Science.gov

Sample records for charley river areas

  1. Characters named Charles or Charley in novels by Charles Dickens.

    PubMed

    Barry, Herbert

    2007-10-01

    12 fictional characters named Charles or Charley are contained in eight of the 14 completed novels by Charles Dickens. Most of the author's namesakes have humorous attributes, an unusually close relationship with one or more other characters, and a happy subsequent life. Three stages of the author's adult life are youthful, mature, and after separation from his wife. The fictional namesakes are most humorous in the author's youthful stage and least humorous after separation from his wife. The 12 fictional namesakes of Charles Dickens are compared with the two fictional namesakes of Jane Austen. PMID:18175490

  2. The Savannah River Site local area network

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of thirteen separate operating or administrative facilities, or areas, spread out over 300 square miles of federal reservation. A facility of this size presents rather unique difficulties to anyone attempting to provide a comprehensive and high performance computer network, or local area network (LAN). Figure 1 is a diagram of the SRS and indicates the approximate number of ''knowledge workers'' (i.e., managerial, professional, and clerical staff) which are located in each site area. The goal of the SRS LAN project is to have each of these workers connected to and using the computer network by the end of 1990. By mid 1989 SRS is three quarters of the way to completing this goal. The fundamental LAN strategy for Savannah River is the integration of personal computers with mid size ''departmental'' computers located within each site area with links to the site's mainframe computer systems and offsite databases for information access. This integration is being provided by baseband local area networks in each of the site areas adjoined together via a broadband and digital telephone communications system to form one sitewide internetwork. The site internetwork is used to connect the departmental and mainframe computers together as well as provide workstation to computer access between site areas. 6 figs.

  3. EAARL Coastal Topography-Western Florida, Post-Hurricane Charley, 2004: First Surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C. Wayne; Sallenger, A.H.; Brock, John C.; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2009-01-01

    This DVD contains lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography GIS datasets of a portion of the western Florida coastline beachface, acquired post-Hurricane Charley on August 16 and 18, 2004. Click on a tile number (1 - 68) to view the corresponding 1-meter-resolution images and links to each data directory. Click on the red tile in the index map to view the 3-meter-resolution mosaic and link to the corresponding directory.

  4. 36 CFR 7.90 - Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chattahoochee River National... THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.90 Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area. (a) Bicycling. (1) Where may I ride a bicycle within Chattahoochee River...

  5. 36 CFR 7.90 - Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chattahoochee River National... THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.90 Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area. (a) Bicycling. (1) Where may I ride a bicycle within Chattahoochee River...

  6. BALD ROCK AND MIDDLE FORK FEATHER RIVER ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorensen, Martin L.; Buehler, Alan R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral-resource assessment of the Bald Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Areas in California indicate several areas within the Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area that have probable mineral-resource potential. A probable potential for placer gold exists at various localities, both in areas covered by Tertiary volcanic rocks and in small streams that drain into the Middle Fork of the Feather River. A probable potential for small deposits of chromite exists in tracts underlain by ultramafic rocks in the Melones fault zone. A probable potential for lead-silver deposits is recognized at the east end of the Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area.

  7. Drainage areas of the Potomac River basin, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, Jeffrey B.; Hunt, Michelle L.; Stewart, Donald K.

    1996-01-01

    This report contains data for 776 drainage-area divisions of the Potomac River Basin, from the headwaters to the confluence of the Potomac River and the Shenandoah River. Data, compiled in downstream order, are listed for streams with a drainage area of approximately 2 square miles or larger within West Virginia and for U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations. The data presented are the stream name, the geographical limits in river miles, the latitude and longitude of the point, the name of the county, and the 7 1/2-minute quadrangle in which the point lies, and the drainage area of that site. The total drainage area of the Potomac River Basin downstream of the confluence of the Shenandoah River at the State boundary is 9,367.29 square miles.

  8. Drainage areas of the Kanawha River basin, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathes, M.V.; Payne, D.D., Jr.; Shultz, R.A.; Kirby, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Drainage areas for 1,493 drainage area divisions for the Kanawha River basin, West Virginia, are listed in the report. Also tabulated for each site are river miles, plus location identifiers: County, latitude and longitude, and the West Virginia District map number. (USGS)

  9. EAARL coastal topography-western Florida, post-Hurricane Charley, 2004: seamless (bare earth and submerged.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Wright, C. Wayne; Sallenger, A.H.; Brock, John C.; Yates, Xan

    2010-01-01

    Project Description These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived seamless (bare-earth and submerged) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the western Florida coastline beachface, acquired post-Hurricane Charley on August 17 and 18, 2004. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  10. Drainage areas of streams in Arkansas, Ouachita River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yanchosek, John J.; Hines, Marion S.

    1979-01-01

    Drainage areas, determined in accordance with procedure recommended by the Subcommittee on Hydrology of the Federal Inter-Agency River Basin Committee, are listed for points on streams in the Ouachita River basin in Arkansas. Points on the streams are identified by some topographic feature and by latitude and longitude. (USGS).

  11. Charley horse

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical therapy or even surgery. Drinking water or sports drinks when exercising can help ease cramps due ... water alone is not enough, salt tablets or sports drinks may help replace minerals in your body.

  12. Charley horse

    MedlinePlus

    ... calf often occur while kicking during swimming or running. They can also happen at night when you ... bed. Upper leg spasms are more common with running or jumping activities. Spasm in the neck (cervical ...

  13. River flow fluctuation analysis: Effect of watershed area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirpa, Feyera A.; Gebremichael, Mekonnen; Over, Thomas M.

    2010-12-01

    This study presents the results of a detailed river flow fluctuation analysis on daily records from 14 stations in the Flint River Basin in Georgia in the southeastern United States with special focus on the effect of watershed area on long memory of river flow fluctuations. The areas of the watersheds draining to the stations range from 23 to 19,606 km2. The climatic and seasonal trends are removed using the detrended fluctuation analysis technique. Results show that (1) river flow fluctuations have two distinct scaling regimes, and the scaling break is delayed for large watershed areas; (2) large watersheds have more persistent river flow fluctuations and stronger long memory (i.e., for lag times beyond the scale break) than small watersheds do; (3) the long memory of river flow fluctuations does not come from the long memory of precipitation; (4) a linear reservoir unit hydrograph transfer function approach does not capture correctly the basin processes that convert short-memory precipitation to long-memory streamflow; and (5) the degree of multifractality of river flow fluctuations decreases with increasing watershed area. The results clearly indicate that watershed area is an important factor in the long-memory studies of streamflow such as streamflow prediction.

  14. River Restoration Within Water Supply Areas - Problems and Solution Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regli, C.; Huggenberger, P.; Guldenfels, L.

    2004-05-01

    The demand of river restoration in many areas of Europe and North America clarifies the existing problems of a sustainable use of water resources. River restoration generally intensifies the exchange between surface- and groundwater and related dissolved compounds or particles. Recommendations concerning ecological measures of river restoration within water supply areas should allow differentiated solutions, which take into account groundwater and flood protection. Model scenarios play an important role in decision-making processes. An application of this approach is given for the groundwater production system of the city of Basel, Switzerland: The former channelized river Wiese should be restored to more natural conditions to re-establish the biological connectivity and to increase the recreational value of this area. These initiatives might conflict with the requirements of groundwater protection, especially during flood events. Therefore, processes of river-groundwater interaction have been characterized by analyses of physical, chemical, and microbiological data sampled in several well clusters between the river and production wells. The well clusters allow sampling of groundwater in different depths of the aquifer. These data together with data from tracer experiments are used for modeling the river-groundwater interaction. The large- and medium-scaled, transient groundwater models are used to evaluate the well capture zones in the different river restoration scenarios. Well capture zones have to satisfy the safety requirements of groundwater protection. A further step includes optimizations of water supply operation such as artificial recharge and pumping. At the small scale, uncertainty estimations concerning delineation of well capture zones are made by stochastic approaches including geological and geophysical data of the aquifer. The methods presented can be used to define and evaluate groundwater protection zones in heterogeneous aquifers associated with

  15. Constructing river stage-discharge rating curves using remotely sensed river cross-sectional inundation areas and river bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Feifei; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan

    2016-09-01

    Remote sensing from satellites and airborne platforms provides valuable data for monitoring and gauging river discharge. One effective approach first estimates river stage from satellite-measured inundation area based on the inundation area-river stage relationship (IARSR), and then the estimated river stage is used to compute river discharge based on the stage-discharge rating (SDR) curve. However, this approach is difficult to implement because of a lack of data for constructing the SDR curves. This study proposes a new method to construct the SDR curves using remotely sensed river cross-sectional inundation areas and river bathymetry. The proposed method was tested over a river reach between two USGS gauging stations, i.e., Kingston Mines (KM) and Copperas Creek (CC) along the Illinois River. First a polygon over each of two cross sections was defined. A complete IARSR curve was constructed inside each polygon using digital elevation model (DEM) and river bathymetric data. The constructed IARSR curves were then used to estimate 47 river water surface elevations at each cross section based on 47 river inundation areas estimated from Landsat TM images collected during 1994-2002. The estimated water surface elevations were substituted into an objective function formed by the Bernoulli equation of gradually varied open channel flow. A nonlinear global optimization scheme was applied to solve the Manning's coefficient through minimizing the objective function value. Finally the SDR curve was constructed at the KM site using the solved Manning's coefficient, channel cross sectional geometry and the Manning's equation, and employed to estimate river discharges. The root mean square error (RMSE) in the estimated river discharges against the USGS measured river discharges is 112.4 m3/s. To consider the variation of the Manning's coefficient in the vertical direction, this study also suggested a power-law function to describe the vertical decline of the Manning

  16. Human impacts on river water quality- comparative research in the catchment areas of the Tone River and the Mur River-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, K.

    2013-12-01

    Human activities in river basin affect river water quality as water discharges into river with pollutant after we use it. By detecting pollutants source, pathway, and influential factor of human activities, it will be possible to consider proper river basin management. In this study, material flow analysis was done first and then nutrient emission modeling by MONERIS was conducted. So as to clarify land use contribution and climate condition, comparison of Japanese and European river basin area has been made. The model MONERIS (MOdelling Nutrient Emissions in RIver Systems; Behrendt et al., 2000) was applied to estimate the nutrient emissions in the Danube river basin by point sources and various diffuse pathways. Work for the Mur River Basin in Austria was already carried out by the Institute of Water Quality, Resources and Waste Management at the Vienna University of Technology. This study treats data collection, modelling for the Tone River in Japan, and comparative analysis for these two river basins. The estimation of the nutrient emissions was carried out for 11 different sub catchment areas covering the Tone River Basin for the time period 2000 to 2006. TN emissions into the Tone river basin were 51 kt/y. 67% was via ground water and dominant for all sub catchments. Urban area was also important emission pathway. Human effect is observed in urban structure and agricultural activity. Water supply and sewer system make urban water cycle with pipeline structure. Excess evapotranspiration in arable land is also influential in water cycle. As share of arable land is 37% and there provides agricultural products, it is thought that N emission from agricultural activity is main pollution source. Assumption case of 10% N surplus was simulated and the result was 99% identical to the actual. Even though N surplus reduction does not show drastic impact on N emission, it is of importance to reduce excess of fertilization and to encourage effective agricultural activity

  17. SALMON RIVER BREAKS PRIMITIVE AREA AND VICINITY, IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Tuchek, Ernest T.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Salmon River Breaks Primitive Area and vicinity in Idaho confirmed a substantiated gold resource potential in placer deposits along the Salmon River but determined that large-scale mining of the deposits probably would not be feasible. Except for demonstrated fluorspar resources at the Big Squaw Creek deposit, no other mineral resources were found in the area. The geologic environment, geochemical findings, and geophysical data all suggest little likelihood for the occurrence of additional mineral resources in the area. No energy resources were identified in this study.

  18. NORTH FORK JOHN DAY RIVER ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.; Conyac, Martin D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the North Fork John Day River Roadless Area in Oregon indicates that a narrow belt along the river has a substantiated resource potential for placer gold, and several other drainages tributary to the North Fork a probable resource potential for placer or lode gold. Further study of the roadless area may reveal other areas with a potential for gold, and could help to delineate bedrock or additional placer resources, especially in drainages tributary to the North Fork. This work could also point to other mineral deposits near the roadless boundary.

  19. 100 Area Columbia River sediment sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.G.

    1993-09-08

    Forty-four sediment samples were collected from 28 locations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to assess the presence of metals and man-made radionuclides in the near shore and shoreline settings of the Hanford Site. Three locations were sampled upriver of the Hanford Site plutonium production reactors. Twenty-two locations were sampled near the reactors. Three locations were sampled downstream of the reactors near the Hanford Townsite. Sediment was collected from depths of 0 to 6 in. and between 12 to 24 in. below the surface. Samples containing concentrations of metals exceeding the 95 % upper threshold limit values (DOE-RL 1993b) are considered contaminated. Contamination by arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc was found. Man-made radionuclides occur in all samples except four collected opposite the Hanford Townsite. Man-made radionuclide concentrations were generally less than 1 pCi/g.

  20. NORTH FORK OF THE AMERICAN RIVER WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harwood, David S.; Federspiel, Francis E.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral-resource surveys of the North Fork of the American River Wilderness study area, California have identified a zone of substantiated resource potential for gold and silver. Zones of probable gold and silver potential occur in the eastern part of the area between the Wubbena and La Trinidad mines and locally around the Marrs mine. A zone with probable chromium potential occurs in the serpentinite belt along the western border of the area. No energy resources were identified in this study.

  1. Drainage areas of the Guyandotte River basin, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathes, M.V.

    1977-01-01

    This report, prepared in cooperation with the West Virginia Office of Federal-State Relations (now the Office of Economic and Community Development), lists in tabular form 435 drainage areas for basins within the Guyandotte River basin of West Virginia. Drainage areas are compiled for sites at the mouths of all streams having drainage areas of approximately five square miles or greater, for sites at U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations (past and present), and for other miscellaneous sites. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. 149. Linville Falls Recreation Area. The 309 Linville River Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    149. Linville Falls Recreation Area. The 309 Linville River Bridge is the parkway's largest stone-faced bridge. This triple span bridge, built in 1940, is an example of a spandrel arch bridge with Roman arches. Looking south. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  3. CHAMA RIVER CANYON WILDERNESS AND CONTIGUOUS ROADLESS AREA, NEW MEXICO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgley, Jennie L.; Light, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    Results of mineral surveys indicate that the Chama River Canyon Wilderness and contiguous roadless area in new Mexico have a probable mineral-resource potential for copper with associated uranium and silver. Gypsum occurs throughout the area, exposed in the canyon walls. Further study of the wilderness should concentrate on exploratory drilling to test the oil and gas potential of Pennsylvanian strata and evaluate vanadium anomalies in the Todilto as a prospecting guide for locating uranium.

  4. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area...

  7. Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Allen, P.M.; Gouge, A.P.

    1991-07-01

    The nev HB-Line, located on the fifth and sixth levels of Building 221-H, is designed to replace the aging existing HB-Line production facility. The nev HB-Line consists of three separate facilities: the Scrap Recovery Facility, the Neptunium Oxide Facility, and the Plutonium Oxide Facility. There are three separate safety analyses for the nev HB-Line, one for each of the three facilities. These are issued as supplements to the 200-Area Safety Analysis (DPSTSA-200-10). These supplements are numbered as Sup 2A, Scrap Recovery Facility, Sup 2B, Neptunium Oxide Facility, Sup 2C, Plutonium Oxide Facility. The subject of this safety analysis, the, Plutonium Oxide Facility, will convert nitrate solutions of {sup 238}Pu to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) powder. All these new facilities incorporate improvements in: (1) engineered barriers to contain contamination, (2) barriers to minimize personnel exposure to airborne contamination, (3) shielding and remote operations to decrease radiation exposure, and (4) equipment and ventilation design to provide flexibility and improved process performance.

  8. THE CHANNELS AND WATERS OF THE UPPER SALMON RIVER AREA, IDAHO. (HYDROLOGIC EVALUATION OF THE UPPER SALMON RIVER AREA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The upper 1,800 square miles of the Salmon River drainage basin (17060201) in south-central Idaho is an area of great scenic beauty and little-disturbed natural environment. Proper development and use of this land and its natural resources are contingent on a multifaceted and de...

  9. Patterns of river width and surface area newly revealed by the satellite-derived North American River Width (NARWidth) dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. H.; Pavelsky, T.

    2014-12-01

    The total surface area of rivers and streams is a key quantity for estimating gaseous emissions from fluvial networks to the atmosphere. Presently, the most sophisticated evaluations of continental-scale river surface area rely on: 1) calculating river width from digital elevation models (DEMs) by scaling width to upstream drainage area via downstream hydraulic geometry (DHG) relationships; 2) extrapolating river width and length from large to small river basins using Horton ratios; and 3) extrapolating empirical relationships between climate and percentage water cover to from low- to high-latitude basins where hydrologically conditioned topographic data does not exist. Here we use the recently developed North American River Width (NARWidth) dataset to estimate the total surface area of North American rivers and streams. NARWidth is the first fine-resolution, continental-scale river centerline and width database. The database is derived from Landsat satellite imagery and contains measurements of >2.4×105 km of rivers wider than 30 m at mean annual discharge. We find that datasets that estimate river width by applying DHG relationships to DEMs underestimate the abundance of wide rivers and do not capture the widest rivers observed by NARWidth. We attribute these differences to: 1) the tendency of stream gauges to be located at stable, single channel sites, leading to a potential bias of measured river width relative to the representative river width throughout a river's entire length; and 2) physiographic conditions that are not captured by DHG and can cause substantial deviation from strict width-discharge relationships. We then calculate the total surface area of North American rivers by extrapolating the strong observed relationship between total river surface area and width at different widths (r2>0.996 for 100-2000 m widths) to narrow rivers and streams. We find that the total surface area of North American rivers is ~1.38×105 km2 for all rivers wider than 1

  10. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-12-31

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  11. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  12. White sturgeon spawning areas in the lower Snake River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsley, M.J.; Kappenman, K.M.

    2000-01-01

    We documented 17 white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus spawning locations in the Snake River from the mouth to Lower Granite Dam (river km 0 to 173). Spawning locations were determined by the collection of fertilized eggs on artificial substrates or in plankton nets. We collected 245 eggs at seven locations in McNary Reservoir, 22 eggs at three locations in Ice Harbor Reservoir, 30 eggs from two locations in Lower Monumental Reservoir, and 464 eggs at five locations in Little Goose Reservoir. All 17 locations were in high water velocity areas and between 1.0 and 7.0 km downstream from a hydroelectric dam. The documentation of spawning areas is important because this habitat is necessary to maintain natural and viable populations.

  13. Inversion of Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Data, Styx River Area, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, A.; Minsley, B. J.; Smith, B. D.; Burns, L.; Emond, A.

    2014-12-01

    A joint effort by the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) aims to add value to public domain airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data, collected in Alaska, through the application of newly developed advanced inversion methods to produce resistivity depth sections along flight lines. Derivative products are new geophysical data maps, interpretative profiles and displays. An important task of the new processing is to facilitate calibration or leveling between adjacent surveys flown with different systems in different years. The new approach will facilitate integration of the geophysical data in the interpretation and construction of geologic framework, resource evaluations and to geotechnical studies. Four helicopter airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys have been flown in the Styx River area by the DGGS; Styx River, Middle Styx, East Styx, and Farewell. The Styx River flown in 2008 and Middle Styx in flown 2013, cover an area of 2300 square kilometers. These data consist of frequency-domain DIGHEM V surveys which have been numerically processed and interpreted to yield a three-dimensional model of electrical resistivity. We describe the numerical interpretation methodology (inversion) in detail, from quality assessment to interpretation. We show two methods of inversion used in these datasets, deterministic and stochastic, and describe how we use these results to define calibration parameters and assess the quality of the datasets. We also describe the difficulties and procedures for combining datasets acquired at different times.

  14. 33 CFR 334.570 - Banana River near Orsino, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Banana River near Orsino, Fla... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.570 Banana River near Orsino, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. That part of Banana River N of the NASA Banana...

  15. 33 CFR 334.570 - Banana River near Orsino, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Banana River near Orsino, Fla... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.570 Banana River near Orsino, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. That part of Banana River N of the NASA Banana...

  16. 33 CFR 334.570 - Banana River near Orsino, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Banana River near Orsino, Fla... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.570 Banana River near Orsino, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. That part of Banana River N of the NASA Banana...

  17. 33 CFR 334.570 - Banana River near Orsino, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Banana River near Orsino, Fla... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.570 Banana River near Orsino, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. That part of Banana River N of the NASA Banana...

  18. 33 CFR 334.570 - Banana River near Orsino, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Banana River near Orsino, Fla... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.570 Banana River near Orsino, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. That part of Banana River N of the NASA Banana...

  19. A cleaning energy area conception on Fenhe river valley

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, C.

    1997-12-31

    Fenhe river valley has a dense population, abundant resources and coal mining, coke making, metallurgy industry concentration. Therefore, it is a seriously pollute area. The paper puts forward a concept of building up a clean energy area through process improvement and change of energy structure to realize ecological economy. The analysis shows that the indigenous method used for coking produces serious pollution, the resource cannot be used comprehensively, the regular machinery coke has a high investment in capital construction, but not much economic benefit. All are disadvantages for health and sustainable economic development. Also, this paper describes a LJ-95 machinery coke oven which has lower investment, higher product quality, less pollution, and higher economical benefit. LJ-95 coke oven will be the technical basis for construction of a clean energy area. The clean energy area concept for the Fenhe river valley consists of a coal gas pipeline network during the first phase and building electricity generation using steam turbines in the second phase.

  20. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED...

  1. Hydrogeochemical studies of historical mining areas in the Humboldt River basin and adjacent areas, northern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nash, J. Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The study area comprises the Humboldt River Basin and adjacent areas, with emphasis on mining areas relatively close to the Humboldt River. The basin comprises about 16,840 mi2 or 10,800,000 acres. The mineral resources of the Humboldt Basin have been investigated by many scientists over the past 100 years, but only recently has our knowledge of regional geology and mine geology been applied to the understanding and evaluation of mining effects on water and environmental quality. The investigations reported here apply some of the techniques and perspectives developed in the Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative (AMLI) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a program of integrated geological-hydrological-biological-chemical studies underway in the Upper Animas River watershed in Colorado and the Boulder River watershed in, Montana. The goal of my studies of sites and districts is to determine the character of mining-related contamination that is actively or potentially a threat to water quality and to estimate the potential for natural attenuation of that contamination. These geology-based studies and recommendations differ in matters of emphasis and data collection from the biology-based assessments that are the cornerstone of environmental regulations.

  2. Body burdens of mercury in lower Hudson River area anglers.

    PubMed

    Gobeille, Alayne K; Morland, Kimberly B; Bopp, Richard F; Godbold, James H; Landrigan, Philip J

    2006-06-01

    The Hudson River has been a federally designated Superfund site for over 20 years. Discharges of industrial waste and of treated and untreated sewage and atmospheric deposition have introduced mercury and other persistent pollutants to the Hudson River ecosystem. Despite New York and New Jersey health advisories, many local anglers and their family members continue to consume fish caught from the river. To evaluate associations between body burden of mercury and local fish consumption, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 191 anglers recruited from piers and fishing clubs. Participants were administered a questionnaire to obtain information on local fish consumption, and 65% (124 individuals) provided a blood sample used to determine mercury levels. Mercury levels ranged from below the limit of detection (0.75 ng/mL) to 24.0 ng/mL. Participants who reported eating locally caught fish had significantly higher levels of mercury (mean (M)=2.4 ng/mL, standard error (SE)=1.2) than anglers who never ate locally caught fish (M=1.3 ng/mL, SE=1.1). A positive dose-response pattern was also observed, where participants who reported eating locally caught fish more than once a week had higher mercury levels (M=2.6 ng/mL, SE=1.1) than anglers eating fish less frequently (M=2.0 ng/mL, SE=1.2) or never at all (M=1.3 ng/mL, SE=1.1). These findings indicate that consumption of fish caught from the lower Hudson River area is a route of human exposure to mercury for the angling community. PMID:16226244

  3. 33 CFR 165.165 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... River South of the Troy Locks, NY. 165.165 Section 165.165 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.165 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY. (a) Regulated navigation area. All navigable waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks. (b) Definitions. The...

  4. 33 CFR 165.165 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 165.165 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY. (a) Regulated navigation area. All navigable waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks. (b) Definitions. The following... operations are not authorized to transit that portion of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks when...

  5. 33 CFR 165.165 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 165.165 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY. (a) Regulated navigation area. All navigable waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks. (b) Definitions. The following... operations are not authorized to transit that portion of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks when...

  6. 33 CFR 165.165 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 165.165 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY. (a) Regulated navigation area. All navigable waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks. (b) Definitions. The following... operations are not authorized to transit that portion of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks when...

  7. 77 FR 6133 - Sector Upper Mississippi River Area Maritime Security Committee; Vacancies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Sector Upper Mississippi River Area Maritime Security Committee; Vacancies AGENCY... interested in serving on the Sector Upper Mississippi River Area Maritime Security Committee (AMSC) to submit their application for membership, to the Captain of the Port, Sector Upper Mississippi River....

  8. Patterns of river width and surface area revealed by the satellite-derived North American River Width data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, George H.; Pavelsky, Tamlin M.

    2015-01-01

    hydraulic, hydrologic, and biogeochemical models evolve toward greater spatial resolution and larger extent, robust morphometric data sets are essential to constrain their results. Here we present the Landsat-derived North American River Width (NARWidth) data set, the first fine-resolution, continental scale river centerline and width database. NARWidth contains measurements of >2.4 × 105 km of rivers wider than 30 m at mean annual discharge. We find that conventional digital elevation model-derived width data sets underestimate the abundance of wide rivers. To calculate the total surface area of North American rivers, we extrapolate the strong observed relationship between river width and total surface area at different river widths (r2 > 0.99 for 100-2000 m widths) to narrower rivers and streams. We conservatively estimate the total surface area of North American rivers as 1.24-0.15+0.39 × 105 km2 (1σ confidence intervals), values 20-15+38% greater than previous estimates used to evaluate greenhouse gas efflux from rivers to the atmosphere.

  9. 33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1323 Section 165.1323 Navigation and Navigable... Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area (RNA): All waters of the...″ W thence to 45°34′44″ N, 122°44′51″ W thence to 45°34′45″ N, 122°44′53″ W thence to 45°34′47” N,...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1323 Section 165.1323 Navigation and Navigable... Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area (RNA): All waters of the...″ W thence to 45°34′44″ N, 122°44′51″ W thence to 45°34′45″ N, 122°44′53″ W thence to 45°34′47” N,...

  11. 33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1323 Section 165.1323 Navigation and Navigable... Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area (RNA): All waters of the...″ W thence to 45°34′44″ N, 122°44′51″ W thence to 45°34′45″ N, 122°44′53″ W thence to 45°34′47” N,...

  12. 33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1323 Section 165.1323 Navigation and Navigable... Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area (RNA): All waters of the...″ W thence to 45°34′44″ N, 122°44′51″ W thence to 45°34′45″ N, 122°44′53″ W thence to 45°34′47” N,...

  13. Hyporheic discharge of river water into fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R. )

    1999-12-01

    Fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawned predominantly in areas of the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River where hyporheic water discharged into the river channel. This upwelling water had a dissolved solids content (i.e., specific conductance) indicative of river water and was presumed to have entered highly permeable riverbed substrate at locations upstream of the spawning areas. Hyporheic discharge zones composed of undiluted ground water or areas with little or no upwelling were not used by spawning salmon. Rates of upwelling into spawning areas averaged 1,200 L?m-2?day-1 (95% C.I.= 784 to 1,665 L?m-2?day-1) as compared to approximately 500 L?m-2?day-1 (95% C.I.= 303 to 1,159 L?m-2?day-1) in non-spawning areas. Dissolved oxygen content of the hyporheic discharge near salmon spawning areas was about 9 mg?L-1 (+ 0.4 mg?L-1) whereas in non-spawning areas dissolved oxygen values were 7 mg?L-1 (+ 0.9 mg?L-1) or lower. In both cases dissolved oxygen of the river water was higher (11.3+ 0.3 mg?L-1). Physical and chemical gradients between the hyporheic zone and the river may provide cues for adult salmon to locate suitable spawning areas. This information will help fisheries managers to describe the suitability of salmon spawning habitat in large rivers.

  14. Water resources of the Ochlockonee River area, Northwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascale, Charles A.; Wagner, Jeffry R.

    1982-01-01

    The Ochlockonee River area, in the northwest Florida panhandle, receives an average of 57 inches of rainfall per year. Water use in 1975 averaged 11.4 million gallons per day. Much of the rainfall that is not lost to evaporation enters the surficial sand aquifer, seeps to streams, or enters the water-bearing zone of the upper confining unit above the Floridan aquifer. The water-bearing zone of the upper confining unit is important for rural domestic supplies, storage of water and recharge to the Floridan aquifer. The Floridan aquifer underlies all the area and is the principal source of municipal supplies. The potentiometric surface of the upper part of the Floridan aquifer ranges from about 50 feet higher than that of the middle and lower part of the aquifer in southwestern Gadsden County to about 10 feet higher in southeastern Gadsden County. Saline water occurs naturally at relatively shallow depths within the Floridan aquifer. Stream discharge is about 1,000 million gallons per day; minimum discharge is about 285 million gallons per day. The chemical quality of most streams in the study area is acceptable for most uses. (USGS)

  15. 76 FR 21633 - Disestablishing Special Anchorage Area 2; Ashley River, Charleston, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... Coast Guard issued a final rule in 1996 (61 FR 40993) converting the special anchorage area into two... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 110 RIN 1625-AA01 Disestablishing Special Anchorage Area 2; Ashley River... (NPRM) entitled Disestablishing Special Anchorage Area 2; Ashley River, Charleston, SC in the...

  16. 33 CFR 167.251 - In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area. 167.251 Section 167.251 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area. A precautionary area is established bounded by a...

  17. 33 CFR 167.251 - In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area. 167.251 Section 167.251 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area. A precautionary area is established bounded by a...

  18. 33 CFR 167.251 - In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area. 167.251 Section 167.251 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area. A precautionary area is established bounded by a...

  19. 33 CFR 167.251 - In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area. 167.251 Section 167.251 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to the Cape Fear River: Precautionary area. A precautionary area is established bounded by a...

  20. 33 CFR 334.75 - Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Thames River, Naval Submarine....75 Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area. (a) The area: The open waters of... restricted area provided their vessels display registration numbers issued by the Naval Submarine Base,...

  1. 33 CFR 334.75 - Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Thames River, Naval Submarine....75 Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area. (a) The area: The open waters of... restricted area provided their vessels display registration numbers issued by the Naval Submarine Base,...

  2. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force... River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area... Commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  3. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force... River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area... Commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  4. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force... River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area... Commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  5. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force... River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area... Commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  6. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force... River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area... Commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  7. An Allocation of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources to Gauley River National Recreation Area and New River Gorge National River, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Crovelli, Robert A.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Milici, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated volumes of undiscovered oil and gas resources that may underlie Gauley River National Recreation Area and New River Gorge National River in West Virginia. Using the results of an assessment of undiscovered resources from ten assessment units in the Appalachian Basin Province that include these land parcels, the USGS allocated 2.9 billion cubic feet of gas, 1.6 thousand barrels of oil, and 45 thousand barrels of natural gas liquids to part of Gauley River National Recreation Area, and 39 billion cubic feet of gas, 24 thousand barrels of oil, and 644 thousand barrels of natural gas liquids to New River Gorge National River. These allocated volumes of undiscovered resources represent potential volumes in undiscovered fields.

  8. 76 FR 58105 - Regulated Navigation Area; Saugus River, Lynn, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... the Saugus River. Serious damage to this pipeline bridge was caused during Tropical Storm Irene, which... otherwise determine compliance with, federal regulations to the Small Business and Agriculture...

  9. 33 CFR 334.75 - Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Thames River, Naval Submarine....75 Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area. (a) The area: The open waters of... notified by personnel of the New London Submarine Base that such use will interfere with...

  10. 33 CFR 334.75 - Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Thames River, Naval Submarine....75 Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area. (a) The area: The open waters of... notified by personnel of the New London Submarine Base that such use will interfere with...

  11. 33 CFR 334.75 - Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Thames River, Naval Submarine....75 Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area. (a) The area: The open waters of... notified by personnel of the New London Submarine Base that such use will interfere with...

  12. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a)...

  13. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a)...

  14. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a)...

  15. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a)...

  16. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a)...

  17. 77 FR 19544 - Regulated Navigation Area, Zidell Waterfront Property, Willamette River, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... Area, Zidell Waterfront Property, Willamette River, OR, in the Federal Register (76 FR 48070). We... Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) at the Zidell Waterfront Property located on the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. This RNA is necessary to preserve the integrity of an engineered sediment cap as part...

  18. 33 CFR 334.293 - Elizabeth River, Craney Island Refueling Pier Restricted Area, Portsmouth VA; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elizabeth River, Craney Island Refueling Pier Restricted Area, Portsmouth VA; naval restricted area. 334.293 Section 334.293 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS §...

  19. Andean Basins Morphometry: Assesing South American Large Rivers' Source Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, R. A.; Latrubesse, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Presently there are no regional-scale morphometric analyses of Andean fluvial basins. Therefore, we created a continental-scale database of these basins. Our data covers over an area 1,000,000 km2 of the Andes, from Venezuela to Argentina. These basins are the source of some of the largest rivers in the world including the Amazon, Orinoco, Parana, and Magdalena. Morphometric parameters including shape factor, relief ratio, longitudinal profiles and different indices of basin elevation were calculated based on the CGIAR SRTM 4.1 DEM (~90 m resolution). FAO Hydrosheds were used to segment the DEM by major catchment and then manually cut at the Andean zone. In the North and Central Andes, this produced over 500,000 subcatchments, which we reduced to 619 by setting minimum catchment area to 100 km2. We then integrate lithologic data from DNPM geologic data. Our results indicate that sedimentary lithologies dominate Central Andean catchments (n=268,k=4), which cover an area 767,00 km2, while the Northern Andean catchments (covering 350,000 km2) are more varied, dominated by volcanics in the Pacific (n=78), a sedimentary (48%) dominant mix in the Caribbean (n=138) and 60% sedimentary in the Amazon-Orinoco subregion catchments (n=138). Elevation averages are smallest in the north Andes and average maximum elevations (6,026 m) in the Argentinian catchments (n=65) of the Central Andes are the highest. Shape factors range from 0.49 to 0.58 in the North and 0.52 to 0.58 in the Central Andes. There are clear differences in all categories between region and subregion, but that difference does not hinge on a single morphometric or geologic parameter. Morphometric parameters at a watershed scale (listed in Table) are analyzed and hydrologic data from gauging stations throughout the Andes (n=100) are used to compare morphometric parameters with lithology and characteristics from the basin hydrograph (peak discharge timing, minimum and maximum discharge, and runoff).

  20. The evolution of the Shiwanghe River valley in response to the Yellow River incision in the Hukou area, Shaanxi, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Wei-Li; Zhang, Jia-Fu; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Yu-Jie; Zhuang, Mao-Guo; Fu, Xiao; Zhou, Li-Ping

    2014-06-01

    Tributary response to mainstream incision is an important landscape evolution process. The objective of this study is to examine tributary valley evolution in response to mainstream incision. The Shiwanghe River, a tributary of the Yellow River in the Hukou area, was chosen for a case study. The terraces and knickpoints of the Shiwanghe River were investigated and correlated to those of the mainstream. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) was applied to date fluvial terraces. Longitudinal profiles of river and terraces were used to analyze valley evolution. The terrace sequence of the Shiwanghe River near their confluence is almost identical to the Yellow River terraces at the Hukou area. This suggests that terrace formations of the tributary and the mainstream are synchronous, and influenced by similar factors. But the formation age of the same tributary terrace varies from downstream to the upper reaches of the river valley. For such terraces, their formation should be controlled by knickpoint migration. A sudden drop in base-level caused by the Yellow River incision would trigger the formation of a knickpoint in the tributary. A new terrace would be formed as the knickpoint propagated upstream throughout the tributary valley. Due to the different erodibility of bedrock, a set of interbedded sandstone and shale, the major knickpoint would disassemble into a cluster of small ones during its propagation. The age of terrace formation with various valley segments depends on knickpoint migration rate and distance from the confluence. Vertical incision of the Yellow River results in knickpoint recession of its tributaries. The migration rate of knickpoints was affected by climate, lithologic variation, and, to some extent, structural control.

  1. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area and volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Chengfeng; Lehrter, John C.; Hu, Chuanmin; Obenour, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L-1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and volume were related to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-derived monthly estimates of river plume area (km2) and average, inner shelf chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a, mg m-3). River plume area in June was negatively related with midsummer hypoxic area (km2) and volume (km3), while July inner shelf Chl a was positively related to hypoxic area and volume. Multiple regression models using river plume area and Chl a as independent variables accounted for most of the variability in hypoxic area (R2 = 0.92) or volume (R2 = 0.89). These models explain more variation in hypoxic area than models using Mississippi River nutrient loads as independent variables. The results here also support a hypothesis that confinement of the river plume to the inner shelf is an important mechanism controlling hypoxia area and volume in this region.

  2. Estuarine River Data for the Ten Thousand Islands Area, Florida, Water Year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrne, Michael J.; Patino, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected stream discharge, stage, salinity, and water-temperature data near the mouths of 11 tributaries flowing into the Ten Thousand Islands area of Florida from October 2004 to June 2005. Maximum positive discharge from Barron River and Faka Union River was 6,000 and 3,200 ft3/s, respectively; no other tributary exceeded 2,600 ft3/s. Salinity variation was greatest at Barron River and Faka Union River, ranging from 2 to 37 ppt, and from 3 to 34 ppt, respectively. Salinity maximums were greatest at Wood River and Little Wood River, each exceeding 40 ppt. All data were collected prior to the commencement of the Picayune Strand Restoration Project, which is designed to establish a more natural flow regime to the tributaries of the Ten Thousand Islands area.

  3. Annual layers in river-bed sediment of a stagnant river-mouth area of the Kitagawa Brook, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashige, Y.; Nakano, T.; Kasubuchi, E.; Maruo, M.; Domitsu, H.

    2015-03-01

    The river mouth of Kitagawa Brook is normally stagnant because it is easily closed by sand and gravel transported by littoral currents of Biwa Lake, Japan. A new urban area exists in the basin and sewerage works were constructed in the early 1990s, so contaminated water with a bad odour had flowed into the brook before the sewerage works. To reduce the smell, the river mouth was excavated to narrow the channel in the early 1980s. Thus, river-bed sediment after this excavation only occurs at the river mouth. From the upper 24 cm of a sediment core, we found 19 strata of leaves which were supplied from deciduous trees in autumn. We also found several gravel layers which were supplied from the lake during severe storms. The combination of veins and gravel layers were reconstructed for about 20 years of sediment records with an error of two to three years.

  4. 33 CFR 165.756 - Regulated Navigation Area; Savannah River, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Savannah River, Georgia. 165.756 Section 165.756 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas...

  5. Catchment scale analysis on river-return ratio of irrigation water from densely developed paddy areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Masumoto, T.; Horikawa, N.; Kudo, R.; Minakawa, H.; Nawa, N.

    2013-12-01

    Irrigation in Japan is predominantly used for rice cultivation, and it accounts for 70% of total water withdrawal. Water loss, which is attributable to nature of open channel irrigation system and percolation from fields, leads to relatively low irrigation efficiencies compared with ones for upland crops. However, because part of water gradually returns to rivers (river-return flow), it contributes to stable water use in downstream. This study investigated how irrigation water circulates and returns to rivers, and quantified a ratio of river-return flow to irrigation intake for an irrigation area (river-return ratio). One difficulty in river-return flow analysis lies in the fact that two types of flow pathways exist in an irrigation area; natural rivers that drain water from the areas, and channel networks whose directions do not necessarily coincide with river directions. In addition, outflux from irrigation area is consisted of water from different sources, such as water loss during water allocation, rainfall, irrigation, and influx from adjacent upstream areas. To cope with such difficulties, we used a grid-based distributed water circulation model that represents both catchment scale hydrological cycles and water flows related to irrigation channel network. The model calculates water flow for irrigation networks based on a GIS database of water use facilities. The model also incorporates operation rules for facilities and field level water management. Using the modeled river network, we first identify grid-cells where influx and outflux occurs across boundaries of irrigation areas. Then, to eliminate the effect of influx from adjacent upstream areas, we subtract influx from outflux. This makes us to capture outflux that purely originates in rainfall and irrigation within an irrigated area. Next, we separate the amount of outflux that originates in irrigation from the total amount of outflux. As residence time of each flow pathway had not been clarified yet, we

  6. Hydrogeology and Simulated Effects of Ground-Water Withdrawals in the Big River Area, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, Gregory E.; Barlow, Paul M.; Dickerman, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The Rhode Island Water Resources Board is considering expanded use of ground-water resources from the Big River area because increasing water demands in Rhode Island may exceed the capacity of current sources. This report describes the hydrology of the area and numerical simulation models that were used to examine effects of ground-water withdrawals during 1964?98 and to describe potential effects of different withdrawal scenarios in the area. The Big River study area covers 35.7 square miles (mi2) and includes three primary surface-water drainage basins?the Mishnock River Basin above Route 3, the Big River Basin, and the Carr River Basin, which is a tributary to the Big River. The principal aquifer (referred to as the surficial aquifer) in the study area, which is defined as the area of stratified deposits with a saturated thickness estimated to be 10 feet or greater, covers an area of 10.9 mi2. On average, an estimated 75 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) of water flows through the study area and about 70 ft3/s flows out of the area as streamflow in either the Big River (about 63 ft3/s) or the Mishnock River (about 7 ft3/s). Numerical simulation models are used to describe the hydrology of the area under simulated predevelopment conditions, conditions during 1964?98, and conditions that might occur in 14 hypothetical ground-water withdrawal scenarios with total ground-water withdrawal rates in the area that range from 2 to 11 million gallons per day. Streamflow depletion caused by these hypothetical ground-water withdrawals is calculated by comparison with simulated flows for the predevelopment conditions, which are identical to simulated conditions during the 1964?98 period but without withdrawals at public-supply wells and wastewater recharge. Interpretation of numerical simulation results indicates that the three basins in the study area are in fact a single ground-water resource. For example, the Carr River Basin above Capwell Mill Pond is naturally losing water

  7. Glacier Area and River Runoff Changes in the Head of Ob River Basins During the Last 50 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surazakov, A. B.; Aizen, V. B.; Aizen, E. M.; Nikitin, S. A.; Narojniy, J. K.

    2006-12-01

    The Altai mountains in Siberia define southern periphery of the Asian Arctic Basin, and the Ob River is a major Siberian river fed by fresh water from Altai glaciers. Intensification of glacier melt in the head of Ob River since the middle of 20th century may have a considerable influence on the water resources and hydrological regime of Siberian rivers, and freshwater budget of the Arctic Ocean. In our research we estimated glacier area and runoff changes in the Aktru River basin (34.9 km2, 45% covered by glaciers) in the Central Altai using remote sensing data and in situ glaciological and hydrological observations. The measurements of the glacier mass-balance started in this basin in 1952 as a part of the World Glacier Monitoring Service, however an accurate estimation of the glacier area change in the last two decades have not been accomplished. In our research we used aerial photographs (1952, 1975), Corona (1968) and ASTER (2004) images, and Ground Control Points collected with DGPS in 2005 and 2006 field surveys. Preliminary analysis shows that area of the studied glaciers reduced up to 7% and glacier tongues retreated up to 600 m from 1952 to 2004. The rate of the glacier recession doubled between 1975 and 2004 and the river runoff increased by 30 mm/year at the head of Ob river tributaries fed by snow and glacier melt water. During the period from 1954 to 2004 annual (mainly summer) air temperature increased by 0.1 C° a decade and precipitation (mainly spring and summer) increased by 50 mm at an elevation of 2000 m.

  8. Power-law tail probabilities of drainage areas in river basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Veitzer, S.A.; Troutman, B.M.; Gupta, V.K.

    2003-01-01

    The significance of power-law tail probabilities of drainage areas in river basins was discussed. The convergence to a power law was not observed for all underlying distributions, but for a large class of statistical distributions with specific limiting properties. The article also discussed about the scaling properties of topologic and geometric network properties in river basins.

  9. 77 FR 1020 - Regulated Navigation Area; S99 Alford Street Bridge Rehabilitation Project, Mystic River, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ...The United States Coast Guard is establishing a regulated navigation area (RNA) on the navigable waters of the Mystic River under and surrounding the S99 Alford Street Bridge which crosses the Mystic River between Boston and Chelsea, Massachusetts. This temporary interim rule is intended to protect both vessels and construction workers by restricting vessel traffic during periods where the......

  10. 33 CFR 165.815 - Ohio River at Louisville, KY; regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... contained in 33 CFR part 165, subpart B apply. (c) No pleasure or fishing craft shall be operated within the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ohio River at Louisville, KY... § 165.815 Ohio River at Louisville, KY; regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a...

  11. An Ecological Characterization and Landscape Assessment of the Muddy-Virgin River Project Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Muddy-Virgin River Project Area covers a large part of southern Nevada. Very little is known about the water quality of the entire Basin. The Muddy and Virgin Rivers drain into Lake Mead which provides drinking water for communities located in the Las Vegas Valley. The are...

  12. 33 CFR 165.803 - Mississippi River-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mississippi River-regulated... Mississippi River—regulated navigation area. The following is a Regulated Navigation Area—The waters of the Mississippi River between miles 88 and 240 above Head of Passes. (a) Definitions. As used in this section:...

  13. 33 CFR 165.803 - Mississippi River-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mississippi River-regulated... Mississippi River—regulated navigation area. The following is a Regulated Navigation Area—The waters of the Mississippi River between miles 88 and 240 above Head of Passes. (a) Definitions. As used in this section:...

  14. 33 CFR 165.803 - Mississippi River-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mississippi River-regulated... Mississippi River—regulated navigation area. The following is a Regulated Navigation Area—The waters of the Mississippi River between miles 88 and 240 above Head of Passes. (a) Definitions. As used in this section:...

  15. 33 CFR 165.803 - Mississippi River-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mississippi River-regulated... Mississippi River—regulated navigation area. The following is a Regulated Navigation Area—The waters of the Mississippi River between miles 88 and 240 above Head of Passes. (a) Definitions. As used in this section:...

  16. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  17. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  18. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  19. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  20. Probability of Liquefaction for H-Area Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.C.

    2000-09-27

    In 1995 WSRC completed the geotechnical assessment for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility and the H-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site. As part of that assessment, a probabilistic liquefaction evaluation for the Tobacco Road soils was completed.

  1. Cross-Sectional Data for Selected Reaches of the Chattahoochee River within the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, Georgia, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalton, Melinda S.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents hydrologic data for selected reaches of the Chattahoochee River within the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area (CRNRA). Data about transect location, width, depth, and velocity of flow for selected reaches of the river are presented in tabular form. The tables contain measurements collected from shoal and run habitats identified as critical sites for the CRNRA. In shoal habitats, measurements were collected while wading using a digital flowmeter and laser range finder. In run habitats, measurements were collected using acoustic Doppler current profiling. Fifty-three transects were established in six reaches throughout the CRNRA; 24 in shoal habitat, 26 in run habitat, and 3 in pool habitat. Illustrations in this report contain information about study area location, hydrology, transect locations, and cross-sectional information. A study area location figure is followed by figures identifying locations of transects within each individual reach. Cross-sectional information is presented for each transect, by reach, in a series of graphs. The data presented herein can be used to complete preliminary habitat assessments for the Chattahoochee River within the CRNRA. These preliminary assessments can be used to identify reaches of concern for future impacts associated with continual development in the Metropolitan Atlanta area and potential water allocation agreements between Georgia, Florida, and Alabama.

  2. Ground-water reconnaissance of the central Weber River area, Morgan and Summit Counties, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, Joseph S.; Steiger, Judy I.; Green, Ronald T.

    1984-01-01

    A reconnaissance of ground water in the central Weber River area obtained data to help State administrators devise a policy for acting on applications to appropriate ground water resulting from recent and future influxes of residents.

  3. MUTAGENIC CHARACTERISTICS OF RIVER WATERS FLOWING THROUGH LARGE METROPOLITAN AREAS IN NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagenic characteristics of river waters flowing through large metropolitan areas in North America

    The hanging technique using blue rayon, which specifically adsorbs mutagens with multicyclic planar structures, has the advantages over most conventional methods of not havi...

  4. Flow and Transport in the Hanford 300 Area Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    SciTech Connect

    Waichler, Scott R.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-13

    Contaminant migration in the 300 Area unconfined aquifer is strongly coupled to fluctuations in the Columbia River stage. To better understand the interaction between the river, aquifer, and vadose zone, a 2-D saturated-unsaturated flow and transport model was developed for a vertical cross-section aligned west-east across the Hanford Site 300 Area, nearly perpendicular to the river. The model was used to investigate water flow and tracer transport in the vadose zone-aquifer-river flow system, in support of the ongoing study of the 300 Area uranium plume. The STOMP simulator was used to model 1-year from 3/1/92 to 2/28/93, a period when hourly data were available for both groundwater and river levels. Net water flow to the river (per 1-meter width of shoreline) was 182 m3/y in the base case, but the cumulative exchange or total flow back and forth across the riverbed was 30 times greater. The low river case had approximately double the net water and Groundwater tracer flux into the river as compared to the base case.

  5. 78 FR 66695 - Loveland Area Projects, Colorado River Storage Project, Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... Area Power Administration Loveland Area Projects, Colorado River Storage Project, Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie Project, Central Arizona Project, and Parker-Davis Project--Rate Order No. WAPA... Western Area Power Administration (Western) Transmission Projects to Enter into WestConnect's...

  6. 33 CFR 165.811 - Atchafalaya River, Berwick Bay, LA-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atchafalaya River, Berwick Bay, LA-regulated navigation area. 165.811 Section 165.811 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated...

  7. 33 CFR 334.290 - Elizabeth River, Southern Branch, Va., naval restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Va., naval restricted areas. 334.290 Section 334.290 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....290 Elizabeth River, Southern Branch, Va., naval restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1) St. Helena Annex Area. Beginning at a point at St. Helena Annex of the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, on the eastern shore...

  8. 33 CFR 334.260 - York River, Va.; naval restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false York River, Va.; naval restricted....; naval restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1) Naval mine service-testing area (prohibited). A rectangular area surrounding Piers 1 and 2, Naval Weapons Station, and extending upstream therefrom, beginning at...

  9. 33 CFR 334.260 - York River, Va.; naval restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false York River, Va.; naval restricted....; naval restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1) Naval mine service-testing area (prohibited). A rectangular area surrounding Piers 1 and 2, Naval Weapons Station, and extending upstream therefrom, beginning at...

  10. 33 CFR 334.290 - Elizabeth River, Southern Branch, Va., naval restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Va., naval restricted areas. 334.290 Section 334.290 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....290 Elizabeth River, Southern Branch, Va., naval restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1) St. Helena Annex Area. Beginning at a point at St. Helena Annex of the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, on the eastern shore...

  11. 33 CFR 334.810 - Holston River at Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS § 334.810 Holston River at Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area. (a) The area... Commanding Officer of the Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee, and such agencies as he may designate. ... Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area. 334.810 Section 334.810 Navigation and Navigable Waters...

  12. 33 CFR 334.810 - Holston River at Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS § 334.810 Holston River at Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area. (a) The area... Commanding Officer of the Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee, and such agencies as he may designate. ... Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area. 334.810 Section 334.810 Navigation and Navigable Waters...

  13. 33 CFR 334.810 - Holston River at Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS § 334.810 Holston River at Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area. (a) The area... Commanding Officer of the Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee, and such agencies as he may designate. ... Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area. 334.810 Section 334.810 Navigation and Navigable Waters...

  14. 33 CFR 334.810 - Holston River at Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS § 334.810 Holston River at Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area. (a) The area... Commanding Officer of the Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee, and such agencies as he may designate. ... Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area. 334.810 Section 334.810 Navigation and Navigable Waters...

  15. 33 CFR 334.810 - Holston River at Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS § 334.810 Holston River at Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area. (a) The area... Commanding Officer of the Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee, and such agencies as he may designate. ... Works, Kingsport, Tenn.; restricted area. 334.810 Section 334.810 Navigation and Navigable Waters...

  16. 78 FR 71495 - Regulated Navigation Area; Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Piscataqua River, Portsmouth, NH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... of Homeland Security FR Federal Register RNA Regulated Navigation Area A. Regulatory History and... Guard is establishing a regulated navigation area (RNA) on the Piscataqua River near Portsmouth, NH... Guard has the authority to establish RNAs in defined water areas that are determined to have...

  17. Spatial variation in river runoff into a coastal area — An ecological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, C.; Máguas, C.; Cabral, H. N.; Costa, M. J.

    2011-04-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes were used to investigate spatial variation in terrestrial particulate organic matter (POM) input to a coastal area off the Tagus river estuary. Isotopic variation in higher trophic level organisms was also examined, along the coast. This study was carried out in late summer, after a period of 3 months of low river flow. The overall aim was to determine if under such conditions the coastal area is enriched by the river plume and, particularly, if lower secondary productivity should be expected in some areas. Spatial variation was detected as a gradient of decreasing terrestrial input with increasing distance from the river. It was concluded that terrestrial carbon input was also incorporated into higher trophic levels and that organisms with lower mobility are more sensitive to the gradient in terrestrial input. Even in low flow conditions the whole fishing area remained under the influence of the river plume, which still accounted for 24% of the total POM 30 km from the river mouth. Additionally, δ 15N values indicated pollution input from the river Tagus.

  18. Detection of Area Changes in River Mouthbars at the Mekong River Delta using ALOS/PALSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.; Uehara, K.; Tamura, T.; Saito, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Projected sea-level rise by the year 2100 would be ~1m recently and its negative impact on the coastal zone has been pointed out, particularly for mega-deltas in Asia by the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007). The relative sea-level rise varies with specific conditions and processes over broad spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, long-term monitoring of geomorphological changes in coastal areas over wide areas is of highly interest and importance for coastal management. However, due to limited data availability and accessibility in developing countries, there is not enough systematic coastal monitoring. The Mekong River Delta is one of typical mega-deltas in Asia, which has a low-lying wide delta-plain located in Cambodia to South Vietnam. Sediment and water discharges of the Mekong River are controlled by the monsoon with high and low discharge in summer (wet season) and winter (dry season), respectively. Therefore, technologies such as SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) not affected by the cloud conditions offer potential for monitoring in the monsoon Asia region. In this study, ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band SAR) data acquired over a period from December 2006 to January 2011 are analyzed to investigate the relation between the sea level and the shape of mouthbars in the Mekong River. Level-1.0 PALSAR data were processed, coregistered, and geocoded to make SAR backscatter intensity images. River mouthbars with strong backscatter, which is surrounded by the water with weak backscatter, are successfully extracted using a histogram thresholding algorithm. Estimated areas of river mouthbars, which are located at the central part of the delta and openly faced to the South China Sea, gradually increase on an annual time scale. These river mouthbars are growing to the seaward. Besides this overall increasing trend, seasonal variations of areas are observed; these correlate with

  19. Geochemical map of the North Fork John Day River Roadless Area, Grant County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.

    1986-01-01

    The North Fork John Day River Roadless Area comprised 21,210 acres in the Umatilla and Wallowa-Whitman National Forests, Grant County, Oregon, about 30 miles northwest of Baker, Oregon. The irregularly shaped area extends for about 1 mile on both sides of a 25-mile segment of the North Fork John Day River from Big Creek on the west to North Fork John Day Campground on the east. Most of the roadless area is in the northern half of the Desolation Butte 15-minute quadrangle. The eastern end of the area is in parts of the Granite and Trout Meadows 7½-minute quadrangles.

  20. Drainage areas in the Big Sioux River basin in eastern South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amundson, Frank D.; Koch, Neil C.

    1985-01-01

    The Big Sioux River basin of eastern South Dakota contains an important surface water supply and a sizeable aquifer system of major importance to the economy of South Dakota. The aquifers are complex, consisting of many small aquifers that are hydrologically associated with several large aquifers and the Big Sioux River. The complexity and interrelation of the surface water/groundwater systems has already created management problems. As development continues and increases, the problems will increase in number and complexity. To aid in planning for future development, an accurate determination of drainage areas for all basins, sub-basins, and noncontributing areas in the Big Sioux River basin is needed. All named stream basins, and all unnamed basins > 10 sq mi within the Big Sioux River basin in South Dakota are shown and are listed by stream name. Stream drainage basins in South Dakota were delineated by visual interpretation of contour information shown on U.S. Geological Survey 77-1/2 minute topographic maps. One table lists the drainage areas of major drainage basins in the Big Sioux River basin that do not have a total drainage area value > 10 sq mi. Another shows the drainage area above stream gaging stations in the Big Sioux River basin. (Lantz-PTT)

  1. Effects of river discharge on hyporheic exchange flows in salmon spawning areas of a large gravel-bed river

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2008-01-01

    The flow magnitude and timing from hydroelectric dams in the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States is managed in part for the benefit of salmon. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of current Hells Canyon Dam discharge operations on hydrologic exchange flows between the river and riverbed in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. Interactions between river water and pore water within the upper 1 m of the riverbed were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. The data were recorded at 20 min intervals over a period of 200 days when the mean daily discharge was 218–605 m3 s–1, with hourly stage changes as large as 1.9 m. Differences in head pressure between the river and riverbed were small, often within ±2 cm. Measured temperature gradients in the riverbed indicated significant interactions between the surface and subsurface water. Neither hydraulic nor temperature gradients at most sites were significantly affected by either short- or long-term changes in discharge operations from Hells Canyon Dam. Only 2 out of 14 study sites exhibited acute flux reversals between the river and riverbed resulting from short-term, large magnitude changes in discharge. The findings suggest small-scale piezometric head differences play a minor role in the hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed at the study sites. The processes controlling hydrologic exchange at the study sites are likely to be bedform-induced advective pumping, turbulence at the riverbed surface, and large-scale hydraulic gradients along the longitudinal profile of the riverbed. By incorporating the knowledge of hydrologic exchange processes into water management planning, regional agencies will be better prepared to manage the limited water resources among competing priorities that include salmon recovery, flood control, irrigation supply, hydropower production, and

  2. Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, John N.; Dresel, P. Evan; Conrad, Mark E.; Patton, Gregory W.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2010-10-31

    Our objectives in this study are to quantify the discharge rate of uranium (U) to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site's 300 Area, and to follow that U down river to constrain its fate. Uranium from the Hanford Site has variable isotopic composition due to nuclear industrial processes carried out at the site. This characteristic makes it possible to use high-precision isotopic measurements of U in environmental samples to identify even trace levels of contaminant U, determine its sources, and estimate discharge rates. Our data on river water samples indicate that as much as 3.2 kg/day can enter the Columbia River from the 300 Area, which is only a small fraction of the total load of dissolved natural background U carried by the Columbia River. This very low-level of Hanford derived U can be discerned, despite dilution to < 1 percent of natural background U, 350 km downstream from the Hanford Site. These results indicate that isotopic methods can allow the amounts of U from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site entering the Columbia River to be measured accurately to ascertain whether they are an environmental concern, or are insignificant relative to natural uranium background in the Columbia River.

  3. Predicting precipitation on nonpoint source pollutant exports in the source area of the Liao River, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Bian, J M; Wang, S N; Nie, S Y

    2016-01-01

    The source area of the Liao River is an important grain growing area in China which experiences serious problems with agricultural nonpoint source pollution (NPS) which is impacting the regional economy and society. In order to address the water quality issues it is necessary to understand the spatial distribution of NPS in the Liao River source area. This issue has been investigated by coupling a wavelet artificial neural network (WA-ANN) precipitation model with a soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) model to assess the export of nonpoint source pollutants from the Liao River source area. The calibration and validation of these models are outlined. The WA-ANN models and the SWAT model were run to generate the spatial distribution of nonpoint source nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) exports in the source area of the Liao River. It was found that the SWAT model identified the sub-catchments which not only receive high rainfall but are also densely populated with high agricultural production from dry fields and paddy fields, which are large users of pesticides and chemical fertilizer, as the primary source areas for nutrient exports. It is also concluded that the coupled WA-ANN models and the SWAT model provide a tool which will inform the identification of NPS issues and will facilitate the identification of management practices to improve the water environments in the source area of the Liao River. PMID:27533862

  4. 78 FR 12260 - Regulated Navigation Area-Weymouth Fore River, Fore River Bridge Construction, Weymouth and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking RNA Regulated... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public... River Bridge Construction, Weymouth and Quincy, MA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  5. Socioeconomic issues for the Bear River Watershed Conservation Land Area Protection Plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Catherine Cullinane; Huber, Christopher; Gascoigne, William; Koontz, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The Bear River Watershed Conservation Area is located in the Bear River Watershed, a vast basin covering fourteen counties across three states. Located in Wyoming, Utah, and Idaho, the watershed spans roughly 7,500 squares miles: 1,500 squares miles in Wyoming; 2,700 squares miles in Idaho; and 3,300 squares miles in Utah (Utah Division of Water Resources, 2004). Three National Wildlife Refuges are currently contained within the boundary of the BRWCA: the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Utah, the Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Idaho, and the Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Wyoming. In 2010, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted a Preliminary Project Proposal and identified the Bear River Watershed Conservation Area as having high-value wildlife habitat. This finding initiated the Land Protection Planning process, which is used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to study land conservation opportunities including adding lands to the National Wildlife Refuge System. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to include part of the Bear River Watershed Conservation Area in the Refuge System by acquiring up to 920,000 acres of conservation easements from willing landowners to maintain landscape integrity and habitat connectivity in the region. The analysis described in this report provides a profile of the social and economic conditions in the Bear River Watershed Conservation Area and addresses social and economic questions and concerns raised during public involvement in the Land Protection Planning process.

  6. Characterization of ground-water discharge from bedrock aquifers to the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers at three areas, Minneapolis-St. Paul area, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenberg, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogeology at three areas along the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area were studied to characterize ground-water discharge from bedrock aquifers to the two rivers. Along the Mississippi River between Fridley and Brooklyn Center, a buried valley underlying the Mississippi River cuts through the overlying terrace deposits and glacial-drift deposits into two underlying bedrock hydro- geologic units: the St Peter aquifer, and a rubble zone between the St. Peter and Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifers. Shallow ground-water flow in the near-surface gray and upper red tills and sand and gravel outwash aquifer discharges to springs along the edge of the river. Ground water flowing through the rubble zone and upper part of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer probably discharges through alluvial deposits to the river. In study area 2, along the Minnesota River between Eagan and Bloomington, almost 200 feet of post-glacial alluvium, glaciofluvial sand and gravel, Pleistocene lake deposits, and peat fill a bedrock valley under the present-day Minnesota River. As much as 40 feet of post-glacial peat, silty clay, clay, and muck lie near the river-valley walls. Confining units beneath the river channel impede the discharge of ground water from the underlying Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer to the river. Ground water discharges to wetlands, lakes, and springs along both the north and south side of the river. Along the Mississippi River at Minneapolis about 5 miles upstream of the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers, the Mississippi River lies in a post-glacial valley cut through thin glacial drift into the St. Peter aquifer. Beneath the river, ground water flows from the St. Peter aquifer through the overlying post-glacial ailuvium to the Mississippi River. No confining unit separates the St. Peter aquifer and the river.

  7. Interaction of the sea breeze with a river breeze in an area of complex coastal heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Shiyuan; Takle, Eugene S.; Leone, John M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction of the sea-breeze circulation with a river-breeze circulation in an area of complex coastal heating (east coast of Florida) was studied using a 3D finite-element mesoscale model. The model simulations are compared with temperature and wind fields observed on a typical fall day during the Kennedy Space Center Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment. The results from numerical experiments designed to isolate the effect of the river breeze indicate that the convergence in the sea-breeze front is suppressed when it passes over the cooler surface of the rivers.

  8. Fine particle emission potential from overflowing areas of Tarim River in the Tarim Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the low-precipitation zone (<100 mm annual precipitation) of the Tarim Basin, wind erosion and fugitive dust emission is a recognized problem. There is limited information, however, regarding wind erosion on river overflowing areas, areas of temporal flooding, in the Tarim Basin. The objectives o...

  9. 33 CFR 165.807 - Calcasieu River, Louisiana-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calcasieu River, Louisiana-regulated navigation area. 165.807 Section 165.807 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  10. 33 CFR 165.807 - Calcasieu River, Louisiana-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calcasieu River, Louisiana-regulated navigation area. 165.807 Section 165.807 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  11. 33 CFR 165.807 - Calcasieu River, Louisiana-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Calcasieu River, Louisiana-regulated navigation area. 165.807 Section 165.807 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  12. 33 CFR 165.807 - Calcasieu River, Louisiana-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calcasieu River, Louisiana-regulated navigation area. 165.807 Section 165.807 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  13. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area andvolume

    EPA Science Inventory

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L−1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and ...

  14. 75 FR 20523 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4, Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ..., Portland, OR'' in the Federal Register (74 FR 69047). We received one comment on the proposed rule. There... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4... establishing two Regulated Navigation Areas (RNA) at the Port of Portland Terminal 4 on the Willamette River...

  15. 33 CFR 165.756 - Regulated Navigation Area; Savannah River, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... escorted vessel. LNG tankship means a vessel as described in 46 CFR 154. Made-up means physically attached... (LNG) shall: (A) Comply with the notice requirements of 33 CFR part 160. The COTP may delay the vessel....756 Regulated Navigation Area; Savannah River, Georgia. (a) Regulated Navigation Area (RNA)....

  16. 76 FR 6327 - Restricted Area, Potomac River, Marine Corps Base Quantico, Quantico, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ..., 2010, edition of the Federal Register (75 FR 53264) and the docket number was COE-2010- 0032. In... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Restricted Area, Potomac River, Marine Corps Base.... Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) is amending its regulations to establish a restricted area in...

  17. The role of discharge variation in scaling of drainage area and food chain length in rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabo, John L.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Post, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Food chain length (FCL) is a fundamental component of food web structure. Studies in a variety of ecosystems suggest that FCL is determined by energy supply, environmental stability, and/or ecosystem size, but the nature of the relationship between environmental stability and FCL, and the mechanism linking ecosystem size to FCL, remain unclear. Here we show that FCL increases with drainage area and decreases with hydrologic variability and intermittency across 36 North American rivers. Our analysis further suggests that hydrologic variability is the mechanism underlying the correlation between ecosystem size and FCL in rivers. Ecosystem size lengthens river food chains by integrating and attenuating discharge variation through stream networks, thereby enhancing environmental stability in larger river systems.

  18. 33 CFR 165.1326 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4, Willamette River, Portland, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Portland Terminal 4, Willamette River, Portland, OR. 165.1326 Section 165.1326 Navigation and... Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1326 Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4... navigation area: (1) All waters of the Willamette River in the head of the Port of Portland's Terminal 4...

  19. The effects of urban areas on benthic macroinvertebrates in two Colorado Plains rivers.

    PubMed

    Voelz, Neal J; Zuellig, Robert E; Shieh, Sen-Her; Ward, J V

    2005-02-01

    Water demands in arid and semi-arid areas, coupled with increased human populations and concomitant changes in land use, can greatly alter aquatic ecosystems. A good example of this type of system occurs along the eastern slope of the Colorado Rocky Mountains, U.S.A. Long-term macroinvertebrate metric data from the Big Thompson and Cache la Poudre Rivers, Colorado, were collected at one site above, and three sites in and downstream from urban areas. These data were compared both with regional reference and single reference sites in the respective rivers. Using the surrogate variables of potential urban impact (population and housing units), and the environmental gradient represented primarily by chemical factors, it was determined that there was an effect of urban land use that was reflected in the macroinvertebrate assemblages in both rivers. The most robust results were usually seen when regional reference data were used. However, even using only the upstream reference site in either river indicated some negative impacts from the urban areas. The long-term data, particularly in the Cache la Poudre River, showed that water quality has not been getting worse and there is some evidence of a slight improvement in downstream reaches, even with increased urban development. PMID:15736883

  20. Numerical Demonstration of Massive Sediment Transport and Cs Recontamination by River Flooding in Fukushima Costal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiko; Yamada, Susumu; Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Okumura, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiro

    2014-05-01

    Radioactive Cs recontamination brought about by deposition of silt and clay on river beds has been a central issue of environmental recovery problems in Fukushima prefecture after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. In fact, the river-side sediment monitored by using remote controlled helicopters and direct sampling measurements has been confirmed to be highly contaminated compared to the other areas, which just naturally decay. Such contamination transportation is especially remarkable in a few rivers in coastal areas of Fukushima prefecture, because their water and sediment are supplied from the highly contaminated area along the northwest direction from FDNPPs. Thus, we numerically study the sediment transportation in rivers by using 2D river simulation framework named iRIC developed by Shimizu et al. Consequently, we find that flood brought about by typhoon is mainly required for the massive transport and the sediment deposition in the flood plain is efficiently promoted by plants naturally grown on the plain. In this presentation, we reveal when and where the sediment deposition occurs in the event of floods through direct numerical simulations. We believe that the results are suggestive for the next planning issue related with decontamination in highly-contaminated evacuated districts.

  1. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Bronx River Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Gruendell, B.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-12-01

    The objective of the Bronx River project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Bronx River project area in Bronx, New York, to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Bronx River was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USAGE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and to evaluate for dredging and disposal. Sediment samples were submitted for physical and chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Fifteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Bronx River project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample, representing the entire reach of the area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which was prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Bronx River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  2. Assessing Potential Conservation and Restoration Areas of Freshwater Fish Fauna in the Indian River Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Jay P.; Manish, Kumar; Mehta, Rajender; Pandit, Maharaj K.

    2016-05-01

    Conservation efforts globally are skewed toward terrestrial ecosystems. To date, conservation of aquatic ecosystems, in particular fish fauna, is largely neglected. We provide a country-wide assessment of Indian river ecosystems in order to identify and prioritize areas for protection and restoration of freshwater fish fauna. Using various biodiversity and anthropogenic attributes, coupled with tools of ecological modeling, we delineated areas for fish fauna conservation and restoration in the 20 major river basins of India. To do this, we used prioritization analyses and reserve selection algorithms to derive conservation value index (CVI) and vulnerability index (VI) of the river basins. CVI was estimated using endemicity, rarity, conservation value, and taxonomic singularity, while VI was estimated using a disturbance index derived from percent geographic area of the basin under human settlements, human population density, predominant land use, and total number of exotic fish species in each basin. The two indices, CVI and VI, were converted into geo-referenced maps, and each map was super-imposed onto species richness and forest cover maps, respectively. After superimposition, areas with high CVI and low VI shade intensities were delineated for conservation, while areas with high CVI and high VI shade intensities were demarcated for restoration. In view of the importance of freshwater fish for human livelihoods and consumption, and ecosystems of India's rivers, we call for urgent attention to the conservation of their fish fauna along with restoration of their degraded habitats.

  3. Effect of the river discharge implementation in an operational model for the West Iberia coastal area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campuzano, Francisco; Brito, David; Juliano, Manuela; Fernandes, Rodrigo; Neves, Ramiro

    2015-04-01

    In the Iberian Peninsula, most of the largest rivers discharge on the Atlantic coast draining almost two thirds of the territory. It is an important source of nutrients and sediments to these coastal areas. Rivers discharges in the Atlantic area when compared with the ones in the Mediterranean side present the particularity that their water before is released into the ocean is previously mixed in their estuaries in a different ratio depending of the estuarine residence time and the discharged flow. In order to evaluate the relative importance of the inland waters in the circulation patterns of Western Iberia, the rivers discharges were implemented in the PCOMS model application (Portuguese Coast Operational Modelling System). To reproduce the water continuum including the different spatial and temporal scales, a methodology consisting in a system of integrated models using the Mohid model was designed. At the watershed level, the Mohid Land model calculated operationally water flow and properties, including nutrients, for the main river catchments of Western Iberian with a 2 km horizontal resolution. Downstream, several operational hydrodynamic and biological estuarine applications used those outcomes as model inputs, filling the gaps in the observation network. From the estuarine models, the tidally modulated water and properties fluxes to the coast were obtained. These fluxes were finally imposed in the Portuguese Coast Operational Modelling System (PCOMS), a fully 3D baroclinic hydrodynamic and ecological regional model that covers the Iberian Atlantic front. The fate of the rivers discharges were analysed by integrating model results in boxes, comparing the climatologies obtained with and without rivers and the rivers area of influence was obtained by lagrangian tracers simulations.

  4. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hackensack River Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Gruendell, B.D.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of the Hackensack River Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material with current ammonia reduction protocols. Hackensack River was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were re-collected from the Hackensack River Project area in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted according to the manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Green Book,{close_quotes} and the regional manual developed by the USACE-NYD and EPA Region II, Guidance for Performing Tests on Dredged Material to be Disposed of in Ocean Waters. The reevaluation of proposed dredged material from the Hackensack River project area consisted of benthic acute toxicity tests. Thirty-three individual sediment core samples were collected from the Hackensack River project area. Three composite sediments, representing each reach of the area proposed for dredging, were used in benthic acute toxicity testing. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia. The amphipod and mysid benthic toxicity test procedures followed EPA guidance for reduction of total ammonia concentrations in test systems prior to test initiation. Statistically significant acute toxicity was found in all three Hackensack River composites in the static renewal tests with A. abdita, but not in the static tests with M. bahia. Statistically significant acute toxicity and a greater than 20% increase in mortality over the reference sediment was found in the static renewal tests with A. abdita. Statistically significant mortality 10% over reference sediment was observed in the M. bahia static tests. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Additional mineral resources assessment of the Battle Creek, Bruneau River, Deep Creek-Owyhee River, Jarbidge River, Juniper Creek, Little Owyhee River, North Fork Owyhee River, Owyhee River Canyon, South Fork Owyhee River, Upper Deep Creek, and Yatahoney Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Owyhee County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diggles, Michael F.; Berger, Byron R.; Vander Meulen, Dean B.; Minor, Scott A.; Ach, Jay A.; Sawlan, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    From 1984 to 1986, studies were conducted to assess the potential for undiscovered mineral resources in wilderness study areas on the Owyhee Plateau. The results of these studies have been published in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Bulletins. Since that time, low-grade, high-tonnage epithermal hot-spring gold-silver deposits have been recognized in the region north of the wilderness study areas. The recognition that this mineral-deposit model is applicable in the region, coupled with new data that has become available to the U.S. Geological Survey, reinterpretation of existing geochemical data, and known-deposit data suggest that similar deposits may be present elsewhere on the Owyhee Plateau. This report is an additional assessment of the Battle Creek, Bruneau River, Deep Creek-Owyhee River, Jarbidge River, Juniper Creek, Little Owyhee River, North Fork Owyhee River, Owyhee River Canyon, South Fork Owyhee River (ID-016-053), Upper Deep Creek, and Yatahoney Creek Wilderness Study Areas in Idaho Wilderness Study Areas in Idaho in light of those new data.

  6. Kentucky River Area Development District (KRADD): Historic Trends and Geographic Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Timothy; Eller, Ronald D.; Taul, Glen Edward

    Lying within the Cumberland Plateau of Appalachia, the Kentucky River Area Development District (KRADD) comprises eight rural Kentucky counties: Breathitt, Knott, Lee, Leslie, Letcher, Owsley, Perry, and Wolfe. This report reviews regional history of economic development and examines socioeconomic indicators, including education, poverty, and the…

  7. 78 FR 53668 - Regulated Navigation Area; Maine Kennebec Bridge Construction Zone, Kennebec River, Richmond, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a regulated navigation area (RNA) on the navigable waters of the Kennebec River surrounding the Maine Kennebec Bridge between Richmond, ME, and Dresden, ME. This RNA allows the Coast Guard to enforce speed and wake restrictions and prohibit all vessel traffic through the RNA during bridge replacement operations, both planned and unforeseen, that could pose an......

  8. 75 FR 8486 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River south of the Troy Locks, New York

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... Troy Locks, New York AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... south of the Troy Locks. This regulated navigation area is necessary to promote maritime safety, and... operations, from operating on the navigable waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy locks when...

  9. Depositional history of the Lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River basin area, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.K.; Paull, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Thirty-three measured sections of the Dinwoody Formation, including five from the literature, provide information on thickness, lithology, paleontology, and stratigraphic relations within the Wind River basin and immediately adjacent areas of Wyoming. Most of these sections are in Fremont County, and some lie within the Wind River Indian Reservation. The Dinwoody becomes progressively thinner eastward, from a maximum thickness of 54.6 m in the northwestern Wind River Mountains to zero near the Natrona County line. The formation is characterized by yellowish-weathering, gray siltstone and silty shale. Variable amounts of limestone, sandstone, gypsum, and claystone are also present. Marine bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods (Lingula), and conodonts are common in the western part of the study area, but are absent to the northeast in gypsiferous strata, and near the eastern limit of Dinwoody deposition. The Dinwoody in the Wind River Basin area was deposited unconformably on the Upper Permian Ervary Member of the Park City Formation during the initial Mesozoic flood onto the Wyoming shelf during the Griesbachian, and represents the first of three Lower Triassic transgressive sequences in the western miogeocline. Conodonts of the Isarcica Chronozone document the rapid nature of this eastward transgression. The Permian surface underlying the Dinwoody rarely shows evidence of the long hiatus separating rocks of this age and earliest Triassic deposits. The Dinwoody transgression was followed by westward progradation of the Red Peak Formation of the Chugwater Group across the study area.

  10. 78 FR 34255 - Regulated Navigation Area; Vessel Traffic in Vicinity of Marseilles Dam; Illinois River

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking TFR Temporary Final Rule RNA Regulated... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Vessel Traffic in Vicinity of....4 on the Illinois River (USCG-2013-0334). This safety zone restricted vessel traffic within...

  11. 76 FR 70866 - Expansions of the Russian River Valley and Northern Sonoma Viticultural Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... description of the features of the viticultural area that affect viticulture, such as climate, geology, soils..., in the Federal Register (73 FR 49123) regarding the proposed expansion of the Russian River Valley....) ATF-159, published in the Federal Register (48 FR 48812) on October 21, 1983. It was expanded by...

  12. 75 FR 39839 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River and Port of NY/NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do... machinery and construction vessel operations above and upon the navigable waters between Port Coeymans on... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River and Port of...

  13. 33 CFR 165.821 - Ohio River at Cincinnati, OH; regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regulated navigation area (RNA)—The waters of the Ohio River between mile 466.0 and mile 473.0. (b.... (1) Transit through the RNA by all downbound vessels towing cargoes regulated by Title 46 Code of... navigation channel of the RNA. (3) All commercial vessels shall continually monitor VHF-FM channel 13...

  14. 33 CFR 165.821 - Ohio River at Cincinnati, OH; regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regulated navigation area (RNA)—The waters of the Ohio River between mile 466.0 and mile 473.0. (b.... (1) Transit through the RNA by all downbound vessels towing cargoes regulated by Title 46 Code of... navigation channel of the RNA. (3) All commercial vessels shall continually monitor VHF-FM channel 13...

  15. 76 FR 48070 - Regulated Navigation Area, Zidell Waterfront Property, Willamette River, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... Guard proposes the establishment of a Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) at the Zidell Waterfront Property located on the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. This RNA is necessary to preserve the integrity of...

  16. 33 CFR 165.821 - Ohio River at Cincinnati, OH; regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... regulated navigation area (RNA)—The waters of the Ohio River between mile 466.0 and mile 473.0. (b.... (1) Transit through the RNA by all downbound vessels towing cargoes regulated by Title 46 Code of... navigation channel of the RNA. (3) All commercial vessels shall continually monitor VHF-FM channel 13...

  17. 33 CFR 165.821 - Ohio River at Cincinnati, OH; regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regulated navigation area (RNA)—The waters of the Ohio River between mile 466.0 and mile 473.0. (b.... (1) Transit through the RNA by all downbound vessels towing cargoes regulated by Title 46 Code of... navigation channel of the RNA. (3) All commercial vessels shall continually monitor VHF-FM channel 13...

  18. 33 CFR 165.821 - Ohio River at Cincinnati, OH; regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regulated navigation area (RNA)—The waters of the Ohio River between mile 466.0 and mile 473.0. (b.... (1) Transit through the RNA by all downbound vessels towing cargoes regulated by Title 46 Code of... navigation channel of the RNA. (3) All commercial vessels shall continually monitor VHF-FM channel 13...

  19. Impact of environmental factor variation on desertification: an example from the Shule River Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yushu; Li, Xiangyun; Wang, Lixin; Zhang, Hongqi

    2003-07-01

    Variation of environmental factors plays an important roll in the process of desertification. In this paper, taking Shule River as an example, the variation and correlation coefficient was calculated to evaluate the main environmental factors" changes and its relation to the state of desertification. The results obtained indicate that the variations of factors including meteorological factors and human active factors are obvious. Since 80"s the annual precipitation and annual number of sandstorm days have been declining in a fluctuating state. The population and the area of cultivated land have been increasing. The correlation analysis shows that there exist positive correlations between desertification and population and area of cultivated land. The correlation between area of desertification and annual wind speed, annual number of sandstorm days is significant. In Shule River area, desertification state has more obvious relation with human active factor, comparing with meteorological factors.

  20. River Basin Water Assessment and Balance in fast developing areas in Viet Nam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Van Chin; Ranzi, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    Uneven precipitation in space and time together with mismanagement and lack of knowledge about quantity and quality of water resources, have caused water shortages for water supply to large cities and irrigation areas in many regions of Viet Nam in the dry season. The rainy season (from June to October) counts for 80% of the total annual rainfall, while the water volume of dry season (from November to May of the following year) accounts for 20% only. Lack of sufficient water volumes occurs in some areas where the pressure of a fast increasing population (1.3% per year on average in the last decade in Viet Nam), intensive agricultural and industrial uses is one of the major problems facing sustainable development. For those areas an accurate water assessment and balance at the riverbasin scale is needed to manage the exploitation and appropriate use of water resources and plan future development. The paper describes the preliminary phase of the pilot development of the river basin water balance for the Day River Basin in the Red River delta in Viet Nam. The Day river basin includes a 7,897 km² area in the south-western part of the Red River in Viet Nam. The total population in the Day river basin exceeds 8 millions inhabitants, including the Hanoi capital, Nam Dinh and other large towns. Agricultural land covered 390,294 ha in 2000 and this area is going to be increased by 14,000 ha in 2010 due to land reclamation and expansion toward the sea. Agricultural uses exploit about 90% of surface water resources in the Day river basin but have to compete with industrial and civil needs in the recent years. At the background of the brief characterization of the Day River Basin, we concentrate on the application of a water balance model integrated by an assessment of water quality after consumptive uses for civil, agricultural and industrial needs to assist water management in the basin. In addition, future development scenarios are taken into account, considering less

  1. 210Pb mass accumulation rates in the depositional area of the Magra River (Mediterranean Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbono, I.; Barsanti, M.; Schirone, A.; Conte, F.; Delfanti, R.

    2016-08-01

    Nine sediment cores were collected between 2009 and 2012 in the inner continental shelf (Mediterranean Sea, Italy) mainly influenced by the Magra River, at water depths ranging from 11 to 64 m. Mass Accumulation Rates (MARs) were calculated through 210Pb analysed by Gamma spectrometry. Three different dating models (single and two-layer CF-CS, CRS) were applied to clay normalised 210Pbxs profiles and 137Cs was used to validate the 210Pb geochronology. The maximum MAR values (>2 g cm-2 yr-1) were found in the region adjacent to the Magra River mouth and outside the Gulf of La Spezia (0.9±0.1 g cm-2 yr-1 at St. 3-C6 and 4-C4). Results from 137Cs/210Pbxs ratios calculated in Surface Mixed Layers (SMLs) evidenced the coastal boundaries of the Magra River depositional area, which is very limited towards south. Differently, in the north-west sector, fine sediments are generally driven by the Ligurian Current and move towards north-west: at the deepest and most distant station from the River mouth, the MAR value is the lowest one in the study area. Few major Magra River floods occurred during the sediment core sampling period. By using the short-lived radioisotope 7Be as a tracer of river floods, a clear 7Be signature of 2009 flood is present at St. 1-SA1C. Finally, by analyzing the clay normalised 210Pbxs profiles, a decrease of its activity dating the years 1999 and 2000 is observed in four cores, corresponding to two major Magra River floods occurring in those years.

  2. Areas of gain and loss along the Platte River, central Nebraska, spring 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Jennifer S.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to protect endangered and other wildlife species, the governors of Nebraska, Colorado, and Wyoming, and the Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior signed an agreement in 1997 (Platte River Endangered Species Partnership, 1997) to initiate the development of a basin-wide habitat recovery program for the central reaches of the Platte River in Nebraska.  This agreement recognizes the need to maintatin minimal flows in the central reaches of the Platte River.  An understanding of the surgace-water and ground-water intetaction along the central reaches of the Platte River is critical to deliver water to the targeted habitat areas.  Therefore, a study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, was conducted to determine qualitatively the areas of gain and loss along the central Platte River between Gothenburg and Silver Creek, Nebraska (fig. 1).  The purpose of this report is to present the results of the study.

  3. A reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Clarion River Roadless Area, Allegheny National Forest, Elk County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickling, N.L.; Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Adrian, Betty M.

    1983-01-01

    Semiquantitative emission spectrographic analyses for 31 elements were determined on 9 stream-sediment samples and 18 bedrock samples from the Clarion River Roadless Area, Elk County, Pennsylvania. All sample localities are given in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. Brief descriptions of bedrock samples are also included. Rocks analyzed are mostly sandstone, and siltstone. The analytical data do not indicate the presence of mineralized rock in the study area.

  4. Mineral resources of the Encampment River Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    du Bray, E.A.; Bankey, V.; Hill, R.H.; Ryan, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Encampment River Canyon Wilderness Study Area is about 4 mi south of Encampment, in Carbon County, Wyoming. This study area is underlain by Archean felsic gneiss and early Proterozoic quartzite; both are intruded by minor middle Proterozoic mafic plutonic rock. Gneiss occurs throughout the eastern and northwestern parts of the study area; whereas, quartzite occurs in the western and southwestern parts. This study area has no identified resources and no potential for energy resources. Resource potential for all undiscovered metallic commodities and for undiscovered industrial minerals is low.

  5. 78 FR 59237 - Regulated Navigation Area-Weymouth Fore River, Fore River Bridge Construction, Weymouth and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... bridge replacement operations. This rule is necessary to provide for the safety of life in the vicinity... of Homeland Security FR Federal Register RNA Regulated navigation area A. Regulatory History and... Quincy, MA'' in the Federal Register (78 FR 12260). No comments were received. No public meeting...

  6. Baseline risk assessment for aquatic life for the Buffalo River, New York, Area of Concern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Passino-Reader, Dora R.; Hudson, Patrick L.; Hickey, James P.

    1995-01-01

    The Great Lakes National Program Office of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiated the Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS) program to address concerns of environmental degradation at 43 Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes. In our first report (Passino-Reader et al. 1992), we developed a generic approach for baseline hazard evaluation of aquatic life in the Great Lakes Areas of Concern. In this report, we demonstrate the application of the generic approach to the Buffalo River (New York) Area of Concern. Using available historical data on residues in sediments, water, and biota, we evaluated exposure for 41 contaminants from the Buffalo River for eight taxa of fish and invertebrates representing the major trophic levels in the Buffalo River. By comparing exposure concentrations with reference toxicities, we calculated risk to the eight receptor organisms for typical and worst cases of exposure to the 41 contaminants. For mixtures of the contaminants present at the Buffalo River, primarily metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, we compared sediment concentrations with effects range-low (EL-R) values as reference values for toxicity of mixtures to estimate risk to aquatic biota.

  7. Modelling phosphorus inputs from agricultural sources and urban areas in river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, Björn; Vereecken, Harry; Kunkel, Ralf; Wendland, Frank

    2009-03-01

    An area-differentiated model approach (MEPhos) for the quantification of mean annual P-inputs from point and diffuse sources is presented. The following pathways are considered: artificial drainage, wash-off, groundwater outflow, soil erosion, rainwater sewers, combined sewer overflows, municipal waste water treatment plants and industrial effluents. Two retention functions for rivers and reservoirs are included in order to model P-sinks within a river basin. This allows a complete record of P-loads in heterogeneous meso- and macroscale river basins and enables validation of modeling results with water quality data on a load basis. The model is applied to the River Ruhr basin (4,485 km2) in Germany, which includes contrasting natural conditions, land use patterns as well as population and industry densities. Based on validated modelling results sub-areas of high P-loads are localized and management options for the reduction of P-inputs to surface waters are proposed taking into account the site conditions of the sub-areas relevant for high P-inputs into surface waters.

  8. 33 CFR 334.155 - Severn River, Naval Station Annapolis, Small Boat Basin, Annapolis, MD; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Severn River, Naval Station Annapolis, Small Boat Basin, Annapolis, MD; naval restricted area. 334.155 Section 334.155 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.155 Severn River, Naval Station Annapolis, Small Boat Basin, Annapolis,...

  9. 33 CFR 334.160 - Severn River, at U.S. Naval Academy Santee Basin, Annapolis, Md.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Severn River, at U.S. Naval Academy Santee Basin, Annapolis, Md.; naval restricted area. 334.160 Section 334.160 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.160 Severn River, at U.S. Naval Academy Santee Basin, Annapolis, Md.;...

  10. 33 CFR 334.155 - Severn River, Naval Station Annapolis, Small Boat Basin, Annapolis, MD; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Severn River, Naval Station Annapolis, Small Boat Basin, Annapolis, MD; naval restricted area. 334.155 Section 334.155 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.155 Severn River, Naval Station Annapolis, Small Boat Basin, Annapolis,...

  11. 33 CFR 334.160 - Severn River, at U.S. Naval Academy Santee Basin, Annapolis, Md.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Severn River, at U.S. Naval Academy Santee Basin, Annapolis, Md.; naval restricted area. 334.160 Section 334.160 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.160 Severn River, at U.S. Naval Academy Santee Basin, Annapolis, Md.;...

  12. Comprehensive strategy for corrective actions at the Savannah River Site General Separations Area

    SciTech Connect

    Ebra, M.A.; Lewis, C.M.; Amidon, M.B.; McClain, L.K.

    1991-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the United States Department of Energy, contains a number of waste disposal units that are currently in various stages of corrective action investigations, closures, and postclosure corrective actions. Many of these sites are located within a 40-square-kilometer area called the General Separations Area (GSA). The SRS has proposed to the regulatory agencies, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), that groundwater investigations and corrective actions in this area be conducted under a comprehensive plan. The proposed plan would address the continuous nature of the hydrogeologic regime below the GSA and the potential for multiple sources of contamination. This paper describes the proposed approach.

  13. Comprehensive strategy for corrective actions at the Savannah River Site General Separations Area

    SciTech Connect

    Ebra, M.A.; Lewis, C.M.; Amidon, M.B. ); McClain, L.K. )

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the United States Department of Energy, contains a number of waste disposal units that are currently in various stages of corrective action investigations, closures, and postclosure corrective actions. Many of these sites are located within a 40-square-kilometer area called the General Separations Area (GSA). The SRS has proposed to the regulatory agencies, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), that groundwater investigations and corrective actions in this area be conducted under a comprehensive plan. The proposed plan would address the continuous nature of the hydrogeologic regime below the GSA and the potential for multiple sources of contamination. This paper describes the proposed approach.

  14. Mutagenic characteristics of river waters flowing through large metropolitan areas in North America.

    PubMed

    Ohe, Takeshi; White, Paul A; DeMarini, David M

    2003-01-10

    The hanging technique using blue rayon, which specifically adsorbs mutagens with multicyclic planar structures, has the advantages over most conventional methods of not having to bring large volumes of water back to the laboratory for extraction of organic materials. Therefore, for the same effort the hanging blue rayon technique allows for the analysis of more samples from remote sites, although it has a disadvantage of not allowing quantitative analysis. In this study, the blue rayon hanging technique was used to collect organic mutagens in river waters that flow through metropolitan areas in northeastern North America. Monitoring was performed at a total of 21 sites: the Providence River system (4 sites), the Charles River (2 sites), the Potomac River (6 sites), the St. Lawrence River (5 sites), the Hudson River (3 sites), and the East River (1 site). Mutagenicity was evaluated using the Salmonella assay with strains TA98, TA100, YG1024, YG1041, and YG1042 with and without metabolic activation. The results demonstrated that strains YG1041 and YG1024 were much more sensitive than TA98 with S9 mix. Fifteen samples out of 21 were positive in YG1041 with S9 mix. Six samples gave 5000-18,400 revertants/g blue rayon equivalent. YG1042 was also much more sensitive than TA100. Eight samples were positive in YG1042 with S9 mix. The highest activity was 10,200 revertants/g blue rayon equivalent. The overall results showed that rivers flowing through major cities in North America contain frameshift-type, aromatic amine-like mutagenic activity. However, the levels of mutagenic activity in these rivers were much lower than expected based on prior analyses and calculated population-to-discharge ratios. Further research, such as detailed chemical analyses and/or simultaneous comparisons of several different adsorbents (e.g. XAD and blue rayon), will be needed to clarify the observed differences between North American blue rayon values and published values for European and

  15. EFFECTS OF RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT ON WATER QUALITY IN THE BIG SOUTH FORK NATIONAL RIVER AND RECREATION AREA, TENNESSEE AND KENTUCKY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, William P.

    1984-01-01

    The South Fork Cumberland River begins in Tennessee at the confluence of the New River and Clear Fork. Strip mining for coal in the New River basin has been ongoing for decades with little reclamation prior to 1977. Water-quality data show that suspended-sediment and dissolved-constituent loads from the New River dominate the water quality in the National River and Recreation Area. The suspended sediment can impart a highly turbid and aesthetically displeasing appearance to the water during low-flow periods which are times of maximum recreational use. High suspended-sediment concentrations are also potentially harmful to the aquatic habitat in the Recreation Area. In addition to the suspended-sediment load, a large supply of coarse material is slowly moving through the channels of the New River basin toward the Recreation Area.

  16. Hydrology and water quality in the Green River and surrounding agricultural areas near Green River in Emery and Grand Counties, Utah, 2004-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerner, S.J.; Spangler, L.E.; Kimball, B.A.; Wilberg, D.E.; Naftz, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Water from the Colorado River and its tributaries is used for municipal and industrial purposes by about 27 million people and irrigates nearly 4 million acres of land in the Western United States. Water users in the Upper Colorado River Basin consume water from the Colorado River and its tributaries, reducing the amount of water in the river. In addition, application of water to agricultural land within the basin in excess of crop needs can increase the transport of dissolved solids to the river. As a result, dissolved-solids concentrations in the Colorado River have increased, affecting downstream water users. During 2004-05, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, investigated the occurrence and distribution of dissolved solids in water from the agricultural areas near Green River, Utah, and in the adjacent reach of the Green River, a principle tributary of the Colorado River. The flow-weighted concentration of dissolved solids diverted from the Green River for irrigation during 2004 and 2005 was 357 milligrams per liter and the mean concentration of water collected from seeps and drains where water was returning to the river during low-flow conditions was 4,170 milligrams per liter. The dissolved-solids concentration in water from the shallow part of the ground-water system ranged from 687 to 55,900 milligrams per liter. Measurable amounts of dissolved solids discharging to the Green River are present almost exclusively along the river banks or near the mouths of dry washes that bisect the agricultural areas. The median dissolved-solids load in discharge from the 17 drains and seeps visited during the study was 0.35 ton per day. Seasonal estimates of the dissolved-solids load discharging from the study area ranged from 2,800 tons in the winter to 6,400 tons in the spring. The estimate of dissolved solids discharging from the study area annually is 15,700 tons. Water samples collected from selected sites within

  17. Occurrence of Blastocystis in Water of Two Rivers from Recreational Areas in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ithoi, Init; Jali, Azman; Mak, J. W.; Wan Sulaiman, Wan Yusoff; Mahmud, Rohela

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the occurrence of Blastocystis in water from two rivers, Sungai Congkak and Sungai Batu, located in recreational areas in Malaysia. This protozoan was detected in samples from both rivers with an average of 33.3% and 22.1%, respectively. It was detected highest at the downstream (73.8% and 33.8%) followed by midstream (17.5% and 25.0%) and upstream (8.8% and 7.5%) stations, with additionally higher detection during holidays (with average 47.5% and 30.8%) than week days (with average 19.2% and 13.3%), in both rivers, respectively. There was a strong association with the daily activities of locals and visitors, who came for water recreational activities, mainly located between midstream and downstream and was observed to be higher at Sungai Congkak. The detection of Blastocystis in these rivers' water implies that this protozoan could potentially be transmitted to humans by the waterborne route. Pearson correlation analysis showed that their occurrence was significantly correlated with faecal coliforms count; inconsistent correlation with dissolved oxygen, temperature and turbidity and no correlation with pH, conductivity and rainfall for both rivers. The correlation of coliforms and Blastocystis suggests the source of the Blastocystis in the water body is likely to be faecal. PMID:21772980

  18. Occurrence of blastocystis in water of two rivers from recreational areas in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ithoi, Init; Jali, Azman; Mak, J W; Wan Sulaiman, Wan Yusoff; Mahmud, Rohela

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the occurrence of Blastocystis in water from two rivers, Sungai Congkak and Sungai Batu, located in recreational areas in Malaysia. This protozoan was detected in samples from both rivers with an average of 33.3% and 22.1%, respectively. It was detected highest at the downstream (73.8% and 33.8%) followed by midstream (17.5% and 25.0%) and upstream (8.8% and 7.5%) stations, with additionally higher detection during holidays (with average 47.5% and 30.8%) than week days (with average 19.2% and 13.3%), in both rivers, respectively. There was a strong association with the daily activities of locals and visitors, who came for water recreational activities, mainly located between midstream and downstream and was observed to be higher at Sungai Congkak. The detection of Blastocystis in these rivers' water implies that this protozoan could potentially be transmitted to humans by the waterborne route. Pearson correlation analysis showed that their occurrence was significantly correlated with faecal coliforms count; inconsistent correlation with dissolved oxygen, temperature and turbidity and no correlation with pH, conductivity and rainfall for both rivers. The correlation of coliforms and Blastocystis suggests the source of the Blastocystis in the water body is likely to be faecal. PMID:21772980

  19. DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.E.; Janecek, L.L.

    1997-08-31

    Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site`s total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside.

  20. [Spatiotemporal differentiation of land cover change and grassland degradation pattern in Yangtze River headwaters area].

    PubMed

    Guo, Luo; Du, Shi-Hong; Xue, Da-Yuan; Cai, Liang

    2012-05-01

    Based on field survey data, remote sensing images and statistical data, this paper analyzed the spatiotemporal differentiation of land use and grassland degradation patterns in Yangtze River headwaters area in 1987-2007, and discussed the main natural factors (elevation, position and slope) leading to the changes of this area's grassland ecological environment. In 1987-2007, the fragmentation of this area' s landscape patterns had an increasing trend, and natural environment and climate change were the main driving forces of land use pattern change. There existed significant differences in the areas of grassland degradation at different altitudes. Grassland degradation mainly occurred at altitudes 4800-5100 m. The grassland degradation area tended to increase with increasing elevation, and the proportions of the degradation area varied greatly over different slopes and aspects. The climate in the study area became warm and dry, and the spatial structure of regional land cover changed obviously. The distribution patterns of grassland degradation at different elevation, position and slope coincided with alpine environment and human disturbances, suggesting that alpine environment and climatic change were the decisive factors to the grassland ecosystem pattern in Yangtze River headwaters area. PMID:22919830

  1. Nitrogen and Sediment Inputs to the San Pedro River Riparian Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, M.; Huth, A. K.; Hamblen, J.; Villinski, J.; Grimm, N.; Lewis, D.; Schade, J.

    2002-05-01

    The San Pedro River in southern Arizona is the last undammed major river in the Western U.S. The riparian habitat along the upper San Pedro is under pressure due to competing water use by nearby agriculture and municipal demands. Numerous nongovernmental organizations and government agencies are cooperating to investigate the functioning of the riparian area, including water and nutrient cycling. The multi-institutional NSF Science and Technology Center for Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA) is using two 500-m study sites along the upper San Pedro River (one gaining and one losing-intermittent) to investigate nutrient and sediment fluxes. Sampling of over 80 shallow piezometers installed in the stream, in gravel bars and in riparian terraces (among cottonwoods and willows) showed nitrate levels were highest in the riparian terrace and gravel bars throughout the year. Nitrate levels in shallow stream piezometers were lower and more variable. Seasonal algal blooms were correlated with decreases in nitrate and organic nitrogen in the stream channel. Intensive sampling during a 300 cfs flood (July 17-18, 2001) in the intermittant-losing reach showed significant increases in nitrate levels during the storm, apparently from the gravel bars and riparian terrace. Hydrograph separation indicated a substantial fraction of the water in the river had been in contact with the river banks. During storm events, substantial sediment transport occurs, as well as scour and fill. As much of the nitrogen cycling in microbially controlled, sediment scour and fill is being monitored concomitantly with respiration measurements in a meander point bar in the losing-intermittant reach. By focusing on key processes in the shallow stream sediments, gravel bars and riparian terraces, we are establishing linkages between the different zones of the riparian area in order to characterize nitrogen uptake capacity of the riparian system.

  2. Method Study of Flood Hazard Analysis for Plain River Network Area, Taihu Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HAN, C.; Liu, S.; Zhong, G.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Flood is one of the most common and serious natural calamities. Taihu Basin is located in delta region of the Yangtze River in East China (see Fig. 1). Because of the abundant rainfall and low-lying terrain, the area frequently suffers from flood hazard which have caused serious casualty and economic loss. In order to reduce the severe impacts of floods events, numerous polder areas and hydraulic constructions (including pumps, water gates etc.) were constructed. Flood Hazard Map is an effective non-structural flood mitigation tool measures. Numerical simulation of flood propagation is one of the key technologies of flood hazard mapping. Because of the complexity of its underlying surface characteristics, numerical simulation of flood propagation was faced with some special problems for the plain river network area in Taihu Basin. In this paper, a coupled one and two dimensional hydrodynamic model was established. Densely covered and interconnected river networks, numerous polder areas and complex scheduling hydraulic constructions were generalized in the model. The model was proved to be believable and stable. Based on the results of the simulation of flood propagation, flood hazard map was compiled.

  3. Assessing and Understanding Trail Degradation: Results from Big South Fork National River and Recreational Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.; Olive, N.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes results from a comprehensive assessment of resource conditions on a large (24%) sample of the trail system within Big South Fork National River and Recreational Area (BSF). Components include research to develop state-of-knowledge trail impact assessment and monitoring methods, application of survey methods to BSF trails, analysis and summary of results, and recommendations for trail management decision making and future monitoring. Findings reveal a trail system with some substantial degradation, particularly soil erosion, which additionally threatens water quality in areas adjacent to streams and rivers. Factors that contribute to or influence these problems are analyzed and described. Principal among these are trail design factors (trail topographic position, soil texture, grade and slope alignment angle), use-related factors (type and amount of use), and maintenance factors (water drainage). Recommendations are offered to assist managers in improving the sustainability of the trails system to accommodate visitation while enhancing natural resource protection.

  4. Valuing nature-based recreation in public natural areas of the Apalachicola River region, Florida.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Ram K; Stein, Taylor V; Clark, Julie

    2007-12-01

    As more people visit natural areas for tourism and recreation purposes, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the value they place on these natural resources. Specifically, tourists to Florida have been increasingly interested in visiting natural areas, forests, parks, and preserves-highlighting the importance of this new and growing phenomenon. We analyze visitors' demand for nature-based recreation in the Apalachicola River region of Florida using the travel cost method. The results from a count data regression model reveal that on average visitors would pay 74.18 dollars per visit-day for nature-based recreation resulting in a total economic value of 484.56 million dollars attributable to nature-based recreation in the Apalachicola River region. Results of this study provide useful information for natural resources management in the region and a rationale to preserve Florida's unique ecosystems. PMID:17275161

  5. Radiocarbon of dissolved humic substances in river waters from the Chernobyl area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Seiya; Aramaki, Takafumi; Fujitake, Nobuhide; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Tkachenko, Yuri

    2004-08-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) was used to study the origin and transport of aquatic humic substances in river waters at the Chernobyl area, which received a pulse input of 14C as a consequence of the nuclear accident. Water samples were collected in April 1999 from the Pripyat and Sakhan Rivers, which flow through the radioactive contaminated area (30 km exclusion zone). The Δ14C values of humic and fulvic acids ranged from -68‰ to +75‰ and were ∼400‰ lower than those of non-contaminated environments. The aquatic humic substances may be derived mainly from those of bog, peat, and podzolic soil with older 14C age, and thereby reflect a larger proportion of older groundwater humic substances. Contribution of 14C by the Chernobyl accident appears to be small because of the long residence time of organic carbon at the surface soil.

  6. Geohydrologic reconnaissance of Lake Mead National Recreation Area; Las Vegas Wash to Virgin River, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laney, R.L.; Bales, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    This study is the last of a series of eight geohydrologic reconnaissance studies that were done in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. The studies were done to evaluate the water resources in the recreation area and to identify areas having potential for the development of water supplies that would be adequate for marinas and campgrounds. The study area includes about 250 square miles north of Lake Mead from Las Vegas Wash to the Virgin River (Overton Arm), Nevada. Volcanic rocks, consolidated sedimentary rocks, and unconsolidated to semiconsolidated sedimentary rocks underlie the area. Surface-water sources include the Colorado River, Virgin River, Muddy River, and Las Vegas Wash. Elsewhere in the area, streamflow is meager and extremely variable. Ground water originates from four sources: (1) subsurface flow in local basins, (2) infiltration of water from Lake Mead into permeable rocks near the lake, (3) subsurface flow in valleys of perennial streams, and (4) subsurface flow in consolidated rocks of the Muddy Mountains. The quantity of water from Lake Mead that has saturated rocks adjacent to the lake probably is greater than the quantity of ground water from all the Other sources. Rocks saturated by water from the lake probably extend less than 0.5 mileinland from the lake shore. The quality of virtually all the ground water in the area is not acceptable for drinking purposes. The most favorable areas for obtaining ground water are those underlain by the coarse-grained deposits of the older alluvium and the younger alluvium adjacent to Lake Mead. The least favorable areas are those underlain by the mudstone facies of the Muddy Creek Formation and fine-grained rocks of the Horse Spring Formation. Four areas identified as having potential for ground-water development are (1) near Overton Beach, (2) west of Callville Bay, (3) near Middle Point, and (4) in the lower Moapa Valley. Usable quantities of water probably can be obtained at these sites, but the

  7. Scientific information in support of water resource management of the Big River area, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, David S.; Masterson, John P.; Robinson, Keith W.; Crawley, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    For nearly two decades, the RIWRB has conducted a series of cooperative studies with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The goals of these studies have been to (1) evaluate and characterize the water resources of the BRMA and the greater Big River area, and (2) identify sustainable levels of groundwater use that would minimize effects on water resources. This fact sheet describes the major findings of those studies.

  8. 33 CFR 165.1337 - Regulated Navigation Area, Zidell Waterfront Property, Willamette River, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuing to 45°30′8.83″ N/122°40′3.81″ W; thence continuing to 45°30′13.06″ N/122°40′5.39″ W; thence... the regulated navigation area established by this section. See 33 CFR part 165, subpart B, for... Waterfront Property, Willamette River, OR. 165.1337 Section 165.1337 Navigation and Navigable Waters...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1337 - Regulated Navigation Area, Zidell Waterfront Property, Willamette River, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuing to 45°30′8.83″ N/122°40′3.81″ W; thence continuing to 45°30′13.06″ N/122°40′5.39″ W; thence... the regulated navigation area established by this section. See 33 CFR part 165, subpart B, for... Waterfront Property, Willamette River, OR. 165.1337 Section 165.1337 Navigation and Navigable Waters...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1337 - Regulated Navigation Area, Zidell Waterfront Property, Willamette River, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuing to 45°30′8.83″ N/122°40′3.81″ W; thence continuing to 45°30′13.06″ N/122°40′5.39″ W; thence... the regulated navigation area established by this section. See 33 CFR part 165, subpart B, for... Waterfront Property, Willamette River, OR. 165.1337 Section 165.1337 Navigation and Navigable Waters...

  11. 78 FR 29648 - Regulated Navigation Area; Waldo-Hancock Bridge Demolition, Penobscot River, Between Prospect and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ...The United States Coast Guard is establishing a regulated navigation area (RNA) on the navigable waters of the Penobscot River between Prospect and Verona, ME, under and surrounding the Waldo- Hancock Bridge in order to facilitate the removal of the trusses, cables, and towers of the Waldo-Hancock Bridge. This temporary final rule (TFR) is necessary to provide for the safety of life on the......

  12. Proposal to market Provo River Project power, Salt Lake City area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This report is an environmental assessment of the Western Area Power Administrations`s proposal to change the way in which the power produced by the Provo River Project (PRP) is marketed. The topics of the report include the alternatives to the proposed action that have been considered, a description of the environmental consequences of the proposed action and the alternatives that were considered, and other environmental considerations.

  13. Columbia River : Select Area Fishery Evaluation project : 1995-96 Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

    1998-06-01

    Water quality monitoring was conducted from November 1994 through October 1996 at five Oregon and three Washington select area study sites in the lower Columbia River. Physicochemical monitoring and aquatic biomonitoring programs were established to profile baseline parameters at each study site and document differences between study sites. Data collected at study sites where fish rearing operations were initiated indicate a potential negative impact on the surrounding benthic invertebrate communities.

  14. Bedform morphology of salmon spawning areas in a large gravel-bed river

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2007-05-01

    While the importance of river channel morphology to salmon spawning habitat is increasingly recognized, quantitative measures of the relationships between channel morphology and habitat use are lacking. Such quantitative measures are necessary as management and regulatory agencies within the Pacific Northwestern region of the USA, and elsewhere, seek to quantify potential spawning habitat and develop recovery goals for declining salmon populations. The objective of this study was to determine if fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas in the Snake River, Idaho, USA, were correlated with specific bed form types at the pool-riffle scale. A bed form differencing technique was used to objectively quantify the longitudinal riverbed profile into four distinct pool-riffle units that were independent of discharge. The vertical location of thalweg points within these units was quantified with a riffle proximity index. Chinook salmon spawning areas were mapped and correlated with the pool-riffle units through the use of cross-tabulation tables. The results indicate that 84% of fall Chinook salmon spawning areas were correlated with riffles (Chi-square=152.1, df=3, p<0.001), with 53% of those areas located on the upstream side of riffle crests. The majority of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning occurred at a vertical location within 80% of the nearest riffle crest elevation. The analyses of bed form morphology will assist regional fish mangers in quantifying existing and potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, and will provide a quantitative framework for evaluating general ecological implications of channel morphology in large gravel-bed rivers.

  15. Evaluation and assessment of water quality in Likangala River and its catchment area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidya, R. C. G.; Sajidu, S. M. I.; Mwatseteza, J. F.; Masamba, W. R. L.

    Likangala is one of the perennial rivers in Malawi that flow into a closed Lake Chilwa, a designated wetland ratified by Ramsar Convention in 1997. Earlier work conducted on this river revealed considerable social-economic activities at riverbanks resulting in indiscriminate disposal of wastes. This study intended to evaluate water quality in Likangala River and its catchment area. Water samples were collected thrice (dry, early rainy and mid rainy seasons) and tested for major physico-chemical and microbiological parameters. The EC, pH, and selected ions ( NO3-, PO43-, Na +, K +, Mg 2+, and Ca 2+) were analysed in soil samples obtained in crop fields along the river banks. Elevated EC levels (>1035.00 μS/cm) were measured during mid rainy season at site S15 (Zomba Sewage Works), near and in the lake. Most of the water samples (86%, n = 28) registered phosphate levels above 1.50 mg/L during mid rainy season with a maximum value (10.70 ± 0.01 mg/L) at site S15. Lower amounts (<0.05 mg/L) of Pb 2+, Cd 2+, Cr 3+, Zn 2+ and Mn 2+ were measured at few sites, while Cu 2+ and Ni 2+ were all below detection limits. The water was classified as soft (0-75 mg/L CaCO 3) to moderately hard (75-150 mg/L CaCO 3). The total and fecal coliform counts above the World Health Organisation (2008) and Malawi Bureau of Standards (2005) limits (0 cfu/100 ml) at some sites signified that the water is unsuitable for human consumption without treatment. The study showed that the river is fairly polluted, the effects being significant in the urban area, near and in the lake. This calls for awareness campaigns aiming at behavioural change and integrated control of water, land use and waste management in order to prevent escalation of the effects.

  16. Water quality assessment of the Asata River catchment area in Enugu Metropolis, Southeast Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinowo, Olawale Olakunle

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogeochemical mapping of the Asata River Catchment area in the Enugu metropolis, southeast Nigeria was carried out in order to assess the quality of the surface and groundwater and based on the analyses of the hydrogeochemical data, establish the level of chemical contaminations which inhibit the availability of potable water in the area. Forty (40) water samples comprising five (5) springs, nineteen (19) surface (streams/rivers) and sixteen (16) groundwater (well/borehole) samples were collected and analysed for the presence and degree of contamination of nine (9) major chemical contaminants. Hydrochemical analyses indicate that Electrical Conductivity (EC) which has a linear relationship with Total Dissolved Solid (TDS) ranges between 015 and 887 μS/cm, pH between 4.4 and 8.3, nitrate (NO3-) ranges between 40 and 130 mg/l and chloride (Cl-) between 7 and 130 mg/l. The concentrations of the dissolved chemical constituents defined the pollution trend and the rate of dispersion of contaminants. The degree of contaminants followed a simple trend, where the level of contamination of the dissolved chemical constituents is least in sampled spring water, with measured chemical constituents of EC, pH, NO3- and Cl- range from 15 to 354 μS/cm; 6.4-6.5; 4.0-70 mg/l and 8-36 mg/l, respectively. However, the value of the measured chemical constituent of EC, pH, NO3- and Cl- gradually increases down the stream in both the surface (63-354 μS/cm; 4.5-7.7; 7.1-110 mg/l; 8-41 mg/l) and groundwater (56-531 μS/cm; 4.5-7.5; 40-130 mg/l; 7-130 mg/l), respectively. Noticeable peaks in contamination levels characterised sections of the study area where human population or their activities is highest. The result of the hydrogeochemical mapping indicate that Enugu coal mine operation, the industrial activities, fertilizer applied to plants cultivated on river banks and domestic human wastes which are indiscriminately dumped along river channels are the major sources of chemical

  17. The influence of the macro-sediment from the mountainous area to the river morphology in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. C.; Wu, C.; Shih, P.

    2012-12-01

    Chen, Su-Chin scchen@nchu.edu.tw Wu, Chun-Hung* chwu@mail.nchu.edu.tw Dept. Soil & Water Conservation, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan. The Chenyulan River was varied changed with the marco-sediment yielded source area, Shenmu watershed, with 10 debris flow events in the last decade, in Central Taiwan. Multi-term DEMs, the measurement data of the river topographic profile and aerial photos are adopted to analyze the decade influences of the marco-sediment to the river morphology in Chenyulan River. The changes of river morphology by observing the river pattern, calculating the multi-term braided index, and estimating the distribution of sediment deposition and main channel in the river. The response for the macro-sediment from the mountainous areas into the river in the primary stage is the increase in river width, the depth of sediment deposition and volume of sediment transport. The distribution of sediment deposition from upstream landslide and river bank erosion along the river dominates the change of river morphology in the primary stage. The river morphology achieves stable gradually as the river discharge gradually decreases in the later stage. Both of the braided index and the volume of sediment transport decrease, and the river flow maintains in a main channel instead of the braided pattern in this stage. The decade sediment deposition depth is estimated as > 0.5 m, especially > 3.5 m in the sections closed to the sediment-yield source areas, the mean river width increases 15%, and the sediment with a total volume of 8×107 tons has been transported in last decade in Chenyulan River. The river morphology in Chenyulan River maintains a short-term stable, i.e. 2 or 3 years, and changes again because of the flooding events with a large amount of sediment caused by frequently heavy rainfall events in Taiwan. Furthermore, the response of river morphology in Chenyulan River due to the heavy rainfall with a total precipitation of around 860 mm

  18. Preconstruction and simulated postconstruction ground-water levels at urban centers in the Red River Navigation Project area, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Red River Valley in Louisiana is 3 to 10 miles wide and is underlain by the Red River alluvial aquifer. This aquifer is in hydraulic connection with the Red River. Precipitation infiltrates the aquifer and water discharges from the aquifer at the Red River and major tributaries. Construction of locks and dams along the Red River will cause new, higher minimum stages for the river for each of the pools. Water levels will rise and outflow from the alluvial aquifer to the river after construction of the locks and dams will be at higher elevations because of the new river stages. Mathematical models of the stream-aquifer system simulate the effects of the lock and dam system for plan B-3, modified. Water-level changes in the aquifer in response to the changes imposed by the system are greatest near the river and are progressively smaller away from the river. The saturated zone in the fine-grained material overlying the aquifer provides the principal potential impact on structures and vegetation in urban areas. As water levels in the aquifer rise, the saturated zone above the aquifer will decrease the thickness. The soil zone in low areas in some communities will be waterlogged. (USGS)

  19. Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, John N.; Dresel, P. Evan; Conrad, Mark E.; Patton, Gregory W.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2010-12-01

    A portion of the subsurface contamination at the Hanford Site, the former plutonium production facility in Washington State, affects the Columbia River. A component of this contamination, uranium (U), has variable isotopic composition due to nuclear industrial processes carried out at the site. This characteristic makes it possible to use high-precision isotopic measurements of U in environmental samples to identify even trace levels of contaminant U, determine its sources, and estimate discharge rates. Our data on river water samples indicate that as much as 3.2 kg/day can enter the Columbia River from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site, which is only a small fraction of the total load of dissolved natural background U carried by the Columbia River. This very low–level contamination can be discerned, despite further dilution to <1% of natural background U, as far as 350 km downstream from the Hanford Site. These results indicate that isotopic methods can allow the amounts of U contamination from the Hanford Site to be measured accurately enough to ascertain where they are an environmental concern, and where they are insignificant.

  20. Identifying the breeding areas of locusts in the Yellow River estuary using Landsat ETM+ imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingsheng; Liu, Gaohuan; Yang, Yuzhen; Liu, Peng; Huang, Jianjie

    2006-03-01

    The Yellow River Estuary became an important plague region of locusts because of its special geographic location. Many years' survey data showed that the environment was the chief factor that influenced locust pest occurring. In the recent years, because the amount of water from the Yellow River and precipitation reduced and distributed asymmetrically, and soil salinization became serious much more, and many farmlands went out of cultivation, which improved the habitats for locusts, the plague of locusts happened frequently under condign climate. The field survey data from 1991 to 2000 showed that the plague of locust became more aggravating year after year. Therefore, it is important to monitor and control the plague of locusts. According to many years' investigation data analysis, got the condign habitat conditions for Locusta Migratoria Manilensis (Meyen) in the Yellow River Estuary. So the breeding areas of locusts monitoring with remote sensing imagery was to identify those regions according to the condign habitat conditions. Landsat ETM+ imagery (2000-05-02) data was chosen to identify the breeding areas of locusts in the Yellow River Estuary. Firstly classified Landsat TM imagery (2000-5-2) and extract reed lands and lawn lands and slightly salinized soils. Secondly made mask images through transforming these three raster classes into vector layers, then calculated a anti-atmospheric visible light vegetation index VARIg = (B2-B3)/(B2+B3-B1). According to field investigation data of vegetation fractional cover in 2000, got the relationship between vegetation fractional cover and VARIg values, 70% to 3.0, 50% to 2.3. As a result, the infrequent areas were where VARIg values were great than 3.0, and the moderate areas were where VARIg values were between 2.3 and 3.0, and frequent areas were where VARIg values were under 2.3. According to statistical analysis, the infrequent areas were percent 10 of the lands that have the condign soil salt content for locust

  1. Transfer of Cadmium from Soil to Vegetable in the Pearl River Delta area, South China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huihua; Chen, Junjian; Zhu, Li; Yang, Guoyi; Li, Dingqiang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regional Cadmium (Cd) concentration levels in soils and in leaf vegetables across the Pearl River Delta (PRD) area; and reveal the transfer characteristics of Cadmium (Cd) from soils to leaf vegetable species on a regional scale. 170 paired vegetables and corresponding surface soil samples in the study area were collected for calculating the transfer factors of Cadmium (Cd) from soils to vegetables. This investigation revealed that in the study area Cd concentration in soils was lower (mean value 0.158 mg kg−1) compared with other countries or regions. The Cd-contaminated areas are mainly located in west areas of the Pearl River Delta. Cd concentrations in all vegetables were lower than the national standard of Safe vegetables (0.2 mg kg−1). 88% of vegetable samples met the standard of No-Polluted vegetables (0.05 mg kg−1). The Cd concentration in vegetables was mainly influenced by the interactions of total Cd concentration in soils, soil pH and vegetable species. The fit lines of soil-to-plant transfer factors and total Cd concentration in soils for various vegetable species were best described by the exponential equation (), and these fit lines can be divided into two parts, including the sharply decrease part with a large error range, and the slowly decrease part with a low error range, according to the gradual increasing of total Cd concentrations in soils. PMID:25247431

  2. Baseline water-quality characteristics of the Alaska Army National Guard Stewart River Training Area near Nome, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, Josh D.

    2005-01-01

    The Alaska Army National Guard Stewart River Training Area is approximately 23 miles north of Nome on the Seward Peninsula in northwest Alaska. The Stewart River Training Area encompasses much of the Stewart River Basin and a small part of the Snake River Basin. Hydrologic, water-quality, and physical-habitat data were collected at seven surface-water sites within the Stewart River Training Area during the summer runoff months (late-May to early-September) in 2004. Two of the sampling sites selected for this study were on the main stem Stewart River, one at the upstream boundary and one at the downstream boundary of the training area. Continuous hydrologic, precipitation, and water temperature data were collected at these two sites throughout the summer of 2004. Three pond sites, along the upper, middle, and lower reaches of the Stewart River within the training area, were each sampled twice during the summer of 2004 for analysis of water-quality constituents. Two tributaries to the Snake River Basin, Goldbottom Creek and North Fork Snake River, within the Stewart River Training Area boundary, also were sampled twice during the summer of 2004. Water-quality data collected from the Stewart River at the upstream and downstream study sites indicate similar constituent concentrations. Concentrations of most water-quality constituents collected during the summer of 2004 did not exceed standards for drinking water or recreational contact. Analysis of trace-element concentrations in bed sediment samples indicate the threshold effect concentration (below which no adverse effects on organisms is expected) was exceeded for arsenic, chromium, and nickel concentrations at all sample sites within the Stewart River Training Area and cadmium, copper, zinc, and lead concentrations were found to exceed the threshold effect concentration in varying degrees at the sample sites. The probable effect concentration (above which toxic effects on organisms is likely) was exceeded by

  3. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic flood modelling for populated valley areas of Russian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, V. V.; Krylenko, I. N.; Alabyan, A. M.; Sazonov, A. A.; Glotko, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    Results of flood modelling for three cities located in different parts of Russia: (1) Veliky Ustyug at the Northern Dvina river (Europe); (2) Mezhdurechensk at the Tom river (Siberia); and (3) Blagoveschensk at the Amur river (Far East) are presented. The two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of flow in channels and on floodplain STREAM_2D on the basis of the numerical solution of two-dimensional Saint-Venant equations on a hybrid curvilinear quadrangular and rectangular mesh was used for the simulations. Verification of the model through a comparison of simulated inundated areas with outlines of flooded zones from satellite images for known hydrologic situations demonstrate close correspondence (relative errors of 7-12% in terms of the area for peaks of the analysed floods). Analyses of embankment influence of large-scale levees on the water flow demonstrate that, in some cases, water levels could rise by more than 1 m and the patterns of the flooding zones could significantly differ.

  4. BRADWELL BAY WILDERNESS AND THE SOPCHOPPY RIVER WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, FLORIDA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cameron, Cornelia C.; Mory, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    A survey to determine the mineral-resource potential, especially for oil, phosphate, fuller's earth, sand, and peat, was conducted in the Bradwell Bay Wilderness and the Sopchoppy River Wilderness Study Area, Florida. On the basis of this survey, the entire area was concluded to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources except the commodity peat. Approximately 136,000 tons of demonstrated peat resources, on a dry weight basis, are available in areas of substantiated peat resource potential from bay swamps in the area, but the deposits are shallow and widespread. Large quantities of quartz sand are available in ancient beach ridges and in deposits that were originally laid down in a shallow nearshore marine environment.

  5. Locations and areas of ponds and Carolina Bays at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, J.D.; Woody, N.D.; Dicks, A.S.; Hollod, G.J.; Schalles, J.; Leversee, G.J.

    1982-05-01

    The Savannah River Plant has 28 ponds and 190 Carolina Bays on its 192,000-acreite. Excluding the Par Pond system, the mean pond area is 17.6 acre, with a range of 0.4 to 202.8 acres. Par Pond is the largest pond, with an area of 2500 acres. The mean Carolina Bay area is 6.6 acres, with a range of less than 0.3 to 124.0 acres. The geographical location of each pond and bay has been digitized and can be graphically displayed by computer. This capability will facilitate identification of wetland areas as required by Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands, May 24, 1977).

  6. Investigation of seasonal river-aquifer interactions in a tropical coastal area controlled by tidal sand ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, H.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2014-08-01

    Water exchanges between streams and aquifers influence the quantity and quality of water in both domains. Seasonal river-aquifer interactions were investigated in a tropical coastal area where tidal sand ridges control river discharge to the sea. The study site is located in southwestern Nicaragua, dominated by humid tropical hydro-climatic conditions. The aquifer provides water to the rural town of Ostional. Connectivity between the river and the aquifer influences water quality and water availability for humans and for the downstream estuarine ecosystem. The effect of stream stage fluctuations on river-aquifer flows and pressure propagation in the adjacent aquifer was investigated analyzing high temporal resolution hydraulic head data and applying a numerical model (HYDRUS 2-D). Tidal sand ridges at the river outlet control the flow direction between the river and the aquifer. Surface water accumulation caused by these features induces aquifer recharge from the river. Simulations show groundwater recharge up to 0.2 m3 h-1 per unit length of river cross section. Rupture of the sand ridges due to overtopping river flows causes a sudden shift in the direction of flow between the river and the aquifer. Groundwater exfiltration reached 0.08 m3 h-1 immediately after the rupture of the sand ridges. Simulated bank storage flows are between 0.004-0.06 m3 h-1. These estimates are also supported by the narrow hysteresis loops between hydraulic heads and river stage. The aquifer behaves as confined, rapidly transmitting pressure changes caused by the river stage fluctuations. However, the pressure wave is attenuated with increasing distance from the river. Therefore, we concluded that a dynamic pressure wave is the mechanism responsible for the observed aquifer responses. Pressure variation observations and numerical groundwater modeling are useful to examine river-aquifer interactions and should be coupled in the future with chemical data to improve process understanding.

  7. Estimating surface water area changes using time-series Landsat data in the Qingjiang River Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhiqiang; Linghu, Bin; Ling, Feng; Li, Wenbo; Tian, Weidong; Wang, Hailei; Gui, Yuanmiao; Sun, Bingyu; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01

    The Qingjiang River Basin, which is 423 km long in the Hubei province, China, is the first large tributary of the Yangtze River below the Three Gorges. The Qingjiang River Basin surface water area monitoring plays an important role in the water resource management strategy and regular monitoring management of the Yangtze River watershed. Hydropower cascade exploitation, which started in 1987, has formed three reservoirs including the Geheyan reservoir, the Gaobazhou reservoir, and the Shuibuya reservoir in the midstream and downstream of the Qingjiang River Basin. They have made a great impact on surface water area changes of the Qingjiang River Basin and need to be taken into account. We monitor the Qingjiang River Basin surface water area changes from 1973 to 2010. Ten scenes from the Multispectral Scanner System (MSS), seven scenes from the Thematic Mapper (TM), and two scenes from the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) remote sensing data of Landsat satellites, the normalized different water index (NDWI), the modified NDWI (MNDWI), and Otsu image segmentation method were employed to quantitatively estimate the Qingjiang River Basin surface water area in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, respectively. The results indicate that the surface water area of the Qingjiang River Basin shows a growing trend with the hydropower cascade development from the 1980s to the first decade of the 21st century. The study concluded the significance of human activities impact on surface water spatiotemporal distribution. Surface water accretion is significant in most parts of the Qingjiang River Basin and might be related to the constructed cascade hydropower dams.

  8. Regional hydrology of the Green River-Moab area, northwestern Paradox basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rush, F.E.; Whitfield, M.S.; Hart, I.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Green River-Moab area encompasses about 7,800 square kilometers or about 25 percent of the Paradox basin. The entire Paradox basin is a part of the Colorado Plateaus that is underlain by a thick sequence of evaporite (salt) beds of Pennsylvanian age. The rock units that underlie the area have been grouped into hydrogeologic units based on their water-transmitting ability. Confining beds consist of evaporite beds of mostly salt, and overlying and underlying thick sequences of rocks with minimal permeability; above and below these confining beds are aquifers. The upper Mesozoic sandstone aquifer, probably is the most permeable hydrogeologic unit of the area and is the subject of this investigation. The principal component of groundwater outflow from this aquifer probably is subsurface flow to regional streams (the Green and Colorado Rivers) and is about 100 million cubic meters per year. All other components of outflow are relatively small. The average annual recharge to the aquifer is about 130 million cubic meters, of which about 20 million cubic meters is from local precipitation. For the lower aquifer, all recharge and discharge probably is by subsurface flow and was not estimated. The aquifers are generally isolated from the evaporite beds by the hounding confining beds; as a result, most ground water has little if any contact with the evaporites. Brines are present in the confining beds, but solution of beds of salt probably is very slow in most parts of the area. No brine discharges' have been identified.

  9. Evaluation of numerical sediment quality targets for the St. Louis River Area of Concern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crane, J.L.; MacDonald, D.D.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Smorong, D.E.; Lindskoog, R.A.; Severn, C.G.; Berger, T.A.; Field, L.J.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical sediment quality targets (SQTs) for the protection of sediment-dwelling organisms have been established for the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC), 1 of 42 current AOCs in the Great Lakes basin. The two types of SQTs were established primarily from consensus-based sediment quality guidelines. Level I SQTs are intended to identify contaminant concentrations below which harmful effects on sediment-dwelling organisms are unlikely to be observed. Level II SQTs are intended to identify contaminant concentrations above which harmful effects on sediment-dwelling organisms are likely to be observed. The predictive ability of the numerical SQTs was evaluated using the matching sediment chemistry and toxicity data set for the St. Louis River AOC. This evaluation involved determination of the incidence of toxicity to amphipods (Hyalella azteca) and midges (Chironomus tentans) within five ranges of Level II SQT quotients (i.e., mean probable effect concentration quotients [PEC-Qs]). The incidence of toxicity was determined based on the results of 10-day toxicity tests with amphipods (endpoints: survival and growth) and 10-day toxicity tests with midges (endpoints: survival and growth). For both toxicity tests, the incidence of toxicity increased as the mean PEC-Q ranges increased. The incidence of toxicity observed in these tests was also compared to that for other geographic areas in the Great Lakes region and in North America for 10- to 14-day amphipod (H. azteca) and 10- to 14-day midge (C. tentans or C. riparius) toxicity tests. In general, the predictive ability of the mean PEC-Qs was similar across geographic areas. The results of these predictive ability evaluations indicate that collectively the mean PEC-Qs provide a reliable basis for classifying sediments as toxic or not toxic in the St. Louis River AOC, in the larger geographic areas of the Great Lakes, and elsewhere in North America.

  10. Ground-Water Geology and Hydrology of the Kern River Alluvial-Fan Area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dale, R.H.; French, James J.; Gordon, G.V.

    1966-01-01

    The Kern River alluvial fan is the southernmost major alluvial fan built by the streams which drain the west side of the Sierra Nevada. The climate is semiarid with rainfall near 5 inches per year. Agricultural development within the area uses over half the 700,000 acre-feet per year flow of the Kern River, plus a considerable amount drawn from the ground-water reservoir particularly during periods of low flow. The area overlies a deep structural trough between crystalline rocks of the Sierra Nevada and the marine rocks of Tertiary age of the Coast Ranges. The top horizon of the marine rocks that lap on the Sierra Nevada block underlies the report area at an average depth of 2,000 feet. The overlying continental deposits that form the groundwater reservoir consist of alluvial-fan and lacustrine deposits. The continental deposits are subdivided into three lithologic units on the basis of grain size and sorting. The gravel and clay unit consists of older alluvial-fan material, of both Sierra Nevada and Coast Range provenance, that shows extremely poor sorting with some diagenetic decomposition through chemical weathering. The fine sand to clay unit consists principally of fine sand, silt, and clay deposited in a lacustrine environment, although some of the unit is of alluvial-fan origin derived from poorly consolidated marine shale of the Coast Ranges. Within the fine sand to clay unit three distinct clays, which affect ground-water conditions, can be recognized. The gravel to medium sand unit consists of unweathered alluvial-fan material that shows much better sorting than the gravel and clay unit. In the eastern part of the area the basal part of this unit is a gravel lentil that can be traced in the subsurface more than 250 square miles. The overlying deposits consist principally of medium sand. In the western part of the area the unit is a heterogeneous gravel and sand unit. Permeability in Meinzer units of the gravel and clay unit ranges between 10 and 100 with

  11. Cumulative effects of restoration efforts on ecological characteristics of an open water area within the Upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, B.R.; Shi, W.; Houser, J.N.; Rogala, J.T.; Guan, Z.; Cochran-Biederman, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Ecological restoration efforts in large rivers generally aim to ameliorate ecological effects associated with large-scale modification of those rivers. This study examined whether the effects of restoration efforts-specifically those of island construction-within a largely open water restoration area of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) might be seen at the spatial scale of that 3476ha area. The cumulative effects of island construction, when observed over multiple years, were postulated to have made the restoration area increasingly similar to a positive reference area (a proximate area comprising contiguous backwater areas) and increasingly different from two negative reference areas. The negative reference areas represented the Mississippi River main channel in an area proximate to the restoration area and an open water area in a related Mississippi River reach that has seen relatively little restoration effort. Inferences on the effects of restoration were made by comparing constrained and unconstrained models of summer chlorophyll a (CHL), summer inorganic suspended solids (ISS) and counts of benthic mayfly larvae. Constrained models forced trends in means or in both means and sampling variances to become, over time, increasingly similar to those in the positive reference area and increasingly dissimilar to those in the negative reference areas. Trends were estimated over 12- (mayflies) or 14-year sampling periods, and were evaluated using model information criteria. Based on these methods, restoration effects were observed for CHL and mayflies while evidence in favour of restoration effects on ISS was equivocal. These findings suggest that the cumulative effects of island building at relatively large spatial scales within large rivers may be estimated using data from large-scale surveillance monitoring programs. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Field survey of pollutants discharged from different types of residential area in the Yamuna River Basin, India.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, A; Sakurai, K; Hiraide, R; Minamiyama, M; Fujiki, O

    2011-01-01

    The Ganges River, one of the most heavily populated and urbanized river basins in Asia, is polluted by increasing wastewater influent and water-borne diseases are caused in the metropolitan area. This study focused on the Yamuna River, a major tributary of the Ganges. We determined the pollutant load per unit of urban area classified by the income of the residents to help design an appropriate sewerage system. In addition, a simple method of estimating runoff pollutant load was examined using data on pollutant load per unit and runoff coefficient. PMID:22156124

  13. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area (RNA): All waters of the Willamette River encompassed by a line commencing at 45°34′.47″ N, 122°45′28″ W along the... regulated area. (2) All vessels transiting or accessing the regulated area shall do so at a no wake speed...

  14. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.150 Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy... beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

  15. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.150 Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy... beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

  16. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.150 Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy... beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

  17. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.150 Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy... beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

  18. Distributions of phosphorus fractions in the sediments of a river-lake system: a case study in Huai River catchment area, China.

    PubMed

    Jingqiu, Piao; Changyuan, Tang; Xianfang, Song

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) forms, with respect to sediment characteristics, and an in-stream sluice were studied in the river-lake system, Huai River catchment area, China. The mean of total P in sediments in the mainstream of the Huai River was higher than that in the Hongze Lake. It was found that P fractions varied in the sediments throughout the river and lake. Detrital-P was the dominant P fraction in the mainstream and organic P and detrital-P were the dominant P fractions in the lake, which could indicate: biologically available and non-biologically available forms. Useful information for the interpretation of P fractions could also be obtained from major sediment characteristics. Whether the relations between P fractions and grain size characteristics were significant or weak, 0.125 mm was a threshold grain size for P fraction distribution in sediment. In addition, the Bengbu Sluice, one of the most important in-stream facilities in the Huai River catchment area, regulated not only the transport of P in sediments upstream and downstream of the sluice, but also the distribution of P fractions in the river-lake system. Therefore, it was confirmed that nutrient loadings could be prevented from reaching the watershed, as well as improved ecological diversity by integrating sluice operation. PMID:26287843

  19. Bajocian ammonoids from Pumani River area (Ayacucho, Peru): Palaeobiogeographical and palaeoenvironmental implications for the Arequipa Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Lopez, Sixto; Carlotto, Victor; Giraldo, Edwin; Chacaltana, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Deposits of the Socosani Formation in the Pucayacu and Pumani sections (Ayacucho Department, Peru), along several kilometres, have yielded Upper Bajocian ammonoid fossil-assemblages characterized by the occurrence of juvenile individuals belonging to endemic or pandemic genera, such as Megasphaeroceras and Spiroceras respectively. In addition, certain Bajocian genera relatively common in the Mediterranean-Caucasian Subrealm, but very scarce in the Eastern Pacific Subrealm, such as the strigoceratid Cadomoceras and the phylloceratid Adabofoloceras, occur in this area. According to the taphonomic, palaeoecological and palaeobiogeographical evidence from the Pumani River area, the maximum deepening, relative sea-level rise and oceanic accessibility of a Bajocian-Bathonian, second-order, transgressive/regressive facies cycle in the marine Arequipa Basin were reached during the Late Bajocian Niortense Biochron. However, synsedimentary regional tectonics in the Pumani River area disturbed this general deepening/shallowing cycle of the Arequipa Basin, particularly during the Late Bajocian post-Niortense time-interval of the Garantiana and Parkinsoni biochrons.

  20. Hydrologic, geologic, and water-quality data, Ochlockonee River basin area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascale, Charles A.; Wagner, Jeffrey R.; Sohm, James E.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents hydrologic, geologic, and water-quality data collected within the Ochlockonee River basin area, in the panhandle of northwest Florida. The data are presented in graphs and tables. Surface-water data include streamflow measurements and analyses of water collected at 58 sites; ground-water data include descriptions of 360 wells and core holes, analyses of water and hydrographs of selected wells, lithologic logs of 131 wells and test borings, and natural-gamma logs of selected wells ranging in depth from 110 to 1,346 feet. Rainfall and municipal pumpage data also are compiled. Maps show the location of the data-collection sites. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  2. Calculation of groundwater discharge to the Columbia River in the 100-N Area

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, T.J.; Newcomer, D.R.; Wurstner, S.K.; Spane, F.A.

    1992-04-01

    A computer code called WATDIS (an acronym for water discharge) was developed that, when used with the commercially available software, WATER-VEL{trademark}, calculates the volumetric discharge to a specific cross-sectional area of the aquifer. This report describes the development of the WATDIS code and its application. The development of this code is Phase 1 of a two-phased project whose objective is to estimate the amounts of radionuclides reaching the Columbia River through the unconfined aquifer as a result of natural'' conditions.

  3. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  4. Reservoir-flooded river mouth areas as sediment traps revealing erosion from peat mining areas - Jukajoki case study in eastern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahvanainen, Teemu; Meriläinen, Henna-Kaisa; Haraguchi, Akira; Simola, Heikki

    2016-04-01

    Many types of soil-disturbing land use have caused excess sedimentation in Finnish lakes. Identification and quantification of catchment sources of sediment material is crucial in cases where demands for remediation measures are considered. We studied recent (50 yr) sediments of four small rivers, all draining to a reservoir impounded in 1971. Catchments of two of the rivers had had peat mining activities from early 1980s until recently, exposing large areas of peat surfaces to erosion. The water level of the reservoir had risen to the river mouth areas of all rivers, while in each case, the river mouth areas still form riverine narrows separable from the main reservoir, hence collecting sedimentation from their own catchments. The original soils under the reservoir water level could readily be observed in core samples, providing a dated horizon under recent sediments. In addition, we used 137Cs-stratigraphies for dating of samples from original river bed locations. As expected, recent sediments of rivers with peat mining influence differed from others e.g. by high organic content and C:N ratios. Stable isotopes 13C and 15N both correlated with C:N (r = 0.799 and r = -0.717, respectively) and they also differentiated the peat-mining influenced samples from other river sediments. Principal components of the physical-chemical variables revealed clearer distinction than any variables separately. Light-microscopy revealed abundance of leafs of Sphagnum mosses in peat-mining influenced river sediments that were nearly absent from other rivers. Spores of Sphagnum were, however, abundant in all river sediments indicating their predominantly airborne origin. We find that combination of several physical-chemical characters rather than any single variable and microscopy of plant remains can result in reliable recognition of peatland-origin of sediment material when non-impacted sites are available for comparison. Dating of disturbed recent sediments is challenging. River

  5. 33 CFR 334.180 - Patuxent River, Md.; restricted areas, U.S. Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (a) Except in the gut off the tip of Point Patience, no person in the water and no craft shall... River between Town Point and Hog Point shoreward of a line described as follows: Beginning at a point on...; thence to a point bearing 130° true, 1,850 yards from Patuxent River Light 8; thence to a piont...

  6. 33 CFR 334.180 - Patuxent River, Md.; restricted areas, U.S. Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (a) Except in the gut off the tip of Point Patience, no person in the water and no craft shall... River between Town Point and Hog Point shoreward of a line described as follows: Beginning at a point on...; thence to a point bearing 130° true, 1,850 yards from Patuxent River Light 8; thence to a piont...

  7. 33 CFR 334.180 - Patuxent River, Md.; restricted areas, U.S. Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) Except in the gut off the tip of Point Patience, no person in the water and no craft shall... River between Town Point and Hog Point shoreward of a line described as follows: Beginning at a point on...; thence to a point bearing 130° true, 1,850 yards from Patuxent River Light 8; thence to a piont...

  8. 33 CFR 334.180 - Patuxent River, Md.; restricted areas, U.S. Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (a) Except in the gut off the tip of Point Patience, no person in the water and no craft shall... River between Town Point and Hog Point shoreward of a line described as follows: Beginning at a point on...; thence to a point bearing 130° true, 1,850 yards from Patuxent River Light 8; thence to a piont...

  9. 33 CFR 334.180 - Patuxent River, Md.; restricted areas, U.S. Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (a) Except in the gut off the tip of Point Patience, no person in the water and no craft shall... River between Town Point and Hog Point shoreward of a line described as follows: Beginning at a point on...; thence to a point bearing 130° true, 1,850 yards from Patuxent River Light 8; thence to a piont...

  10. 33 CFR 165.T01-0876 - Regulated Navigation Area-Weymouth Fore River, Fore River Bridge Construction, Weymouth and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regulations contained in 33 CFR 165.10, 165.11, and 165.13 apply. (2) In accordance with the general... in this rule, the Rules of the Road (33 CFR part 84—Subchapter E, inland navigational rules) are...-Weymouth Fore River, Fore River Bridge Construction, Weymouth and Quincy, MA. 165.T01-0876 Section...

  11. 77 FR 47331 - Regulated Navigation Area-New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac River, Mill River, New Haven, CT; Pearl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms COTP Captain of the Port DHS Department of Homeland Security FR... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... River, Mill River, New Haven, CT; Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge (Interstate 95) Construction...

  12. An Automated Method for Delineating Braided River Water Surface Area from RGB Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, C. J.; Smith, L. C.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Pitcher, L. H.; Balog, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrologic research is increasingly conducted from remote sensing platforms, allowing for efficient, non-contact sampling of hydraulic parameters. In this study, a new method is presented for fully automated delineation of braided river water surfaces from Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) oblique-view RGB camera imagery, enabling rapid calculation of hydraulic parameters such as effective width (inundation area divided by reach length Smith et al., 1995; 1996) and braiding index. The test dataset is 200 high-resolution camera images obtained for the proglacial Isortoq River, southwestern Greenland, in July 2011. First, images are segmented via automated histogram thresholding, a process that also determines which images to reject for poor quality. These quality-screened images then initialize an active contouring (AC) image delineation process using the method of Li et al. (2010). This method seeks to minimize changes in contrast gradients as an initial contour determined by the automated thresholding evolves toward a final, stable solution. Comparison of this coupled thresholding/AC method with traditional supervised classification suggests that supervised classification is superior for low quality images and marginally superior for high quality images. However, this method is time consuming and impractical for long term hydrologic studies with large data volumes. Coupled AC and traditional unsupervised classifications present automated solutions for extracting hydraulic parameters, and AC proved more effective at water surface classification for the river images in this study. Results indicate that an automated solution for image selection and hydraulic parameter calculation for large data volumes can be both accurate and practical. Such a methodology will be useful in numerous hydrologic studies that monitor complex river systems using large data volumes of camera, video, or remotely sensed imagery.

  13. A model to locate potential areas for lake sturgeon spawning habitat construction in the St. Clair–Detroit River System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennion, David; Manny, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    In response to a need for objective scientific information that could be used to help remediate loss of fish spawning habitat in the St. Clair River and Detroit River International Areas of Concern, this paper summarizes a large-scale geographic mapping investigation. Our study integrates data on two variables that many riverine fishes respond to in selecting where to spawn in these waters (water flow velocity and water depth) with available maps of the St. Clair–Detroit River System (SC–DRS). Our objectives were to locate and map these two physical components of fish habitat in the St. Clair and Detroit rivers and Lake St. Clair using a geographic information system (GIS) and to identify where, theoretically, fish spawning habitat could be remediated in these rivers. The target fish species to which this model applies is lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), but spawning reefs constructed for lake sturgeon in this system have been used for spawning by 17 species of fish. Our analysis revealed areas in each river that possessed suitable water velocity and depth for fish spawning and therefore could theoretically be remediated by the addition of rock-rubble substrate like that used at two previously remediated sites in the Detroit River at Belle Isle and Fighting Island. Results of our analysis revealed that only 3% of the total area of the SC–DRS possesses the necessary combination of water depth and high flow velocity to be indicated by the model as potential spawning habitat for lake sturgeon.

  14. Influence of urban area on the water quality of the Campo River basin, Paraná State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, K Q; Lima, S B; Passig, F H; Gusmão, L K; Souza, D C; Kreutz, C; Belini, A D; Arantes, E J

    2015-12-01

    The Campo River basin is located on the third plateau of the Paraná State or trap plateau of Paraná, at the middle portion between the rivers Ivaí and Piquiri, southern Brazil, between the coordinates 23° 53 and 24° 10' South Latitude and 52° 15' and 52° 31' West Longitude. The basin has 384 Km² area, being 247 km² in the municipality of Campo Mourão and 137 km² in the municipality of Peabiru, in Paraná State. The Campo River is a left bank tributary of the Mourão River, which flows into the Ivaí River. The objective of this study was to monitor water quality in the Km 119 River and the Campo River, tributaries of the Mourão River, with monthly collection of water samples to determine pH, temperature, turbidity, biochemical oxygen demand, dissolved oxygen, fecal coliforms, total solids, total nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite, nitrate and total phosphorus. The results obtained were compared with the indices established by the environmental legislation and applied in the determination of the Water Quality Index (WQI) used by the Water Institute of Paraná State, regulating environmental agency. Poor water quality in these rivers presents a worrying scenario for the region, since this river is the main source of water supply for the public system. Results of organic matter, fecal coliforms and total phosphorus were higher than the limits established by Resolution CONAMA 357/2005 to river class 2, specially at downstream of the Km 119 River and the Campo River, due to the significant influence of the urban anthropic activity by the lack of tertiary treatment and also rural by the lack of basic sanitation in this area. Results of WQI of Km 119 River and do Campo River indicated that water quality can be classified as average in 71% and good in 29% of the sites evaluated. PMID:26628235

  15. Chemical analyses of ground water related to geothermal investigations in the Teton River area, eastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crosthwaite, E.G.

    1979-01-01

    Water samples from 31 wells and springs in eastern Idaho and western Wyoming were collected to help evaluate the potential geothermal resources in the Teton River area. Water analyses included anions and cations, oxygen-18, deuterium, and several minor elements. Actual temperature of the thermal waters ranged from 23 to 49C. Estimated aquifer temperatures, as derived from geochemical thermometers, ranged from 45 to 145C based on sodium-potassium-calcium ratios. Using the cation thermometer, two analyses indicated aquifer temperatures lower than actual measured temperatures. Using a mixing model method, estimated temperatures ranged from 205 to 320C, the higher being of questionable value. The different methods used showed little correlation. Based on isotope data, the warm waters may be of local meteoric origin and not heated enough to react significantly with aquifer rocks; or, they originated as precipitation at high altitude and great distance from the area. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. The cost of anaplasmosis in the Red River Plains and south-east areas of Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Morley, R S; Hugh-Jones, M E

    1989-01-01

    Losses from morbidity and mortality due to anaplasmosis were assessed in beef and dairy cattle of the Red River Plains and south-east areas of Louisiana. The cost of treatment and prevention of anaplasmosis and losses in milk production and those due to deaths or culling were valued at $0.5 million for the year 1983 in these two areas. The cost of prevention included the use of tetracyclines in feed and salt-mineral supplements, injectable tetracycline, vaccination and an estimated 10% of the cost of insecticidal ear tags, sprays, pour-on applications and dust bags. The remainder of these costs and the total cost of vector control in dairy cattle was attributed to the control of fly annoyance. Treatment costs included veterinary fees and the owner's treatment costs, including labour costs. PMID:2588475

  17. Safety analysis -- 200 Area Savannah River Plant, F-Canyon Operations. Supplement 4

    SciTech Connect

    Beary, M.M.; Collier, C.D.; Fairobent, L.A.; Graham, R.F.; Mason, C.L.; McDuffee, W.T.; Owen, T.L.; Walker, D.H.

    1986-02-01

    The F-Canyon facility is located in the 200 Separations Area and uses the Purex process to recover plutonium from reactor-irradiated uranium. The irradiated uranium is normally in the form of solid or hollow cylinders called slugs. These slugs are encased in aluminum cladding and are sent to the F-Canyon from the Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor areas or from the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF). This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the F-Canyon operations and is an update to a section of a previous SAR. The previous SAR documented an analysis of the entire 200 Separations Area operations. This SAR documents an analysis of the F-Canyon and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the Savannah River Implementation Plans. A substantial amount of the information supporting the conclusions of this SAR is found in the Systems Analysis. Some F-Canyon equipment has been updated during the time between the Systems Analysis and this SAR and a complete description of this equipment is included in this report. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the F-Canyon can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations and to the environment. In this report, risk is defined as the expected frequency of an accident, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequence in person-rem. The units of risk for radiological dose are person-rem/year. Maximum individual exposure values have also been calculated and reported.

  18. Drainage Area-Dependent Knickpoint Generation Mechanisms, Smith River, northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, D. J.; Kelsey, H. M.

    2011-12-01

    Knickpoints and knickzones (reaches of relatively high gradient located immediately downstream of a knickpoint) are a prominent characteristic of the channel slopes of both mainstem and tributary channels of the 1,575 km2 Smith River drainage in northern California. We have investigated these knickpoints using aerial photos, 10 m and 1 m digital elevation models (DEM's), and NAIP images supplemented by Schmidt hammer rock strength measurements and field verification of channel and terrace elevations using real time kinematic GPS surveys. Two types of knickpoints occur. At higher drainage areas (threshold of greater than ~250 km2), knickpoints occur within rock types with no significant difference in rock strength. There is a distinct upstream convergence of the modern channel with the lowest elevated strath surface along these knickzones, resulting in elevated strath surfaces downstream of the knickzones. We infer that the knickpoints are transient and that the straths are more vertically separated from the modern channel only after the knickpoint has migrated upstream. The causative baselevel fall that generates migrating knickpoints in the Smith River may be eustatic sea level fall following Quaternary highstands. For instance, fluvial terraces are cut into stage 5 marine terraces at the coast and these fluvial terraces likely are generated in the wake of knickpoints migrating upstream. In contrast, at drainage areas less than ~250 km2, the only knickpoints present in channels are those associated with large landslides that mobilize entire hillslopes into the channel, forcing a channel response. Notably absent along the Smith River are any knickpoints associated with changes in rock strength, as measured by Schmidt hammer values. From these observations, we infer that, first, major knickpoints along channels above a threshold drainage area of about 250 km2 are generated by baselevel fall that propagates upstream through channels of varying rock type; and second

  19. Plutonium Surveillance Destructive Examination Requirements at Savannah River National Laboratory for K-Area Interim Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Stefek, T. M.

    2005-09-29

    The DOE 3013 storage standard requires nested, welded 300 series stainless steel containers to store plutonium-bearing materials for up to 50 years. Packaged contents include stabilized plutonium-bearing residues that contain chloride salts and a low (< 0.5 weight %) water content. The DOE 3013 STD requires surveillance of the packages over the 50 year lifetime. These surveillance requirements have been further defined by the Integrated Surveillance Program to include both non-destructive examination (NDE) and destructive examination (DE) of the 3013 container. The DE portion of surveillance involves examining the 3013 nested containers, analyzing the head space gas, and evaluating the plutonium oxide chemistry. At SRS, the stored 3013 containers will undergo preparation for the DE surveillance activities in facilities located in K-Area. The actual DE surveillance will be performed in SRNL. This report provides preliminary functional requirements for the destructive examination (DE) of plutonium-bearing oxide materials and containers in support of K-Area Interim Surveillance (KIS). The KIS project will install interim facilities to prepare the samples for analysis in SRNL. This document covers the requirements for the interim period beginning in 2007, and lasting until the Container Storage and Surveillance Capability (CSSC) project provides the permanent facilities in K-Area to perform sampling and repackaging operations associated with the 3013 container storage and surveillance program. Initial requirements for the CSSC project have been previously defined in WSRC-TR-2004-00584 ''Plutonium Surveillance Destructive Examination Requirements at Savannah River National Laboratory''. As part of the Plutonium Surveillance Program of 3013 Containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) will receive the emptied 3013 container components, plutonium oxide samples and headspace gas samples from K-Area. The DE program scope

  20. Tucannon River Temperature Study, Prepared for : Watershed Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35.

    SciTech Connect

    HDR Engineering.

    2006-06-30

    This report presents the results of a temperature analysis of the Tucannon River completed for the WRIA 35 Planning Unit. The Tucannon River is located in southeastern Washington and flows approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) from the Blue Mountains to the Snake River. High water temperature in the Tucannon River has been identified as a limiting factor for salmonid fish habitat (Columbia Conservation District, 2004). Several segments of the Tucannon River are included on Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) 303(d) list of impaired waterbodies due to temperature. Ecology is currently conducting scoping for a temperature Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) study of the Tucannon River. The WRIA 35 Planning Unit retained HDR Engineering to evaluate water temperature in the Tucannon River. The project objectives are: (1) Review recent and historic data and studies to characterize temperature conditions in the river; (2) Perform field studies and analyses to identify and quantify heating and cooling processes in the river; (3) Develop and calibrate a computer temperature model to determine the sources of heat to the Tucannon River and to predict the temperature of the river that would occur with increased natural riparian shading assuming the current river morphology; (4) Evaluate differences in river temperatures between current and improved riparian shading during the 'critical' period - low river flows and high temperatures; and (5) Determine the potential benefits of riparian shading as a mechanism to decrease river temperature.

  1. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted area. The waters of Severn River shoreward of a line beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

  2. 33 CFR 165.T01-0824 - Regulated Navigation Area; Housatonic River Bridge Replacement Operations; Stratford, CT.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Housatonic River Bridge Replacement Operations; Stratford, CT. 165.T01-0824 Section 165.T01-0824 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  3. 33 CFR 165.T01-1097 - Regulated Navigation Area; Memorial Bridge Construction, Piscataqua River, Portsmouth, NH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Memorial Bridge Construction, Piscataqua River, Portsmouth, NH. 165.T01-1097 Section 165.T01-1097 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  4. 33 CFR 165.T01-1130 - Regulated Navigation Area; S99 Alford Street Bridge rehabilitation project, Mystic River, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; S99 Alford Street Bridge rehabilitation project, Mystic River, MA. 165.T01-1130 Section 165.T01-1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  5. Comparison of benthos and plankton for selected areas of concern and non-areas of concern in western Lake Michigan Rivers and Harbors in 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eikenberry, Barbara C. Scudder; Bell, Amanda H.; Templar, Hayley A.; Burns, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent data are lacking to assess whether impairments still exist at four of Wisconsin’s largest Lake Michigan harbors that were designated as Areas of Concern (AOCs) in the late 1980s due to sediment contamination and multiple Beneficial Use Impairments (BUIs), such as those affecting benthos (macroinvertebrates) and plankton (zooplankton and phytoplankton) communities. During three seasonal sampling events (“seasons”) in May through August 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey collected sediment benthos and water plankton at the four AOCs as well as six less-degraded non-AOCs along the western Lake Michigan shoreline to assess whether AOC communities were degraded in comparison to non-AOC communities. The four AOCs are the Lower Menominee River, the Lower Green Bay and Fox River, the Sheboygan River, and the Milwaukee Estuary. Due to their size and complexity, multiple locations or “subsites” were sampled within the Lower Green Bay and Fox River AOC (Lower Green Bay, the Fox River near Allouez, and the Fox River near De Pere) and within the Milwaukee Estuary AOC (the Milwaukee River, the Menomonee River, and the Milwaukee Harbor) and single locations were sampled at the other AOCs and non-AOCs. The six non-AOCs are the Escanaba River in Michigan, and the Oconto River, Ahnapee River, Kewaunee River, Manitowoc River, and Root River in Wisconsin. Benthos samples were collected by using Hester-Dendy artificial substrates deployed for 30 days and by using a dredge sampler; zooplankton were collected by net and phytoplankton by whole-water sampler. Except for the Lower Green Bay and Milwaukee Harbor locations, communities at each AOC were compared to all non-AOCs as a group and to paired non-AOCs using taxa relative abundances and metrics, including richness, diversity, and an Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI, for Hester-Dendy samples only). Benthos samples collected during one or more seasons were rated as degraded for at least one metric at all AOCs. In the

  6. Variability of rainfall over Lake Kariba catchment area in the Zambezi river basin, Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchuru, Shepherd; Botai, Joel O.; Botai, Christina M.; Landman, Willem A.; Adeola, Abiodun M.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, average monthly and annual rainfall totals recorded for the period 1970 to 2010 from a network of 13 stations across the Lake Kariba catchment area of the Zambezi river basin were analyzed in order to characterize the spatial-temporal variability of rainfall across the catchment area. In the analysis, the data were subjected to intervention and homogeneity analysis using the Cumulative Summation (CUSUM) technique and step change analysis using rank-sum test. Furthermore, rainfall variability was characterized by trend analysis using the non-parametric Mann-Kendall statistic. Additionally, the rainfall series were decomposed and the spectral characteristics derived using Cross Wavelet Transform (CWT) and Wavelet Coherence (WC) analysis. The advantage of using the wavelet-based parameters is that they vary in time and can therefore be used to quantitatively detect time-scale-dependent correlations and phase shifts between rainfall time series at various localized time-frequency scales. The annual and seasonal rainfall series were homogeneous and demonstrated no apparent significant shifts. According to the inhomogeneity classification, the rainfall series recorded across the Lake Kariba catchment area belonged to category A (useful) and B (doubtful), i.e., there were zero to one and two absolute tests rejecting the null hypothesis (at 5 % significance level), respectively. Lastly, the long-term variability of the rainfall series across the Lake Kariba catchment area exhibited non-significant positive and negative trends with coherent oscillatory modes that are constantly locked in phase in the Morlet wavelet space.

  7. Availability of ground water in the Blackstone River area Rhode Island and Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Herbert E.; Dickerman, David C.

    1974-01-01

    The Blackstone River study area covers 83 square miles of northern Rhode Island and 5 square miles of adjacent Massachusetts (fig. 1). It includes parts of the Blackstone, Moshassuck, and Tenmile River basins, and a coastal area that drains to the brackish Seekonk and Providence Rivers. In Rhode Island, all or parts of the suburban towns of Cumberland, Lincoln, North Smithfield, and Smithfield and all or parts of the cities of Central Falls, East Povidence, Pawtucket, Providence, and Woonsocket are within the study area. Also included are parts of the towns Attleboro and North Attleborough in Massachusetts. In 1970, total population was about 240,000, which was equivalent to about one-fourth of the total population of Rhode Island. Fresh water usage in 1970 by public-supply systems and self-supplied industry was about 33 mgd (million gallons per day), which was equal to 22 percent of total fresh water use in Rhode Island for all purposes except generation of electric power (fig. 2). Anticipated increases in population and per capita water requirements are likely to cause the demand for water to more than double within the next 50 years. A significant part of this demand can be met from wells that tap the principal streams. This aquifer yielded an average of 10 mgd in 1970 and is capable of sustaining a much higher yield. The primary objectives of the study were to determine and map the saturated thickness and transmissivity of the stratified-drift aquifer and to assess the potential sustained yield of those parts of the aquifer favorable for large-scale development of water. A secondary objective was to describe ground-water quality and to evaluate the impact of induced infiltration of polluted stream water on the quality of native ground water. This report is based on analysis of drillers' records of more than 700 wells and borings which include 462 lithologic logs; 35 specific-capacity determinations; 12 aquifer tests, including detailed tests at two sites to

  8. Loess-like deposits in the Pearl River delta area, southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Guoneng; Peng, Zhuolun; Grapes, Rodney

    2015-12-01

    A layer of yellow silt is widely distributed in the late Quaternary succession of the Pearl River delta, southeast China. A representative section at Xi Lingang was analyzed using particle size analysis, scanning electron microscope observation, geochemical analysis and OSL dating to determine the characteristics and genesis of the yellow silt. Grain size composition of the yellow silt is homogeneous and comparable to typical north China loess (10-50 μm as "basic grain size group", <5 μm as "secondary grain size group"). Grain size parameters and frequency distribution curves of the yellow silt also indicate an aeolian origin. Aeolian micro-textures with subangular-subrounded grains characterized by dished surface collision pits during wind transportation. Homogeneous major element composition of the yellow silt suggests that the dust has been well mixed and sorted prior to deposition, a typical feature of aeolian origin, but Chemical Index of Alteration values indicate that the yellow silt has suffered intense weathering after deposition. Five OSL dates obtained in this study and other geochronological data indicate that the yellow silt has a Last Glacial Maximum age. The grain size of loess across China becomes finer from northwest to southeast because of increasing transportation distance, and implies that the loess component of the yellow silt in the Pearl River delta area is also derived from a northwest China provenance.

  9. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Brian

    2004-02-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Oxbow Ranch, now know as the Oxbow Conservation Area (OCA). Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. The project during 2003 was crippled due to the aftermath of the BPA budget crisis. Some objectives were not completed during the first half of this contract because of limited funds in the 2003 fiscal year. The success of this property purchase can be seen on a daily basis. Water rights were utilized only in the early, high water season and only from diversion points with functional fish screens. After July 1, all of the OCA water rights were put instream. Riparian fences on the river, Ruby and Granite Boulder creeks continued to promote important vegetation to provide shade and bank stabilization. Hundreds of willow, dogwood, Douglas-fir, and cottonwood were planted along the Middle Fork John Day River. Livestock grazing on the property was carefully managed to ensure the protection of fish and wildlife habitat, while promoting meadow vigor and producing revenue for property taxes. Monitoring of property populations, resources, and management activities continued in 2003 to build a database for future management of this and other properties in the region.

  10. Synoptic Discharge, Water-Property, and pH Measurements for Muddy River Springs Area and Muddy River, Nevada, February 7, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beck, David A.; Wilson, Jon W.

    2006-01-01

    On February 7, 2001, synoptic discharge measurements at selected sites along the Muddy River in Nevada, indicated three trends in discharge resulting from contributions of spring discharge, influences of diversionary flow, and contributions from shallow ground water. Effects from diversionary and tributary flow were local in nature and resulted in a net gain of 2.6 cubic feet per second throughout the measured reach. The minor increase in discharge may be the result of contributions from ground-water flow and measurement error. Comparison of 1963 and 2001 discharge measurements within the Muddy River Springs area indicated that discharge rates and trends from these source waters were similar. Along the mainstem of the Muddy River, water-temperature measurements indicated a net decrease of 8.8 degrees Celsius. Water samples collected and analyzed for specific conductance indicated a net increase of 390 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius, whereas pH measurements remained relatively constant.