. The charging process is highly dependent on the sliding distances, and gives rise to long-ranged repulsions that protect interfacial particles from coagulating at the interface by the presence of electrolyte. These triboelectric charges, however, are compensated within several hours, which affect the stability of interfacial particles. Importantly, by charging different kinds of colloidal particles using various spreading solvents and dispersion methods, we have demonstrated that charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces impacts a broad range of dynamical behavior.

  3. Charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Xing, XiaoChen; Li, Ye; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2014-01-01

    The physical behavior of solid colloids trapped at a fluid-fluid interface remains in itself an open fundamental issue. Here, we show that the gradients of surface tension can induce particles to jet towards the oil/water interface with velocities as high as ≈ 60 mm/s when particle suspensions come in contact with the interface. We hypothesize that rubbing between the particles and oil lead to the spontaneous accumulation of negative charges on the hemisphere of those interfacial particles that contact the oil phase by means of triboelectrification. The charging process is highly dependent on the sliding distances, and gives rise to long-ranged repulsions that protect interfacial particles from coagulating at the interface by the presence of electrolyte. These triboelectric charges, however, are compensated within several hours, which affect the stability of interfacial particles. Importantly, by charging different kinds of colloidal particles using various spreading solvents and dispersion methods, we have demonstrated that charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces impacts a broad range of dynamical behavior. PMID:24786477

  4. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals.

  5. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction.

    PubMed

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals. PMID:26984298

  6. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    PubMed Central

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals. PMID:26984298

  7. Temporary Charge Carrier Separation Dominates the Photoluminescence Decay Dynamics of Colloidal CdSe Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Rabouw, Freddy T; van der Bok, Johanna C; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Mahler, Benoît; Nasilowski, Michel; Pedetti, Silvia; Dubertret, Benoît; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël

    2016-03-01

    Luminescent colloidal CdSe nanoplatelets with atomically defined thicknesses have recently been developed, and their potential for various applications has been shown. To understand their special properties, experiments have until now focused on the relatively short time scales of at most a few nanoseconds. Here, we measure the photoluminescence decay dynamics of colloidal nanoplatelets on time scales up to tens of microseconds. The excited state dynamics are found to be dominated by the slow (∼μs) dynamics of temporary exciton storage in a charge-separated state, previously overlooked. We study the processes of charge carrier separation and exciton recovery in pure CdSe nanoplatelets as well as in core-crown and core-shell CdSe/CdS nanoplatelets with high ensemble quantum yields of 50%, and discuss the implications. Our work highlights the importance of reversible charge carrier trapping and experiments over a wide range of time scales for the understanding of colloidal nanoemitters in general and nanoplatelets in particular. PMID:26863992

  8. Transport of colloidal silica in unsaturated sand: Effect of charging properties of sand and silica particles.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Motoyoshi

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the transport of colloidal silica in various degrees of a water-saturated Toyoura sand column, because silica particles are widely used as catalyst carriers and abrasive agents, and their toxicity is reported recently. Since water-silica, water-sand, and air-water interfaces have pH-dependent negative charges, the magnitude of surface charge was controlled by changing the solution pH. The results show that, at high pH conditions (pH 7.4), the deposition of colloidal silica to the sand surface is interrupted and the silica concentration at the column outlet immediately reaches the input concentration in saturated conditions. In addition, the relative concentration of silica at the column outlet only slightly decreases to 0.9 with decreasing degrees of water saturation to 38%, because silica particles are trapped in straining regions in the soil pore and air-water interface. On the other hand, at pH 5 conditions (low pH), where sand and colloid have less charge, reduced repulsive forces result in colloidal silica attaching onto the sand in saturated conditions. The deposition amount of silica particles remarkably increases with decreasing degrees of water saturation to 37%, which is explained by more particles being retained in the sand column associated with the air-water interface. In conclusion, at higher pH, the mobility of silica particles is high, and the air-water interface is inactive for the deposition of silica. On the other hand, at low pH, the deposition amount increases with decreasing water saturation, and the particle transport is inhibited. PMID:27045635

  9. Asymmetrical phase separation and gelation in binary mixtures of oppositely charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Yiwu; Yuan, Guangcui; Han, Charles C.

    2016-07-01

    Two types of colloidal particles, which are nearly the same in chemical composition but carry opposite surface charges, are mixed in water. Depending on the relative proportion of the oppositely charged particles, the process of aggregation leads to the formation of discrete clusters of various sizes in dilute dispersions, and to the development of particle gel networks in more concentrated systems. Due to the significant difference in the absolute values of surface charges (negative particle: -48 mV, positive particle: +24 mV), the phase separation and the gelation behaviors are asymmetric with respect to the mixing ratio. Mixtures with excess negative particles are more stable, while mixtures with excess positive particles are easily affected by phase separation. The hetero-aggregation triggered by the addition of microscopically large macro-ions is similar to what is often observed in a mono-component charged colloidal system, i.e., phase separation occurs through addition of small electrolyte ions. Within the concentration region investigated here, it is clear that the gel line is buried inside the phase separation region. Gelation occurs only when the number and size of the clusters are large and big enough to connect up into a space-spanning network. Our results indicate that, in this binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids, although the interaction between unlike species is attractive and that between like species is repulsive, the onset of gelation is in fact governed by the equilibrium phase separation, as in the case of purely attractive systems with short-range isotropic interaction.

  10. Lattice-Boltzmann method for the simulation of transport phenomena in charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Horbach, J; Frenkel, D

    2001-12-01

    We present a simulation scheme based on the lattice-Boltzmann method to simulate the dynamics of charged colloids in an electrolyte. In our model we describe the electrostatics on the level of a Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamics of the fluid by the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. We verify our simulation scheme by means of a Chapman-Enskog expansion. Our method is applied to the calculation of the reduced sedimentation velocity U/U(0) for a cubic array of charged spheres in an electrolyte. We show that we recover the analytical solution first derived by Booth [F. Booth, J. Chem. Phys. 22, 1956 (1954)] for a weakly charged, isolated sphere in an unbounded electrolyte. The present method makes it possible to go beyond the Booth theory, and we discuss the dependence of the sedimentation velocity on the charge of the spheres. Finally we compare our results to experimental data. PMID:11736191

  11. Weakly nonlinear electrophoresis of a highly charged colloidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Zeyde, Roman; Yavneh, Irad; Yariv, Ehud

    2013-05-01

    At large zeta potentials, surface conduction becomes appreciable in thin-double-layer electrokinetic transport. In the linear weak-field regime, where this effect is quantified by the Dukhin number, it is manifested in non-Smoluchowski electrophoretic mobilities. In this paper we go beyond linear response, employing the recently derived macroscale model of Schnitzer and Yariv ["Macroscale description of electrokinetic flows at large zeta potentials: Nonlinear surface conduction," Phys. Rev. E 86, 021503 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.021503] as the infrastructure for a weakly nonlinear analysis of spherical-particle electrophoresis. A straightforward perturbation in the field strength is frustrated by the failure to satisfy the far-field conditions, representing a non-uniformity of the weak-field approximation at large distances away from the particle, where salt advection becomes comparable to diffusion. This is remedied using inner-outer asymptotic expansions in the spirit of Acrivos and Taylor ["Heat and mass transfer from single spheres in Stokes flow," Phys. Fluids 5, 387 (1962), 10.1063/1.1706630], with the inner region representing the particle neighborhood and the outer region corresponding to distances scaling inversely with the field magnitude. This singular scheme furnishes an asymptotic correction to the electrophoretic velocity, proportional to the applied field cubed, which embodies a host of nonlinear mechanisms unfamiliar from linear electrokinetic theories. These include the effect of induced zeta-potential inhomogeneity, animated by concentration polarization, on electro-osmosis and diffuso-osmosis; bulk advection of salt; nonuniform bulk conductivity; Coulomb body forces acting on bulk volumetric charge; and the nonzero electrostatic force exerted upon the otherwise screened particle-layer system. A numerical solution of the macroscale model validates our weakly nonlinear analysis.

  12. Particle Segregation at Contact Lines of Evaporating Colloidal Drops: Influence of the Substrate Wettability and Particle Charge-Mass Ratio.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Marín, Diego; Moraila-Martínez, Carmen L; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A

    2015-06-23

    Segregation of particles during capillary/convective self-assembly is interesting for self-stratification in colloidal deposits. In evaporating drops containing colloidal particles, the wettability properties of substrate and the sedimentation of particles can affect their accumulation at contact lines. In this work we studied the size segregation and discrimination of charged particles with different densities. We performed in-plane particle counting at evaporating triple lines by using fluorescence confocal microscopy. We studied separately substrates with very different wettability properties and particles with different charge-mass ratios at low ionic strength. We used binary colloidal suspensions to compare simultaneously the deposition of two different particles. The particle deposition rate strongly depends on the receding contact angle of the substrate. We further observed a singular behavior of charged polystyrene particles in binary mixtures under "salt-free" conditions explained by the "colloidal Brazil nut" effect. PMID:26000909

  13. Charge effects and nanoparticle pattern formation in electrohydrodynamic NanoDrip printing of colloids.

    PubMed

    Richner, Patrizia; Kress, Stephan J P; Norris, David J; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-03-21

    Advancing open atmosphere printing technologies to produce features in the nanoscale range has important and broad applications ranging from electronics to photonics, plasmonics and biology. Recently an electrohydrodynamic printing regime has been demonstrated in a rapid dripping mode (termed NanoDrip), where the ejected colloidal droplets from nozzles of diameters of O (1 μm) can controllably reach sizes an order of magnitude smaller than the nozzle and can generate planar and out-of-plane structures of similar sizes. Despite the demonstrated capabilities, our fundamental understanding of important aspects of the physics of NanoDrip printing needs further improvement. Here we address the topics of charge content and transport in NanoDrip printing. We employ quantum dot and gold nanoparticle dispersions in combination with a specially designed, auxiliary, asymmetric electric field, targeting the understanding of charge locality (particles vs. solvent) and particle distribution in the deposits as indicated by the dried nanoparticle patterns (footprints) on the substrate. We show that droplets of alternating charge can be spatially separated when applying an ac field to the nozzle. The nanoparticles within a droplet are distributed asymmetrically under the influence of the auxiliary lateral electric field, indicating that they are the main carriers. We also show that the ligand length of the nanoparticles in the colloid affects their mobility after deposition (in the sessile droplet state). PMID:26928324

  14. Surface vibrational structure of colloidal silica and its direct correlation with surface charge density.

    PubMed

    Lagström, Tove; Gmür, Tobias A; Quaroni, Luca; Goel, Alok; Brown, Matthew A

    2015-03-31

    We show that attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy can be used to determine the surface charge density (SCD) of colloidal silica nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution. We identify the Si-O stretch vibrations of neutral surface bound silanol, ≡Si-OH, and of the deprotonated group, ≡Si-O(-). The position of the Si-(OH) stretch vibration is shown to directly correlate with the NPs SCD as determined by traditional potentiometric titrations, shifting to lower wavenumber (cm(-1)) with increasing density of ≡Si-O(-). The origin of this shift is discussed in terms of inductive effects that reduce the ionic character of the Si-(OH) bond after delocalization of the negative charge left on a terminal ≡Si-O(-) group across the atoms within ∼1 nm of the charged site. Using this new methodology, we quantitatively determine the SCD of 9, 14, and 25 nm diameter colloidal silica in varying concentrations of NaCl electrolyte at different bulk pH. This novel spectroscopic approach to investigate SCDs provides several opportunities for in situ coupling, for example, in microfluidic channels or with liquid microjets, and requires only very little sample—all potential advantages over a traditional potentiometric titration. PMID:25761506

  15. Polymer depletion-driven cluster aggregation and initial phase separation in charged nanosized colloids.

    PubMed

    Gögelein, Christoph; Nägele, Gerhard; Buitenhuis, Johan; Tuinier, Remco; Dhont, Jan K G

    2009-05-28

    We study polymer depletion-driven cluster aggregation and initial phase separation in aqueous dispersions of charge-stabilized silica spheres, where the ionic strength and polymer (dextran) concentration are systematically varied, using dynamic light scattering and visual observation. Without polymers and for increasing salt and colloid content, the dispersions become increasingly unstable against irreversible cluster formation. By adding nonadsorbing polymers, a depletion-driven attraction is induced, which lowers the stabilizing Coulomb barrier and enhances the cluster growth rate. The initial growth rate increases with increasing polymer concentration and decreases with increasing polymer molar mass. These observations can be quantitatively understood by an irreversible dimer formation theory based on the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek pair potential, with the depletion attraction modeled by the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij potential. At low colloid concentration, we observe an exponential cluster growth rate for all polymer concentrations considered, indicating a reaction-limited aggregation mechanism. At sufficiently high polymer and colloid concentrations, and lower salt content, a gas-liquidlike demixing is observed initially. Later on, the system separates into a gel and fluidlike phase. The experimental time-dependent state diagram is compared to the theoretical equilibrium phase diagram obtained from a generalized free-volume theory and is discussed in terms of an initial reversible phase separation process in combination with irreversible aggregation at later times. PMID:19485479

  16. Interactions between colloidal particles in the presence of an ultrahighly charged amphiphilic polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Yu, Danfeng; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hui; Cui, Yingxian; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jinben

    2014-12-01

    A novel amphiphilic polyelectrolyte denoted as PAGC8 and a traditional amphiphilic polyelectrolyte denoted as PASC8 were prepared. PAGC8 consisted of gemini-type surfactant segment based on 1,3-bis (N,N-dimethyl-N-octylammonium)-2-propyl acrylate dibromide, while PASC8 incorporated acryloyloxyethyl-N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecylammonium bromide as single chain surfactant units within its repeat unit structure. Turbidity, stability, and zeta potential measurements were performed in the presence of PAGC8 and PASC8, respectively, to evaluate their effectiveness in inducing solid/liquid separations. It was found that the maximum transmittance was observed before the zeta potential values reached the isoelectric point, implying that not only charge neutralization but also charge-patch mechanism contributed to the separation process. Colloid probe atomic force microscopy technique was introduced to directly determine the interactions between surfaces in the presence of ultrahighly charged amphiphilic polyelectrolyte. On the basis of the AFM results, we have successfully interpreted the influence of the charge density of the polyelectrolytes on the phase stability. Electrostatic interaction played the dominant role in the flocculation processes, although both electrostatic interaction and hydrophobic effect provided contributions to the colloidal dispersions. The attractions upon surfaces approach in the case of PAGC8 were significantly larger than that of PASC8 due to the higher charge density. The strong peeling events upon retraction in the presence of PAGC8 implied that the hydrophobic effect was stronger than that of PASC8, which displayed the loose pulling events. A strong attraction was identified at shorter separation distances for both systems. However, these interactions cannot be successfully described by the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory of colloid stability due to the participation of charge-patch and strong hydrophobic effect. To account for the

  17. Effect of laundry surfactants on surface charge and colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, Sara; Lowe, Troy A; Hedberg, Jonas; Blomberg, Eva; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall; Wold, Susanna; Lundin, Maria

    2013-07-16

    The stability of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) potentially released from clothing during a laundry cycle and their interactions with laundry-relevant surfactants [anionic (LAS), cationic (DTAC), and nonionic (Berol)] have been investigated. Surface interactions between Ag NPs and surfactants influence their speciation and stability. In the absence of surfactants as well as in the presence of LAS, the negatively charged Ag NPs were stable in solution for more than 1 day. At low DTAC concentrations (≤1 mM), DTAC-Ag NP interactions resulted in charge neutralization and formation of agglomerates. The surface charge of the particles became positive at higher concentrations due to a bilayer type formation of DTAC that prevents from agglomeration due to repulsive electrostatic forces between the positively charged colloids. The adsorption of Berol was enhanced when above its critical micelle concentration (cmc). This resulted in a surface charge close to zero and subsequent agglomeration. Extended DLVO theory calculations were in compliance with observed findings. The stability of the Ag NPs was shown to depend on the charge and concentration of the adsorbed surfactants. Such knowledge is important as it may influence the subsequent transport of Ag NPs through different chemical transients and thus their potential bioavailability and toxicity. PMID:23758058

  18. Effect of alkyl functionalization on charging of colloidal silica in apolar media.

    PubMed

    Poovarodom, Saran; Poovarodom, Sathin; Berg, John C

    2010-11-15

    The present work examines the effect of alkyl-silane treatment on the charging of colloids in apolar solvent using two otherwise identical 250 nm diameter, spherical silica particles, one with untreated surface and the other treated with hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (C16), dispersed in an apolar isoparaffin solvent (Isopar-L) containing one of three oil-soluble surfactants: Aerosol-OT, OLOA 11,000, and zirconyl 2-ethyl hexanoate. The electrophoretic mobility of each dispersion was determined using phase angle light scattering (PALS). It was found that at sufficiently high surfactant concentration, i.e., where micelles begin to form in the bulk, the particle surfaces could be electrically charged. All three surfactants studied imparted a negative surface charge to the untreated silica particles. In all cases, the C16-treated particles were also found to be negatively charged but had a much higher magnitude of mobility than the untreated silica. Although the increase in magnitude of mobility as a result of the alkyl functionalization was surprising, it could be attributed to the increase in the number of surface hydroxyl groups arising from the hydrolysis of unbound methoxy groups of the silane molecules. The added hydroxyl groups provided additional potential acid-base interaction sites, resulting in higher particle mobility. It was also found that further increases in surfactant concentration lowered the particle mobility, attributed to the increasing concentration of electrically charged micelles, which may partially neutralize the surface charge or compress the electrical double layer. PMID:20728088

  19. Interaction between randomly charged rods and plates: Energy landscapes, stick slip, and recognition at a distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyukov, Sergei; Rabin, Yitzhak

    1997-12-01

    We study the interaction between randomly, irreversibly charged objects. We consider arbitrary relative displacements of two parallel rigid rods and of two parallel rigid plates, and calculate the statistical properties of the resulting energy landscape, such as the distribution of the energies of potential minima and maxima, the depth, the radia of curvature, and the width and density of typical energy wells, as functions of the separation between the objects and of the Debye screening length. We show that this complicated energy landscape may lead to stick-slip phenomena during relative displacement of the plates. We study the case of perfectly correlated charge distributions on the two objects, and show that the presence of long range forces may lead to prealignment of the objects, even before contact. The relevance of our results to interacting biological systems and to pattern recognition is discussed.

  20. Drude-type conductivity of charged sphere colloidal crystals: density and temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Medebach, Martin; Jordán, Raquel Chuliá; Reiber, Holger; Schöpe, Hans-Joachim; Biehl, Ralf; Evers, Martin; Hessinger, Dirk; Olah, Julianna; Palberg, Thomas; Schönberger, Ernest; Wette, Patrick

    2005-09-01

    We report on extensive measurements in the low-frequency limit of the ac conductivity of colloidal fluids and crystals formed from charged colloidal spheres suspended in de-ionized water. Temperature was varied in a range of 5 degrees C < Theta < 35 degrees C and the particle number density n between 0.2 and 25 microm(-3) for the larger, respectively, 2.75 and 210 microm(-3) for the smaller of two investigated species. At fixed Theta the conductivity increased linearly with increasing n without any significant change at the fluid-solid phase boundary. At fixed n it increased with increasing Theta and the increase was more pronounced for larger n. Lacking a rigorous electrohydrodynamic treatment for counterion-dominated systems we describe our data with a simple model relating to Drude's theory of metal conductivity. The key parameter is an effectively transported particle charge or valence Z(*). All temperature dependencies other than that of Z(*) were taken from literature. Within experimental resolution Z(*) was found to be independent of n irrespective of the suspension structure. Interestingly, Z(*) decreases with temperature in near quantitative agreement with numerical calculations. PMID:16178620

  1. Particle size, charge and colloidal stability of humic acids coprecipitated with Ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Angelico, Ruggero; Ceglie, Andrea; He, Ji-Zheng; Liu, Yu-Rong; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Colombo, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    Humic acids (HA) have a colloidal character whose size and negative charge are strictly dependent on surface functional groups. They are able to complex large amount of poorly ordered iron (hydr)oxides in soil as a function of pH and other environmental conditions. Accordingly, with the present study we intend to assess the colloidal properties of Fe(II) coprecipitated with humic acids (HA) and their effect on Fe hydroxide crystallinity under abiotic oxidation and order of addition of both Fe(II) and HA. TEM, XRD and DRS experiments showed that Fe-HA consisted of Ferrihydrite with important structural variations. DLS data of Fe-HA at acidic pH showed a bimodal size distribution, while at very low pH a slow aggregation process was observed. Electrophoretic zeta-potential measurements revealed a negative surface charge for Fe-HA macromolecules, providing a strong electrostatic barrier against aggregation. Under alkaline conditions HA chains swelled, which resulted in an enhanced stabilization of the colloid particles. The increasing of zeta potential and size of the Fe-HA macromolecules, reflects a linear dependence of both with pH. The increase in the size and negative charge of the Fe-HA precipitate seems to be more affected by the ionization of the phenolic acid groups, than by the carboxylic acid groups. The main cause of negative charge generation of Fe/HA is due to increased dissociation of phenolic groups in more expanded structure. The increased net negative surface potential induced by coprecipitation with Ferrihydrite and the correspondent changes in configuration of the HA could trigger the inter-particle aggregation with the formation of new negative surface. The Fe-HA coprecipitation can reduce electrosteric repulsive forces, which in turn may inhibit the aggregation process at different pH. Therefore, coprecipitation of Ferrihydrite would be expected to play an important role in the carbon stabilization and persistence not only in organic soils, but

  2. Adsorption and stabilizing effects of highly-charged latex nanoparticles in dispersions of weakly-charged silica colloids.

    PubMed

    Herman, David; Walz, John Y

    2015-07-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of using highly-charged nanoparticles as stabilizers for colloidal dispersions. The specific systems used here involved cationic (amidine) and anionic (sulfate) polystyrene latex nanoparticles with an approximate diameter of 20 nm and silica microparticles of diameter 1.0 μm, and experiments were conducted at the isoelectric point of the silica. It was found that while both types of nanoparticles adsorbed to the silica microparticles and increased the zeta potential to values where stability was expected, long term stability was not achieved, even at bulk nanoparticle concentrations as high as 0.5 vol.%. It is theorized that the incomplete coverage of the microparticles by the nanoparticles (i.e., surface coverage never exceeded 50%) allowed either direct contact between bare patches of the underlying microparticles or, alternatively, for nanoparticles adsorbed on one microparticle to bridge to bare spots on a neighboring microparticle. PMID:25498877

  3. Coupled effect of pH and porous media type on transport and deposition of variably-charged soil colloids in saturated sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Kawamoto, K.; Moldrup, P.; de Jonge, L. W.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding colloid transport and deposition in subsurface is essential for predicting colloid-associated contaminant transport and developing effective remedial strategies. Compared to numerous studies using model colloids and model porous media, limited studies have been conducted with natural soil-colloids and porous media. This study investigated transport and deposition of suspended soil-colloids with diameter less than 1 μm extracted from a volcanic ash-soil (VAS colloids) from Nishi-Tokyo, Japan and a red-yellow soil (RYS colloids) from Okinawa, Japan. The extracted soil colloids were applied to 10-cm long saturated sand columns repacked with either Narita sand (mean diameter = 0.64 mm) or Toyoura sand (mean diameter = 0.21 mm) at different flow rates, input concentrations and pH conditions. The pH was adjusted using 0.1 M HCl and 0.01 M NaBr was used as a conservative tracer. Colloid transport and deposition were studied by analyzing colloid effluent concentration breakthrough curves, corresponding deposition profiles and particle size distributions. Based on zeta potential measurements, VAS colloids and Toyoura sand were characterized as pH-dependent surface charge dominant whereas, RYS colloids and Narita sand were categorized as less pH-dependent surface charge dominant colloids and porous media. The results of column studies indicated that decreasing pH decreased the colloid breakthrough curves and increased the deposition of colloids through both porous media. The effect of pH was more significant for VAS colloids than for RYS colloids and for Toyoura sand than for Narita sand, mainly attributed to the pH-dependent surface charge characteristics of VAS colloids and Toyoura sand. The results also demonstrated that if either a colloid or a porous medium is pH-dependent, a significant decrease in breakthrough curves is accompanied by depth-dependent deposition profiles. This study indicated that surface charge properties of colloids coupled with

  4. Competing nucleation pathways in a mixture of oppositely charged colloids: Out-of-equilibrium nucleation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Baron

    2009-12-01

    Recent simulations of crystal nucleation from a compressed liquid of oppositely charged colloids show that the natural Brownian dynamics results in nuclei of a charge-disordered FCC (DFCC) solid whereas artificially accelerated dynamics with charge swap moves result in charge-ordered nuclei of a CsCl phase. These results were interpreted as a breakdown of the quasiequilibrium assumption for precritical nuclei. We use structure-specific nucleus size coordinates for the CsCl and DFCC structures and equilibrium based sampling methods to understand the dynamical effects on structure selectivity in this system. Nonequilibrium effects observed in previous simulations emerge from a diffusion tensor that dramatically changes when charge swap moves are used. Without the charge swap moves diffusion is strongly anisotropic with very slow motion along the charge-ordered CsCl axis and faster motion along the DFCC axis. Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory predicts that under the realistic dynamics, the diffusion anisotropy shifts the current toward the DFCC axis. The diffusion tensor also varies with location on the free energy landscape. A numerical calculation of the current field with a diffusion tensor that depends on the location in the free energy landscape exacerbates the extent to which the current is skewed toward DFCC structures. Our analysis confirms that quasiequilibrium theories based on equilibrium properties can explain the nonequilibrium behavior of this system. Our analysis also shows that using a structure-specific nucleus size coordinate for each possible nucleation product can provide mechanistic insight on selectivity and competition between nucleation pathways.

  5. Charge effects and nanoparticle pattern formation in electrohydrodynamic NanoDrip printing of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richner, Patrizia; Kress, Stephan J. P.; Norris, David J.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-03-01

    Advancing open atmosphere printing technologies to produce features in the nanoscale range has important and broad applications ranging from electronics to photonics, plasmonics and biology. Recently an electrohydrodynamic printing regime has been demonstrated in a rapid dripping mode (termed NanoDrip), where the ejected colloidal droplets from nozzles of diameters of O (1 μm) can controllably reach sizes an order of magnitude smaller than the nozzle and can generate planar and out-of-plane structures of similar sizes. Despite the demonstrated capabilities, our fundamental understanding of important aspects of the physics of NanoDrip printing needs further improvement. Here we address the topics of charge content and transport in NanoDrip printing. We employ quantum dot and gold nanoparticle dispersions in combination with a specially designed, auxiliary, asymmetric electric field, targeting the understanding of charge locality (particles vs. solvent) and particle distribution in the deposits as indicated by the dried nanoparticle patterns (footprints) on the substrate. We show that droplets of alternating charge can be spatially separated when applying an ac field to the nozzle. The nanoparticles within a droplet are distributed asymmetrically under the influence of the auxiliary lateral electric field, indicating that they are the main carriers. We also show that the ligand length of the nanoparticles in the colloid affects their mobility after deposition (in the sessile droplet state).Advancing open atmosphere printing technologies to produce features in the nanoscale range has important and broad applications ranging from electronics to photonics, plasmonics and biology. Recently an electrohydrodynamic printing regime has been demonstrated in a rapid dripping mode (termed NanoDrip), where the ejected colloidal droplets from nozzles of diameters of O (1 μm) can controllably reach sizes an order of magnitude smaller than the nozzle and can generate planar and

  6. Soil colloidal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent understanding that organic and inorganic contaminants are often transported via colloidal particles has increased interest in colloid science. The primary importance of colloids in soil science stems from their surface reactivity and charge characteristics. Characterizations of size, shape,...

  7. Phase Behavior of 2D Charged Hydrophobic Colloids in Flat and Curved Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Colm; Guerra, Rodrigo; Chaikin, Paul

    Charged hydrophobic colloids, when dispersed in oil with a relatively high dielectric constant, can become highly charged. In the presence of an interface with a conducting aqueous phase, particles bind strongly to the interface via image-charge attraction. At sufficiently high density, these charged interfacial particles self-organize into a 2D repulsive (Wigner) crystalline solid phase, while at lower densities, the particles form a 2D fluid. By observing samples prepared at different densities, we can probe various points in the phase diagram of this soft 2D material, and compare our results with applicable theory and simulations. In this talk, we present two sets of experiments we have performed on this system: first, we show how we can use gravity as an external force to create a controlled density gradient, and thereby directly measure the equation of state and other quantities of interest. Second, we discuss how, by observing particles which are bound to the surface of spherical droplets, we can explore how the presence of finite background curvature affects the phase behavior of the system.

  8. Correlated adsorption of polyelectrolytes in the "charge inversion" of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennato, S.; Bordi, F.; Cametti, C.

    2004-10-01

    In this letter, we study the complexation of spherical colloidal particles induced by oppositely charged polyelectrolytes by means of dynamic light scattering technique. We employed cationic liposomes, 100 nm in diameter, and compared their aggregation behavior in the presence of differently organized counterions, i.e. simple uni-valent ions, deriving from the dissociation of NaCl salt, and multi-ions bounded to a polymer chain (large-valence polyions deriving from the ionization of two polyelectrolyte chains, polyacrylate and DNA). We show that the system behaves differently and, in the presence of oppositely charged polyions, undergoes a well-defined re-entrant condensation, following a charge inversion effect, as a function of the counterion concentration in the aqueous phase. Our results present a clear evidence of the role played by the lateral correlation of polyion chains onto the charged-particle surface, in terms of a simple Wigner crystal theory, according to the idea developed by Nguyen et al. (Rev. Mod. Phys. 74 (2002) 329).

  9. Influence of iron solubility and charged surface-active compounds on lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters containing association colloids.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Johnson, David R; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-05-15

    The impact of iron compounds with different solubilities on lipid oxidation was studied in the presence and absence of association colloids. Iron (III) sulfate only accelerated lipid oxidation in the presence of association colloids while iron (III) oleate accelerated oxidation in the presence and absence of association colloids. Further, iron (III) oxide retarded lipid oxidation both with and without association colloids. The impact of charged association colloids on lipid oxidation in ethyl oleate was also investigated. Association colloids consisting of the anionic surface-active compound dodecyl sulphosuccinate sodium salt (AOT), cationic surface-active compound hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic surface-active compound 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) retarded, promoted, and had no effect on lipid oxidation rates, respectively. These results indicate that the polarity of metal compounds and the charge of association colloids play a big role in lipid oxidation. PMID:26776045

  10. Elastic properties of static charge-stabilized colloidal crystal with two-dimensional hexagonal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Y. V.; Batanova, A. A.; Gladkova, E. V.; Dyshlovenko, P. E.; Nagatkin, A. N.; Nizametdinov, A. F.

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional charge-stabilized colloidal crystal with a hexagonal crystal lattice and constant electric potential on the particles is studied numerically. The properties of the crystal are described by the theory based on the Poisson-Boltzmann non-linear differential equation. The force constants and the equilibrium pressure in the crystals are calculated for a broad range of the lattice parameters. The numerical procedures of the force constant and pressure determination is briefly described. Elastic constants of the first and second order are also calculated on the base of the force constants to obtain information about the many-body effective interactions in the system. It was shown that the Cauchy relation between the elastic constants breaks down in the whole range of the lattice parameter especially at higher densities. This can be interpreted as an effect of the many-body effective interaction between the particles in the crystal.

  11. Wrinkled-graphene wrapped silicon nanoparticles synthesized through charged colloidal assembly for enhanced battery performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Lu, Chunxiang; Ma, Canliang; Zhang, Baoping

    2014-10-01

    Elastic composite of wrinkled graphene sheets and Si nanoparticles has been prepared through engineering charged Si nanoparticles capping with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane and graphene oxide in colloidal state. In the composite, the Si nanoparticles are uniformly wrapped by the graphene sheets. When used as an anode for lithium-ion batteries, the as-obtained material exhibits high Coulombic efficiency, good cycling stability of 1044 mAh g-1 at a current density of 200 mA g-1 after 100 cycles, and superior rate capability. Such excellent electrochemical performance should be attributed to the wrinkled graphene sheets, which not only buffer volume expansion of Si nanoparticles during the cycling but also act as electrical conducting pathway.

  12. Long-range repulsive charged colloids in and out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, M. N.

    2013-04-01

    The research described in this thesis focusses on the behaviour of charged colloidal particles with long-range repulsive interactions. The experimental model system we used consisted of sterically stabilised charged poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) colloids suspended in cyclohexyl bromide (CHB). In this low-polar solvent very low ionic concentrations can be achieved, resulting in a large Debye screening length (on the order of the particle diameter), i.e. long-range interactions. The pair interaction in these systems is often modelled by the hard-core repulsive Yukawa (or screened Coulomb) potential, which we used for our computer simulations. In Monte Carlo simulations we investigated the effect of size polydispersity on the crystal-fluid transition. We observed a shift to higher volume fraction of the crystal-fluid transition upon increasing the polydispersity. At high polydispersities parts of the higher charged systems that were initially crystalline became amorphous. The amorphous parts had a higher polydispersity than the crystalline parts, indicating the presence of a terminal polydispersity beyond which the homogeneous crystal phase was no longer stable. We investigated the slow dynamics close to the glass transition as a function of the range of the potential, also in simulations. We determined the long-time structural relaxation time and long-time self-diffusion coefficient, which could be well fitted by a power law predicted by mode-coupling theory (MCT) and by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) equation. In experiments we used confocal microscopy to study the system quantitatively in 3D on a single-particle level. We performed micro-electrophoresis measurements to determine the surface potential and charge of the PMMA particles at a volume fraction around 0.02. The surface potential was roughly independent of the diameter of the particle and was found to be lower for unlocked particles (steric stabiliser adsorbed to surface) than for locked particles

  13. Effect of many-body interactions on the solid-liquid phase behavior of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobnikar, J.; Rzehak, R.; von Grünberg, H. H.

    2003-03-01

    The solid-liquid phase diagram of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions has been calculated using a technique that combines a continuous Poisson-Boltzmann description for the microscopic electrolyte ions with a molecular-dynamics simulation for the macroionic colloidal spheres. While correlations between the microions are neglected in this approach, many-body interactions between the colloids, mediated by the screening ionic fluid between them, are fully included. The Lindemann criterion has been used to determine the solid-to-liquid transition temperature in a colloidal system at a relatively high colloid volume fraction where many-body interactions are expected to be strong. With a view to the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory predicting that colloids interact via Yukawa pair potentials, we compare our results with the phase diagram of a simple Yukawa liquid. We find an agreement under high-salt conditions, but considerable differences at low ionic strength. Using effective force calculations and data from molecular-dynamics simulations with simple model potentials, we further demonstrate that these differences are due to many-body interactions.

  14. One-step solvothermal synthesis of highly water-soluble, negatively charged superparamagnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jining; Ran, Xinze; Shi, Chunmeng; Cheng, Humin; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping

    2013-07-01

    Highly charged hydrophilic superparamagnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters with an average diameter of 195 nm have been successfully synthesized using a modified one-step solvothermal method. Anionic polyelectrolyte poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt containing both sulfonate and carboxylate groups was used as the stabilizer. The clusters synthesized under different experimental conditions were characterized with transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering; it was found that the size distribution and water dispersity were significantly affected by the concentration of the polyelectrolyte stabilizer and iron sources in the reaction mixtures. A possible mechanism involving novel gel-like large molecular networks that confined the nucleation and aggregation process was proposed and discussed. The colloidal nanocrystal clusters remained negatively charged in the experimental pH ranges from 2 to 11, and also showed high colloidal stability in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and ethanol. These highly colloidal stable superparamagnetic Fe3O4 clusters could find potential applications in bioseparation, targeted drug delivery, and photonics.Highly charged hydrophilic superparamagnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters with an average diameter of 195 nm have been successfully synthesized using a modified one-step solvothermal method. Anionic polyelectrolyte poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt containing both sulfonate and carboxylate groups was used as the stabilizer. The clusters synthesized under different experimental conditions were characterized with transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering; it was found that the size distribution and water dispersity were significantly affected by the concentration of the polyelectrolyte stabilizer and iron sources in the reaction mixtures. A possible mechanism involving novel gel-like large molecular networks that confined the nucleation and

  15. Propagation and Separation of Charged Colloids by Cylindrical Passivated Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Bikos, Dimitri; Mason, Thomas G

    2016-07-01

    We explore the electrophoretic propagation of charged colloidal objects, monodisperse anionically stabilized polystyrene spheres, in large-pore agarose gels that have been passivated using polyethylene glycol (PEG) when a radial electric field is applied in a cylindrical geometry. By contrast to standard Cartesian gel-electrophoresis geometries, in a cylindrical geometry, charged particles that start at a ring well near the central axis propagate outward more rapidly initially and then slow down as they move further away from the axis. By building a full-ring cylindrical gel electrophoresis chamber and taking movies of scattered light from propagating nanospheres undergoing electrophoresis, we experimentally demonstrate that the ring-like front of monodisperse nanospheres propagates stably in PEG-passivated agarose gels and that the measured ring radius as a function of time agrees with a simple model that incorporates the electric field of a cylindrical geometry. Moreover, we show that this cylindrical geometry offers a potential advantage when performing electrophoretic separations of objects that have widely different sizes: smaller objects can still be retained in a cylindrical gel that has a limited size over long electrophoretic run times required for separating larger objects. PMID:27109865

  16. Single-mode lasing from colloidal water-soluble CdSe/CdS quantum dot-in-rods.

    PubMed

    Di Stasio, Francesco; Grim, Joel Q; Lesnyak, Vladimir; Rastogi, Prachi; Manna, Liberato; Moreels, Iwan; Krahne, Roman

    2015-03-18

    Core-shell CdSe/CdS nanocrystals are a very promising material for light emitting applications. Their solution-phase synthesis is based on surface-stabilizing ligands that make them soluble in organic solvents, like toluene or chloroform. However, solubility of these materials in water provides many advantages, such as additional process routes and easier handling. So far, solubilization of CdSe/CdS nanocrystals in water that avoids detrimental effects on the luminescent properties poses a major challenge. This work demonstrates how core-shell CdSe/CdS quantum dot-in-rods can be transferred into water using a ligand exchange method employing mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Key to maintaining the light-emitting properties is an enlarged CdS rod diameter, which prevents potential surface defects formed during the ligand exchange from affecting the photophysics of the dot-in-rods. Films made from water-soluble dot-in-rods show amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) with a similar threshold (130 μJ/cm(2)) as the pristine material (115 μJ/cm(2)). To demonstrate feasibility for lasing applications, self-assembled microlasers are fabricated via the "coffee-ring effect" that display single-mode operation and a very low threshold of ∼10 μJ/cm(2). The performance of these microlasers is enhanced by the small size of MPA ligands, enabling a high packing density of the dot-in-rods. PMID:25335769

  17. Effect of charging on CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods single-photon emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manceau, M.; Vezzoli, S.; Glorieux, Q.; Pisanello, F.; Giacobino, E.; Carbone, L.; De Vittorio, M.; Bramati, A.

    2014-07-01

    The photon statistics of CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods nanocrystals is studied with a method involving postselection of the photon detection events based on the photoluminescence count rate. We show that flickering between two states needs to be taken into account to interpret the single-photon emission properties. With postselection we are able to identify two emitting states: the exciton and the charged exciton (trion), characterized by different lifetimes and different second-order correlation functions. Measurements of the second-order autocorrelation function at zero delay with postselection shows a degradation of the single-photon emission for CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods in a charged state that we explain by deriving the neutral and charged biexciton quantum yields.

  18. Polarimetry-based analysis of dipolar transitions of single colloidal CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lethiec, C.; Pisanello, F.; Carbone, L.; Bramati, A.; Coolen, L.; Maître, A.

    2014-09-01

    We use polarization resolved micro-photoluminescence to analyze the dipolar nature of single core/shell cadmium selenide/cadmium sulfide (CdSe/CdS) dot-in-rods. Polarization analysis, anisotropy measurements on more than 400 nanoparticles, and defocused imaging suggest that these nanoparticles behave as linear dipoles. The same methods were also used to determine the three-dimensional orientation of the emission dipole, which proved to be consistent with the hypothesis of a linear dipole tilted with respect to the rod axis. Moreover, we observe that for high-energy pumping, the excitation transition of the dot-in-rod cannot be approximated by a single linear dipole, contrary to the emission transition.

  19. Surface charge of polymer coated SPIONs influences the serum protein adsorption, colloidal stability and subsequent cell interaction in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Vera; Kinnear, Calum; Moniatte, Marc; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J. D.; Fink, Alke

    2013-04-01

    It is known that the nanoparticle-cell interaction strongly depends on the physicochemical properties of the investigated particles. In addition, medium density and viscosity influence the colloidal behaviour of nanoparticles. Here, we show how nanoparticle-protein interactions are related to the particular physicochemical characteristics of the particles, such as their colloidal stability, and how this significantly influences the subsequent nanoparticle-cell interaction in vitro. Therefore, different surface charged superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. Similar adsorbed protein profiles were identified following incubation in supplemented cell culture media, although cellular uptake varied significantly between the different particles. However, positively charged nanoparticles displayed a significantly lower colloidal stability than neutral and negatively charged particles while showing higher non-sedimentation driven cell-internalization in vitro without any significant cytotoxic effects. The results of this study strongly indicate therefore that an understanding of the aggregation state of NPs in biological fluids is crucial in regards to their biological interaction(s).It is known that the nanoparticle-cell interaction strongly depends on the physicochemical properties of the investigated particles. In addition, medium density and viscosity influence the colloidal behaviour of nanoparticles. Here, we show how nanoparticle-protein interactions are related to the particular physicochemical characteristics of the particles, such as their colloidal stability, and how this significantly influences the subsequent nanoparticle-cell interaction in vitro. Therefore, different surface charged superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. Similar adsorbed protein profiles were identified following incubation in supplemented cell culture media, although cellular uptake varied significantly between

  20. Structure and short-time dynamics in concentrated suspensions of charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westermeier, Fabian; Fischer, Birgit; Roseker, Wojciech; Grübel, Gerhard; Nägele, Gerhard; Heinen, Marco

    2012-09-01

    We report a comprehensive joint experimental-theoretical study of the equilibrium pair-structure and short-time diffusion in aqueous suspensions of highly charged poly-acrylate (PA) spheres in the colloidal fluid phase. Low-polydispersity PA sphere systems with two different hard-core radii, R0 = 542 and 1117 Å, are explored over a wide range of concentrations and salinities using static and dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle x-ray scattering, and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). The measured static and dynamic scattering functions are analyzed using state-of-the-art theoretical methods. For all samples, the measured static structure factor, S(Q), is in good agreement with results by an analytical integral equation method for particles interacting by a repulsive screened Coulomb plus hard-core pair potential. In our DLS and XPCS measurements, we have determined the short-time diffusion function D(Q) = D0 H(Q)/S(Q), comprising the free diffusion coefficient D0 and the hydrodynamic function H(Q). The latter is calculated analytically using a self-part corrected version of the δγ-scheme by Beenakker and Mazur which accounts approximately for many-body hydrodynamic interactions (HIs). Except for low-salinity systems at the highest investigated volume fraction ϕ ≈ 0.32, the theoretical predictions for H(Q) are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In particular, the increase in the collective diffusion coefficient Dc = D(Q → 0), and the decrease of the self-diffusion coefficient, Ds = D(Q → ∞), with increasing ϕ is well described. In accord with the theoretical prediction, the peak value, H(Qm), of H(Q) relates to the nearest neighbor cage size ˜2π/Qm, for which concentration scaling relations are discussed. The peak values H(Qm) are globally bound from below by the corresponding neutral hard-spheres peak values, and from above by the limiting peak values for low-salinity charge-stabilized systems. HIs usually slow short

  1. Thermal activation of non-radiative Auger recombination in charged colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Javaux, C; Mahler, B; Dubertret, B; Shabaev, A; Rodina, A V; Efros, Al L; Yakovlev, D R; Liu, F; Bayer, M; Camps, G; Biadala, L; Buil, S; Quelin, X; Hermier, J-P

    2013-03-01

    Applications of semiconductor nanocrystals such as biomarkers and light-emitting optoelectronic devices require that their fluorescence quantum yield be close to 100%. However, such quantum yields have not been obtained yet, in part, because non-radiative Auger recombination in charged nanocrystals could not be suppressed completely. Here, we synthesize colloidal core/thick-shell CdSe/CdS nanocrystals with 100% quantum yield and completely quenched Auger processes at low temperatures, although the nanocrystals are negatively photocharged. Single particle and ensemble spectroscopy in the temperature range 30-300 K shows that the non-radiative Auger recombination is thermally activated around 200 K. Experimental results are well described by a model suggesting a temperature-dependent delocalization of one of the trion electrons from the CdSe core and enhanced Auger recombination at the abrupt CdS outer surface. These results point to a route for the design of core/shell structures with 100% quantum yield at room temperature. PMID:23396313

  2. Effect of the polydispersion in the crystallization and micro-structure of the high charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Bañuelos, Efraín; Aranda-Espinosa, Helim; Chasvez-Paez, Martin

    2008-03-01

    In this work we investigate the effect of the polydipersion in the crystallization and micro-structure of the high charged colloids particles with tow and three different types and different concentrations of that types. This results were obtained by computer simulation, the particles interaction was modeled by a screened Coulomb potential. We used 4000 particles in our simulation cell to let them evolution from an initial random configuration, periodic boundary conditions was imposed to simulate the bulk. The temporal evolutions of the configuration show long-ranged self-ordering and a crystalline transition, the crystalline nucleation depend of the concentrations of different kinds as well as of types of particle. The common neighbor analysis (CNA) exhibit the competition of two micro-structures, icosahedral and bcc, in the equilibrium bcc crystalline order is dominant with relative abundance over the other micro-structures. 1.- U. Gasser, Eric R. Weeks et al, Science, 292 (258), 2001. 2.- Stefan Auer, Daan Frenkel, Letter of Nature, 409 (1020), 2001. 3.- J.P. Hoogenboom, et al , Phys. Rev. Leeters, 89 (256104), 2002. 4.- M. Ch'avez-P'aez, E. Urrutia-Bañuelos and M. Medina --Noyola, Phys. Rev. E, 58 (681),1998 5.- Andrew S. Clarke and Hannes J'onsson, Phys. Rev. E, 47 (3975), 1993.

  3. Anion-Dependent Aggregate Formation and Charge Behavior of Colloidal Fullerenes (n-C60)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, B.; Weaver, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    The fate and transport of colloidal fullerenes (n-C60) in the environment are likely to be guided by their electrokinetic and aggregation behavior. In natural water bodies inorganic ions exert significant effects in determining the size and charge of dispersed n-C60. Although the effects of cations on the behavior of n-C60 have been studied extensively; studies on the effect of anions are relatively few and thus were the focus of our investigation. The effects of anions (e.g., Cl- , SO42-) on average aggregate size (DH) and zeta potential (ZP) of n-C60 were found to be absent in presence of monovalent cations (e.g., Na+) over the tested range of pH (3-to-12) and ionic strength (0-to-20 mM). Similar observations were noted in the presence of multivalent cations (e.g., Mg2+) near acidic and neutral pH conditions. However, under alkaline conditions (pH~10) a strong anion-dependent reversal of surface charge was noted. The ZP of n-C60 changed from -65 mV, when dispersed in DI water, to +4 mV and +40 mV in the presence of SO42- and Cl-, respectively in a 10mM salt concentration (i.e., MgCl2 and MgSO4). The corresponding DH of the dispersed n-C60 changed simultaneously from 115 nm, in DI water, to 1450 nm and 225 nm for the MgSO4 and MgCl2 electrolytes. These findings provide a better understanding of interfacial interaction characteristics of n-C60 NPs, and may lead to remediation strategies for n-C60 NPs in the environment.

  4. Determination of the positions and orientations of concentrated rod-like colloids from 3D microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Besseling, T H; Hermes, M; Kuijk, A; de Nijs, B; Deng, T-S; Dijkstra, M; Imhof, A; van Blaaderen, A

    2015-05-20

    Confocal microscopy in combination with real-space particle tracking has proven to be a powerful tool in scientific fields such as soft matter physics, materials science and cell biology. However, 3D tracking of anisotropic particles in concentrated phases remains not as optimized compared to algorithms for spherical particles. To address this problem, we developed a new particle-fitting algorithm that can extract the positions and orientations of fluorescent rod-like particles from three dimensional confocal microscopy data stacks. The algorithm is tailored to work even when the fluorescent signals of the particles overlap considerably and a threshold method and subsequent clusters analysis alone do not suffice. We demonstrate that our algorithm correctly identifies all five coordinates of uniaxial particles in both a concentrated disordered phase and a liquid-crystalline smectic-B phase. Apart from confocal microscopy images, we also demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to identify nanorods in 3D electron tomography reconstructions. Lastly, we determined the accuracy of the algorithm using both simulated and experimental confocal microscopy data-stacks of diffusing silica rods in a dilute suspension. This novel particle-fitting algorithm allows for the study of structure and dynamics in both dilute and dense liquid-crystalline phases (such as nematic, smectic and crystalline phases) as well as the study of the glass transition of rod-like particles in three dimensions on the single particle level. PMID:25922931

  5. Determination of the positions and orientations of concentrated rod-like colloids from 3D microscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besseling, T. H.; Hermes, M.; Kuijk, A.; de Nijs, B.; Deng, T.-S.; Dijkstra, M.; Imhof, A.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2015-05-01

    Confocal microscopy in combination with real-space particle tracking has proven to be a powerful tool in scientific fields such as soft matter physics, materials science and cell biology. However, 3D tracking of anisotropic particles in concentrated phases remains not as optimized compared to algorithms for spherical particles. To address this problem, we developed a new particle-fitting algorithm that can extract the positions and orientations of fluorescent rod-like particles from three dimensional confocal microscopy data stacks. The algorithm is tailored to work even when the fluorescent signals of the particles overlap considerably and a threshold method and subsequent clusters analysis alone do not suffice. We demonstrate that our algorithm correctly identifies all five coordinates of uniaxial particles in both a concentrated disordered phase and a liquid-crystalline smectic-B phase. Apart from confocal microscopy images, we also demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to identify nanorods in 3D electron tomography reconstructions. Lastly, we determined the accuracy of the algorithm using both simulated and experimental confocal microscopy data-stacks of diffusing silica rods in a dilute suspension. This novel particle-fitting algorithm allows for the study of structure and dynamics in both dilute and dense liquid-crystalline phases (such as nematic, smectic and crystalline phases) as well as the study of the glass transition of rod-like particles in three dimensions on the single particle level.

  6. Hexadecapolar colloids

    PubMed Central

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously. PMID:26864184

  7. Hexadecapolar colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of `colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.

  8. Hexadecapolar colloids.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2016-01-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of 'colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously. PMID:26864184

  9. Hexadecapolar Colloids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-11

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and forbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms’ displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. We describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Becausemore » of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and report the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.« less

  10. Quantitative analysis of PEG-functionalized colloidal gold nanoparticles using charged aerosol detection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mackensie C; Crist, Rachael M; Clogston, Jeffrey D; McNeil, Scott E

    2015-05-01

    Surface characteristics of a nanoparticle, such as functionalization with polyethylene glycol (PEG), are critical to understand and achieve optimal biocompatibility. Routine physicochemical characterization such as UV-vis spectroscopy (for gold nanoparticles), dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential are commonly used to assess the presence of PEG. However, these techniques are merely qualitative and are not sensitive enough to distinguish differences in PEG quantity, density, or presentation. As an alternative, two methods are described here which allow for quantitative measurement of PEG on PEGylated gold nanoparticles. The first, a displacement method, utilizes dithiothreitol to displace PEG from the gold surface. The dithiothreitol-coated gold nanoparticles are separated from the mixture via centrifugation, and the excess dithiothreitol and dissociated PEG are separated through reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The second, a dissolution method, utilizes potassium cyanide to dissolve the gold nanoparticles and liberate PEG. Excess CN(-), Au(CN)2 (-), and free PEG are separated using RP-HPLC. In both techniques, the free PEG can be quantified against a standard curve using charged aerosol detection. The displacement and dissolution methods are validated here using 2-, 5-, 10-, and 20-kDa PEGylated 30-nm colloidal gold nanoparticles. Further value in these techniques is demonstrated not only by quantitating the total PEG fraction but also by being able to be adapted to quantitate the free unbound PEG and the bound PEG fractions. This is an important distinction, as differences in the bound and unbound PEG fractions can affect biocompatibility, which would not be detected in techniques that only quantitate the total PEG fraction. PMID:25749798

  11. Charge Stabilized Crystalline Colloidal Arrays As Templates For Fabrication of Non-Close-Packed Inverted Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Justin J.; Ben-Moshe, Matti; Tikhonov, Alexander; Qu, Dan; Lamont, Daniel N.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a straightforward method to form non close-packed highly ordered fcc direct and inverse opal silica photonic crystals. We utilize an electrostatically self assembled crystalline colloidal array (CCA) template formed by monodisperse, highly charged polystyrene particles. We then polymerize a hydrogel around the CCA (PCCA) and condense the silica to form a highly ordered silica impregnated (siPCCA) photonic crystal. Heating at 450 °C removes the organic polymer leaving a silica inverse opal structure. By altering the colloidal particle concentration we independently control the particle spacing and the wall thickness of the inverse opal photonic crystals. This allows us to control the optical dielectric constant modulation in order to optimize the diffraction; the dielectric constant modulation is controlled independently of the photonic crystal periodicity. These fcc photonic crystals are better ordered than typical close-packed photonic crystals because their self assembly utilizes soft electrostatic repulsive potentials. We show that colloidal particle size and charge polydispersity has modest impact on ordering, in contrast to that for close-packed crystals. PMID:20163800

  12. Efficient Light-driven Long Distance Charge Separation and H2 Generation in Semiconductor Quantum Rods and Nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Tianquan

    Quantum confined semiconductor nanocrystals (0D quantum dots, 1D quantum rods and 2D quantum platlets) have been intensively investigated as light harvesting and charge separation materials for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications. The efficiency of these semiconductor nanocrystal-based devices depends on many fundamental processes, including light harvesting, carrier relaxation, exciton localization and transport, charge separation and charge recombination. The competition between these processes determines the overall solar energy conversion (solar to electricity or fuel) efficiency. Semiconductor nano-heterostructures, combining two or more material components, offer unique opportunities to control their charge separation properties by tailoring their compositions, dimensions and spatial arrangement. Further integration of catalysts (heterogeneous or homogeneous) to these materials form multifunctional nano-heterostructures. Using 0D, 1D and 2D CdSe/CdS/Pt heterostructures as model systems, we directly probe the above-mentioned fundamental exciton and carrier processes by transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. We are examining how to control these fundamental processes through the design of heterostructures to achieve long-lived charge separation and efficient H2 generation. In this talk, we will discuss a new model for exciton dissociation by charge transfer in quantum dots (i.e. Auger assisted electron transfer), mechanism of 1D and 2D exciton transport and dissociation in nanorods, and key factors limiting H2 generation efficiency in CdSe/CdS/Pt nanorod heterostructures.

  13. Kinetics of ergodic-to-nonergodic transitions in charged colloidal suspensions: Aging and gelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hajime; Jabbari-Farouji, Sara; Meunier, Jacques; Bonn, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    There are two types of isotropic disordered nonergodic states in colloidal suspensions: colloidal glasses and gels. In a recent paper [H. Tanaka, J. Meunier, and D. Bonn, Phys. Rev. E 69, 031404 (2004)], we discussed the static aspect of the differences and the similarities between the two. In this paper, we focus on the dynamic aspect. The kinetics of the liquid-glass transition is called “aging,” while that of the sol-gel transition is called “gelation.” The former is primarily governed by repulsive interactions between particles, while the latter is dominated by attractive interactions. Slowing down of the dynamics during aging reflects the increasing cooperativity required for the escape of a particle from the cage formed by the surrounding particles, while that during gelation reflects the increase in the size of particle clusters towards the percolation transition. Despite these clear differences in the origin of the slowing down of the kinetics between the two, it is not straightforward experimentally to distinguish them in a clear manner. For an understanding of the universal nature of ergodic-to-nonergodic transitions, it is of fundamental importance to elucidate the differences and the similarities in the kinetics between aging and gelation. We consider this problem, taking Laponite suspension as an explicit example. In particular, we focus on the two types of nonergodic states: (i) an attractive gel formed by van der Waals attractions for high ionic strengths and (ii) a repulsive Wigner glass stabilized by long-range Coulomb repulsions for low ionic strengths. We demonstrate that the aging of colloidal Wigner glass crucially differs not only from gelation, but also from the aging of structural and spin glasses. The aging of the colloidal Wigner glass is characterized by the unique cage-forming regime that does not exist in the aging of spin and structural glasses.

  14. Electric response of a magnetic colloid to periodic external excitation for different nanoparticles concentrations: Determination of the particles' effective charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalioto, F.; Barbero, G.; Sehnem, A. L.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    The effective electric charge of a nanoparticle in an ionic magnetic colloidal system (an ionic ferrofluid) is determined by using the impedance spectroscopy technique. The electric response of the samples to a harmonic external electric field excitation is described by means of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck model. The model proposed for the theoretical interpretation of the impedance spectroscopy data considers that the magnetic particles are electrically charged with H+ and have in their vicinity Cl- counterions, resulting in an effective charge Qeff. In the presence of an harmonic, in time, external field (frequency bigger than 10 4 Hz ) particles are assumed to be at rest, due to inertial reason. In this framework, the response of the cell is due to the H+ and Cl- present in the solution. From the spectra of the real and imaginary components of the electric impedance of the cell, by means of a best fit procedure to our model, we derive the effective electric charge of the magnetic particles and the bulk density of ions. From an independent measurement of the ζ-potential of the suspension, it is possible to calculate the hydrodynamic radius of the particle, in good agreement with that independently measured.

  15. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d3 (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles.

  16. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d(3) (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles. PMID:27394119

  17. Aspect-ratio-dependent phase transitions and concentration fluctuations in aqueous colloidal dispersions of charged platelike particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Nobuyoshi; Fujita, Takako; Nakato, Teruyuki; Koizumi, Satoshi; Ohta, Noboru; Yagi, Naoto; Hashimoto, Takeji

    2012-01-01

    Phase transitions of aqueous colloidal dispersions of charged platelike particles of niobate nanosheets were investigated as a function of the aspect ratio (rasp) and particle volume concentration (φp) by means of small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. The results elucidated the following three pieces of evidence: (1) the macroscopic phase separation of the dispersions into an isotropic phase and a liquid crystalline (LC) phase under the conditions of (a) varying rasp (1.3×10-4 ≤ rasp ≤ 2.5×10-3) at a constant φp = 0.01 and (b) varying φp (0.01 ≤ φp ≤ 0.025) at a constant rasp = 2.5×10-3, a mechanism of which is proposed in the text, where rasp ≡ d/L¯, with d and L¯ being thickness and the average lateral size of the plates, respectively; (2) the rasp-induced phase transition of the LC phase from a nematic phase to a highly periodic layered phase, the line shapes of the scattering peaks of which were examined by Caillé's analysis, upon increasing rasp under the condition (a); (3) the LC phase having remarkable concentration fluctuations of the particles which are totally unexpected for the conventional lyotropic molecular LC but which are anticipated to be general for the platelike colloidal particles.

  18. Block Liposomes: Vesicles of Charged Lipids with Distinctly Shaped Nanoscale Sphere-, Pear-, Tube-, or Rod-Segments

    PubMed Central

    Zidovska, Alexandra; Ewert, Kai K.; Quispe, Joel; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the preparation and characterization of block liposomes, a new class of liquid vesicles, from mixtures of the highly charged (+16 e) multivalent cationic lipid MVLBG2 and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). Block liposomes (BLs) consist of distinct spherical, tubular, and micellar liposomes which remain connected, forming a single liposome. This is in contrast to typical vesicle systems, where distinctly shaped liposomes are macroscopically separated. In a narrow composition range (8-10 mol % MVLBG2), an abundance of micrometer-scale BLs (typically sphere-tube-sphere triblocks) was observed. Cryo-TEM revealed that BLs are also present at the nanometer scale, where the blocks consist of distinctly shaped nanoscale spheres, pears, tubes, or rods. Pear-tube diblock and pear-tube-pear triblock liposomes contain nanotubes with inner lumen diameter 10-50 nm. In addition, sphere-rod diblock liposomes are present, containing rigid micellar nanorods ≈4 nm in diameter and several μm in length. Block liposomes may find a range of applications in chemical and nucleic acid delivery and as building blocks in the design of templates for hierarchical structures. PMID:19913164

  19. Influence of an Additive-Free Particle Spreading Method on Interactions between Charged Colloidal Particles at an Oil/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yi, Zonglin; Xing, Xiaochen; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2016-05-17

    The assembly and manipulation of charged colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces represent active areas of fundamental and applied research. Previously, we have shown that colloidal particles can spontaneously generate unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface when spreading solvent is used to disperse them at an oil/water interface. These residual charges in turn affect the long-ranged electrostatic repulsive forces and packing of particles at the interface. To further uncover the influence arising from the spreading solvents on interfacial particle interactions, in the present study we utilize pure buoyancy to drive the particles onto an oil/water interface and compare the differences between such a spontaneously adsorbed particle monolayer to the spread monolayer based on solvent spreading techniques. Our results show that the solvent-free method could also lead particles to spread well at the interface, but it does not result in violent sliding of particles along the interface. More importantly, this additive-free spreading method can avoid the formation of unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface. These findings agree well with our previous hypothesis; namely, those unstable residual charges are triboelectric charges that arise from the violently rubbing of particles on oil at the interface. Therefore, if the spreading solvents could be avoided, then we would be able to get rid of the formation of residual charges at interfaces. This finding will provide insight for precisely controlling the interactions among colloidal particles trapped at fluid/fluid interfaces. PMID:27108987

  20. A differential dielectric spectroscopy setup to measure the electric dipole moment and net charge of colloidal quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kortschot, R. J.; Bakelaar, I. A.; Erné, B. H.; Kuipers, B. W. M.

    2014-03-15

    A sensitive dielectric spectroscopy setup is built to measure the response of nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid to an alternating electric field over a frequency range from 10{sup −2} to 10{sup 7} Hz. The measured complex permittivity spectrum records both the rotational dynamics due to a permanent electric dipole moment and the translational dynamics due to net charges. The setup consists of a half-transparent capacitor connected in a bridge circuit, which is balanced on pure solvent only, using a software-controlled compensating voltage. In this way, the measured signal is dominated by the contributions of the nanoparticles rather than by the solvent. We demonstrate the performance of the setup with measurements on a dispersion of colloidal CdSe quantum dots in the apolar liquid decalin.

  1. High reduction of interfacial charge recombination in colloidal quantum dot solar cells by metal oxide surface passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jin; Kuga, Yuki; Mora-Seró, Iván; Toyoda, Taro; Ogomi, Yuhei; Hayase, Shuzi; Bisquert, Juan; Shen, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on colloidal QDs and metal oxide nanowires (NWs) possess unique and outstanding advantages in enhancing light harvesting and charge collection in comparison to planar architectures. However, the high surface area of the NW structure often brings about a large amount of recombination (especially interfacial recombination) and limits the open-circuit voltage in BHJ solar cells. This problem is solved here by passivating the surface of the metal oxide component in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar cells (CQDSCs). By coating thin TiO2 layers onto ZnO-NW surfaces, the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency have been improved by over 40% in PbS CQDSCs. Characterization by transient photovoltage decay and impedance spectroscopy indicated that the interfacial recombination was significantly reduced by the surface passivation strategy. An efficiency as high as 6.13% was achieved through the passivation approach and optimization for the length of the ZnO-NW arrays (device active area: 16 mm2). All solar cells were tested in air, and exhibited excellent air storage stability (without any performance decline over more than 130 days). This work highlights the significance of metal oxide passivation in achieving high performance BHJ solar cells. The charge recombination mechanism uncovered in this work could shed light on the further improvement of PbS CQDSCs and/or other types of solar cells.Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on colloidal QDs and metal oxide nanowires (NWs) possess unique and outstanding advantages in enhancing light harvesting and charge collection in comparison to planar architectures. However, the high surface area of the NW structure often brings about a large amount of recombination (especially interfacial recombination) and limits the open-circuit voltage in BHJ solar cells. This problem is solved here by passivating the surface of the metal oxide component in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar

  2. Approximate Analytic Expression for the Electrophoretic Mobility of Moderately Charged Cylindrical Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-29

    An approximate analytic expression for the electrophoretic mobility of an infinitely long cylindrical colloidal particle in a symmetrical electrolyte solution in a transverse electric field is obtained. This mobility expression, which is correct to the order of the third power of the zeta potential ζ of the particle, considerably improves Henry's mobility formula correct to the order of the first power of ζ (Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 1931, 133, 106). Comparison with the numerical calculations by Stigter (J. Phys. Chem. 1978, 82, 1417) shows that the obtained mobility formula is an excellent approximation for low-to-moderate zeta potential values at all values of κa (κ = Debye-Hückel parameter and a = cylinder radius). PMID:26639309

  3. Finite compressibility in shaped charge jet and long rod penetration—the effect of shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugstad, B. S.; Dullum, O. S.

    1981-08-01

    The classical theory of high speed jet and long rod penetration assumes incompressibility of both projectile and target. We extend here previous analyses of the implications of finite compressibility by including the effect of stationary shocks. For uniform projectile velocities V≲6×103 ms-1, depending on the type of target material, the total effect of compressibility is in the order of 10% or less, and is well approximated by the volume compressison work considered in the previous analyses [A. Coombs, private communication, Royal Air Force Research and Development Establishment, 1978; B. S. Haugstad, J. Appl. Phys. 52, 1243 (1981)]. At higher velocities shocks play an increasingly dominant role, contributing at least equally to the total compressibility effect at V≲104 ms-1. At these velocities there is a reduction in penetration depth of 10-20% in targets of aluminium or lead, while for plexiglass a full 35% reduction is predicted. Targets of lead or plexiglass experience local melting or even sublimation during penetration. In targets of aluminium, steel, platinum, and probably also in most other metallic targets, melting or sublimation first occurs well above typical projectile velocities.

  4. Hydrodynamic interactions in metal rod-like particle suspensions due to induced charge electroosmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Hoffman, B; Saintillan, D; Shaqfeh, E G; Santiago, J G

    2008-05-05

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the motion and dispersion of metal rod-like particles in the presence of an externally applied electric field. In these systems, the electric field polarizes the particles and induces an electroosmosis flow relative to the surface of each particle. The simulations include the effect of the gravitational body force, buoyancy, far-field hydrodynamic interactions, near-field lubrication forces, and electric field interactions. The particles in the simulations and experiments were observed to experience repeated pairing interactions in which they come together axially with their ends approaching each other, slide past one another until their centers approach, and then push apart. These interactions were confirmed in measurements of particle orientations and velocities, pair distribution functions, and net dispersion of the suspension. For large electric fields, the pair distribution functions show accumulation and depletion regions consistent with many pairing events. For particle concentrations of 1e8 particles/mL and higher, dispersion within the suspension dramatically increases with increased field strength.

  5. Charging behavior of the gibbsite basal (001) surface in NaCl solution investigated by AFM colloidal probe technique.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yang; Franks, George V

    2006-07-01

    The charging behavior of the gibbsite gamma-Al(OH)3 basal (001) surface in aqueous solution is important for correctly modeling the overall charging properties of gibbsite particles which controls surface phenomena such as adsorption and crystal growth. However, the question of whether the hydroxyl groups on the basal plane are proton active has been raised recently both from experimental and theoretical points of view. Using gibbsite crystals prepared from industrial Bayer process, the surface potentials of cleaved (001) surfaces were calculated from forces measured by the colloidal probe technique in 1 mM NaCl solution with differing pH. It was surprisingly found that the basal plane is proton active in pH less than 7 and protonation seems to level off at about pH 5. The potential-pH data was accurately fitted with a single pKa surface protonation model with pK(a) = 5.9 +/- 0.2. PMID:16800663

  6. Interaction between like-charged polyelectrolyte-colloid complexes in electrolyte solutions: A Monte Carlo simulation study in the Debye-Hückel approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truzzolillo, D.; Bordi, F.; Sciortino, F.; Sennato, S.

    2010-07-01

    We study the effective interaction between differently charged polyelectrolyte-colloid complexes in electrolyte solutions via Monte Carlo simulations. These complexes are formed when short and flexible polyelectrolyte chains adsorb onto oppositely charged colloidal spheres, dispersed in an electrolyte solution. In our simulations the bending energy between adjacent monomers is small compared to the electrostatic energy, and the chains, once adsorbed, do not exchange with the solution, although they rearrange on the particles surface to accommodate further adsorbing chains or due to the electrostatic interaction with neighbor complexes. Rather unexpectedly, when two interacting particles approach each other, the rearrangement of the surface charge distribution invariably produces antiparallel dipolar doublets that invert their orientation at the isoelectric point. These findings clearly rule out a contribution of dipole-dipole interactions to the observed attractive interaction between the complexes, pointing out that such suspensions cannot be considered dipolar fluids. On varying the ionic strength of the electrolyte, we find that a screening length κ-1, short compared with the size of the colloidal particles, is required in order to observe the attraction between like-charged complexes due to the nonuniform distribution of the electric charge on their surface ("patch attraction"). On the other hand, by changing the polyelectrolyte/particle charge ratio ξs, the interaction between like-charged polyelectrolyte-decorated particles, at short separations, evolves from purely repulsive to strongly attractive. Hence, the effective interaction between the complexes is characterized by a potential barrier, whose height depends on the net charge and on the nonuniformity of their surface charge distribution.

  7. Aggregation and stability of anisotropic charged clay colloids in aqueous medium in the presence of salt.

    PubMed

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2016-01-01

    Na-montmorillonite nanoclay is a colloid of layered mineral silicate. When dispersed in water, this mineral swells on absorption of water and exfoliates into platelets with electric double layers on their surfaces. Even at low particle concentration, the aqueous dispersion can exhibit a spontaneous ergodicity breaking phase transition from a free flowing liquid to nonequilibrium, kinetically arrested and disordered states such as gels and glasses. In an earlier publication [Applied Clay Science, 2015, 114, 8592], we showed that the stability of clay gels can be enhanced by adding a salt later to the clay dispersion prepared in deionized water, rather than by adding the clay mineral to a previously mixed salt solution. Here, we directly track the collapsing interface of sedimenting clay gels using an optical method and show that adding salt after dispersing the clay mineral does indeed result in more stable gels even in very dilute dispersions. These weak gels are seen to exhibit a transient collapse after a finite delay time, a phenomenon observed previously in depletion gels. The velocity of the collapse oscillates with the age of the sample. However, the average velocity of collapse increases with sample age up to a peak value before decreasing at higher ages. With increasing salt concentration, the delay time for transient collapse decreases, while the peak value of the collapsing velocity increases. Using ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy, rheometry and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, we confirm that morphological changes of the gel network assembly, facilitated by thermal fluctuations, lead to the observed collapse phenomenon. Since clay minerals are used extensively in polymer nanocomposites, as rheological modifiers, stabilizers and gas absorbents, we believe that the results reported in this work are extremely useful for several practical applications and also for understanding geophysical phenomena such as the formation and stability of quicksand

  8. Dictyostelium Myosin Bipolar Thick Filament Formation: Importance of Charge and Specific Domains of the Myosin Rod

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating the phenomenon of self-assembly, as the myosin molecule itself contains all the information required to form a structure of defined size. Phosphorylation of only three threonine residues can dramatically change the assembly state of myosin-II. We show here that the C-terminal 68 kDa of the myosin-II tail (termed AD-Cterm) assembles in a regulated manner similar to full-length myosin-II and forms bipolar thick filament (BTF) structures when a green fluorescent protein (GFP) “head” is added to the N terminus. The localization of this GFP-AD-Cterm to the cleavage furrow of dividing Dictyostelium cells depends on assembly state, similar to full-length myosin-II. This tail fragment therefore represents a good model system for the regulated formation and localization of BTFs. By reducing regulated BTF assembly to a more manageable model system, we were able to explore determinants of myosin-II self-assembly. Our data support a model in which a globular head limits the size of a BTF, and the large-scale charge character of the AD-Cterm region is important for BTF formation. Truncation analysis of AD-Cterm tail fragments shows that assembly is delicately balanced, resulting in assembled myosin-II molecules that are poised to disassemble due to the phosphorylation of only three threonines. PMID:15492777

  9. Dictyostelium myosin bipolar thick filament formation: importance of charge and specific domains of the myosin rod.

    PubMed

    Hostetter, Daniel; Rice, Sarah; Dean, Sara; Altman, David; McMahon, Peggy M; Sutton, Shirley; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Spudich, James A

    2004-11-01

    Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating the phenomenon of self-assembly, as the myosin molecule itself contains all the information required to form a structure of defined size. Phosphorylation of only three threonine residues can dramatically change the assembly state of myosin-II. We show here that the C-terminal 68 kDa of the myosin-II tail (termed AD-Cterm) assembles in a regulated manner similar to full-length myosin-II and forms bipolar thick filament (BTF) structures when a green fluorescent protein (GFP) "head" is added to the N terminus. The localization of this GFP-AD-Cterm to the cleavage furrow of dividing Dictyostelium cells depends on assembly state, similar to full-length myosin-II. This tail fragment therefore represents a good model system for the regulated formation and localization of BTFs. By reducing regulated BTF assembly to a more manageable model system, we were able to explore determinants of myosin-II self-assembly. Our data support a model in which a globular head limits the size of a BTF, and the large-scale charge character of the AD-Cterm region is important for BTF formation. Truncation analysis of AD-Cterm tail fragments shows that assembly is delicately balanced, resulting in assembled myosin-II molecules that are poised to disassemble due to the phosphorylation of only three threonines. PMID:15492777

  10. Dynamic Arrest in Charged Colloidal Systems Exhibiting Large-Scale Structural Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Haro-Perez, C.; Callejas-Fernandez, J.; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R.; Rojas-Ochoa, L. F.; Castaneda-Priego, R.; Quesada-Perez, M.; Trappe, V.

    2009-01-09

    Suspensions of charged liposomes are found to exhibit typical features of strongly repulsive fluid systems at short length scales, while exhibiting structural heterogeneities at larger length scales that are characteristic of attractive systems. We model the static structure factor of these systems using effective pair interaction potentials composed of a long-range attraction and a shorter range repulsion. Our modeling of the static structure yields conditions for dynamically arrested states at larger volume fractions, which we find to agree with the experimentally observed dynamics.

  11. Investigation of the nonlinear effects during the sedimentation process of a charged colloidal particle by direct numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Keller, Florian; Feist, Markus; Nirschl, Hermann; Dörfler, Willy

    2010-04-01

    In this article we study the settling process of a colloidal particle under the influence of a gravitational or centrifugal field in an unbounded electrolyte solution. Since particles in aqueous solutions normally carry a non-zero surface charge, a microscopic electric field develops which alters the sedimentation process compared to an uncharged particle. This process can be mathematically modelled via the Stokes-Poisson-Nernst-Planck system, a system of coupled partial differential equations that have to be solved in an exterior domain. After a dimensional analysis we investigate the influence of the various characteristic dimensionless numbers on the sedimentation velocity. Thereby the linear-response (weak-field) approximation that underpins almost all existing theoretical work on classical electrokinetic phenomena is relaxed, such that no additional assumption on the thickness of the double layer as well as on its displacement is needed. We show that there exists a strong influence of the fluid Reynolds number and the ionic strength on the sedimentation velocity. Further we have developed an asymptotic expansion to describe the limit of small values of the surface potential of a single particle. This expansion incorporates all nonlinear effects and extends the well-known results of Booth (1954) [1] and Ohshima et al. (1984) [2] to higher fluid Reynolds numbers. PMID:20097350

  12. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE ANALYSIS OF YOUNG AND OLD RED BLOOD CELLS STAINED WITH COLLOIDAL IRON FOR SURFACE CHARGE EVALUATION

    PubMed Central

    Marikovsky, Y.; Danon, D.

    1969-01-01

    Human and rabbit red blood cells, separated into "young" and "old" age groups by differential flotation on phthalate esters, were fixed with glutaraldehyde and labeled with colloidal ferric oxide. Electron micrographs of thin sections of young cells showed a uniform and dense depostion of positive iron particles. Old cells showed particles deposited irregularly, leaving unlabeled gaps on the membrane surface. Red cells incubated with 10 units/ml receptor-destroying enzyme (RDE) demonstrate a reduced labeling, similar to that of old cells. After neuraminic acid had been removed from red cells by 20 units/ml RDE, no iron particles were found on membrane surfaces. The different labeling of young, old, and RDE-treated human and rabbit red cells was correlated with their electric mobility and agglutinability by poly-L-lysine. The contradiction between the apparent similarity in charge density of human and rabbit red cells as estimated by density of iron particles and the markedly lower electric mobility of rabbit red cells is discussed. PMID:4186411

  13. Electron microscope analysis of young and old red blood cells stained with colloidal iron for surface charge evaluation.

    PubMed

    Marikovsky, Y; Danon, D

    1969-10-01

    Human and rabbit red blood cells, separated into "young" and "old" age groups by differential flotation on phthalate esters, were fixed with glutaraldehyde and labeled with colloidal ferric oxide. Electron micrographs of thin sections of young cells showed a uniform and dense depostion of positive iron particles. Old cells showed particles deposited irregularly, leaving unlabeled gaps on the membrane surface. Red cells incubated with 10 units/ml receptor-destroying enzyme (RDE) demonstrate a reduced labeling, similar to that of old cells. After neuraminic acid had been removed from red cells by 20 units/ml RDE, no iron particles were found on membrane surfaces. The different labeling of young, old, and RDE-treated human and rabbit red cells was correlated with their electric mobility and agglutinability by poly-L-lysine. The contradiction between the apparent similarity in charge density of human and rabbit red cells as estimated by density of iron particles and the markedly lower electric mobility of rabbit red cells is discussed. PMID:4186411

  14. Out-of-equilibrium processes in suspensions of oppositely charged colloids: liquid-to-crystal nucleation and gel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Eduardo; Valeriani, Chantal; Vissers, Teun; Fortini, Andrea; Leunissen, Mirjam E.; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Frenkel, Daan; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2008-12-01

    We study the kinetics of the liquid-to-crystal transformation and of gel formation in colloidal suspensions of oppositely charged particles. We analyse, by means of both computer simulations and experiments, the evolution of a fluid quenched to a state point of the phase diagram where the most stable state is either a homogeneous crystalline solid or a solid phase in contact with a dilute gas. On the one hand, at high temperatures and high packing fractions, close to a substitutionally-ordered/substitutionally-disordered solid-solid coexistence line, we find that the fluid-to-crystal pathway does not follow the minimum free energy route. On the other hand, a quench to a state point far from the substitutionally-ordered/substitutionally-disordered crystal coexistence border is followed by a fluid-to-solid transition through the minimum free energy pathway. At low temperatures and packing fractions we observe that the system undergoes a gas-liquid spinodal decomposition that, at some point, stops, giving rise to a gel-like structure. Both our simulations and experiments suggest that increasing the interaction range favours crystallization over vitrification in gel-like structures.

  15. Delocalized and localized charged excitons in single CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods revealed by polarized photoluminescence blinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Toshiyuki; Sato, Ryota; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-07-01

    CdSe/CdS heterostructured nanocrystals with quasi-type-II band alignments provide an interesting platform for studying the photoluminescence (PL) blinking associated with their unique morphologies. By using simultaneous measurements of the PL intensity, lifetime, and polarization anisotropy, we reveal the role of the electron delocalization during the blinking of single CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods. We found that a significant change in the PL polarization anisotropy distinguishes between two kinds of charged excitons with different electron delocalizations. We report our observation of unique polarized PL blinking governed by the band alignments and the Coulomb interactions between the charges inside and outside the dot-in-rod.

  16. Rodding Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rods can be made of stainless steel or titanium. Regular rods do not expand. They have many ... v regular), the rod materials (stainless steel v titanium) and the age for a first rodding surgery. ...

  17. Electrophoresis of a charged colloidal particle in porous media: boundary effect of a solid plane.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Peter; Huang, Cheng-Hsuan; Lee, Eric

    2011-11-15

    Electrokinetic treatments such as the electrophoretic technique have been applied successfully to various soil remediation and contaminant removal situations. To understand further the fundamental features involved, the electrophoretic motion of a charged particle in porous media is investigated theoretically in this study, focusing on the boundary effect of a nearby solid plane toward which the particle moves perpendicularly. The porous medium is modeled as a Brinkman fluid with a characteristic screening length (λ(-1)) that can be obtained directly from the experimental data. General electrokinetic equations are used to describe the system and are solved with a pseudospectral method based on Chebyshev polynomials. We found that the particle motion is deterred by the boundary effect in general. The closer the particle is to the boundary, the more severe this effect is. Up to a 90% reduction in particle mobility is observed in some situations. This indicates that a drastic overestimation (10-fold!) of the overall transport rate of particles may occur for large-scale in situ operations in porous media, such as soil remediation utilizing large planar electrodes, should a portable analytical formula valid for bulk systems only be used. Correction factors for various situations in porous media are presented as convenient charts with which to aid engineers and researchers in the field of environmental engineering, for instance, as a realistic estimation of the actual transport rate obtainable. In addition, the results of present study can be applied to biomedical engineering and drug delivery as well because polymer gels and skin barriers both have a porous essence. PMID:21967511

  18. Out-of-equilibrium processes in suspensions of oppositely charged colloids: liquid-to-crystal nucleation and gel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We study the kinetics of the liquid-to-crystal transformation and of gel formation in colloidal suspensions of oppositely charged particles. We analyse, by means of both computer simulations and experiments, the evolution of a fluid quenched to a state point of the phase diagram where the most stable state is either a homogeneous crystalline solid or a solid phase in contact with a dilute gas. On the one hand, at high temperatures and high packing fractions, close to an ordered-solid/disordered-solid coexistence line, we find that the fluid-to-crystal pathway does not follow the minimum free energy route. On the other hand, a quench to a state point far from the ordered-crystal/disordered-crystal coexistence border is followed by a fluid-to-solid transition through the minimum free energy pathway. At low temperatures and packing fractions we observe that the system undergoes a gas-liquid spinodal decomposition that, at some point, arrests giving rise to a gel-like structure. Both our simulations and experiments suggest that increasing the interaction range favors crystallization over vitrification in gel-like structures. [4pt] In collaboration with Chantal Valeriani, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands and SUPA, School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, JCMB King's Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, UK; Teun Vissers, Andrea Fortini, Mirjam E. Leunissen, and Alfons van Blaaderen, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University; Daan Frenke, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW, Cambridge, UK; and Marjolein Dijkstra, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University.

  19. Plasmon-induced charge separation at two-dimensional gold semishell arrays on SiO{sub 2}@TiO{sub 2} colloidal crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ling; Nishi, Hiroyasu; Tatsuma, Tetsu

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectrodes based on plasmonic Au semishell (or halfshell) arrays are developed. A colloidal crystal consisting of SiO{sub 2}@TiO{sub 2} core-shell particles is prepared on a TiO{sub 2}-coated transparent electrode. A Au semishell (or halfshell) array is deposited by sputtering or evaporation on the colloidal crystal. An electrode with the semishell (or halfshell) array exhibits negative photopotential shifts and anodic photocurrents under visible light at 500-800 nm wavelengths in an aqueous electrolyte containing an electron donor. In particular, hydroquinone and ethanol are good electron donors. The photocurrents can be explained in terms of plasmon-induced charge separation at the Au-TiO{sub 2} interface.

  20. Plasmon-induced charge separation at two-dimensional gold semishell arrays on SiO2@TiO2 colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ling; Nishi, Hiroyasu; Tatsuma, Tetsu

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectrodes based on plasmonic Au semishell (or halfshell) arrays are developed. A colloidal crystal consisting of SiO2@TiO2 core-shell particles is prepared on a TiO2-coated transparent electrode. A Au semishell (or halfshell) array is deposited by sputtering or evaporation on the colloidal crystal. An electrode with the semishell (or halfshell) array exhibits negative photopotential shifts and anodic photocurrents under visible light at 500-800 nm wavelengths in an aqueous electrolyte containing an electron donor. In particular, hydroquinone and ethanol are good electron donors. The photocurrents can be explained in terms of plasmon-induced charge separation at the Au-TiO2 interface.

  1. Trap-Assisted Transport and Non-Uniform Charge Distribution in Sulfur-Rich PbS Colloidal Quantum Dot-based Solar Cells with Selective Contacts.

    PubMed

    Malgras, Victor; Zhang, Guanran; Nattestad, Andrew; Clarke, Tracey M; Mozer, Attila J; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Kim, Jung Ho

    2015-12-01

    This study reports evidence of dispersive transport in planar PbS colloidal quantum dot heterojunction-based devices as well as the effect of incorporating a MoO3 hole selective layer on the charge extraction behavior. Steady state and transient characterization techniques are employed to determine the complex recombination processes involved in such devices. The addition of a selective contact drastically improves the device efficiency up to 3.15% (especially due to increased photocurrent and decreased series resistance) and extends the overall charge lifetime by suppressing the main first-order recombination pathway observed in device without MoO3. The lifetime and mobility calculated for our sulfur-rich PbS-based devices are similar to previously reported values in lead-rich quantum dots-based solar cells. Nevertheless, strong Shockley-Read-Hall mechanisms appear to keep restricting charge transport, as the equilibrium voltage takes more than 1 ms to be established. PMID:26541422

  2. Directed self-assembly of colloidal model systems on charge-selective surfaces in external electric fields: theory and numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Falk, Guido

    2013-02-14

    Membrane electrophoretic deposition has a long-established reputation in delivering high quality nanoparticle compact and coating solutions in the field of high performance nanoparticle architectures made from aqueous nanoparticle suspensions. Although for a long time, it has been common practice in nanoparticle science and particle-based nanotechnology to use membrane electrophoretic shaping of nanoparticles, little is known about long-range electrohydrodynamic manipulation of the engineered assembly of colloidal particles at the nanoscale. Here, we analyze the interfacial field-induced flow of a strong electrolyte and its implications for the directed self-assembly of colloidal nanoparticles on nonuniform charge-selective ion-exchange membrane surfaces as well as on conducting microelectrodes imposed to electrophoretic deposition boundary conditions. Numerical calculations of the vortex streamlines are derived for the case of extreme diffusion limitation, concentration polarization near the limiting current, and induced electric forces acting upon the residual space charge. The system is modeled by coupled mass balances, Ohmic law, Navier-Stokes, and Nernst-Planck equations. Particularly, numerical calculations under bulk electroconvection conditions show that the latter provides an efficient intrinsic interfacial mechanism capable of accounting for the experimentally observed local electrophoretic deposition behavior of nanoparticles at ideal permselective membranes with nonplanar periodic charge discontinuity and metal microelectrodes. PMID:22913482

  3. Enhanced emission of charged-exciton polaritons from colloidal quantum dots on a SiN/SiO2 slab waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xingsheng; Li, Xingyun

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the photoluminescence (PL) spectra and the time-resolved PL decay process from colloidal quantum dots on SiN/SiO2 wet etched via BOE (HF:NH4F:H2O). The spectrum displays multi-peak shapes that vary with irradiation time. The evolution of the spectral peaks with irradiation time and collection angle demonstrates that the strong coupling of the charged-exciton emission to the leaky modes of the SiN/SiO2 slab waveguide predominantly produces short-wavelength spectral peaks, resulting in multi-peak spectra. We conclude that BOE etching enhances the charged-exciton emission efficiency and its contribution to the total emission compared with the unetched case. BOE etching smoothes the electron confinement potential, thus decreasing the Auger recombination rate. Therefore, the charged-exciton emission efficiency is high, and the charged-exciton-polariton emission can be further enhanced through strong coupling to the leaky mode of the slab waveguide. PMID:25988709

  4. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    fluid-fluid interface [2]. Together with Remco Tuinier, Henk has recently completed a book in this area which is to appear later this year. A major theme in Henk's research is that of phase transitions in lyotropic liquid crystals. Henk, together with Daan Frenkel and Alain Stroobants, realized in the 1980s that a smectic phase in dispersions of rod-like particles can be stable without the presence of attractive interactions, similar to nematic ordering as predicted earlier by Onsager [3]. Together with Gert-Jan Vroege he wrote a seminal review in this area [4]. Henk once said that 'one can only truly develop one colloidal model system in one's career' and in his case this must be that of gibbsite platelets. Initially Henk's group pursued another polymorph of aluminium hydroxide, boehmite, which forms rod-like particles [5], which already displayed nematic liquid crystal phases. The real breakthrough came when the same precursors treated the produced gibbsite platelets slightly differently. These reliably form a discotic nematic phase [6] and, despite the polydispersity in their diameter, a columnar phase [7]. A theme encompassing a wide range of soft matter systems is that of colloidal dynamics and phase transition kinetics. Many colloidal systems have a tendency to get stuck in metastable states, such as gels or glasses. This is a nuisance if one wishes to study phase transitions, but it is of great practical significance. Such issues feature in many of Henk's publications, and with Valerie Anderson he wrote a highly cited review in this area [8]. Henk Lekkerkerker has also invested significant effort into the promotion of synchrotron radiation studies of colloidal suspensions. He was one of the great supporters of the Dutch-Belgian beamline 'DUBBLE' project at the ESRF [9]. He attended one of the very first experiments in Grenoble in 1999, which led to a Nature publication [7]. He was strongly involved in many other experiments which followed and also has been a

  5. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    fluid-fluid interface [2]. Together with Remco Tuinier, Henk has recently completed a book in this area which is to appear later this year. A major theme in Henk's research is that of phase transitions in lyotropic liquid crystals. Henk, together with Daan Frenkel and Alain Stroobants, realized in the 1980s that a smectic phase in dispersions of rod-like particles can be stable without the presence of attractive interactions, similar to nematic ordering as predicted earlier by Onsager [3]. Together with Gert-Jan Vroege he wrote a seminal review in this area [4]. Henk once said that 'one can only truly develop one colloidal model system in one's career' and in his case this must be that of gibbsite platelets. Initially Henk's group pursued another polymorph of aluminium hydroxide, boehmite, which forms rod-like particles [5], which already displayed nematic liquid crystal phases. The real breakthrough came when the same precursors treated the produced gibbsite platelets slightly differently. These reliably form a discotic nematic phase [6] and, despite the polydispersity in their diameter, a columnar phase [7]. A theme encompassing a wide range of soft matter systems is that of colloidal dynamics and phase transition kinetics. Many colloidal systems have a tendency to get stuck in metastable states, such as gels or glasses. This is a nuisance if one wishes to study phase transitions, but it is of great practical significance. Such issues feature in many of Henk's publications, and with Valerie Anderson he wrote a highly cited review in this area [8]. Henk Lekkerkerker has also invested significant effort into the promotion of synchrotron radiation studies of colloidal suspensions. He was one of the great supporters of the Dutch-Belgian beamline 'DUBBLE' project at the ESRF [9]. He attended one of the very first experiments in Grenoble in 1999, which led to a Nature publication [7]. He was strongly involved in many other experiments which followed and also has been a

  6. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  7. The role of charged particles in the positive corona-generated photon count in a rod to plane air gap

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, X. M.; Wang, Y. J.; MacAlpine, J. M. K.; Chen, L.; Wang, L. M.; Guan, Z. C.; Wan, S. W.; Liu, L.

    2013-08-26

    The relationship between the calculated charged-particle densities in positive corona, the rate of streamer production, and the photon count from the corona were investigated and found to be closely related. Both the densities of electrons and positive ions peaked at 11.8 kV, near the corona inception voltage; they then fell rapidly before slowly rising again. This behavior was exactly matched by the measured photon count. The calculation of the charged-particle density in a positive corona was achieved by means of a fluid model.

  8. Effect of surface charge on the colloidal stability and in vitro uptake of carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Vanessa; Herrera, Adriana P.; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Torres-Lugo, Madeline

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle physicochemical properties such as surface charge are considered to play an important role in cellular uptake and particle–cell interactions. In order to systematically evaluate the role of surface charge on the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles, we prepared carboxymethyl-substituted dextrans with different degrees of substitution, ranging from 38 to 5 groups per chain, and reacted them using carbodiimide chemistry with amine–silane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with narrow size distributions in the range of 33–45 nm. Surface charge of carboxymethyl-substituted dextran-coated nano-particles ranged from −50 to 5 mV as determined by zeta potential measurements, and was dependent on the number of carboxymethyl groups incorporated in the dextran chains. Nanoparticles were incubated with CaCo-2 human colon cancer cells. Nanoparticle–cell interactions were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and uptake was quantified by elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Mechanisms of internalization were inferred using pharmacological inhibitors for fluid-phase, clathrin-mediated, and caveola-mediated endocytosis. Results showed increased uptake for nanoparticles with greater negative charge. Internalization patterns suggest that uptake of the most negatively charged particles occurs via non-specific interactions. PMID:24470787

  9. Charge transfer between a CdSe/CdS quantum rod and an attached ferrocene molecule: a first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarafder, Kartick; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dot (QD) shows interesting opto-electrical properties, very different from bulk semiconductors. However, one major challenge for opto-electrical application is to get the charge carrier out of the QD. One approach is to use an attached molecule to extract the photon generated carrier from the QD. Ferrocene has a potential to change its electron transition level either by adjusting the Ferrocene and Ferrocene + ratio in a solvent, or by adding other functional groups. However, proper understanding of the interactions between QD and molecule is limited, which is extremely useful for further design of such system. One of the main difficult is that there are thousands of atoms contained in the system, a first principle study of which is beyond the limit of existing computational power using direct density functional theory method. In this work we used a novel technique called charge-patching method, and combined that with Marcus model to study the electron and hole transfer between ferrocene and CdS/CdSe core-shell quantum dot. This study allows us to gain insights into the molecule dot interactions and underlying photoluminescence quenching process.

  10. An insight into the mechanism of charge-transfer of hybrid polymer:ternary/quaternary chalcopyrite colloidal nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Parul; Singh, Son

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this work, we have demonstrated the structural and optoelectronic properties of the surface of ternary/quaternary (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe) chalcopyrite nanocrystallites passivated by tri-n-octylphosphine-oxide (TOPO) and tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) and compared their charge transfer characteristics in the respective polymer: chalcopyrite nanocomposites by dispersing them in poly(3-hexylthiophene) polymer. It has been found that CZTSe nanocrystallites due to their high crystallinity and well-ordered 3-dimensional network in its pristine form exhibit a higher steric- and photo-stability, resistance against coagulation and homogeneity compared to the CISe and CIGSe counterparts. Moreover, CZTSe nanocrystallites display efficient photoluminescence quenching as evident from the high value of the Stern–Volmer quenching constant (K SV) and eventually higher charge transfer efficiency in their respective polymer P3HT:CZTSe composites. We modelled the dependency of the charge transfer from the donor and the charge separation mechanism across the donor–acceptor interface from the extent of crystallinity of the chalcopyrite semiconductors (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe). Quaternary CZTSe chalcopyrites with their high crystallinity and controlled morphology in conjunction with regioregular P3HT polymer is an attractive candidate for hybrid solar cells applications. PMID:25161859

  11. An insight into the mechanism of charge-transfer of hybrid polymer:ternary/quaternary chalcopyrite colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Parul; Singh, Son; Sharma, Shailesh Narain

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have demonstrated the structural and optoelectronic properties of the surface of ternary/quaternary (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe) chalcopyrite nanocrystallites passivated by tri-n-octylphosphine-oxide (TOPO) and tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) and compared their charge transfer characteristics in the respective polymer: chalcopyrite nanocomposites by dispersing them in poly(3-hexylthiophene) polymer. It has been found that CZTSe nanocrystallites due to their high crystallinity and well-ordered 3-dimensional network in its pristine form exhibit a higher steric- and photo-stability, resistance against coagulation and homogeneity compared to the CISe and CIGSe counterparts. Moreover, CZTSe nanocrystallites display efficient photoluminescence quenching as evident from the high value of the Stern-Volmer quenching constant (K SV) and eventually higher charge transfer efficiency in their respective polymer P3HT:CZTSe composites. We modelled the dependency of the charge transfer from the donor and the charge separation mechanism across the donor-acceptor interface from the extent of crystallinity of the chalcopyrite semiconductors (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe). Quaternary CZTSe chalcopyrites with their high crystallinity and controlled morphology in conjunction with regioregular P3HT polymer is an attractive candidate for hybrid solar cells applications. PMID:25161859

  12. Hopf solitons and elastic rods

    SciTech Connect

    Harland, Derek; Sutcliffe, Paul; Speight, Martin

    2011-03-15

    Hopf solitons in the Skyrme-Faddeev model are stringlike topological solitons classified by the integer-valued Hopf charge. In this paper we introduce an approximate description of Hopf solitons in terms of elastic rods. The general form of the elastic rod energy is derived from the field theory energy and is found to be an extension of the classical Kirchhoff rod energy. Using a minimal extension of the Kirchhoff energy, it is shown that a simple elastic rod model can reproduce many of the qualitative features of Hopf solitons in the Skyrme-Faddeev model. Features that are captured by the model include the buckling of the charge three solution, the formation of links at charges five and six, and the minimal energy trefoil knot at charge seven.

  13. Trapping and chaining self-assembly of colloidal polystyrene particles over a floating electrode by using combined induced-charge electroosmosis and attractive dipole-dipole interactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiyu; Shao, Jinyou; Jia, Yankai; Tao, Ye; Ding, Yucheng; Jiang, Hongyuan; Ren, Yukun

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel low-frequency strategy to trap 10 μm colloidal polystyrene (PS) particles of small buoyancy velocity on the surface of a floating electrode, on the basis of combined induced-charge electroosmotic (ICEO) flow and dipole-dipole chaining phenomenon. For field frequencies of 5-50 Hz, much lower than the reciprocal RC time scale, double-layer polarization makes electric field lines pass around the 'insulating' surface of the ideally polarizable floating electrode. Once the long-range ICEO convective micro-vortexes transport particles quickly from the bulk fluid to the electrode surface, neighbouring particles aligned along the local horizontal electric field attract one another by attractive dipolar interactions, and form arrays of particle chains that are almost parallel with the applied electric field. Most importantly, this low-frequency trapping method takes advantage of the dielectrophoretic (DEP) particle-particle interaction to enhance the downward buoyancy force of this dipolar chaining assembly structure, in order to overcome the upward ICEO fluidic drag and realize stable particle trapping around the flow stagnation region. For the sake of comparison, the field frequency is further raised far above the DC limit. At the intermediate frequencies of 200 Hz-2 kHz, this trapping method fails to work, since the normal electric field component emanates from the conducting electrode surface. Besides, at high field frequencies (>3 kHz), particles can be once again effectively trapped at the electrode center, though with a compact (3 kHz) or disordered (10 kHz) 2D packing state on the electrode surface and mainly governed by the short-range negative DEP force field, resulting in requiring a much longer trapping time. To gain a better interpretation of the various particle behaviours observed in experiments, we develop a theoretical framework that takes into account both Maxwell-Wagner interfacial charge relaxation at the particle

  14. Many facets of the polyelectrolyte and oppositely charged colloidal particle complexation: counterion release and electrical conductivity behavior.

    PubMed

    Cametti, C; Truzzolillo, D

    2011-06-01

    The lateral correlated adsorption of polyions onto oppositely charged vesicles, leading to the formation of stable equilibrium clusters of mesoscopic size, is associated to the release of a fraction of counterions, initially condensed on the polyion chains. This ulterior release of counterions provokes an increase of the number of free ions, besides the ones due to the partial ionization of both charged particles and polyions, that can be appropriately monitored by means of electrical conductivity measurements of the whole system. We have investigated this behavior in a suspension of cationic vesicles made up by dioleoyl trimethyl ammonium propane (DOTAP) liposomial vesicles interacting with an anionic polyelectrolyte composed by polyacrylate sodium salt. This system has been in the past extensively studied by us by means of different experimental techniques, and its behavior has been sufficiently characterized, as far as hydrodynamic and electrical properties are concerned. In this note, we report on the dc electrical conductivity behavior during the whole aggregation process, from the single polyion-coated liposomal particles, to polyion-induced liposome clusters, to finally polyion-fully covered liposomes, in polyion excess conditions. We have evaluated the excess of released counterions on the basis of the standard theory of the electrical properties of aqueous charged solutions and compared this quantity with the one predicted by the lateral correlation adsorption model. The agreement is quite good, offering strong experimental evidence of the role played by the release of counterions in the aggregation process. Finally, we have considered a similar liposomial system, where the lateral correlation adsorption was inhibited by structural reasons, having replaced the polyion by a simple electrolyte, whose dissociated ions will adsorb randomly at the particle surface, rather than in a correlated manner. In this case, no counterion release upon complexation occurs

  15. Role of detergents in driving complex structural arrangements in colloidal suspensions of Photosystem I (PS I) via charge stabilization and neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niroomand, Hanieh; Mukherjee, Dibyendu; Khomami, Bamin

    2012-02-01

    Specific concentrations of detergents such as DM (n-Dodecyl-β-D-Maltoside) and Triton X-100 (TX-100) used for Photosystem I (PS I) stabilization in buffer solutions play significant roles in controlling the solution-phase protein-protein interactions. Such control on PS I-PS I interactions facilitates uniform monolayer deposition of PS I on self-assembled monolayer (SAM)/Au substrates, a critical step for their future incorporation into bio-hybrid photovoltaic devices. Moreover, electric-field assisted assembly from PS I solutions with TX-100 as the detergent facilitates the formation of uniform PS I monolayer. But, the same phenomenon is not observed for PS I suspensions with DM as the detergent. To explain the underlying colloidal physics of these systems, in-situ dynamic light scattering experiments under various incubation times and applied voltages reveal the role of DM in charge neutralization and in turn, significant reduction of the PS I dipole moment in solution. Furthermore, small angle X-ray scattering measurements provide the much-needed structural information for a detailed understanding of the protein-detergent complexation process. These detailed investigations point towards the use of random sequential adsorption techniques in creating systematic dense monolayers of PS I.

  16. Self-Assembly of Charged Amphiphilic Diblock Copolymers with Insoluble Blocks of Decreasing Hydrophobicity: From Kinetically Frozen Colloids to Macrosurfactants

    SciTech Connect

    M Jacquin; P Muller; H Cottet; O Theodoly

    2011-12-31

    We have investigated the self-assembly properties in aqueous solution of amphiphilic diblock copolymers with insoluble blocks of different hydrophobicity and demonstrated that the condition to obtain dynamic micelles is to design samples with insoluble blocks of low enough hydrophobicity. We focus here on results with new water-soluble amphiphilic diblock copolymers poly(diethyleneglycol ethylether acrylate)-b-poly(acrylic acid), or PDEGA-b-PAA. The physical characteristics of PDEGA-b-PAA micelles at high ionization have been determined by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). We show that PDEGA-b-PAA samples form micelles at thermodynamic equilibrium. The critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) decrease strongly with ionic strength and temperature due to a solvent quality decrease for, respectively, the corona and the core. This behavior of reversible aggregation is remarkable as compared to the behavior of kinetically frozen aggregation that has been widely observed with samples of similar architecture and different hydrophobic blocks, for example, poly(styrene)-b-poly(acrylic acid), PS-b-PAA, and poly(butyl acrylate)-b-poly(acrylic acid), PBA-b-PAA. We have measured the interfacial tension between water and the homopolymers PDEGA and PBA at, respectively, 3 and 20 mN/m at room temperature, which permits one to estimate the energy cost to extract a unimer from a micelle. The results are consistent with a micelle association that is fast for PDEGA-b-PAA and kinetically frozen PBA-b-PAA. Hence, PDEGA-b-PAA samples form a new system of synthetic charged macrosurfactant with unique properties of fast dynamic association, tunable charge, and water solubility even at temperatures and NaCl concentrations as high as 65 C and 1 M.

  17. Polarity inversion of ζ-potential in concentrated colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla-Granados, Héctor M; Jiménez-Ángeles, Felipe; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2011-10-27

    A concentrated colloidal dispersion is studied by applying an integral equations theory to the colloidal primitive model fluid. Important effects, attributed to large size and charge and to the finite concentration of colloidal particles, are found. We observe a polarity inversion of ζ-potential for concentrated colloidal dispersions, while it is not present for a single colloidal particle at infinite dilution. An excellent qualitative agreement between our theoretical predictions and our computer simulations is observed. PMID:21928833

  18. Nucleation and crystal growth in a suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres with bi-modal size distribution studied by time-resolved ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang; Menke, Dirk; Forthaus, Martin; Subatzus, Sebastian; Franke, Markus; Schöpe, Hans-Joachim; Palberg, Thomas; Perlich, Jan; Herlach, Dieter

    2014-12-01

    A suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres exhibiting a bi-modal size distribution of particles, thereby mimicking a binary mixture, was studied using time-resolved ultra-small-angle synchrotron X-ray scattering (USAXS). The sample, consisting of particles of diameters d(A) = (104.7 ± 9.0) nm and d(B) = (88.1 ± 7.8) nm (d(A)/d(B) ≈ 1.2), and with an estimated composition A(0.6(1))B(0.4(1)), was studied with respect to its phase behaviour in dependance of particle number density and interaction, of which the latter was modulated by varying amounts of added base (NaOH). Moreover, its short-range order in the fluid state and its eventual solidification into a long-range ordered colloidal crystal were observed in situ, allowing the measurement of the associated kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth. Key parameters of the nucleation kinetics such as crystallinity, crystallite number density, and nucleation rate density were extracted from the time-resolved scattering curves. By this means an estimate on the interfacial energy for the interface between the icosahedral short-range ordered fluid and a body-centered cubic colloidal crystal was obtained, comparable to previously determined values for single-component colloidal systems. PMID:25481168

  19. Quantum confined colloidal nanorod heterostructures for solar-to-fuel conversion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaifeng; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-07-11

    Solar energy conversion, particularly solar-driven chemical fuel formation, has been intensely studied in the past decades as a potential approach for renewable energy generation. Efficient solar-to-fuel conversion requires artificial photosynthetic systems with strong light absorption, long-lived charge separation and efficient catalysis. Colloidal quantum confined nanoheterostructures have emerged as promising materials for this application because of the ability to tailor their properties through size, shape and composition. In particular, colloidal one-dimensional (1D) semiconductor nanorods (NRs) offer the opportunity to simultaneously maintain quantum confinement in radial dimensions for tunable light absorptions and bulk like carrier transport in the axial direction for long-distance charge separations. In addition, the versatile chemistry of colloidal NRs enables the formation of semiconductor heterojunctions (such as CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod NRs) to separate photogenerated electron-hole pairs and deposition of metallic domains to accept charges and catalyze redox reactions. In this review, we summarize research progress on colloidal NR heterostructures and their applications for solar energy conversion, emphasizing mechanistic insights into the working principle of these systems gained from spectroscopic studies. Following a brief overview of synthesis of various NRs and heterostructures, we introduce their electronic structures and dynamics of exciton and carrier transport and interfacial transfer. We discuss how these exciton and carrier dynamics are controlled by their structures and provide key mechanistic understanding on their photocatalytic performance, including the photo-reduction of a redox mediator (methyl viologen) and light driven H2 generation. We discuss the solar-driven H2 generation mechanism, key efficiency limiting steps, and potential approaches for rational improvement in semiconductor NR/metal heterostructures (such as Pt tipped Cd

  20. Re-shaping colloidal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the geometry and yield of anisotropic colloidal particles remains a challenge for hierarchical self-assembly. I will discuss a synthetic strategy for fabricating colloidal clusters by creating order in randomly aggregated polymer spheres using surface tension and geometrical constraints. The technique can be extended to a variety of charge-stabilized polymer spheres and offers control over the cluster size distribution. VENI grant from The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  1. Colloidal polypyrrole

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized aromatic heterocyclic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a vinyl pyridine-containing polymer and dopant anions and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are disclosed.

  2. Colloid Mobilization and Transport during Capillary Fringe Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead filled column. Confocal images showed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively-charged and hydrophilic positively-charged colloids did.

  3. Colloid mobilization and transport during capillary fringe fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead-filled column. We studied four specific conditions: (1) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase, (2) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially wet porous medium, (3) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially dry porous medium, and (4) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase with the presence of a static air bubble. Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. Our results demonstrate that capillary fringe fluctuations are an effective means for colloid mobilization. PMID:24897130

  4. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  5. Colloidal polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized amino-substituted aromatic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a random copolymer containing amino-benzene type moieties as side chain constituents, and dopant anions, and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are provided.

  6. Semiconductor Quantum Rods as Single Molecule FluorescentBiological Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Boussert, Benjamine; Koski, Kristie; Gerion, Daniele; Manna, Liberato; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-05-29

    In recent years, semiconductor quantum dots have beenapplied with great advantage in a wide range of biological imagingapplications. The continuing developments in the synthesis of nanoscalematerials and specifically in the area of colloidal semiconductornanocrystals have created an opportunity to generate a next generation ofbiological labels with complementary or in some cases enhanced propertiescompared to colloidal quantum dots. In this paper, we report thedevelopment of rod shaped semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum rods) asnew fluorescent biological labels. We have engineered biocompatiblequantum rods by surface silanization and have applied them fornon-specific cell tracking as well as specific cellular targeting. Theproperties of quantum rods as demonstrated here are enhanced sensitivityand greater resistance for degradation as compared to quantum dots.Quantum rods have many potential applications as biological labels insituations where their properties offer advantages over quantumdots.

  7. Sterically stabilized colloids with tunable repulsions.

    PubMed

    van Gruijthuijsen, Kitty; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Heinen, Marco; Nägele, Gerhard; Stradner, Anna

    2013-09-10

    When studying tunable electrostatic repulsions in aqueous suspensions of charged colloids, irreversible colloid aggregation or gelation may occur at high salt concentrations. For many commonly used synthetic colloids, such as polystyrene and silica particles, the reason for coagulation is the presence of unbalanced, strongly attractive, and short-ranged van der Waals (VDW) forces. Here, we present an aqueous polystyrene model colloid that is sterically stabilized against VDW attractions. We show that the synthesis procedure, based on a neutral initiator couple and a nonionic surfactant, introduces surface charges that can be further increased by the addition of charged comonomer methacrylic acid. Thus, the interactions between the polystyrene spheres can be conveniently tuned from hard-sphere-like to charge-stabilized with long-ranged electrostatic repulsions described by a Yukawa-type pair potential. The particle size, grafting density, core-shell structure, and surface charge are characterized by light and neutron scattering. Using X-ray and neutron scattering in combination with an accurate analytic integral equation scheme for the colloidal static structure factor, we deduce effective particle charges for colloid volume fractions ≥0.1 and salt concentrations in the range of 1.5 to 50 mM. PMID:23937718

  8. Characteristics of colloids generated during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Mertz, C.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.; Chaiko, D.

    1993-10-01

    Aqueous colloidal suspensions were generated by reacting nuclear waste glasses with groundwater at 90{degrees}C at different ratios of the glass surface area to solution volume (S/V). The colloids have been characterized in terms of size, charge, identity, and stability with respect to salt concentration, pH, and time, by examination using dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and transmission electron microscopy. The colloids are predominately produced by precipitation from solution, possibly with contribution from reacted layers that have spallated from the glass. These colloids are silicon-rich minerals. The colloidal suspensions agglomerate when the salinity of the solutions increase. The following implications for modeling the colloidal transport of contaminants have been derived from this study: (1) The sources of the colloids are not only solubility-limited real colloids and the pseudo colloids formed by adsorption of radionuclides onto a groundwater colloid, but also from the spalled surface layers of reacted waste glasses. (2) In a repository, the local environment is likely to be glass-reaction dominated and the salt concentration is likely to be high, leading to rapid colloid agglomeration and settling; thus, colloid transport may be insignificant. (3) If large volumes of groundwater contact the glass reaction site, the precipitated colloids may become resuspended, and colloid transport may become important. (4) Under most conditions, the colloids are negatively charged and will deposit readily on positively charged surfaces. Negatively charged surfaces will, in general, facilitate colloid stability and transport.

  9. Tuning Colloid-Interface Interactions by Salt Partitioning.

    PubMed

    Everts, J C; Samin, S; van Roij, R

    2016-08-26

    We show that the interaction of an oil-dispersed colloidal particle with an oil-water interface is highly tunable from attractive to repulsive, either by varying the sign of the colloidal charge via charge regulation or by varying the difference in hydrophilicity between the dissolved cations and anions. In addition, we investigate the yet unexplored interplay between the self-regulated colloidal surface charge distribution with the planar double layer across the oil-water interface and the spherical one around the colloid. Our findings explain recent experiments and have direct relevance for tunable Pickering emulsions. PMID:27610887

  10. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole–dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single

  11. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  12. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Messina and H Löwen Mode expansion for the density profiles of crystal-fluid interfaces: hard spheres as a test caseM Oettel Scaling of layer spacing of charged particles under slit-pore confinement: an effect of concentration or of effective particle diameter?Yan Zeng and Regine von Klitzing Hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal particles in a planar poreB Bonilla-Capilla, A Ramírez-Saito, M A Ojeda-López and J L Arauz-Lara Ageing in a system of polydisperse goethite boardlike particles showing rich phase behaviourA B G M Leferink op Reinink, E van den Pol, D V Byelov, A V Petukhov and G J Vroege Temperature as an external field for colloid-polymer mixtures: 'quenching' by heating and 'melting' by coolingShelley L Taylor, Robert Evans and C Patrick Royall Spinning motion of a deformable self-propelled particle in two dimensionsMitsusuke Tarama and Takao Ohta Emergent states in dense systems of active rods: from swarming to turbulenceH H Wensink and H Löwen

  13. Doped colloidal artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libál, A.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Reichhardt, C.

    2015-10-01

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  14. Stability of Ionic Colloidal Crystals (ICCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskaly, Garry R.; Garcia, R. Edwin; Carter, W. Craig; Chiang, Yet-Ming

    2003-03-01

    Ionic colloidal crystals (ICCs) are here defined as ordered multicomponent colloids formed by attractive electrostatic interactions. Compared to previous approaches to colloidal crystallization, the ICC approach holds the potential for self-assembly of a wide range of structures not easily accessible by other methods. In this work, the colloid-chemical conditions under which ICCs are stable have been theoretically analyzed. A model is presented in which two dimensionless parameters are found to fully characterize an ICC system. We calculate the Madelung constant for ICCs of several classical ionic crystal structures as a function of these two parameters, and discuss the parallels between the ICC Madelung constants and the classical ionic case. Experimentally accessible regions of surface charge, particle sizes, salt concentration, and temperature where ionic colloidal crystallization should be possible are identified.

  15. Linked topological colloids in a nematic host.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Angel; Hermosillo, Leonardo; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-04-14

    Geometric shape and topology of constituent particles can alter many colloidal properties such as Brownian motion, self-assembly, and phase behavior. Thus far, only single-component building blocks of colloids with connected surfaces have been studied, although topological colloids, with constituent particles shaped as freestanding knots and handlebodies of different genus, have been recently introduced. Here we develop a topological class of colloids shaped as multicomponent links. Using two-photon photopolymerization, we fabricate colloidal microparticle analogs of the classic examples of links studied in the field of topology, the Hopf and Solomon links, which we disperse in nematic fluids that possess orientational ordering of anisotropic rod-like molecules. The surfaces of these particles are treated to impose tangential or perpendicular boundary conditions for the alignment of liquid crystal molecules, so that they generate a host of topologically nontrivial field and defect structures in the dispersing nematic medium, resulting in an elastic coupling between the linked constituents. The interplay between the topologies of surfaces of linked colloids and the molecular alignment field of the nematic host reveals that linking of particle rings with perpendicular boundary conditions is commonly accompanied by linking of closed singular defect loops, laying the foundations for fabricating complex composite materials with interlinking-based structural organization. PMID:25825765

  16. Linked topological colloids in a nematic host

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Angel; Hermosillo, Leonardo; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2015-01-01

    Geometric shape and topology of constituent particles can alter many colloidal properties such as Brownian motion, self-assembly, and phase behavior. Thus far, only single-component building blocks of colloids with connected surfaces have been studied, although topological colloids, with constituent particles shaped as freestanding knots and handlebodies of different genus, have been recently introduced. Here we develop a topological class of colloids shaped as multicomponent links. Using two-photon photopolymerization, we fabricate colloidal microparticle analogs of the classic examples of links studied in the field of topology, the Hopf and Solomon links, which we disperse in nematic fluids that possess orientational ordering of anisotropic rod-like molecules. The surfaces of these particles are treated to impose tangential or perpendicular boundary conditions for the alignment of liquid crystal molecules, so that they generate a host of topologically nontrivial field and defect structures in the dispersing nematic medium, resulting in an elastic coupling between the linked constituents. The interplay between the topologies of surfaces of linked colloids and the molecular alignment field of the nematic host reveals that linking of particle rings with perpendicular boundary conditions is commonly accompanied by linking of closed singular defect loops, laying the foundations for fabricating complex composite materials with interlinking-based structural organization. PMID:25825765

  17. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  18. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets. PMID:27131565

  19. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  20. FUEL ROD ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1959-09-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods aod a tubular casing through which a coolant flows in heat-change contact with the ruel rods are described. The casting is of trefoil section and carries the fuel rods, each of which has two fin engaging the serrated fins of the other two fuel rods, whereby the fuel rods are held in the casing and are interlocked against relative longitudinal movement.

  1. Effective Forces Between Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tehver, Riina; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1999-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions have proven to be excellent model systems for the study of condensed matter and its phase behavior. Many of the properties of colloidal suspensions can be investigated with a systematic variation of the characteristics of the systems and, in addition, the energy, length and time scales associated with them allow for experimental probing of otherwise inaccessible regimes. The latter property also makes colloidal systems vulnerable to external influences such as gravity. Experiments performed in micro-ravity by Chaikin and Russell have been invaluable in extracting the true behavior of the systems without an external field. Weitz and Pusey intend to use mixtures of colloidal particles with additives such as polymers to induce aggregation and form weak, tenuous, highly disordered fractal structures that would be stable in the absence of gravitational forces. When dispersed in a polarizable medium, colloidal particles can ionize, emitting counterions into the solution. The standard interaction potential in these charged colloidal suspensions was first obtained by Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek. The DLVO potential is obtained in the mean-field linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approximation and thus has limited applicability. For more precise calculations, we have used ab initio density functional theory. In our model, colloidal particles are charged hard spheres, the counterions are described by a continuum density field and the solvent is treated as a homogeneous medium with a specified dielectric constant. We calculate the effective forces between charged colloidal particles by integrating over the solvent and counterion degrees of freedom, taking into account the direct interactions between the particles as well as particle-counterion, counterion-counterion Coulomb, counterion entropic and correlation contributions. We obtain the effective interaction potential between charged colloidal particles in different configurations. We evaluate two

  2. Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russel, W. B.; Saville, D. A.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1992-03-01

    The book covers the physical side of colloid science from the individual forces acting between submicron particles suspended in a liquid through the resulting equilibrium and dynamic properties. The relevant forces include Brownian motion, electrostatic repulsion, dispersion attraction, both attraction and repulsion due to soluble polymer, and viscous forces due to relative motion between the particles and the liquid. The balance among Brownian motion and the interparticle forces decides the questions of stability and phase behavior. Imposition of external fields produces complex effects, i.e. electrokinetic phenomena (electric field), sedimentation (gravitational field), diffusion (concentration/chemical potential gradient), and non-Newtonian rheology (shear field). The treatment aims to impart a sound, quantitative understanding based on fundamental theory and experiments with well-characterized model systems. This broad grasp of the fundamentals lends insight and helps to develop the intuitive sense needed to isolate essential features of technological problems and design critical experiments. Some exposure to fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and electricity and magnetism is assumed, but each subject is reintroduced in a self-contained manner.

  3. Electric field in the vicinity of long thin conducting rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezinkina, M. M.; Rezinkin, O. L.; Svetlichnaya, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the results of numerical and analytical calculations of distributions of potentials and electric fields in the vicinity of thin conducting rods that model the leader channel of lightning and lightning rods. We consider rods represented in the form of a uniformly charged filament, a conducting ellipsoid with a free charge on its surface, as well an ellipsoid or a cylinder in a uniform external electric field. The effect of parameters of conducting rods modeling the leader channel of lightning and lightning rods, as well as the region containing a space charge around the tip of the leader channel, on the distribution of potentials and field strengths are analyzed. The conditions for the propagation of the counter leader from the lightning rod are specified.

  4. Control rod drive hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Ose, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

  5. Synthesis of Ionic Colloidal Crystals (ICCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskaly, Garry R.; Garcia, R. Edwin; Carter, W. Craig; Chiang, Yet-Ming

    2003-03-01

    Binary ionic colloidal crystals (ICCs) have been produced by ordered heterocoagulation of colloidal mixtures of silica (negative surface charge) and polystyrene functionalized with amidine (positive surface charge) suspended in isopropanol. Experimental conditions predicted by the theoretical model discussed in a separate talk have been implemented to obtain heterocoagulation of these particles in the rocksalt structure. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration of the ICC concept. The importance of various experimental parameters on ICC formation is discussed. Particle dynamics simulations are carried out to provide insight into the kinetics of ICCs. Potential applications are discussed.

  6. Colloidal Silver Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be dangerous to your health. What the Science Says About the Safety and Side Effects of ... homemade and commercial colloidal silver products. What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of Colloidal Silver Scientific ...

  7. Colloid Bound Transport of Contaminats In The Unsaturated Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, T.; Christ, A.

    Colloids can play a major role in the relocation of contaminants in the unsaturated zone. The amount of colloid driven transport is defined by soil chemistry, soil water chemistry and water flow velocity as well as colloid composition and formation. In a current research project we investigate the filtration and mobilization of colloids in unsaturated column studies. We use different soil types, chosen by a wide range of mean grain size and heterogeneity. Particle tracers are polystyrene solids with a de- fined negative surface charge and defined size from 50 nm to 10 µm. In addition, we use natural colloids extracted from a wide range of contaminated and uncontaminated land. Experimental conditions are exactly controlled throughout all the time. We alter mainly flow velocity ionic strength in order to study the filtration behaviour of the soils. In addition, Pyrene and Lead are are used as model contaminants. First results show the colloids are not retarded in many coarse structured soil types. Preferential colloid flow shows a major impact in breakthrough behaviour. Colloid bound lead is relocated significant through the unsaturated zone, whereas non colloid bound lead species are strongly retarded. In the presentation we will show results of contami- nant processes and present new results on the filtration behaviour of colloids in the unsaturated zone depending on flow velocity, soil type and colloid size.

  8. Control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  9. Optimal Navigation of Self-Propelled Colloids in Microstructured Mazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuguang; Bevan, Michael

    Controlling navigation of self-propelled microscopic `robots' subject to random Brownian motion in complex microstructured environments (e.g., porous media, tumor vasculature) is important to many emerging applications (e.g., enhanced oil recovery, drug delivery). In this work, we design an optimal feedback policy to navigate an active self-propelled colloidal rod in complex mazes with various obstacle types. Actuation of the rods is modelled based on a light-controlled osmotic flow mechanism, which produces different propulsion velocities along the rod's long axis. Actuator-parameterized Langevin equations, with soft rod-obstacle repulsive interactions, are developed to describe the system dynamics. A Markov decision process (MDP) framework is used for optimal policy calculations with design goals of colloidal rods reaching target end points in minimum time. Simulations show that optimal MDP-based policies are able to control rod trajectories to reach target regions order-of-magnitudes faster than uncontrolled rods, which diverges as maze complexity increases. An efficient multi-graph based implementation for MDP is also presented, which scales linearly with the maze dimension.

  10. What Is a Colloid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the properties of colloids, listing those commonly encountered (such as whipped cream, mayonnaise, and fog). Also presents several experiments using colloids and discusses "Silly Putty," a colloid with viscoelastic properties whose counterintuitive properties result from its mixture of polymers. (DH)

  11. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  12. Using Microfluidics to Measure the Equation of State for a 2D Colloidal Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balchunas, Andrew; Cabanas, Rafael; Fraden, Seth; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-03-01

    In the presence of non-adsorbing polymer, monodisperse filamentous viruses assembles into colloidal membranes which are 2D liquid-like one-rod-length-thick monolayers of aligned rods. Colloidal membranes are of particular interest because their properties are accounted for by the same theoretical models that are used to describe biophysics of conventional lipid bilayers. However, bulk membrane formation only occurs over a very limited range of depletant concentrations and ionic strengths. In order to explore the properties of the colloidal membranes under a much wider range of molecular parameters, we have develop a microfluidics technique that allows for in-site exchange of the enveloping polymer suspension thus allowing us to access the region of phase space where membranes are metastable. Using our technique we determine how the colloidal membrane area depends on applied osmotic pressure allowing us to determine its equation of state. We also characterize the dynamics of the constituent rods by using single molecules tracking techniques.

  13. Non-blinking single-photon generation with anisotropic colloidal nanocrystals: towards room-temperature, efficient, colloidal quantum sources.

    PubMed

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Leménager, Godefroy; Martiradonna, Luigi; Carbone, Luigi; Vezzoli, Stefano; Desfonds, Pascal; Cozzoli, Pantaleo Davide; Hermier, Jean-Pierre; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Cingolani, Roberto; De Vittorio, Massimo; Bramati, Alberto

    2013-04-11

    Blinking and single-photon emission can be tailored in CdSe/CdS core/shell colloidal dot-in-rods. By increasing the shell thickness it is possible to obtain almost non-blinking nanocrystals, while the shell length can be used to control single-photon emission probability. PMID:23334905

  14. Directed Self-Assembly of Colloidal Janus Matchsticks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Kundan; Chen, Qian; Juarez, Jaime; Granick, Steve; Lewis, Jennifer

    2013-03-01

    The ability to assemble anisotropic colloidal building blocks into ordered configurations is scientifically and technologically important for developing new classes of soft materials. We are studying the fabrication and electric field driven assembly of end- and side-coated Janus rods. Specifically, we fabricate silica rods (L/D = 2-4) functionalized with hydrophobic gold (Au) patches using a multistep process involving electric field alignment and crystallization, microcontact printing, and selective metallization. In the absence of an applied electric filed, the Janus matchsticks (end-coated rods) self-assemble into multi pods (e.g., bi-, tri- and tetrapods) of varying coordination number and patch angle in aqueous solution. By contrast, both Janus matchsticks and side-coated Janus rods form complex chains in applied AC electric fields of varying magnitude and frequency, whose configurations vary significantly from those formed by pure silica rods.

  15. Electrokinetic properties of polymer colloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micale, F. J.; Fuenmayor, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The surface of polymer colloids, especially polystyrene latexes, were modified for the purpose of controlling the electrokinetic properties of the resulting colloids. Achievement required a knowledge of electrical double layer charging mechanism, as a function of the electrolyte conditions, at the polymer/water interface. The experimental approach is to control the recipe formulation in the emulsion polymerization process so as to systematically vary the strong acid group concentration on the surface of the polymer particles. The electrophoretic mobility of these model particles will then be measured as a function of surface group concentration and as a function of electrolyte concentration and type. An effort was also made to evaluate the electrophoretic mobility of polystyrene latexes made in space and to compare the results with latexes made on the ground.

  16. Photoinduced ultrafast charge separation in colloidal 2-dimensional CdSe/CdS-Au hybrid nanoplatelets and corresponding application in photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Himani; Kumar, Yogesh; Dana, Jayanta; Satpati, Biswarup; Ghosh, Hirendra N; Deka, Sasanka

    2016-08-25

    Multicomponent hybrid nanocrystals (HNC) consisting of a semiconductor and metallic domains are an important class of nanostructured materials demonstrating useful applications and interesting basic knowledge. In this scenario, Au nanoparticle (NP) islands of ∼2 nm have been grown on unique two dimensional (2D) CdSe/CdS core@shell hexagonal nanoheteroplatelets of 20 nm diameter to form unprecedented 2D CdSe/CdS-Au HNCs and detailed optical characterization has been carried out to determine the dimensionality based electron transfer dynamics on the ultrafast scale. Steady state optical absorption studies show that upon growing Au NPs onto the 2D nanoplates, a new band appears in the red region of the spectra (500-800 nm), which suggests a strong interaction between the exciton of the core-shell and the plasmon of the metal NPs. Fluorescence studies showed the quenching of emission of the semiconductor domains upon the growth of the metallic domains. Detailed optical and TRPL studies suggested efficient charge transfer from the 2D CdSe/CdS to the Au domains, irrespective of excitation wavelength. Femtosecond transient absorption studies suggest that the electron transfer from the 2D hybrid nanocrystals to the metal domain is on an ultrafast time scale (∼800 fs). No evidence is observed for charge transfer from the 2 nm Au domains to the semiconductor seeds. The broad absorption in the visible region of the hybrid nanocrystals and the ultrafast charge transfer facilitates very efficient photo-catalytic reactions under direct sun light, as a case study. PMID:27533050

  17. Surface pressure isotherm for a monolayer of charged colloidal particles at a water/nonpolar-fluid interface: experiment and theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Plamen V; Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A

    2014-03-18

    Monolayers from electrically charged micrometer-sized silica particles, spread on the air/water interface, are investigated. Because of the electrostatic repulsion, the distances between the particles are considerably greater than their diameters, i.e., we are dealing with nondensely packed interfacial layers. The electrostatic repulsion between the particles occurs through the air phase. Surface pressure vs area isotherms were measured by Langmuir trough, and the monolayers' morphology was monitored by microscope. The mean area per particle is determined by Delaunay triangulation and Voronoi diagrams. In terms of mean area, the surface pressure for monolayers from polydisperse and monodisperse particles obeys the same law. The experiments show that Π ∝ L(-3) at large L, where Π is the surface pressure and L is the mean interparticle distance. A theoretical cell model is developed, which predicts not only the aforementioned asymptotic law but also the whole Π(L) dependence. The model presumes a periodic distribution of the surface charge density, which induces a corresponding electric field in the air phase. Then, the Maxwell pressure tensor of the electric field in the air phase is calculated and integrated according to the Bakker's formula to determine the surface pressure. Thus, all collective effects from the electrostatic interparticle interactions are taken into account as well as the effects from the particle finite size. By evaporation of water, the particle monolayers are deposited on a solid substrate placed on the bottom of the trough. The electrostatic interparticle repulsion is strong enough to withstand the attractive lateral capillary immersion forces that are operative during the drying of the monolayer on the substrate. The obtained experimental results and the developed theoretical model can be useful for prediction and control of the properties of nondensely packed interfacial monolayers from charged particles that find applications for

  18. Singlet-Triplet Splittings in the Luminescent Excited States of Colloidal Cu(+):CdSe, Cu(+):InP, and CuInS2 Nanocrystals: Charge-Transfer Configurations and Self-Trapped Excitons.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Kathryn E; Nelson, Heidi D; Kilburn, Troy B; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-10-14

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the luminescent excited states of colloidal Cu(+):CdSe, Cu(+):InP, and CuInS2 nanocrystals were investigated using variable-temperature photoluminescence (PL) and magnetic circularly polarized luminescence (MCPL) spectroscopies. The nanocrystal electronic structures were also investigated by absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopies. By every spectroscopic measure, the luminescent excited states of all three materials are essentially indistinguishable. All three materials show very similar broad PL line widths and large Stokes shifts. All three materials also show similar temperature dependence of their PL lifetimes and MCPL polarization ratios. Analysis shows that this temperature dependence reflects Boltzmann population distributions between luminescent singlet and triplet excited states with average singlet-triplet splittings of ∼1 meV in each material. These similarities lead to the conclusion that the PL mechanism in CuInS2 NCs is fundamentally different from that of bulk CuInS2 and instead is the same as that in Cu(+)-doped NCs, which are known to luminesce via charge-transfer recombination of conduction-band electrons with copper-localized holes. The luminescence of CuInS2 nanocrystals is explained well by invoking exciton self-trapping, in which delocalized photogenerated holes contract in response to strong vibronic coupling at lattice copper sites to form a luminescent excited state that is essentially identical to that of the Cu(+)-doped semiconductor nanocrystals. PMID:26389577

  19. Electrohydrodynamically patterned colloidal crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Ryan C. (Inventor); Poon, Hak F. (Inventor); Xiao, Yi (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for assembling patterned crystalline arrays of colloidal particles using ultraviolet illumination of an optically-sensitive semiconducting anode while using the anode to apply an electronic field to the colloidal particles. The ultraviolet illumination increases current density, and consequently, the flow of the colloidal particles. As a result, colloidal particles can be caused to migrate from non-illuminated areas of the anode to illuminated areas of the anode. Selective illumination of the anode can also be used to permanently affix colloidal crystals to illuminated areas of the anode while not affixing them to non-illuminated areas of the anode.

  20. Colloidal stability of iron oxide nanoparticles with multivalent polymer surfactants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Wook; Lee, Hoik; Song, Youngjun; Sohn, Daewon

    2015-04-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for preparing magnetic colloidal suspensions with electrostatic repulsion between particles and polyelectrolyte surfactants. The surface charge of the iron oxide particles was positive in acidic aqueous conditions; however the surface charge of the colloid was negative in basic aqueous conditions due to the amphoteric property of Fe2O3. The long-term colloidal stability and particle distribution of the multivalent charged polymers, Poly(4-vinylbenzenesulfonate sodium salt) (PSS), Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), and Poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) were compared with the monovalent surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Both mono- and multivalent surfactant molecules showed good colloidal stability for extended periods of time. However, the particle distribution was dependent on the hydrophobicity of the surfactants' functional groups. Polyelectrolytes with a negatively charged functional group showed good long-term stability of particles and a narrow particle distribution regardless of the acid dissociation constant (pKa) of the polymer. PMID:25526296

  1. Statistical Physics of Colloidal Dispersions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canessa, E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis is concerned with the equilibrium statistical mechanics of colloidal dispersions which represent useful model systems for the study of condensed matter physics; namely, charge stabilized colloidal dispersions and polymer stabilized colloidal dispersions. A one-component macroparticle approach is adopted in order to treat the macroscopic and microscopic properties of these systems in a simple and comprehensive manner. The thesis opens with the description of the nature of the colloidal state before reviewing some basic definitions and theory in Chapter II. In Chapter III a variational theory of phase equilibria based on the Gibbs-Bogolyobov inequality is applied to sterically stabilized colloidal dispersions. Hard spheres are chosen as the reference system for the disordered phases while an Einstein model is used for the ordered phases. The new choice of pair potential, taken for mathematical convenience, is a superposition of two Yukawa functions. By matching a double Yukawa potential to the van der Waals attractive potential at different temperatures and introducing a purely temperature dependent coefficient to the repulsive part, a rich variety of observed phase separation phenomena is qualitatively described. The behaviour of the potential is found to be consistent with a small decrease of the polymer layer thickness with increasing temperature. Using the same concept of a collapse transition the non-monotonic second virial coefficient is also explained and quantified. It is shown that a reduction of the effective macroparticle diameter with increasing temperature can only be partially examined from the point of view of a (binary-) polymer solution theory. This chapter concludes with the description of the observed, reversible, depletion flocculation behaviour. This is accomplished by using the variational formalism and by invoking the double Yukawa potential to allow

  2. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  3. Charge dynamics at heterojunctions for PbS/ZnO colloidal quantum dot solar cells probed with time-resolved surface photovoltage spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, B. F.; Leontiadou, M. A.; Clark, P. C. J.; Williamson, A. I.; Silly, M. G.; Sirotti, F.; Fairclough, S. M.; Tsang, S. C. E.; Neo, D. C. J.; Assender, H. E.; Watt, A. A. R.; Flavell, W. R.

    2016-02-01

    Time-resolved laser-pump X-ray-photoemission-probe spectroscopy of a ZnO ( 10 1 ¯ 0 ) substrate with and without PbS quantum dots (QDs) chemically linked to the surface is performed, using laser photon energies resonant with and below the band gap energy of the substrate (λ = 372 and 640 nm, hν = 3.33 and 1.94 eV). Charge injection from the photoexcited QDs to ZnO is demonstrated through the change in the surface photovoltage of the ZnO substrate observed when the heterojunction is illuminated with 1.94 eV radiation. The measured carrier dynamics are limited by the persistent photoconductivity of ZnO, giving dark carrier lifetimes of the order of 200 μs in a depletion layer at the interface. The chemical specificity of soft X-rays is used to separately measure the charge dynamics in the quantum dots and the substrate, yielding evidence that the depletion region at the interface extends into the PbS QD layer.

  4. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    PubMed Central

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  5. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Viswanathan; P. Reimus

    2003-09-05

    Colloid retardation is influenced by the attachment and detachment of colloids from immobile surfaces. This analysis demonstrates the development of parameters necessary to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids and, hence, retardation in both fractured tuff and porous alluvium. Field and experimental data specific to fractured tuff are used for the analysis of colloid retardation in fractured tuff. Experimental data specific to colloid transport in alluvial material from Yucca Mountain as well as bacteriophage field studies in alluvial material, which are thought to be good analogs for colloid transport, are used to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids in the alluvial material. There are no alternative scientific approaches or technical methods for calculating these retardation factors.

  6. Microfluidic colloid filtration.

    PubMed

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J C; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today's water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a "cake layer" - often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  7. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” - often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  8. Sodium meta-autunite colloids: Synthesis, characterization,stability

    SciTech Connect

    zzuoping@lbl.gov

    2004-04-10

    Waste forms of U such as those in the United States Department of Energy's Hanford Site often contain high concentrations of Na and P. Low solubility sodium uranyl phosphates such as sodium meta-autunite have the potential to form mobile colloids that can facilitate transport of this radionuclide. In order to understand the geochemical behavior of uranyl phosphate colloids, we synthesized sodiummeta-autunite colloids, and characterized their morphology, chemical composition, structure, dehydration, and surface charge. The stability of these synthetic plate-shaped colloids was tested with respect to time and pH. The highest aggregation rate was observed at pH 3, and the rate decreases as pH increases, indicating that higher stability of colloid dispersion under neutral and alkaline pH conditions. The synthetic colloids are all negatively charged and no isoelectric points were found over a pH range of 3 to 9. The zeta-potentials of the colloids in the phosphate solution show a strong pH-dependence in the more acidic range over time, but are relatively constant in the neutral and alkaline pH range. The geochemical behavior of the synthetic colloids can be interpreted using DLVO theory. The results suggest that formation of mobile sodium meta-autunite colloids can enhance the transport of U in some contaminated sediments.

  9. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  10. Synchronized oscillations of dimers in biphasic charged fd-virus suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, K.; Piao, S. H.; Choi, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    Micron-sized colloidal spheres that are dispersed in an isotropic-nematic biphasic host suspension of charged rods (fd-virus particles) are shown to spontaneously form dimers, which exhibit a synchronized oscillatory motion. Dimer formation is not observed in the monophase of isotropic and nematic suspensions. The synchronized oscillations of dimers are connected to the inhomogeneous state of the host suspension of charged rods (fd viruses) where nematic domains are in coexistence with isotropic regions. The synchronization of oscillations occurs in bulk states, in the absence of an external field. With a low field strength of an applied electric field, the synchronization is rather reduced, but it recovers again when the field is turned off. In this Rapid Communication, we report this observation as an example of the strange attractor, occurring in the mixture of PS (polystyrene) dimers in an isotropic-nematic coexistence biphasic fd-virus network. Furthermore, we highlight that the synchronization of PS-dimer oscillations is the result of a global bifurcation diagram, driven by a delicate balance between the short-attractive "twisted" interaction of PS dimers and long-ranged electrostatic repulsive interactions of charged fd rods. The interest is then in the local enhancement of "twist-nematic" elasticity in reorientation of the dimer oscillations. An analysis of image-time correlations is provided with the data movies and Fourier transforms of averaged orientations for the synchronized oscillations of dimers in the biphasic I -N coexistence concentration of charged fd-virus suspensions.

  11. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  12. Effective interaction of charged platelets in aqueous solution: Investigations of colloid laponite suspensions by static light scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Rosenfeldt, S.; Ballauff, M.; Harnau, L.

    2005-11-01

    We study dilute aqueous solutions of charged disklike mineral particles (laponite) by a combination of static light scattering (SLS) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Laponite solutions are known to form gels above a certain critical concentration that must be described as nonequilibrium states. Here we focus on the investigation by SLS and SAXS at concentrations below gelation (c<0.016 g/L) and at low concentrations of added salt (0.001M and 0.005M). Thus, we have obtained the scattering function of single Laponite platelets as well as the structure factor describing their interaction at finite concentration. A detailed analysis of the combined sets of data proves that the solutions are in a well-defined equilibrium state. Moreover, this analysis demonstrates the internal consistency and accuracy of the scattering functions obtained at finite concentrations. We find that laponite particles interact through an effective pair potential that is attractive on short range but repulsive on longer range. This finding demonstrates that Laponite solutions exhibit only a limited stability at the concentration of added salt used herein. Raising the ionic strength to 0.005M already leads to slow flocculation as is evidenced from the enhanced scattering intensity at smallest scattering angles. All data strongly suggest that the gelation occurring at higher concentration is related to aggregation.

  13. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2013-08-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called ``colloid antibodies'', were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating the targeted microbial cells. We successfully demonstrated the shape and size recognition between such colloidal imprints and matching microbial cells. High percentage of binding events of colloidal imprints with the size matching target particles was achieved. We demonstrated selective binding of colloidal imprints to target microbial cells in a binary mixture of cells of different shapes and sizes, which also resulted in high binding selectivity. We explored the role of the electrostatic interactions between the target cells and their colloid imprints by pre-coating both of them with polyelectrolytes. Selective binding occurred predominantly in the case of opposite surface charges of the colloid cell imprint and the targeted cells. The mechanism of the recognition is based on the amplification of the surface adhesion in the case of shape and size match due to the increased contact area between the target cell and the colloidal imprint. We also tested the selective binding for colloid imprints of particles of fixed shape and varying sizes. The concept of cell recognition by colloid imprints could be used for development of colloid antibodies for shape-selective binding of microbes. Such colloid antibodies could be additionally functionalized with surface groups to enhance their binding efficiency to cells of specific shape and deliver a drug payload directly to their surface or allow them to be manipulated using external fields. They could benefit the pharmaceutical industry in developing selective antimicrobial therapies and formulations.

  14. Ring around the colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Marcello, Jr.; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Baumgart, Tobias; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    In this work, we show that Janus washers, genus-one colloids with hybrid anchoring conditions, form topologically required defects in nematic liquid crystals. Experiments under crossed polarizers reveal the defect structure to be a rigid disclination loop confined within the colloid, with an accompanying defect in the liquid crystal. When confined to a homeotropic cell, the resulting colloid-defect ring pair tilts relative to the far field director, in contrast to the behavior of toroidal colloids with purely homeotropic anchoring. We show that this tilting behavior can be reversibly suppressed by the introduction of a spherical colloid into the center of the toroid, creating a new kind of multi-shape colloidal assemblage.

  15. Bacterial Flagella as a Model Rigid Rod of Tunable Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Walter; Yardimci, Sevim; Gibaud, Thomas; Snow, Henry; Urbach, Jeff; Dogic, Zvonimir

    In this research, we study the physical properties of suspensions of bacterial flagella from Salmonella typhimurium prepared in a variety of rigid polymorphic shapes. Flagella act as a rigid colloidal particle that can exhibit non-trivial geometry including helices of varying dimensions, straight rods, or a combination of the two in the same filament. By controlling the conditions in which flagella are prepared, the polymorphic shape assumed by the filament can be controlled. Utilizing different polymorphic shapes, we combine results from optical microscopy observations of single filaments with bulk rheological measurements to help understand the role that constituent colloidal geometry plays in complex bulk behavior.

  16. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  17. Pull rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1988-04-21

    A pull rod assembly comprising a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring, said piston device being mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  18. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  19. Analysis of colloid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-12-31

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Synthesis, crystal structure, and colloidal dispersions of vanadium tetrasulfide (VS4).

    PubMed

    Kozlova, Mariia N; Mironov, Yuri V; Grayfer, Ekaterina D; Smolentsev, Anton I; Zaikovskii, Vladimir I; Nebogatikova, Nadezhda A; Podlipskaya, Tatyana Yu; Fedorov, Vladimir E

    2015-03-16

    Although many of the layered metal chalcogenides, such as MoS2, are well-studied, some other chalcogenides have received less attention by comparison. In particular, there has been an emerging interest in vanadium tetrasulfide (VS4), which displays useful properties as a component of hybrids. However, the synthetic methods and characteristics of individual VS4 are not yet well defined, and there is no report on its solution processability. Here we have synthesized VS4 by a simple and fast direct reaction between elements. Reinvestigation of the VS4 crystal structure yielded more precise atomic coordinates and interatomic distances, thereby confirming the crystallization of VS4 in the monoclinic C2/c group and its quasi-1D chainlike structure. As the chains in VS4 are only bonded by weak van der Waals forces, we further demonstrate that bulk VS4 may be ultrasonically dispersed in appropriate solvents to form colloids, similarly to the layered chalcogenides. VS4 particles in colloids retain their phase identity and rod-shaped morphology with lengths in the range of hundreds of nanometers. Isopropanol dispersion exhibited the highest concentration and stability, which was achieved owing to the repulsion caused by high negative charges on the edges of the particles. PMID:25663043

  1. Statics and dynamics of colloidal particles on optical tray arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    We examine the statics and dynamics of charged colloids interacting with periodic optical trap arrays. In particular we study the regime where more than one colloid is confined in each trap, creating effective dimer, trimer, and higher order states called colloidal molecular crystals. The n-mer states have all effective orientational degree of freedom which can be controlled with an external driving field. In general, the external field causes a polarization effect where the orientation of the n-mers aligns with the external field, similar to liquid crystal systems. Additionally, under a rotating external drive the n-mers can rotate with the drive. In some cases a series of structural transitions in the colloidal crystal states occur in the rotating field due to a competition between the ordering of the colloidal molecular crystals and the polarization effect which orients the n-mers in the direction of the drive. We also show that for some parameters, the n-mers continuously rotate with the drive without witching, that depinning transitions can occur where the colloids jump from well to well, and that there are a number of distinct dynamical transitions between the phases. Finally, we illustrate colloidal orderings at fillings of more than four colloids per trap, indicating that it is possible to create higher order colloidal crystal cluster phases.

  2. Study on the colloids generated from testing of high-level nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Mertz, C.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.; Chaiko, D.J.

    1993-03-01

    The generation of colloids in the interaction of high-level nuclear waste glasses with groundwater at 90{degrees}C has been investigated. The stability of the colloidal suspensions has been characterized with respect to salt concentration, pH time, particle size, and zeta potential. The compositions and the morphology of the colloids have also been determined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From ourtest results combined with earlier ones, we conclude that the waste glass may contribute to the colloid formation by increasing ion concentration in groundwater, which causes nucleation of colloids; by releasing radionuclides that adsorb onto existing groundwater colloids; and by spalling colloidal-size fragments from the surface layer of the reacted glass. The colloids are silicon-rich particles, such as smectites and uranium silicates. When the salt concentration in the solution is high the colloidal suspensions agglomerate. However, the agglomerated particles can be resuspended if the salt concentration is lowered by dilution with groundwater. The colloids agglomerate quickly after the leachate is cooled to room temperature. Most of the colloids settle out of the solution within a few days at ambient temperature. The isoelectric point is at a pH of approximately 1.0. Between pH 1 and 10.5, the colloids are negatively charged, which suggests that they will deposit readily on, positively charged surfaces. The average particle size islargest at the isoelectric point and is smallest around pH 6.

  3. Study on the colloids generated from testing of high-level nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Mertz, C.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.; Chaiko, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The generation of colloids in the interaction of high-level nuclear waste glasses with groundwater at 90[degrees]C has been investigated. The stability of the colloidal suspensions has been characterized with respect to salt concentration, pH time, particle size, and zeta potential. The compositions and the morphology of the colloids have also been determined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From ourtest results combined with earlier ones, we conclude that the waste glass may contribute to the colloid formation by increasing ion concentration in groundwater, which causes nucleation of colloids; by releasing radionuclides that adsorb onto existing groundwater colloids; and by spalling colloidal-size fragments from the surface layer of the reacted glass. The colloids are silicon-rich particles, such as smectites and uranium silicates. When the salt concentration in the solution is high the colloidal suspensions agglomerate. However, the agglomerated particles can be resuspended if the salt concentration is lowered by dilution with groundwater. The colloids agglomerate quickly after the leachate is cooled to room temperature. Most of the colloids settle out of the solution within a few days at ambient temperature. The isoelectric point is at a pH of approximately 1.0. Between pH 1 and 10.5, the colloids are negatively charged, which suggests that they will deposit readily on, positively charged surfaces. The average particle size islargest at the isoelectric point and is smallest around pH 6.

  4. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  5. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  6. Rod Photoreceptors Detect Rapid Flicker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, J. D.; MacLeod, Donald I. A.

    1977-01-01

    Rod-isolation techniques show that light-adapted human rods detect flicker frequencies as high as 28 hertz, and that the function relating rod critical flicker frequency to stimulus intensity contains two distinct branches. (MLH)

  7. Driving magnetic colloidal polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, Joshua; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    Magnetic colloids are of growing interest for applications such as drug delivery and in vitro tissue growth. Recent experiments have synthesized 1D chains of magnetic colloids into permanent colloidal polymers. We study magnetic colloidal polymers theoretically and computationally under the influence of time-varying external fields and find a rich set of controllable, dynamic conformations. By iterating through a sequence of conformations, these polymers can perform mechanical functions. We discuss possible roles for these polymers beyond those considered for single colloids. This work was supported as part of the Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award # DE-SC0000989.

  8. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  9. Measuring the equation of state for a 2D colloidal membrane: A microfluidic approach to buffer exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balchunas, Andrew; Cabanas, Rafael; Fraden, Seth; Dogic, Zvonimir

    Previous work has shown that monodisperse rod-like colloidal particles, such as a filamentous bacteriophage, self assemble into a 2D monolayer smectic in the presence of a non-adsorbing depleting polymer. These structures have the same functional form of bending rigidity and lateral compressibility as conventional lipid bi-layers, so we name the monolayer smectic a colloidal membrane. We have developed a microfluidic device such that the osmotic pressure acting on a colloidal membrane may be controlled via a full in situ buffer exchange. Rod density within individual colloidal membranes was measured as a function of osmotic pressure and a first order phase transition, from 2D fluid to 2D solid, was observed. kon and koff rates of rod to membrane binding were measured by lowering the osmotic pressure until membrane evaporation occurred.

  10. Dielectric effects on the ion distribution near a Janus colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huanxin; Han, Ming; Luijten, Erik

    Spherical Janus colloids, particles with two domains of different materials, are typically heterogeneous in permittivity. This dielectric heterogeneity will influence their behavior in electrolytes, ranging from their aggregation to their electrokinetics in external fields. We investigate the structure of the electric double layer around spherical Janus colloids immersed in solution via molecular dynamics simulations. Polarization of the colloidal surfaces by the surrounding ions is calculated dynamically with a boundary-element method based Poisson solver. One observation is that even neutral Janus colloids may carry a net dipole moment in the presence of asymmetric salts. Moreover, we extend this study to incorporate a spatially varying permittivity of the solvent near a charged Janus colloid, and demonstrate the effect of this dielectric variation on the electric double layer.

  11. Method for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trau, Mathias (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method apparatus is provided for electrophoretically depositing particles onto an electrode, and electrohydrodynamically assembling the particles into crystalline structures. Specifically, the present method and apparatus creates a current flowing through a solution to cause identically charged electrophoretically deposited colloidal particles to attract each other over very large distances (<5 particle diameters) on the surface of electrodes to form two-dimensional colloidal crystals. The attractive force can be created with both DC and AC fields and can modulated by adjusting either the field strength or frequency of the current. Modulating this lateral attraction between the particles causes the reversible formation of two-dimensional fluid and crystalline colloidal states on the electrode surface. Further manipulation allows for the formation of two or three-dimensional colloidal crystals, as well as more complex designed structures. Once the required structures are formed, these three-dimension colloidal crystals can be permanently frozen or glued by controlled coagulation induced by to the applied field to form a stable crystalline structure.

  12. Apparatus for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trau, Mathias (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method apparatus is provided for electrophoretically depositing particles onto an electrode, and electrohydrodynamically assembling the particles into crystalline structures. Specifically, the present method and apparatus creates a current flowing through a solution to cause identically charged electrophoretically deposited colloidal particles to attract each other over very large distances (<5 particle diameters) on the surface of electrodes to form two-dimensional colloidal crystals. The attractive force can be created with both DC and AC fields and can modulated by adjusting either the field strength or frequency of the current. Modulating this lateral attraction between the particles causes the reversible formation of two-dimensional fluid and crystalline colloidal states on the electrode surface. Further manipulation allows for the formation of two or three-dimensional colloidal crystals, as well as more complex designed structures. Once the required structures are formed, these three-dimension colloidal crystals can be permanently frozen or glued by controlled coagulation induced by to the applied field to form a stable crystalline structure.

  13. Rhythmic Cluster Generation in Strongly Driven Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensink, H. H.; Löwen, H.

    2006-07-01

    We study the response of a nematic colloidal dispersion of rods to a driven probe particle which is dragged with high speed through the dispersion perpendicular to the nematic director. In front of the dragged particle, clusters of rods are generated which rhythmically grow and dissolve by rotational motion. We find evidence for a mesoscopic cluster-cluster correlation length, independent of the imposed drag speed. Our results are based on nonequilibrium Brownian dynamics computer simulations and in line with a dynamical scaling theory.

  14. Lock and key colloids.

    PubMed

    Sacanna, S; Irvine, W T M; Chaikin, P M; Pine, D J

    2010-03-25

    New functional materials can in principle be created using colloids that self-assemble into a desired structure by means of a programmable recognition and binding scheme. This idea has been explored by attaching 'programmed' DNA strands to nanometre- and micrometre- sized particles and then using DNA hybridization to direct the placement of the particles in the final assembly. Here we demonstrate an alternative recognition mechanism for directing the assembly of composite structures, based on particles with complementary shapes. Our system, which uses Fischer's lock-and-key principle, employs colloidal spheres as keys and monodisperse colloidal particles with a spherical cavity as locks that bind spontaneously and reversibly via the depletion interaction. The lock-and-key binding is specific because it is controlled by how closely the size of a spherical colloidal key particle matches the radius of the spherical cavity of the lock particle. The strength of the binding can be further tuned by adjusting the solution composition or temperature. The composite assemblies have the unique feature of having flexible bonds, allowing us to produce flexible dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric colloidal molecules as well as more complex colloidal polymers. We expect that this lock-and-key recognition mechanism will find wider use as a means of programming and directing colloidal self-assembly. PMID:20336142

  15. Control rod driveline and grapple

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A control rod driveline and grapple is disclosed for placement between a control rod drive and a nuclear reactor control rod containing poison for parasitic neutron absorption required for reactor shutdown. The control rod is provided with an enlarged cylindrical handle which terminates in an upwardly extending rod to provide a grapple point for the driveline. The grapple mechanism includes a tension rod which receives the upwardly extending handle and is provided with a lower annular flange. A plurality of preferably six grapple segments surround and grip the control rod handle. Each grapple rod segment grips the flange on the tension rod at an interior upper annular indentation, bears against the enlarged cylindrical handle at an intermediate annulus and captures the upwardly flaring frustum shaped handle at a lower and complementary female segment. The tension rods and grapple segments are surrounded by and encased within a cylinder. The cylinder terminates immediately and outward extending annulus at the lower portion of the grapple segments. Excursion of the tension rod relative to the encasing cylinder causes rod release at the handle by permitting the grapple segments to pivot outwardly and about the annulus on the tension rod so as to open the lower defined frustum shaped annulus and drop the rod. Relative movement between the tension rod and cylinder can occur either due to electromagnetic release of the tension rod within defined limits of travel or differential thermal expansion as between the tension rod and cylinder as where the reactor exceeds design thermal limits.

  16. Electric double layer of anisotropic dielectric colloids under electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, M.; Wu, H.; Luijten, E.

    2016-07-01

    Anisotropic colloidal particles constitute an important class of building blocks for self-assembly directed by electrical fields. The aggregation of these building blocks is driven by induced dipole moments, which arise from an interplay between dielectric effects and the electric double layer. For particles that are anisotropic in shape, charge distribution, and dielectric properties, calculation of the electric double layer requires coupling of the ionic dynamics to a Poisson solver. We apply recently proposed methods to solve this problem for experimentally employed colloids in static and time-dependent electric fields. This allows us to predict the effects of field strength and frequency on the colloidal properties.

  17. Photophysics and photochemistry of quantized ZnO colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, P.V.; Patrick, B.

    1992-08-06

    The photophysical and photochemical behavior of quantized ZnO colloids in ethanol has been investigated by time-resolved transient absorption and emission measurements. Trapping of electrons at the ZnO surface resulted in broad absorption in the red region. The green emission of ZnO colloids was readily quenched by hole scavengers such as SCN{sup -} and I{sup -}. The photoinduced charge transfer to these hole scavengers was studied by laser flash photolysis. The yield of oxidized product increased considerably when ZnO colloids were coupled with ZnSe. 36 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Control over Colloidal Particle Morphology by Dispersion Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, B.

    2013-03-01

    The main subject of this thesis is the structure and morphology control of colloidal polymer particles, in particular, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles, by dispersion polymerization in polar solvents. The structure control, ranging from surface morphology and internal structure to shape manipulation of polymer particles, was attempted through copolymerization of monomers with various types of materials, such as cross-linkers, dyes, and colloidal silica spheres or rods. The obtained spherical or non-spherical particles are interesting as model systems as they mimic molecules at colloidal scales. Their phase behavior can be studied in the presence or absence of external fields (like electric and gravity fields). Additionally, they can be used for various applications, such as photonic crystals

  19. Nanoparticle engineering of colloidal suspension behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Angel Thanda

    We investigate the effects of highly charged nanoparticles on the phase behavior, structure, and assembly of colloidal microsphere suspensions. Specifically, by selectively tuning the electrostatic interactions between silica microspheres and polystyrene nanoparticles, we study the behavior of four key systems: (i) strongly repulsive, (ii) haloing, (iii) weakly attractive, and (iv) strongly attractive systems. In each system, a combination of nanoparticle adsorption, zeta potential, and confocal microscopy measurements are carried out to systematically study the effects of nanoparticle volume fraction, microsphere/nanoparticle size ratios, and interparticle interactions on their behavior. Our observations indicate that minimal adsorption of highly charged nanoparticles occurs on like-charged and negligibly-charged microspheres, whereas their extent of association increases dramatically with increasing microsphere-nanoparticle attraction. A rich phase behavior emerges in these systems based on whether the nanoparticle species serve as depletants, haloing, or bridging species. The phase transitions in the haloing system occur at constant nanoparticle volume fractions, φnano, over a broad range of microsphere volume fractions, φmicro . By contrast, the observed transitions in the weakly and strongly attractive mixtures occur at a constant number ratio of nanoparticles per microsphere, Nnano/Nmicro. Important structural differences emerge, which can be exploited in the assembly of colloidal gels for direct ink writing and colloidal crystals on epitaxially patterned substrates. Finally, for the first time, we explore nanoparticle haloing as a new route for stabilizing hydrophobic colloidal drugs in aqueous suspensions media for preparation of injectable pharmaceuticals. These microsphere suspensions exhibit improved stability relative to their surfactant-stabilized counterparts after autoclaving, a critical processing step for this target applications. This research

  20. Colloidal pen lithography.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mianqi; Cai, Xiaojing; Chen, Ghenfu

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal pen lithography, a low-cost, high-throughput scanning probe contact printing method, has been developed, which is based on self-assembled colloidal arrays embedded in a soft elastomeric stamp. Patterned protein arrays are demonstrated using this method, with a feature size ranging from 100 nm to several micrometers. A brief study into the specificity reorganization of protein gives evidence for the feasibility of this method for writing protein chips. PMID:25288364

  1. Entropic forces stabilize diverse emergent structures in colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Gibaud, Thomas; Dogic, Zvonimir; Lubensky, T. C.

    The depletion interaction mediated by non-adsorbing polymers promotes condensation and assembly of repulsive colloidal particles into diverse higher-order structures and materials. One example, with particularly rich emergent behaviors, is the formation of two-dimensional colloidal membranes from a suspension of filamentous $\\it{fd}$ viruses, which act as rods with effective repulsive interactions, and dextran, which acts as a condensing, depletion-inducing agent. Colloidal membranes exhibit chiral twist even when the constituent virus mixture lacks macroscopic chirality, change from a circular shape to a striking starfish shape upon changing the chirality of constituent rods, and partially coalesce via domain walls through which the viruses twist by $180^\\circ$. We formulate an entropically-motivated theory that can quantitatively explain these experimental structures and measurements, both previously published and newly performed, over a wide range of experimental conditions. Our results elucidate how entropy alone, manifested through the viruses as Frank elastic energy and through the depletants as an effective surface tension, drives the formation and behavior of these diverse structures. Our generalizable principles propose the existence of analogous effects in molecular membranes and can be exploited in the design of reconfigurable colloidal structures.

  2. Entropic forces stabilize diverse emergent structures in colloidal membranes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Louis; Gibaud, Thomas; Dogic, Zvonimir; Lubensky, T C

    2016-01-14

    The depletion interaction mediated by non-adsorbing polymers promotes condensation and assembly of repulsive colloidal particles into diverse higher-order structures and materials. One example, with particularly rich emergent behaviors, is the formation of two-dimensional colloidal membranes from a suspension of filamentous fd viruses, which act as rods with effective repulsive interactions, and dextran, which acts as a condensing, depletion-inducing agent. Colloidal membranes exhibit chiral twist even when the constituent virus mixture lacks macroscopic chirality, change from a circular shape to a striking starfish shape upon changing the chirality of constituent rods, and partially coalesce via domain walls through which the viruses twist by 180°. We formulate an entropically-motivated theory that can quantitatively explain these experimental structures and measurements, both previously published and newly performed, over a wide range of experimental conditions. Our results elucidate how entropy alone, manifested through the viruses as Frank elastic energy and through the depletants as an effective surface tension, drives the formation and behavior of these diverse structures. Our generalizable principles propose the existence of analogous effects in molecular membranes and can be exploited in the design of reconfigurable colloidal structures. PMID:26472139

  3. A brief perspective on the diverging theories of lymphatic targeting with colloids.

    PubMed

    Siram, Karthik; Marslin, Gregory; Raghavan, Chellan Vijaya; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Rahman, Habibur; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    For targeted delivery of colloids to the lymphatic system, the colloids should efficiently reach and remain in the lymphatics for a considerable period of time. As per the current knowledge, diffusion and phagocytosis are the two mechanisms through which colloids reach the lymphatic system. Several parameters including particle size and charge have been shown to affect the direct uptake of colloids by the lymphatic system. Although many researchers attached ligands on the surface of colloids to promote phagocytosis-mediated lymphatic delivery, another school of thought suggests avoidance of phagocytosis by use of carriers like polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated colloids to impart stealth attributes and evade phagocytosis. In this perspective, we weigh up the paradoxical theories and approaches available in the literature to draw conclusions on the conditions favorable for achieving efficient lymphatic targeting of colloids. PMID:27366065

  4. A brief perspective on the diverging theories of lymphatic targeting with colloids

    PubMed Central

    Siram, Karthik; Marslin, Gregory; Raghavan, Chellan Vijaya; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Rahman, Habibur; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    For targeted delivery of colloids to the lymphatic system, the colloids should efficiently reach and remain in the lymphatics for a considerable period of time. As per the current knowledge, diffusion and phagocytosis are the two mechanisms through which colloids reach the lymphatic system. Several parameters including particle size and charge have been shown to affect the direct uptake of colloids by the lymphatic system. Although many researchers attached ligands on the surface of colloids to promote phagocytosis-mediated lymphatic delivery, another school of thought suggests avoidance of phagocytosis by use of carriers like polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated colloids to impart stealth attributes and evade phagocytosis. In this perspective, we weigh up the paradoxical theories and approaches available in the literature to draw conclusions on the conditions favorable for achieving efficient lymphatic targeting of colloids. PMID:27366065

  5. High Charge-Carrier Mobility of 2.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) from a Water-Borne Colloid of a Polymeric Semiconductor via Smart Surfactant Engineering.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jangwhan; Cheon, Kwang Hee; Ahn, Hyungju; Park, Kwang Hun; Kwon, Soon-Ki; Kim, Yun-Hi; Chung, Dae Sung

    2015-10-01

    Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles dispersed in water are synthesized by a novel method utilizing non-ionic surfactants. By developing a smart surfactant engineering technique involving a selective post-removal process of surfactants, an unprecedentedly high mobility of 2.51 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) from a water-borne colloid is demonstrated for the first time. PMID:26288123

  6. Mechanism of diffusion in the smectic- A phase of wormlike rods studied by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinacchi, Giorgio; de Gaetani, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations have been carried out in the smectic- A phase of stiff wormlike rods. The analysis of the long trajectories generated has allowed for a detailed insight into that diffusion mechanism which is operative in the above-mentioned liquid-crystalline phase, as recently visualized in a system of colloidal virus rods. Fast particles, i.e., those able to move abruptly out from one into an adjacent layer, have been identified. Their properties, such as the velocity autocorrelation function and the orientational distribution function, have been determined and compared to the corresponding quantities valid for a generic rod.

  7. Directing colloidal assembly and a metal-insulator transition using quenched-disordered polymeric networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Anh; Jadrich, Ryan; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Replica integral equation and effective medium theory methods are employed to elucidate how to massively reconfigure a colloidal assembly and realize equilibrium states of high electrical conductivity at low physical volume fractions. This is achieved by employing variable mesh size networks of rigid rod or semiflexible polymers as a templating internal field. By exploiting bulk phase separation frustration and the tunable competing processes of colloid adsorption on the low dimensional network and fluctuation-driven colloid clustering in the pore spaces, distinct spatial organizations of greatly enhanced particle contacts can be achieved. As a result, a continuous, but very abrupt, transition from an insulating to metallic-like state can be realized via a small change of either the colloid-template or colloid-colloid attraction strength. Polymer conformational fluctuations are found to significantly modify the physical adsorption process and hence the ability of colloids to organize along the filamentary network strands. Qualitatively new physical behavior can emerge as the pore size approaches the colloid diameter, reflecting strong frustrating constraints of the template on colloidal assembly.

  8. Colloidal nanocrystals for quality lighting and displays: milestones and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Talha; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis of nanocrystals have enabled high-quality high-efficiency light-emitting diodes, displays with significantly broader color gamut, and optically-pumped lasers spanning the whole visible regime. Here we review these colloidal platforms covering the milestone studies together with recent developments. In the review, we focus on the devices made of colloidal quantum dots (nanocrystals), colloidal quantum rods (nanorods), and colloidal quantum wells (nanoplatelets) as well as those of solution processed perovskites and phosphor nanocrystals. The review starts with an introduction to colloidal nanocrystal photonics emphasizing the importance of colloidal materials for light-emitting devices. Subsequently,we continue with the summary of important reports on light-emitting diodes, in which colloids are used as the color converters and then as the emissive layers in electroluminescent devices. Also,we review the developments in color enrichment and electroluminescent displays. Next, we present a summary of important reports on the lasing of colloidal semiconductors. Finally, we summarize and conclude the review presenting a future outlook.

  9. Colloidal Stability of Graphene Oxide: Aggregation in Two Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Gudarzi, Mohsen Moazzami

    2016-05-24

    Colloidal stability of graphene oxide (GO) is studied in aqueous and organic media accompanied by an improved aggregation model based on Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey- Overbeek (DLVO) theory for ultrathin colloidal flakes. It is found that both magnitude and scaling laws for the van der Waals forces are affected significantly by the two-dimensional (2D) nature of GO. Experimental critical coagulation concentrations (CCC) of GO in monovalent salt solutions concur with DLVO theory prediction. The surface charge density of GO is largely affected by pH. However, theoretical calculations and experimental observations show that the colloidal stability of the 2D colloids is less sensitive to the changes in the surface charge density compared to the classical picture of 3D colloids. The DLVO theory also quantitatively predicts the colloidal stability of reduced GO (rGO). The origin of lower stability of rGO compared to GO is rooted in the higher van der Waals forces among rGO sheets, and particularly, in the removal of negatively charged groups, and possibly formation of some cationic groups during reduction. GO also exfoliates in the polar organic solvents and results in stable dispersions. However, addition of nonpolar solvents perturbs the colloidal stability at a critical volume fraction. Analyzing the aggregation of GO in mixtures of different nonpolar solvents and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone proposed that the solvents with dielectric constants of less than 24 are not able to host stable colloids of GO. However, dispersions of GO in very polar solvents shows unexpected stability at high concentration (>1 M) of salts and acids. The origin of this stability is most probably solvation forces. A crucial parameter affecting the ability of polar solvents to impart high stability to GO is their molecular size: the bigger they are, the higher the chance for stabilization. PMID:27143102

  10. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  11. Understanding flame rods

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, J.A. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The flame rod is probably the least understood method of flame detection. Although it is not recommended for oilfired equipment, it is very common on atmospheric, or {open_quotes}in-shot,{close_quotes} gas burners. It is also possible, although not common, to have an application with a constant gas pilot, monitored by a flame rod, and maintaining an oil main flame. Regardless of the application, chances are that flame rods will be encountered during the course of servicing. The technician today must be versatile and able to work on many different types of equipment. One must understand the basic principles of flame rods, and how to correct potential problems. The purpose of a flame detection system is two-fold: (1) to prove there is no flame when there shouldn`t be one, and (2) to prove there is a flame when there should be one. Flame failure response time is very important. This is the amount of time it takes to realize there is a loss of flame, two to four seconds is typical today. Prior to flame rods, either bi-metal or thermocouple type flame detectors were common. The response time for these detectors was up to three minutes, seldom less than one minute.

  12. Intramedullary rodding in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Mulpuri, K; Joseph, B

    2000-01-01

    The results of intramedullary rodding of long bones of 16 children with osteogenesis imperfecta, over a 10-year period, were analyzed. Sheffield elongating rods or non-elongating rods were used. The frequency of fractures was dramatically reduced after implantation of either type of rod, and the ambulatory status improved in all instances. The results were significantly better after Sheffield rodding with regard to the frequency of complications requiring reoperations and the longevity of the rods. Migration of the rods, encountered frequently, appears to be related to improper placement of the rods in the bone. It seems likely that if care is taken to ensure precise placement of a rod of appropriate size, several of these complications may be avoided. PMID:10739296

  13. Axial Thermal Rotation of Slender Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dichuan; Fakhri, Nikta; Pasquali, Matteo; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2011-05-01

    Axial rotational diffusion of rodlike polymers is important in processes such as microtubule filament sliding and flagella beating. By imaging the motion of small kinks along the backbone of chains of DNA-linked colloids, we produce a direct and systematic measurement of axial rotational diffusivity of rods both in bulk solution and near a wall. The measured diffusivities decrease linearly with the chain length, irrespective of the distance from a wall, in agreement with slender-body hydrodynamics theory. Moreover, the presence of small kinks does not affect the chain’s axial diffusivity. Our system and measurements provide insights into fundamental axial diffusion processes of slender objects, which encompass a wide range of entities including biological filaments and linear polymer chains.

  14. COMPOSITE CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Rock, H.R.

    1963-12-24

    A composite control rod for use in controlling a nuclear reactor is described. The control rod is of sandwich construction in which finned dowel pins are utilized to hold together sheets of the neutron absorbing material and nonabsorbing structural material thereby eliminating the need for being dependent on the absorbing material for structural support. The dowel pins perform the function of absorbing the forces due to differential thermal expansion, seating further with the fins into the sheets of material and crushing before damage is done either to the absorbing or non-absorbing material. (AEC)

  15. Soil-borne mobile colloids as influenced by water flow and organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.; Bertsch, P.M.; Adriano, D.C.; Miller, W.P. |

    1993-06-01

    Paucity of understanding mechanisms relevant to the generation of subsurface mobile colloids is a major limitation to our current knowledge of colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. To evaluate the roles of natural organic materials and pore water velocity on mobile colloid generation, colloids generated from 14-m{sup 3} lysimeters containing reconstructed soil profiles were collected and characterized. Colloids generated during low flow rates were 1030% less abundant, contained at least 65% more iron oxides and gibbsite, were 80% smaller, and had 40% greater electrophoretic mobility than colloids generated during higher flow rates. Quartz, kaolinite, and hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite were enriched by at least 32% in colloids generated during faster flow rates. Mobile colloid surface charge was greatly enhanced by organic carbon (OC) coatings. Concentrations of OC associated with mobile colloids were higher than or equal to the OC concentrations existing in the bulk soils from which the mobile colloids were derived. The profound effects of pore water flow rate and OC on mobile colloid generation introduces complexity to this potentially critical, yet poorly understood, component of subsurface contaminant transport. 41 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    third conference in a series that began in 2004 [2] and was continued in 2008 [3]. The CODEF meeting series is held in conjunction with the German Dutch Transregional Collaborative Research Centre SFB TR6 with the title Physics of Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields. Papers from scientists working within this network as well as those from further invited contributors are summarized in this issue. They are organized according to the type of field applied, namely: shear flow electric field laser-optical and magnetic field confinement other fields and active particles To summarize the highlights of this special issue as regards shear fields, the response of depletion-induced colloidal clusters to shear is explored in [4]. Soft particles deform under shear and their structural and dynamical behaviour is studied both by experiment [5] and theory [6]. Transient dynamics after switching on shear is described by a joint venture of theory, simulation and experiment in [7]. Colloids provide the fascinating possibility to drag single particles through the suspension, which gives access to microrheology (as opposed to macrorheology, where macroscopic boundaries are moved). Several theoretical aspects of microrheology are discussed in this issue [8-10]. Moreover, a microscopic theory for shear viscosity is presented [11]. Various aspects of colloids in electric fields are also included in this issue. Electrokinetic phenomena for charged suspensions couple flow and electric phenomena in an intricate way and are intensely discussed both by experiment and simulation in contributions [12-14]. Dielectric phenomena are also influenced by electric fields [15]. Electric fields can induce effective dipolar forces between colloids leading to string formation [16]. Finally, binary mixtures in an electric driving field exhibit laning [17]. Simulation [18] and theoretical [19] studies of this nonequilibrium phenomenon are also discussed in this issue. Laser-optical fields can be used to

  17. Anchor for Fiberglas Guy Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Solution to problem of anchoring fiberglas guy rods to install nut with threads on outer circumference, followed by aluminum sleeve. Sleeve has opening oval at upper and round at bottom end. End of rod is split so fiberglas wedge can be inserted to form V-shaped end. Spread end of rod fits into tapered hole in sleeve and threaded aluminum coupling is put over rod and sleeve.

  18. Scattering from correlations in colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions typically exhibit spatial correlations over distances of order 10-10/sup 4/ A, corresponding either to the size of individual particles (e.g., polymer chains, surfactant micelles) or to the range of interaction between particles (e.g., charged polymer lattices at low ionic strength). Apart from having fundamental intrinsic interest, such systems are also extremely useful as model systems with which to study, for example, non-Newtonian hydrodynamics, since temporal correlations are generally much longer lived (10/sup -8/-10/sup -3/ sec) than those found in simple atomic or small molecular systems (10/sup -13/-10/sup -10/ sec). Colloids have long been the subject of macroscopic phenomenological research (on rheological properties, for example), but it is only recently that microscopic light, x-ray and neutron scattering techniques have been applied to their study, in large part because of theoretical difficulties in understanding the scattering from dense liquid-like systems of interacting particles. For spherical colloids, such theoretical problems have now been largely overcome, and for anisotropic colloids experimental techniques are being developed which circumvent the intractable theoretical areas. This paper will first review some static light and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) results on colloidal suspensions, both at equilibrium and in steady-state non-equilibrium situations, and will then discuss some dynamic measurements on polymer solutions and melts made using the neutron spin-echo (NSE) technique. Emphasis is placed on experiments which have a possible counterpart in synchrotron radiation studies. In particular, NSE extends the results of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) to larger momentum transfers and shorter time-scales than are available with visible light, and the extension of PCS to short wavelength on a synchrotron source would be of similar fundamental interest.

  19. Glassy Spin Dynamics in Buckled Colloidal Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Di; Wang, Feng; Han, Yilong

    Geometric frustration arises when lattice structure prevents simultaneous minimization of local interaction energies. It leads to highly degenerate ground states and complex behaviors in frustrated magnetic materials. Here we experimentally studied buckled 1.5-layer colloidal NIPA microgel crystals confined between parallel plates. Spheres buckled up and down are analogous to antiferromagnetic Ising spins. These spins on the distorted triangular lattice exhibit glassy dynamics at low temperatures. In particular, a spin only has 13 nearest-neighbor configurations, which enables to reveal the correlation between structures and dynamical heterogeneity. Soft modes also localize at high-energy regions. Further, we compared the colloidal spin system with kinetic constrained models (KCMs) and observed dynamical facilitation behaviors including excitations lines in space-time. Similar structures and glassy dynamics are also observed in our simulation of Coulomb charges on a triangular lattice. The work was supported by Grant RGC-GRF601613.

  20. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  1. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  2. Approaches to separations using silica colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia Anne Argana

    This thesis describes the synthesis and properties of free-standing nanoporous silica colloidal membranes where the molecular transport is controlled on the basis of size, charge, and chiral selectivity. To achieve this, free-standing membranes were prepared from colloidal solutions of silica nanospheres and the nanopore size and surface functionality were varied. First, Au-coated membranes were prepared and the transport of neutral and charged small molecules through Au-coated silica colloidal membranes modified with poly(methacrylic acid) was studied. Polymer length was controlled by polymerization time to produce pH- and ion-responsive brushes inside the nanopores. By monitoring the flux of a diffusing species, it was demonstrated that the polyelectrolyte brush undergoes swelling and collapse when the pH is increased and decreased, respectively. We also observed an expansion and contraction in the absence and presence of counterions, respectively. We also studied the transport of enantiomers of a chiral dye molecule through silica colloidal membranes with attached chiral moieties. We used small molecules and polymers of amino acid derivatives and chiral calixarenes capable of chiral recognition as a result of stereochemically dependent noncovalent interactions with the diffusing molecule. We found that the selectivity remains approximately the same for membranes modified with small molecules and with polymers. This suggests that enantiopermselectivity depends primarily on the strength of noncovalent interactions rather than the availability of recognition sites. Next, the transport of various generations of dendrimers through silica colloidal membranes was studied in a proof-of-concept experiment to demonstrate the size-selectivity of our materials. Smaller dendrimers were found to diffuse faster and selectivity is improved by using smaller nanopores. Finally, the transport of proteins through silica colloidal membranes was studied as a function of nanopore size

  3. Hafnium stainless steel absorber rod for control rod

    SciTech Connect

    Charnley, J.E.; Cearley, J.E.; Dixon, R.C.; Izzo, K.R.; Aiello, L.L.

    1989-08-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a control rod having a stainless steel body for enclosing a neutron absorbing poison, the control rod having movement along an axial direction for insertion into and out of a nuclear reactor for controlling a nuclear reaction. The improvement comprising: a piece of hafnium; a piece of stainless steel joined to the hafnium by a thin diffusion interface created by friction welding. The hafnium and the stainless steel oriented serially in the axial direction with the thin diffusion interface disposed normal to the axial direction of the control rod movement; means for confining the hafnium to movement along the axial direction with the control rod; and means for attaching the piece of stainless steel to the remaining portion of the control rod to load the weld therebetween under compression or tension during the control rod movement. Whereby the thin diffusion interface is loaded in tension or compression only upon dynamic movement of the control rod.

  4. SAFETY SYSTEM FOR CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Paget, J.A.

    1963-05-14

    A structure for monitoring the structural continuity of a control rod foi a neutron reactor is presented. A electric conductor readily breakable under mechanical stress is fastened along the length of the control rod at a plurality of positions and forms a closed circuit with remote electrical components responsive to an open circuit. A portion of the conductor between the control rod and said components is helically wound to allow free and normally unrestricted movement of the segment of conductor secured to the control rod relative to the remote components. Any break in the circuit is indicative of control rod breakage. (AEC)

  5. Locked-wrap fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Samuel; Chertock, Alan J.; Punches, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for spacing fast reactor fuel rods using a wire wrapper improved by orienting the wire-wrapped fuel rods in a unique manner which introduces desirable performance characteristics not attainable by previous wire-wrapped designs. Use of this method in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor results in: (a) improved mechanical performance, (b) improved rod-to-rod contact, (c) reduced steel volume, and (d) improved thermal-hydraulic performance. The method produces a "locked wrap" design which tends to lock the rods together at each of the wire cluster locations.

  6. Synchronized oscillations of dimers in biphasic charged fd-virus suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kang, K; Piao, S H; Choi, H J

    2016-08-01

    Micron-sized colloidal spheres that are dispersed in an isotropic-nematic biphasic host suspension of charged rods (fd-virus particles) are shown to spontaneously form dimers, which exhibit a synchronized oscillatory motion. Dimer formation is not observed in the monophase of isotropic and nematic suspensions. The synchronized oscillations of dimers are connected to the inhomogeneous state of the host suspension of charged rods (fd viruses) where nematic domains are in coexistence with isotropic regions. The synchronization of oscillations occurs in bulk states, in the absence of an external field. With a low field strength of an applied electric field, the synchronization is rather reduced, but it recovers again when the field is turned off. In this Rapid Communication, we report this observation as an example of the strange attractor, occurring in the mixture of PS (polystyrene) dimers in an isotropic-nematic coexistence biphasic fd-virus network. Furthermore, we highlight that the synchronization of PS-dimer oscillations is the result of a global bifurcation diagram, driven by a delicate balance between the short-attractive "twisted" interaction of PS dimers and long-ranged electrostatic repulsive interactions of charged fd rods. The interest is then in the local enhancement of "twist-nematic" elasticity in reorientation of the dimer oscillations. An analysis of image-time correlations is provided with the data movies and Fourier transforms of averaged orientations for the synchronized oscillations of dimers in the biphasic I-N coexistence concentration of charged fd-virus suspensions. PMID:27627230

  7. COLLOIDS. Colloidal matter: Packing, geometry, and entropy.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-08-28

    Colloidal particles with well-controlled shapes and interactions are an ideal experimental system for exploring how matter organizes itself. Like atoms and molecules, these particles form bulk phases such as liquids and crystals. But they are more than just crude analogs of atoms; they are a form of matter in their own right, with complex and interesting collective behavior not seen at the atomic scale. Their behavior is affected by geometrical or topological constraints, such as curved surfaces or the shapes of the particles. Because the interactions between the particles are often short-ranged, we can understand the effects of these constraints using geometrical concepts such as packing. The geometrical viewpoint gives us a window into how entropy affects not only the structure of matter, but also the dynamics of how it forms. PMID:26315444

  8. APPARATUS FOR SHEATHING RODS

    DOEpatents

    Ford, W.K.; Wyatt, M.; Plail, S.

    1961-08-01

    An arrangement is described for sealing a solid body of nuclear fuel, such as a uranium metal rod, into a closelyfitting thin metallic sheath with an internal atmosphere of inert gas. The sheathing process consists of subjecting the sheath, loaded with the nuclear fuel body, to the sequential operations of evacuation, gas-filling, drawing (to entrap inert gas and secure close contact between sheath and body), and sealing. (AEC)

  9. A survey of laser lightning rod techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Arnold A., Jr.; Berthel, Robert O.

    1991-01-01

    The work done to create a laser lightning rod (LLR) is discussed. Some ongoing research which has the potential for achieving an operational laser lightning rod for use in the protection of missile launch sites, launch vehicles, and other property is discussed. Because of the ease with which a laser beam can be steered into any cloud overhead, an LLR could be used to ascertain if there exists enough charge in the clouds to discharge to the ground as triggered lightning. This leads to the possibility of using LLRs to test clouds prior to launching missiles through the clouds or prior to flying aircraft through the clouds. LLRs could also be used to probe and discharge clouds before or during any hazardous ground operations. Thus, an operational LLR may be able to both detect such sub-critical electrical fields and effectively neutralize them.

  10. Vortices in vibrated granular rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neicu, Toni; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2002-03-01

    We report the first experimental observation of vortex patterns in granular rods inside a container that is vibrated vertically . The experiments were carried out with an anodized aluminum circular container which is rigidly attached to an electromagnetic shaker and the patterns are imaged using a high-frame rate digital camera. At low rod numbers and driving amplitudes, the rods are observed to lie horizontally. Above a critical number or packing fraction of rods, moving domains of vertical rods are spontaneously observed to form which coexist with horizontal rods. These small domains of vertical rods coarsen over time to form a few large vortices. The size of the vortices increases with the number of rods. We are able to track the ends of the vertical rods and obtain the velocity fields of the vortices. The mean azimuthal velocity as a function of distance from the center of the vortex is obtained as a function of the packing fraction. We will report the phase diagram of the various patterns observed as function of number of rods and driving amplitude. The mechanism for the formation and motion of the domains of vertical rods will be also discussed.

  11. Development of Filler Structure in Colloidal Silica-Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Meth, Jeffrey S; Zane, Stephen G; Chi, Changzai; Londono, J David; Wood, Barbara A; Cotts, Patricia; Keating, Mimi; Guise, William; Weigand, Steven

    2012-02-07

    The realization of the full potential for polymeric nanocomposites to manifest their entitled property improvements relies, for some properties, on the ability to achieve maximum particle-matrix interfacial area. Well-dispersed nanocomposites incorporating colloidal silica as the filler can be realized in both polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) matrices by exploiting the charge stabilized nature of silica in nonaqueous solvents which act as Bronsted bases. We demonstrate that dispersions of colloidal silica in dimethylformamide are charge stabilized, regardless of organosilyl surface functionalization. When formulated with polymer solutions, the charge stabilized structure is maintained during drying until the charged double layer collapses. Although particles are free to diffuse and cluster after this neutralization, increased matrix viscosity retards the kinetics. We demonstrate how high molecular weight polymers assist in immobilizing the structure of the silica to produce well-dispersed composites. The glass transition temperatures of these composites do not vary, even at loadings up to 50 vol %.

  12. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small button'' in the latch mechanism had broken off of the lock plunger'' and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  13. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small ``button`` in the latch mechanism had broken off of the ``lock plunger`` and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  14. Hybrid Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticle Colloidal Gels are Injectable Fillers for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhen; Jamal, Syed; Detamore, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Injectable bone fillers have emerged as an alternative to the invasive surgery often required to treat bone defects. Current bone fillers may benefit from improvements in dynamic properties such as shear thinning during injection and recovery of material stiffness after placement. Negatively charged inorganic hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled with positively charged organic poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs to create a cohesive colloidal gel. This material is held together by electrostatic forces that may be disrupted by shear to facilitate extrusion, molding, or injection. Scanning electron micrographs of the dried colloidal gels showed a well-organized, three-dimensional porous structure. Rheology tests revealed that certain colloidal gels could recover after being sheared. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells were also highly viable when seeded on the colloidal gels. HAp/PLGA NP colloidal gels offer an attractive scheme for injectable filling and regeneration of bone tissue. PMID:23815275

  15. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.; Zachara, John M.; Jin, Yan

    2002-06-01

    This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated transport of Cs in the vadose zone. The specific objectives are: (1) Determine the structure, composition, and surface charge characteristics of colloidal particles formed under conditions similar to those occurring during leakage of waste typical of Hanford tank supernatants into soils and sediments surrounding the tanks. (2) Characterize the mutual interactions between colloids, contaminant, and soil matrix in batch experiments under various ionic strength and pH conditions. We will investigate the nature of the solid-liquid interactions and the kinetics of the reactions. (3) Evaluate mobility of colloids through soil under different degrees of water saturation and solution chemistry (ionic strength and pH). (4) Determine the potential of colloids to act as carriers to transport the contaminant through the vadose zone and verify the results through comparison with field samples collected under leaking tanks. Results of this project will help to understand the fundamental mechanisms of Cs transport under the leaking Hanford tanks, and thus contribute to the long-term clean-up strategies at the Hanford site.

  16. Showing particles their place: deterministic colloid immobilization by gold nanomeshes.

    PubMed

    Stelling, Christian; Mark, Andreas; Papastavrou, Georg; Retsch, Markus

    2016-08-14

    The defined immobilization of colloidal particles on a non-close packed lattice on solid substrates is a challenging task in the field of directed colloidal self-assembly. In this contribution the controlled self-assembly of polystyrene beads into chemically modified nanomeshes with a high particle surface coverage is demonstrated. For this, solely electrostatic interaction forces were exploited by the use of topographically shallow gold nanomeshes. Employing orthogonal functionalization, an electrostatic contrast between the glass surface and the gold nanomesh was introduced on a sub-micron scale. This surface charge contrast promotes a highly site-selective trapping of the negatively charged polystyrene particles from the liquid phase. AFM force spectroscopy with a polystyrene colloidal probe was used to rationalize this electrostatic focusing effect. It provides quantitative access to the occurring interaction forces between the particle and substrate surface and clarifies the role of the pH during the immobilization process. Furthermore, the structure of the non-close packed colloidal monolayers can be finely tuned by varying the ionic strength and geometric parameters between colloidal particles and nanomesh. Therefore one is able to specifically and selectively adsorb one or several particles into one individual nanohole. PMID:27416921

  17. Colloidal electrodynamics, electrohydrodynamics and thermodynamics in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yilong

    We use digital video microscopy and liquid structure theory to measure pair potentials of charged stabilized colloidal spheres in an equilibrium monolayer. Anomalous attraction is founded between like-charged spheres in different degree of confinement, different composition of spheres or substrates, at high ionic strength, or for larger spheres. Error analysis is developed to rule out artifacts. We show that one wall is enough to induce the attraction and gold substrate can enhance such effect. The recently derived configuration temperature is generalized to a hierarchy of hyperconfigurational temperatures. We show their relation to the hypervirial theorem. These temperature definitions are successfully tested experimentally for the first time via colloidal systems. The results confirmed our anomalous attractions measured in the previous chapter. As a set of constrains, hyperconfigurational temperatures are used to determine free parameters in an unknown potential. Other applications and thermodynamic considerations are discussed. The complicate electrohydrodynamic interplay of microions' fluxes and macroions in an electric field can induce many instabilities. A zoo of self-organized colloidal patterns are discovered in electrolysis of a horizontal layer of aqueous colloid. At low voltage, spheres cooperatively form various quasi-stationary microscopic clusters. At higher bias, spheres passively trace the electroconvection which is more nonlinear than its thermal analogy, the Raleigh-Benard convection. Explaining these patterns provides new challenge in pattern formation, electrokinetic of colloid and electrochemistry.

  18. Colloid migration in fractured media

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.R. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1989-09-15

    Field studies at the Nevada Test Site by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated that radionuclides are being transported by colloidal material suspended in groundwater. This observation is counter to most predictions from contaminant transport models because the models assume adsorbed species are immobile. The purpose of this research is to quantify the transport processes for colloidal materials and develop the mechanistic understanding necessary to predict radionuclide transport in fractured media. There were three areas of investigation during this year that have addressed these issues: chemical control of colloid deposition on clean mineral surfaces, colloid accumulation on fracture surfaces, and the influence of deposited colloids on colloid and tracer migration. 7 refs.

  19. Spectroscopic properties of colloidal indium phosphide quantum wires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Wang, Fudong; Yu, Heng; Li, Jingbo; Hang, Qingling; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Janes, David B.; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    Colloidal InP quantum wires are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, and passivated with the traditional quantum dots surfactants 1-hexadecylamine and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide. The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to other experimental results for InP quantum dots and wires, and to the predictions of theory. The photoluminescence behavior of the wires is also investigated. Efforts to enhance photoluminescence efficiencies through photochemical etching in the presence of HF result only in photochemical thinning or photo-oxidation, without a significant influence on quantum-wire photoluminescence. However, photo-oxidation produces residual dot and rod domains within the wires, which are luminescent. The results establish that the quantum-wire band gaps are weakly influenced by the nature of the surface passivation, and that colloidal quantum wires have intrinsically low photoluminescence efficiencies.

  20. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  1. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Peter T. K.

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  2. Making Highly Pure Glass Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed quasi-containerless method for making glass rods or fibers minimizes contact between processing equipment and product. Method allows greater range of product sizes and shapes than achieved in experiments on containerless processing. Molten zone established in polycrystalline rod. Furnace sections separated, and glass rod solidifies between them. Clamp supports solid glass as it grows in length. Pulling clamp rapidly away from melt draws glass fiber. Fiber diameter controlled by adjustment of pulling rate.

  3. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1988-01-01

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  4. Nanocrystal Inks without Ligands: Stable Colloids of Bare Germanium Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Zachary C.; Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2011-05-11

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals typically have ligands attached to their surfaces that afford solubility in common solvents but hinder charge transport in nanocrystal films. Here, an alternative route is explored in which bare germanium nanocrystals are solubilized by select solvents to form stable colloids without the use of ligands. A survey of candidate solvents shows that germanium nanocrystals are completely solubilized by benzonitrile, likely because of electrostatic stabilization. Films cast from these dispersions are uniform, dense, and smooth, making them suitable for device applications without postdeposition treatment.

  5. Colloids as model systems for liquid undercooled metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wette, Patrick; Klassen, Ina; Holland-Moritz, Dirk; Palberg, Thomas; Roth, Stephan V.; Herlach, Dieter M.

    2009-01-01

    Charged colloidal particles interact via a hard core Yukawa potential, while isotropic Lennard-Jones-like potentials are frequently used as pair potentials in metals. We present measurements of the structure factor of shear molten monodisperse colloids and molten metals using ultrasmall-angle x-ray scattering and elastic neutron scattering, respectively. In both systems data analysis gives evidence of fivefold-symmetric short-range order becoming more pronounced with increasing deviations from equilibrium. The experiments demonstrate that in both systems topological effects control ordering in the melt state.

  6. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  7. Colloidal Suspensions in Shear Flow : a Real Space Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derks, D.

    2006-09-01

    decomposition pattern is observed. As the structure coarsens, the domains become highly stretched along the flow direction, and the domain width along the vorticity axis reaches a stationary size, corresponding to a steady state. In the final stage of phase separation the denser colloidal liquid phase settles on the bottom of the cell, while the gas phase floats on top. The interface between these phases is the topic of Chapter 5. We investigate the thermal fluctuations of the colloidal gas-liquid interface subjected to a shear flow parallel to the interface. Strikingly, we find that the shear strongly suppresses capillary waves, making the interface smoother. Finally, we consider the demixing process in systems of attractive rods (Chapter 6). A mixture of rod-like viruses (fd) and polymer (dextran) is quenched from a flow-induced fully nematic state into the region where the nematic and the isotropic phase coexist (at zero shear). Dependent on the concentration of rods we observe either demixing by nucleation-and-growth (high concentration) or spinodal decomposition (low concentration). At intermediate concentrations we see the transition between both types of demixing processes, where we locate the spinodal point.

  8. Transport of synthetic colloids through single saturated fractures: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, P.W.

    1995-07-01

    Colloids having the same surface charge sign as the bulk of the geologic media in a groundwater system may be able to travel through the system faster than soluble species because they will follow fluid streamlines more closely and they should have less tendency to diffuse into pores or dead spaces in the media than soluble species. Synthetic colloids with uniform, controlled properties may be ideal for serving as {open_quotes}worst-case{close_quotes} tracers that provide lower-bound estimates of contaminant travel times in hydrologic systems. This report discusses a review of the literature pertaining to colloid transport in single saturated natural fractures. After a brief background discussion to put the literature review in perspective, the phenomenon of colloid transport in saturated fractures is divided into three major topics, each of which is reviewed in detail: (1) saturated fluid flow through fractures; (2) colloid transport by convection, diffusion, and force fields; and (3) colloid interactions with surfaces. It is suggested that these phenomena be accounted for in colloid transport models by using (1) lubrication theory to describe water flow through fractures, (2) particle tracking methods to describe colloid transport in fractures, and (3) a kinetic boundary layer approximation to describe colloid interactions with fracture walls. These methods offer better computational efficiency and better experimental accessibility to model parameters than rigorously solving the complete governing equations.

  9. Decreased Salinity and Actinide Mobility: Colloid-Facilitated Transport or pH Change?

    PubMed

    Haliena, Brian; Zheng, Hangping; Melson, Nathan; Kaplan, Daniel I; Barnett, Mark O

    2016-01-19

    Colloids have been implicated in influencing the transport of actinides and other adsorbed contaminants in the subsurface, significantly increasing their mobility. Such colloid-facilitated transport can be induced by changes in groundwater chemistry that occur, for example, when high ionic strength contaminant plumes are displaced by infiltrating rainwater. We studied the transport and mobility of Th(IV), as an analogue for Pu(IV) and other tetravalent actinides [An(IV)], in saturated columns packed with a natural heterogeneous subsurface sandy sediment. As expected, decreases in ionic strength both promoted the mobilization of natural colloids and enhanced the transport of previously adsorbed Th(IV). However, colloid-facilitated transport played only a minor role in enhancing the transport of Th(IV). Instead, the enhanced transport of Th(IV) was primarily due to the pH-dependent desorption of Th(IV) caused by the change in ionic strength. In contrast, the adsorption of Th(IV) had a marked impact on the surface charge of the sandy sediment, significantly affecting the mobility of the colloids. In the absence of Th(IV), changes in ionic strength were ineffective at releasing colloids while in the presence of Th(IV), decreases in ionic strength liberated significant concentrations of colloids. Therefore, under the conditions of our experiments which mimicked acidic, high ionic strength groundwater contaminant plumes, Th(IV) had a much greater effect on colloid transport than colloids had on Th(IV) transport. PMID:26687028

  10. Mesoscopic dynamics of colloids simulated with dissipative particle dynamics and fluid particle model.

    PubMed

    Dzwinel, Witold; Yuen, David A; Boryczko, Krzysztof

    2002-01-01

    We report results of numerical simulations of complex fluids, using a combination of discrete-particle methods. Our molecular modeling repertoire comprises three simulation techniques: molecular dynamics (MD), dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), and the fluid particle model (FPM). This type of model can depict multi-resolution molecular structures found in complex fluids ranging from single micelle, colloidal crystals, large-scale colloidal aggregates up to the mesoscale processes of hydrodynamical instabilities in the bulk of colloidal suspensions. We can simulate different colloidal structures in which the colloidal beds are of comparable size to the solvent particles. This undertaking is accomplished with a two-level discrete particle model consisting of the MD paradigm with a Lennard-Jones (L-J) type potential for defining the colloidal particle system and DPD or FPM for modeling the solvent. We observe the spontaneous emergence of spherical or rod-like micelles and their crystallization in stable hexagonal or worm-like structures, respectively. The ordered arrays obtained by using the particle model are similar to the 2D colloidal crystals observed in laboratory experiments. The micelle shape and its hydrophobic or hydrophilic character depend on the ratio between the scaling factors of the interactions between colloid-colloid to colloid-solvent. Unlike the miscellar arrays, the colloidal aggregates involve the colloid-solvent interactions prescribed by the DPD forces. Different from the assumption of equilibrium growth, the two-level particle model can display much more realistic molecular physics, which allows for the simulation of aggregation for various types of colloids and solvent liquids over a very broad range of conditions. We discuss the potential prospects of combining MD, DPD, and FPM techniques in a single three-level model. Finally, we present results from large-scale simulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and dispersion of colloidal slab

  11. Magnetofluidic Tweezing of Nonmagnetic Colloids.

    PubMed

    Timonen, Jaakko V I; Demirörs, Ahmet F; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2016-05-01

    Magnetofluidic tweezing based on negative magnetophoresis and microfabricated core-shell magnetic microtips allows controlled on-demand assembly of colloids and microparticles into various static and dynamic structures such as colloidal crystals (as shown for 3.2 μm silica particles). PMID:26990182

  12. Experimental and computational studies of rod-deployment mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalbe, L.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Stofleth, J.H.; Greene, R.W.

    1996-08-01

    We describe experimental measurements and hydrocode simulations of two tests in which long (L/D=12), steel rods were accelerated laterally with charges of Detasheet-C high explosive (HE). In each test configuration, 84 rods were initially aligned parallel to one another in an array of four concentric rings. The first test had a central core of HE that dispersed the rods isotropically. The second test had a narrow, 180 degree strip of HE on one side of the assembly that focused the rods directionally. Using radiographic data taken at several milliseconds after HE initiation, we measured the dynamic distributions of the rods, and their translational velocities and tumble rates. To compare with the data, we also modeled the experiments with our smooth particle hydrocode SPHINX. Within the context of our numerical model, the hydrocode results agree satisfactorily with the test data. We include in our discussion many of the inferences and insights that our results provide to the phenomenology and performance of multimode, rod-deployment mechanisms.

  13. Composite Lightning Rods for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Charles F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Composite, lightweight sacrificial tip with graphite designed reduces lightning-strike damage to composite parts of aircraft and dissipates harmful electrical energy. Device consists of slender composite rod fabricated from highly-conductive unidirectional reinforcing fibers in matrix material. Rods strategically installed in trailing edges of aircraft wings, tails, winglets, control surfaces, and rearward-most portion of aft fuselage.

  14. Rod Climbing of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Wang, Xiaorong

    We wish to report an unexpected effect observed for particle suspensions sucked to pass through a vertical pipe. Above a critical concentration, the suspension on the outside of the pipe may climb along the outside wall of the pipe and then display a surprising rod-climbing effect. Our study shows that the phenomenon is influenced mainly by the suspension composition, the pipe dimension and the suction speed. The effects of the pipe materials of different kinds are negligible. Increasing the suction force and the concentration increases the climbing height. Increasing the pipe diameter and wall thickness reduces the climbing effect. This behavior may be relevant to that the suspensions of the type described are all displaying markedly shear-thickening.

  15. Sorption of radionuclides at tracer level on mineral colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Hadem, N.; Fourest, B.; Guillaumont, R.

    1995-12-01

    Transport of radionuclides by colloids through the geosphere is an important issue in exercises aimed to assess the safety of an underground radwaste repository sited in a water saturated zone. The first problems to deal with are the characterization of the colloids and their capabilities to sorb, at trace level and even at tracer level, radionuclides. This study investigates the relationships between the sorption of short lived {sup 137}Cs{sup +}, {sup 223}Ra{sup 2+}, {sup 227}Th and {sup 131}I{sup -} and the zeta potential, {zeta}-potential, of well identified colloids, as a function of pH (2 to 11), ionic strength, I (10{sup -3} to 1 M), and colloid concentration (up to 2000 ppm). {xi}-potential is the essential parameter to be considered since it reflects both the stability and the surface charge of the colloid. SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Th{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4} colloids have been chosen as `model colloids`. They are not really found in natural media, but are representative of particles with isoelectric points (i.e.p.) ranging between pH 2 to 9. In some cases the effect of the concentration of the elements has been studied as well, to check saturation effects (Cs and I from 10{sup -11} to 10{sup -2}M). Experimental data show that the distribution of radionuclides between the two phases considered depends mainly on zeta potential, but also on other identified factors.

  16. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul William; Boukhalfa, Hakim

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  17. Crystalline Colloidal Arrays in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunkara, Hari B.; Penn, B. G.; Frazier, D. O.; Ramachandran, N.

    1997-01-01

    Crystalline Colloidal Arrays (CCA, also known as colloidal crystals), composed of aqueous or nonaqueous dispersions of self-assembled nanosized polymer colloidal spheres, are emerging toward the development of advanced optical devices for technological applications. The spontaneous self assembly of polymer spheres in a dielectric medium results from the electrostatic repulsive interaction between particles of uniform size and charge distribution. In a way similar to atomic crystals that diffract X-rays, CCA dispersions in thin quartz cells selectively and efficiently Bragg diffract the incident visible light. The reason for this diffraction is because the lattice (body or face centered cubic) spacing is on the order of the wavelength of visible light. Unlike the atomic crystals that diffract a fixed wavelength, colloidal crystals in principle, depending on the particle size, particle number and charge density, can diffract W, Vis or IR light. Therefore, the CCA dispersions can be used as laser filters. Besides, the diffraction intensity depends on the refractive index mismatch between polymer spheres and dielectric medium; therefore, it is possible to modulate incident light intensities by manipulating the index of either the spheres or the medium. Our interest in CCA is in the fabrication of all-optical devices such as optical switches, limiters, and spatial light modulators for optical signal processing. The two major requirements from a materials standpoint are the incorporation of suitable nonlinear optical materials (NLO) into polymer spheres which will allow us to alter the refractive index of the spheres by intense laser radiation, and preparation of solid CCA filters which can resist laser damage. The fabrication of solid composite filters not only has the advantage that the films are easier to handle, but also the arrays in solid films are more robust than in liquid media. In this paper, we report the photopolymerization process used to trap CCA in polymer

  18. Adaptable and dynamic soft colloidal photonics (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Go, Dennis

    2015-10-01

    Existent photonic systems are highly integrated with the active component being completely isolated from the environment as a result of their complex format. There are almost no example for periodic photonic materials, which can interact with their environment by being sensitive to external stimuli while providing the corresponding photonic response. Due to this lack of interaction with the outside world, smart optical components, which are self-healing or adaptable, are almost impossible to achieve. I am going to present an aqueous colloidal system, consisting of core-shell particles with a solid core and a soft shell, bearing both negatively and positively charged groups. The described soft colloids exhibit like charges over a broad range of pH, where they repel each other resulting in a pefect and defect-free photonic crystal. In the absence of a net charge the colloids acquire the arrangement of an amorphous photonic glass. We showcase the applicability of our colloidal system for photonic applications by temporal programming of the photonic system and dynamic switching between ordered and amorphous particle arrangements. We can decrease the pH slowly allowing the particles to transit from negative through neutral to positive, and have them arrange accordingly from crystalline to amorphous and back to crystalline. Thus, we achieve a pre-programmable and autonomous dynamic modulation of the crystallinity of the colloidal arrays and their photonic response. References [1] Go, D., Kodger, T. E., Sprakel, J., and Kuehne, A. J.C. Soft matter. 2014, 10(40), 8060-8065.

  19. Regenerative hyperpolarization in rods.

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, F S

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of the rods in Necturus maculosus were studied at the cell body and the outer segments in dark and light under current and voltage clamp with a pair of intracellular electrodes separated by about 1 mum. 2. The membrane resistance in the dark was voltage- and time-dependent both for the cell body and the outer segment. Slight depolarizations in the cell body reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 10 M omega with a time constant of about 1 sec. Polarization in either direction, at the outer segment, when greater than about 20 mV, reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 30 M omega. The dark potential in the cell body was typically -30 to -35 m V; at the outer segment it was typically only -10 to -15 mV. 3. The light-elicited voltage response in both the cell body and the outer segment was largest with the membrane near the dark potential level. In both regions, the response was reduced when the membrane was polarized in either direction. 4. Under voltage-clamp conditions, a reversal potential for the light response near + 10 mV was measured at the outer segment. At the cell body no reversal potential for the light response was measured; there the clamping current required during the light response was almost of the same magnitude at all potential levels. 5. When the membrane at the cell body was hyperpolarized in the dark under voltage clamp, a transient outward current, typically about one-half the magnitude of the initial inward clamping current was required to maintain the membrane at the clamped potential level. This outward current transient was associated with a decrease in membrane resistance with similar time course. The transient outward current reversed and became inward when the membrane was clamped to potentials more negative than -80 mV. Thus, the transient outward current appears to involve a transient activation initiated by hyperpolarization. I is regenerative in that it is initiated by hyperpolarization and tends to

  20. Status of rod consolidation, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    It is estimated that the spent fuel storage pools at some domestic light-water reactors will run out of space before 2003, the year that the US Department of Energy currently predicts it will have a repository available. Of the methods being studied to alleviate the problem, rod consolidation is one of the leading candidates for achieving more efficient use of existing space in spent fuel storage pools. Rod consolidation involves mechanically removing all the fuel rods from the fuel assembly hardware (i.e., the structural components) and placing the fuel rods in a close-packed array in a canister without space grids. A typical goal of rod consolidation systems is to insert the fuel rods from two fuel assemblies into a canister that has the same exterior dimensions as one standard fuel assembly (i.e., to achieve a consolidation or compaction ratio of 2:1) and to compact the nonfuel-bearing structural components from those two fuel assemblies by a factor of 10 to 20. This report provides an overview of the current status of rod consolidation in the United States and a small amount of information on related activities in other countries. 85 refs., 36 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Colloidal aggregation in polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, M; Ridouane, H; Hachem, E-K; Derouiche, A; Rahmoune, M

    2005-06-22

    We consider here a low-density assembly of colloidal particles immersed in a critical polymer mixture of two chemically incompatible polymers. We assume that, close to the critical point of the free mixture, the colloids prefer to be surrounded by one polymer (critical adsorption). As result, one is assisted to a reversible colloidal aggregation in the nonpreferred phase, due the existence of a long-range attractive Casimir force between particles. This aggregation is a phase transition driving the colloidal system from dilute to dense phases, as the usual gas-liquid transition. We are interested in a quantitative investigation of the phase diagram of the immersed colloids. We suppose that the positions of particles are disordered, and the disorder is quenched and follows a Gaussian distribution. To apprehend the problem, use is made of the standard phi(4) theory, where the field phi represents the composition fluctuation (order parameter), combined with the standard cumulant method. First, we derive the expression of the effective free energy of colloids and show that this is of Flory-Huggins type. Second, we find that the interaction parameter u between colloids is simply a linear combination of the isotherm compressibility and specific heat of the free mixture. Third, with the help of the derived effective free energy, we determine the complete shape of the phase diagram (binodal and spinodal) in the (Psi,u) plane, with Psi as the volume fraction of immersed colloids. The continuous "gas-liquid" transition occurs at some critical point K of coordinates (Psi(c) = 0.5,u(c) = 2). Finally, we emphasize that the present work is a natural extension of that, relative to simple liquid mixtures incorporating colloids. PMID:16035822

  2. Solvent wrapped metastable colloidal crystals: highly mutable colloidal assemblies sensitive to weak external disturbance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongpeng; Ye, Siyun; Ge, Jianping

    2013-12-11

    Solvent wrapped "metastable" crystalline colloidal arrays (CCAs) have been prepared by supersaturation induced precipitation and self-assembly of monodisperse particles in polar/nonpolar organic solvents. These metastable CCAs possess ordered structures but with less stability comparing with traditionally fixed colloidal crystal systems. They are stabilized by the balance between long-range attraction and electrostatic repulsion of neighboring like-charged particles. Monitoring the reflection intensity during evaporation suggests that these crystals can exist for several hours at 90 °C and even longer at room temperature. Based on the evolution of particle volume fraction in whole suspension (φ(SiO2)), crystal phase (φ(crystal)), and liquid phase (φ(liquid)), the formation of metastable CCAs can be understood as a microscopic phase separation process, where the homogeneous dispersion will separate into a "crystal phase" with orderly stacked particles and a "liquid phase" with randomly dispersed particles. Further calculation of the volume fraction of crystal phase (V(crystal)/V(total)) and the ratio of particles in crystal phase (f(crystal)) shows that with the increase of designed Φ(SiO2), more particles precipitate to form colloidal crystals with larger sizes but the lattice spacing of the microcrystals remains constant. Unlike fixed or traditional responsive CCAs, these metastable CCAs can reversibly assemble and disassemble with great ease, because little energy is involved or required in this transformation. Therefore, they can sense weak external disturbances, including subtle motion and slight friction or shearing forces. PMID:24266836

  3. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. PMID:27600123

  4. Two-dimensional dipolar nematic colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Skarabot, M; Ravnik, M; Zumer, S; Tkalec, U; Poberaj, I; Babic, D; Osterman, N; Musevic, I

    2007-11-01

    We study the interactions and directed assembly of dipolar nematic colloidal particles in planar nematic cells using laser tweezers. The binding energies for two stable configurations of a colloidal pair with homeotropic surface alignment are determined. It is shown that the orientation of the dipolar colloidal particle can efficiently be controlled and changed by locally quenching the nematic liquid crystal from the laser-induced isotropic phase. The interaction of a single colloidal particle with a single colloidal chain is determined and the interactions between pairs of colloidal chains are studied. We demonstrate that dipolar colloidal chains self-assemble into the two-dimensional (2D) dipolar nematic colloidal crystals. An odd-even effect is observed with increasing number of colloidal chains forming the 2D colloidal crystal. PMID:18233658

  5. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  6. Method of making colloid labeled with radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  7. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.

    1990-11-13

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints. No Drawings

  8. Absorption of Polyelectrolytes on Colloidal Surfaces as Studied by Electrophoretic and Dynamic Light-Scattering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Okubo; Suda

    1999-05-15

    zeta-Potential and the effective diameter of the colloidal spheres absorbed with the macro-cations and macro-anions are studied by the electrophoretic light-scattering and dynamic light-scattering measurements. Colloidal spheres used are monodispersed polystyrene (220 nm in diameter) and colloidal silica spheres (110 nm). Macro-ions used are sodium polyacrylate, sodium polymethylacrylate, sodium poly(styrene sulfonate), and poly-4-vinyl pyridines quaternized with ethyl bromide, n-butyl bromide, benzyl chloride, and 5% hexadecyl bromide and 95% benzyl chloride. Reversal of colloidal surface charges from negative to positive occurs abruptly above the critical concentration of macro-ions by the excess absorption of the macro-cations onto the anionic colloidal spheres, i.e., avalanche-type absorption. The effective diameter of colloidal spheres including the absorbed layers increases substantially by four- to tenfold. In the presence of large amount of macro-cations aggregation of colloidal spheres mediated by the layers of absorbed macro-cations may occur. Absorption also occurs on the anionic colloidal spheres in the presence of an excess amount of macro-anions by the dipole-dipole-type attractive interactions. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10222098

  9. Gelled colloidal crystals as tunable optical filters for spectrophotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugao, Yukihiro; Onda, Sachiko; Toyotama, Akiko; Takiguchi, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Tsutomu; Hara, Shigeo; Nishikawa, Suguru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-08-01

    We examined the performance of charged colloidal crystals immobilized in a polymer gel as tunable optical filters. The colloidal crystals of charged silica particles (particle diameter = 121 nm; particle concentration = 3.5 vol %; and Bragg wavelength λB = 630–720 nm) were produced by unidirectional crystallization under a temperature gradient. Photocurable gelation reagents were dissolved in the sample beforehand; this enabled gel immobilization of the crystals under ultraviolet illumination. The crystals had dimensions of more than 25 mm2 in area and 1 mm in thickness, and spatial λB variations of less than 1%. Upon mechanical compression, λB values shifted linearly and reversibly over almost the entire visible spectrum. Using the gelled crystals as tunable optical filters, we measured the transmittance spectra of various samples and found them to be in close agreement with those determined using a spectrophotometer equipped with optical gratings.

  10. The renormalized Jellium model of colloidal suspensions with multivalent counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, Thiago E.; Levin, Yan

    2010-12-01

    An extension of the renormalized Jellium model which allows to study colloidal suspensions containing trivalent counterions is proposed. The theory is based on a modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation which incorporates the effects of counterion correlations near the colloidal surfaces using a new boundary condition. The renormalized charges, the counterion density profiles, and osmotic pressures can be easily calculated using the modified renormalized Jellium model. The results are compared with the ones obtained using the traditional Wigner-Seitz (WS) cell approximation also with a new boundary condition. We find that while the thermodynamic functions obtained within the renormalized Jellium model are in a good agreement with their WS counterpart, the effective charges predicted by the two theories can be significantly different.

  11. COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH THE VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus

    2003-09-14

    Contaminants have leaked into the vadose zone at the USDOE Hanford reservation. It is important to understand the fate and transport of these contaminants to design remediation strategies and long-term waste management plans at the Hanford reservation. Colloids may play an important role in fate and transport of strongly sorbing contaminants, such as Cs or Pu. This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. The specific objectives addressed are: (1) Determine the structure, composition, and surface charge characteristics of colloidal particles formed under conditions similar to those occurring during leakage of waste typical of Hanford tank supernatants into soils and sediments surrounding the tanks. (2) Characterize the mutual interactions between colloids, contaminant, and soil matrix in batch experiments under various ionic strength and pH conditions. We will investigate the nature of the solid-liquid interactions and the kinetics of the reactions. (3) Evaluate mobility of colloids through soil under different degrees of water saturation and solution chemistry (ionic strength and pH). (4) Determine the potential of colloids to act as carriers to transport the contaminant through the vadose zone and verify the results through comparison with field samples collected under leaking tanks. (5) Improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for implementation into reactive chemical transport models. This project was in part supported by an NSF-IGERT grant to Washington State University. The IGERT grant provided funding for graduate student research and education, and two graduate students were involved in the EMSP project. The IGERT program also supported undergraduate internships. The project is part of a larger EMSP program to study fate and transport of contaminants under leaking Hanford waste tanks. The project has

  12. Influence of The Physico-chemical Factors On The Transport of Colloids Through Saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovitch, N.; Garnier, J. M.

    Mobile colloids can act as carriers for strongly sorbing chemicals and may enhance contaminant transport in the soil. The transport of colloids through porous media strongly depends on the kinetics of colloid deposition and release. One of the im- portant chemical factors controlling colloid deposition and release is the charge of porous media and colloid surfaces. The surface charge is strongly influenced by so- lution pH and ionic strength. The transport of colloids is also influenced by the size of the colloidal particles and the pore size distribution of the soil matrix. The aim of this work is to evaluate the role of ionic strength, pH and size of particles on the col- loid suspension transport and retention through porous medium. Colloid deposition and release kinetics were studied by the comparison between conservative tracer and colloids breakthrough curves as a response of pulse injections through packed silica sand (16 cm long) columns. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic latex particles were used as model colloids. Tree different size of latex particles were tested: ( 0.1, 0.88, 1.5) µm; pH varied between 5.5 to 8 and the ionic strength (10-4 - 10-3) was adjusted either by NaCl or by mixture of Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 when high pH was used. Results show that low ionic strength and high pH resulted in decrease of hydrophilic colloid deposition rate that was explained by changing of the surface charge of the porous medium. This was confirmed by an increase of the Zeta - potential of the silica sand for decreasing ionic strength and increasing pH that resulted in an increase of the repulsion forces. Higher rate of deposition was observed in the case of hydrophobic colloids. The rate of colloid release depended on the ionic strength: more the ionic strength was decreased, more the release was important. The breakthrough curves showed that the release of colloid consisted of two steps: a rapid release characterized by peak of concentration followed by a tail. The peak was

  13. Emergent behavior in active colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöttl, Andreas; Stark, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Active colloids are microscopic particles, which self-propel through viscous fluids by converting energy extracted from their environment into directed motion. We first explain how artificial microswimmers move forward by generating near-surface flow fields via self-phoresis or the self-induced Marangoni effect. We then discuss generic features of the dynamics of single active colloids in bulk and in confinement, as well as in the presence of gravity, field gradients, and fluid flow. In the third section, we review the emergent collective behavior of active colloidal suspensions, focusing on their structural and dynamic properties. After summarizing experimental observations, we give an overview of the progress in modeling collectively moving active colloids. While active Brownian particles are heavily used to study collective dynamics on large scales, more advanced methods are necessary to explore the importance of hydrodynamic and phoretic particle interactions. Finally, the relevant physical approaches to quantify the emergent collective behavior are presented.

  14. Colloidal Suspended Iron in Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiller, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Iron is transported in most rivers predominantly in two physical-chemical forms: a) organic complexes of Fe(III) and b) crystalline or poorly-ordered suspended phases frequently dominated by iron oxides. These two forms have different properties with respect to transport, bioavailability, and sorption. For the suspended phase iron, the fraction in the colloidal size range may be especially important given the interactions of ferric oxide surfaces with dissolved metal ions and organic compounds. We report the concentrations of colloidal (20 - 450 nm) suspended particulate iron in a wide variety of rivers. Goals of this effort are to ascertain the ubiquity of this material and also to examine other fluvial variables as indicators of its sources and nature. This, in turn, should lead to an understanding of how landscape/climate change could affect fluvial colloidal suspended iron. Possible sources of suspended colloidal iron include ferric oxides precipitated from the oxidation of ferrous iron derived from reducing environments, alumino-silicates derived from physical weathering, products of chemical weathering, and flushing of soils. We observe most commonly that increasing concentrations of colloidal suspended iron follow indicators of reducing sources (e.g., higher dissolved Mn and Ce anomaly close to 1), suggesting that this material is dominated by freshly precipitated iron oxides. Only in glacial watersheds do we find colloidal suspended iron instead correlating with colloidal suspended Si, and hence, likely to be associated with alumino-silicates. We also observe that colloidal suspended iron correlates well with the UV absorbance associated with this size range (20 - 450 nm).

  15. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  16. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  17. Colloidal membranes: The rich confluence of geometry and liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Cihan Nadir

    A simple and experimentally realizable model system of chiral symmetry breaking is liquid-crystalline monolayers of aligned, identical hard rods. In these materials, tuning the chirality at the molecular level affects the geometry at systems level, thereby inducing a myriad of morphological transitions. This thesis presents theoretical studies motivated by the rich phenomenology of these colloidal monolayers. High molecular chirality leads to assemblages of rods exhibiting macroscopic handedness. In the first part we consider one such geometry, twisted ribbons, which are minimal surfaces to a double helix. By employing a theoretical approach that combines liquid-crystalline order with the preferred shape, we focus on the phase transition from simple flat monolayers to these twisted structures. In these monolayers, regions of broken chiral symmetry nucleate at the interfaces, as in a chiral smectic A sample. The second part particularly focuses on the detailed structure and thermodynamic stability of two types of observed interfaces, the monolayer edge and domain walls in simple flat monolayers. Both the edge and "twist-walls" are quasi-one-dimensional bands of molecular twist deformations dictated by local chiral interactions and surface energy considerations. We develop a unified theory of these interfaces by utilizing the de Gennes framework accompanied by appropriate surface energy terms. The last part turns to colloidal "cookies", which form in mixtures of rods with opposite handedness. These elegant structures are essentially flat monolayers surrounded by an array of local, three dimensional cusp defects. We reveal the thermodynamic and structural characteristics of cookies. Furthermore, cookies provide us with a simple relation to determine the intrinsic curvature modulus of our model system, an important constant associated with topological properties of membranes. Our results may have impacts on a broader class of soft thin films.

  18. Showing particles their place: deterministic colloid immobilization by gold nanomeshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelling, Christian; Mark, Andreas; Papastavrou, Georg; Retsch, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The defined immobilization of colloidal particles on a non-close packed lattice on solid substrates is a challenging task in the field of directed colloidal self-assembly. In this contribution the controlled self-assembly of polystyrene beads into chemically modified nanomeshes with a high particle surface coverage is demonstrated. For this, solely electrostatic interaction forces were exploited by the use of topographically shallow gold nanomeshes. Employing orthogonal functionalization, an electrostatic contrast between the glass surface and the gold nanomesh was introduced on a sub-micron scale. This surface charge contrast promotes a highly site-selective trapping of the negatively charged polystyrene particles from the liquid phase. AFM force spectroscopy with a polystyrene colloidal probe was used to rationalize this electrostatic focusing effect. It provides quantitative access to the occurring interaction forces between the particle and substrate surface and clarifies the role of the pH during the immobilization process. Furthermore, the structure of the non-close packed colloidal monolayers can be finely tuned by varying the ionic strength and geometric parameters between colloidal particles and nanomesh. Therefore one is able to specifically and selectively adsorb one or several particles into one individual nanohole.The defined immobilization of colloidal particles on a non-close packed lattice on solid substrates is a challenging task in the field of directed colloidal self-assembly. In this contribution the controlled self-assembly of polystyrene beads into chemically modified nanomeshes with a high particle surface coverage is demonstrated. For this, solely electrostatic interaction forces were exploited by the use of topographically shallow gold nanomeshes. Employing orthogonal functionalization, an electrostatic contrast between the glass surface and the gold nanomesh was introduced on a sub-micron scale. This surface charge contrast promotes a

  19. Removal of colloidal biogenic selenium from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Staicu, Lucian C; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Mehmet A; Ackerson, Christopher J; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic selenium, Se(0), has colloidal properties and thus poses solid-liquid separation problems, such as poor settling and membrane fouling. The separation of Se(0) from the bulk liquid was assessed by centrifugation, filtration, and coagulation-flocculation. Se(0) particles produced by an anaerobic granular sludge are normally distributed, ranging from 50 nm to 250 nm, with an average size of 166±29 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.18. Due to its nanosize range and protein coating-associated negative zeta potential (-15 mV to -23 mV) between pH 2 and 12, biogenic Se(0) exhibits colloidal properties, hampering its removal from suspension. Centrifugation at different centrifugal speeds achieved 22±3% (1500 rpm), 73±2% (3000 rpm) and 91±2% (4500 rpm) removal. Separation by filtration through 0.45 μm filters resulted in 87±1% Se(0) removal. Ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate were used as coagulants in coagulation-flocculation experiments. Aluminum sulfate achieved the highest turbidity removal (92±2%) at a dose of 10(-3) M, whereas ferric chloride achieved a maximum turbidity removal efficiency of only 43±4% at 2.7×10(-4) M. Charge repression plays a minor role in particle neutralization. The sediment volume resulting from Al2(SO3)4 treatment is three times larger than that produced by FeCl3. PMID:25559175

  20. Hierarchical Fast Multipole Simulation of Magnetic Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günal, Yüksel; Visscher, Pieter

    1997-03-01

    We have extended the well-known "fast multipole"footnote L. F. Greengard and V. Rokhlin, J. Comp. Phys. 73 p. 325, 1987. methods for molecular-dynamics simulation of large systems of point charges to continuum systems, such as magnetic films or colloids/march.html>particulate suspensions. (These methods reduce the computational labor from O(N^2) to O(N log N) or O(N), the number of particles). We apply the method to the particular case of a colloidal dispersion of magnetized cylindrical particles. Our method is fully hierarchical, both upward and downward from the particle size scale. The force on each particle is calculated by grouping distant particles into large clusters, nearer particles into smaller clusters, and dividing the nearest particles into segments. The fineness with which the particles are divided is controlled by an error tolerance parameter. The field of each cluster or segment is computed from a multipole expansion. Distant periodic images are also treated as multipoles - this is much faster than standard Fourier-transform or Ewald summation techniques.

  1. Force vs. extension of colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Leroy; Pelcovits, Robert; Powers, Thomas; Zakhary, Mark; Dogic, Zvonimir

    In experiments, disk-shaped colloidal membranes composed of long rod-like viruses will take on a twisted ribbon shape under the application of a diametric stretching force. We use an effective model valid for membranes with small twist penetration to study this phase transition and calculate the force necessary to stretch the membrane to a given extension. The model predicts that for small deformations, the force is linear with spring constant depending on the effective edge bending stiffness of the membrane, while for large extensions, the force is found to saturate to a constant value. Surprisingly, the force is not a monotonic function of the extension. Finally, we use simple numerical calculations to find a power law that accurately describes the critical stretch at which the membrane starts to twist, which may be used to estimate the value of unknown parameters by comparison with experimental data. We are grateful for support from the Brandeis Center for Bioinspired Soft Materials, NSF MRSEC, DMR-1420382.

  2. Organic nature of colloidal actinides transported in surface water environments.

    PubMed

    Santschi, Peter H; Roberts, Kimberly A; Guo, Laodong

    2002-09-01

    Elevated levels of (239,240)Pu and 241Am have been present in surficial soils of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), CO, since the 1960s, when soils were locally contaminated in the 1960s by leaking drums stored on the 903 Pad. Further dispersion of contaminated soil particles was by wind and water. From 1998 until 2001, we examined actinide ((239,240)Pu and 241Am) concentrations and phase speciation in the surface environment at RFETS through field studies and laboratory experiments. Measurements of total (239,240)Pu and 241Am concentrations in storm runoff and pond discharge samples, collected during spring and summer times in 1998-2000, demonstrate that most of the (239,240)Pu and 241Am transported from contaminated soils to streams occurred in the particulate (> or = 0.45 microm; 40-90%) and colloidal (approximately 2 nm or 3 kDa to 0.45 microm; 10-60%) phases. Controlled laboratory investigations of soil resuspension, which simulated storm and erosion events, confirmed that most of the Pu in the 0.45 microm filter-passing phase was in the colloidal phase (> or = 80%) and that remobilization of colloid-bound Pu during soil erosion events can be greatly enhanced by humic and fulvic acids present in these soils. Most importantly, isoelectric focusing experiments of radiolabeled colloidal matter extracted from RFETS soils revealed that colloidal Pu is in the four-valent state and is mostly associated with a negatively charged organic macromolecule with a pH(IEP) of 3.1 and a molecular weight of 10-15 kDa, rather than with the more abundant inorganic (iron oxide and clay) colloids. This finding has important ramifications for possible remediation, erosion controls, and land-management strategies. PMID:12322742

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD DRIVE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Oakes, L.C.; Walker, C.S.

    1959-12-15

    ABS>A suspension mechanism between a vertically movable nuclear reactor control rod and a rod extension, which also provides information for the operator or an automatic control signal, is described. A spring connects the rod extension to a drive shift. The extension of the spring indicates whether (1) the rod is at rest on the reactor, (2) the rod and extension are suspended, or (3) the extension alone is suspended, the spring controlling a 3-position electrical switch.

  4. Method of measuring a profile of the density of charged particles in a particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, L.G.; Jankowski, D.J.

    1975-10-01

    A profile of the relative density of charged particles in a beam is obtained by disposing a number of rods parallel to each other in a plane perpendicular to the beam and shadowing the beam. A second number of rods is disposed perpendicular to the first rods in a plane perpendicular to the beam and also shadowing the beam. Irradiation of the rods by the beam of charged particles creates radioactive isotopes in a quantity proportional to the number of charged particles incident upon the rods. Measurement of the radioactivity of each of the rods provides a measure of the quantity of radioactive material generated thereby and, together with the location of the rods, provides information sufficient to identify a profile of the density of charged particles in the beam.

  5. Impact of dissolved organic matter on colloid transport in the vadose zone: deterministic approximation of transport deposition coefficients from polymeric coating characteristics.

    PubMed

    Morales, Verónica L; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Bin; Lion, Leonard W; Bisogni, James J; McDonough, Brendan A; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2011-02-01

    Although numerous studies have been conducted to discern colloid transport and stability processes, the mechanistic understanding of how dissolved organic matter (DOM) affects colloid fate in unsaturated soils (i.e., the vadose zone) remains unclear. This study aims to bridge the gap between the physicochemical responses of colloid complexes and porous media interfaces to solution chemistry, and the effect these changes have on colloid transport and fate. Measurements of adsorbed layer thickness, density, and charge of DOM-colloid complexes and transport experiments with tandem internal process visualization were conducted for key constituents of DOM, humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA), at acidic, neutral and basic pH and two CaCl(2) concentrations. Polymeric characteristics reveal that, of the two tested DOM constituents, only HA electrosterically stabilizes colloids. This stabilization is highly dependent on solution pH which controls DOM polymer adsorption affinity, and on the presence of Ca(+2) which promotes charge neutralization and inter-particle bridging. Transport experiments indicate that HA improved colloid transport significantly, while FA only marginally affected transport despite having a large effect on particle charge. A transport model with deposition and pore-exclusion parameters fit experimental breakthrough curves well. Trends in deposition coefficients are correlated to the changes in colloid surface potential for bare colloids, but must include adsorbed layer thickness and density for sterically stabilized colloids. Additionally, internal process observations with bright field microscopy reveal that, under optimal conditions for retention, experiments with FA or no DOM promoted colloid retention at solid-water interfaces, while experiments with HA enhanced colloid retention at air-water interfaces, presumably due to partitioning of HA at the air-water interface and/or increased hydrophobic characteristics of HA-colloid complexes. PMID:21193215

  6. Bulk and confinement-induced phase transitions in colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, A.

    2007-02-01

    In the thesis, we have presented computer simulation results on the bulk and interfacial phase behaviour of colloidal suspensions. In the first part, we have developed and tested a simulation technique to calculate the free energy of hard-core systems. This technique was used to calculate the interfacial free energy of colloidal hard spheres and with the addition of non-adsorbing polymer coils. Good agreement was found between the simulation results and those from density functional theory. Furthermore, we have determined the equilibrium phases of a system of hard spheres confined between two parallel hard walls for plate separations from one to five hard-sphere diameters. We found a fluid-solid transition, which corresponded to either capillary freezing or melting depending on the plate separation. The coexisting solid phase consisted of crystalline layers with either triangular or square symmetry. At high densities, intermediate structures, e.g., prism, buckled, and rhombic phases, were found. In addition we have analysed colloid-polymer mixtures confined between two parallel plates. We have considered different types of confinement, namely either through two hard walls or through two semi-permeable walls that repel colloids but allowed polymers to freely penetrate. For hard walls we found capillary condensation, while for semi-permeable walls we found capillary evaporation. In the second part of the thesis we have analysed the bulk behaviour of colloidal suspensions. We have studied the stability of mixtures of highly screened repulsive charged spheres and non-adsorbing ideal polymer chains. We found that the screened-Coulomb repulsion counteracts the effect of the effective polymer-mediated attraction. For mixtures of small polymers and relatively large charged colloidal spheres, the fluid-crystal transition shifted to significantly larger polymer concentrations with increasing range of the screened-Coulomb repulsion. For relatively large polymers, the effect

  7. [Impact of SDBS/Na+ on red soil colloidal stability].

    PubMed

    Tang, Ying; Li, Hang; Zhu, Hua-Ling; Tian, Rui; Gao, Xiao-Dan

    2014-04-01

    The interactions between soil colloidal-sized particles and organic contaminants or inorganic ions profoundly affect numerous soil physical, chemical and biological processes. The coupling effect of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) and Na+ on the aggregation process of red soil colloid was studied using the dynamic light scattering method, and the mechanism of interactions between soil colloidal-sized particles and SDBS/Na+ was analyzed according to the pH and Zeta potential of suspension during the aggregation process. Results show that, (1) under a given concentration of Na+, the soil colloidal suspension becomes more stable with increasing SDBS concentrations. For example, under 120 mmol x L(-1) Na+, as the concentrations of SDBS increase from 0 mmol x L(-1) to 10 mmol x L(-1), the effective diameters of aggregates decrease from 702 nm to 193 nm, and the total average aggregation rates of aggregates decrease from 28.6 nm x min(-1) to 3.36 nm x min(-1). (2) Under a given concentration of SDBS, as the concentrations of Na+ increase, the Zeta potential of suspension sharply decreases, while the effective diameters and the total average aggregation rates of aggregates gradually increase. (3) The absolute values of Zeta potential for suspensions without adding NaNO3 solution increase from 47.6 mV to 62.2 mV as the SDBS concentrations increase, and the pH of the suspensions increase from 6.17 to 6.76, although these pH values are lower than that of initial soil colloidal suspension (6.89). Therefore, the adsorption of SDBS onto soil colloidal-sized particles, which is attributed to the hydrophobic effect and electrostatic effect, results in the increment of surface charge number, as well as the decrease in effective concentration of Na+ around colloidal-sized particles' surface (resulting from the steric hindrance of long hydrophobic chain of adsorbed SDBS and adsorption of Na+ by SDBS micelle). As a result, soil colloidal suspension becomes more stable and

  8. Performance of 18 polymers in aluminum citrate colloidal dispersion gels

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal dispersion gels are made up of low concentrations of polymer and aluminum citrate in water. These gels, which are mixed as a homogeneous solution at the surface, provide a valuable tool for in-depth blockage of high permeability regions of rock in heterogeneous reservoirs. Performance of colloidal dispersion gels depends strongly on the type and quality of polymer used. This paper provides an overview of the performance of 18 different polymers in colloidal dispersion gels. 14 of the polymers were partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamides or AMPS polymers in dry crystalline form with varying degrees of hydrolysis and molecular weight. The group also includes one cationic polyacrylamide, one carboxymethyl cellulose, one partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide in emulsion form and one polysaccharide in dry form. Gels were mixed with the polymers at two polymer concentrations, three polymer:aluminum ratios and in different concentrations of potassium chloride. The gels were quantitatively tested at 1, 7, 14 and 28 days after crosslinking using the transition pressure test, which is a screen flow resistance test. Of the six polymer types tested, only the dry partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamides and AMPS polymers formed colloidal dispersion gels. Gel strength generally increased with increasing anionic charge and molecular weight; however, the manner in which the polymer is manufactured and the impurities present in the polymer also play roles which are more significant than originally expected.

  9. 2D Colloidal Wigner crystals in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higler, Ruben; Sprakel, Joris

    2015-03-01

    Crystallization of bulk systems has been widely studied using colloids as a model system. However, study into colloidal crystallization in confined geometries has been sparse and little is known about the effects of strong confinement on the dynamics of colloidal crystal. In our research we prepare 2D crystals from charged colloids in an apolar solvent to study crystal dynamics, formation, and structure in circular confinements. These confining geometries are made using softlithography techniques from SU-8. In order to broaden the parameter space we can reach in experiments we employ brownian dynamics simulations to supplement our experimental results. Using single-particle tracking we have subpixel resolution positional information of every particle in the system. We study the vibrational modes of our confined crystals and find well defined modes unique to confined systems, such as a radially symmetric compression (or breathing) mode, a collective rotation mode, and distinct resonance modes. Furthermore, due to the circular nature of our constrictions, defectless crystals are impossible, we find, for sufficiently high area fractions, that the defects order at well defined points at the edge. The effect of this ``defect-localization'' has a clear influence on the vibrational modes.

  10. Dielectrophoresis force of colloidal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Ou-Yang, Daniel

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is the motion of a polarizable colloidal particle in a non­uniform electric field. The magnitude of the DEP force is known to be proportional to the gradient of E2. The DEP force also depends on the relative polarizability of the particle to that of the surrounding medium. Due to its ease of use, DEP has been proposed for a variety of applications to manipulate colloidal particles in a microfluidic setting. However, accurate measurements of the DEP force on colloidal nanoparticles are lacking. A new method is proposed to measure accurately the DEP potential force of colloidal nanoparticles by using confocal fluorescence imaging to determine the density distributions of dilute colloidal nanoparticle in a DEP potential force field. The DEP potential field can be calculated from the particle density distributions since the spatial distribution of the particle number density follows the Boltzmann distribution of the DEP potential energy. The validity of the measured DEP force is tested by examining the force as a function of the E field strength and particle size. The classic Maxwell­Wagner­O'Konski is found to be inadequate to fully describe the frequency dependence of the DEP force. NSF 0928299, Emulsion Polymer Institute, Department of Physics of Lehigh University.

  11. Stuck fuel rod capping sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Gorscak, Donald A.; Maringo, John J.; Nilsen, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    A stuck fuel rod capping sleeve to be used during derodding of spent fuel assemblies if a fuel rod becomes stuck in a partially withdrawn position and, thus, has to be severed. The capping sleeve has an inner sleeve made of a lower work hardening highly ductile material (e.g., Inconel 600) and an outer sleeve made of a moderately ductile material (e.g., 304 stainless steel). The inner sleeve may be made of an epoxy filler. The capping sleeve is placed on a fuel rod which is then severed by using a bolt cutter device. Upon cutting, the capping sleeve deforms in such a manner as to prevent the gross release of radioactive fuel material

  12. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  13. On the Equivalence of Trapped Colloids, Pinned Vortices, and Spin Ice

    SciTech Connect

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-04-23

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. The frustration of the two models, one describing colloids and vortices, the other describing spin ice, differs essentially. However, their effective energetics is made identical by the contribution of an emergent field associated to a topological charge. This equivalence extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, yet breaks down in lattices of mixed coordination, because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices.

  14. Electrohydrodynamic simulation of an electrospray in a colloid thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugroot, Manish; Forget, Martin; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile

    2012-02-01

    A precise understanding of electrosprays is highly interesting as the complexity of micro-technology (such as nano-material processing, spacecraft propulsion and mass-spectrometers) systems increases. A multi-component CFD-based model coupling fluid dynamics, charged species dynamics and electric field is developed. The simulations describe the charged fluid interface with emphasis on the Taylor cone formation and cone-jet transition under the effect of a electric field. The goal is to recapture this transition from a rounded liquid interface into a Taylor cone from an initial uniform distribution, without making assumptions on the behaviour, geometry or charge distribution of the system. The time evolution of the interface highlights the close interaction among space charge, coulombic forces and the surface tension, which appear as governing and competing processes in the transition. The results from the coupled formalism provide valuable insights on the physical phenomena and will be applied to a colloid thruster for small spacecrafts.

  15. Colloidal properties and behaviors of 3 nm primary particles of detonation nanodiamonds in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Mchedlov-Petrossyan, N O; Kamneva, N N; Marynin, A I; Kryshtal, A P; Ōsawa, E

    2015-06-28

    This study was aimed to reveal the principal colloidal properties of the aqueous dispersion of extremely small primary single-crystalline diamond particles in water. Together with the non-diamond layer, the size of the colloidal species is 2.8 ± 0.6 nm as found via DLS of the initial 5.00 wt/vol% hydrosol. Anionic dyes are readily adsorbed on the colloidal species. This is in line with the positive zeta-potential. The critical coagulation concentrations of the 0.19 wt/vol% nanodiamond hydrosol were determined with a set of inorganic electrolytes and anionic surfactants. The data are in line with the Schulze-Hardy rule for "positive" sols. The fulfillment of the lyotropic (Hofmeister) series was also observed for single-charged anions. The abnormal influence of alkali gives evidence of the acidic nature of the positive charge of the nanodiamond species. Application of acid-base indicators allows estimating the value of the interfacial electrical potential of the nanodiamond particles. Upon dilution from 5.00% to 0.01%, the colloidal system under study exhibits unusual changes. The average size increases ca. ten-fold as determined by DLS. The TEM images support this observation. At the same time, the viscosity drops. This phenomenon was explained in terms of the so-called periodic colloidal structures (colloidal crystals) in concentrated solutions. PMID:26035732

  16. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:26279317

  17. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  18. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-a; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:26279317

  19. Rod-shaped hydroxyapatite with mesoporous structure as drug carriers for proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wandong; Chai, Yamin; Xu, Xianghua; Wang, Yonglan; Cao, Nana

    2014-12-01

    Rod-shaped hydroxyapatite (HAp) with mesoporous structure was synthesized by a hydrothermal method using Pluronic block co-polymer F127 as the template. The rod-shaped HAp was then tested as protein drug carriers by investigating their protein adsorption/release properties. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme (LSZ) were used as the model drugs. Various instrumental methods were used to characterize the structure, morphology, texture and protein drug adsorption/release properties of the samples. The amounts of BSA or LSZ adsorbed onto the rod-shaped HAp and their release profiles were evaluated in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The synthesized rod-shaped HAp had irregular mesostructures with lengths of 75-125 nm and diameters of about 25 nm. The rod-shaped HAp exhibited a higher loading capacity for BSA than for LSZ in the SBF. This adsorption behavior can be explained by the morphology of the rod-shaped HAp, which grew along the c-axis, leading to an a(b)-plane area that is larger than the c-plane area. Consequently, the number of positive charges on the surface of the rod-shaped HAp increased relative to the number of negative charges. The BSA release rate in SBF was slower than that of LSZ which is a result of the HAp surface properties.

  20. Entropy favours open colloidal lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaoming; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Burgeoning experimental and simulation activity seeks to understand the existence of self-assembled colloidal structures that are not close-packed. Here we describe an analytical theory based on lattice dynamics and supported by experiments that reveals the fundamental role entropy can play in stabilizing open lattices. The entropy we consider is associated with the rotational and vibrational modes unique to colloids interacting through extended attractive patches. The theory makes predictions of the implied temperature, pressure and patch-size dependence of the phase diagram of open and close-packed structures. More generally, it provides guidance for the conditions at which targeted patchy colloidal assemblies in two and three dimensions are stable, thus overcoming the difficulty in exploring by experiment or simulation the full range of conceivable parameters.

  1. Polymeric stabilization of colloidal asphaltenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, Sara; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2010-03-01

    Asphaltenes, the heaviest component of crude oil, cause many problems in petroleum extraction and recovery. Operationally defined as insoluble in long chain alkanes but soluble in toluene, asphaltenes have been described by bulk thermodynamic models such as the Flory-Huggins theory. However, bulk models work well only for asphaltenes in good solvents. Characterization of asphaltenes in poor solvents remains elusive: molecular scale asphaltenes readily aggregate to the colloidal scale and become highly unstable in solution. We investigate the ability of polymers to stabilize colloidal asphaltene suspensions in heptane. In the absence of added polymer, sedimentation measurements reveal dynamics reminiscent of collapsing gels. Adding polymers to colloidal asphaltene suspensions can delay the characteristic sedimentation time by orders of magnitude. Light scattering results suggest that the mechanism of stabilization may be related to a decrease in both particle size and polydispersity as a function of added polymer.

  2. Gel transitions in colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergenholtz, J.; Fuchs, M.

    1999-12-01

    The idealized mode-coupling theory (MCT) is applied to colloidal systems interacting via short-range attractive interactions of Yukawa form. At low temperatures, MCT predicts a slowing down of the local dynamics and ergodicity-breaking transitions. The non-ergodicity transitions share many features with the colloidal gel transition, and are proposed to be the source of gelation in colloidal systems. Previous calculations of the phase diagram are complemented with additional data for shorter ranges of the attractive interaction, showing that the path of the non-ergodicity transition line is then unimpeded by the gas-liquid critical curve at low temperatures. Particular attention is given to the critical non-ergodicity parameters; this is motivated by recent experimental measurements. An asymptotic model is developed, valid for dilute systems of spheres interacting via strong short-range attractions, and is shown to capture all aspects of the low-temperature MCT non-ergodicity transitions.

  3. Colloidal particle assembly using piezoelectric inkjet printing of polystyrene colloidal ink formulations.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Younghwan

    2014-10-01

    We report the feasibility of piezoelectric inkjet printing of colloidal dispersion inks for geometrical patterning to arrange colloids in desired locations. Polystyrene colloid (dia. = 3 μm) inks dispersed with thermally curable binder in organic solvents are explored for fundamental study on colloidal patterning. The inkjet printability of colloidal inks is systematically investigated with different ink formulations and inkjet process variables. In addition, in order to maintain the structural stability of colloidal patterns fabricated on the substrate from externally applied forces such as mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli, thermally curable binder was formulated into the colloidal ink formulations. PMID:25942838

  4. Colloid cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grasu, Beatrice L; Alberico, Anthony M

    2011-01-01

    Colloid cysts are a rare clinical finding with a unique clinical presentation: non-specific paroxysmal headaches. The current recommended treatment is microsurgery, which poses the greatest risk to the patient but allows complete removal of the cyst to prevent recurrence. A 41-year old man presented with a colloid cyst located in the foramen of Monro causing obstructive hydrocephalus. He had paroxysmal headaches and memory and personality changes. Transcortical transventricle microsurgery was performed to remove the entire cyst. A temporary shunt was placed to prevent post-operative hydrocephalus. Normal neurological function returned upon cyst removal. PMID:22034805

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Supramolecular Colloids.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Neus; De Feijter, Isja; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-01-01

    Control over colloidal assembly is of utmost importance for the development of functional colloidal materials with tailored structural and mechanical properties for applications in photonics, drug delivery and coating technology. Here we present a new family of colloidal building blocks, coined supramolecular colloids, whose self-assembly is controlled through surface-functionalization with a benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derived supramolecular moiety. Such BTAs interact via directional, strong, yet reversible hydrogen-bonds with other identical BTAs. Herein, a protocol is presented that describes how to couple these BTAs to colloids and how to quantify the number of coupling sites, which determines the multivalency of the supramolecular colloids. Light scattering measurements show that the refractive index of the colloids is almost matched with that of the solvent, which strongly reduces the van der Waals forces between the colloids. Before photo-activation, the colloids remain well dispersed, as the BTAs are equipped with a photo-labile group that blocks the formation of hydrogen-bonds. Controlled deprotection with UV-light activates the short-range hydrogen-bonds between the BTAs, which triggers the colloidal self-assembly. The evolution from the dispersed state to the clustered state is monitored by confocal microscopy. These results are further quantified by image analysis with simple routines using ImageJ and Matlab. This merger of supramolecular chemistry and colloidal science offers a direct route towards light- and thermo-responsive colloidal assembly encoded in the surface-grafted monolayer. PMID:27168201

  6. Colloids and Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range

  7. Two studies of colloidal interactions: electric polarizability and protein crystallization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fraden, Seth; Hu, Yue

    2001-08-06

    (I)Electric polarizability. During this grant period, the focus was on five topics concerning electric field effects on colloids. The first topic focuses on electric interactions between charged colloids in the absence of external fields, and the remaining four deal with colloids in the presence of external fields. The topics are (1) calculation of the effect of confinement on the pair-potential between like-charged colloids, (2) experimental determination of the interparticle potential under the conditions of dielectric polarization, (3) measurement of the evolution of structure of ER fluids, (4) synthesis of novel colloids designed for ER studies, and (5) computer modeling of polarization of surface charge. (II) Protein crystallization. Studies of the phase behavior of mixtures of proteins and polymers were initiated. The motivation was to test recent theories that suggested that optimal conditions for protein crystallization could be obtained using such mixtures. Combined light scattering measurements of the virial coefficients and determination of the phase diagram of protein/polymer mixtures revealed that the theoretical picture needs to be substantially modified.

  8. Programmable co-assembly of oppositely charged microgels.

    PubMed

    Go, Dennis; Kodger, Thomas E; Sprakel, Joris; Kuehne, Alexander J C

    2014-10-28

    Here we report the development of an aqueous, self-assembling system of oppositely charged colloids leading towards particle arrangements with controlled order. The colloidal system consists of two types of particles, each consisting of refractive index matched colloidal core-shell microgel particles, which are either negatively charged or amphoteric. By slowly decreasing the pH of our system below the isoelectric point of the amphoteric particles, changing their net charge from negative to positive, the co-assembly of the colloids is induced. By using different buffer concentrations, we gain temporal and kinetic control over the acidification process and thus the ability to program the co-assembly of the two particles species. PMID:25169820

  9. Colloid Formation in Hanford Sediments Reacted with Simulated Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Mashal, Kholoud; Harsh, James B.; Flury, Markus; Felmy, Andrew R.; Zhao, Hongting

    2004-11-01

    Solutions of high pH, ionic strength, and aluminum concentration have leaked into the subsurface from underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Reservation in Washington State. Here, we test the hypothesis that these waste solutions alter and dissolve the native minerals present in the sediments and that colloidal (diameter < 2 m) feldspathoids form. We reacted Hanford sediments with simulated solutions representative of Hanford waste tanks. The solutions consisted of 1.4 or 2.8 mol/kg NaOH, 0.125 or 0.25 mol/kg NaAlO4, and 3.7 mol/kg NaNO3 and were contacted with the sediments for a period of 25 or 40 days at 50 C. The colloidal size fraction was separated from the sediments and characterized in terms of mineralogy, morphology, chemical composition, and electrophoretic mobility. Upon reaction with tank waste solutions, native minerals released Si and other elements into the solution phase. This Si precipitated with the Al present in the waste solutions to form secondary minerals, identified as the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite. The solution phase was modeled with the chemical equilibrium model GMIN for solution speciation and saturation indices with respect to sodalite and cancrinite. The amount of colloidal material in the sediments increased upon reaction with waste solutions. At the natural pH found in Hanford sediments (pH 8) the newly formed minerals are negatively charged, similar to the unreacted colloidal material present in the sediments. The formation of colloidal material in Hanford sediments upon reaction with tank waste solutions is an important aspect to consider in the characterization of Hanford tank leaks and may affect the fate of hazardous radionuclides present in the tank waste.

  10. Colloid formation in Hanford sediments reacted with simulated tank waste.

    PubMed

    Mashal, Kholoud; Harsh, James B; Flury, Markus; Felmy, Andrew R; Zhao, Hongting

    2004-11-01

    Solutions of high pH, ionic strength, and aluminum concentration have leaked into the subsurface from underground waste storage tanks atthe Hanford Reservation in Washington State. Here, we test the hypothesis that these waste solutions alter and dissolve the native minerals present in the sediments and that colloidal (diameter < 2 microm) feldspathoids form. We reacted Hanford sediments with simulated solutions representative of Hanford waste tanks. The solutions consisted of 1.4 or 2.8 mol/kg NaOH, 0.125 or 0.25 mol/kg NaAlO4, and 3.7 mol/kg NaNO3 and were contacted with the sediments for a period of 25 or 40 days at 50 degrees C. The colloidal size fraction was separated from the sediments and characterized in terms of mineralogy, morphology, chemical composition, and electrophoretic mobility. Upon reaction with tank waste solutions, native minerals released Si and other elements into the solution phase. This Si precipitated with the Al present in the waste solutions to form secondary minerals, identified as the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite. The solution phase was modeled with the chemical equilibrium model GMIN for solution speciation and saturation indices with respect to sodalite and cancrinite. The amount of colloidal material in the sediments increased upon reaction with waste solutions. At the natural pH found in Hanford sediments (pH 8) the newly formed minerals are negatively charged, similar to the unreacted colloidal material present in the sediments. The formation of colloidal material in Hanford sediments upon reaction with tank waste solutions is an important aspect to consider in the characterization of Hanford tank leaks and may affect the fate of hazardous radionuclides present in the tank waste. PMID:15575296

  11. Three-Rod Linear Ion Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, Gary R.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1993-01-01

    Three-parallel-rod electrode structures proposed for use in linear ion traps and possibly for electrostatic levitation of macroscopic particles. Provides wider viewing angle because they confine ions in regions outside rod-electrode structures.

  12. Control rods in LMFBRs: a physics assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, H.F.; Collins, P.J.

    1982-08-01

    This physics assessment is based on roughly 300 control rod worth measurements in ZPPR from 1972 to 1981. All ZPPR assemblies simulated mixed-oxide LMFBRs, representing sizes of 350, 700, and 900 MWe. Control rod worth measurements included single rods, various combinations of rods, and Ta and Eu rods. Additional measurements studied variations in B/sub 4/C enrichment, rod interaction effects, variations in rod geometry, neutron streaming in sodium-filled channels, and axial worth profiles. Analyses were done with design-equivalent methods, using ENDF/B Version IV data. Some computations for the sensitivities to approximations in the methods have been included. Comparisons of these analyses with the experiments have allowed the status of control rod physics in the US to be clearly defined.

  13. Colloidal quantum dot solids for solution-processed solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mingjian; Liu, Mengxia; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-03-01

    Solution-processed photovoltaic technologies represent a promising way to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of solar energy harvesting. Among these, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot photovoltaics have the advantage of a spectrally tuneable infrared bandgap, which enables use in multi-junction cells, as well as the benefit of generating and harvesting multiple charge carrier pairs per absorbed photon. Here we review recent progress in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, focusing on three fronts. First, we examine strategies to manage the abundant surfaces of quantum dots, strategies that have led to progress in the removal of electronic trap states. Second, we consider new device architectures that have improved device performance to certified efficiencies of 10.6%. Third, we focus on progress in solution-phase chemical processing, such as spray-coating and centrifugal casting, which has led to the demonstration of manufacturing-ready process technologies.

  14. Magnetic assembly of colloidal superstructures with multipole symmetry.

    PubMed

    Erb, Randall M; Son, Hui S; Samanta, Bappaditya; Rotello, Vincent M; Yellen, Benjamin B

    2009-02-19

    The assembly of complex structures out of simple colloidal building blocks is of practical interest for building materials with unique optical properties (for example photonic crystals and DNA biosensors) and is of fundamental importance in improving our understanding of self-assembly processes occurring on molecular to macroscopic length scales. Here we demonstrate a self-assembly principle that is capable of organizing a diverse set of colloidal particles into highly reproducible, rotationally symmetric arrangements. The structures are assembled using the magnetostatic interaction between effectively diamagnetic and paramagnetic particles within a magnetized ferrofluid. The resulting multipolar geometries resemble electrostatic charge configurations such as axial quadrupoles ('Saturn rings'), axial octupoles ('flowers'), linear quadrupoles (poles) and mixed multipole arrangements ('two tone'), which represent just a few examples of the type of structure that can be built using this technique. PMID:19225522

  15. Temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient of ionic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehnem, A. L.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.; Aquino, R.; Campos, A. F. C.; Tourinho, F. A.; Depeyrot, J.

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient ST(T ) in electrostatically charged magnetic colloids is investigated. Two different ferrofluids, with different particles' mean dimensions, are studied. In both cases we obtain a thermophilic behavior of the Soret effect. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient is described assuming that the nanoparticles migrate along the ionic thermoelectric field created by the thermal gradient. A model based on the contributions from the thermoelectrophoresis and variation of the double-layer energy, without fitting parameters, is used to describe the experimental results of the colloid with the bigger particles. To do so, independent measurements of the ζ potential, mass diffusion coefficient, and Seebeck coefficient are performed. The agreement of the theory and the experimental results is rather good. In the case of the ferrofluid with smaller particles, it is not possible to get experimentally reliable values of the ζ potential and the model described is used to evaluate this parameter and its temperature dependence.

  16. Determination of colloidal osmotic equation of state by dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Jacob; Huang, Hao; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Osmotic equation of state [P(N,T)] describes both the mechanical properties and phase behavior of a colloidal suspension. As an alternative to sedimentation, we propose a new approach to determine P(N,T) by dielectrophoresis (DEP). Using fluorescence confocal microscopy, we obtain particle density profiles in order to determine the DEP force distribution when the particle concentration is low and the inter-particle interactions are negligible. From the known force distribution and Einstein's osmotic equilibrium equation, we can calculate P(N,T) from the particle density profile of interacting, charge-stabilized polystyrene latex particles under different salt concentrations and added neutral polymers. The osmotic equation of state for colloidal suspensions can then be crosschecked by sedimentation equilibrium.

  17. Designing Whey Protein-Polysaccharide Particles for Colloidal Stability.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Ty; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh; Foegeding, E Allen

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between whey proteins and polysaccharides, in particular the formation of food-grade soluble complexes, are of interest because of potential functional and health benefits. A specific application that has not received much attention is the use of complexes for enhanced colloidal stability of protein sols, such as protein-containing beverages. In beverages, the primary goal is the formation of complexes that remain dispersed after thermal processing and extended storage. This review highlights recent progress in the area of forming whey protein-polysaccharide soluble complexes that would be appropriate for beverage applications. Research in this area indicates that soluble complexes can be formed and stabilized that are reasonably small in size and possess a large surface charge that would predict colloidal stability. Selection of specific proteins and polysaccharides can be tailored to desired conditions. The principal challenges involve overcoming restrictions on protein concentration and ensuring that protein remains bioavailable. PMID:26934171

  18. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  19. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Wood, Vanessa; Bulović, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs) have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI). We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs) in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs - optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection - that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt). We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs. PMID:22110863

  20. Preparation of hydroxyapatite rod-like crystals by protein precursor method

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yingchao; Li Shipu . E-mail: zlhyc@yahoo.com.cn; Wang Xinyu; Jia Li; He Jianhua

    2007-06-05

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) rod-like crystals were successfully prepared by thermolysis of bovine serum albumin (BSA)/calcium-phosphate (CaP) colloidal precursors. The precursors were obtained by precipitation method from Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Ca(OH){sub 2}, in which BSA was added as regulation additive and ultrasound irradiation was utilized as assistant technology. The properties of the precursors, such as size distribution, morphology, thermodynamic changes, were determined by DLS, SPM and TGA-DTA. The characterization results from DLS, SPM, TG-DTA, XRD and SEM indicated that BSA interacted with CaP particles and formed about 7-130 nm BSA/CaP hybrid colloidal particles between 2 and 4 g/L of BSA concentration. With the increasing of sintering temperature, BSA disintegrated and burned out, and rod-like HAP crystals formed at about 600 deg. C. With the increasing of BSA concentration, the phase composition of products did not change and the HAP crystals became more uniform and smaller. The ratio of length to width ranged from 7.6 to 12 at 4 g/L BSA concentration. This method provides for a controllable bottom-up fabrication of HAP rod-like crystals.

  1. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for studying the groundwater colloids for the Yucca Mountain Project in conjunction with the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. Colloidal particle size distributions and total particle concentration in groundwater samples are quantified and characterized. Colloid materials from cavity waters collected near underground nuclear explosion sites by HRMP field sampling personnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were quantified. Selected colloid samples were further characterized by electron microscope to evaluate the colloid shapes, elemental compositions, and mineral phases. The authors have evaluated the colloid size and concentration in the natural groundwater sample that was collected from the ER-20-5 well and stored in a 50-gallon (about 200-liter) barrel for several months. This groundwater sample was studied because HRMP personnel have identified trace levels of radionuclides in the water sample. Colloid results show that even though the water sample had filtered through a series of Millipore filters, high-colloid concentrations were identified in all unfiltered and filtered samples. They had studied the samples that were diluted with distilled water and found that diluted samples contained more colloids than the undiluted ones. These results imply that colloids are probably not stable during the storage conditions. Furthermore, results demonstrate that undesired colloids have been introduced into the samples during the storage, filtration, and dilution processes. They have evaluated possible sources of colloid contamination associated with sample collection, filtrating, storage, and analyses of natural groundwaters. The effects of container types and sample storage time on colloid size distribution and total concentration were studied to evaluate colloid stability by using J13 groundwater. The data suggests that groundwater samples

  2. Phase behavior of mixtures of oppositely charged protein nanoparticles at asymmetric charge ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarten Biesheuvel, P.; Lindhoud, Saskia; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; de Vries, Renko

    2006-04-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for the phase behavior of mixtures of oppositely charged globular protein molecules in aqueous solutions containing monovalent salt. These colloidal mixtures are interesting model systems, on the one hand for electrolyte solutions (“colloidal ionic liquids”), and on the other for mixtures of oppositely charged (bio)macromolecules, colloids, micelles, etc., with the range of the electrostatic interactions (Debye length) easily tunable from much smaller to much larger than the particle size, simply by adding different amounts of monovalent salt. In this paper we investigate the phase behavior of such mixtures in the case that equally sized colloids have a large difference in charge magnitude. This is possible at any mixing ratio because small ions compensate any colloidal charge asymmetry. Our experimental system is based on lysozyme, a positively charged “hard” globular protein molecule, and succinylated lysozyme, a chemical modification of lysozyme which is negatively charged. By changing the solution pH we can adjust the ratio of charge between the two molecules. To describe phase separation into a dilute phase and a dense “complex” phase, a thermodynamic model is set up in which we combine the Carnahan-Starling-van der Waals equation of state with a heterogeneous Poisson-Boltzmann cell model and include the possibility that protein molecules adjust their charge when they move from one phase to the other (charge regulation). The theory uses the nonelectrostatic attraction strength as the only adjustable parameter and reasonably well reproduces the data in that complexation is only possible at intermediate pH , not too asymmetric mixing ratios, and low enough ionic strength and temperature.

  3. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  4. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  5. Sonochemical synthesis of iron colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.; Fang, M.; Hyeon, T.

    1996-11-27

    We present here a new method for the preparation of stable ferromagnetic colloids of iron using high-intensity ultrasound to sonochemically decompose volatile organometallic compounds. These colloids have narrow size distributions centered at a few nanometers and are found to be superparamagnetic. In conclusion, a simple synthetic method has been discovered to produce nanosized iron colloid using high-intensity ultrasound. Nanometer iron particles dispersed in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) matrix or stabilized by adsorption of oleic acid have been synthesized by sonochemical decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5}. Transmission electron micrographs show that the iron particles have a relatively narrow range in size from 3 to 8 nm for polyvinylpyrrolidone, while oleic acid gives an even more uniform distribution at 8 nm. magnetic measurements revealed that these nanometer iron particles are superparamagnetic with a saturation magnetization of 101 emu/g (Fe) at 290 K. This work is easily extended to colloids of other metals and to alloys of two or more metals, simply by using multiple volatile precursors. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Physics of Colloids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, Dave; Weeks, Eric; Gasser, Urs; Dinsmore, Tony; Mawley, Suliana; Segre, Phil; Cipelletti, Lucia

    2000-01-01

    This talk will present recent results from ground-based research to support the "Physics of Colloids in Space" project which is scheduled to fly in the ISS approximately one year from now. In addition, results supporting future planned flights will be discussed.

  7. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-09-01

    Drying suspensions often leave behind complex patterns of particulates, as might be seen in the coffee stains on a table. Here, we consider the dynamics of periodic band or uniform solid film formation on a vertical plate suspended partially in a drying colloidal solution. Direct observations allow us to visualize the dynamics of band and film deposition, where both are made of multiple layers of close packed particles. We further see that there is a transition between banding and filming when the colloidal concentration is varied. A minimal theory of the liquid meniscus motion along the plate reveals the dynamics of the banding and its transition to the filming as a function of the ratio of deposition and evaporation rates. We also provide a complementary multiphase model of colloids dissolved in the liquid, which couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving meniscus to the fluid and particulate flows and the transition from a dilute suspension to a porous plug. This allows us to determine the concentration dependence of the bandwidth and the deposition rate. Together, our findings allow for the control of drying-induced patterning as a function of the colloidal concentration and evaporation rate.

  8. Towards Structural Complexity with Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Colloids rather easily assemble into simple crystal structures like the face-centered cubic lattice or the body-centered cubic lattice. More complex phases are harder to achieve, but have recently been reported using a number of approaches. Yet, assembling complex structures often results from trial-and-error and is not well understood. In this presentation, we show how novel crystals, quasicrystals, and liquid crystals can be achieved with colloidal building blocks by varying the interactions and the shapes of the building blocks. Using computer simulations, we demonstrate the formation of unusually ordered phases both with isotropic pair potentials, as well as with facetted shapes like polyhedra. We describe new tools we have developed to perform complex structural analysis on simulated systems and show how they may be used to analyze real space images from colloid experiments. We also compare the assembled structures with densest packings of the building blocks and show that good packings can often be distinct from what is observed to assemble from the disordered state. This suggests that dense packings may not be illustrative of what is achievable in colloid experiments.

  9. Critical Examination of the Colloidal Particle Model of Globular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sarangapani, Prasad S.; Hudson, Steven D.; Jones, Ronald L.; Douglas, Jack F.; Pathak, Jai A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of globular protein solutions have uniformly adopted a colloidal view of proteins as particles, a perspective that neglects the polymeric primary structure of these biological macromolecules, their intrinsic flexibility, and their ability to sample a large configurational space. While the colloidal perspective often serves as a useful idealization in many cases, the macromolecular identity of proteins must reveal itself under thermodynamic conditions in which the native state is no longer stable, such as denaturing solvents and high protein concentrations where macromolecules tend to have screened excluded volume, charge, and hydrodynamic interactions. Under extreme pH conditions, charge repulsion interactions within the protein chain can overcome the attractive hydrogen-bonding interactions, holding it in its native globular state. Conformational changes can therefore be expected to have great significance on the shear viscosity and other rheological properties of protein solutions. These changes are not envisioned in conventional colloidal protein models and we have initiated an investigation of the scattering and rheological properties of model proteins. We initiate this effort by considering bovine serum albumin because it is a globular protein whose solution properties have also been extensively investigated as a function of pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration. As we anticipated, near-ultraviolet circular dichroism measurements and intrinsic viscosity measurements clearly indicate that the bovine serum albumin tertiary structure changes as protein concentration and pH are varied. Our findings point to limited validity of the colloidal protein model and to the need for further consideration and quantification of the effects of conformational changes on protein solution viscosity, protein association, and the phase behavior. Small-angle Neutron Scattering measurements have allowed us to assess how these conformational changes

  10. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  11. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  12. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  13. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  14. Inverted Control Rod Lock-In Device

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, W. G.; Bost, G. E.

    1962-12-01

    A mechanism which prevents control rods from dropping out of the reactor core in the event the vessel in which the reactor is mounted should capsize is described. The mechanism includes a pivoted toothed armature which engages the threaded control rod lead screw and prevents removal of the rod whenever the armature is not attracted by the provided electromagnetic means. (AEC)

  15. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  16. Fuel followed control rod installation at AFRRI

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Mark; Owens, Chris; Forsbacka, Matt

    1992-07-01

    Fuel Followed Control Rods (FFCRs) were installed at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute's 1 MW TRIGA Reactor. The procedures for obtaining, shipping, and installing the FFCRs is described. As part of the FFCR installation, the transient rod drive was relocated. Core performance due to the addition of the fuel followed control rods is discussed. (author)

  17. Surface-modified silica colloidal crystals: nanoporous films and membranes with controlled ionic and molecular transport.

    PubMed

    Zharov, Ilya; Khabibullin, Amir

    2014-02-18

    binding. When we modify the surface of the colloidal nanopores with ionizable moieties, they can generate an electric field inside the nanopores, which repels ions of the same charge and attracts ions of the opposite charge. This allows us to electrostatically gate the ionic flux through colloidal nanopores, controlled by pH and ionic strength of the solution when surface amines or sulfonic acids are present or by irradiation with light in the case of surface spiropyran moieties. When we modify the surface of the colloidal nanopores with chiral moieties capable of stereoselective binding of enantiomers, we generate colloidal films with chiral permselectivity. By filling the colloidal nanopores with polymer brushes attached to the pore surface, we can control the ionic flux through the corresponding films and membranes electrostatically using reversibly ionizable polymer brushes. By filling the colloidal nanopores with polymer brushes whose conformation reversibly changes in response to pH, ionic strength, temperature, or small molecule binding, we can control the molecular flux sterically. There are various potential applications for surface-modified silica colloidal films and membranes. Due to their ordered nanoporous structure and mechanical durability, they are beneficial in nanofluidics, nanofiltration, separations, and fuel cells and as catalyst supports. Reversible gating of flux by external stimuli may be useful in drug release, in size-, charge-, and structure-selective separations, and in microfluidic and sensing devices. PMID:24397245

  18. Phase behavior and unusual dynamics of stimuli-responsive microgel colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, B. V. R.

    2013-02-01

    Monodisperse poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel particles in aqueous medium exhibit structural ordering similar to that observed in atomic systems. Colloidal crystals of these microgel particles exhibit series of phase transitions with increase in temperature due to reduction in the particle size and variation in the interparticle interactions. Unlike hard-sphere or charged colloidal particles, microgel particles are heterogeneous in particle density with dense solvent penetrable polymer core and brush-like polymer chains forming a shell. In this talk I will present static/dynamic light scattering, confocal microscopy and UV-Visible spectroscopy results on dense microgel suspensions exhibiting unusual dynamics across melting, tunabilty of Bragg diffraction, particle distribution and nature of interparticle interaction upon osmotic compression. From these results I conclude that PNIPAM microgel sphere are not only soft but also compressible and differ from other hard-sphere and charged colloidal systems in significant way in their structure, dynamics and phase behaviour.

  19. Phase behavior, structure, and properties of colloidal microsphere-nanoparticle mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohver, Valeria

    2001-10-01

    We have studied the phase behavior, structure and properties of binary mixtures of negligibly charged colloidal microspheres and highly repulsive nanoparticles. The interactions between such species were investigated via scanning angle reflectometry, zeta potential measurements, and sedimentation studies. At pH < 3, the nanoparticles are highly charged with an estimated zeta potential of 65 mV and the colloidal microspheres are negligibly charged with a measured zeta potential of roughly 1 mV. Under these conditions, scanning angle reflectometry measurements indicated no nanoparticle adsorption occurs on model silica surfaces (i.e., oxidized silicon wafers). However, zeta potential measurements carried out on dilute microsphere suspensions revealed that these microspheres exhibited an effective charge buildup as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction at pH = 1.5. This behavior which we refer to as nanoparticle haloing can stem solely from their repulsive interactions in solution and has a profound effect on the phase behavior, structure and properties of these binary mixtures. The phase behavior, structure, and properties of binary mixtures of negligibly charged colloidal microspheres were studied for two size ratios of 95 and 197 at pH = 1.5. In the absence of nanoparticle additions, the system spontaneously assembled into a colloidal gel whose strength increased with microsphere volume fraction. Between a lower and upper critical nanoparticle volume fraction, such binary mixtures formed a stable fluid phase due to nanoparticle haloing. In this concentration regime, colloidal microsphere crystals could be assembled under gravity-driven sedimentation. Confocal microscopy revealed that such crystals exhibited a center-to-center microsphere separation distance of 2 amusphere, where amusphere is the microsphere radius. Above the upper critical nanoparticle volume fraction, depletion flocculation induced by the presence of highly charged nanoparticles in solution

  20. Distorted colloidal arrays as designed template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ye; Zhou, Ziwei; Möhwald, Helmuth; Ai, Bin; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Ye, Shunsheng; Zhang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel type of colloidal template with broken symmetry was generated using commercial, inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE). With proper but simple treatment, the traditional symmetric non-close-packed colloidal template evolves into an elliptical profile with high uniformity. This unique feature can add flexibility to colloidal lithography and/or other lithography techniques using colloidal particles as building blocks to fabricate nano-/micro-structures with broken symmetry. Beyond that the novel colloidal template we developed possesses on-site tunability, i.e. the transformability from a symmetric into an asymmetric template. Sandwich-type particles with eccentric features were fabricated utilizing this tunable template. This distinguishing feature will provide the possibility to fabricate structures with unique asymmetric features using one set of colloidal template, providing flexibility and broad tunability to enable nano-/micro-structure fabrication with colloidal templates.

  1. Glass/Jamming Transition in Colloidal Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segre, Philip N.; Prasad, Vikram; Weitz, David A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have studied colloidal aggregation in a model colloid plus polymer system with short-range attractive interactions. By varying the colloid concentration and the strength of the attraction, we explored regions where the equilibrium phase is expected to consist of colloidal crystallites in coexistance with colloidal gas (i.e. monomers). This occurs for moderate values of the potential depth, U approximately equal to 2-5 kT. Crystallization was not always observed. Rather, over an extended sub-region two new metastable phases appear, one fluid-like and one solid-like. These were examined in detail with light scattering and microscopy techniques. Both phases consist of a near uniform distribution of small irregular shaped clusters of colloidal particles. The dynamical and structural characteristics of the ergodic-nonergodic transition between the two phases share much in common with the colloidal hard sphere glass transition.

  2. Colloid particle size-dependent dispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Katzourakis, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that dispersion coefficients evaluated by fitting advection-dispersion transport models to nonreactive tracer breakthrough curves do not adequately describe colloid transport under the same flow field conditions. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size and interstitial velocity. A total of 49 colloid transport experiments were performed in columns packed with glass beads under chemically unfavorable colloid attachment conditions. Nine different colloid diameters, and various flow velocities were examined. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity is positively correlated with colloid particle size, and increases with increasing velocity.

  3. Synaptic transmission from rods to rod-dominated bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Yang, X L; Wu, S M

    1993-06-11

    Synaptic transmission between photoreceptors and bipolar cells was studied in dark-adapted tiger salamander retinas. Based on the relative light sensitivity, bipolar cells, either depolarizing (DBC) or hyperpolarizing (HBC), fell into two groups: one receives inputs primarily from rods (rod-dominated bipolar cells, DBCR and HBCR) and the other receives inputs primarily from cones (cone-dominated bipolar cells, DBCC and HBCC). The input-output relations of the rod-DBCR and rod-HBCR synapses were determined by plotting the voltage responses of the rod and DBCR (or HBCR) to dim 500-nm light steps, which polarizes only the rods but not the cones. The slope gains of both synapses were the highest near the dark rod voltage (-2.5 for the rod-DBCR synapse and 4.0 for the rod-HBCR synapse), and they (the absolute values) became progressively smaller at more hyperpolarized rod voltages. PMID:8186975

  4. Surface chemistry investigation of colloid transport in packed beds. Final report, August 1, 1989--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    The importance of colloids as co-transport agents for pollutants in subsurface systems hinges on the extent to which electrostatic or other sources of repulsive colloid-collector interactions inhibit their filtration. When electrostatic interactions are favorable, for example when the colloid and groundwater media have opposite charge, colloids may be expected to travel only a few centimeters in saturated porous media. Repulsive electrostatic interactions between colloids and aquifer media with the same charge sign are postulated to significantly mobilize particles. As it happens, however, theories describing particle filtration from first principles, i.e., DLVO (Derjagin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek) theory, dramatically underestimate filtration rates when colloid-collector interactions are electrostatically repulsive. One of the primary objectives of the project was to experimentally investigate potential reasons for the historical lack of agreement between particle filtration models based on DLVO theory and observed particle deposition rates. An important hypothesis of the study was to test the validity of the assumption of surface homogeneity, as required by these models. The approach was to focus on collector surfaces that were commonly used as model systems, e.g., glass beads and quartz sand. Laboratory-scale column filtration experiments were conducted with colloidal polystyrene latex spheres. Collector surface preparation and cleaning approaches were examined, as well as the effects of solution chemistry.

  5. Spectroscopy of colloidal semiconductor core/shell nanoplatelets with high quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Tessier, M D; Mahler, B; Nadal, B; Heuclin, H; Pedetti, S; Dubertret, B

    2013-07-10

    Free standing two-dimensional materials appear as a novel class of structures. Recently, the first colloidal two-dimensional heterostructures have been synthesized. These core/shell nanoplatelets are the first step toward colloidal quantum wells. Here, we study in detail the spectroscopic properties of this novel generation of colloidal nanoparticles. We show that core/shell CdSe/CdZnS nanoplatelets with 80% quantum yield can be obtained. The emission time trace of single core/shell nanoplatelets exhibits reduced blinking compared to core nanoplatelets with a two level emission time trace. At cryogenic temperatures, these nanoplatelets have a quantum yield close to 100% and a stable emission time trace. A solution of core/shell nanoplatelets has emission spectra with a full width half-maximum close to 20 nm, a value much lower than corresponding spherical or rod-shaped heterostructures. Using single particle spectroscopy, we show that the broadening of the emission spectra upon the shell deposition is not due to dispersity between particles but is related to an intrinsic increased exciton-phonon coupling in the shell. We also demonstrate that optical spectroscopy is a relevant tool to investigate the presence of traps induced by shell deposition. The spectroscopic properties of the core/shell nanoplatelets presented here strongly suggest that this new generation of objects will be an interesting alternative to spherical or rod-shaped nanocrystals. PMID:23731211

  6. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  7. Rod cluster having improved vane configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Shockling, L.A.; Francis, T.A.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes a pressurized water reactor vessel, the vessel defining a predetermined axial direction of the flow of coolant therewithin and having plural spider assemblies supporting, for vertical movement within the vessel, respective clusters of rods in spaced, parallel axial relationship, parallel to the predetermined axial direction of coolant flow, and a rod guide for each spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The rod guide having horizontally oriented support plates therewithin, each plate having an interior opening for accommodating axial movement therethrough of the spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The opening defining plural radially extending channels and corresponding parallel interior wall surfaces of the support plate.

  8. Exploiting rod technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-01

    ROD development was proceeding apace until recent budgetary decisions caused funding support for ROD development to be drastically reduced. The funding which was originally provided by DARPA and the Balanced Technology Initiative (BTI) Office has been cut back to zero from $800K. To determine the aeroballistic coefficients of a candidate dart, ARDEC is currently supporting development out of its own 6.2 funds at about $100K. ARDEC has made slow progress toward achieving this end because of failures in the original dart during testing. It appears that the next dart design to be tested will diverge from the original concept visualized by DARPA and Science and Technology Associates (STA). STA, the design engineer, takes exception to these changes on the basis of inappropriate test conditions and insufficient testing. At this time, the full resolution of this issue will be difficult because of the current management structure, which separates the developer (ARDEC) from the designer (STA).

  9. Tribe kills fuel rod proposal

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-13

    This article is a review of nuclear utilities` efforts to find a repository of spent fuel rods. The rejection by the Mescalero Apaches of plans to build a waste repository on tribal lands has left a number of utilities scrambling to find interim solutions. Prairie Island will have to close before the end of the year unless a solution is found, and the Hope Creek/Salem units, exhausting there storage capacity within ten years, are considering dry-cask storage.

  10. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    DOEpatents

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  11. PREFACE: Colloidal and molecular electro-optics Colloidal and molecular electro-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palberg, Thomas; Löwen, Hartmut

    2010-12-01

    exciting trends and earn the interest of a good fraction of contemporary soft matter scientists. Note1 http://www.elopto2010.fb08.uni-mainz.de Note2 http://www.sfb-tr6.de References [1] Weinberger P 2008 John Kerr and his effects found in 1877 and 1878 Phil. Mag. Lett. 88 897-907 [2] Benoit H 1948 Calcul de l'écart quadratique moyen entre les extrémités de diverses chaînes moléculaires de type usuel J. Polym. Sci. 3 376-87 [3] Benoit H 1949 Sur un dispositif de mesure de l'effet Kerr par impulsions electriques isoles Comptes Rendus 228 1716-8 [4] Benoit H 1951 Contribution a l'etude de l'effet Kerr presente par les solutions diluees de macromolecules rigide Ann. Phys. 6 561-609 Colloidal and molecular electro-optics contents Electric dichroism transients of aqueous solutions of DNA J A Bertolotto, G M Corral, E M Farias de La Torre and G B Roston The role of effective charges in the electrophoresis of highly charged colloids Apratim Chatterji and Jürgen Horbach Nonlinear response of the electric birefringence of polyelectrolyte solutions J L Déjardin and J M Martinez Kerr constant of multi-subunit particles and semiflexible, wormlike chains J García de la Torre, F G Díaz Baños and H E Pérez Sánchez Self-assembling electroactive hydrogels for flexible display technology Scott L Jones, Kok Hou Wong, Pall Thordarson and François Ladouceur Electrooptical effects in colloid systems subjected to short pulses of strong electric field S A Klemeshev, M P Petrov, A A Trusov and A V Voitylov The effect of ionic strength on electrical properties of polyelectrolyte multilayers on colloidal particles V Milkova and Ts Radeva Charge transport and current in non-polar liquids Kristiaan Neyts, Filip Beunis, Filip Strubbe, Matthias Marescaux, Bart Verboven, Masoumeh Karvar and Alwin Verschueren Ionic concentration- and pH-dependent electrophoretic mobility as studied by single colloid electrophoresis I Semenov, P Papadopoulos, G Stober and F Kremer Effect of magnesium ions and

  12. Tuning of electronic properties in IV-VI colloidal nanostructures by alloy composition and architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashchiuk, Aldona; Yanover, Diana; Rubin-Brusilovski, Anna; Maikov, Georgy I.; Čapek, Richard K.; Vaxenburg, Roman; Tilchin, Jenya; Zaiats, Gary; Lifshitz, Efrat

    2013-08-01

    Colloidal lead chalcogenide (IV-VI) quantum dots and rods are of widespread scientific and technological interest, owing to their size tunable energy band gap at the near-infrared optical regime. This article reviews the development and investigation of IV-VI derivatives, consisting of a core (dot or rod) coated with an epitaxial shell, when either the core or the shell (or both) has an alloy composition, so the entire structure has the chemical formula PbSexS1-x/PbSeyS1-y (0 <= x(y) <= 1). The article describes synthesis procedures and an examination of the structures' chemical and temperature stability. The investigation of the optical properties revealed information about the quantum yield, radiative lifetime, emission's Stokes shift and electron-phonon interaction, on the variation of composition, core-to-shell division, temperature and environment. The study reflected the unique properties of core-shell heterostructures, offering fine electronic tuning (at a fixed size) by changing their architecture. The optical observations are supported by the electronic band structure theoretical model. The challenges related to potential applications of the colloidal lead chalcogenide quantum dots and rods are also briefly addressed in the article.

  13. Colloidal aspects of texture perception.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Ton; van Aken, George A; de Jongh, Harmen H J; Hamer, Rob J

    2009-08-30

    Recently, considerable attention has been given to the understanding of texture attributes that cannot directly be related to physical properties of food, such as creamy, crumbly and watery. The perception of these attributes is strongly related to the way the food is processed during food intake, mastication, swallowing of it and during the cleaning of the mouth after swallowing. Moreover, their perception is modulated by the interaction with other basic attributes, such as taste and aroma attributes (e.g. sourness and vanilla). To be able to link the composition and structure of food products to more complicated texture attributes, their initial physical/colloid chemical properties and the oral processing of these products must be well understood. Understanding of the processes in the mouth at colloidal length scales turned out to be essential to grasp the interplay between perception, oral physiology and food properties. In view of the huge differences in physical chemical properties between food products, it is practical to make a distinction between solid, semi-solid, and liquid food products. The latter ones are often liquid dispersions of emulsion droplets or particles in general. For liquid food products for instance flow behaviour and colloidal stability of dispersed particles play a main role in determining their textural properties. For most solid products stiffness and fracture behaviour in relation to water content are essential while for semi-solids a much larger range of mechanical properties will play a role. Examples of colloidal aspects of texture perception will be discussed for these three categories of products based on selected sensory attributes and/or relevant colloidal processes. For solid products some main factors determining crispness will be discussed. For crispiness of dry cellular solid products these are water content and the architecture of the product at mesoscopic length scales (20-1000 microm). In addition the distribution of

  14. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems). PMID:26427370

  15. Preparatiion of metal colloids in inverse micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcoxon, J.P.

    1990-11-23

    A method is provided for preparing catalytic elemental metal colloidal particles (e.g., gold, palladium, silver, rhodium, nickel, iron, platinum, molybdenum) or colloidal alloy particles (silver/iridium or platinum/gold). A homogenous inverse micelle solution of a metal salt is first formed in a metal-salt solvent comprised of a surfactant (e.g. a nonionic or cationic surfactant) and an organic solvent. The size and number of inverse micelles is controlled by the proportions of the surfactant and the solvent. Then, the metal salt is reduced (by chemical reduction or by a pulsed or continuous wave UV laser) to colloidal particles of elemental metal. After their formation, the colloidal metal particles can be stabilized by reaction with materials that permanently add surface stabilizing groups to the surface of the colloidal metal particles. The sizes of the colloidal elemental metal particles and their size distribution is determined by the size and number of the inverse micelles. A second salt can be added with further reduction to form the colloidal alloy particles. After the colloidal elemental metal particles are formed, the homogeneous solution distributes to two phases, one phase rich in colloidal elemental metal particles and the other phase rich in surfactant. The colloidal elemental metal particles from one phase can be dried to form a powder useful as a catalyst.

  16. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the

  17. Organic Colloids in Forest Soils: 1. Biochemical Mobilization in the Forest Floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, G.; Kaiser, K.; Zech, W.

    1998-03-01

    Colloid-assisted contaminant transport in soils strongly depends on the concentration, the chemical composition and the charge behavior of the carrier. Organic colloids are produced in significant amounts in the forest canopy and in the forest floor. Besides pure chemical dissolution equilibria biotic processes comprise to the mobilization of organic colloids. 13C NMR spectroscopy and destructive analytical methods applied on solid and colloidal organic matter obtained in the forest floor was used to assess the formation and mobilization pathways of organic colloids. The studies suggested that a major part of the organic solutes are lignocellulose-degradation products being strongly microbially altered in the course of ligninolysis. The release of lignin-derived moieties into the soil solution is directly controlled by their degree of bio-oxidation. Microorganisms contribute also directly to the organic solutes through the release of microbial metabolites. There are indications that the microbial-controlled production of organic colloids in the forest floor is vulnerable to changes in the soil environment.

  18. Predicting crystals of Janus colloids.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Teun; Preisler, Zdenek; Smallenburg, Frank; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Sciortino, Francesco

    2013-04-28

    We present a numerical study on the phase diagram for a simple model of Janus colloids, including ordered and disordered structures. Using a range of techniques, we generate a set of crystal structures and investigate their relative stability field in the pressure-temperature and temperature-density planes by means of free-energy calculations and thermodynamic integration schemes. We find that despite the Janus colloids' simple architecture, they form stable crystal structures with complicated bond-topologies on an underlying face-centered-cubic or hexagonal-close-packed lattice. In addition, we find a phase consisting of wrinkled bilayer sheets, competing with both the fluid and the crystal phases. We detect a metastable gas-liquid coexistence which displays a micellization-driven re-entrant behavior. PMID:23635155

  19. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  20. Phases transitions and interfaces in temperature-sensitive colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Schall, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Colloids are widely used because of their exceptional properties. Beside their own applications in food, petrol, cosmetics and drug industries, photonic, optical filters and chemical sensor, they are also known as powerful model systems to study molecular phase behavior. Here, we examine both aspects of colloids using temperature-sensitive colloidal systems to fully investigate colloidal phase behavior and colloidal assembly.

  1. Colloidal stability of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: influence of natural organic matter and synthetic polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saikat; Jiang, Wei; McClements, Julian D; Xing, Baoshan

    2011-07-01

    The colloidal behavior of natural organic matter (NOM) and synthetic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-coated ferrimagnetic (γFe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated. Humic acid (HA), an important component of NOM, was extracted from a peat soil. Two different molecular weight PAAs were also used for coating. The colloidal stability of the coated magnetic NPs was evaluated as a resultant of the attractive magnetic dipolar and van der Waals forces and the repulsive electrostatic and steric-electrosteric interactions. The conformational alterations of the polyelectrolytes adsorbed on magnetic γFe(2)O(3) NPs and their role in colloidal stability were determined. Pure γFe(2)O(3) NPs were extremely unstable because of aggregation in aqueous solution, but a significant stability enhancement was observed after coating with polyelectrolytes. The steric stabilization factor induced by the polyelectrolyte coating strongly dictated the colloidal stability. The pH-induced conformational change of the adsorbed, weakly charged polyelectrolytes had a significant effect on the colloidal stability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the stretched conformation of the HA molecular chains adsorbed on the γFe(2)O(3) NP surface at pH 9, which enhanced the colloidal stability through long-range electrosteric stabilization. The depletion of the polyelectrolyte during the dilution of the NP suspension decreased the colloidal stability under acidic solution conditions. The conformation of the polyelectrolytes adsorbed on the NP surface was altered as a function of the substrate surface charge as viewed from AFM imaging. The polyelectrolyte coating also led to a reduction in magnetic moments and decreased the coercivity of the coated γFe(2)O(3) NPs. Thus, the enhanced stabilization of the coated maghematite NPs may facilitate their delivery in the groundwater for the effective removal of contaminants. PMID:21650201

  2. Superconductivity in colloidal lead nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotavin, Pavlo

    Monodisperse colloidal lead nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 4.4 to 20 nm were prepared by a self-limiting growth method. The nanoparticles are protected from oxidation by an amorphous lead-tin oxide shell of 1.5-2 nm thickness. The magnetic susceptibility of the particles was measured as a function of size, temperature and magnetic field. The Meissner effect was observed indicating the superconducting transition. For the 20 and 16 nm particles, the critical temperature is suppressed to 6.9 K from the bulk value of 7.2 K and is further reduced for smaller particles. Depending on the size of the particles, the critical field is enhanced by 60 to 140 times. The coupling between particles was in situ controlled through the conversion of the oxides present on the surface of the nanoparticles to chalcogenides. This transformation allows for a 109-fold increase in the conductivity. The temperature of the onset of the superconductivity was found to depend upon the degree of coupling of the nanoparticles in the vicinity of the insulator - superconductor transition. The critical current density of the best sample of Pb/PbSe nanocrystals at zero magnetic field was determined to be 4 x 103 A/cm 2. In turn, the critical field of the sample shows 50-fold enhancement compared to bulk Pb. A method to convert the original Pb/PbO nanocrystals into colloidal Pb/PbS (Se, Te) particle was developed. This alleviates the necessity of chemical post processing and provides a truly colloidal superconductor. Paramagnetic Meissner effect of abnormally large amplitude is observed for Pb/PbTe nanocrystal assemblies. The material described in this manuscript is the first nanostructured superconductor prepared by the bottom-up approach starting from colloidal nanoparticles.

  3. Linear viscoelasticity of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichocki, B.; Felderhof, B. U.

    1992-12-01

    We develop a phenomenological theory of the dynamic viscosity of colloidal suspensions, based on an extrapolation of the low-frequency behavior by use of a continued-fraction representation. In lowest approximation the dynamic viscosity depends on a small number of parameters, which may be determined experimentally. For semidilute suspensions the parameters may be found by theoretical calculation. The theory is tested by comparison with an exactly soluble model.

  4. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, J. L.

    1990-05-01

    A method for constructing a solid colloidal optical wavelength filter is discussed. The device was developed to filter optical wavelengths for spectroscopy, protection from intense radiation, monochromatizing, and analyzing optical radiation. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium (such as setting plastic); agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  5. Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots with tunable surface composition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Helen Hsiu-Ying; Evans, Christopher M; Swartz, Brett D; Neukirch, Amanda J; Young, Jeremy; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Krauss, Todd D

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal CdS quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized with tunable surface composition. Surface stoichiometry was controlled by applying reactive secondary phosphine sulfide precursors in a layer-by-layer approach. The surface composition was observed to greatly affect photoluminescence properties. Band edge emission was quenched in sulfur terminated CdS QDs and fully recovered when QDs were cadmium terminated. Calculations suggest that electronic states inside the band gap arising from surface sulfur atoms could trap charges, thus inhibiting radiative recombination and facilitating nonradiative relaxation. PMID:22924603

  6. Colloidal assembly by ice templating.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, Guruswamy; Biswas, Bipul; Choudhury, Chandan Kumar

    2016-04-12

    We investigate ice templating of aqueous dispersions of polymer coated colloids and crosslinkers, at particle concentrations far below that required to form percolated monoliths. Freezing the aqueous dispersions forces the particles into close proximity to form clusters, that are held together as the polymer chains coating the particles are crosslinked. We observe that, with an increase in the particle concentration from about 10(6) to 10(8) particles per ml, there is a transition from isolated single particles to increasingly larger clusters. In this concentration range, most of the colloidal clusters formed are linear or sheet like particle aggregates. Remarkably, the cluster size distribution for clusters smaller than about 30 particles, as well as the size distribution of linear clusters, is only weakly dependent on the dispersion concentration in the range that we investigate. We demonstrate that the main features of cluster formation are captured by kinetic simulations that do not consider hydrodynamics or instabilities at the growing ice front due to particle concentration gradients. Thus, clustering of colloidal particles by ice templating dilute dispersions appears to be governed only by particle exclusion by the growing ice crystals that leads to their accumulation at ice crystal boundaries. PMID:26780838

  7. Colloidal thermoresponsive gel forming hybrids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruixue; Tirelli, Nicola; Cellesi, Francesco; Saunders, Brian R

    2010-09-15

    Colloidal hybrids comprise organic and inorganic components and are attracting considerable attention in the literature. Recently, we reported hybrid anisotropic microsheets that formed thermoresponsive gels in polymer solutions [Liu et al., Langmuir, 25, 490, 2009]. Here, we investigate the composition and properties of these hybrid colloids themselves in detail for the first time. Three different cationic PNIPAm (N-isopropylacrylamide) graft copolymers and two inorganic nanoparticle types (laponite and Ludox silica) were used to prepare a range of hybrids. Anisotropic microsheets only formed when laponite particles were added to the copolymer implying directed self-assembly. Aqueous dispersions of the microsheets spontaneously formed gels at room temperature and these gels were thermoresponsive. They represent a new class of gel forming colloid and are termed thermoresponsive gel forming hybrids. The compositions of the hybrids were determined from thermogravimetric analysis and those that gave gel forming behaviour identified. Variable-temperature rheology experiments showed that the elasticity of the gels increased linearly with temperature. The reversibility of the thermally-triggered changes in gel elasticity was investigated. The concentration dependence of the rheology data was well described by elastic percolation scaling theory and the data could be collapsed onto a master curve. The concentration exponent for the elastic modulus was 2.5. The strong attractive interactions that exist between the dispersed gel forming hybrids was demonstrated by the formation of stable thermoresponsive hybrid hydrogels through casting of hybrid dispersions. PMID:20561633

  8. Addressing Colloidal Stability for Unambiguous Electroanalysis of Single Nanoparticle Impacts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Donald A; Kondajji, Aditya M; Castañeda, Alma D; Dasari, Radhika; Crooks, Richard M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2016-07-01

    Herein the problem of colloidal instability on electrochemically detected nanoparticle (NP) collisions with a Hg ultramicroelectrode (UME) by electrocatalytic amplification is addressed. NP tracking analysis (NTA) shows that rapid aggregation occurs in solution after diluting citrate-stabilized Pt NPs with hydrazine/phosphate buffers of net ionic strength greater than 70 mM. Colloidal stability improves by lowering the ionic strength, indicating that aggregation processes were strongly affected by charge screening of the NP double layer interactions at high cation concentrations. For the system of lowest ionic strength, the overwhelming majority of observed electrocatalytic current signals represent single NP/electrode impacts, as confirmed by NTA kinetic monitoring. NP diffusion coefficients determined by NTA and NP impact electroanalysis are in excellent agreement for the stable colloids, which signifies that the sticking probability of Pt NPs interacting with Hg is unity and that the observed NP impact rate agrees with the expected steady-state diffusive flux expression for the spherical cap Hg UME. PMID:27306603

  9. Particle size distributions of polyaniline-silica colloidal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.; Armes, S.P. ); Fairhurst, D. ); Emmett, S.N. ); Idzorek, G.; Pigott, T. )

    1992-09-01

    We have characterized a new polyaniline-silica composite colloid by various particle sizing techniques. Our transmission electron microscopy studies have confirmed for the first time an unusual raspberry morphology, with the small silica particles held together by the polyaniline [open quotes]binder[close quotes]. These particles have average diameters in the size range 150-500 nm. Charge-velocity analysis experiments indicated a number-average particle diameter of 300 [plus minus] 80 nm, but only poor statistics were obtained (172 particles counted). Photon correlation spectroscopy studies suggested an intensity-average particle diameter of 380 nm. Disk centrifuge photosedimentometry (DCP) turned out to be our preferred sizing technique for the polyaniline-silica colloids, since it was both quick and reliable and, more importantly, produced the true particle size distribution (PSD) curve with excellent statistics. The DCP data indicated a weight-average and number-average particle diameter of 330 [plus minus] 70 nm and 280 [plus minus] 70 nm, respectively, and moreover confirmed the PSD to be both broad and unimodal. Finally, these colloidal composites were sized using the Malvern Aerosizer. Using this instrument in conjunction with a nebulizer attachment (which allowed particle sizing of the [open quotes]wet[close quotes] dispersion) rather than in the conventional [open quotes]dry powder[close quotes] mode, we obtained particle size data which were in reasonable agreement with the DCP results. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Precise colloids with tunable interactions for confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kodger, Thomas E.; Guerra, Rodrigo E.; Sprakel, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Model colloidal systems studied with confocal microscopy have led to numerous insights into the physics of condensed matter. Though confocal microscopy is an extremely powerful tool, it requires a careful choice and preparation of the colloid. Uncontrolled or unknown variations in the size, density, and composition of the individual particles and interactions between particles, often influenced by the synthetic route taken to form them, lead to difficulties in interpreting the behavior of the dispersion. Here we describe the straightforward synthesis of copolymer particles which can be refractive index- and density-matched simultaneously to a non-plasticizing mixture of high dielectric solvents. The interactions between particles are accurately tuned by surface grafting of polymer brushes using Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP), from hard-sphere-like to long-ranged electrostatic repulsion or mixed charge attraction. We also modify the buoyant density of the particles by altering the copolymer ratio while maintaining their refractive index match to the suspending solution resulting in well controlled sedimentation. The tunability of the inter-particle interactions, the low volatility of the solvents, and the capacity to simultaneously match both the refractive index and density of the particles to the fluid opens up new possibilities for exploring the physics of colloidal systems. PMID:26420044

  11. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S.; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids. PMID:26078020

  12. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J

    2015-01-01

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids. PMID:26078020

  13. Propagation of extensional waves in a piezoelectric semiconductor rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. L.; Wang, X. Y.; Chen, W. Q.; Yang, J. S.

    2016-04-01

    We studied the propagation of extensional waves in a thin piezoelectric semiconductor rod of ZnO whose c-axis is along the axis of the rod. The macroscopic theory of piezoelectric semiconductors was used which consists of the coupled equations of piezoelectricity and the conservation of charge. The problem is nonlinear because the drift current is the product of the unknown electric field and the unknown carrier density. A perturbation procedure was used which resulted in two one-way coupled linear problems of piezoelectricity and the conservation of charge, respectively. The acoustic wave and the accompanying electric field were obtained from the equations of piezoelectricity. The motion of carriers was then determined from the conservation of charge using a trigonometric series. It was found that while the acoustic wave was approximated by a sinusoidal wave, the motion of carriers deviates from a sinusoidal wave qualitatively because of the contributions of higher harmonics arising from the originally nonlinear terms. The wave crests become higher and sharper while the troughs are shallower and wider. This deviation is more pronounced for acoustic waves with larger amplitudes.

  14. Binodal Colloidal Aggregation Test - 4: Polydispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaikin, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Binodal Colloidal Aggregation Test - 4: Polydispersion (BCAT-4-Poly) will use model hard-spheres to explore seeded colloidal crystal nucleation and the effects of polydispersity, providing insight into how nature brings order out of disorder. Crewmembers photograph samples of polymer and colloidal particles (tiny nanoscale spheres suspended in liquid) that model liquid/gas phase changes. Results will help scientists develop fundamental physics concepts previously cloaked by the effects of gravity.

  15. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test Conducted on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Monica I.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1999-01-01

    Colloids are tiny (submicron) particles suspended in fluid. Paint, ink, and milk are examples of colloids found in everyday life. The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test (BCAT) is part of an extensive series of experiments planned to investigate the fundamental properties of colloids so that scientists can make colloids more useful for technological applications. Some of the colloids studied in BCAT are made of two different sized particles (binary colloidal alloys) that are very tiny, uniform plastic spheres. Under the proper conditions, these colloids can arrange themselves in a pattern to form crystals. These crystals may form the basis of new classes of light switches, displays, and optical devices. Windows made of liquid crystals are already in the marketplace. These windows change their appearance from transparent to opaque when a weak electric current is applied. In the future, if the colloidal crystals can be made to control the passage of light through them, such products could be made much more cheaply. These experiments require the microgravity environment of space because good quality crystals are difficult to produce on Earth because of sedimentation and convection in the fluid. The BCAT experiment hardware included two separate modules for two different experiments. The "Slow Growth" hardware consisted of a 35-mm camera with a 250- exposure photo film cartridge. The camera was aimed toward the sample module, which contained 10 separate colloid samples. A rack of small lights provided backlighting for the photographs. The BCAT hardware was launched on the shuttle and was operated aboard the Russian space station Mir by American astronauts John Blaha and David Wolf (launched September 1996 and returned January 1997; reflown September 1997 and returned January 1998). To begin the experiment, one of these astronauts would mix the samples to disperse the colloidal particles and break up any crystals that might have already formed. Once the samples were mixed and

  16. Magnetic assembly route to colloidal responsive photonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    He, Le; Wang, Mingsheng; Ge, Jianping; Yin, Yadong

    2012-09-18

    Responsive photonic structures can respond to external stimuli by transmitting optical signals. Because of their important technological applications such as color signage and displays, biological and chemical sensors, security devices, ink and paints, military camouflage, and various optoelectronic devices, researchers have focused on developing these functional materials. Conventionally, self-assembled colloidal crystals containing periodically arranged dielectric materials have served as the predominant starting frameworks. Stimulus-responsive materials are incorporated into the periodic structures either as the initial building blocks or as the surrounding matrix so that the photonic properties can be tuned. Although researchers have proposed various versions of responsive photonic structures, the low efficiency of fabrication through self-assembly, narrow tunability, slow responses to the external stimuli, incomplete reversibility, and the challenge of integrating them into existing photonic devices have limited their practical application. In this Account, we describe how magnetic fields can guide the assembly of superparamagnetic colloidal building blocks into periodically arranged particle arrays and how the photonic properties of the resulting structures can be reversibly tuned by manipulating the external magnetic fields. The application of the external magnetic field instantly induces a strong magnetic dipole-dipole interparticle attraction within the dispersion of superparamagnetic particles, which creates one-dimensional chains that each contains a string of particles. The balance between the magnetic attraction and the interparticle repulsions, such as the electrostatic force, defines the interparticle separation. By employing uniform superparamagnetic particles of appropriate sizes and surface charges, we can create one-dimensional periodicity, which leads to strong optical diffraction. Acting remotely over a large distance, magnetic forces drove the

  17. Rheology of rod/random coil polymer systems, and interpenetrating networks

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    Poly({gamma}-benzyl-L-glutamate) (PBLG), a synthetic {alpha}-helical rodlike polypeptide, and aqueous solutions of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), a surfactant that forms rodlike colloids, were used to study the properties of rod polymer solutions. Interpenetrating networks of PBLG and acrylic polymers were prepared and studied rheologically. The rheology of PBLG solutions in toluene and dimethyl formamide (DMF) was studied in the dilute, semi-dilute, and concentrated regimes. Steady shear results fit well to a theory recently proposed, but not to older theories in the literature. The rheology and morphology of viscoelastic solutions of CTAC were studied using steady and oscillatory shear measurements, and transmission electron microscopy. By titrating a fixed CTAC concentration with salicylate the surfactant solution changed from the Newtonian behavior of spherical micelles 5 nm in diameter to viscoelastic solutions of entangled rodlike micelles as long as several micrometers. The phase diagram was determined for the three component system PBLG, polystyrene (PS), DMF system at {approximately}23 C. The results did not fit the athermal theory for rod/random coil systems. However, the addition of enthalpic terms brings theoretical predictions in general agreement with experimental results. The kinetics of PBLG/DMF gelation were studied rheologically. Solutions of PBLG/DMF were observed using oscillatory shear as they were cooled below the gel point, and on heating from the gel to the solution phase. The results support the hypothesis that gelation occurs as a result of the kinetics of phase separation; however, the mechanism is unproven. The rheological properties of interpenetrating networks (IPNs) prepared from rod and random coil polymers were studied. Rod/random coil IPNs were prepared by polymerizing the diluent around an isotropic solution of rods, and by polymerizing the diluent around a microphase separated rod polymer gel.

  18. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  19. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  20. Aggregation kinetics in a model colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2005-08-08

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulations of aggregation kinetics in a colloidal suspension modeled as a highly asymmetric binary mixture. Starting from a configuration with largely uncorrelated colloidal particles the system relaxes by coagulation-fragmentation dynamics to a structured state of low-dimensionality clusters with an exponential size distribution. The results show that short range repulsive interactions alone can give rise to so-called cluster phases. For the present model and probably other, more common colloids, the observed clusters appear to be equilibrium phase fluctuations induced by the entropic inter-colloidal attractions.

  1. Colloid Coalescence with Focused X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Kim, J. T.; Je, J. H.; Yi, J. M.; Wang, S.; Lee, W.-K.

    2011-07-01

    We show direct evidence that focused x rays enable us to merge polymer colloidal particles at room temperature. This phenomenon is ascribed to the photochemical scission of colloids with x rays, reducing the molecular weight, glass transition temperature, surface tension, and viscosity of colloids. The observation of the neck bridge growth with time shows that the x-ray-induced colloid coalescence is analogous to viscoelastic coalescence. This finding suggests a feasible protocol of photonic nanofabrication by sintering or welding of polymers, without thermal damage, using x-ray photonics.

  2. Collective motion in populations of colloidal bots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis

    One of the origins of active matter physics was the idea that flocks, herds, swarms and shoals could be quantitatively described as emergent ordered phases in self-driven materials. From a somehow dual perspective, I will show how to engineer active materials our of colloidal flocks. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors and how to handle them in microfluidic chips. These populations of colloidal bots display a non-equilibrium transition toward collective motion. A special attention will be paid to the robustness of the resulting colloidal flocks with respect to geometrical frustration and to quenched disorder.

  3. Nonequilibrium forces between dragged ultrasoft colloids.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sunil P; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2011-10-01

    The dynamical deformation of ultrasoft colloids as well as their dynamic frictional forces are numerically investigated, when one colloid is dragged past another at constant velocity. Hydrodynamic interactions are captured by a particle-based mesoscopic simulation method. At vanishing relative velocity, the equilibrium repulsive force-distance curve is obtained. At large drag velocities, in contrast, we find an apparent attractive force for departing colloids along the dragging direction. The deformation, in the close encounter of colloids, and the energy dissipation are examined as a function of the drag velocity and their separation. PMID:22107322

  4. Self-assembly of rod-coil-rod ABA-type triblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Zhong; Sun, Zhao-Yan; Zhang, Cheng-Xiang; An, Li-Jia; Tong, Zhen

    2008-02-21

    Self-assembled behavior of symmetric ABA rod-coil-rod triblock copolymer melts is studied by applying self-consistent-field lattice techniques in three-dimensional space. The phase diagram is constructed to understand the effects of the chain architecture on the self-assembled behavior. Four stable structures are observed for the ABA rod-coil-rod triblock, i.e., spherelike, lamellar, gyroidlike, and cylindrical structures. Different from AB rod-coil diblock and BAB coil-rod-coil triblock copolymers, the lamellar structure observed in ABA rod-coil-rod triblock copolymer melts is not stable for high volume fraction of the rod component (f(rod)=0.8), which is attributed to the intramolecular interactions between the two rod blocks of the polymer chain. When 0.3rod)<0.7, the intramolecular interactions between the two rigid blocks of the polymer chain are decrease, which results in the occurrence of some interesting metastable mixed structures. These structures have not been observed in polymers containing only one rod block, such as a lamellar-alt-lamellar structure. The results are expected to provide guidance for the design of microstructures in experiments. PMID:18298171

  5. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  6. Hierarchical self-assembly of colloidal magnetic particles into reconfigurable spherical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morphew, Daniel; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan

    2015-04-01

    Colloidal self-assembly has enormous potential as a bottom-up means of structure fabrication. Here we demonstrate hierarchical self-assembly of rationally designed charge-stabilised colloidal magnetic particles into ground state structures that are topologically equivalent to a snub cube and a snub dodecahedron, the only two chiral Archimedean solids, for size-selected clusters. These spherical structures open up in response to an external magnetic field and demonstrate controllable porosity. Such features are critical to their applications as functional materials.

  7. Inducing Propulsion of Colloidal Dimers by Breaking the Symmetry in Electrohydrodynamic Flow.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fuduo; Yang, Xingfu; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Ning

    2015-11-13

    We show that dielectric colloidal dimers with broken symmetry in geometry, composition, or interfacial charges can all propel in directions that are perpendicular to the applied ac electric field. The asymmetry in particle properties ultimately results in an unbalanced electrohydrodynamic flow on two sides of the particles. Consistent with scaling laws, the propulsion direction, speed, and orientation of dimers can be conveniently tuned by frequency. The new propulsion mechanism revealed here is important for building colloidal motors and studying collective behavior of active matter. PMID:26613479

  8. Inducing Propulsion of Colloidal Dimers by Breaking the Symmetry in Electrohydrodynamic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuduo; Yang, Xingfu; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Ning

    2015-11-01

    We show that dielectric colloidal dimers with broken symmetry in geometry, composition, or interfacial charges can all propel in directions that are perpendicular to the applied ac electric field. The asymmetry in particle properties ultimately results in an unbalanced electrohydrodynamic flow on two sides of the particles. Consistent with scaling laws, the propulsion direction, speed, and orientation of dimers can be conveniently tuned by frequency. The new propulsion mechanism revealed here is important for building colloidal motors and studying collective behavior of active matter.

  9. Examination of cadmium safety rod thermal test specimens and failure mechanism evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Peacock, H.B.; Iyer, N.C.

    1992-01-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental cadmium safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. Companion reports describe the experiments and a structural evaluation (finite element analysis) of the safety rod. This report deals primarily with the examination of the test specimens, evaluation of possible failure mechanisms, and confirmatory separate effects experiments. It is concluded that the failures observed in the cadmium safety rod thermal tests which occurred at low temperature (T < 600{degrees}C) with slow thermal ramp rates (slow cladding strain rates) resulted from localized dissolution of the stainless steel cladding by the cadmium/aluminum solution and subsequent ductility exhaustion and rupture. The slow thermal ramp rate is believed to be the root cause for the failures; specifically, the slow ramp rate led to localized cladding shear deformation which ruptured the protective oxide film on the cladding inner surface and allowed dissolution to initiate. The test results and proposed failure mechanism support the conclusion that the rods would not fail below 500{degrees}C even at slow ramp rates. The safety rod thermal test specimen failures which occurred at high temperature (T > 800{degrees}C) with fast thermal ramp rates are concluded to be mechanical in nature without significant environmental degradation. Based on these tests, tasks were initiated to design and manufacture B{sub 4}C safety rods to replace the cadmium safety rods. The B{sub 4}C safety rods have been manufactured at this time and it is currently planned to charge them to the reactor in the near future. 60 refs.

  10. SIGNIFICANCE OF STRAINING IN COLLOID DEPOSITION: EVIDENCE AND IMPLICATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Filtration theory is often used to characterize colloid attachment when deposition is controlled by chemical interactions between colloids and grain surfaces. Over the past decade considerable research suggests that colloid deposition is frequently not consistent with filtration theory predictions u...

  11. Gelation and phase separation of attractive colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peter James

    2008-07-01

    I present several scientific and technical contributions in this thesis. I demonstrate that the gelation of spherical particles with isotropic, short-range attractive interactions is initiated by spinodal decomposition, a thermodynamic instability that triggers the formation of clusters that span and dynamically arrest to create a gel. This simple, universal gelation picture does not depend on microscopic system-specific details---thus broadly describing any particle system with short-range attractions---and suggests that gelation, often considered a purely kinetic phenomenon, is in fact a direct consequence of equilibrium liquid-gas phase separation. I also demonstrate that spherical particles with isotropic attractive interactions exhibit a stable phase---a fluid of particle clusters---that persists on experimental timescales even in the absence of any long-range Coulombic charge repulsion; this contrasts some expectations based on simulation and theory. I describe a new capability I created by integrating accelerated image processing software that I wrote into a high-speed confocal microscope system that I developed: active target-locking, the ability to follow freely-moving complex objects within a microscope sample, even as they change size, shape, and orientation---in real time. Finally, I report continuous, month-long observations of near-critical spinodal decomposition of colloids with isotropic attractions, aboard the International Space Station. I also include detailed descriptions, with examples and illustrations, of the tools and techniques that I have developed to produce these results.

  12. Potentiometric Titrations for Measuring the Capacitance of Colloidal Photodoped ZnO Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Brozek, Carl K; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-08-24

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals offer a unique opportunity to bridge molecular and bulk semiconductor redox phenomena. Here, potentiometric titration is demonstrated as a method for quantifying the Fermi levels and charging potentials of free-standing colloidal n-type ZnO nanocrystals possessing between 0 and 20 conduction-band electrons per nanocrystal, corresponding to carrier densities between 0 and 1.2 × 10(20) cm(-3). Potentiometric titration of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals has not been described previously, and little precedent exists for analogous potentiometric titration of any soluble reductants involving so many electrons. Linear changes in Fermi level vs charge-carrier density are observed for each ensemble of nanocrystals, with slopes that depend on the nanocrystal size. Analysis indicates that the ensemble nanocrystal capacitance is governed by classical surface electrical double layers, showing no evidence of quantum contributions. Systematic shifts in the Fermi level are also observed with specific changes in the identity of the charge-compensating countercation. As a simple and contactless alternative to more common thin-film-based voltammetric techniques, potentiometric titration offers a powerful new approach for quantifying the redox properties of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals. PMID:27444048

  13. Automatic safety rod for reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-03-23

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  14. Growth and Morphology of Rod Eutectics

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Teng; Shan Liu; R. Trivedi

    2008-03-17

    The formation of rod eutectic microstructure is investigated systematically in a succinonitrile-camphor alloy of eutectic composition by using the directional solidification technique. A new rod eutectic configuration is observed in which the rods form with elliptical cylindrical shape. Two different orientations of the ellipse are observed that differ by a 90{sup o} rotation such that the major and the minor axes are interchanged. Critical experiments in thin samples, where a single layer of rods forms, show that the spacing and orientation of the elliptic rods are governed by the growth rate and the sample thickness. In thicker samples, multi layers of rods form with circular cross-section and the scaling law between the spacing and velocity predicted by the Jackson and Hunt model is validated. A theoretical model is developed for a two-dimensional array of elliptical rods that are arranged in a hexagonal or a square array, and the results are shown to be consistent with the experimental observations. The model of elliptic rods is also shown to reduce to that for the circular rod eutectic when the lengths of the two axes are equal, and to the lamellar eutectic model when one of the axes is much larger than the other one.

  15. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Pardini, John A.; Walker, David E.

    1987-01-01

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  16. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  17. The directional sensitivity of retinal rods.

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M; Ching, C C; Kitahara, K

    1983-01-01

    Rod field sensitivity, 10-S(r) (i.e. the reciprocal of the radiance of a background required for 10-fold elevation of rod threshold) was measured for monochromatic backgrounds traversing the pupil at various points (r) on three subjects. The wave-length dependency of the directional sensitivities of the three foveal cone mechanisms of the principal subject have been reported previously (Alpern & Kitahara, 1983). Rods, as cones, are less sensitive to obliquely incident, than to normally incident backgrounds. At the pupil margin (4 mm) the effect is between 0.368 and 0.976 log10 units smaller for rods. After correction for losses by corneal reflexion and by absorption in the lens, S(r) for rods is reasonably described by the parabolic equation used by Stiles (1937) to quantify the directional sensitivity of cones. The small effect for rods precludes a description as consistently precise as this equation provides for cones. The steepness of the parabolic curve best fitting the directional sensitivity data of the rods of the principal subject was independent of background wave number. For a second subject, whose rods are supposed to be smaller, it was directly proportional to the square of that wave number. The latter is the expectation if the directional sensitivity of this subject's rods were determined by principles outlined in the diffraction theory of Simon (1970). PMID:6644624

  18. Rod Control Assemblies Wear Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczorowski, Damien; Georges, Jean-Mary; Bec, Sandrine; Vannes, Andre-Bernard; Tonck, Andre; Vernot, Jean-Philippe

    2002-07-01

    In nuclear power plants, slender tubular components are subjected to vibrations in a PHTW environment. As a result, the two contacting surfaces, tubes and their guides undergo impact at low contact pressures. The components are usually made of stainless steel and it was found that the influence of the PHTW, combined with other actions (such as corrosion, erosion, squeeze film effect, third body effect and cavitation) leads to a particular wear of the material. Therefore, this paper aims to show that the colloidal oxides, formed on the steel surfaces in PHTW, play a principal role in the wear of the surfaces. Actually, due to the specific kinematic conditions of the contact, the flow of compacted oxides abrades the surfaces. (authors)

  19. Analysis of colloid and tracer breakthrough curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindrod, Peter; Edwards, Mark S.; Higgo, Jenny J. W.; Williams, Geoffrey M.

    1996-02-01

    We consider the dispersion and elution of colloids and dissolved nonsorbing tracers within saturated heterogeneous porous media. Since flow path geometry in natural systems is often ill-characterized macroscopic (mean) flow rates and dispersion tensors are utilized in order to account for the sub-model scale microscopic fluctuations in media structure (and the consequent hydrodynamic profile). Even for tracer migration and dispersal this issue is far from settled. Here we consider how colloid and tracer migration phenomena can be treated consistently. Theoretical calculations for model flow geometries yield two quantitative predictions for the transport of free (not yet captured) colloids with reference to a non-sorbing dissolved tracer within the same medium: the average migration velocity of the free colloids is higher than that of the tracer; and that the ratio of the equivalent hydrodynamic dispersion rates of colloids and tracer is dependent only upon properties of the colloids and the porous medium, it is independent of pathlengths and fluid flux, once length scales are large enough. The first of these is well known, since even in simple flow paths free colloids must stay more centre stream. The second, if validated suggests how solute and colloid dispersion may be dealt with consistently in macroscopic migration models. This is crucial since dispersion is usually ill-characterized and unaddressed by the experimental literature. In this paper we present evidence based upon an existing Drigg field injection test for the validity of these predictions. We show that starting from experimental data the fitted dispersion rates of both colloids and non-sorbing tracers increase with the measured elution rates (obeying slightly different rules for tracers and colloids); and that the ratio of colloid and nonsorbing tracer elution rates, and the ratio of colloid and nonsorbing tracer dispersion rates may be dependent upon properties of the colloids and the medium (not

  20. Structural color from colloidal glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia

    When a material has inhomogeneities at a lengthscale comparable to the wavelength of light, interference can give rise to structural colors: colors that originate from the interaction of the material's microstructure with light and do not require absorbing dyes. In this thesis we study a class of these materials, called photonic glasses, where the inhomogeneities form a dense and random arrangement. Photonic glasses have angle-independent structural colors that look like those of conventional dyes. However, when this work started, there was only a handful of colors accessible with photonic glasses, mostly hues of blue. We use various types of colloidal particles to make photonic glasses, and we study, both theoretically and experimentally, how the optical properties of these glasses relate to their structure and constituent particles. Based on our observations from glasses of conventional particles, we construct a theoretical model that explains the scarcity of yellow, orange, and red photonic glasses. Guided by this model, we develop novel colloidal systems that allow a higher degree of control over structural color. We assemble glasses of soft, core-shell particles with scattering cores and transparent shells, where the resonant wavelength can be tuned independently of the reflectivity. We then encapsulate glasses of these core-shell particles into emulsion droplets of tunable size; in this system, we observe, for the first time, angle-independent structural colors that cover the entire visible spectrum. To enhance color saturation, we begin experimenting with inverse glasses, where the refractive index of the particles is lower than the refractive index of the medium, with promising results. Finally, based on our theoretical model for scattering from colloidal glasses, we begin an exploration of the color gamut that could be achieved with this technique, and we find that photonic glasses are a promising approach to a new type of long-lasting, non-toxic, and

  1. Capped semiconductor colloids. Synthesis and photoelectrochemical behavior of TiO{sub 2}-capped SnO{sub 2} nanocrystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Bedja, I.; Kamat, P.V.

    1995-06-01

    In our continuing efforts to surface-modify semiconductor colloids, we have succeeded in preparing TiO{sub 2}-capped SnO{sub 2} (SnO{sub 2} @ TiO{sub 2}) and TiO{sub 2}-capped SiO{sub 2} (SiO{sub 2} @ TiO{sub 2}) colloids. The SnO{sub 2} @ TiO{sub 2} colloids are 80-100 A in diameter and exhibit improved photochromic and photocatalytic efficiencies compared to the native colloids. The improved charge separation in this system was confirmed from the enhanced efficiency of hole trapping monitored from the absorption peak at 360 nm. The photocatlytic properties of SiO{sub 2} @ TiO{sub 2} colloids are similar to that of native TiO{sub 2} colloids. The capped semiconductor systems are useful for the oxidation of I{sup -} and SCN{sup -}. For example, the quantum efficiency for I{sup -} oxidation can be improved by a factor of 2-3 upon capping the SnO{sub 2} colloids with TiO{sub 2}. The distinction between the capped and coupled semiconductor systems has been made by preparing nanocrystalline thin films in two different geometries and studying their photoelectrochemical behavior. 54 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Highly uniform polyhedral colloids formed by colloidal crystal templating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifan; McGinley, James; Crocker, John; Crocker Research Group Team

    2015-03-01

    We seek to create polyhedral solid particles by trapping oil droplets in a colloidal crystal, and polymerizing them in situ, resulting in polyhedral particles containing spherical dimples in an ordered arrangement. Specifically, highly monodisperse, micron-sized droplets of 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (TPM) were first prepared through a poly condensation reaction, following well established methods. The droplets were mixed with an excess of polystyrene(PS) particles (diameter in 2.58 μm), which formed close packed (FCC or HCP) colloidal crystals by natural sedimentation and compression under partial drying to an extent, with TPM oil droplets trapped into their tetrahedral and octahedral interstitial sites and wet PS particles. Depending on the initial particle volume fraction and extent of drying, a high yield of dimpled particles having different shapes including tetrahedra and cubes were obtained after oil initiated polymerization and dissolution of the host PS particles, as seen under SEM. The effects of TPM to PS particles size ratio, drying time, and other factors in relation to the yield of tetrahedral and cubic dimpled particles will be presented. Finally, fractionation techniques were used to obtain suspensions of uniform polyhedral particles of high purity.

  3. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways. PMID:26718442

  4. Active colloids at fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Malgaretti, P; Popescu, M N; Dietrich, S

    2016-05-01

    If an active Janus particle is trapped at the interface between a liquid and a fluid, its self-propelled motion along the interface is affected by a net torque on the particle due to the viscosity contrast between the two adjacent fluid phases. For a simple model of an active, spherical Janus colloid we analyze the conditions under which translation occurs along the interface and we provide estimates of the corresponding persistence length. We show that under certain conditions the persistence length of such a particle is significantly larger than the corresponding one in the bulk liquid, which is in line with the trends observed in recent experimental studies. PMID:27025167

  5. Telegraphic noise in transport through colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Lachance-Quirion, Dany; Tremblay, Samuel; Lamarre, Sébastien A; Méthot, Vincent; Gingras, Daniel; Camirand Lemyre, Julien; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel; Allen, Claudine Nì

    2014-02-12

    We report measurements of electrical transport through single CdSe/CdS core/shell colloidal quantum dots (cQDs) connected to source and drain contacts. We observe telegraphic switching noise showing few plateaus at room temperature. We model and interpret these results as charge trapping of individual trap states, and therefore we resolve individual charge defects in these high-quality low-strain cQDs. The small number of observed defects quantitatively validates the passivation method based on thick CdS shells nearly lattice-matched to CdSe cores first developed to suppress photoluminescence blinking. Finally, we introduce a figure of merit useful to efficiently distinguish telegraphic noise from noise with a Gaussian distribution. PMID:24437447

  6. Colloidal entanglement in highly twisted chiral nematic colloids: twisted loops, Hopf links, and trefoil knots.

    PubMed

    Jampani, V S R; Škarabot, M; Ravnik, M; Čopar, S; Žumer, S; Muševič, I

    2011-09-01

    The topology and geometry of closed defect loops is studied in chiral nematic colloids with variable chirality. The colloidal particles with perpendicular surface anchoring of liquid crystalline molecules are inserted in a twisted nematic cell with the thickness that is only slightly larger than the diameter of the colloidal particle. The total twist of the chiral nematic structure in cells with parallel boundary conditions is set to 0, π, 2π, and 3π, respectively. We use the laser tweezers to discern the number and the topology of the -1/2 defect loops entangling colloidal particles. For a single colloidal particle, we observe that a single defect loop is winding around the particle, with the winding pattern being more complex in cells with higher total twist. We observe that colloidal dimers and colloidal clusters are always entangled by one or several -1/2 defect loops. For colloidal pairs in π-twisted cells, we identify at least 17 different entangled structures, some of them exhibiting linked defect loops-Hopf link. Colloidal entanglement is even richer with a higher number of colloidal particles, where we observe not only linked, but also colloidal clusters knotted into the trefoil knot. The experiments are in good agreement with numerical modeling using Landau-de Gennes theory coupled with geometrical and topological considerations using the method of tetrahedral rotation. PMID:22060386

  7. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy of Bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane/Tolane-Based Molecular Rods Included in Tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We examine the fluorescence anisotropy of rod-shaped guests held inside the channels of tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) host nanocrystals, characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and solid state NMR spectroscopy. We address two issues: (i) are light polarization measurements on an aqueous colloidal solution of TPP nanocrystals meaningful, or is depolarization by scattering excessive? (ii) Can measurements of the rotational mobility of the included guests be performed at low enough loading levels to suppress depolarization by intercrystallite energy transfer? We find that meaningful measurements are possible and demonstrate that the long axis of molecular rods included in TPP channels performs negligible vibrational motion. PMID:25937858

  8. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the incre...

  9. Colloidal Electrolytes and the Critical Micelle Concentration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, L. G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes methods for determining the Critical Micelle Concentration of Colloidal Electrolytes; methods described are: (1) methods based on Colligative Properties, (2) methods based on the Electrical Conductivity of Colloidal Electrolytic Solutions, (3) Dye Method, (4) Dye Solubilization Method, and (5) Surface Tension Method. (BR)

  10. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Aspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaikin, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Aspheres (BCAT-5-Aspheres) experiment photographs initially randomized colloidal samples (tiny nanoscale spheres suspended in liquid) in microgravity to determine their resulting structure over time. BCAT-5-Aspheres will study the properties of concentrated systems of small particles when they are identical, but not spherical in microgravity..

  11. Colloid deposition in granular porous media based on random sequential adsorption mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.R.; Elimelech, M.

    1995-12-01

    A theoretical model is presented for describing one-dimensional colloid transport in granular porous media. The model depicts irreversible, monolayer deposition of colloidal particles onto oppositely-charged collectors of spherical geometry. A dynamic blocking function based on random sequential adsorption (RSA) mechanics is implemented to account for the dynamic aspects of particle deposition. The RSA dynamic blocking function is modified to consider the excluded area effects arising from diffuse double-layer interactions of particles. The RSA blocking function exhibits a nonlinear power law dependence on surface coverage, in contrast to the linear Langmuirian blocking function utilized in previous dynamic deposition models for porous media. A comparison of theoretical model predictions based on RSA and Langmuirian blocking with experimental particle breakthrough curves demonstrates the superiority of RSA mechanics as a means of describing the transient nature of colloid deposition in granular porous media.

  12. Investigating the role of particle shape on colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Seymour, M.; Chen, G.; Su, C.

    2011-12-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the transport and retention of nanoparticles in porous media is essential both for environmental applications of nanotechnology and assessing the potential environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials. Engineered and naturally occurring nanoparticles can be found in various shapes including rod-shape carbon nanotubes that have high aspect ratios. Although it is expected that nonspherical shape could play an important role on their transport and retention behaviors, current theoretical models for particle transport in porous media, however, are mostly based on spherical particle shape. In this work, the effect of particle shape on its transport and retention in porous media was evaluated by stretching carboxylate-modified fluorescent polystyrene spheres into rod shapes with aspect ratios of 2:1 and 4:1. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation experiments (QCM-D) were conducted to measure the deposition rates of spherical and rod-shaped nanoparticles to the collector (poly-L-lysine coated silica sensor) surface under favorable conditions. Under unfavorable conditions, the retention of nanoparticles in a microfluidic flow cell packed with glass beads was studied with the use of laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Under favorable conditions, the spherical particles displayed a significantly higher deposition rate compared with that of the rod-shaped particles. Theoretical analysis based on Smoluchowski-Levich approximation indicated that the rod-shaped particles largely counterbalance the attractive energies due to higher hydrodynamic forces and torques experienced during their transport and rotation. Under unfavorable conditions, significantly more attachment was observed for rod-shaped particles than spherical particles, and the attachment rate of the rod-shaped particles showed an increasing trend with the increase in injection volume. Rod-shaped particles were found to be less sensitive to the surface charge heterogeneity change

  13. Investigating the role of particle shape on colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Seymour, M.; Chen, G.; Su, C.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the transport and retention of nanoparticles in porous media is essential both for environmental applications of nanotechnology and assessing the potential environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials. Engineered and naturally occurring nanoparticles can be found in various shapes including rod-shape carbon nanotubes that have high aspect ratios. Although it is expected that nonspherical shape could play an important role on their transport and retention behaviors, current theoretical models for particle transport in porous media, however, are mostly based on spherical particle shape. In this work, the effect of particle shape on its transport and retention in porous media was evaluated by stretching carboxylate-modified fluorescent polystyrene spheres into rod shapes with aspect ratios of 2:1 and 4:1. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation experiments (QCM-D) were conducted to measure the deposition rates of spherical and rod-shaped nanoparticles to the collector (poly-L-lysine coated silica sensor) surface under favorable conditions. Under unfavorable conditions, the retention of nanoparticles in a microfluidic flow cell packed with glass beads was studied with the use of laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Under favorable conditions, the spherical particles displayed a significantly higher deposition rate compared with that of the rod-shaped particles. Theoretical analysis based on Smoluchowski-Levich approximation indicated that the rod-shaped particles largely counterbalance the attractive energies due to higher hydrodynamic forces and torques experienced during their transport and rotation. Under unfavorable conditions, significantly more attachment was observed for rod-shaped particles than spherical particles, and the attachment rate of the rod-shaped particles showed an increasing trend with the increase in injection volume. Rod-shaped particles were found to be less sensitive to the surface charge heterogeneity change

  14. Shaping Colloids for Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacanna, Stefano; Yi, Gi-Ra; Pine, David

    2013-03-01

    The creation of a new material often starts from the design of its constituent building blocks at a smaller scale. From macromolecules to colloidal architectures, to granular systems, the interactions between basic units of matter can dictate the macroscopic behavior of the resulting engineered material and even regulate its genesis. Information can be imparted to the building units by altering their physical and chemical properties. In particular, the shape of building blocks plays a fundamental role at the colloidal scale, as it can govern the self-organization of particles into hierarchical structures and ultimately into the desired material. Herein we report a simple and general approach to generate an entire zoo of new anisotropic colloids. Our method is based on a controlled deformation of multiphase colloidal particles that can be selectively liquified, polymerized, dissolved and functionalized in bulk. We further demonstrate control over the particle functionalization and coating by realizing patchy and Janus colloids.

  15. Shaping colloids for self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacanna, Stefano; Korpics, Mark; Rodriguez, Kelvin; Colón-Meléndez, Laura; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Pine, David J.; Yi, Gi-Ra

    2013-04-01

    The creation of a new material often starts from the design of its constituent building blocks at a smaller scale. From macromolecules to colloidal architectures, to granular systems, the interactions between basic units of matter can dictate the macroscopic behaviour of the resulting engineered material and even regulate its genesis. Information can be imparted to the building units by altering their physical and chemical properties. In particular, the shape of building blocks has a fundamental role at the colloidal scale, as it can govern the self-organization of particles into hierarchical structures and ultimately into the desired material. Herein we report a simple and general approach to generate an entire zoo of new anisotropic colloids. Our method is based on a controlled deformation of multiphase colloidal particles that can be selectively liquified, polymerized, dissolved and functionalized in bulk. We further demonstrate control over the particle functionalization and coating by realizing patchy and Janus colloids.

  16. Computing Temperatures In Optically Pumped Laser Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program presents new model solving temperature-distribution problem for laser rods of finite length and calculates both radial and axial components of temperature distributions in these rods. Contains several self-checking schemes to prevent over-writing of memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  17. Tipping Time of a Quantum Rod

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrikar, Onkar

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of a quantum rod, pivoted at its lower end on an impenetrable floor and restricted to moving in the vertical plane under the gravitational potential, is studied analytically under the approximation that the rod is initially localized to a "small-enough" neighbourhood around the point of classical unstable equilibrium. It is shown…

  18. Kinetically guided colloidal structure formation

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Fabian M.; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2016-01-01

    The self-organization of colloidal particles is a promising approach to create novel structures and materials, with applications spanning from smart materials to optoelectronics to quantum computation. However, designing and producing mesoscale-sized structures remains a major challenge because at length scales of 10–100 μm equilibration times already become prohibitively long. Here, we extend the principle of rapid diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) to a multicomponent system of spherical colloidal particles to enable the rational design and production of finite-sized anisotropic structures on the mesoscale. In stark contrast to equilibrium self-assembly techniques, kinetic traps are not avoided but exploited to control and guide mesoscopic structure formation. To this end the affinities, size, and stoichiometry of up to five different types of DNA-coated microspheres are adjusted to kinetically control a higher-order hierarchical aggregation process in time. We show that the aggregation process can be fully rationalized by considering an extended analytical DLCA model, allowing us to produce mesoscopic structures of up to 26 µm in diameter. This scale-free approach can easily be extended to any multicomponent system that allows for multiple orthogonal interactions, thus yielding a high potential of facilitating novel materials with tailored plasmonic excitation bands, scattering, biochemical, or mechanical behavior. PMID:27444018

  19. Synthesis of substantially monodispersed colloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klabunde, Kenneth J. (Inventor); Stoeva, Savka (Inventor); Sorensen, Christopher (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming ligated nanoparticles of the formula Y(Z).sub.x where Y is a nanoparticle selected from the group consisting of elemental metals having atomic numbers ranging from 21-34, 39-52, 57-83 and 89-102, all inclusive, the halides, oxides and sulfides of such metals, and the alkali metal and alkaline earth metal halides, and Z represents ligand moieties such as the alkyl thiols. In the method, a first colloidal dispersion is formed made up of nanoparticles solvated in a molar excess of a first solvent (preferably a ketone such as acetone), a second solvent different than the first solvent (preferably an organic aryl solvent such as toluene) and a quantity of ligand moieties; the first solvent is then removed under vacuum and the ligand moieties ligate to the nanoparticles to give a second colloidal dispersion of the ligated nanoparticles solvated in the second solvent. If substantially monodispersed nanoparticles are desired, the second dispersion is subjected to a digestive ripening process. Upon drying, the ligated nanoparticles may form a three-dimensional superlattice structure.

  20. Nonlinear rheology of colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Brader, J M

    2010-09-15

    Colloidal dispersions are commonly encountered in everyday life and represent an important class of complex fluid. Of particular significance for many commercial products and industrial processes is the ability to control and manipulate the macroscopic flow response of a dispersion by tuning the microscopic interactions between the constituents. An important step towards attaining this goal is the development of robust theoretical methods for predicting from first-principles the rheology and nonequilibrium microstructure of well defined model systems subject to external flow. In this review we give an overview of some promising theoretical approaches and the phenomena they seek to describe, focusing, for simplicity, on systems for which the colloidal particles interact via strongly repulsive, spherically symmetric interactions. In presenting the various theories, we will consider first low volume fraction systems, for which a number of exact results may be derived, before moving on to consider the intermediate and high volume fraction states which present both the most interesting physics and the most demanding technical challenges. In the high volume fraction regime particular emphasis will be given to the rheology of dynamically arrested states. PMID:21386516