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Sample records for charnley total hip

  1. [50 years of total hip prosthesis--a tribute to Prof. Sir John Charnley].

    PubMed

    Mikić, Zelimir Dj; Lesić, Aleksandar R

    2013-01-01

    November 2012 marked the 50th anniversary of the first implantation of a successful and long-lived hip endoprosthesis, which was performed by Prof Sir John Charnley in the "Centre for Hip Surgery" at a small country place in the north-west England. John Charnley (1911-1982) finished medical school at the Victoria University of Manchester in 1935, and than started training in orthopaedics at the Manchester Royal Infirmary, and completed it after the Second World War, in which he served as a volunteer. After that he continued working in the same hospital, and, apart from that he worked as a lecturer at the University of Manchester, and from 1949 as a visiting surgeon in the Wrightington Hospital. In 1958 Charnley decided to put his efforts into the development of hip replacement research and surgery, and initiated the foundation of the "Centre for Hip Surgery" with Biomechanical laboratory in the Wrightington Hospital in 1960, where the intesive basic and clinical research started, and becuase of that Charnley in 1962 left Manchester and moved with a full time practice at the Wrightington Hospital. That period of research time was not easy, there were many "trial and tribulations", but, owing to the tenacity and inventive mind of Charnley, in 1962 a new prosthesis consisting of a cemented metal stem with a 22 mm head articulating with a cemented polyethilene acetabular component, and with a low frictional torque was designed. The first such prosthesis, which later produced excellent long-term results, was implanted on November 22nd, 1962, and today, when we look back over a distance of fifty years, we can conclude that that day could be considered as a beginning of a modem aloarthroplastic surgery, and certainly as one of the greatest orthopaedic advance in the whole of the 20th century; and all that was initiated and promoted by Prof. Sir John Charnley. PMID:24669557

  2. Tribological measurements on a Charnley-type artificial hip joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A total hip simulator was used to determine the friction and wear properties of Charnley-type (316L stainless steel balls and sterile ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene cups) hip prostheses. Three different sets of specimens were tested to 395,000, 101,500 and 233,000 walking cycles, respectively. All tests were run unlubricated, at ambient conditions (22 to 26 C, 30 to 50 percent relative humidity), at 30 walking cycles per minute, under a dynamic load simulating walking. Polyethylene cup wear rates ranged from 1.4 to 39 ten billions cu m which corresponds to dimensional losses of 4.0 to 11 microns per year. Although these wear rates are lower than those obtained from other hip simulators and from in vivo X-ray measurements, they are comparable when taking run-in and plastic deformation into account. Maximum tangential friction forces ranged from 93 to 129 N under variable load (267 to 3090 N range) and from 93 to 143 N under a static load of 3090 N. A portion of one test 250,000 walking cycles) run under dry air ( 1 percent relative humidity) yielded a wear rate almost 6 times greater than that obtained under wet air ( 70 percent relative humidity) conditions.

  3. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Monzón, Daniel Godoy; Iserson, Kenneth V.; Jauregui, José; Musso, Carlos; Piccaluga, Francisco; Buttaro, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to determine the dislocation and reoperation rate, functional outcomes, and the survival rate of the unique subset of very old but lucid and independent patients with hip fractures following a total hip arthroplasty (THA) and geriatric team-coordinated perioperative care. Method: Between 2000 and 2006, previously independent ambulatory patients ≥80 years old presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture were given THAs under the care of an integrated orthopedic surgery–geriatric service. Their fracture-related complications, ambulation, mental status, and survival were followed for 5 to 11 years postinjury. Results: Five years postinjury, 57 (61.3%) patients of the original study group were living. In all, 3 (3.2%) patients had postoperative hip dislocations (and 2 patients had dislocation twice) and 2 reoperations were needed within the first postoperative month. There were no hip dislocations or reoperations after the first year. Radiographs obtained on 88% of the surviving patients at 5 years postoperatively showed that all remained unchanged from their immediate postoperative images. Nearly half of the patients were still able to ambulate as they did preoperatively and their mixed-model equation was statistically unchanged. Conclusion: This study of patients >80 years old with previously good functional status demonstrates that with appropriate surgical (best prosthesis, good operating technique, and regional anesthesia) and geriatric (pre- and postoperative assessments, close follow-up, medication adjustments, and fall-prevention instruction) care, they have few hip dislocations and reoperations, survive postfracture at least as long as their noninjured contemporaries, and continue to function and ambulate as they did prior to their injury. PMID:24660092

  4. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  5. Cementless total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Morscher, E W

    1983-12-01

    The differences between prostheses fixed with and without cement are mainly in the design and nature of the surface implant. The shapes of the sockets to be implanted without cement show a wide variety: cylinder, square, conus, and ellipsoid with and without threads. The hemispheric shape, however, which was chosen for the acetabular component of the isoelastic hip joint, does not disturb the natural form and function of the hip joint since the outer surface is closely adapted to the original subchondral bone layer. The noncemented cup is secured by threads, pegs, screws, etc., and by ingrowth of bony tissue in the grooves of the surfaces. Most femoral stems are based on the self-locking principle. All prosthetic models incorporate attempts to increase the surface of the stem (ribs, wings, corrugations, rims, etc.). There is a tendency to use less rigid elastic implants instead of the well known rigid metallic prostheses. The aim is to overcome the problems of stress protection and stress concentration observed with rigid implants. For the biomechanical integration of an implant, the properties of the surface, especially macroporosity and microporosity, are important. Most European models of noncemented endoprostheses are based on macroporosity (porometal, madreporic, etc.). The increase in implant surface area achieved with macroscopic perforations and recesses is relatively minor compared with the possibilities offered by microporosity ("alumine fritée," Proplast, fiber-metal, etc.). The best indication for use of a cementless hip endoprosthesis is in revision arthroplasty. The lost bone stock is replaced by bone grafts, thereby creating a situation comparable with that of a primary arthroplasty. Clinical experience with noncemented hip endoprostheses is, to date, promising, although the observation time for most models is short. PMID:6357588

  6. Wear of the high-density polyethylene socket in total hip arthroplasty and its role in endosteal cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, B M

    1997-01-01

    High-density polyethylene (HDP) has been used in clinical practice in total hip replacement since its introduction by Charnley in November 1962. Fears are being expressed that this may be the weakest link and the ultimate cause of failure of the arthroplasty. Long-term clinical experience suggests that loosening may be the primary cause while the presence of HDP wear particles is secondary. Healing of endosteal cavities can take place in the presence of HDP wear particles. PMID:9141896

  7. Total hip replacement in dancers.

    PubMed

    Buyls, Inge R A E; Rietveld, A B M Boni; Ourila, Tiia; Emerton, Mark E; Bird, H A

    2013-04-01

    A case report of a professional contemporary dancer who successfully returned to the stage after bilateral total hip replacements (THR) for osteoarthritis is presented, together with her own commentary and a retrospective cohort study of total hip replacements in dancers. In the presented cohort, there were no post-operative dislocations or infections, the original pain had been relieved, rehabilitation was objectively normal and all resumed their dance (teaching) activities. Nevertheless, they were disappointed about the prolonged rehabilitation. Due to their high demands as professional dancers, post-operative expectations were too optimistic in view of the usual quick and favourable results of THR in the older and less physically active, general population. In all dancers with unilateral osteoarthritis, the left hip was involved, which may reflect the tendency to use the left leg as standing leg and be suggestive that strenuous physical activity may lead to osteoarthritis. Better rehabilitation guidelines are needed for dancer patients undergoing THR, especially drawing their attention to realistic post-operative expectations. PMID:23588878

  8. A modified technique to extract fractured femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Akrawi, Hawar; Magra, Merzesh; Shetty, Ajit; Ng, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The removal of well-fixed broken femoral component and cement mantle can be extremely demanding, time consuming and potentially damaging to the host bone. Different methods have been described to extract broken femoral stem yet this remains one of the most challenging prospect to the revision hip surgeon. PRESENTATION OF CASE The authors present two cases underwent a modified sliding cortical window technique utilising a tungsten carbide drill, Charnley pin retractor and an orthopaedic mallet to aid extraction of a fractured cemented femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty. DISCUSSION The modified technique offers a simple and controlled method in extracting a well fixed fractured cemented femoral stem. It has the advantage of retaining the cement mantle with subsequent good seal of the femoral cortical window secured with cable ready system. Furthermore, tungsten carbide drill bit and Charnley pin retractor are relatively readily available to aid the extraction of the broken stem. Finally, it yields the option of implanting a standard femoral stem and obviates the need for bypassing the cortical window with long revision femoral component. CONCLUSION Fractured femoral stem is a rare yet a complex and very demanding prospect to both patients and hip surgeons. The sliding cortical window technique utilising tungsten carbide drill and Charnley pin retractor is technically easy and most importantly; preserves host bone stock with cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty. We believe this technique can be added to the armamentarium of revision hip surgeon when faced with the challenge of extracting a fractured cemented femoral stem. PMID:24858980

  9. Clinical and roentgenographic evaluation of hydroxyapatite-augmented and nonaugmented porous total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ciccotti, M G; Rothman, R H; Hozack, W J; Moriarty, L

    1994-12-01

    Sixty osteoarthritic patients undergoing primary, uncemented total hip arthroplasty were matched for age and weight and randomized into one of four groups with respect to implant coating and postoperative, protected weight-bearing status: group 1, hydroxyapatite-augmented, 12 weeks; group 2, nonaugmented, 12 weeks; group 3, hydroxyapatite-augmented, 6 weeks; and group 4, nonaugmented, 6 weeks. Tantalum spheres were implanted periprosthetically into the femur at the time of the arthroplasty, thus providing constant references for stereoscopic radiographs. Patients were then evaluated over a 2-year period with clinical examination, plain radiography, and roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. Clinical evaluation using the Charnley scoring system showed no significant preoperative or postoperative intergroup differences, whereas visual analog testing noted less thigh pain with hydroxyapatite-augmented stems at the 12-week and 6-month follow-up evaluations. Plain radiographic analysis produced no significant differences, with no instability detected, and bony ingrowth was uniform in all groups. Stereographic evaluation showed migration in all groups, but there were no significant differences between the augmented and nonaugmented stems or the 6-week and 12-week partial weight-bearing protocols. Charnley, plain radiographic, and stereogrammetric evaluations all suggest that migration is unaltered by enhanced surfaces and early, unprotected weight bearing does not jeopardize implant fixation regardless of coating design. The lower incidence of visual analog thigh pain with the hydroxyapatite-augmented stems, however, may be a reflection of bony ingrowth and, as such, add some validity to the theoretic advantages of enhanced surface prostheses. PMID:7699376

  10. Comparison of measures to assess outcomes in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, J; Fitzpatrick, R; Murray, D; Carr, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To compare the performance of a disease specific and a general health questionnaire in assessing changes resulting from total hip replacement. DESIGN--Two stage prospective study of patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery involving an assessment at a clinic before and six months after surgery. 60(32%) patients were followed up by post. SETTING--Outpatient departments at a specialist orthopaedic hospital and peripheral clinics within Oxfordshire. PATIENTS--188 patients admitted for unilateral total hip replacement between February and mid-August 1994. MAIN MEASURES--Patients' self assessed scores with the 12 item Oxford hip score and SF-36 general health questionnaire together with surgeons' assessment with Charnley hip score obtained before and again at six months after surgery. RESULTS--186 patients were followed up six months after total hip replacement; a subsample (n=60) by post. Of the 60 postal patients, 59(98.3%) fully completed the Oxford hip score compared with 44(73.3%) who fully completed the SF-36. For the followup sample as a whole, post operative changes in scores produced a large effect size of 2.75 on the Oxford hip score, compared with -1.89 physical function (SF-36), -2.13 pain (SF-36). With the exception of physical function and role (physical), postoperative SF-36 scores were shown to be similar to or better than those found by two population surveys on patients of comparable age. The responsiveness of a disease specific questionnaire, the Oxford hip score, and relevant sections of a general questionnaire, SF-36, were found to be similar as assessed by three different criteria. CONCLUSIONS--A disease specific questionnaire, the Oxford hip score, and a general state of health questionnaire, SF-36, performed similarly in assessing outcomes of total hip replacement except that the disease specific questionnaire resulted in a higher completion rate and greater responsiveness in some sections. On the other hand the general

  11. Primary total hip replacement versus hip resurfacing - hospital considerations.

    PubMed

    Ward, William G; Carter, Christina J; Barone, Marisa; Jinnah, Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors regarding surgical procedures and patient selection affect hospital staffing needs as well as hospital revenues. In order to better understand the potential impact on hospitals that hip arthroplasty device selection (standard total hip arthroplasty vs. resurfacing) creates, a review of all primary hip arthroplasties performed at one institution was designed to identify factors that impacted hospital staffing needs and revenue generation. All primary hip arthroplasties undertaken over three fiscal years (2008 to 2010) were reviewed, utilizing only hospital business office data and medical records data that had been previously extracted prior for billing purposes. Analysis confirmed differing demographics for two hip arthroplasty populations, with the resurfacing patients (compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty population) consisting of younger patients (mean age, 50 vs. 61 years), who were more often male (75% vs. 45%), were more likely to have osteoarthritis as their primary diagnosis (83 vs. 67%) and were more often covered by managed care or commercial insurance (83 vs. 34%). They also had shorter hospital stays (mean length of stay, 2.3 vs. 4.1 days) and consequently provided a more favorable financial revenue stream to the hospital on a per patient basis. Several trends appeared during the study periods. There was a steady increase in all procedures in all groups except for the resurfacings, which decreased 26% in males and 53% in females between 2009 and 2010. Differences were observed in the demographics of patients presenting for resurfacing, compared to those presenting for conventional total hip arthroplasty. In addition to the revenue stream considerations, institutions undertaking a resurfacing program must commit the resources and planning in order to rehabilitate these patients more expeditiously than is usually required with conventional hip arthroplasty patients. PMID:22035493

  12. Charnley low-friction arthroplasty in teenage patients: the ultimate challenge.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, B M; Purbach, B; Siney, P D; Fleming, P A

    2010-04-01

    Increasing follow-up identifies the outcome in younger patients who have undergone total hip replacement (THR) and reveals the true potential for survival of the prosthesis. We identified 28 patients (39 THRs) who had undergone cemented Charnley low friction arthroplasty between 1969 and 2001. Their mean age at operation was 17.9 years (12 to 19) and the maximum follow-up was 34 years. Two patients (4 THRs) were lost to follow-up, 13 (16 THRs) were revised at a mean period of 19.1 years (8 to 34) and 13 (19 THRs) continue to attend regular follow-up at a mean of 12.6 years (2.3 to 29). In this surviving group one acetabular component was radiologically loose and all femoral components were secure. In all the patients the diameter of the femoral head was 22.225 mm with Charnley femoral components used in 29 hips and C-stem femoral components in ten. In young patients who require THR the acetabular bone stock is generally a limiting factor for the size of the component. Excellent long-term results can be obtained with a cemented polyethylene acetabular component and a femoral head of small diameter. PMID:20357322

  13. NEW BEARING SURFACES IN TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is being increasingly indicated for younger and more active patients, in addition to a naturally growing demand for the procedure because of increasing life expectancy among patients. The high costs of this surgery and the controversies regarding implant performance have made this topic the subject of constant research, seeking new materials with better resistance to wear and better biocompatibility. The present article provides a review of new surfaces in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27042614

  14. Is the use of antidepressants associated with patient-reported outcomes following total hip replacement surgery?

    PubMed

    Greene, Meridith E; Rolfson, Ola; Gordon, Max; Annerbrink, Kristina; Malchau, Henrik; Garellick, Göran

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Patients with anxiety and/or depression tend to report less pain reduction and less satisfaction with surgical treatment. We hypothesized that the use of antidepressants would be correlated to patient-reported outcomes (PROs) 1 year after total hip replacement (THR), where increased dosage or discontinuation would be associated with worse outcomes. Patients and methods - THR cases with pre- and postoperative patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were selected from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register (n = 9,092; women: n = 5,106). The PROMs were EQ-5D, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, Charnley class, and VAS for satisfaction after surgery. These cases were merged with a national database of prescription purchases to determine the prevalence of antidepressant purchases. Regression analyses were performed where PROs were dependent variables and sex, age, Charnley class, preoperative pain, preoperative health-related quality of life (HRQoL), patient-reported anxiety/depression, and antidepressant use were independent variables. Results - Antidepressants were used by 10% of the cases (n = 943). Patients using antidepressants had poorer HRQoL and higher levels of pain before and after surgery and they experienced less satisfaction. Preoperative antidepressant use was independently associated with PROs 1 year after THR regardless of patient-reported anxiety/depression. Interpretation - Antidepressant usage before surgery was associated with reduced PROs after THR. Cases at risk of poorer outcomes may be identified through review of the patient's medical record. Clinicians are encouraged to screen for antidepressant use preoperatively, because their use may be associated with PROs after THR. PMID:27482877

  15. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty, but not of total knee arthroplasty, is related to the preoperative radiographic severity of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, Claire; Holtslag, Maarten J; Tordoir, Rutger L; Leichtenberg, Claudia S; Verdegaal, Suzan H M; Kroon, Herman M; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus on the impact of radiographic severity of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) on the clinical outcome of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether preoperative radiographic severity of OA is related to improvements in functioning, pain, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 1 year after THA or TKA. Patients and methods This prospective cohort study included 302 THA patients and 271 TKA patients with hip or knee OA. In the THA patients, preoperatively 26% had mild OA and 74% had severe OA; in the TKA patients, preoperatively 27% had mild OA and 73% had severe OA. Radiographic severity was determined according to the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) classification. Clinical assessments preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively included: sociodemographic characteristics and patient-reported outcomes (PROMs): Oxford hip/knee score, hip/knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS/KOOS), SF36, and EQ5D. Change scores of PROMs were compared with mild OA (KL 0–2) and severe OA (KL 3–4) using a multivariate linear regression model. Results Adjusted for sex, age, preoperative scores, BMI, and Charnley score, radiographic severity of OA in THA was associated with improvement in HOOS “Activities of daily living”, “Pain”, and “Symptoms”, and SF36 physical component summary (“PCS”) scale. In TKA, we found no such associations. Interpretation The decrease in pain and improvement in function in THA patients, but not in TKA patients, was positively associated with the preoperative radiographic severity of OA. PMID:26484651

  16. Active Robotics for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dungy, Danton S; Netravali, Nathan A

    2016-01-01

    Robotics and computer-assisted navigation have been developed to increase the accuracy of hip implant placement and improve long-term outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA). These technologies have shown significant improvements in implant positioning when compared to conventional techniques. Currently, 3 robotic systems are cleared for use for THA in the US. The lead author (DSD) describes his preferred technique for using one of these systems, the TSolution One® (Think Surgical, Inc.). PMID:27327918

  17. Hip Squeaking after Ceramic-on-ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qi; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the characteristics and influencing factors of squeaking after ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to analyze the possible mechanisms of the audible noise. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were based on articles from PubMed and Web of Science. Study Selection: The articles selected for review were original articles and reviews found based on the following search terms: “total hip arthroplasty”, “ceramic-on-ceramic”, “hip squeaking”, and “hip noise.” Results: The mechanism of the squeaking remains unknown. The possible explanations included stripe wear, edge loading, a third body, fracture of the ceramic liner, and resonance of the prosthesis components. Squeaking occurrence is influenced by patient, surgical, and implant factors. Conclusions: Most studies indicated that squeaking after CoC THA was the consequence of increasing wear or impingement, caused by prosthesis design, patient characteristics, or surgical factors. However, as conflicts exist among different articles, the major reasons for the squeaking remain to be identified. PMID:27453238

  18. The use of primary total hip arthroplasty in university hospitals of the European Union.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, Thierry; Druyts, Pieter; Casteleyn, Pierre-Paul

    2004-06-01

    Current practice in primary total hip replacement was investigated by postal survey in 125 university hospitals of the European Union (EU). Most hospitals (78.4%) use a hip register and implant cemented as well as uncemented stems (72.0%) and cups (68.8%). In Scandinavian & Anglo-Saxon countries, 42.9% of the departments implant cemented stems in all their patients, and 16.7% implant cemented cups in all their patients. In these countries, modern cementing techniques are commonly used and therapeutic choices are strongly influenced by hip registers. In Southern Europe, cemented cups have been abandoned in 31.1% and modern cementing techniques are less common. Benelux & Germanic countries have a practice in between. Three cemented (Exeter, Charnley, Lubinus) and three uncemented stems (Zweymüller, ABG, Bi-contact) represent 41.9% and 25.3% of stem types in use. Most departments (70.4%) have adopted alternative bearings. Ceramic-ceramic and metal-metal are both used in almost half of the hospitals. Metal-polyethylene has been abandoned in 15.2%. These trends are taught to new generations of surgeons in the EU and could become common practice in a near future. PMID:15287402

  19. COMPONENT VERSION IN MODULAR TOTAL HIP REVISION

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, Michael A.; Pemberton, Aaron; Milbrandt, Joseph C.; Allan, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Morphologic changes of the proximal femur make revision total hip arthroplasty challenging. Metaphyseal retroversion and diaphyseal varus are common in this scenario. Twenty-one total hip revisions using a modular femoral prosthesis were examined by obtaining three radiographs (A/P, surgical lateral, and true lateral of the femur) to assemble CAD models for determining the range of modular component positioning. An average of femoral neck anteversion was observed. Seventeen of 21 cases (81%) had retroverted metaphyseal segments (−23.2°+/−17.4°) and/or varus stems (−32.1°+/−13.0°). Neck anteversion averaged 21.4°(+/−10.0°). One of 21 cases (5%) resulted in component orientation similar to a non-modular prosthesis. Modular components provide options to accommodate proximal femoral remodeling not afforded by monobloc stems in total hip revision surgery. PMID:19742077

  20. Accuracy of femoral templating in reproducing anatomical femoral offset in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Davies, H; Foote, J; Spencer, R F

    2007-01-01

    Restoration of hip biomechanics is a crucial component of successful total hip replacement. Preoperative templating is recommended to ensure that the size and orientation of implants is optimised. We studied how closely natural femoral offset could be reproduced using the manufacturers' templates for 10 femoral stems in common use in the UK. A series of 23 consecutive preoperative radiographs from patients who had undergone unilateral total hip replacement for unilateral osteoarthritis of the hip was employed. The change in offset between the templated position of the best-fitting template and the anatomical centre of the hip was measured. The templates were then ranked according to their ability to reproduce the normal anatomical offset. The most accurate was the CPS-Plus (Root Mean Square Error 2.0 mm) followed in rank order by: C stem (2.16), CPT (2.40), Exeter (3.23), Stanmore (3.28), Charnley (3.65), Corail (3.72), ABG II (4.30), Furlong HAC (5.08) and Furlong modular (7.14). A similar pattern of results was achieved when the standard error of variability of offset was analysed. We observed a wide variation in the ability of the femoral prosthesis templates to reproduce normal femoral offset. This variation was independent of the seniority of the observer. The templates of modern polished tapered stems with high modularity were best able to reproduce femoral offset. The current move towards digitisation of X-rays may offer manufacturers an opportunity to improve template designs in certain instances, and to develop appropriate computer software. PMID:19197861

  1. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IH.

    PubMed

    O'heireamhoin, S; Bayer, T; Mulhall, K J

    2011-01-01

    Children affected by mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IH (Hurler Syndrome), an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, are known to experience a range of musculoskeletal manifestations including spinal abnormalities, hand abnormalities, generalised joint stiffness, genu valgum, and hip dysplasia and avascular necrosis. Enzyme therapy, in the form of bone marrow transplantation, significantly increases life expectancy but does not prevent the development of the associated musculoskeletal disorders. We present the case of a 23-year-old woman with a diagnosis of Hurler syndrome with a satisfactory result following uncemented total hip arthroplasty. PMID:23259102

  2. Total hip arthroplasty after rotational acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideya; Takatori, Yoshio; Moro, Toru; Oshima, Hirofumi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether the outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) are equal to those of primary THA, and to elucidate the characteristics of THA after RAO. The clinical and radiographic findings of THA after RAO (44 hips), with minimum 24 months of follow-up, were compared with a matched control group of 58 hips without prior RAO. We found that the outcomes in terms of functional scores and complication rates did not differ between THA after RAO and THA without previous pelvic osteotomy, indicating that the results of THA after RAO are equivalent to those of primary THA. Although THA after RAO requires technical considerations, similar clinical outcomes to primary THA can be expected. PMID:25456635

  3. Clinical and roentgenographic evaluation of hydroxyapatite-coated and uncoated porous total hip arthroplasty: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Ciccotti, M G; Rothman, R H; Veress, S A; Hozack, W J; Moriarty, L; Beight, J

    1991-10-01

    Sixty osteoarthritic patients undergoing primary uncemented total hip arthroplasty were matched for age and weight and randomized into one of four groups with respect to implant coating and postoperative protected weight-bearing status: group 1, hydroxyapatite, 12 weeks; group 2, uncoated, 12 weeks; group 3, hydroxyapatite, 6 weeks; group 4, uncoated, 6 weeks. Tantalum spheres were implanted periprosthetically into the femur at the time of arthroplasty, thus providing constant references for stereoscopic radiographs. Patients were then evaluated over a 1-year period with clinical examination, plain radiography, and roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA). Clinical evaluation using Charnley scoring showed no significant preoperative or postoperative intergroup differences, whereas visual analog testing noted less thigh pain with hydroxyapatite-coated stems at 12 weeks and 6 months follow-up. Plain radiographic analysis produced no significant differences, with no instability detected and bony ingrowth noted uniformly in all groups. The preliminary stereographic evaluation showed migration in all groups, but there were no significant differences between coated and uncoated stems or 6-week and 12-week partial weightbearing protocols. The Charnley, plain radiographic, and preliminary stereogrammetric evaluations all suggest that migration is unaltered by enhanced surfaces and that early unprotected weightbearing does not jeopardize implant fixation regardless of coating design. The lower incidence of visual analog thigh pain with the hydroxyapatite-coated stems, however, may be a reflection of bony ingrowth and as such add some validity to the theoretical advantages of enhanced surface prostheses. PMID:10149615

  4. Cup positioning in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, T

    2014-09-01

    The "optimal" positioning of the cup in total hip arthroplasty can improve hip function and reduce wear, impingement and dislocation. The cup position is described as the spatial relation between the hip rotation centre and the pelvis and, as the cup orientation around the rotation centre. The first parameter affects hip balance and, if not managed properly, might result in poor function and leg length discrepancy. The second parameter is often "silent", unless impingement or dislocation occurs. However, inappropriate cup orientation can accelerate wear and cause early failure. As such, it is mandatory to get both right, taking into account multiple parameters: the stem position, the approach, the bearing surface, the cup coverage and the pelvic orientation during loading. In most cases a "standard" cup position is adequate. However, specific anatomic features might require an individualized approach. This paper aims at reviewing the parameters that impact on the optimal cup position. This should allow for more judicious choices in those particular cases. PMID:26280607

  5. Renal function after elective total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Perregaard, Helene; Damholt, Mette B; Solgaard, Søren; Petersen, Morten B

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased short-term and long-term mortality in intensive care populations and in several surgical specialties, but there are very few data concerning orthopedic populations. We have studied the incidence of AKI and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an elective population of orthopedic patients undergoing primary total hip replacement, hypothesizing that chronic kidney disease predisposes to AKI. Patients and methods - This was a single-center, population-based, retrospective, registry-based cohort study involving all primary elective total hip replacements performed from January 2003 through December 2012. Patient demographics and creatinine values were registered. We evaluated the presence of CKD and AKI according to the international guidelines for kidney disease (KDIGO Acute Kidney Injury Workgroup 2013 ). Results - 3,416 patients were included (2,064 females (60%)). AKI (according to KDIGO criteria) was seen in 75 patients (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.7-2.7) in the course of primary total hip replacement. Of these, 26 had pre-existing CKD of class 3-5. Pre-existing CKD of class 3-5, indicating moderately to severely reduced kidney function, was seen in 374 individuals (11%). Interpretation - Development of acute kidney injury appears to be a substantial problem compared to other complications related to elective total hip arthroplasty, i.e. luxation and infection. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease may be especially vulnerable. The clinical impact of acute kidney injury in an elective orthopedic population remains to be elucidated. PMID:26937782

  6. The Anterior Approach for Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Hochfelder, Jason P; Davidovitch, Roy I

    2016-03-01

    The anterior approach for total hip replacements has recently gained popularity. Some authors report faster recoveries and decreased dislocation rated with no increased risk of complications. However others claim no difference in outcomes when compared to other approaches yet an increase in complication rates. This paper provides a brief history of the approach, discusses various indications and contraindications, preoperative considerations, surgical techniques, and postoperative protocols. PMID:26977549

  7. Renal function after elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Perregaard, Helene; Damholt, Mette B; Solgaard, Søren; Petersen, Morten B

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased short-term and long-term mortality in intensive care populations and in several surgical specialties, but there are very few data concerning orthopedic populations. We have studied the incidence of AKI and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an elective population of orthopedic patients undergoing primary total hip replacement, hypothesizing that chronic kidney disease predisposes to AKI. Patients and methods This was a single-center, population-based, retrospective, registry-based cohort study involving all primary elective total hip replacements performed from January 2003 through December 2012. Patient demographics and creatinine values were registered. We evaluated the presence of CKD and AKI according to the international guidelines for kidney disease (KDIGO Acute Kidney Injury Workgroup 2013). Results 3,416 patients were included (2,064 females (60%)). AKI (according to KDIGO criteria) was seen in 75 patients (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.7–2.7) in the course of primary total hip replacement. Of these, 26 had pre-existing CKD of class 3–5. Pre-existing CKD of class 3–5, indicating moderately to severely reduced kidney function, was seen in 374 individuals (11%). Interpretation Development of acute kidney injury appears to be a substantial problem compared to other complications related to elective total hip arthroplasty, i.e. luxation and infection. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease may be especially vulnerable. The clinical impact of acute kidney injury in an elective orthopedic population remains to be elucidated. PMID:26937782

  8. Total Hip Joint Replacement Biotelemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Luntz, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a biotelemetry system that is hermetically sealed within a total hip replacement implant is reported. The telemetry system transmits six channels of stress data to reconstruct the major forces acting on the neck of the prosthesis and uses an induction power coupling technique to eliminate the need for internal batteries. The activities associated with the telemetry microminiaturization, data recovery console, hardware fabrications, power induction systems, electrical and mechanical testing and hermetic sealing test results are discussed.

  9. Total hip arthroplasty revision in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gasbarra, Elena; Perrone, Fabio Luigi; Celi, Monica; Rao, Cecilia; Feola, Maurizio; Cuozzo, Nicola; Tarantino, Umberto

    2013-10-01

    In the last years, the number of total hip arthroplasty is increased both in young patients and elderly with a poor bone quality due to extension of surgical indications. According to this trend, also revision surgery showed a growth of its number, especially in elderly patients, because of implant loosening, failed osseointegration of prosthetic components, errors in biomechanical restoration and infections. The aim of this study is to analyze life quality improvement through evaluation of articular functionality and postoperative pain, and to examine osseointegration of implant components with periprosthetic bone. During total hip arthroplasty revision, the orthopedic surgeon often has to face complex cases, especially in elderly patients with a preexisting status of poor bone quality and sarcopenia. In these cases, a correct planning and a surgical procedure well-executed are able to ensure a good outcome that led to pain relief and functional recovery. Furthermore anti-osteoporotic therapy surely represents a useful resource both in primary total hip arthroplasty and in revisions, mainly for elderly patients with a poor bone quality. PMID:24046034

  10. Ceramic/ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bizot, P; Nizard, R; Lerouge, S; Prudhommeaux, F; Sedel, L

    2000-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasty has been used for 30 years, mainly in Europe. The theoretical advantages of this combination are represented by its remarkable sliding characteristics, its very low wear debris generation, and its sufficient fracture toughness. These advantages are achieved if the material is properly controlled with high density, high purity, and small grains. The authors summarize the results obtained with ceramic/ceramic total hip arthroplasty. Information is provided about in vivo behavior regarding wear debris characterization and quantification, and histological tissue examinations for inflammatory reactions, which were not encountered except when alumina debris was mixed with metal or cement. Modification of socket fixation resulted in improved clinical outcomes. With a press-fit metal shell and an alumina liner utilized for 10 years, the results are excellent especially in a young and active population. Alumina-on-alumina seems at the moment to be one of the best choices when a total hip arthroplasty has to be performed in young and active patients. PMID:11180930

  11. Alternative bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Inzerillo, V Christopher; Garino, Jonathan P

    2003-01-01

    Polyethylene wear and extension of indications of total hip arthroplasty into younger and younger age groups have pushed manufacturers to develop more durable bearing surfaces. Standard polyethylene, the plastic used for the first 3 decades of hip replacement, virtually ceases to exist in its original form. Modifications of the processing, including sterlization in an inert environment and cross-linking, have demonstrated some improvements in wear. Hard-on-hard bearings such as ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal also have demonstrated extremely low wear. This article reviews the pros and cons of the alternative bearing options available to assist in the proper bearing selection for a particular patient. PMID:12882250

  12. Acetabular Reconstruction in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Siva Swaminathan; Choi, Jung Woo

    2016-01-01

    The difficulties encountered in dealing with the bone deficient acetabulum are amongst the greatest challenges in hip surgery. Acetabular reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty can successfully be achieved with hemispherical components featuring a porous or roughened ingrowth surface and options for placement of multiple screws for minor acetabular defect. Acetabular component selection is mostly based on the amount of bone loss present. In the presence of combined cavitary and segmental defects without superior acetabular coverage, reconstructions with a structural acetabular allograft protected by a cage or a custom-made triflange cage have been one of preferred surgical options. The use of a cage or ring over structural allograft bone for massive uncontained defects in acetabular revision can restore host bone stock and facilitate subsequent rerevision surgery to a certain extent. But high complication rates have been reported including aseptic loosening, infection, dislocation and metal failure. On the other hand, recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with the use of modular augments combined with a hemispherical shell for major acetabular defect. Highly porous metals have been introduced for clinical use in arthroplasty surgery over the last decade. Their higher porosity and surface friction are ideal for acetabular revision, optimizing biological fixation. The use of trabecular metal cups in acetabular revision has yielded excellent clinical results. This article summarizes author's experience regarding revision acetabular reconstruction options following failed hip surgery including arthroplasty. PMID:27536638

  13. Acetabular Reconstruction in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shon, Won Yong; Santhanam, Siva Swaminathan; Choi, Jung Woo

    2016-03-01

    The difficulties encountered in dealing with the bone deficient acetabulum are amongst the greatest challenges in hip surgery. Acetabular reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty can successfully be achieved with hemispherical components featuring a porous or roughened ingrowth surface and options for placement of multiple screws for minor acetabular defect. Acetabular component selection is mostly based on the amount of bone loss present. In the presence of combined cavitary and segmental defects without superior acetabular coverage, reconstructions with a structural acetabular allograft protected by a cage or a custom-made triflange cage have been one of preferred surgical options. The use of a cage or ring over structural allograft bone for massive uncontained defects in acetabular revision can restore host bone stock and facilitate subsequent rerevision surgery to a certain extent. But high complication rates have been reported including aseptic loosening, infection, dislocation and metal failure. On the other hand, recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with the use of modular augments combined with a hemispherical shell for major acetabular defect. Highly porous metals have been introduced for clinical use in arthroplasty surgery over the last decade. Their higher porosity and surface friction are ideal for acetabular revision, optimizing biological fixation. The use of trabecular metal cups in acetabular revision has yielded excellent clinical results. This article summarizes author's experience regarding revision acetabular reconstruction options following failed hip surgery including arthroplasty. PMID:27536638

  14. Mortality after total hip replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Berstock, J. R.; Beswick, A. D.; Lenguerrand, E.; Whitehouse, M. R.; Blom, A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Total hip replacement causes a short-term increase in the risk of mortality. It is important to quantify this and to identify modifiable risk factors so that the risk of post-operative mortality can be minimised. We performed a systematic review and critical evaluation of the current literature on the topic. We identified 32 studies published over the last 10 years which provide either 30-day or 90-day mortality data. We estimate the pooled incidence of mortality during the first 30 and 90 days following hip replacement to be 0.30% (95% CI 0.22 to 0.38) and 0.65% (95% CI 0.50 to 0.81), respectively. We found strong evidence of a temporal trend towards reducing mortality rates despite increasingly co-morbid patients. The risk factors for early mortality most commonly identified are increasing age, male gender and co-morbid conditions, particularly cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular complications appear to have overtaken fatal pulmonary emboli as the leading cause of death after hip replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:175–82. PMID:24894596

  15. BLEEDING OF FEMORAL HEAD DURING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY FOR OSTEOARTHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Sotomayor, Marco Yánez; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the bleeding of the femoral head on hip osteoarthritis in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Methods: One hundred and three hips affected by primary hip osteoarthritis were evaluated. After surgical dislocation, the femoral head was divided into four quadrants, and micro perforations were made in order to observe and assess the presence of bleeding, as early type (EB), late type (LB) or without bleeding (WB). Results: We observed early bleeding (EB) in the upper quadrant in 16 hips (15.5%), late bleeding in 14 hips (13.6%) and no bleeding (WB) in 73 hips (70.9%). The anterior quadrant showed EB in 24 hips (23.3%), LB in 7 hips (6.8%) and WB in 72 hips (69.9%). The lower quadrant presented EB in 40 hips (38.8%), LB 14 hips (13.6%) and WB in 49 hips (47.6%). The posterior quadrant showed EB in 39 hips (37.9%), LB 19 hips (18.4%) and WB in 45 hips (43.7%). Comparing BMI and gender, we found no association between these parameters (p> 0.05). Conclusions: The inferior and posterior quadrant had the highest bleeding levels, following the path of the medial circumflex artery. Level of Evidence III, Therapeutic Study. PMID:26981036

  16. Dual mobility in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Darren R; Haughom, Bryan D; Della Valle, Craig J

    2014-01-01

    Dual-mobility articulations have shown promising results. Postoperative instability remains the most common reason for revision of a total hip arthroplasty (THA). Dual-mobility cups have been shown to decrease the rate of dislocation in primary THA and have been used to treat and prevent instability in revision THA. Greater range of motion and a greater head-to-neck ratio and a greater jump distance are achieved, resulting in a lower risk of instability. Concerns with dual-mobility cups include wear and intraprosthetic dislocation. Specific design modifications have aimed to improve cup fixation and decrease polyethylene wear and the risks of intraprosthetic dislocation. PMID:24267202

  17. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: in opposition.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2004-06-01

    At the Knee Society Winter Meeting in 2003, Seth Greenwald and I debated about whether there should be new standards (ie, regulations) applied to the release of information to the public on "new developments." I argued for the public's "right to know" prior to the publication of peer-reviewed literature. He argued for regulatory constraint or "proving by peer-reviewed publication" before alerting the public. It is not a contradiction for me to currently argue against the public advertising of minimally invasive (MIS) total hip arthroplasty as not yet being in the best interest of the public. It is hard to remember a concept that has so captured both the public's and the surgical community's fancy as MIS. Patients are "demanding" MIS without knowing why. Surgeons are offering it as the next best, greatest thing without having developed the skill and experience to avoid the surgery's risks. If you put "minimally invasive hip replacement" into the Google search engine (http://www.google.com), you get 5,170 matches. If you put the same words in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi), referencing the National Library of Medicine database, you get SEVENTEEN; none is really a peer-reviewed article. Most are 1 page papers in orthopedics from medical education meetings. On the other hand, there are over 6,000 peer-reviewed articles on total hip arthroplasty. Dr. Thomas Sculco, my couterpart in this debate, wrote an insightful editorial in the American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery in which he stated: "Although these procedures have generated incredible interest and enthusiasm, I am concerned that they may be performed to the detriment of our patients." I couldn't agree with him more. Smaller is not necessarily better and, when it is worse, it will be the "smaller" that is held accountable. PMID:15190556

  18. Comparison of functional outcome of total hip arthroplasties involving four surgical approaches.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, R A; Askew, M J; Gradisar, I A; Hoyt, W A; Snyder, R; Bailey, B

    1988-01-01

    One hundred thirty-seven total hip arthroplasty patients had a follow-up evaluation consisting of an orthopaedic physical evaluation, isokinetic strength testing, and collection of demographic and surgical information from medical records. The intraoperative variables of surgical time and blood loss and the functional outcome status of the subjects, as demonstrated by D'Aubigne--Postel ratings and isokinetic strength tests, were compared for various trochanteric management techniques: no osteotomy; complete Charnley-type osteotomy; sharp abductor release; and a wafer technique, in which a wafer of bone was osteotomized from the trochanter to release the abductors. A comparison of the mean values for the variables indicated that the wafer and sharp techniques were superior to the complete and no osteotomy techniques. The wafer technique resulted in statistically significant superior isokinetic strength measured in adduction, flexion, and extension. Surgical time was significantly greater in the complete osteotomy cases and blood loss was least in the wafer cases, although these differences were not significant. PMID:3183682

  19. Robot-assisted total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffery J; Elmallah, Randa K; Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Precise and accurate biomechanical reconstruction during total hip arthroplasty (THA) is essential for durable long-term survivorship. Accurate fit of cementless hip implants is also crucial to reduce micromotion between the bone-implant interfaces to allow for stable osseointegration. Robotic technology aims to minimize potential human errors and improve implant alignment and fit, and address persisting concerns with modern-day cementless THA. Although robotic THA dates back to the early 1990s, concerns with increased operating times, costs, and complications led to its withdrawal. However, semi-active systems have renewed interest in robot-assisted joint arthroplasty. We reviewed the current technology, its potential benefits, and the reported clinical and radiographic outcomes. Early evidence suggests that robotic use may lead to more accurate reconstruction of radiographic parameters, such as implant positioning, fit, center-of-rotation, and leg-length discrepancy. Further research is needed to determine if these will translate into better outcomes and improved implant longevity to justify increased costs. PMID:26592900

  20. Total hip replacement for developmental dysplasia of hip and postoperative nursing.

    PubMed

    Zong, S J; Wang, F; Hu, S L

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical effect of total hip replacement for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and analyze the postoperative nursing. Sixty patients (78 hips) aged 18-75 years (average 58.6±2.31 years) who received total hip replacement for treatment of DDH at the Zhengzhou People’s Hospital, Henan, China, from April 2013 to June 2016 were selected as research subjects. Twenty-four patients were male (30 hips) and 36 were female (48 hips). Of the 60 patients, according to Crowe typing, 24 were type I (30 hips), 26 were type II (34 hips), 6 were type III (8 hips) and 4 were type IV (6 hips). According to the Harris hip score system, the score of all hips was 39.46±3.56 points average (18-56 points) before treatment and resulted as 89.60±4.25 points (79-98 points) at the last follow-up, showing a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). Complications such as wound infection, dislocation, fracture of femoral shaft, femoral nerve and injury of sciatic nerve were not found after treatment. A total of 48 cases (58 hips) obtained excellent curative results (93.33% recovery), 8 cases (14 hips) good (92.31% recovery), and 4 cases (6 hips) medium. Total hip replacement proved to be effective in treating DDH and secondary osteoarthritis. Moreover, soft tissue release and an optimum degree recovery of anatomic form and physiological function of the diseased hip is an important basis for reconstructing the acetabulum and stabilizing acetabulum prosthesis. PMID:27049089

  1. Unilateral total hip replacement patients with symptomatic leg length inequality have abnormal hip biomechanics during walking

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junyan; McWilliams, Anthony B.; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Stone, Martin H.; Redmond, Anthony C.; Stewart, Todd D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptomatic leg length inequality accounts for 8.7% of total hip replacement related claims made against the UK National Health Service Litigation authority. It has not been established whether symptomatic leg length inequality patients following total hip replacement have abnormal hip kinetics during gait. Methods Hip kinetics in 15 unilateral total hip replacement patients with symptomatic leg length inequality during gait was determined through multibody dynamics and compared to 15 native hip healthy controls and 15 ‘successful’ asymptomatic unilateral total hip replacement patients. Finding More significant differences from normal were found in symptomatic leg length inequality patients than in asymptomatic total hip replacement patients. The leg length inequality patients had altered functions defined by lower gait velocity, reduced stride length, reduced ground reaction force, decreased hip range of motion, reduced hip moment and less dynamic hip force with a 24% lower heel-strike peak, 66% higher mid-stance trough and 37% lower toe-off peak. Greater asymmetry in hip contact force was also observed in leg length inequality patients. Interpretation These gait adaptions may affect the function of the implant and other healthy joints in symptomatic leg length inequality patients. This study provides important information for the musculoskeletal function and rehabilitation of symptomatic leg length inequality patients. PMID:25900447

  2. Choosing the socket in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Davey, J R

    1995-02-01

    Significant improvements have been made in the long-term results of cemented femoral components, but there has been little improvement in the results of cemented acetabular components. Polyethylene wear debris has been proposed as the most important factor causing loosening of cemented acetabular components. Polyethylene thickness and femoral-head size affect the rate of acetabular wear and loosening. The early results of total hip arthroplasty with noncemented acetabular components are promising, and many feel that they represent the state of the art. The hemispheric components with a porous coating have proven superior to most of the screw ring designs. There are potential disadvantages with the use of screws to augment fixation of the hemispheric components, and recently it has become popular to under-ream the acetabulum and press-fit the oversized acetabular component without the use of screws. PMID:7874628

  3. Uncemented total hip arthroplasty in patients younger than 50 years: a 6- to 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tian J; You, Mu Z; Xing, Pei F; Bin, Shen; Ke, Zhou Zhong; Jing, Yang

    2010-04-01

    Young patients are expected to place increased demands on total hip arthroplasty (THA) because they are more active and have a longer life expectancy. The long-term outcome of the Charnley low-friction arthroplasty in young, active patients has been shown to be associated with a high degree of polyethylene wear and osteolysis. However, cementless acetabular components have been shown to be successful in young patients.We evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of 77 cementless THAs in 81 young, active patients at a mean follow-up of 7.5 years. Mean preoperative Harris Hip Score improved from 46.24 to 96.5 points at 6 years. One acetabular component showed aseptic loosening 10 years postoperatively. Three patients (3 hips) underwent bone grafts and liner renewal for severe osteolysis around the acetabular component. The rate of survival at 6 years for loosening was 98.8%, and for revision of the liner was 95.5% (95% confidence interval, 93%-98%). Mean liner wear rate was 0.125 mm/year (range, 0.0-0.39 mm/year). Acetabular osteolysis was found in 14% (9 hips) of the 67 hips and was related to polyethylene wear (P=.0024). Although there was only 1 cup loosening in this study, there was a high rate of linear wear of the polyethylene liner and acetabular osteolysis in young, active patients. Further follow-up is therefore needed, and osteolysis and polyethylene wear should continue to be observed in young, active patients. PMID:20415300

  4. CLINICAL OUTCOME AFTER INFECTED TOTAL KNEE AND TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, Falk; Leichtle, Carmen Ina; Schlumberger, Michael; Leichtle, Ulf Gunther; Wünschel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Infection after total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a serious complication which typically leads to a long lasting and intensive surgical and medicamentous treatment. The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence outcome after revision surgery caused by prosthetic infection. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 64 patients who had revision surgery between 1989 and 2009 due to periprosthetic infection. We examined a total of 69 joints (TKA: 36%, THA: 64%), follow-up 5.1 years (0.5-21 years) after the initial surgical intervention. The mean patient age at time of surgery was 67 years old (43-79 years old). Clinical data and scores including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC)-Index, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS) were surveyed. Results: There was no difference in clinical scores regarding treatment between a single and a multiple stage treatment regime. Infections with multiple microorganisms and Enterococcus spp. lead to a significantly higher number of interventions. Using a modified Tsukayama system we classified 24% as type I, 34% type II and 42% type III- infections, with no differences in clinical outcome. Overweight patients had a significantly lower HHS and WOMAC-score. Immunosuppression leads to a worse WOMAC and HSS-Score. An increased number of procedures was associated to a limping gait. Conclusion: Thorough surgical technique leads to good clinical results independent of infection-type and treatment philosophy. Level of Evidence III, Case Control Study. PMID:26997914

  5. The effect of cup outer sizes on the contact mechanics and cement fixation of cemented total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-10-01

    One important loosening mechanism of the cemented total hip arthroplasty is the mechanical overload at the bone-cement interface and consequent failure of the cement fixation. Clinical studies have revealed that the outer diameter of the acetabular component is a key factor in influencing aseptic loosening of the hip arthroplasty. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the cup outer diameter on the contact mechanics and cement fixation of a cemented total hip replacement (THR) with different wear penetration depths and under different cup inclination angles using finite element (FE) method. A three-dimensional FE model was developed based on a typical Charnley hip prosthesis. Two acetabular cup designs with outer diameters of 40 and 43 mm were modelled and the effect of cup outer diameter, penetration depth and cup inclination angle on the contact mechanics and cement fixation stresses in the cemented THR were studied. The results showed that for all penetration depths and cup inclination angles considered, the contact mechanics in terms of peak von Mises stress in the acetabular cup and peak contact pressure at the bearing surface for the two cup designs were similar (within 5%). However, the peak von Mises stress, the peak maximum principal stress and peak shear stress in the cement mantle at the bone-cement interface for the 43 mm diameter cup design were predicted to be lower compared to those for the 40 mm diameter cup design. The differences were predicted to be 15-19%, 15-22% and 18-20% respectively for different cup penetration depths and inclination angles, which compares to the clinical difference of aseptic loosening incidence of about 20% between the two cup designs. PMID:26343226

  6. [Total hip arthroplasty in the treatment of arthrosis with coexistent high developmental hip dislocation].

    PubMed

    Matewski, Dariusz; Szymkowiak, Edward; Gumański, Ryszard

    2008-01-01

    The question if total hip arthroplasty ought to be advised for patients with high developmental hip dislocation is still actual. The subject of hip arthroplasty, as a method of surgical treatment of high developmental hip dislocation, was analyzed on the base of follow up of seven patients, who underwent this procedure. The mean age of patients was 44.5 (+/- 12.6) years. The mean time of follow up was 64.4 (21.6) months. Initial three patients were treated in two stage regime. In first stage, a surgical hip liberalization and skeletal traction through 3 weeks was performed. In 2nd stage we did total hip replacement with simultaneous shortening of the femoral shaft just below the lesser trochanter. In next four patients we performed total hip arthroplasty with simultaneous shortening of the femoral shaft in one stage. Protection of undesirable rotational instability after osteotomy was done by means of different ways of osteotomy fixation describe in paper. Applied surgical treatment allowed for implanting a cup of prosthesis in original place of acetabulum and reduction of the big anteversion of the femoral neck. The hip congruency was improved in all patients. Score in functional Harris hip scale increased from mean value of 50 points before hip arthroplasty to mean value of 85 points after surgery. The symptoms of late consolidation of osteotomy were observed in one patient with transverse osteotomy without anty-rotational fixation. Total hip replacement with simultaneous "Z" shortening osteotomy of the femoral shaft give good such clinical as radiological results in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis in accordance to high developmental hip dislocation. PMID:18847022

  7. Countrywise results of total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose An earlier Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) report on 280,201 total hip replacements (THRs) based on data from 1995–2006, from Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, was published in 2009. The present study assessed THR survival according to country, based on the NARA database with the Finnish data included. Material and methods 438,733 THRs performed during the period 1995–2011 in Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland were included. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to calculate survival probabilities with 95% confidence interval (CI). Cox multiple regression, with adjustment for age, sex, and diagnosis, was used to analyze implant survival with revision for any reason as endpoint. Results The 15-year survival, with any revision as an endpoint, for all THRs was 86% (CI: 85.7–86.9) in Denmark, 88% (CI: 87.6–88.3) in Sweden, 87% (CI: 86.4–87.4) in Norway, and 84% (CI: 82.9–84.1) in Finland. Revision risk for all THRs was less in Sweden than in the 3 other countries during the first 5 years. However, revision risk for uncemented THR was less in Denmark than in Sweden during the sixth (HR = 0.53, CI: 0.34–0.82), seventh (HR = 0.60, CI: 0.37–0.97), and ninth (HR = 0.59, CI: 0.36–0.98) year of follow-up. Interpretation The differences in THR survival rates were considerable, with inferior results in Finland. Brand-level comparison of THRs in Nordic countries will be required. PMID:24650019

  8. Patient injuries in primary total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Hirvensalo, Eero; Huhtala, Heini; Remes, Ville

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Although the results of primary total hip replacements (THRs) are generally excellent, sometimes serious complications arise. Some of these severe complications are considered to be patient injuries. We analyzed primary THR-related patient injuries in a nationwide setting. Patients and methods - We evaluated all the primary THR-related patient injury claims in Finland between 2008 and 2010. We used the original medical records and 2 nationwide registries, the Care Register for Social Welfare and Health Care and the Patient Injury Claim Register. Results - We identified 563 claims, 44% of which were compensated (n = 250). Of these 250 compensated claims, 79% were considered to be avoidable (treatment injuries) and 21% were severe unexpected infections (with a preoperative infection risk of less than 2%). The most common type of technical error was cup malposition (31%). High-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume ≥ 400) had a lower patient injury rate. In lower-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume of < 400), the relative risks (RRs) of patient injury for any reason, due to technical errors, or because of cup malposition were 2-fold (95% CI: 1.6-3.1), 4-fold (95% CI: 2.3-6.2), and 9-fold (95% CI: 3-28), respectively, compared to high-volume hospitals. Interpretation - Our study provides the first comprehensive nationwide data on THR-related patient injury types. Hospital volume was associated with the quality and quantity of errors detected. An annual hospital volume of ≥ 400 primary THRs was established as a protective factor against patient injuries. PMID:26808350

  9. Infection after primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lindeque, Bennie; Hartman, Zach; Noshchenko, Andriy; Cruse, Margaret

    2014-04-01

    The number of primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed in the United States each year continues to climb, as does the incidence of infectious complications. The changing profile of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has made preventing and treating primary THA infections increasingly complex. The goal of this review was to summarize (1) the published data concerning the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after primary THA by type of bacteria and (2) the effect of potentially modifying factors. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, EMBASE, Web of Science, and PubMed were searched. Studies dated between 2001 and 2011 examining primary THA in adults were included. Meta-analysis of the collected data was performed. The pooled SSI rate was 2.5% (95% confidence interval [Cl], 1.4%-4.4%; P<.001; n=28,883). The pooled deep prosthetic joint infection (PJI) rate was 0.9% (95% Cl, 0.4%-2.2%; P<.001; n=28,883). The pooled rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus SSI was 0.5% (95% Cl, 0.2%-1.5%; P<.001; n=26,703). This is approximately 20% of all SSI cases. The pooled rate of intraoperative bacterial wound contamination was 16.9% (95% Cl, 6.6%-36.8%; P=.003; n=2180). All these results had significant heterogeneity. The postoperative risk of SSI was significantly associated with intraoperative bacterial surgical wound contamination (pooled rate ratio, 2.5; 95% Cl, 1.4%-4.6%; P=.001; n=19,049). PMID:24762833

  10. Future Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  11. Future bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun-Dong

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  12. Patient injuries in primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Hirvensalo, Eero; Huhtala, Heini; Remes, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Although the results of primary total hip replacements (THRs) are generally excellent, sometimes serious complications arise. Some of these severe complications are considered to be patient injuries. We analyzed primary THR-related patient injuries in a nationwide setting. Patients and methods We evaluated all the primary THR-related patient injury claims in Finland between 2008 and 2010. We used the original medical records and 2 nationwide registries, the Care Register for Social Welfare and Health Care and the Patient Injury Claim Register. Results We identified 563 claims, 44% of which were compensated (n = 250). Of these 250 compensated claims, 79% were considered to be avoidable (treatment injuries) and 21% were severe unexpected infections (with a preoperative infection risk of less than 2%). The most common type of technical error was cup malposition (31%). High-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume ≥ 400) had a lower patient injury rate. In lower-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume of < 400), the relative risks (RRs) of patient injury for any reason, due to technical errors, or because of cup malposition were 2-fold (95% CI: 1.6–3.1), 4-fold (95% CI: 2.3–6.2), and 9-fold (95% CI: 3–28), respectively, compared to high-volume hospitals. Interpretation Our study provides the first comprehensive nationwide data on THR-related patient injury types. Hospital volume was associated with the quality and quantity of errors detected. An annual hospital volume of ≥ 400 primary THRs was established as a protective factor against patient injuries. PMID:26808350

  13. Role of ceramic implants. Design and clinical success with total hip prosthetic ceramic-to-ceramic bearings.

    PubMed

    Clarke, I C

    1992-09-01

    Ceramic implants have become of great interest because of the increased awareness that wear debris from metal-polyethylene components of total hip prostheses can cause osteolysis around implants. Polyethylene wear rates with the Charnley total hip prosthesis were found to be from 0.1 to 0.2 mm/year in the elderly, which corresponded to 30 to 80 mm3 of polyethylene debris being released to the joint tissues. This in turn can be related to 40 million to 40 billion particles being released into the joint every year. This polyethylene particulate is heavily implicated in the osteolytic destruction of periarticular tissues. The ceramic ball, ceramic cup combination of total hip prostheses may have promise of wear rates that could be thousands of times smaller than polyethylene alone. Such alumina ceramic prosthetic concepts were introduced in Europe from 1970 to 1973. Under Food and Drug Administration regulations at that time, the only U.S. introductions allowed circa 1980 were the Autophor and Xenophor types of ceramic prostheses. However, this particular prosthetic design was not successful in the United States because of pain, neck-socket impingement, ceramic fracture, and component loosening. This did not therefore appear to be a successful compromise in the hands of U.S. surgeons. Ceramic innovations from Europe now include cemented ceramic cups of "matching" tolerances with the femoral ball, and press-fit Ti-alloy acetabular shells with modular ceramic inserts. In addition, alumina and zirconia ceramic balls are now in routine clinical use in Europe. The objectives of this Symposium are to highlight these ceramic ball, ceramic cup innovations with their long-term clinical results from Europe. Then one can evaluate which of these innovations in material and design selections offers the best possible alternatives in the 1990s. PMID:1516312

  14. Mild to Moderate Hip OA: Joint Preservation or Total Hip Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Peters, Christopher L

    2015-07-01

    Treatment of structural hip disease such as FAI and acetabular dysplasia has increased dramatically over the past decade with the goal of preservation of the native hip joint. A number of patient and disease specific parameters including the amount of underlying hip osteoarthrosis can help predict success with joint preservation surgery. Total hip arthroplasty remains a very good option in young patients who are not ideal candidates for joint preservation surgery. Future developments will help to better identify ideal surgical candidates and improve understanding of the disease processes. PMID:25842248

  15. Evaluation of the hip center in total hip arthroplasty for old developmental dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Flecher, Xavier; Parratte, Sebastien; Brassart, Nicolas; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel; Argenson, Jean-Noël

    2008-12-01

    We describe the problems with positioning the hip center according to the severity of dislocation in 97 cementless total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip. The mean location of the hip center from the interteardrop was 30.4 +/- 8.7 mm horizontally and 23.4 +/- 5.4 mm vertically. The presence of a limp correlated with a superior placement of the cup. Four cups were revised, 2 of which with a significant high hip center. The survival rate of the acetabular component was 95% at 12 years. Craniopodal repositioning was easy in class 1. In class 2, the cup was the largest. In class 3, the greatest variations of the hip center were found. In class 4, the smallest implants were necessary for positioning in the true acetabulum. PMID:18534475

  16. Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Girdlestone Hip following a Failed Hemiarthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, VJ; Ranganath, BT

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Girdlestone hip arthroplasty, though described as a salvage procedure for infected hip joints, can also be considered for failed Hemiarthroplasty procedures. The functional results of such Girdlestone hip may not be satisfactory. They may require total hip replacement to improve the quality of life, which are technically challenging. Here we are reporting such a case ina 60 year old male patient, with review of literature. Case Report: A 60 year old male patient underwent cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty for fracture neck of femur which failed, owing to improper implantation. Subsequently he underwent Girdlestone arthroplasty which resulted in persistent painful hip. He presented to us in this situation, where we successfully converted the Girdlestone arthroplasty to a Total Hip arthroplasty. Conclusion: Improper implantation in Hemiarthroplasty fails subsequently. In such cases Girdlestone arthroplasty may be an option to consider, though it may not give requisite relief to patient in some cases. In such situations total hip arthroplasty procedure, though technically challenging will give stable painless hip to the patient. PMID:27299043

  17. European experience with cementless total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Morscher, E W

    1983-01-01

    The differences between prostheses fixed with and without cement consist mainly of the design and the nature of the surface of the implant. The shapes of the sockets to be implanted without cement show a wide variety--cylinder, square, conus, ellipsoid with and without threads. The hemispherical shape, which was chosen for the acetabular component of the isoelastic hip joint, does not disturb the natural form and function of the hip joint since the outer surface is closely adapted to the original subchondral bone layer. Undesired stress concentrations therefore are eliminated. The fixation of the noncemented cup is secured by threads, pegs, screws, etc. and by ingrowth of bony tissue in the grooves of the surfaces. Except for some special forms, most of the stems are based on the self-locking principle. All prosthesis models show preparations that increase the surface area (ribs, wings, corrugations, or rims). PMID:6368478

  18. Ureaplasma urealyticum infection in total hip arthroplasty leading to revision.

    PubMed

    Sköldenberg, Olof G; Rysinska, Agata D; Neander, Gustaf; Muren, Olle H; Ahl, Torbjörn E

    2010-10-01

    We describe an infection with Ureaplasma urealyticum causing rapid loosening of a cemented total hip arthroplasty. When reviewing the literature we found that no such case has been reported previously. Taking intraoperative cultures for U urealyticum during revision surgery is not a standard procedure. In cases with rapid, presumed aseptic, loosening of a total hip arthroplasty, an infection with U urealyticum should be considered. PMID:20705423

  19. Total hip replacement for high dislocated hips without femoral shortening osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Zhu, Z-A; Xie, Y-Z; Yu, B; Yu, D-G

    2011-09-01

    When performing total hip replacement (THR) in high dislocated hips, the presence of soft-tissue contractures means that most surgeons prefer to use a femoral shortening osteotomy in order to avoid the risk of neurovascular damage. However, this technique will sacrifice femoral length and reduce the extent of any leg-length equalisation. We report our experience of 74 THRs performed between 2000 and 2008 in 65 patients with a high dislocated hip without a femoral shortening osteotomy. The mean age of the patients was 55 years (46 to 72) and the mean follow-up was 42 months (12 to 78). All implants were cementless except for one resurfacing hip implant. We attempted to place the acetabular component in the anatomical position in each hip. The mean Harris hip score improved from 53 points (34 to 74) pre-operatively to 86 points (78 to 95) at final follow-up. The mean radiologically determined leg lengthening was 42 mm (30 to 66), and the mean leg-length discrepancy decreased from 36 mm (5 to 56) pre-operatively to 8.5 mm (0 to 18) postoperatively. Although there were four (5%) post-operative femoral nerve palsies, three had fully resolved by six months after the operation. No loosening of the implant was observed, and no dislocations or infections were encountered. Total hip replacement without a femoral shortening osteotomy proved to be a safe and effective surgical treatment for high dislocated hips. PMID:21911529

  20. Isokinetic performance of hip muscles after revision total hip arthroplasty via previous anterolateral approach.

    PubMed

    Cankaya, Deniz; Aydin, Cemal; Karakus, Dilek; Toprak, Ali; Ozkurt, Bulent; Tabak, Yalçın

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the isokinetic performance of hip muscles and clinical outcomes after revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) via same anterolateral approach used in primary surgery. Thirty patients who had undergone previous THA via an anterolateral approach underwent both acetabular and femoral component revision after aseptic loosening. The Harris Hip Score (HHS) was evaluated during a minimum 2-year follow-up. The isokinetic muscle strength of the operated and nonoperated hips was assessed 1 year after surgery. The HHS improved from 49.0 to 77.4. Operated and nonoperated hips exhibited similar isokinetic performance during all measurements (flexion, extension, and abduction) (p>0.05). This prospective study showed that the anterolateral approach preserves abductor strength after revision THA in aseptic cases with acceptable functional and clinical results. The main clinical relevance of this study is that the same anterolateral approach used in previous primary THA is also safe and viable for revision THA. PMID:26435233

  1. Effects of preoperative physiotherapy in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Czyżewska, Anna; Walesiak, Katarzyna; Krawczak, Karolina; Cabaj, Dominika; Górecki, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) claimed osteoarthritis as a civilization-related disease. The effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy among patients suffering hip osteoarthritis (OA) at the end of their conservative treatment is rarely described in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life and musculoskeletal health status of patients who received preoperative physiotherapy before total hip replacement (THR) surgery within a year prior to admission for a scheduled THR and those who did not. Material and methods Forty-five patients, admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Locomotor System for elective total hip replacement surgery, were recruited for this study. The assessment consisted of a detailed interview using various questionnaires: the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), as well as physical examination. Patients were assigned to groups based on their attendance of preoperative physiotherapy within a year prior to surgery. Results Among patients who received preoperative physiotherapy a significant improvement was found for pain, daily functioning, vitality, psychological health, social life, and (active and passive) internal rotation (p < 0.05). Conclusions Patients are not routinely referred to physiotherapy within a year before total hip replacement surgery. This study confirmed that pre-operative physiotherapy may have a positive influence on selected musculoskeletal system status indicators and quality of life in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting surgery. PMID:25395951

  2. Cementless porous-coated anatomic medullary locking total hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Kim, V E

    1994-06-01

    The authors studied 50 consecutive and nonselected patients (52 hips) who were followed for a minimum of 7 years (range, 84-89 months) after they had a primary total hip arthroplasty with an uncemented Anatomic Medullary Locking (DePuy, Warsaw, IN) hip system. The average age of the patients at operation was 47.6 years (range, 19-88 years). The operative diagnoses were: avascular necrosis of the femoral head in 18 hips (34%), osteoarthritis in 16 (31%), fracture of the femoral neck in 14 (27%), and miscellaneous in 4 (8%). The average preoperative Harris hip score was 59 points (range, 6-67 points) that improved to 91 points (range, 69-100 points) at the 7-year follow-up examination. To assess the adequacy of intramedullary fit, the fit of the stem at the proximal canal and isthmus level was evaluated. Forty-one hips (79%) had a good press-fit at both the proximal canal and isthmus level, five hips (10%) had a good press-fit at the proximal canal only, and the remaining six hips (11%) had a poor fit at both the proximal canal and isthmus level. Of the 46 hips that had a good press-fit at the proximal canal and/or isthmus level or proximal canal only, 32 (70%) had bone ingrowth and 14 (30%) had stable fibrous tissue ingrowth. Of the remaining six hips with a poor press-fit at both the proximal canal and isthmus level, three (6%) had stable fibrous tissue ingrowth and another three (6%) were unstable. Of the three hips (6%) with femoral component loosening, one was revised and the other two were asymptomatic. There was an alarmingly high incidence of perioprosthetic osteolysis in our series: 16 hips (31%) had acetabular and femoral osteolysis and 13 hips (25%) had femoral osteolysis only. Also, there was a strikingly high incidence of polyethylene-liner wear (12 hips or 23%). Although the incidence of component loosening was low, a high incidence of periprosthetic osteolysis and excessive wear in the polyethylene linear remain challenging problems after insertion of

  3. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patient with Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young Wook; Kim, Seung Chan; Kwon, Soon Yong; Park, Do Joon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with aplastic anemia (AA) are now living longer and therefore are at increased risk for the development of osteonecrosis of the hip. However, studies on the results of total hip arthroplasty (THA) are lacking. The purpose of this study is to present the result of THA in patients with AA. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the data for a group of 29 patients (45 hips) with AA who presented to our institution for THA between May 2008 and May 2012. All hips were replaced because of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. A specific prospective protocol was followed for the perioperative transfusion of platelets and blood. The clinical and radiographic evaluations were done, and the minimum follow-up period was 3 years (mean, 49.2 months; range, 36 to 84 months). Results Three hips had excessive perioperative bleeding and hematoma formation, and then hematoma evacuations were done; one hip was finally revised because of infection of acetabular component. One patient with poorly controlled AA died due to delayed infection on the hip joint. All hips showed stable fixation, and the mean Harris hip score was improved from 54.2 points (range, 42 to 69 points) preoperatively to 90.8 points (range, 73 to 97 points) at the time of the latest follow-up. Conclusion In the present study, the durability of implant fixation was maintained and the clinical results demonstrated a sustained increase in function of the hip. Postoperatively, paying attention to bleeding and infection should be needed. PMID:27536640

  4. Recurrent Catastrophic Ceramic Femoral Head Failure in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tai, S. M. M.; Parker, L.; de Roeck, N. J.; Skinner, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Fracture of a modern ceramic head component in total hip replacement is an uncommon but catastrophic complication. Hence, the occurrence of a second ceramic head fracture in the same hip replacement of an individual represents a perishingly rare event. We present the case as a means of highlighting potential risk factors for ceramic head fracture and suggest possible management strategies in such cases. PMID:24991441

  5. Preventing Leg Length Discrepancy and Instability After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sculco, Peter K; Austin, Matthew S; Lavernia, Carlos J; Rosenberg, Aaron G; Sierra, Rafael J

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of equal leg lengths and dynamic hip stability are essential elements of a successful total hip arthroplasty. A careful clinical examination, a preoperative plan, and appropriate intraoperative techniques are necessary to achieve these goals. Preoperative identification of patients at risk for residual leg length discrepancy allows surgeons to adjust the surgical approach and/or the type of implant and provide better preoperative patient education. The use of larger femoral heads, high-offset stem options, and enhanced soft-tissue repairs have improved impingement-free range of motion as well as dynamic hip stability and have contributed to an overall reduction in dislocation. Methods for accurate leg length restoration and component positioning include anatomic landmarks, intraoperative radiographs, intraoperative calipers, stability testing, and computer-assisted surgery. If recurrent instability occurs after total hip arthroplasty, the underlying cause for dislocation should be identified and treated; this may include the use of semiconstrained dual-mobility or fully constrained liners, depending on abductor function. Surgeons should be aware of the clinical and surgical techniques for achieving leg length equalization and dynamic hip stability in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27049193

  6. Prevalence of osteoporosis in patients awaiting total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Vitor Rodrigues; de Campos, Gustavo Constantino; Plapler, Pérola Grimberg; de Rezende, Márcia Uchôa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of osteoporosis in patients awaiting total hip arthroplasty. Method: Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with hip osteoarthritis awaiting primary total arthroplasty of the hip answered WOMAC questionnaire, VAS and questions about habits, osteoporosis and related diseases. Bone mineral densitometry of the lumbar spine and hips and laboratory tests (complete blood count and examination of calcium metabolism) were performed. Weight and height were measured to calculate body mass index (BMI). The evaluated quantitative characteristics were compared between patients with and without osteoporosis using the Mann-Whitney tests. Results: Thirteen men and 16 women with a mean age of 61.5 years old, WOMAC 51.4; EVA 6.4 and BMI 27.6 were evaluated. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 20.7%, and 37.9% had osteopenia. Patients with osteoporosis were older than patients without osteoporosis (p=0.006). The mean bone mineral density of the femoral neck without hip osteoarthritis was lower than the affected side (p=0.007). Thirty-five percent of patients did not know what osteoporosis is. Of these, 30% had osteopenia or osteoporosis. Conclusion: osteoarthritis and osteoporosis may coexist and the population waiting for total hip arthroplasty should be considered at risk for the presence of osteoporosis. Level of Evidence III, Observational Study. PMID:26327793

  7. Clinical Implication of Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young-Soo; Lee, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Cho, Yoon-Je

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of diabetes mellitus on primary total hip arthroplasty by comparing the clinical outcomes of patients diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus before the operation with those without diabetes. Materials and Methods A total 413 patients who underwent unilateral cementless total hip arthroplasty from June 2006 to May 2009 were recruited and divided into diabetic and non-diabetic groups. The comparative analysis between the two groups was made. We evaluated Harris hip score, postoperative complications such as wound problem, surgical site infection, other medical complication and length of stay in hospital as clinical parameters. Radiographic evaluations were also included to determine loosening, dislocation and osteolysis. Results Patients with diabetes had an increased incidence of orthopaedic complications including surgical site infection and mortality, but other medical complications were not increased in diabetic patients. All complications after primary total hip arthroplasty were associated with diabetes mellitus, but the degree of diabetes was not associated with complications. Conclusion Diabetes mellitus increases incidence of orthopaedic complications, particularly deep infection, after cementless primary total hip arthroplasty.

  8. Relative importance of gait vs. joint positioning on hip contact forces after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C; Hurwitz, Debra E; Wimmer, Markus A

    2009-12-01

    Implant loosening is a common indication for total hip replacement (THR) revision. High contact forces and implant twisting moments are thought to be associated with implant loosening. Relationships between joint positioning and hip forces, or outcomes, have been investigated through in vivo and in vitro modalities. Relationships between hip forces and gait are less understood, despite repeated findings that gait following a THR does not fully return to normal. We tested the hypothesis that gait parameters would be better predictors of implant force (peak contact forces and peak twisting moment during walking) than joint positioning parameters. Subjects underwent gait analysis, hip force modeling, and measurement of clinical radiographs 1 year after successful THR surgery. Gait parameters were consistently more influential in determining hip forces. Alone, gait explained as much as 67% of the variation in force, compared to a maximum of 33% by joint geometry. Combinations of gait and joint positioning parameters together explained up to 86% of the variation in hip force parameters. Results suggest that gait may provide a valuable postoperatively modifiable target to improve hip loads and potentially reduce the risk for implant loosening. PMID:19514072

  9. Diagnosis of infected total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Enayatollahi, Mohammad A; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Despite the battery of available tests, the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) remains a challenge. A comprehensive medical history and physical examination with appropriate radiographs followed by erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum C-reactive protein are the first-line screening test for patients with suspected hip PJI. The second line of investigation of patients with abnormal serology or a strong suspicion for PJI, is joint aspiration. Aspirates should be sent for assessment of white blood cell count, polymorphonuclear percentage, leukocyte esterase strip test, and microbiology. If the first attempt fails, the joint should be re-aspirated at a different time. The International Consensus recommends against infiltration of saline or other fluids into a "dry" joint. In patients not planned for surgery but need further evaluation for PJI, a nuclear imaging study may help. In others with a planned revision surgery, intraoperative samples for frozen section and culture study are the best measures available. Treatment strategies for PJI are well established in the literature. Poor surgical candidates receive oral suppressive antibiotic therapy alone. Acute PJI, presenting within 4 weeks of the index surgery, or as a result of bacteraemia, may be treated with irrigation and debridement and implant retention. Chronic PJI, occurring more than 4 weeks after initial surgery, is treated with 1-stage or 2-stage revision arthroplasty. In some persistent infections or patients who refuse to undergo revision surgery, salvage procedures may be needed. PMID:26044538

  10. Contemporary Strategies for Rapid Recovery Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stambough, Jeffrey B; Beaulé, Paul E; Nunley, Ryan M; Clohisy, John

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, rapid recovery protocols for total hip arthroplasty have evolved in parallel with advancements in pain management, regional anesthesia, focused rehabilitation, and the patient selection process. As fiscal pressures from payers of health care increase, surgical outcomes and complications are being scrutinized, which evokes a sense of urgency for arthroplasty surgeons as well as hospitals. The implementation of successful accelerated recovery pathways for total hip arthroplasty requires the coordinated efforts of surgeons, practice administrators, anesthesiologists, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, case managers, and postacute care providers. To optimize performance outcomes, it is important for surgeons to select patients who are eligible for rapid recovery. The fundamental tenets of multimodal pain control, regional anesthesia, prudent perioperative blood management, venous thromboembolic prophylaxis, and early ambulation and mobility should be collectively addressed for all patients who undergo primary total hip replacement. PMID:27049192

  11. Combined Anterior and Posterior Approach in Total Hip Arthroplasty for Crowe IV Dysplasia or Ankylosed Hips.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Kyun; Kim, Ki-Choul; Ha, Yong-chan; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated 70 patients (71 hips) who underwent complex total hip arthroplasty (THA) through the combined anterior and posterior approach. Sixty-five patients (32 dislocated hips and 34 ankylosed hips) were followed-up at a minimum of 3 years (median, 6 years; range, 3-10 years). Seven patients (10.6%), who had transient paresthesia on the anterior thigh, recovered within 3 months. All patients had a good clinical outcome in terms of range of motion, pain and recovery of walking. At the latest follow-up, all prostheses had bone-ingrown stability without any detectable wear or osteolysis. The combined approach allows an excellent exposure of the acetabulum for accurate cup alignment, leg lengthening and mobilization of joint in complex THA without trochanteric osteotomy, excessive abductor release and femoral shortening osteotomy. PMID:25682205

  12. Composite technology for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Skinner, H B

    1988-10-01

    Composite materials, which can be very strong while having a low modulus of elasticity, are being studied because such materials have potential to be made into isoelastic hip prostheses. Composites intended for medical applications incorporate carbon or polyamide as a fiber component, while polysulfone, polyetheretherketone, or polyethylene is used as a matrix component. Mechanical properties (especially the modulus of elasticity) are emphasized because of the desire to match those properties of the proximal femur. Many of the variables that affect the mechanical properties of these materials are explained. The application of stress to different fiber orientations demonstrates the mechanical properties of the composite, and this is proved mathematically. It is shown that in composites with fibers oriented in the same direction, the modulus of elasticity in the direction of the fibers generally approaches that of the fibers as the amount of matrix decreases. Perpendicular to the fibers, the modulus of elasticity of the composite is only slightly greater than that of the matrix material. For isotropic chopped-fiber composites, the modulus of elasticity approaches that of the matrix as the fiber content decreases; at high-fiber content, the modulus is significantly less than that of oriented long-fiber composites. In general, the modulus of elasticity and fiber content have a linear relationship. Composites have fatigue properties that vary with direction and approach ultimate strength in tension but are lower in compression. The fatigue properties of proposed composites are discussed. Abrasion as a cause of stress concentration sites and wear particles is considered. PMID:3416528

  13. The rotating platform mobile bearing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, R B

    2000-01-01

    The recent evolution of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been substantial and unlike that of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The current THA technique is similar to that initially developed and perfected by Professor John Charnley in the mid 1960s. The ball-and-socket articulation of the hip is simple and reproducible biomechanically. The long term (20 years and longer) results with total hip arthroplasty have been very satisfactory. The THA prosthetic designs of today remain similar to those of years past. Improvements have been in biomaterials, methods of fixation and surgical technique. The total knee arthroplasty prostheses of today differ greatly from their predecessors. PMID:21136412

  14. The Rotating Platform Mobile Bearing Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, R Barry

    2000-10-01

    The recent evolution of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been substantial and unlike that of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The current THA technique is similar to that initially developed and perfected by Professor John Charnley in the mid 1960s. The ball-and-socket articulation of the hip is simple and reproducible biomechanically. The long term (20 years and longer) results with total hip arthroplasty have been very satisfactory. The THA prosthetic designs of today remain similar to those of years past. Improvements have been in biomaterials, methods of fixation and surgical technique. The total knee arthroplasty prostheses of today differ greatly from their predecessors. PMID:12219304

  15. [Blood vessel and nerve damage in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Dietze, S; Perka, C; Baecker, H

    2014-01-01

    Blood vessel and nerve damage are uncommon complications in total hip arthroplasty (THA). With an incidence between 0.1 and 0.2 % in primary THA these complications are rare but can be serious with a high mortality risk. The individual risk is determined by multiple factors depending on the surgeon's skills, the number of previous surgeries and the approach itself. The anatomy of the defect is an essential risk factor. Some procedures, such as the use of screws for cup fixation are associated with a higher risk of vascular and neural damage. The acetabular quadrant system of the hip as described by Wasielewski et al. is a useful tool to visualize the neurovascular anatomy of the hip, to detect the safe zone and subsequently prevent complications. Sciatic nerve palsy after total hip replacement is the most common nerve damage followed by femoral nerve damage. Previous surgery, a posterior approach and excessive leg extension are the most common risk factors for nerve damage. In order to diagnose nerve palsy after orthopedic surgery an electromyogram can be of use to assess the extent and prognosis. This article focuses on vascular and neural complications after total hip arthroplasty and the options for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:24384891

  16. Lower limb length and offset in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Flecher, X; Ollivier, M; Argenson, J N

    2016-02-01

    Restoration of normal hip biomechanics is a key goal of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and favorably affects functional recovery. Furthermore, a major concern for both the surgeon and the patient is preservation or restoration of limb length equality, which must be achieved without compromising the stability of the prosthesis. Here, definitions are given for anatomic and functional limb length discrepancies and for femoral and hip offset, determined taking anteversion into account. Data on the influence of operated-limb length and offset on patient satisfaction, hip function, and prosthesis survival after THA are reviewed. Errors may adversely impact function, quality of life, and prosthetic survival and may also generate conflicts between the surgeon and patient. Surgeons rely on two- or three-dimensional preoperative templating and on intraoperative landmarks to manage offset and length. Accuracy can be improved by using computer-assisted planning or surgery and the more recently introduced EOS imaging system. The prosthetic's armamentarium now includes varus-aligned and lateralized implants, as well as implants with modular or custom-made necks, which allow restoration of the normal hip geometry, most notably in patients with coxa vara or coxa valga. Femoral anteversion must also receive careful attention. The most common errors are limb lengthening and a decrease in hip offset. When symptoms are caused by an error in length and/or offset, revision arthroplasty may deserve consideration. PMID:26797005

  17. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27536639

  18. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Min, Byung-Woo; Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27536639

  19. Wear testing of total hip replacements under severe conditions.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Fabry, Christian; Reinders, Joern; Dammer, Rebecca; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Bader, Rainer; Sonntag, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Controlled wear testing of total hip replacements in hip joint simulators is a well-established and powerful method, giving an extensive prediction of the long-term clinical performance. To understand the wear behavior of a bearing and its limits under in vivo conditions, testing scenarios should be designed as physiologically as possible. Currently, the ISO standard protocol 14242 is the most common preclinical testing procedure for total hip replacements, based on a simplified gait cycle for normal walking conditions. However, in recent years, wear patterns have increasingly been observed on retrievals that cannot be replicated by the current standard. The purpose of this study is to review the severe testing conditions that enable the generation of clinically relevant wear rates and phenomena. These conditions include changes in loading and activity, third-body wear, surface topography, edge wear and the role of aging of the bearing materials. PMID:26048088

  20. CIRCUMFERENTIAL PROXIMAL FEMORAL ALLOGRAFTS IN TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY REVISION SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Bruno Dutra; Roos, Milton Valdomiro; Júnior, Antero Camisa; Lampert, Henrique Bonotto; da Silva, Matheus Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from patients who underwent femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of total hip arthroplasty, using circumferential proximal femoral allografts and cemented implants. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 32 patients (33 hips) who underwent femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of total hip arthroplasty, using circumferential proximal femoral allografts and cemented implants. Among these patients, 28 (29 hips) fulfilled all the requirements for this study. The mean follow-up was five years and two months. The clinical evaluation was done in accordance with the Harris Hip Score. Radiographically, the patients were assessed regarding reabsorption and consolidation of the allograft, migration of the greater trochanter, stability of the femoral component and heterotypic calcification. Results: The average preoperative Harris Hip Score was 32 points. At the last postoperative follow-up, the average score was 82 points. Allograft resorption of some degree was seen in nine hips (31%). Regarding consolidation, 24 cases (82.8%) showed full consolidation, three (10.3%) showed partial consolidation and two (6.9%) showed pseudarthrosis. All femoral components were stable. According to the criteria established, 27 cases (93.1%) were considered to be successful reconstructions after a mean follow-up of five years and two months. Conclusion: From the results obtained, it was concluded that use of circumferential proximal femoral allografts in selected cases of femoral reconstruction secondary to loosening of arthroplasty presented a high survival rate from the reconstruction over an average follow-up of five years and two months. PMID:27047896

  1. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. Material/Methods A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. Results A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). Conclusions 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  2. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. RESULTS A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  3. Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty in 20 Years Old Female with Neglected Developmental Dysplasia of Hip

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Jain, Jitesh K; Sharma, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Management of developmental dysplasia of hip in adult is challenging problem. Management protocols are not well defined in terms of operative technique. Patient may present very late. Usually they consult orthopaedic surgeons when osteoarthritic changes set in, leading to pain. Operative management is difficult because of difficult exposure, altered anatomy of soft tissue structures, hypoplastic femoral medullary canal and shallow and atypical acetabulum filled with soft tissues. Femoral head is up-ridden with contracted Abductors which resists reduction of femoral head into acetabulum. Altered anatomy of neurovascular structures also pose a risk of being injured during surgery. Case Report Here we are presenting a case of bilateral total hip arthroplasty in 20 years old female with developmental dysplasia of hip and sharing our experience of its operative management. Conclusion We concluded from this case study that total hip arthroplasty in developmental dysplasia of hip is technically demanding but gives good functional and clinical result. For getting functionally good result contracted soft tissues around joint need special attention. PMID:27298952

  4. Total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Daras, Mariza; Macaulay, William

    2009-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA), an effective treatment for patients with end-stage arthritic hip conditions, provides dramatic pain relief, enhances mobility, and restores function.The success of THA in older patients, in concert with improvements in techniques and biomaterials, has stimulated demand for this procedure in younger, more active patients hoping to regain full activity. Although young age remains a relative contraindication to THA, the weight of this factor has diminished. Several investigators have reported results of low-friction arthroplasty in young patients. Unfortunately, the value of these studies is limited because of heterogeneous hip pathology in the younger groups, particularly given that preoperative pathology has proved to significantly affect implant survival. In this review of the literature, we focus on THA survival in young, active patients with a preoperative diagnosis of noninflammatory osteoarthritis. PMID:19377644

  5. Bilateral total hip replacement in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Dalton, David Michael; Magill, Paul; Mulhall, Kevin James

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a case of bilateral total hip replacements (THRs) in a 56-year-old patient with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). The considerations for the perioperative period and the outcome are discussed. Preoperative planning included an anaesthetic review and availability of fiberoptic intubation due to poor mouth opening. Perioperatively, contractures can make positioning and exposure difficult but in this case a standard posterior approach was taken. Particular attention was given to soft tissue balancing given the theoretical risk of dislocation. There were no perioperative complications. Postoperatively there has been improvement in pain and hip scores but the patient has failed to return to work. Objective improvements in range of motion (ROM) have not been made. This experience suggests THR is a safe and effective treatment for osteoarthritic hip pain in patients with AMC but patients should be informed that ROM is unlikely to improve. PMID:26607193

  6. Cementless total hip arthroplasty in developmental dysplasia of the hip with end stage osteoarthritis: 2-7 years' clinical results.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Tugrul; Guclu, Berk; Karaguven, Dogac; Kaya, Alper; Akan, Burak; Cetin, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2011, 102 hips of 78 patients with end-stage osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). According to the Crowe's classification, 22 hips (21%) were type 1, 19 hips (18%) were type 2, 22 hips (21%) were type 3 and 39 hips (38%) were type 4 respectively. Functional and clinical analyses were performed by Harris Hip Scores (HHS). There were 73 (71%) excellent or good results according to HHS. The postoperative HHS was significantly lower in patients who underwent femoral shortening (p<0.01). We observed 25 (24.5%) complications in total, 15 (14.7%) of which required revision surgery. The authors concluded that THA for DDH is a safe and a reliable procedure with good clinical outcomes. PMID:25907395

  7. Avoiding Hip Instability and Limb Length Discrepancy After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sculco, Peter K; Cottino, Umberto; Abdel, Matthew P; Sierra, Rafael J

    2016-04-01

    Two complications after total hip arthroplasty (THA) are hip instability and limb length discrepancy; instability is a common indication for revision THA. The goal of a successful THA is to maximize impingement-free range of motion, recreate appropriate offset, and equalize limb length discrepancies to produce a pain-free and dynamically stable THA. In this article, the patient risk factors for dislocation and limb length discrepancy, key elements of the preoperative template, the anatomic landmarks for accurate component placement, the leg positions for soft tissue stability testing, and the management of postoperative instability are reviewed. PMID:26772941

  8. A Useful Anatomical Reference Guide for Stem Anteversion during Total Hip Arthroplasty in the Dysplastic Hip.

    PubMed

    Tsukeoka, Tadashi; Tsuneizumi, Yoshikazu; Lee, Tae Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography scans of 50 dysplastic hips were obtained and reconstructed using preoperative planning software for total hip arthroplasty. The anteversion of the stem implanted parallel to the line connecting the trochanteric fossa and the middle of the medial cortex of the femoral neck (T line) was measured. The cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm above the lesser trochanter were simulated. The mean difference of the anteversion of the stem using the T line and the native femoral anteversion was 2.7° (95% CI: 1.0°-4.5°) and 3.5° (95% CI: 1.5°-5.5°) at cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm respectively. An anteversion using a T line is compatible with native femoral anteversion even in developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:25873282

  9. Cementless Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty with Ceramic Articulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jong-Hyuck; Yang, Seong-Jo; Kang, Joon-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The results of ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearing surfaces in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) were well known. However, it was not known in revision THA. The purpose of this study is to report the results of revision THA with ceramic articulation. Materials and Methods A total of 112 revision THAs were evaluated. The mean age at the time of surgery was 51.6 years (27.7 to 84.2 years). The mean duration of the follow-up periods was 6.3 years (2.3 to 11.4 years). Results The Harris hip scores improved from an average of 56.2 at the index surgery to an average of 93.3 at the last follow-up (P<0.001). None of hips showed osteolysis or ceramic head fracture. One hip showed aseptic loosening in the acetabular component with squeaking that caused a re-revision. There were nine cases of dislocation. The survivorship at 5 years was 94.5% (95% confidence interval, 87.9% to 97.6%) with revision for any reason as the endpoint and 100% with femoral revision. Conclusion The ceramic articulation is one of good bearing options for revision THA in patients with a long life expectancy. PMID:27536630

  10. Increased Long-Term Cardiovascular Risk After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Max; Rysinska, Agata; Garland, Anne; Rolfson, Ola; Aspberg, Sara; Eisler, Thomas; Garellick, Göran; Stark, André; Hailer, Nils P.; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Total hip arthroplasty is a common and important treatment for osteoarthritis patients. Long-term cardiovascular effects elicited by osteoarthritis or the implant itself remain unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine if there is an increased risk of late cardiovascular mortality and morbidity after total hip arthroplasty surgery. A nationwide matched cohort study with data on 91,527 osteoarthritis patients operated on, obtained from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register. A control cohort (n = 270,688) from the general Swedish population was matched 1:3 to each case by sex, age, and residence. Mean follow-up time was 10 years (range, 7–21). The exposure was presence of a hip replacement for more than 5 years. The primary outcome was cardiovascular mortality after 5 years. Secondary outcomes were total mortality and re-admissions due to cardiovascular events. During the first 5 to 9 years, the arthroplasty cohort had a lower cardiovascular mortality risk compared with the control cohort. However, the risk in the arthroplasty cohort increased over time and was higher than in controls after 8.8 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.0–10.5). Between 9 and 13 years postoperatively, the hazard ratio was 1.11 (95% CI 1.05–1.17). Arthroplasty patients were also more frequently admitted to hospital for cardiovascular reasons compared with controls, with a rate ratio of 1.08 (95% CI 1.06–1.11). Patients with surgically treated osteoarthritis of the hip have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality many years after the operation when compared with controls. PMID:26871792

  11. Conventional Versus Cross-Linked Polyethylene for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Monestier, Luca; Vulcano, Ettore; Harwin, Steven F; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The clinical and radiographic outcomes of 88 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with either conventional polyethylene or cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) from the same manufacturer were compared. There were no significant differences between the 2 subpopulations regarding average age, gender, side affected, or prosthetic stem and cup size. The average follow-up was 104 months (range, 55 to 131 months). To the authors' knowledge, this is the longest follow-up for this particular insert. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results showed that XLPE has a significantly greater wear reduction than that of standard polyethylene in primary total hip arthroplasty. At the longest available follow-up for these specific inserts, XLPE proved to be effective in reducing wear. PMID:26375527

  12. Modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty. Experimental study in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This prospective experimental study evaluated the surgical procedure and results of modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty in dogs. Methods Ten skeletally mature healthy mongrel dogs with weights varying between 19 and 27 kg were used. Cemented modular femoral stems and uncemented porous-coated acetabular cups were employed. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed before surgery and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 360 days post-operation. Results Excellent weight bearing was noticed in the operated limb in seven dogs. Dislocation followed by loosening of the prosthesis was noticed in two dogs, which were therefore properly treated with a femoral head osteotomy. Femoral fracture occurred in one dog, which was promptly treated with full implant removal and femoral osteosynthesis. Conclusions The canine modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty provided excellent functionality of the operated limb. PMID:21736758

  13. [Modern tribology in total hip arthroplasty: pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Gómez-García, F

    2014-01-01

    The wear products and adverse reactions that occur on bearing surfaces represent one of the greatest challenges in prosthetic replacements, as the latter experience increasing demands due to the large number of young and older adult patients that have a long life expectancy and remarkable activity. The purpose of this review is to analyze the pros and cons of the new advances in the bearing components of the articular surfaces of current total hip arthroplasties. We also discuss the strategies used historically, their problems, results and the surgeon's role in prescribing the tribologic couple that best fits each patient's needs. We conclude with practical recommendations for the prescription and management of the latest articular couples for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26021098

  14. Evaluation and management of chronic total hip instability.

    PubMed

    Sheth, N P; Melnic, C M; Paprosky, W G

    2016-01-01

    Given the increasing number of total hip arthroplasty procedures being performed annually, it is imperative that orthopaedic surgeons understand factors responsible for instability. In order to treat this potentially complex problem, we recommend correctly classifying the type of instability present based on component position, abductor function, impingement, and polyethylene wear. Correct classification allows the treating surgeon to choose the appropriate revision option that ultimately will allow for the best potential outcome. PMID:26733640

  15. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this review was to assess the safety and effectiveness of metal on metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty for young patients compared with that of total hip replacement (THR) in the same population. Clinical Need Total hip replacement has proved to be very effective for late middle-aged and elderly patients with severe degenerative diseases of the hips. As indications for THR began to include younger patients and those with a more active life style, the longevity of the implant became a concern. Evidence suggests that these patients experience relatively higher rates of early implant failure and the need for revision. The Swedish hip registry, for example, has demonstrated a survival rate in excess of 80% at 20 years for those aged over 65 years, whereas this figure was 33% by 16 years in those aged under 55 years. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to THR that restores normal joint biomechanics and load transfer. The technique has been used around the world for more than 10 years, specifically in the United Kingdom and other European countries. The Technology Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative procedure to conventional THR in younger patients. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is less invasive than THR and addresses the problem of preserving femoral bone stock at the initial operation. This means that future hip revisions are possible with THR if the initial MOM arthroplasty becomes less effective with time in these younger patients. The procedure involves the removal and replacement of the surface of the femoral head with a hollow metal hemisphere, which fits into a metal acetabular cup. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a technically more demanding procedure than is conventional THR. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is retained, which makes it much more difficult to access the acetabular cup. However, hip resurfacing arthroplasty has several advantages over a

  16. Anterior muscle sparing approach for total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Moskal, Joseph T; Capps, Susan G; Scanelli, John A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the validity of positive claims regarding the direct anterior approach (DAA) with a fracture table for total hip arthroplasty. Recent literature regarding the DAA was searched and specific claims investigated including improved early outcomes, speed of recovery, component placement, dislocation rates, and complication rates. Recent literature is positive regarding the effects of total hip arthroplasty with the anterior approach. While the data is not definitive at present, patients receiving the anterior approach for total hip arthroplasty tend to recover more quickly and have improved early outcomes. Component placement with the anterior approach is more often in the “safe zone” than with other approaches. Dislocation rates tend to be less than 1% with the anterior approach. Complication rates vary widely in the published literature. A possible explanation is that the variance is due to surgeon and institutional experience with the anterior approach procedure. Concerns remain regarding the “learning curve” for both surgeons and institutions. In conclusion, it is not a matter of should this approach be used, but how should it be implemented. PMID:23362470

  17. Saving Implants BMP-2 Application in Revision Total Hip Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, M.; Emami, R.; Thorey, F.; Krauspe, R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Besides others, there are two major problems in total hip replacement surgery which result in implant failure. First there is aseptic loosening due to a lack of implant biocompatibility or micromovements and second periimplant wear debris induced osteolysis which limits the survival rate of an implant. Regarding to recent data there are only limited therapeutic strategies to heal these bony defects without arthroplasty revision surgery. Since the investigation and characterization of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow, a cell and tissue engineering based therapy might be a promising solution to heal endoprosthesis associated bony defects. Moreover the application of growth factors in bone reconstructive surgery is another treatment concept to promote local bone regeneration. Patient and Methods: We report about a 73-year old patient with a painful weight bearing and a large, wear debris induced pelvic osteolysis after total hip arthroplasty. To prevent from salvage surgical procedures and preserve bone, a healing attempted was performed by filling the critical bony defect zone with a BMP-2/MSC composit. Results: Clinical and radiological follow-ups showed a progressive bony healing of the critical size defect area without any complications. Fifteen months after application the patient is still pain free, has no limitations in daily life or sport activities. Conclusion: The case embarks on a strategy of non-embryonic stem cell and growth factor application to heal bony defects at patients with total hip endoprosthesis. PMID:23674982

  18. Basic Science Considerations in Primary Total Hip Replacement Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Saqeb B; Dunlop, Douglas G; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Naqvi, Syed G; Gangoo, Shafat; Salih, Saif

    2010-01-01

    Total Hip Replacement is one of the most common operations performed in the developed world today. An increasingly ageing population means that the numbers of people undergoing this operation is set to rise. There are a numerous number of prosthesis on the market and it is often difficult to choose between them. It is therefore necessary to have a good understanding of the basic scientific principles in Total Hip Replacement and the evidence base underpinning them. This paper reviews the relevant anatomical and biomechanical principles in THA. It goes on to elaborate on the structural properties of materials used in modern implants and looks at the evidence base for different types of fixation including cemented and uncemented components. Modern bearing surfaces are discussed in addition to the scientific basis of various surface engineering modifications in THA prostheses. The basic science considerations in component alignment and abductor tension are also discussed. A brief discussion on modular and custom designs of THR is also included. This article reviews basic science concepts and the rationale underpinning the use of the femoral and acetabular component in total hip replacement. PMID:20582240

  19. Preparation of the proximal femur in cementless total hip revision.

    PubMed

    Mallory, T H

    1988-10-01

    With an increased incidence of revision for the failed cemented total hip arthroplasty, techniques of revision surgery need meticulous attention to detail. Although the causes of the failed cemented total hip arthroplasty are many, they tend to follow characteristic patterns. The proximal femur can be exposed through an extensive muscle split incision, which offers a complete circumferential view of the femur. The cement removal is enhanced by controlled perforation using high-speed drills. Classification of bony deficits of the proximal femur can be divided into Type I, including intact cortex and medullary content; Type II, in which there is intact cortex but deficient medullary content; and Type III, in which deficits of both the cortex and medullary canal are present. Prosthetic selection is based on residual bone stock. In general, cementless fixation is advocated, with distal fixation using long-stem devices. Augmentation of bone deficits requires the use of segmental prosthetic replacement or fresh-frozen allografts. One hundred sixty patients were followed for two to six years. Satisfactory results have occurred in over 90% of the patients; better results are anticipated in patients with minimal bone deficits. Aseptic loosening requiring rerevision has occurred in 5% of the patient population. Understanding the dynamics of failure and the residual bone deficits allows one to manage the failed cemented total hip arthroplasty with greater efficiency and predictability. PMID:3416541

  20. Impingement and Dislocation in Total HIP Arthroplasty: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D; Elkins, Jacob M; Pedersen, Douglas R; Callaghan, John J

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary total hip arthroplasty, instability has been a complication in approximately 2% to 5% of primary surgeries and 5% to 10% of revisions. Due to the reduction in the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis that has been achieved over the last decade, instability now stands as the single most common reason for revision surgery. Moreover, even without frank dislocation, impingement and subluxation are implicated in a set of new concerns arising with advanced bearings, associated with the relatively unforgiving nature of many of those designs. Against that backdrop, the biomechanical factors responsible for impingement, subluxation, and dislocation remain under-investigated relative to their burden of morbidity. This manuscript outlines a 15-year program of laboratory and clinical research undertaken to improve the scientific basis for understanding total hip impingement and dislocation. The broad theme has been to systematically evaluate the role of surgical factors, implant design factors, and patient factors in predisposing total hip constructs to impinge, sublux, and/or dislocate. Because this class of adverse biomechanical events had not lent itself well to study with existing approaches, it was necessary to develop (and validate) a series of new research methodologies, relying heavily on advanced finite element formulations. Specific areas of focus have included identifying the biomechanical challenges posed by dislocation-prone patient activities, quantifying design parameter effects and component surgical positioning effects for conventional metal-on-polyethylene implant constructs, and the impingement/dislocation behavior of non-conventional constructs, quantifying the stabilizing role of the hip capsule (and of surgical repairs of capsule defects), and systematically studying impingement and edge loading of hard-on-hard bearings, fracture of ceramic liners, confounding effects of patient obesity, and subluxation-mediated worsening of third body

  1. Metastatic muscle abscesses complicating infected total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Balato, Giovanni; Ascione, Tiziana; Mariconda, Massimo; Pagliano, Pasquale

    2016-03-01

    A 73-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis presented to our institution with infection of her right total hip arthroplasty. On admission, a draining sinus tract over the hip and a palpable mass in the left lower posterior region of the neck were detected. The contrast CT scan showed a large abscess in the trapezius muscle and multiple abscesses involving muscle of the neck and right shoulder. Intraoperative specimens from the muscle abscess were positive for presumably the same methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus that sustained the prosthetic joint infection. Prolonged intravenous daptomycin led to remission of the muscle abscess and control of the prosthetic joint infection. The patient refused revision total hip arthroplasty and oral cotrimoxazole was prescribed for chronic suppression of the infection. Three years after the primary surgery there was stable remission of the prosthetic joint infection. This rare case demonstrates the severity of prosthetic joint infections sustained by multiresistant bacteria in immunocompromised hosts, which may result in their bacteraemic spread. PMID:27031898

  2. Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty: Comparative outcomes and contemporary results

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Keith P; Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-01

    Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty has become increasingly more popular among arthroplasty surgeons, in large part due to the use of an intramuscular interval and desire to reduce soft tissue damage. Several studies have now been published comparing the anterior intramuscular to other commonly used approaches, and many studies have published complication rates on large series of patients. Review of comparative studies indicates direct anterior hips tend towards shorter hospital stays and high rates of patients discharged to home. Although some studies show evidence of early benefit in functional outcomes, there is no strong evidence that the anterior approach provides any long term functional improvements compared to other approaches. Additionally, evidence to support reduced damage to soft tissue may not translate to certain clinical significance. Rates of intra-operative femur fracture, operative time and blood loss rates are notably higher for those developing familiarity with this approach. However, when surgeons have performed a modest number of procedures, the complication rates tend to markedly decrease in most studies to levels comparable to other approaches. Accuracy of component positioning also favors the anterior approach in some studies. This review summarizes the available literature comparing the direct anterior to other approaches for total hip arthroplasty and provides a comprehensive summary of common complications. PMID:26925380

  3. Metal sensitivity before and after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Deutman, R; Mulder, T J; Brian, R; Nater, J P

    1977-10-01

    Of 212 patients undergoing total hip replacement who were tested preoperatively for sensitivity to nickel, chromium, and cobalt, fourteen showed sensitivity. No sensitivity to the bone cement was recorded. Of 173 patients who had never had a metal implant before, 5.8 per cent showed a positive reaction. Two patients out of fifteen with a failed McKee-Farrar prosthesis were found to be sensitive. Of six patients who had a stable McKee-Farrar prosthesis in the other hip, none showed sensitivity to the metal. In four of sixty-six patients, sensitivity to nickel or cobalt developed after the implantation of a metal-to-plastic prosthesis. No patients were sensitized to the cement. The consequences of proved hypersensitivity in patients with metal-to-plastic prostheses, either present prior to insertion of the prosthesis or evoked by the implant material, are not known. PMID:908716

  4. Cementless hemispheric acetabular component in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Weber, D; Schaper, L A; Pomeroy, D L; Badenhausen, W E; Curry, J I; Smith, M W; Suthers, K E

    2000-01-01

    A series of 198 total hip arthroplasties was performed using a porous-coated, hemispheric press-fit cup. One hundred and twenty-seven cups were available for clinical and radiological examination at mean follow-up of 10.6 years. The mean age at the index procedure was 61.2 years. The mean Harris hip score at final follow-up was 89.8. Three cups were revised for aseptic loosening and two liners were changed for eccentric wear and pelvic osteolysis. Nine additional patients showed mild or suspected osteolysis. Two cups were rated "fibrous" stable. There was no correlation between additional screw fixation of the press-fit cup and osteolysis or revision. PMID:10990381

  5. Total hip arthroplasty: areview of advances, advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-Wei; Zi, Ying; Xiang, Liang-Bi; Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic outcomes of Osteoarthritis (OA) has been unsatisfactory and often surgeries such as total hip arthroplasty (THA) is required. THA is an effective treatment for patients with end-stage arthritic hip conditions. Cemented THA has been the treatment of choice for elderly patients with OA. An improvement in Timed “Up and Go” (TUG) before surgery might contribute to a decrease in the occurrence of DVT after THA, though post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), a chronic condition in the lower extremity does not appear to be a major complication after DVT in patients undergoing THA. For OA, four domains to be evaluated: pain, physical function, joint imaging, and patient global assessment. Thus, THA can be cost saving or, at least cost- effective in improving quality-adjusted life expectancy. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances as well as advantages and limitations of THA. PMID:25784971

  6. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, T.; Feng, J. G.; Liu, T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the operative outcome between mini and standard incisions in total hip arthroplasty (THA). We identified 12 randomised or quasi-randomised control trials (RCT or qRCT) published between 1996 and 2008. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the differences in results for surgical approach, trial quality, and follow-up duration. Operative time and blood loss were significantly reduced in the mini-incision group for studies with the posterior or posterolateral approach. Concerning postoperative complications, there were no significant differences between the two groups with no significant heterogeneity. No differences were observed between the two groups for Harris hip score and radiographic results except for cup anterversion. Although mini-incision appeared to have similar outcomes compared to standard incision, the follow-up is short-term according to current standards in THA. High-quality studies are required to compare the outcomes of these two procedures. PMID:19277652

  7. Sexual Function before and after Total Hip Replacement: Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Meiri, Rotem; Rosenbaum, Talli Y; Kalichman, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Background More than 1 million total hip replacements (THRs) are performed every year worldwide. Achieving decreased pain, increased mobility, and improved quality of life (QoL) are key factors in the decision to undergo THR. Sexual activity is a valued component of QoL; however, little is known about how THR affects sexual functioning or the extent to which health care providers address sexuality in THR patients. Aim The aim of the study was to assess the literature regarding sexuality and sexual function in patients before and after THR. Methods PubMed, Google Scholar, and PEDro databases were searched without search limitations from inception until December 2013 for terms relating to sexual function and THR. Results Sexual activity before and after a THR is an important QoL issue. In patients with end-stage hip osteoarthritis, THR has been reported to have beneficial effects in restoring sexual satisfaction and performance. While research has recently been conducted to determine the range of motion of the hip joints necessary to execute certain sexual positions, there remains a lack of validated guidelines and the risks related to sexual activity after THR is rarely discussed between patients and medical staff. Conclusions The ability to move comfortably is included among the many physical and psychosocial factors influencing sexual functioning. Practitioners should be encouraged to question their THR patients about sexual concerns and to provide counseling related to physical and functional aspects of sexual activity. Rehabilitation that focuses specifically on activities of daily living of sex should include sexual counseling, therapeutic exercise, and advice regarding sexual positions. Rehabilitation provided by physical therapists may help decrease pain, and facilitate greater self-awareness, self-confidence, and improved body image, all of which encourage and affirm optimal sexual health. Meiri R, Rosenbaum TY, and Kalichman L. Sexual function before and

  8. Inequalities in use of total hip arthroplasty for hip fracture: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, David; Griffin, Xavier L; Costa, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the use of total hip arthroplasty (THA) among individuals with a displaced intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck is based on national guidelines or if there are systematic inequalities. Design Observational cohort study using the National Hip Fracture Database (NHFD). Setting All hospitals that treat adults with hip fractures in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Participants Patients within the national database (all aged ≥60) who received operative treatment for a non-pathological displaced intracapsular hip fracture from 1 July 2011 to 31 April 2015. Main outcome measures Provision of THA to patients considered eligible under criteria published by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Results 114 119 patients with hip fracture were included, 11 683 (10.2%) of whom underwent THA. Of those who satisfied the NICE criteria, 32% (6780)received a THA. Of patients who underwent THA, 42% (4903) did not satisfy the NICE criteria. A recursive partitioning algorithm found that the NICE eligibility criteria did not optimally explain which patients underwent THA. A model with superior explanatory power drew distinctions that are not supported by NICE, which were an age cut off at 76 and a different ambulation cut off. Among patients who satisfied the NICE eligibility, the use of THA was less likely with higher age (odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.87 to 0.88), worsening abbreviated mental test scores (0.49 (0.41 to 0.58) for normal cognition v borderline cognitive impairment)), worsening American Society of Anesthesiologists score (0.74, 0.66 to 0.84), male sex (0.85, 0.77 to 0.93), worsening ambulatory status (0.32, 0.28 to 0.35 for walking with a stick v independent ambulation), and fifths of worsening socioeconomic area deprivation (0.76 (0.66 to 0.88) for least v most deprived fifth). Patients receiving treatment during the working week were more likely to receive THA than at the

  9. [Total hip replacement with isoelastic prosthesis in animals (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Muhr, O; Stockhusen, H; Müller, O

    1976-10-01

    Uncemented fixation and low-fraction materials are the basis of this experiment. Plastics with an elasticity similar to the bone ("isoelasticity") show very propitious material qualities. The direct cementless incorporation of test bodies must be checked. In 63 sheep isoelastic total hip joints were implanted. After 2 till 51 weeks the animals were sacrificed and 44 specimen of hips and organs were explored macroscopically, radiologically, spherimetrically and histologically. The result was: 1. Plastic hip prosthesis are incorporated in the bone, but the boundary layer is built by a collagenous fiber tissue. 2. Loosening brings resoption of the bone and expansion of the structural changed soft tissue. 3. The transformation of the femoral cortex to osteoporosis is considered possibly as the consequence of an insufficient biological transfer of the weight. 4. Fractures of the femoral prosthesis-stem could not be observed. 5. The radiology allows at the pelvis prosthesis a concret statement concerning stability, on the femoral part a probable one. 6. The abrasion is minimal, the tissue reaction to abrasion products is unessential. 7. Small abrasion particles are carried of by the lymph tract and stored in the first regional gland. A more distant spreading is not demonstrable. PMID:985179

  10. Short-Term Results of Novel Constrained Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Thomas; Finley, Stephen; Snider, Rebecca; Looper, Jayme; Tanner, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Constrained acetabular components have only been recommended as a salvage option for the persistently unstable total hip arthroplasty (THA), due to limited range of motion and less than satisfactory component failure rates. This is a retrospective review of 137 patients with 154 consecutive primary constrained THAs performed between November 2003 and August 2007. We reviewed serial radiographs, postoperative complications, groin/thigh pain, and compared preoperative and postoperative Harris Hip Scores. With a mean follow-up of 6 years, there was 1.9% dislocation rate, 0% component failure rate, and 2.6% infection rate. Seven patients reported continued groin pain, and three had continued thigh pain. One patient showed radiographic evidence of 1 mm polyethylene wear. Radiographic review showed no evidence of osteolysis or stem subsidence. Harris Hip Scores improved from a mean of 68.8 (range 58-87) preoperatively to 98.9 (range 65-100) at final clinical assessment. This constrained acetabular prosthesis had a dislocation rate of less than 2%, with 0% component failure rate at a minimum of 2 years of follow-up suggesting this prosthesis may be a viable alternative for patients at risk for instability or those known to have recurrent instability. PMID:26330992

  11. Modern total hip arthroplasty in patients younger than 21 years.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Atul F; Sheth, Neil P; Hosalkar, Harish H; Babatunde, Oladapo M; Lee, Gwo-Chin; Nelson, Charles L

    2012-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is not commonly performed in adolescents. However, it may be the only option for pain control with continued mobility for advanced disease. We report our experience with modern alternative-bearing THA in patients younger than 21 years. Twenty-one THAs (18 patients) were followed. Preoperative and postoperative Harris hip scores were recorded, and radiographs were reviewed. Average follow-up was 49 months (range, 25-89). Underlying etiology was chemotherapy-induced osteonecrosis (33%), steroid-induced osteonecrosis (29%), sickle cell disease (24%), and chronic dislocation (14%). Articulation bearings were ceramic/ceramic (67%), metal/highly cross-linked polyethylene (29%), and metal resurfacing (5%). Mean age was 18 years (range, 13-20). Harris hip scores improved from 43.6 to 83.6 (P < .001). At final follow-up, there was no radiographic loosening; 1 THA was revised for a cracked ceramic liner. At intermediate-term follow-up, clinical and radiographic results are favorable after alternative-bearing THA in patients younger than 21 years. PMID:21723701

  12. Tribological characteristics of a composite total-surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous fiber, woven E glass composite femoral shells having the same elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle wear tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these continuous fiber particulate composite femoral shells articulating with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups were comparable to those of a vitallium ball articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cup.

  13. Development of a Risk Stratification Model for Delayed Inpatient Recovery of Physical Activities in Patients Undergoing Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Elings, Jordi; van der Sluis, Geert; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Galindo Garre, Francisca; de Gast, Arthur; Hoogeboom, Thomas; van Meeteren, Nico L U

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort design using data derived from usual care. Background It is important that patients are able to function independently as soon as possible after total hip replacement. However, the speed of regaining activities differs significantly. Objectives To develop a risk stratification model (RSM) to predict delayed inpatient recovery of physical activities in people who underwent total hip replacement surgery. Methods This study was performed in 2 routine orthopaedic settings: Diakonessenhuis Hospital (setting A) and Nij Smellinghe Hospital (setting B). Preoperative screening was performed for all consecutive patients. In-hospital recovery of activities was assessed with the Modified Iowa Level of Assistance Scale. Delayed inpatient recovery of activities was defined as greater than 5 days. The RSM, developed using logistic regression analysis and bootstrapping, was based on data from setting A (n = 154). External validation was performed on the data set from setting B (n = 271). Results Twenty-one percent of the patients in setting A had a delayed recovery of activities during their hospital stay. Multivariable logistic regression modeling yielded a preliminary RSM that included the following factors: male sex (odds ratio [OR] = 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.2, 2.6), 70 or more years of age (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.4, 3.4), body mass index of 25 kg/m(2) or greater (OR = 2.2; 95% CI: 0.7, 7.4), an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.3, 4.4), a Charnley score of B or C (OR = 6.1; 95% CI: 2.2, 17.4), and a timed up-and-go score of 12.5 seconds or greater (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 9.0). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.90) and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test score was 3.57 (P>.05). External validation yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.71 (95% CI: 0.61, 0.81). Conclusion We demonstrated that the risk for delayed recovery of activities during the hospital

  14. Early surveillance of ceramic-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hill, J C; Diamond, O J; O'Brien, S; Boldt, J G; Stevenson, M; Beverland, D E

    2015-03-01

    Ceramic-on-metal (CoM) is a relatively new bearing combination for total hip arthroplasty (THA) with few reported outcomes. A total of 287 CoM THAs were carried out in 271 patients (mean age 55.6 years (20 to 77), 150 THAs in female patients, 137 in male) under the care of a single surgeon between October 2007 and October 2009. With the issues surrounding metal-on-metal bearings the decision was taken to review these patients between March and November 2011, at a mean follow-up of 34 months (23 to 45) and to record pain, outcome scores, radiological analysis and blood ion levels. The mean Oxford Hip Score was 19.2 (12 to 53), 254 patients with 268 hips (95%) had mild/very mild/no pain, the mean angle of inclination of the acetabular component was 44.8(o) (28(o) to 63(o)), 82 stems (29%) had evidence of radiolucent lines of > 1 mm in at least one Gruen zone and the median levels of cobalt and chromium ions in the blood were 0.83 μg/L (0.24 μg/L to 27.56 μg/L) and 0.78 μg/L (0.21 μg/L to 8.84 μg/L), respectively. The five-year survival rate is 96.9% (95% confidence interval 94.7% to 99%). Due to the presence of radiolucent lines and the higher than expected levels of metal ions in the blood, we would not recommend the use of CoM THA without further long-term follow-up. We plan to monitor all these patients regularly. PMID:25737511

  15. Spontaneous modular femoral head dissociation complicating total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Talmo, Carl T; Sharp, Kinzie G; Malinowska, Magdalena; Bono, James V; Ward, Daniel M; LaReau, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Modular femoral heads have been used successfully for many years in total hip arthroplasty. Few complications have been reported for the modular Morse taper connection between the femoral head and trunnion of the stem in metal-on-polyethylene bearings. Although there has always been some concern over the potential for fretting, corrosion, and generation of particulate debris at the modular junction, this was not considered a significant clinical problem. More recently, concern has increased because fretting and corrosive debris have resulted in rare cases of pain, adverse local tissue reaction, pseudotumor, and osteolysis. Larger femoral heads, which have gained popularity in total hip arthroplasty, are suspected to increase the potential for local and systemic complications of fretting, corrosion, and generation of metal ions because of greater torque at the modular junction. A less common complication is dissociation of the modular femoral heads. Morse taper dissociation has been reported in the literature, mainly in association with a traumatic event, such as closed reduction of a dislocation or fatigue fracture of the femoral neck of a prosthesis. This report describes 3 cases of spontaneous dissociation of the modular prosthetic femoral head from the trunnion of the same tapered titanium stem because of fretting and wear of the Morse taper in a metal-on-polyethylene bearing. Continued clinical and scientific research on Morse taper junctions is warranted to identify and prioritize implant and surgical factors that lead to this and other types of trunnion failure to minimize complications associated with Morse taper junctions as hip implants and surgical techniques continue to evolve. PMID:24972443

  16. Testing of silicon nitride ceramic bearings for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bal, B Sonny; Khandkar, Ashok; Lakshminarayanan, R; Clarke, Ian; Hoffman, Aaron A; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2008-11-01

    Modern ceramic bearings used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) consist of a femoral head (ball) articulating inside a hemispherical acetabular cup (socket); the ball and socket are made of alumina (Al(2)O(3)) and Al(2)O(3)-based composite materials. In the present study, total hip bearings were made from a different ceramic material, silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)), by sintering and hot isostatic pressing of powders. The resulting material had improved mechanical properties over modern Al(2)O(3) THA bearings, with a flexural strength of 920 +/- 70 MPa, a Weibull modulus of 19, and a fracture toughness of 10 +/- 1 MPa m(1/2). Unlike zirconia-based ceramics that have also been used in THA, accelerated aging of Si(3)N(4) did not adversely affect the flexural strength. In simulated wear tests, Si(3)N(4) acetabular cups produced low-volumetric wear whether articulating against Si(3)N(4) or cobalt-chromium (CoCr) femoral heads. The results of this investigation suggest that Si(3)N(4) may allow improved THA bearings that combine the reliability of metal femoral heads with the low wear advantages of ceramic materials. PMID:18491410

  17. Femoral head diameter considerations for primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Girard, J

    2015-02-01

    The configuration of total hip arthroplasty (THA) implants has constantly evolved since they were first introduced. One of the key components of THA design is the diameter of the prosthetic femoral head. It has been well established that the risk of dislocation is lower as the head diameter increases. But head diameter impacts other variables beyond joint stability: wear, cam-type impingement, range of motion, restoration of biomechanics, proprioception and groin pain. The introduction of highly cross-linked polyethylene and hard-on-hard bearings has allowed surgeons to implant large-diameter heads that almost completely eliminate the risk of dislocation. But as a result, cup liners have become thinner. With femoral head diameters up to 36 mm, the improvement in joint range of motion, delay in cam-type impingement and reduction in dislocation risk have been clearly demonstrated. Conversely, large-diameter heads do not provide any additional improvements. If an "ecologically sound" approach to hip replacement is embraced (e.g. keeping the native femoral head diameter), hip resurfacing with a metal-on-metal bearing must be carried out. The reliability of large-diameter femoral heads in the longer term is questionable. Large-diameter ceramic-on-ceramic bearings may be plagued by the same problems as metal-on-metal bearings: groin pain, squeaking, increased stiffness, irregular lubrication, acetabular loosening and notable friction at the Morse taper. These possibilities require us to be extra careful when using femoral heads with a diameter greater than 36 mm. PMID:25596984

  18. Pseudotumor Caused by Titanium Particles From a Total Hip Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Higashi, Hidetaka; Kubosawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman underwent metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the right hip at another institution. During surgery, the greater trochanter was broken and internal fixation was performed with a trochanteric cable grip reattachment. Although postoperative recovery was uneventful, approximately 6 years later, the patient had severe right hip pain with apparent swelling, and she was referred to the authors' institution. Plain radiographs showed evidence of severe osteolysis in the proximal femur and cable breakage; however, preoperative aspiration culture findings were negative for bacterial growth. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a well-circumscribed mass, presumed to be a pseudotumor. Serum cobalt and chromium levels were within normal limits, and the serum titanium level was high. During surgery, the mass was excised and removal of the cable system revealed a sharp deficit in the bare femoral stem. Gross surgical findings showed no obvious evidence of infection and no corrosion at the head-neck junction; therefore, all components were retained besides the cable system, which resulted in clinical recovery. All of the cultures from specimens were negative for bacterial growth, and histologic findings were compatible with a pseudotumor, such as histiocytes containing metal particles, abundant plasma cells, and CD8-positive cells. Quantitative analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry showed that the main source of metal debris in the pseudotumor was the femoral stem, which was made of titanium alloy, not the broken cable, which was made of cobalt-chromium alloy. The findings suggest that titanium particles can form symptomatic solid pseudotumors. PMID:26709566

  19. Constrained components for the unstable hip following total hip arthroplasty: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ragland, P. S.; Clarke, S.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with chronic instability or late dislocation following total hip arthroplasty often require operative management. Unfortunately, there is an increased risk of recurrent dislocation following revision in these patients. Over the past decade the use of constrained devices for patients with chronic instability has gained increased interest; however, there is a paucity of studies available in the literature regarding the use of these devices. The purpose of this study was to analyze the available literature over the past 15 years, focusing on larger, long-term studies, to obtain recommendations from the respective articles for indications and contraindications for the use of constrained devices. Our review of eight reports included 1,199 hips in 1,148 patients with a total mean follow-up of 51 months (range, 24 to 124 months). The mean rate of dislocation following revision with a constrained liner was 10% and the mean re-operation rate for reasons other than dislocation was 4%. We concluded that constrained liners are an option for patients who have failed management of instability with other implants, those with instability of unclear etiology, those with cognitive problems who are unable to follow dislocation precautions, those with deficient abductors, and elderly or low-demand individuals with well-positioned implants requiring revision. PMID:16927089

  20. Canine intersegmental hip joint forces and moments before and after cemented total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Dogan, S; Manley, P A; Vanderby, R; Kohles, S S; Hartman, L M; McBeath, A A

    1991-01-01

    Intersegmental forces and moments (i.e. resultant free body forces and moments computed at the joint centers) were studied in canine hindlimbs before and after cemented total hip replacement (THR). Five large, adult, mixed-breed dogs were selected. Their gait was recorded (while leash-walked) before surgery using high-speed cinematography and a force plate. Cemented total hip replacement was unilaterally performed on each dog. Gait was again recorded at one and four months after surgery. Segmental properties (mass, center of mass, and mass moment of inertia) of the hindlimbs were experimentally determined, and an inverse dynamics approach was used to compute intersegmental forces and moments in the sagittal plane. Significant reductions in intersegmental joint forces and moments were observed in the operated hindlimb one month after surgery, although kinematic gait parameters were unaltered. Decreases of 77.0% for vertical forces, 61.9% for craniocaudal forces, and 66.2% for extension moments were determined. Four months after surgery, the joint forces and moments had returned to their preoperative values. This experiment demonstrates that the dynamics of normal walking can be restored in a canine model by four months after THR. It also shows that kinetic (rather than kinematic) parameters are more descriptive of antalgic gait in the canine. PMID:1856240

  1. Metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty: the concerns.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, S J

    2004-12-01

    The metal-on-metal bearing couple is having a resurgence in clinical applications seen in total hip and hip resurfacing technologies. The most noteworthy advantage of a metal-on-metal implant is the improved wear characteristics seen in vitro on wear simulators and in vivo with retrieved implants. All bearings have disadvantages, and a metal-on-metal bearing is no exception. Concerns exist regarding the generation of metal ions seen in the blood and urine of patients with metal-on-metal implants. These elevated metal ions have theoretical, although not proven, risks related to carcinogenic and biologic concerns. Additionally, concerns exist regarding hypersensitivity, increased incidence of instability and increased costs. Specific patient selection issues arise with metal-on-metal implants. The current generation of implants has only early and mid-term results available, with no long-term series yet published. Therefore, although a metal-on-metal bearing may be considered a viable alternative to either polyethylene or ceramic implants, outstanding and unresolved issues continue to exist with this bearing, as they do with the alternatives. PMID:15577471

  2. Sciatic nerve palsy associated with total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, M S; Nagi, O N

    1992-01-01

    Six cases of clinically evident sciatic or peroneal nerve palsy occurred in a consecutive series of 380 total hip arthroplasties (THA). An additional eight cases of peroneal nerve palsy due to pressure from Thomas splint or tight bandages were seen. Factors apparently causing nerve palsy were significant lateralization and lengthening in four cases and dislocation of the hip in one case. The cases with neuroapraxia of the peroneal nerve were seen from the third to the fifth day of Thomas splint immobilization. EMG studies were conducted in all six group 1 patients; at the end of one year the results were good in two cases, fair in three cases, and poor in one case. The results suggest that limb lengthening should be limited to 4 cm to minimize this complication. It was also seen that patients with peroneal nerve palsy due to local compression do well, though some are bothered by mild residual dysesthesia over the dorsum of the foot. In contrast, patients with sciatic nerve palsy do not have such a good outlook. PMID:1345646

  3. Responsiveness and minimal important differences after revision total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is currently weighted more heavily when evaluating health status, particularly regarding medical treatments and interventions. However, it is rarely used by physicians to compare responsiveness. Additionally, responsiveness estimates derived by the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Short Form 36 (SF-36) before and after revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) have not been clinically compared. This study compared responsiveness and minimal important differences (MID) between HHS and SF-36. Methods All revision THA patients completed the disease-specific HHS and the generic SF-36 before and 6 months after surgery. Scores using these instruments were interpreted by generalized estimating equation (GEE) before and after revision THA. The bootstrap estimation and modified Jacknife test were used to derive 95% confidence intervals for differences in the responsiveness estimates. Results Comparisons of effect size (ES), standardized response means (SRM), relative efficiency (RE) (>1) and MID indicated that the responsiveness of HHS was superior to that of SF-36. The ES and SRM for pain and physical functions in the HHS were significantly larger than those of the SF-36 (p < 0.001). Conclusion The data in this study indicated that clinicians and health researchers should weight disease-specific measures more heavily than generic measures when evaluating treatment outcomes. PMID:21070675

  4. Economics of thromboprophylaxis in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J; Warwick, D J; Coast, J

    1997-07-01

    In 1997, 50,000 hip replacements will be performed in the UK, and over 1 million worldwide. Venous thromboembolism is the most frequent serious complication following joint replacement; its effective and economic management is essential. Antithrombotic prophylaxis can be used to reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolic disease, which presents as either deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. A number of published studies have shown that prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism is financially beneficial in terms of reduced diagnostic and treatment costs. Cost-effectiveness studies have provided a comparison of the costs and consequences resulting from alternative prophylactic programmes. This article reviews the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism after total hip replacement, prophylaxis against it and a model for cost-effectiveness analysis. Its aim is to highlight inadequacies in the available data and areas of uncertainty within the model that require further research. Pharmacoeconomic studies published to date have all used a similar framework to allow prophylactic options to be compared. However, assumptions made about the frequency of clinical disease have varied widely between studies. This degree of uncertainty calls into question the validity of reported incremental cost savings between treatments. Some studies have also failed to address the cost of complications resulting from the prophylactic method under consideration. Future studies must carefully consider the validity of their models, understand the limitations on current knowledge of outcome rates, and carefully consider all outcomes (both beneficial and detrimental) that result from the intervention. PMID:10169386

  5. Contralateral ulnar neuropathy following total hip replacement and intraoperative positioning.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S; Bennett, D; Spence, D J; Mawhinney, I; Beverland, D E

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a rare but important complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and has previously been reported in the ipsilateral arm and associated with inflammatory arthritis. The results of 7004 primary hip arthroplasties performed between January 1993 and February 2009 were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who reported ulnar neuropathy symptoms, with ten patients identified at mean follow-up of 57 months (range = 3-195 months). Eight patients experienced unilateral ulnar nerve symptoms in the contralateral upper limb post-surgery, one patient experienced symptoms in the ipsilateral upper limb and one patient experienced symptoms in both upper limbs. The incidence of post-THA ulnar neuropathy was 0.14%. All patients had a pre-operative diagnosis of osteoarthritis and none had diabetes, a previous history of neuropathy or inflammatory arthritis. All operations were primary arthroplasties and were performed under the care of a single surgeon in a single centre. Two of the ten patients (20%) had a general anaesthetic. The pattern of symptoms reported, i.e. mainly unilateral affecting the contralateral side with variable resolution, contrasts with previous studies and suggests that intraoperative patient positioning may be an important factor influencing ulnar neuropathy following THA. Attention to support and positioning of the contralateral arm may help reduce the incidence of this complication. PMID:26589446

  6. Severity of Diabetes Mellitus and Total Hip or Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Nielen, Johannes T.H.; Emans, Pieter J.; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Boonen, Annelies; Lalmohamed, Arief; de Boer, Anthonius; van den Bemt, Bart J.F.; de Vries, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is generally thought that people with diabetes mellitus (DM) are more likely to suffer from osteoarthritis (OA) due to an increased body mass index (BMI), resulting in mechanical destruction of cartilage. However, previous studies have suggested a coexisting metabolic causality. To evaluate the risk of hip or knee replacement, as a proxy for severe OA, in patients with DM. We additionally evaluated the risk of total joint replacement (TJR) with various proxies for increased DM severity. A population-based case–control study was performed, using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Cases (n = 94,609) were defined as patients >18 years who had undergone TJR between 2000 and 2012. Controls were matched by age, gender, and general practice. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of total knee (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) surgery associated with use of antidiabetic drugs (ADs). We additionally stratified current AD users by proxies for DM severity. Current AD use was significantly associated with a lower risk of TKR (OR = 0.86 (95% CI = 0.78–0.94)) and THR (OR = 0.90 (95% CI = 0.82–0.99)) compared to patients not using ADs. Moreover, risk of TKR and THR was decreased with increasing HbA1c. This study does not support the theory that DM patients are more likely to suffer from severe OA as compared to patients without diabetes. Moreover, risk of severe OA necessitating TJR decreases with increasing DM severity. This is possibly due to dissimilarities in methodology, a decrease in eligibility for surgery, or variability of OA phenotypes. PMID:27196498

  7. Two Different Total Hip Arthroplasties for Hartofilakidis Type C1 Developmental Dysplasia of Hip in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ya-Ming; Zhou, Yi-Xin; Han, Na; Yang, De-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty (THA) in developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is more complex than the normal hip, with large replacement risks and many complications. Although nonosteotomy THA is convenient to perform, femoral osteotomy shortening can avoid blood vessel and nerve traction injuries. This study aimed to compare osteotomy THA with nonosteotomy to determine reasonable options for operative management of DDH. Methods: Data on 48 DDH patients who underwent THA were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups: Group A 29 cases (nonosteotomy), and group B 19 cases (osteotomy). Harris and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, limb length discrepancy (LLD), radiological data on the hip, and claudication were evaluated. Data were analyzed by using paired-sample Student's t-test, independent-sample Student's t-test, and Pearson's Chi-square test; the test level was α =0.05. Results: Postoperative Harris (90.7 ± 5.1) and WOMAC scores (88.0 ± 10.6) were significantly improved compared with preoperative Harris (44.8 ± 5.7) and WOMAC scores (42.0 ± 5.3) in group A (P < 0.05). Postoperative Harris (90.4 ± 2.8) and WOMAC scores (88.2 ± 5.9) were significantly improved compared with preoperative Harris (44.4 ± 4.2) and WOMAC scores (43.2 ± 4.3) in group B (P < 0.05). One case of dislocation occurred in group A; after closed reduction, dislocation did not recur. In group A, 2 patients developed cutaneous branch injury of the femoral nerve, which spontaneously recovered without treatment. Postoperative LLD >2 cm was seen in one case in group A and five cases in group B. Postoperative claudication showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). No patients developed infection; postoperative X-rays showed that the location of the prosthesis was satisfactory, and the surrounding bone was not dissolved. Conclusions: THA is effective and safe for DDH. For unilateral high

  8. Bilateral Femoral Nutrient Foraminal Cement Penetration during Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Coomber, Ross; Bhumbra, Rej S; Marston, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Cement pressurisation is important for the insertion of both the acetabular and femoral components during Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). Secondary to pressurization the rare phenomenon of unilateral cement incursion into the nutrient foramen has previously been reported. No bilateral case has been reported to date. This has implications both for misdiagnosis of periprosthetic fractures and for medico-legal consequences due to a presumed adverse intra-operative event. Case Report: We present a case report of a 59 year old, caucasian female who underwent staged bilateral cemented Stanmore THA. The post-operative radiographs demonstrate evidence of bilateral nutrient foramen penetration intra-operatively by standard viscosity cement. The patient suffered no adverse consequences. Conclusions: In summary, cement extravasation into the nutrient foramen is an important differential to be considered in presence of posterior-medial cement in the diaphysis of femur following THA. This requires no further intervention and has no effect on the outcome.

  9. Cemented total hip prosthesis: Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Aliabadi, P.; Tumeh, S.S.; Weissman, B.N.; McNeil, B.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Conventional radiographs, technetium-99m bone scans, and gallium-67 scans were reviewed in 44 patients who had undergone cemented total hip joint replacement and were imaged because of suspicion of prosthesis loosening or infection. A complete radiolucent line of 2 mm or wider along the bone-cement interface or metal-cement lucency on conventional radiographs was used as the criterion for prosthetic loosening with or without infection and proved to be 54% sensitive and 96% specific. Scintigraphic criteria for prosthetic loosening were increased focal uptake of the radiopharmaceutical for the femoral component and increased focal or diffuse uptake for the acetabular component. For bone scintigraphy, sensitivity was 73% and specificity was 96%. Combining the results of conventional radiographs and bone scans increased sensitivity to 84% and decreased specificity to 92% for the diagnosis of loosening, infection, or both. The study also showed that Ga-67 scintigraphy has a low sensitivity for the detection of infection.

  10. Impingement in Total Hip Replacement: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D.; Callaghan, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of total hip impingement, whether or not accompanied by frank dislocation, holds substantial untoward clinical consequences, especially as less-forgiving advanced bearing implant designs come into ever more widespread use. Biomechanical aspects of impingement and dislocation have historically received relatively little scientific attention, although that situation is now rapidly changing. The present article reviews contemporary laboratory and clinical research on the impingement/dislocation phenomena, focusing particularly on how implant design variables, surgical implantation factors and patient activity each act individually and in concert to pose impingement and dislocation challenges. In recent years, several powerful new research methodologies have emerged that have greatly expanded the scope for clinical translation of systematic laboratory study. Transferring the findings from such research into yet better implant designs, and even better surgical procedures, offers encouragement that the clinical impact of this troublesome complication can be further reduced. PMID:19956356

  11. Modular noncemented total hip arthroplasty for congenital dislocation of the hip. Case report and design rationale.

    PubMed

    Gorski, J M

    1988-03-01

    The highest rate of failure and the greatest technical difficulty in total hip arthroplasty occurs with congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH). Predisposing factors are failure to secure special femoral components to fit an extremely narrow and straight medullary cavity with space for only a very thin mantle of cement. The acetabulum is usually atrophic, and bone grafts are commonly required to support a small-diameter cup. The young age of the average patient and high levels of activity contribute to cement failure. A new modular cementless prosthesis provides excellent immediate skeletal fixation and pain relief in CDH patients. Five modular components are screwed or press-fit into bone. The modular approach facilitates implantation, reduces inventory, and is adaptable to unforeseen problems. These advantages are ordinarily absent with standard or custom cemented components. Modular components may also permit easier revision. The prosthesis is made of titanium alloy for its superalloy strength, elastic modulus, and bioinertness. By omitting the cement mantle, press-fit is obtained with the largest possible implant. The large size minimizes stem breakage in these young, small bones. Excellent short-term results suggest that modular cementless implants are indicated in some patients with CDH. PMID:3342552

  12. Characterization of the Neural Anatomy in the Hip Joint to Optimize Periarticular Regional Anesthesia in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Simons, Matthew J; Amin, Nirav H; Cushner, Fred D; Scuderi, Giles R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify and map the periarticular neural anatomy of the hip to optimize periarticular injection techniques in total hip arthroplasty. A literature review of common search engines was performed using terms associated with hip innervation and 17 met the inclusion criteria. The studies addressed both gross and microscopic neural anatomy of the human hip joint, and the findings summarize key areas of hip mechanoreceptors and free nerve endings to provide a framework for targeted periarticular hip infiltration. Grossly, the hip joint is supplied by the femoral, obturator, sciatic, and superior gluteal nerves, as well as the nerve to the quadratus femoris. The greatest concentration of sensory nerve endings and mechanoreceptors is found at the anterior hip capsule, especially superiorly. The labrum is most highly innervated from the 10 to 2 o'clock position. After the cup and liner are placed, periarticular injections should be infiltrated toward the remnant labrum from 10 to 2 o'clock. Before stem insertion, the visible periosteum may then be injected circumferentially about the femur. The anterior and superior capsular tissue, if retained, is routinely infiltrated at the time of capsular repair. Depending on surgical approach, the fascia and incised soft tissue are infiltrated before final closure. PMID:26731384

  13. Uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis of hip secondary to low and high dislocated hips: A mid-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; O’Dwyer, Sinead; Masterson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Performing successful total hip replacement (THR) in dysplastic, subluxed, and dislocated hip is a challenging task. Here, we assessed midterm clinical and radiological outcomes of uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis (OA) of hip secondary to Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocated hips with a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of prospectively collected data was designed involving all consecutive patients who underwent uncemented THR for OA of hip secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip and Grade II or Grade III Hartofilakidis classification. Results: Thirty-two patients underwent 45 THR, with 23 Grade II (low dislocation) and 22 Grade III (high-dislocation) of Hartofilakidis classification. Thirteen patients had bilateral hip replacements, 19 patients had unilateral THR. There was highly statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative HHS and SF-36v2™ at each follow-up. Survivorship of original implant was 98.88% at a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. The mean improvement in leg length in this series was 3.6 cm (1.8-4.5, 95% confidence interval). No sciatic nerve or femoral nerve palsies were observed. Conclusions: Uncemented THR provides better function and quality of life. However, longer follow-up studies are needed to assess survivorship of uncemented THR in Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocations. PMID:27433063

  14. Physiotherapy Rehabilitation After Total Knee or Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy analysis was to determine, where, how, and when physiotherapy services are best delivered to optimize functional outcomes for patients after they undergo primary (first-time) total hip replacement or total knee replacement, and to determine the Ontario-specific economic impact of the best delivery strategy. The objectives of the systematic review were as follows: To determine the effectiveness of inpatient physiotherapy after discharge from an acute care hospital compared with outpatient physiotherapy delivered in either a clinic-based or home-based setting for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of outpatient physiotherapy delivered by a physiotherapist in either a clinic-based or home-based setting in addition to a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of preoperative exercise for people who are scheduled to receive primary total knee or hip replacement surgery Clinical Need Total hip replacements and total knee replacements are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in Ontario. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after first-time total hip or knee replacement surgery is accepted as the standard and essential treatment. The aim is to maximize a person’s functionality and independence and minimize complications such as hip dislocation (for hip replacements), wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. The Therapy The physiotherapy rehabilitation routine has 4 components: therapeutic exercise, transfer training, gait training, and instruction in the activities of daily living. Physiotherapy rehabilitation for people who have had total joint replacement surgery varies in where, how, and when it is delivered. In Ontario, after discharge from an acute care hospital, people who have had a primary total knee or hip replacement may

  15. Protrusio After Medial Acetabular Wall Breach in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher T.; Heiner, Anneliese D.; Baer, Thomas E.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Noiseux, Nicolas O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medial protrusio is a recognized complication of total hip arthroplasty, but it is not known if a medial wall breach during cup implantation increases the risk. We thus investigated the effect of up to a 2 cm defect in the medial acetabular wall in a cadaveric model. Separately, we investigated the ability of acetabular screws to rescue the construct. Methods Nine human fresh-frozen hemipelves were reamed medially to create the defect, implanted with acetabular cups, and then loaded to failure. The nine contralateral hemipelves were reamed in a standard fashion and served as controls. Separately, nine hemipelves with a medial defect were augmented with two acetabular screws each, then loaded to failure, with the contralateral side as a control. Load-to-failure, stiffness, and energy were recorded. Findings The presence of a medial wall defect decreased the load-to-failure by a mean of 26% (5710 v. 4221 N, p=0.024). The addition of two acetabular screws did not rescue the construct (mean 27% decrease, 4082 v. 2985 N, p=0.024). The majority of specimens failed in a supra-physiologic range of force. Bone density correlated with failure loads (R2 range of 0.54-0.78), and osteoporotic specimens were more likely to fail at a physiologic range, consistent with forces experienced during minor stumbles or falls. Interpretation Osteoporotic patients with a medial wall defect after hip arthroplasty may be susceptible to fracture during activities of daily living. Protected weight bearing with an assistive device may be reasonable in order to minimize fall risk until cup ingrowth is achieved. PMID:26361450

  16. Total hip arthroplasty for failed aseptic Austin Moore prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, Pradeep; Suryawanshi, Ashish; Mittal, Amber

    2012-01-01

    Background: Though Austin Moore (AM) replacement prosthesis has fairly good short term results for intracapsular femoral neck fractures in the elderly, it still is a compromised option and has a high failure rate in the long run. The objective of the present retrospective study is to analyze the functional outcome, assess survivorship of revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) at mid to long term followup, and evaluate intraoperative difficulties faced during conversion of failed aseptic AM prosthesis to cemented THA. Materials and Methods: Eighty-nine cemented THA surgeries for failed AM prosthesis were performed between 1986 and 2005. AM failures were classified into seven groups on the basis of mode of failure. Infected failures were excluded from the study. There were 35 men and 54 women in the study group. The mean age was 68 years (range 57–91 years). Mean followup was 8 years (range 5–13 years). Results: Average Harris Hip Score improved from 65 preoperatively (range 42–73) to 87 (range 76–90) at 1 year postoperatively and to 86 (range 75–89) at the last followup. The overall complication rate was 4.5%. Conclusion: Conversion THA is an excellent treatment strategy for symptomatic failed AM hemiarthroplasty in terms of pain relief and restoration of function and mobility as near as possible to the preinjury level. Also, hemiarthroplasty should not be used in physically active patients, even in elderly individuals. Careful patient selection for hemiarthroplasty versus THA is vital and may decrease the incidence of complications and ameliorate the outcomes in the treatment of intracapsular femoral neck fractures. PMID:22719116

  17. Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Randa K; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Jauregui, Julio J; Padden, David A; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Complications following total hip arthroplasty (THA), such as dislocation, component loosening and wear, continue to be common indications for revision surgery. Multiple studies have attributed some of these problems to poor acetabular cup alignment and placement outside of the purported radiographic safe zone. In addition, it has been shown that conventional manually performed acetabular cup placement may not lead to optimal alignment, regardless of surgical experience. Additionally, incorrect leg length and offset can lead to dissatisfaction and instability. Therefore, robotic-arm assisted surgery has been introduced to improve accuracy of cup placement and leg length, and to offset with the aim of reducing the risk of hip instability and improving satisfaction after primary THA. Our aim was to prospectively review the use of robotic-arm assisted surgery in 224 patients and to assess whether the pre-operatively determined radiographic targets were achieved post-operatively and the proportion of acetabular cups outside of the safe zone. Pre-determined anteversion and inclination were 15 and 40 degrees, respectively. Our results have shown that the use of robotic-arm assisted surgery resulted in a post-operative mean inclination of 40 degrees (range, 34 to 51 degrees) and a mean anteversion of 16 degrees (range, 9 to 25 degrees). Ninety-nine percent of the patients remained within the pre-designated safe zone. Evidence has shown that robotic-arm assisted surgery may have improved accuracy in cup placement when compared to conventional surgery and possibly to computer-assisted surgery. When compared to the literature on robotic-arm assisted surgery, our results were comparable. We believe that this surgical technique may aid in reducing post-operative THA complications, such as aseptic loosening and dislocations, but further prospective studies are needed to evaluate clinical outcomes and long-term results. PMID:26055021

  18. Analysis of Femoral Components of Cemented Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shantanu; Harsha, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    There have been continuous on-going revisions in design of prosthesis in Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) to improve the endurance of hip replacement. In the present work, Finite Element Analysis was performed on cemented THA with CoCrMo trapezoidal, CoCrMo circular, Ti6Al4V trapezoidal and Ti6Al4V circular stem. It was observed that cross section and material of femoral stem proved to be critical parameters for stress distribution in femoral components, distribution of interfacial stress and micro movements. In the first part of analysis, designs were investigated for micro movements and stress developed, for different stem materials. Later part of the analysis focused on investigations with respect to different stem cross sections. Femoral stem made of Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) resulted in larger debonding of stem at cement-stem interface and increased stress within the cement mantle in contrast to chromium alloy (CoCrMo) stem. Thus, CoCrMo proved to be a better choice for cemented THA. Comparison between CoCrMo femoral stem of trapezium and circular cross section showed that trapezoidal stem experiences lesser sliding and debonding at interfaces than circular cross section stem. Also, trapezium cross section generated lower peak stress in femoral stem and cortical femur. In present study, femur head with diameter of 36 mm was considered for the analysis in order to avoid dislocation of the stem. Also, metallic femur head was coupled with cross linked polyethylene liner as it experiences negligible wear compared to conventional polyethylene liner and unlike metallic liner it is non carcinogenic.

  19. Hospitalization for total hip replacement among inpatients aged 45 and over: United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Wolford, Monica L; Palso, Kathleen; Bercovitz, Anita

    2015-02-01

     Total hip replacement, in which both the head of the femur and its socket are replaced, is done to restore movement to hips damaged by osteoarthritis, late-stage degenerative bone and cartilage disease, or other injuries and disease (1). The number of total hip replacements is expected to increase over the next few decades (2). National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data show trends and estimates of the number and rate of total hip replacements and average length of stay among inpatients aged 45 and over. PMID:25714040

  20. Durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dion, Neil T; Bragdon, Charles; Muratoglu, Orhun; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the history of the development of highly cross-linked polyethylene and provides an in-depth review of the clinical results regarding the durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The use of polyethylene as a bearing surface has contributed to the success of THA and TKA; however, polyethylene wear and osteolysis can lead to failure. Ongoing clinical and retrieval studies are required to analyze outcomes at longer-term follow-up. PMID:26043046

  1. Applications of porous tantalum in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Levine, Brett; Della Valle, Craig J; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2006-11-01

    Porous tantalum is an alternative metal for total joint arthroplasty components that offers several unique properties. Its high volumetric porosity (70% to 80%), low modulus of elasticity (3 MPa), and high frictional characteristics make it conducive to biologic fixation. Tantalum has excellent biocompatibility and is safe to use in vivo. The low modulus of elasticity allows for more physiologic load transfer and relative preservation of bone stock. Because of its bioactive nature and ingrowth properties, tantalum is used in primary as well as revision total hip arthroplasty components, with good to excellent early clinical results. In revision arthroplasty, standard and custom augments may serve as a structural bone graft substitute. Formation of a bone-like apatite coating in vivo affords strong fibrous ingrowth properties and allows for substantial soft-tissue attachment, indicating potential for use in cases requiring reattachment of muscles and tendons to a prosthesis. Development of modular components and femoral stems also is being evaluated. The initial clinical data and basic science studies support further investigation of porous tantalum as an alternative to traditional implant materials. PMID:17077337

  2. Readmission Rates in Patients Who Underwent Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Randa K; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Amin, Hiral; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Readmission rates remain a concern following total hip arthroplasty (THA). This study: 1) evaluated 30-day, 90-day, and total readmission rates after THAs; 2) assessed causes of readmission; 3) determined differences in demographic factors between those who were and were not readmitted; and 4) compared readmission rates to other large-scale studies. We retrospectively reviewed 232 primary THAs (224 patients) using the same prosthesis at 7 institutions. This included 79 men and 145 women who had a mean age of 69 years (range, 44 to 88). Descriptive analyses were used to evaluate readmission, and rates were compared with those from large cohort studies. There were 11 unplanned readmissions (4.7%) in 10 patients during the first 90 days post-discharge. Seven (3%) readmissions were due to surgical and 4 (1.7%) were due to medical reasons. Surgical causes were found in 70% of early (0 to 30 days) readmissions but none of late (60 to 90 days) readmissions. No differences existed in mean age, gender, and body mass index between readmitted patients and the remainder of the population. We observed lower readmission rates when compared with large cohort studies. The positive performance of the prosthesis may have contributed to the lower readmission rates. PMID:26680400

  3. Accuracy considerations in navigated cup placement for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Langlotz, U; Grützner, P A; Bernsmann, K; Kowal, J H; Tannast, M; Caversaccio, M; Nolte, L-P

    2007-10-01

    Computer assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) technology has recently been introduced to overcome problems resulting from acetabular component malpositioning in total hip arthroplasty. Available navigation modules can conceptually be categorized as computer tomography (CT) based, fluoroscopy based, or image-free. The current study presents a comprehensive accuracy analysis on the computer assisted placement accuracy of acetabular cups. It combines analyses using mathematical approaches, in vitro testing environments, and an in vivo clinical trial. A hybrid navigation approach combining image-free with fluoroscopic technology was chosen as the best compromise to CT-based systems. It introduces pointer-based digitization for easily assessable points and bi-planar fluoroscopy for deep-seated landmarks. From the in vitro data maximum deviations were found to be 3.6 degrees for inclination and 3.8 degrees for anteversion relative to a pre-defined test position. The maximum difference between intraoperatively calculated cup inclination and anteversion with the postoperatively measured position was 4 degrees and 5 degrees, respectively. These data coincide with worst cases scenario predictions applying a statistical simulation model. The proper use of navigation technology can reduce variability of cup placement well within the surgical safe zone. Surgeons have to concentrate on a variety of error sources during the procedure, which may explain the reported strong learning curves for CAOS technologies. PMID:18019461

  4. Probabilistic analysis of an uncemented total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Dopico-González, Carolina; New, Andrew M; Browne, Martin

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the application of probabilistic design methods to the analysis of the behaviour of an uncemented total hip replacement femoral component implanted in a proximal femur. Probabilistic methods allow variations in factors which control the behaviour of the implanted femur (the input parameters) to be taken into account in determining the performance of the construct. Monte Carlo sampling techniques were applied and the performance indicator was the maximum strain in the bone. The random input parameters were the joint load, the angle of the applied load and the material properties of the bone and the implant. Two Monte Carlo based simulations were applied, direct sampling and latin hypercube sampling. The results showed that the convergence of the mean value of the maximum strain improved gradually as a function of the number of simulations and it stabilised around a value of 0.008 after 6200 simulations. A similar trend was observed for the cumulative distribution function of the output. The strain output was most sensitive to the bone stiffness, followed very closely by the magnitude of the applied load. The application of latin hypercube sampling with 1000 simulations gave similar results to direct sampling with 10,000 simulations in a much reduced time. The results suggested that the number of simulations and the selection of parameters and models are important for the reliability of both the probability values and the sensitivity analyses. PMID:19217340

  5. Determinants of heterotopic ossification after total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Marlene; Neal, Bruce; Cameron, Ian D; Crawford, Ross; Tregonning, Garnet; Winstanley, Julie; Norton, Robyn

    2009-01-01

    The ability of various pre- or peri-operative variables to determine the risk of developing moderate to severe heterotopic ossification (HO) six to twelve months after surgery was investigated among 407 patients undergoing elective total hip replacement (THR) surgery and allocated to placebo in a randomised controlled trial evaluating NSA IDs-based prophylaxis for HO. Overall, 11 (30%) of the 37 patients undergoing revision surgery developed moderate to severe HO compared with 58 (16%) of the 370 patients undergoing primary THR; odds ratio (OR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1 to 4.9. Among patients undergoing primary THR , mutually adjusted analysis of collected independent risk factors demonstrated that receiving a transfusion of red cells or having general as well as epidural or spinal anaesthesia present as indicators of increased risk for developing moderate to severe HO. Patients who have undergone revision surgery have a significantly increased risk of clinically relevant ectopic bone, while among patients who have undergone primary THR surgery, those with indicators of excessive surgical bleeding are also at increased risk of clinically relevant HO. PMID:19455501

  6. Surgical exposure and cement removal in revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mallory, T H

    1992-10-01

    The surgical approach in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) must conform to the preoperative goals of revision surgery. Factors to be considered include adequate visualization, assessment of remaining bone stock, presence or absence of cement, status of the trochanter, leg length discrepancies, and previous surgical approaches. To maintain neurovascular structures, blood supply to the involved bone, postoperative abductor function, stability, and gait normalcy, an anterolateral approach is best used. Three anterolateral approaches are used to address various aspects of revision THA. Approach 1 allows for exposure of the acetabulum and proximal femur. The associated abductor muscle split allows for excellent proximal exposure. Approach 2 is performed when acetabular reconstruction is neither complex nor involved, and when extended access to the femur is necessary. The lateral-distal incision is determined by the need for adequate femur exposure for implant removal, cement removal, and any bone grafting procedures to reconstitute osseous structures. Approach 3 is further developed proximally to expose necessary anatomic regions of the acetabulum while preserving the underlying neurovascular structures. Using special instrumentation and controlled femoral perforations, cement mantles are quickly removed, minimizing damage to the bone and preserving the osseous structures. For all three approaches, abductor muscle separation repair and/or reattachment is performed with a heavy, no. 5, nonabsorbable suture. Postoperative patient management depends on the degree of dissection and extent of reconstruction. PMID:10147935

  7. Pharmacological thromboprophylaxis and total hip or knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Frostick, Simon

    Pharmacological and mechanical thromboprophylaxis reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients undergoing total knee/hip replacement (TKR/THR). Nurses play a key role in VTE prevention through clinical care, before and after discharge from hospital, and patient education. Conventional pharmacological agents for VTE prophylaxis include low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) and fondaparinux. However, parenteral administration, increased bleeding risk, and patient/physician non-adherence to treatment and guidelines, are important limitations. Three non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants--dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban and apixaban--are available in the UK for VTE prevention following THR/TKR. In common with LMWHs and fondaparinux, these offer rapid onset of action and fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. An agent for emergency reversal of dabigatran is in development, while there is no antidote for fondaparinux and LMWHs can be partially neutralised by protamine. Oral administration may result in better adherence to treatment and guidelines, reducing the nurse burden after discharge, and enhancing cost-effectiveness. PMID:26768045

  8. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I–III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I–III). PMID:27512242

  9. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I-III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I-III). PMID:27512242

  10. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    PubMed

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. PMID:25874400

  11. Total hip arthroplasty in paralytic dislocation from poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Laguna, Rafael; Barrientos, Jesús

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a case of a patient with degenerative hip disease in paralytic dislocation by poliomyelitis. Poliomyelitis is an acute infection disease caused by a group of neurotrophic viruses, which has a special affinity by the anterior horns cells of the spinal cord and for certain motor nuclei of the brain stem. Paralysis is a flaccid type and characteristically paralysis is asymmetrical. It is said that the joints of the affected limb by poliomyelitis are protected from the development of osteoarthritis. Hip dislocation in poliomyelitis is an acquired deformity caused by flaccid paralysis and the resulting muscular imbalance. In young children, when the gluteus maximus and medius muscles are paralyzed and the hip flexors and adductors are of normal strength, eventual luxation of the hip is almost inevitable. Hip osteoarthritis in a limb with poliomyelitis is an unusual entity because these limbs do not support excessive loads. In patients who present with the residual effects of poliomyelitis including degenerative disease and hip dysplastic, surgery is one of the most difficult challenges faced by reconstructive surgeons. In such cases, surgeons should attempt to optimize the component position and choice, surgical approach, and soft tissue tensioning because stability of the prosthesis can be problematic. PMID:19292189

  12. Mid-term clinical results of total hip arthroplasty using a Wagner standard cup for dysplastic hip

    PubMed Central

    Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Nozawa, Masahiko; Yuasa, Takahito; Aritomi, Kentaro; Ogawa, Seiki; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty depends on many factors. We must not forget fundamental things those are design of outer surface of the component, that leads bone ingrowth into the prosthesis, better initial stability, and better insertional techniques. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty with a Wagner standard cup for patients who had acetabular dysplasia. Patients and methods Fifty-four patients with 55 hips underwent primary metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (Metasul prosthesis) with a Wagner standard cup (44–48 mm in outer diameter) and were followed for a minimum of 10 years. All patients received the same type of cementless femoral component (Natural hip stem) and femoral head (28 mm in diameter). Results Seventeen of the 55 Wagner standard cups (30.9%) showed aseptic loosening over a mean period of 3.6 years after surgery, and there were no bone anchors on the outer surface of the 16 retrieved cups. Conclusion From our experience, the small Wagner standard cup does not achieve sufficient osteointegration and we do not recommend the use of this cup, especially for patients with acetabular dysplasia and/or those with a small stature. PMID:25561751

  13. Total hip arthroplasty in patients with avascular necrosis of the hip. Follow-up observations on cementless and cemented operations.

    PubMed

    Katz, R L; Bourne, R B; Rorabeck, C H; McGee, H

    1992-08-01

    Thirty-one patients with avascular necrosis of the hip were treated by 34 total hip arthroplasties (THAs). All patients were observed prospectively with a minimum two-year follow-up evaluation (average, 46 months; range, 24-84 months). Twenty had cemented arthroplasties using contemporary cementing techniques. This included insertion of a medullary plug, cleansing of the canal with a medullary brush, pulsatile lavage irrigation, and insertion of the cement with a cement gun. In 14 hips, a cementless prosthesis was used. Patients were rated using a modified Harris hip score. Sequential postoperative roentgenograms were analyzed in each patient. The overall Harris hip score ratings were 88 in the cemented and 84 in the noncemented groups. Mechanical failure with loosening of the femoral component occurred in one patient who developed deep sepsis. Significant thigh pain occurred in four patients in the noncemented group. Previous studies in the literature have generally reported unfavorable results in patients with avascular necrosis of the hip treated with THA. Using cementless and cemented fixation with contemporary cementing techniques, improved results can be expected. A high incidence of thigh pain (29%) in the cementless group remains a problem. PMID:1499201

  14. Trends and predictors of opioid use after total knee and total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Goesling, Jenna; Moser, Stephanie E; Zaidi, Bilal; Hassett, Afton L; Hilliard, Paul; Hallstrom, Brian; Clauw, Daniel J; Brummett, Chad M

    2016-06-01

    Few studies have assessed postoperative trends in opioid cessation and predictors of persistent opioid use after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA). Preoperatively, 574 TKA and THA patients completed validated, self-report measures of pain, functioning, and mood and were longitudinally assessed for 6 months after surgery. Among patients who were opioid naive the day of surgery, 8.2% of TKA and 4.3% of THA patients were using opioids at 6 months. In comparison, 53.3% of TKA and 34.7% of THA patients who reported opioid use the day of surgery continued to use opioids at 6 months. Patients taking >60 mg oral morphine equivalents preoperatively had an 80% likelihood of persistent use postoperatively. Day of surgery predictors for 6-month opioid use by opioid-naive patients included greater overall body pain (P = 0.002), greater affected joint pain (knee/hip) (P = 0.034), and greater catastrophizing (P = 0.010). For both opioid-naive and opioid users on the day of surgery, decreases in overall body pain from baseline to 6 months were associated with decreased odds of being on opioids at 6 months (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.72, P = 0.050; aOR = 0.62, P = 0.001); however, change in affected joint pain (knee/hip) was not predictive of opioid use (aOR = 0.99, P = 0.939; aOR = 1.00, P = 0.963). In conclusion, many patients taking opioids before surgery continue to use opioids after arthroplasty and some opioid-naive patients remained on opioids; however, persistent opioid use was not associated with change in joint pain. Given the growing concerns about chronic opioid use, the reasons for persistent opioid use and perioperative prescribing of opioids deserve further study. PMID:26871536

  15. Single-dose radiation therapy for prevention of heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, W.L.; Lo, T.C.; Covall, D.J.; Pfeifer, B.A.; Wasilewski, S.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Single-dose radiation therapy was prospectively evaluated for its efficacy in prevention of heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Thirty-one patients (34 hips) were treated between 1981 and 1988. Risk factors for inclusion in the protocol included prior evidence of heterotopic ossification, ankylosing spondylitis, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Patients with hypertrophic osteoarthritis or traumatic arthritis with osteophytes were not included. Operations on 34 hips included 19 primary total and 11 revision total hip arthroplasties and 4 excisions of heterotopic ossification. All patients received radiotherapy to the hip after operation with a single dose of 700 centigray. Radiotherapy is recommended on the first postoperative day. After this single-dose radiation treatment, no patient had clinically significant heterotopic ossification. Recurrent disease developed in two hips (6%), as seen on radiography (grades 2 and 3). This series documents a 100% clinical success rate and a 94% radiographic success rate in preventing heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Single-dose radiotherapy is as effective as other radiation protocols in preventing heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty. It is less expensive and easier to administer than multidose radiotherapy.

  16. Reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty cost-effectiveness: A quality-adjusted life years comparison with total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Daniel; Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) cost-effectiveness with total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. METHODS: This study used a stochastic model and decision-making algorithm to compare the cost-effectiveness of RSA and total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent pre-operative, and 3, 6, and 12 mo post-operative clinical examinations and Short Form-36 Health Survey completion. Short form-36 Health Survey subscale scores were converted to EuroQual Group Five Dimension Health Outcome scores and compared with historical data from age-matched patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) improvements based on life expectancies were calculated. RESULTS: The cost/QALY was $3900 for total hip arthroplasty and $11100 for RSA. After adjusting the model to only include shoulder-specific physical function subscale items, the RSA QALY improved to 2.8 years, and its cost/QALY decreased to $8100. CONCLUSION: Based on industry accepted standards, cost/QALY estimates supported both RSA and total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the quality of life improvement “gold standard” among arthroplasty procedures, cost/QALY estimates identified in this study support the growing use of RSA to improve patient quality of life. PMID:26925384

  17. A frictional study of total hip joint replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, S. C.; Unsworth, A.; Goldsmith, A. A. J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric wear debris produced by articulation of the femoral head against the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene socket of a total hip replacement has been implicated as the main cause of osteolysis and subsequent failure of these implants. Potential solutions to this problem are to employ hard bearing surface combinations such as metal-on-metal or ceramic-on-ceramic prostheses. The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in lubrication modes and friction of a range of material combinations using synthetic and biological fluids as the lubricants. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions of film thicknesses and lubrication modes. A strong correlation was observed between experiment and theory when employing carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) fluids as the lubricant. Under these conditions the ceramic-on-ceramic joints showed full fluid film lubrication while the metal-on-metal, metal-on-plastic, diamond-like carbon-coated stainless steel (DLC)-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic prostheses operated under a mixed lubrication regime. With bovine serum as the lubricant in the all ceramic joints, however, the full fluid film lubrication was inhibited due to adsorbed proteins. In the metal-on-metal joints this adsorbed protein layer acted to reduce the friction while in the ceramic coupling the friction was increased. The use of bovine serum as the lubricant also significantly increased the friction in both the metal-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic joints. The friction produced by the DLC-on-plastic joints depended on the quality of the coating. Those joints with a less consistent coating and therefore a higher surface roughness gave significantly higher friction than the smoother, more consistently coated heads.

  18. Sensitivity to implant materials in patients undergoing total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Granchi, Donatella; Cenni, Elisabetta; Trisolino, Giovanni; Giunti, Armando; Baldini, Nicola

    2006-05-01

    Sensitivity to implant materials is an unpredictable event, which may contribute to the process leading to the failure of the total hip replacement (THR). The aim of the current study was to investigate the informative power of skin testing in detecting the sensitization to the implant components in patients undergoing THR. A consecutive series of 223 patients was enrolled in the study, including 66 candidates to THR, 53 with stable implant, and 104 with THR loosening. The patch testing was performed by using the most relevant components of cobalt-based alloys (CoCrMo), Ti-based alloys (TiAlV), and bone cements. The frequency of positive patch testing in preimplant patients did not differ from that observed after THR. Patients with CoCrMo-failed implant showed a significant low frequency of nickel-positive skin reaction, while patients with TiAlV-THR had a high incidence of vanadium-positive patch testing. The panel of haptens showed a good performance in the identification of patients known to have a contact dermatitis. With regard to the THR outcome, patch testing was not able to discriminate between stable and failed implant. Sensitivity to at least one hapten, namely bone cement, as well as the positive medical history of hypersensitivity, influenced negatively the THR survival. Our results show the reliability of patch testing for investigating the sensitivity to implant components. The cause-effect relationship between sensitization and negative outcome cannot be established, but the shorter lifespan of THR in patients who have a positive patch testing supports the significant role of this event in contributing to the implant failure. PMID:16265661

  19. Does intraoperative fluoroscopy improve component positioning in total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Tischler, Eric H; Orozco, Fabio; Aggarwal, Vinay K; Pacheco, Haroldo; Post, Zachary; Ong, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Accurate placement of components is imperative for successful outcomes after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Although technology-assisted techniques offer the potential for greater accuracy in prosthesis positioning, the need for additional resources prevents their widespread use. The goal of this study was to compare primary THA procedures performed with and without intraoperative fluoroscopic guidance with regard to accuracy of prosthesis placement, operative time, and postoperative complications. The authors reviewed 341 consecutive cases (330 patients) undergoing primary THA at the authors' institution from September 2007 to January 2010. Postoperative anteroposterior radiographs were used to measure acetabular inclination angle, leg length discrepancy, and femoral offset discrepancy. Operative time and postoperative complications related to implant positioning were recorded. Mean acetabular inclination angle, leg length discrepancy, and offset discrepancy for control vs study groups were 43.0° (range, 32.2°-61.4°) vs 43.8° (range, 29.0°-55.1°), 4.75 mm (range, 0-25) vs 4.24 mm (range, 0-27), and 8.47 mm (range, 0-9.7) vs 7.70 mm (range, 0-31), respectively. Complication rates were not significantly different between the control (8.1%) and study (5.3%) groups. Mean operative time was significantly higher in the study group compared with the control group (59.8 vs 52.8 minutes) (P<.0001). The findings showed that intraoperative fluoroscopy may not improve prosthesis accuracy or decrease postoperative complication rates compared with a freehand technique. Because of significantly increased operative time and cost associated with fluoroscopic guidance, the authors discourage the use of this technique in uncomplicated primary THA performed at high-volume arthroplasty institutions. PMID:25611413

  20. Predictive value of robotic-assisted total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    El Bitar, Youssef F; Jackson, Timothy J; Lindner, Dror; Botser, Itamar B; Stake, Christine E; Domb, Benjamin G

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular cup positioning, leg-length discrepancy, and global offset are important parameters associated with outcomes following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Deviation from an accepted range of values can lead to significant complications, including dislocation, leg-length discrepancy, impingement, accelerated bearing surface wear, and revisions. The purpose of this study was to assess whether robotic-assisted THA was reliable in predicting radiographic measurements of cup inclination and anteversion, leg-length change, and global offset change. All 61 robotic-assisted THAs that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were performed by a single surgeon through a mini-posterior approach. Data provided by the robot were collected prospectively, and radiographic data were collected retrospectively by 2 blinded independent reviewers. The cohort in this study consisted of 27 male and 34 female patients, with an average age of 60.5 years. A strong inter- and intraobserver correlation was found for the radiographic measurements of cup inclination, cup anteversion, leg-length discrepancy, and global offset (r>0.8 with P<.001 for all). Ninety-six point seven percent of robotic-measured inclination angles and 98.4% of robotic-measured anteversion angles were within 10° of radiographic measurements. One hundred percent of robotic-measured leg-length change and 91.8% of robotic-measured global offset change were within 10 mm of radiographic measurements. Robotic-assisted THA showed good predictive value for cup inclination and anteversion angles and measurements of leg-length change and global offset change done postoperatively on plain radiographs. Further refinement of the robotic system would make it more accurate in predicting the postoperative parameters mentioned. PMID:25611417

  1. Mortality rates at 10 years after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing compared with total hip replacement in England: retrospective cohort analysis of hospital episode statistics

    PubMed Central

    Kendal, Adrian R; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Arden, Nigel K; Judge, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare 10 year mortality rates among patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and total hip replacement in England. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting English hospital episode statistics database linked to mortality records from the Office for National Statistics. Population All adults who underwent primary elective hip replacement for osteoarthritis from April 1999 to March 2012. The exposure of interest was prosthesis type: cemented total hip replacement, uncemented total hip replacement, and metal-on-metal hip resurfacing. Confounding variables included age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index, rurality, area deprivation, surgical volume, and year of operation. Main outcome measures All cause mortality. Propensity score matching was used to minimise confounding by indication. Kaplan-Meier plots estimated the probability of survival up to 10 years after surgery. Multilevel Cox regression modelling, stratified on matched sets, described the association between prosthesis type and time to death, accounting for variation across hospital trusts. Results 7437 patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing were matched to 22 311 undergoing cemented total hip replacement; 8101 patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing were matched to 24 303 undergoing uncemented total hip replacement. 10 year rates of cumulative mortality were 271 (3.6%) for metal-on-metal hip resurfacing versus 1363 (6.1%) for cemented total hip replacement, and 239 (3.0%) for metal-on-metal hip resurfacing versus 999 (4.1%) for uncemented total hip replacement. Patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing had an increased survival probability (hazard ratio 0.51 (95% confidence interval 0.45 to 0.59) for cemented hip replacement; 0.55 (0.47 to 0.65) for uncemented hip replacement). There was no evidence for an interaction with age or sex. Conclusions Patients with hip osteoarthritis undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing have reduced mortality in

  2. Subject-specific musculoskeletal modelling in patients before and after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; De Groote, Friedl; Meyer, Christophe; Corten, Kristoff; Simon, Jean-Pierre; Desloovere, Kaat; Jonkers, Ilse

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this study was to define the effect on hip contact forces of including subject-specific moment generating capacity in the musculoskeletal model by scaling isometric muscle strength and by including geometrical information in control subjects, hip osteoarthritis and total hip arthroplasty patients. Scaling based on dynamometer measurements decreased the strength of all flexor and abductor muscles. This resulted in a model that lacked the capacity to generate joint moments required during functional activities. Scaling muscle forces based on functional activities and inclusion of MRI-based geometrical detail did not compromise the model strength and resulted in hip contact forces comparable to previously reported measured contact forces. PMID:27123960

  3. Projections of total hip replacement in Sweden from 2013 to 2030

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Max; Rogmark, Cecilia; Rolfson, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose The continuously increasing demand for joint replacement surgery in the past decades imposes higher constraints on the budgets of hospitals and healthcare providers. We undertook an analysis of historical trends in total hip replacement performed in Sweden between 1968 and 2012 in order to provide projections of future demand. Data and methods We obtained data on total hip replacements registered every year and on the evolution of the Swedish population between 1968 and 2012. We assumed the existence of a maximum incidence. So we adopted a regression framework that assumes the existence of an upper limit of total hip replacement incidence. Results We found that the incidence of total hip replacement will continue to increase until a projected upper incidence level of about 400 total hip replacements per 105 Swedish residents aged 40 years and older will be reached around the year 2107. In 2020, the estimated incidence of total hip replacement will be 341 (95% prediction interval (PI): 302–375) and in 2030 it will be 358 (PI: 317–396). Using official forecasted population growth data, about 18,000 operations would be expected to be performed in 2020 and 20,000 would be expected to be performed in 2030. Interpretation Growing incidence, population growth, and increasing life expectancy will probably result in increased demand for hip replacement surgery. Our findings could serve as a basis for decision making. PMID:24758323

  4. Obesity and long term functional outcomes following elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Obesity rates continue to rise and more total hip arthroplasty procedures are being performed in progressively younger, obese patients. Hence, maintenance of long term physical function will become very important for quality of life, functional independence and hip prosthesis survival. Presently, there are no reviews of the long term efficacy of total hip arthroplasty on physical function. This review: 1) synopsized available data regarding obesity effects on long term functional outcomes after total hip arthroplasty, and 2) suggested future directions for research. Methods A literature search was conducted from 1965 to January of 2011 for studies that evaluated long term functional outcomes at one year or longer after THA in obese (body mass index values ≥30 kg/m2) and non-obese patients (body mass index <30 kg/m2). Results Five retrospective studies and 18 prospective studies were identified as those that assessed physical function before surgery out to ≥ one year after total hip arthroplasty. Study sample sizes ranged from 108–18,968 and followed patients from one to twenty years. Total hip arthroplasty confers significant pain reduction and improvement in quality of life irrespective of body mass index. Functional improvement occurred after total hip arthroplasty among all studies, but obese patients generally did not attain the same level of physical function by the follow-up time point. Discussion Uncontrolled obesity after total hip arthroplasty is related to worsening of comorbidities and excessive health care costs over the long term. Aggressive and sustainable rehabilitation strategies that include physical exercise, psychosocial components and behavior modification may be highly useful in maximizing and maintaining weight loss after total hip arthroplasty. PMID:22533938

  5. Early catastrophic acetabular failure in Furlong total hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Steven W.; Wardlaw, Douglas; Gibson, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    The use of uncemented hip arthroplasty prostheses with ceramic articulations are popular, especially in the young, because of a perceived reduction in wear. We highlight a complication of ceramic on polyethylene articulating couples not previously described in the Furlong replacement. Despite widespread metalosis and particulate debris, osteolysis was not initially seen. The contamination compromised subsequent revision. PMID:19384635

  6. Early catastrophic acetabular failure in Furlong total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Knox, David; Hamilton, Steven W; Wardlaw, Douglas; Gibson, Peter H

    2009-03-01

    The use of uncemented hip arthroplasty prostheses with ceramic articulations are popular, especially in the young, because of a perceived reduction in wear. We highlight a complication of ceramic on polyethylene articulating couples not previously described in the Furlong replacement. Despite widespread metalosis and particulate debris, osteolysis was not initially seen. The contamination compromised subsequent revision. PMID:19384635

  7. Actis Total Hip System 2 Year Follow-up

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Osteoarthritis; Traumatic Arthritis; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head; Acute Traumatic Fracture of the Femoral Head or Neck; Certain Cases of Ankylosis; Non-union of Femoral Neck Fractures; Certain High Sub-Capital and Femoral Neck Fractures in the Elderly

  8. Total Hip Arthroplasty for the Paralytic and Non-paralytic Side in Patient with Residual Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sonohata, Motoki; Kitajima, Masaru; Kawano, Shunsuke; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty (THA) for poliomyelitis is a problematic procedure due to difficulty in positioning the cup of the prosthesis in the true acetabulum and the risk of dislocation after THA due to the low muscle tone. Methods: We herein present a case of bilateral hip pain with a history of poliomyelitis. Radiograph showed bilateral hip osteoarthritis caused by hip dysplasia due to residual poliomyelitis in right hip joint or developing dysplasia of the hip joint in left hip joint. THA was performed to bilateral hip joints. Results: Six years after bilateral THA, bilateral hip pain significantly improved. Additionally, the muscle strength on the paralyzed right side partially improved. However, the muscle strength on the non-paralyzed left side did not significantly improve. No complications related to the surgery were observed. Conclusion: Promising early results were obtained for THA in our patient with residual poliomyelitis. However, surgeons should pay attention to the potential development of complications concerning THA that may arise due to the residual poliomyelitis. PMID:27347238

  9. Uncemented total hip arthroplasty in young patients with juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. N.; Swann, M.

    1998-01-01

    The hip joint is commonly affected in juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) and involvement is usually bilateral. It is well established that the involvement of the hip in JCA is the most important reason that the patient will lose independence and mobility. The positive gains, both in terms of hip function and the overall functional capability, of the patients of JCA after hip replacement have been shown by several studies. There have been many reports regarding cemented total hip replacement in young patients with JCA. The short-term results have been excellent, but failure rates were considerably higher with further follow-up. To our knowledge there have been no other reports to date of the results of cementless arthroplasty of the hip in this condition. We reviewed the results of 25 primary uncemented total hip replacements (THR) in 16 patients with JCA. The mean postoperative follow-up time was 4.5 years (range 1-19 years). The clinical results were evaluated using the modified Harris hip score. The functional outcome was assessed by a scoring system described by Witt et al. The most significant long-term problem was acetabular loosening (12%) in our series. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9682646

  10. Small diameter acetabulum and femoral head in total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip, with no femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia; Xarchas, Konstantinos; Drosos, Georgios; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of 66 total hip arthroplasties in 62 patients of mean age 46 years (24-74 years), with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In all cases the centre of rotation of the new hip was positioned at the site of the true acetabulum. In all patients cementless press fit acetabular components of small diameter (42-44 mm) were used, articulating exclusively with a 22.25 mm modular metal femoral head, without the use of bone grafts or shortening osteotomies of the femur. Despite the use of small diameter femoral heads the rate of dislocation was 3%. After an average follow-up period of 9 years (4-18 years), no revisions were required for infection, loosening or wear or implant migration. Osteolytic lesions were seen in the periacetabular region in 3 patients who were symptom free. A total of 2 revisions were required for instability and 2 patients had the wires of their trochanteric osteotomy removed because of bursitis. Leg length inequality was improved in 55% of the patients and one postoperative transient sciatic nerve lesion settled within 4 months. We believe that in patients with painful dysplastic hips, the use of small diameter implants with the centre of rotation at the true acetabulum, can give very satisfactory results, without any supplementary procedures. PMID:25907394

  11. The possible introduction of anti-osteoporosis drugs as an integrated treatment in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Marchese, Marcella; Zarattini, Guido; Pazzaglia, Ugo E

    2011-04-01

    The anchorage of cementless total hip arthroplasty relies on a direct bone to implant bonding. Several factors including material properties and surface treatment determine the interfacial response of the host bone to a foreign material. Another factor that must be taken into account is the bone remodeling after the prosthesis introduction. Considering this bone remodeling, in the last few years the possibility of using anti-osteoporotic drugs has been introduced as a supplementary and integrated treatment in total hip replacement. PMID:21970916

  12. Bearing surfaces in hip replacement – Evolution and likely future

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narinder; Arora, Gen N.C.; Datta, Barun

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty has evolved from the first total hip arthroplasty in 1938, through the revolutionization of hip arthroplasty by principles of low friction arthroplasty introduced by Sir John Charnley in 1960s to the present state of the art implants and techniques. The main concern regarding failure of total hip arthroplasty has been the biological response to particulate polyethylene debris generated by conventional metal on polyethylene bearing surfaces leading to osteolysis and aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. Therefore, recent research has been focussing on alternative bearing surfaces to reduce the particulate debris generated. These bearing surfaces include ceramic-polyethylene, metal–metal as well as ceramic–ceramic articulations and have demonstrated lesser friction rates as well as significantly lower wear rates as compared to widely used metal on polyethylene surfaces. Clinical experience until now has shown that metal on metal articulations have significant safety concerns whereas metal-on-highly crosslinked polyethylene, ceramic on ceramic and ceramic on highly crosslinked polyethylene articulations have shown encouraging results to hold promise for wider use in younger and more active patients. This review article discusses positives and drawbacks of various bearing surfaces in current clinical use in total hip arthroplasty as well as briefly explores the newer technologies on the horizon which may even further decrease wear and improve total hip arthroplasty survivorship. PMID:25382913

  13. Two-Stage Progressive Femoral Lowering Followed by Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty for Treating Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type 3 Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Binazzi, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    High developmental dysplasia of the hip is commonly treated with total hip arthroplasty and shortening osteotomy. We present a two stage technique, consisting of progressive femoral lowering followed by total hip arthroplasty. The clinico-radiographic results of eleven patients (twelve hips) who were operated on with the two-stage technique were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 11 ± 5 years. At the final follow-up, ten patients (eleven hips) had a mean Harris hip score of 85 ± 5 points with no implant loosening. One patient (one hip) was revised at 5 years due to infection. No neurovascular complications were observed in any patients. With this technique, we could place the cup in the anatomical position and obtain complete limb symmetry with excellent clinical results at long-term. PMID:25599863

  14. Total hip replacement in osteoarthritis: the role of bone metabolism and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Bottai, Vanna; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Celli, Fabio; Bugelli, Giulia; Cazzella, Niki; Cei, Elena; Guido, Giulio; Giannotti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoarthritis is one of the most common joint disorder. For treatment of hip symptomatic osteoarthritis, when conservative medical therapy has failed, total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a successful orthopaedic procedures that reduces pain and improves function and quality of life. Incidence of osteoarthritis is constantly increasing with raising life expectancy. This aging process also has led to an increasing number of patients with osteoporosis who need hip replacement for osteoarthritis. Osteoporosis have 3 major potential complications in total hip arthroplasty: perioperative fracture, an increased risk of periprosthetic fracture, and late aseptic loosening. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of osteoporosis on total hip replacement procedure outcome and highlight the importance of adequate study of calcium-phosphorus metabolism in patient candidate for hip surgery, and the need to start a suitable therapy to recover the bone mass before surgery. Bone quality of the hip joint has become an important risk factor limiting the durability of THA. PMID:26811704

  15. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using a Polished Tapered Cemented Stem in Hereditary Multiple Exostosis

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Akio; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu; Mogami, Atsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old Japanese man underwent right total hip arthroplasty for hereditary multiple exostosis. At first presentation, he had suffered from coxalgia for a long time. On radiographic images, there was a gigantic femoral head, increased shaft angle, and large diameter of the femoral neck. He had also developed coxarthrosis and severe pain of the hip joint. The transformation of the proximal femur bone causes difficulty in setting a cementless total hip prosthesis. Therefore, total hip arthroplasty using a cemented polished tapered stem was performed via a direct lateral approach. Using a cemented polished tapered stem allowed us to deal with the femoral bone transformation and bone substance defectiveness due to exostosis and also minimized the invasiveness of the operation. PMID:27127668

  16. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using a Polished Tapered Cemented Stem in Hereditary Multiple Exostosis.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Akio; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu; Mogami, Atsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old Japanese man underwent right total hip arthroplasty for hereditary multiple exostosis. At first presentation, he had suffered from coxalgia for a long time. On radiographic images, there was a gigantic femoral head, increased shaft angle, and large diameter of the femoral neck. He had also developed coxarthrosis and severe pain of the hip joint. The transformation of the proximal femur bone causes difficulty in setting a cementless total hip prosthesis. Therefore, total hip arthroplasty using a cemented polished tapered stem was performed via a direct lateral approach. Using a cemented polished tapered stem allowed us to deal with the femoral bone transformation and bone substance defectiveness due to exostosis and also minimized the invasiveness of the operation. PMID:27127668

  17. Genetic susceptibility to total hip arthroplasty failure: a preliminary study on the influence of matrix metalloproteinase 1, interleukin 6 polymorphisms and vitamin D receptor

    PubMed Central

    Malik, M H A; Jury, F; Bayat, A; Ollier, W E R; Kay, P R

    2007-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)1, interleukin(IL)6 and vitamin D receptor (VDR) have been implicated in the biological cascade of events initiated by particulate wear debris and bacterial infection, resulting in periprosthetic bone loss around loosened total hip replacements (THRs). The individual responses to such stimuli may be dictated by genetic variation. Objective To study the effect of single‐nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within these candidate genes. Methods A case–control study of the MMP1, IL6 and VDR genes was performed for possible association with deep sepsis or aseptic loosening. All cases included in the study were Caucasian patients with osteoarthritis who had received a cemented Charnley total hip arthroplasty (THA) and polyethylene acetabular cup. Cases consisted of 91 patients with early aseptic loosening and 71 patients with microbiological evidence of deep infection on surgery. Controls consisted of 150 patients with THAs that were clinically asymptomatic for over 10 years and showed no radiographic features of aseptic loosening. DNA samples from all individuals were genotyped using Taqman allelic discrimination. Results The C allele (p = 0.001; OR = 3.27; 95% CI 2.21 to 4.83) and C/C genotype (p = 0.001) for the MMP1 SNP were highly associated with aseptic failure when compared with controls. No statistically significant relationships were found between aseptic loosening and the MMP2, MMP4, IL6 –174 or VDRL SNPs. The T allele (p = 0.007; OR = 1.76; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.66) and T/T genotype (p = 0.028) for VDR‐T were statistically associated with osteolysis owing to deep infection as compared with controls. No statistically significant relationship was found between septic failure and any of the other SNPs examined in this study. Conclusions Aseptic loosening and possibly deep infection of THR may be due to the genetic influence of candidate susceptibility genes. SNP markers may serve as predictors of

  18. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Anwander, H.; Cron, G. O.; Rakhra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hips with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) have a high rate of adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR), often associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) measures tissue perfusion with the parameter Ktrans (volume transfer constant of contrast agent). Our purpose was 1) to evaluate the feasibility of DCE-MRI in patients with THA and 2) to compare DCE-MRI in patients with MoM bearings with metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) bearings, hypothesising that the perfusion index Ktrans in hips with MoM THA is higher than in hips with MoP THA. Methods In this pilot study, 16 patients with primary THA were recruited (eight MoM, eight MoP). DCE-MRI of the hip was performed at 1.5 Tesla (T). For each patient, Ktrans was computed voxel-by-voxel in all tissue lateral to the bladder. The mean Ktrans for all voxels was then calculated. These values were compared with respect to implant type and gender, and further correlated with clinical parameters. Results There was no significant difference between the two bearing types with both genders combined. However, dividing patients by THA bearing and gender, women with MoM bearings had the highest Ktrans values, exceeding those of women with MoP bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.053 min−1; p-value < 0.05) and men with MoM bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.034 min−1; p-value < 0.001). Considering only the men, patients with MoM bearings had lower Ktrans than those with MoP bearings (0.034 min−1 versus 0.046 min−1; p < 0.05). Conclusion DCE-MRI is feasible to perform in tissues surrounding THA. Females with MoM THA show high Ktrans values in DCE-MRI, suggesting altered tissue perfusion kinematics which may reflect relatively greater inflammation. Cite this article: Dr P. E. Beaule. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty: A pilot stud. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:73–79. DOI: 10

  19. Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Rare Case of Multicentric Reticulohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Das, Ashim; Sharma, Aman

    2015-01-01

    Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MRH) is a rare systemic disease, which commonly manifests as muco-cutaneous papulonodules and inflammatory erosive polyarthropathy. In this research, we report the clinical manifestations and management of a rare case of MRH with destructive arthropathy of bilateral hip joints and arthritis mutilans presenting with characteristic deformities. Disabling hip arthropathy that occurs secondary to MRH can be successfully managed with bilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA). Osteopenia and acetabular bone defects must be anticipated during THA. This case is reported due to its rare occurrence and because little literature has been published regarding THA in such patients. PMID:26640636

  20. The Clinical Performance of Metal-on-Metal as an Articulation Surface in Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Long, William T

    2005-01-01

    The metal-on-metal articulations in total hip arthroplasty (THA) were widely used between 1960 and 1975. The McKee-Farrar and other first-generation prostheses failed at a high rate because impingement caused early component loosening. The problem of early component loosening was corrected by improved component design and better manufacturing quality. Second-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements have experienced short and medium-term success as assessed by Harris Hip Scores and patient selfassessment. The combined annual linear wear of the metal-on-metal femoral head and acetabular insert is less than 10 mm and osteolysis has only rarely been observed in association with well-fixed metal-on-metal total hip replacements. Hypersensitivity is not a common cause of loosening with second-generation hip replacements and remains to be proven as a definitive diagnosis in unusual cases of unexplained pain. More than 40 years of use has demonstrated no increase in the incidence of renal failure or cancer in patients with metal-on-metal total hip replacements. The scientific evidence of the results using the metal-on-metal articulations would recommend its continued use in any patient who does not have compromised renal function. PMID:16089065

  1. Use of postoperative irradiation for the prevention of heterotopic bone formation after total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, J.E.; Greenberg, P.; Selch, M.T.; Thomas, B.J.; Amstutz, H.

    1988-03-01

    Formation of heterotopic bone (HTB) following total hip replacement may partially or completely ankylose the joint space, causing pain and/or limiting the range of motion. Patients at high risk for formation of HTB postoperatively include those with previous HTB formation, heterotopic osteoarthritis, and active rheumatoid spondylitis. Patients in these high risk groups have a 63-69% incidence of post-operative HTB formation, usually seen radiographically by 2 months post-operation. From 1980-1986 twenty-nine hips in 28 consecutively treated patients were irradiated post-operatively at the UCLA Center for the Health Sciences. The indication for irradiation was documented HTB formation previously in 26 of the 27 hips presented below. From 1980-1982 patients received 20 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions; from 1982-1986 the dose was reduced to 10 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Twenty-seven hips in 26 patients completed therapy and were available for evaluation, with a minimum of 2 month follow-up, and a median follow-up of 12 months. Three of 27 hips developed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV) post-operatively, whereas 5 of 27 hips developed minor, nonsymptomatic HTB (Brooker grade I). When irradiation was begun by postoperative day 4, 0 of 17 hips formed significant HTB. If irradiation began after post-operative day 4, 3 of 10 hips formed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV). These 3 hips received doses of 10 Gy in one hip and 20 Gy in the other 2 hips. There were no differences in the incidence or severity of side effects in the 10 Gy vs. the 20 Gy treatment groups. Eighteen hips received 10 Gy, 8 hips 20 Gy and, 1 hip 12 Gy. In conclusion, 10 Gy in 5 fractions appears as effective as 20 Gy in 10 fractions at preventing post-operative formation of HTB. For optimal results, treatment should begin as early as possible prior to post-operative day 4.

  2. A New Case of Fracture of a Modular Femoral Neck Device After a Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Trieb, Klemens; Stadler, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    This report addresses a new case of a modular femoral neck fracture after total hip arthroplasty. A now seventy-three-year- old overweight female underwent total hip replacement of the right hip because of osteoarthritis in the year 2002. Then, years later, the head and the polyethylene were changed due to wear. In October 2014, the patient was transferred from the trauma department of her hometown to our department after she had slipped and fallen directly on her right hip. The x-rays done at the trauma department have shown no periprosthetic fracture but a fracture of the modular neck. Therefore, the patient was transferred to our department in order to undergo a revision arthroplasty with change of the stem and head after splitting the femur. PMID:26157528

  3. Favorable outcome of a total hip arthroplasty with insufficient bone coverage of the roof reinforcement ring

    PubMed Central

    Judas, Fernando M.; Lucas, Francisco M.; Fonseca, Ruben L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Total hip arthroplasty in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip can be a complex procedure due to acetabular and proximal femoral deformities. Presentation of case A 59-year-old male patient underwent a total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of end-stage dysplastic osteoarthritis. A roof reinforcement ring, a cemented polyethylene cup, and a cementless stem were used. A portion of the superior rim of the ring was uncovered by the host bone. Morsellized autogenous femoral-head graft was impacted to fill the space between the superior rim of the ring and the superior part of the dysplastic acetabulum. At the follow-up after 5-years, the patient had no complaints and was very satisfied with the operation result. The hip radiograph revealed no signs of instability of the acetabular component, and no bone graft resorption. Discussion Favorable results were described using metal rings and conical femoral stems for the treatment of the developmental dysplasia of the hip. The superior rim of the metal ring should be against host bone for 60% of its support. Despite the suboptimal implantation of the ring compromising, apparently, mechanical stability of the arthroplasty, the outcome was favorable. Conclusion This result can be supported by the good fixation of the metal ring to the pelvis with screws, the adequate orientation of both components of the total hip arthroplasty, and the bone graft incorporation. PMID:26453941

  4. Theoretical and practical aspects in total uncemented hip arthroplasty by using short femoral stem prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Moga, M; Pogarasteanu, ME; Barbilian, A

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthrosis, primary or secondary, is an osteoarthritic degenerative process that affects the hip joint. Primary hip arthrosis has an unknown etiology, and secondary hip arthrosis has well defined causes; of these causes, some are known to lead to arthrosis of the hip in the young age patient. The surgical treatment aims either to preserve the patient’s hip joint, or to replace the joint. The most commonly used procedure at this time is the total hip arthroplasty. The femoral component may have a short or a long stem. The short femoral stem prosthesis is usually impacted by using a unique technique and unique instruments, according to the manufacturer’s specifications. There are several models of short stem femoral prosthesis, but no matter which one is chosen, the surgical indication, the surgical technique and a well-conducted recovery program are important. The choosing of each arthroplastic implant must be made with care, taking into consideration the patient’s benefit, his expectations, and also the surgeon’s experience. PMID:26103643

  5. Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty in Hip Dysplasia with an Extensively Porous-Coated Cylindrical Stem Modified for Asians: A 12-Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tsutomu; Otani, Takuya; Sugiyama, Hajime; Hayama, Tetsuo; Katsumata, Souichi; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-06-01

    Long-term outcomes of primary cementless total hip arthroplasty were examined for 198 hips of Asian patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. AML stems were modified for patients' relatively small physique. Stable fixation was achieved despite various proximal femoral deformities. At follow up (mean 12.1 years), radiographs demonstrated fixation in all hips, with 100% stem survivorship. Radiographic changes revealed that the severity of stress-shielding was mild in 55% of hips, moderate in 26%, and severe in 19%. Longer follow up is needed to determine whether these changes will develop into clinical manifestations. A distal fixation stem can be a useful reconstruction option when application of a proximal fixation stem in primary total hip arthroplasty is difficult for various reasons. PMID:25677937

  6. Anterior Longitudinal Osteotomy of the Greater Trochanter in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Regazzola, Gianmarco M V; Vulcano, Ettore; Monestier, Luca; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    The extra-articular impingement of the greater trochanter against the ileum is an underrated cause of early dislocation in total hip arthroplasty. In this preliminary study, the authors assess the effectiveness of an anterior longitudinal osteotomy of the greater trochanter for preventing dislocation. A total of 115 patients underwent a total hip arthroplasty through a posterolateral approach. All patients underwent clinical and radiological follow-up at 1, 3, and 6 months. No dislocation was reported. All patients demonstrated fast recovery of range of motion and walking. No trochanter fractures were observed. The osteotomy of the greater trochanter is an effective surgical technique that decreases anterior impingement and consequently lowers the dislocation rate in primary total hip arthroplasty. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(8):490-493.]. PMID:26313167

  7. Total hip arthroplasty in young adults, with focus on Perthes' disease and slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Pediatric hip diseases account for 9% of all primary hip arthroplasties in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. We wanted to validate the diagnosis as reported to the register and to assess the quality of life of these patients after hip replacement. Patients and methods 540 patients accepted to participate in this follow-up study (634 hips). All were less than 40 years of age and had been reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register as having undergone a primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) between 1987 and 2007. The underlying diagnosis, age at diagnosis, and type of treatment given prior to the hip replacement were recorded from the original hospital notes. Results The diagnoses reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register were confirmed to be correct in 91% of all cases (538/592). For the 94 hips that had been treated due to Perthes' disease or slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), the diagnosis was verified in 95% of cases (89/94). The corresponding proportion for inflammatory hip disease was 98% (137/140) and it was only 61% for primary osteoarthritis (19/31). The self reported quality of life (EQ-5D) was poorer for these young patients with THA than for persons in age-matched cohorts from Great Britain and Sweden, except for those with an underlying SCFE. Interpretation The diagnoses reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register as the underlying cause of THA were correct in 91% of cases. Individuals who undergo THA before the age of 40 have a reduced quality of life, except for those requiring a hip replacement because of SCFE. PMID:22112152

  8. Late Disassembly of Femoral Head and Neck of A Modular Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Parvej; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Modular total hip arthroplasty system are now widely used, as these components increase the flexibility during primary and revision total hip arthoplasty. But this modularity itself associated with some risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Case Report: We report a case of late disassembly of a primary total arthroplasty in a 42 years old patient five years after the replacement surgery where the femoral head remained in the acetabular socket. Conclusion: Femoral head should be solidly impacted onto the stem and confirm that it has been assembled correctly before reduction. PMID:27299010

  9. Compatibility of the totally replaced hip. Reduction of wear by amorphous diamond coating.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, Seppo

    2003-12-01

    Particulate wear debris in totally replaced hips causes adverse local host reactions. The extreme form of such a reaction, aggressive granulomatosis, was found to be a distinct condition and different from simple aseptic loosening. Reactive and adaptive tissues around the totally replaced hip were made of proliferation of local fibroblast like cells and activated macrophages. Methylmethacrylate and high-molecular-weight polyethylene were shown to be essentially immunologically inert implant materials, but in small particulate form functioned as cellular irritants initiating local biological reactions leading to loosening of the implants. Chromium-cobalt-molybdenum is the most popular metallic implant material; it is hard and tough, and the bearings of this metal are partially self-polishing. In total hip implants, prerequisites for longevity of the replaced hip are good biocompatibility of the materials and sufficient tribological properties of the bearings. The third key issue is that the bearing must minimize frictional shear at the prosthetic bone-implant interface to be compatible with long-term survival. Some of the approaches to meet these demands are alumina-on-alumina and metal-on-metal designs, as well as the use of highly crosslinked polyethylene for the acetabular component. In order to avoid the wear-based deleterious properties of the conventional total hip prosthesis materials or coatings, the present work included biological and tribological testing of amorphous diamond. Previous experiments had demonstrated that a high adhesion of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coatings to a substrate can be achieved by using mixing layers or interlayers. Amorphous diamond was found to be biologically inert, and simulator testing indicated excellent wear properties for conventional total hip prostheses, in which either the ball or both bearing surfaces were coated with hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous diamond films. Simulator testing with such total hip prostheses

  10. Surgical approach in primary total hip arthroplasty: anatomy, technique and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Petis, Stephen; Howard, James L.; Lanting, Brent L.; Vasarhelyi, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has revolutionized the treatment of hip arthritis. A number of surgical approaches to the hip joint exist, each with unique advantages and disadvantages. The most commonly used approaches include the direct anterior, direct lateral and posterior approaches. A number of technical intricacies allow safe and efficient femoral and acetabular reconstruction when using each approach. Hip dislocation, abductor insufficiency, fracture and nerve injury are complications of THA, although their relative risk varies by approach. Numerous clinical trials have sought to elicit differences in patient-reported outcomes, complication rates and return to function among the surgical approaches. This review outlines some of the technical pearls of performing a THA through either a direct anterior, direct lateral or posterior approach. A literature review outlines the impact of surgical approach on clinical outcomes and clinically relevant complication rates. PMID:25799249

  11. New experience with alumina-on-alumina ceramic bearings for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, James; Capello, William; Manley, Michael; Bierbaum, Benjamin

    2002-06-01

    A major challenge for total hip arthroplasty is to minimize wear and osteolysis in young, active patients. Alumina ceramic bearings have shown superior wear resistance and lubrication and do not carry the risk of ion release. In a prospective randomized study, 514 hips were implanted. All patients (average age, 53 years) received the same press-fit hydroxyapatite coated femoral stem; two thirds (345 hips) received alumina ceramic bearings, and one third (169 hips) received a cobalt-chrome-on-polyethylene bearing. At a mean follow-up of 35.2 months (range, 24-48 months), there was no significant difference in clinical performance between the patient cohorts. No ceramic fracture or alumina ceramic bearing failure occurred. This new experience involves the use of improved ceramic materials and new design considerations that eliminate the risks and complications of past experiences with ceramic implants and provides a safe bearing option for young patients. PMID:12066265

  12. Clinical results of cementless total hip arthroplasty with shortening osteotomy for high dislocation with developmental dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Desteli, Engin Eren; Imren, Yunus; Tan, Erkan; Erdoğan, Murat; Özcan, Hüseyin

    2015-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty for severe developmental dysplasia of the hip is a technically challenging procedure. Subtrochanteric femoral osteotomy enables reducing the femoral head and restoring abductor muscle strength without compromising proximal femoral bone stock in advanced dysplasia.We aimed to retrospectively evaluate Crowe type III or IV developmental dysplasia of the hip who underwent reconstruction with cementless total hip arthroplasty combined with a transverse subtrochanteric femoral osteotomy. Sixty hips of 52 patients (11 male, 49 female) with Crowe type III (n: 37) or IV (n: 23) developmental dysplasia of the hip were included. The average age was 51.4 years. Surgery was performed in lateral decubitis position with posterolateral approach. Subtrochanteric transverse femoral osteotomy were used with cementless components. 40 of the femoral components were Secur-Fit type, and 20 of them were secur-fit plus max type. Ceramic-ceramic coupling was used in 24 cases and metal-polyethylene coupling was used in 36 cases. Merle D'Aubigne and Harris Hip score were used to rate the clinical outcome at the final follow up. All femoral shortening osteotomies were united at a mean of 5.7 months. Mean Merle D'Aubigne pain score was increased from 3.1 to 5.4, and mean Harris Hip score improved from 39 to 92.8, postoperatively (p<0.01). There was no significant difference in time to union between different types of stems. 4 femoral stems had asymptomatic radiolucent lines. There was no significant difference in time to union between different types of stems. PMID:26280851

  13. New concept in durability improvement of hip total joint endoprostheses.

    PubMed

    Capitanu, Lucian; Florescu, Virgil; Badita, Liliana-Laura

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the well-known fact that the rolling movement always has a lower friction compared to sliding friction, the authors have conceived and realized a pivoting movement joint on a "layer of balls" with "compensation space", placed between the acetabular cup and the femoral head. This technical solution allows free self-directed migration of the balls, depending on the resistance opposed, with successive occupation of the "compensation space". As a concept, the proposed technical solution excludes the existence of a cage for maintaining the relative positions of the spheres. It can be observed that the smallest values of the force and of the friction coefficient are obtained for the prostheses with balls and self-directed movement (approximately 5 times smaller than the values obtained for a classical prosthesis). For all the couples tested, the friction force grows with the growth of the normal load and of the oscillation speed. Changing the contact mechanism for the artificial hip joint from one sliding contact between two large surfaces, to a multitude of rolling contacts, could lead to some problems regarding functionality and durability of the active prosthesis elements. The key to an accurate evaluation of damaging mechanisms acting on THP with self directed rolling balls is a clear and complete picture of the load transfer mechanism. PMID:24707822

  14. Alumina-on-alumina total hip prostheses in patients 40 years of age or younger.

    PubMed

    Bizot, P; Banallec, L; Sedel, L; Nizard, R

    2000-10-01

    To avoid the consequences of polyethylene wear in a high-risk population, 128 alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasties have been done in 104 consecutive patients. The maximum age of patients was 40 years. The main preoperative diagnoses were osteonecrosis and sequellae of congenital hip dislocation (71% of the hips). The same titanium alloy cemented stem was implanted in all of the hips. Four types of alumina acetabular component fixations were used: a cemented plain alumina socket (41 hips), a screw-in ring with an alumina insert (22 hips), a press-fit plain alumina socket (32 hips), and a press-fit titanium metal back with an alumina insert (33 hips). Eight patients (11 hips) died during the followup period. Sixteen revisions have been documented, 12 for acetabular aseptic loosening, three for bipolar loosening (two of which were septic), and one for unexplained pain. Eighty-eight hips in 74 patients have been followed up radiologically for 2 to 22 years. Wear was unmeasurable. Four additional sockets showed definite migration. The respective survival rates after 7 years were 94.1% for the cemented cup, 88.8% for the screw-in ring, 95.1% for cementless press-fit plain alumina socket and 94.3% for the metal-back press-fit component. The 10-year survival rate was 90.4% for the cemented socket and 88.8% for the screw-in ring. The 15-year survival rate was 78.9% for the cemented socket. Grafting was the only prognostic factor, with a survival rate of 62.6% after 10 years for the hips with a bone graft and of 90.1% for hips without a graft. The alumina-on-alumina bearing surfaces seem to be a valuable alternative to the standard metal-on-polyethylene system for young patients. However, an improvement in socket fixation is required to lengthen the life span of the prosthesis to match the life expectancy of this demanding population. PMID:11039794

  15. Polyethylene wear with an entirely HA-coated total hip replacement: 79 hips followed for 5 years.

    PubMed

    Røkkum, M; Reigstad, A

    1998-06-01

    We measured the eccentricity of the femoral head in the metal backing annually during 5 years in 79 consecutive total hip replacements (73 patients). The mean age of the patients was 57 (32-73) years and the female/male ratio 63/22. The prostheses were entirely coated with hydroxyapatite. Modular 32 mm stainless steel heads and hemispherical, self-tapping screw cups with polyethylene liners were used. We found accelerating eccentricity throughout the observation period. The mean eccentricity at 5 years was 0.71 mm (95% CI 0.53-0.90), resulting in a mean eccentricity rate of 0.14 mm (0.11-0.18) per year. The 5-year eccentricity was 0.5 mm or less in 45 hips and more than 1.5 mm in 13 hips, 2 in the latter group apparently having worn through the polyethylene liner. The true wear may be twice as great. The use of 32 mm stainless steel heads and thin polyethylene inlays may have aggravated the wear problems. These HA-coated prostheses must all be checked regularly, so that cases with excessive polyethylene wear can be reoperated on before wear-through of the liner. PMID:9703398

  16. Total hip arthroplasty (S-ROM stem) and subtrochanteric osteotomy for Crowe type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangtao; Yu, Mingyang; Yang, Chen; Gu, Guishan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in adults with severe pain and disability is best treated by total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcomes of subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy combined with THA using S-ROM stem for those severe patients with a special focus on the effect of two shapes in the subtrochanteric osteotomy ends: Oblique and transverse. Materials and Methods: Twenty one cases with mean age of 43.6 years who met inclusion criteria and were operated between February 2007 and February 2012 were included in the study. Those cases had been divided into two groups (oblique vs. transverse) and all records between the two groups were analyzed. Results: The Harris hip score significantly improved from 30.6 (range 18–59) preoperatively to 91.2 (range 87–98) postoperatively by the latest followup. Complications including one deep venous thrombosis, one intraoperative fracture of femur and two dislocations occurred while they were addressed properly afterward. The oblique group showed significant advantages in operative time, union time and additional fixation in comparison with the transverse group. Conclusions: In the primary THA for the treatment of irreducible DDH, subtrochanteric oblique osteotomy combined with the freely-rotatable S-ROM stem provided favorable short term outcomes by affording both morphological and functional advantages. PMID:27053810

  17. Musculoskeletal-based finite element analysis of femur after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Meena, Vijay K; Kumar, Mohit; Pundir, Amit; Singh, Suman; Goni, Vijay; Kalra, Parveen; Sinha, Ravindra K

    2016-06-01

    This article evaluates the effect of stress variation on adult femur following total hip replacement using musculoskeletal-based finite element analysis. The aim was to study the changes in stress distribution in the femur after total hip replacement by providing simulated in vivo loading and boundary conditions. The loading and boundary conditions were generated using a musculoskeletal modelling software 'AnyBody' and were applied on femur model, generated from the computed tomography (CT) scan data for standing posture of male patient. The results showed considerable variation in stress distribution pattern in the femur before and after total hip replacement, the metallic implant taking major loads of human body and transferring very less loads to the femur. PMID:27006421

  18. Chronic Lymphedema of the Lower Limb: A Rare Cause of Dislocation of Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Gupta, Nishint; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) in a patient with chronic lymphedema of both lower limbs is rarely reported in the literature. Chronic lymphedema is a challenging condition associated with various complications especially in a patient with THA. However, dislocation of the total hip prosthesis due to acute exacerbation of lower limb swelling in the postoperative period is an extremely rare complication. The cause that led to the dislocation of the prosthesis is intricate and difficult to assess, as this has not been discussed in the literature yet. We believe that the excessive weight of the limb due to chronic lymphedema had a deleterious effect on the biomechanics of total hip prosthesis, thereby increasing the tendency for dislocation. This case illustrates that chronic lymphedema of the lower limb should be dealt with aggressively using various modalities like intermittent pneumatic compression pumps and compression stockings after THA in such patients. PMID:27226940

  19. Chronic Lymphedema of the Lower Limb: A Rare Cause of Dislocation of Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Nishint; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) in a patient with chronic lymphedema of both lower limbs is rarely reported in the literature. Chronic lymphedema is a challenging condition associated with various complications especially in a patient with THA. However, dislocation of the total hip prosthesis due to acute exacerbation of lower limb swelling in the postoperative period is an extremely rare complication. The cause that led to the dislocation of the prosthesis is intricate and difficult to assess, as this has not been discussed in the literature yet. We believe that the excessive weight of the limb due to chronic lymphedema had a deleterious effect on the biomechanics of total hip prosthesis, thereby increasing the tendency for dislocation. This case illustrates that chronic lymphedema of the lower limb should be dealt with aggressively using various modalities like intermittent pneumatic compression pumps and compression stockings after THA in such patients. PMID:27226940

  20. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods - We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results - None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation - We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon's preference. PMID:27329869

  1. Mid-term Results of Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Modular Cementless Femoral Stems

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyung-Gyu; Min, Byung-Woo; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of revision total hip arthroplasty using modular distal fixation stems for proximal femoral deficiency. Materials and Methods Forty-five patients (47 hips) were analyzed more than 24 months after revision total hip arthroplasty that used modular distal fixation stems and was performed between 2006 and 2012. There were proximal femoral defects in all cases. Preoperative femoral defect classification revealed Paprosky type II in 31 cases, type IIIA in 7, and type IIIB in 9. The mean duration of follow-up was 53.4 (25-100) months. We evaluated the Harris hip score (HHS), walking ability according to Koval as clinical parameters, stem stability, and stem position change as radiographic parameters. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed. Results The average HHS improved form 39.5 points to 91.3 points and walking ability also improved in most cases; all patients had stable fixation of the femoral stem. Postoperative complications included 5 cases of infection and 2 cases of dislocation. The survival rate with the end point of re-revision surgery due to infection or dislocation was 86% after 8-year follow-up. Conclusion Cementless revision total hip arthroplasty using modular femoral stems is useful because the stems can be stably fixed on the diaphyseal portion of the femur, which has relatively good bone quality at mid-term follow-up. PMID:27536616

  2. EVALUATION OF HEPATIC FUNCTION AMONG PATIENTS UNDERGOING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY USING ENOXAPARIN

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Felipe Vitiello; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate hepatic changes resulting from the use of enoxaparin for prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis among patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Methods: Thirty-two patients underwent elective total hip arthroplasty, using enoxaparin, and were followed up for 65 days with serial hepatic enzyme assays. Results: Changes in laboratory parameters were found in up to 75% of the patients during the study, but the parameters normalized after suspension of the treatment. No clinical evidence of hepatic lesions was found. Conclusion: The hepatic enzyme levels increase in most patients using enoxaparin, but without clinical correlation, and the levels normalize after suspension of the treatment. PMID:27022533

  3. Total Hip Arthroplasty around the Inception of the Interface Bioactive Bone Cement Technique

    PubMed Central

    Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Background To augment cement-bone fixation, Dr. Hironobu Oonishi attempted additional physicochemical bonding through interposition of osteoconductive crystal hydroxyapatite (HA) granules at the cement-bone interface in 1982. He first used the interface bioactive bone cement (IBBC) technique in 12 selected patients (12 hips) in 1982 (first stage) and followed them for 2 years. In 1985, the technique was applied in 25 total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients (second stage) and the effects were investigated by comparing the side with the IBBC technique and the other side without the IBBC technique. He has employed this technique in all THA patients since 1987 (third stage). Methods In the IBBC technique, HA granules (2 to 3 g) were smeared on the bone surface just before the acetabular and femoral components were cemented. In the first stage, 12 hips were operated using the IBBC technique in 1982. In the second stage, THA was performed without the IBBC technique on one side and with the IBBC technique on the other side within 1 year in 25 patients. In the third stage, THA was performed with the IBBC technique in 285 hips in 1987. Results In the first stage patients, implant loosening was not detected at 30 years after operation. In the second stage patients, revision was required in 7 hips without the IBBC technique due to cup loosening (5 hips) and stem loosening (2 hips), whereas no hip was revised after THA with the IBBC technique at 26 years after operation. In the third stage patients, the incidence of radiolucent lines and osteolysis was very few at 25 years after operation. Conclusions The long-term follow-up of THA performed around the inception of the IBBC technique has revealed low incidences of radiolucent lines, osteolysis, and revision surgery. PMID:27583104

  4. Hip fracture evaluation with alternatives of total hip arthroplasty versus hemiarthroplasty (HEALTH): protocol for a multicentre randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Mohit; Devereaux, P J; Einhorn, Thomas A; Thabane, Lehana; Schemitsch, Emil H; Koval, Kenneth J; Frihagen, Frede; Poolman, Rudolf W; Tetsworth, Kevin; Guerra-Farfán, Ernesto; Madden, Kim; Sprague, Sheila; Guyatt, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hip fractures are a leading cause of mortality and disability worldwide, and the number of hip fractures is expected to rise to over 6 million per year by 2050. The optimal approach for the surgical management of displaced femoral neck fractures remains unknown. Current evidence suggests the use of arthroplasty; however, there is lack of evidence regarding whether patients with displaced femoral neck fractures experience better outcomes with total hip arthroplasty (THA) or hemiarthroplasty (HA). The HEALTH trial compares outcomes following THA versus HA in patients 50 years of age or older with displaced femoral neck fractures. Methods and analysis HEALTH is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial where 1434 patients, 50 years of age or older, with displaced femoral neck fractures from international sites are randomised to receive either THA or HA. Exclusion criteria include associated major injuries of the lower extremity, hip infection(s) and a history of frank dementia. The primary outcome is unplanned secondary procedures and the secondary outcomes include functional outcomes, patient quality of life, mortality and hip-related complications—both within 2 years of the initial surgery. We are using minimisation to ensure balance between intervention groups for the following factors: age, prefracture living, prefracture functional status, American Society for Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class and centre number. Data analysts and the HEALTH Steering Committee are blinded to the surgical allocation throughout the trial. Outcome analysis will be performed using a χ2 test (or Fisher's exact test) and Cox proportional hazards modelling estimate. All results will be presented with 95% CIs. Ethics and dissemination The HEALTH trial has received local and McMaster University Research Ethics Board (REB) approval (REB#: 06-151). Results Outcomes from the primary manuscript will be disseminated through publications in academic journals and presentations

  5. Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Total Hip Arthroplasty Stratified by Body Mass Index.

    PubMed

    Wu, Eddie S; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Jauregui, Julio J; Robinson, Kristin; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Obese patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty have been shown to have less functional recovery. This study prospectively compared temporal trends in patient-reported outcomes and activity levels between patients with a body mass index (BMI) of less than 30, 30 to 35, and 35 to 40 kg/m(2) after total hip arthroplasty. Patients were evaluated via the Harris Hip Score, Lower Extremity Activity Scale, and Short Form-12 physical and mental components. The results suggest that patients with BMIs of 35 to 40 kg/m(2) might have poorer functional outcomes preoperatively, with function returning more slowly or poor function being sustained and their not reaching other cohorts' levels. Surgeons must counsel these patients regarding functional expectations and the potential for slower functional returns. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e572-e577.]. PMID:27064775

  6. Navigated Acetabular Cup Fixation for Acetabular Deformity or Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Yu, Jung Jin; Seo, Hyo-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of navigated acetabular cup fixation for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods This study enrolled 28 patients with at least 12 months' follow-up. The safe zone of the acetabular cup was defined as 40°±10°in inclination and 15°±10°in anteversion. The authors used the navigation and radiographic data to determine whether the acetabular cup was located within the safe zone or not. To evaluate the clinical outcomes, preoperative and last follow-up Harris hip scores were checked, and the occurrence of complications was evaluated. Results According to the navigation data, the mean inclination and anteversion were 38.5°±4.7°(range, 32°-50°) and 16.6°±4.0°(range, 8°-23°), respectively. According to the radiographic data the mean inclination and anteversion were 40.5°±4.6°(range, 32°-50°) and 19.4°±4.2°(range, 8°-25°), respectively. In both cases, all values were within the safe zone. Harris hip score was improved in all patients from preoperative 52.3±14.4 points (range, 29-87 points) to 88.0±9.0 points (range, 65-99 points) at the last follow-up. There was no dislocation or loosening of both cases. Conclusion Navigated acetabular cup fixation is a useful technique for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty because it prevents the malposition and related complications.

  7. Long-Term Outcome after Rehabilitation of Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty in Renal Transplant Recipient – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Erieta Nikolikj; Adamov, Aleksandar; Koevska, Valentina; Mitrevska, Biljana; Gacevikj, Ivan; Agushi, Arsim

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Total hip replacement is generally proposed for renal transplant patients with avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to report the long-term outcome after rehabilitation of bilateral total hip arthroplasty in a patient with renal transplantation suffering from avascular osteonecrosis of the both femoral heads. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The patient S.D, 49 years old at follow-up. Few months after renal transplantation, the patient had got avascular osteonecrosis of both femoral head. One year after transplantation the total hip arthroplasty for both hip joints were performed. Three years later repeat total hip arthroplasty surgery for left hip was performed. After any surgery intervention the patient was referred for inpatient rehabilitation. For clinical assessment the clinical findings and Harris Hip Score have been used. The rehabilitation program consisted of exercises, occupational therapy, and patient education. RESULTS: After any rehabilitation treatment the patient had improvement of clinical findings. At follow-up assessment outcome for both hip function was good - Harris Hip Score was 81 points. CONCLUSION: Rehabilitation is integral part of multidisciplinary treatment of renal transplant recipient after total hip arthroplasty. Regular exercise training of these patients is very important for improving of their long-term outcome. PMID:27275350

  8. Catastrophic Failure of the Acetabular Polyethylene Liner in Ceramic-on-Polyethylene Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Givenchy; Levin, Rayna A. C.; Mayor, Michael B.; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Catastrophic polyethylene failure is a rare complication of ceramic-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty due to the favorable tribological characteristics of ceramic. Failure of the polyethylene liner can be disastrous, increasing periprosthetic osteolysis, metallosis, and risk of dislocation. Complications associated with ceramic-on-polyethylene articulations have been studied extensively, however, only few reports have described its catastrophic wear. We report such a case of complete wear of the acetabular liner in a ceramic-on-polyethylene prosthesis in a 57-year adult male. Case Report: A 57-year adult male with a history of bilateral total hip arthroplasty presented to our institution with bilateral hip pain worst on the right. Range of motion was limited by pain on the right hip at the extremes of motion. Radiographs revealed severe osteolysis, heterotopic ossification, complete wear of the acetabular liner, bony impingement of the femoral greater trochanter on the acetabular rim and superior migration of the femoral head. All findings were confirmed intraoperatively. Revision of the acetabular components was performed, which successfully alleviated the patient’s symptoms. Conclusion: Failure of the ceramic-on-polyethylene liner in our patient is due to the use of a non-cross linked polyethylene liner, a highly active lifestyle, and poor follow up. Arthroplasty surgeons should be aware of this complication especially in highly active patients with a conventional polyethylene liner and chronic hip pain. PMID:27298960

  9. Comparison between 28 mm and 32 mm ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y K; Ha, Y C; Koo, K H

    2014-11-01

    Large femoral heads have become popular in total hip replacement (THR) as a method of reducing the risk of dislocation. However, if large heads are used in ceramic-on-ceramic THR, the liner must be thinner, which may increase the risk of fracture. To compare the rates of ceramic fracture and dislocation between 28 mm and 32 mm ceramic heads, 120 hips in 109 patients (51 men and 58 women, mean age 49.2 years) were randomised to THR with either a 28 mm or a 32 mm ceramic articulation. A total of 57/60 hips assigned to the 28 mm group and 55/60 hips assigned to the 32 mm group were followed for at least five years. No ceramic component fractures occured in any patient in either group. There was one dislocation in the 32 mm group and none in the 28 mm group (p = 0.464). No hip had detectable wear, focal osteolysis or prosthetic loosening. In our small study the 32 mm ceramic articulation appeared to be safe in terms of ceramic liner fracture. PMID:25371457

  10. ANALYSIS ON QUALITY OF LIFE OF PATIENTS WITH OSTEOARTHROSIS UNDERGOING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Loures, Elmanq; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the health-related quality of life among patients affected by hip osteoarthrosis who were treated by means of total hip arthroplasty. Methods: A cohort of 38 patients operated by a single surgeon in a regional referential teaching hospital during the year 2010 was prospectively studied and followed up for at least six months until they had achieved satisfactory rehabilitation. Each patient gave responses to the SF-36 form immediately before the operation and six months later and the Harris Hip Score was obtained at the same time. The pre and postoperative results were analyzed and compared with the literature. Results: The pre and postoperative SF-36 results were as follows: physical function: 13.4–53.7; role physical: 9.21–48.0; body pain: 23.1–62.6; general health: 54.2–71.3; vitality: 40.3–69.9; social function: 40.8–74.3; role emotional: 23.7–64.9; and mental health: 52.6–80.4. The Harris Hip Score went from 36.1 to 92.1, on average. All the results were statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The combination of two scales was shown to be valuable in identifying bias and gave greater reliability for understanding the different variables. The study showed that there was a significant improvement in health-related quality of life among patients affected by osteoarthrosis of different etiologies who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Health-related quality of life evaluations cannot replace clinical evaluations provided by specific instruments and physicians’ experience but can add important data through giving value to patients’ sets of expectations regarding medical treatment. Moreover, such evaluations can be considered to be an efficient tool for analyzing the outcomes from total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27047858

  11. A Case Report: An Acute Thrombus in the Femoral Artery following Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GBS, Varun; N, Muralidhar; Bharathidasan, Kavya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vascular complications post-operative to a total hip arthroplasty are a very rare phenomenon. Only a few isolated cases have been reported to date. Diagnosis of such a case in a timely manner so as to preserve the limb is also difficult due to the subtle signs with which the patient presents. We report a case of complete occlusion of the common femoral artery following total hip arthroplasty due to acute thrombus formation. Case Presentation: A 56 year old Indian male patient underwent a cemented total hip replacement. Three hours post-operatively, the patient’s left lower limb was found to be pale and pulseless. Angiography showed complete occlusion of the left common femoral artery. Thrombectomy was carried out immediately and the patient recovered well. Conclusion: Vascular injuries are highly unusual findings following a total hip arthroplasty. Careful pre-operative and immediate post-operative monitoring of the patient is essential. Signs such as limb ischemia, absence of pulses, etc. must be recognized as early as possible and the necessary investigations and procedures should be carried out without any delay. PMID:27299128

  12. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee arthroplasty: a survey of Canadian orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Michael; Anderson, David R.; Nagpal, Seema; O’Brien, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacologic and physical modalities used by orthopedic surgeons in Canada to prevent venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Design Mail survey sent to all members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association. Setting A nation-wide study. Methods A total of 828 questionnaires, designed to identify the type and frequency of prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism that were used after hip and knee arthroplasty were mailed to orthopedic surgeons. Outcome measures Demographic data and the frequency and type of thromboprophylaxis. Results Of the 828 surveys mailed 445 (54%) were returned, and 397 were included in this analysis. Of the respondents, 97% used prophylaxis routinely for patients who undergo total hip or knee arthroplasty. Three of the 397 (0.8%) did not use any method of prophylaxis. Warfarin was the most common agent used (46%), followed by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (36%). Combination therapy with both mechanical and pharmacologic methods were used in 39% of patients. Objective screening tests were not frequently performed before discharge. Extended prophylaxis beyond the duration of hospitalization was used by 36% of physicians. Conclusion Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism with warfarin or LMWH has become standard care after total hip or knee arthroplasty in Canada. PMID:10593248

  13. Adverse sequelae following revision of a total hip replacement for a fractured ceramic component: case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ling Hong; Langton, David; Green, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Revision total hip replacement following a fractured ceramic bearing component presents a challenge in the choice of the new bearing implant. A femoral head made of equal or harder material should be implanted to prevent catastrophic wear. Despite this, patients and surgeons must be wary of potential complications. PMID:27163083

  14. Adverse sequelae following revision of a total hip replacement for a fractured ceramic component: case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ling Hong; Langton, David; Green, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Revision total hip replacement following a fractured ceramic bearing component presents a challenge in the choice of the new bearing implant. A femoral head made of equal or harder material should be implanted to prevent catastrophic wear. Despite this, patients and surgeons must be wary of potential complications. PMID:27163083

  15. Elevated risk of early reoperation in total hip replacement during the stage of unit closure.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Mikko; Malmivaara, Antti; Paavola, Mika; Seitsalo, Seppo

    2016-04-01

    Background and purpose - The effects of launch or closure of an entire arthroplasty unit on the first or last patients treated in these units have not been studied. Using a 3-year follow-up, we investigated whether patients who were treated at the launch or closure stage of an arthroplasty unit of a hospital would have a higher risk of reoperation than patients treated in-between at the same units. Patients and methods - From the Finnish Arthroplasty Register, we identified all the units that had performed total joint arthroplasty and the units that were launched or closed in Finland between 1998 and 2011. The risks of reoperation within 3 years for the 41,748 total hip and knee replacements performed due to osteoarthritis in these units were modeled with Cox proportional-hazards regression, separately for hip and knee and for the launch and the closure stage. Results - The unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for total hip and knee replacements performed in the initial stage of activity of the units that were launched were similar to the reoperation risks in patients who were operated in these units after the early stage of activity. The unadjusted and risk-adjusted HRs for early reoperation after total hip replacement (THR) were increased at the closure stage (adjusted HR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.8). The reoperation risk at the closure stage after total knee replacement (TKR) was not increased. Interpretation - The results indicate that closure of units performing total hip replacements poses an increased risk of reoperation. Closures need to be managed carefully to prevent the quality from deteriorating when performing the final arthroplasties. PMID:26541178

  16. Elevated risk of early reoperation in total hip replacement during the stage of unit closure

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Mikko; Malmivaara, Antti; Paavola, Mika; Seitsalo, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effects of launch or closure of an entire arthroplasty unit on the first or last patients treated in these units have not been studied. Using a 3-year follow-up, we investigated whether patients who were treated at the launch or closure stage of an arthroplasty unit of a hospital would have a higher risk of reoperation than patients treated in-between at the same units. Patients and methods — From the Finnish Arthroplasty Register, we identified all the units that had performed total joint arthroplasty and the units that were launched or closed in Finland between 1998 and 2011. The risks of reoperation within 3 years for the 41,748 total hip and knee replacements performed due to osteoarthritis in these units were modeled with Cox proportional-hazards regression, separately for hip and knee and for the launch and the closure stage. Results — The unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for total hip and knee replacements performed in the initial stage of activity of the units that were launched were similar to the reoperation risks in patients who were operated in these units after the early stage of activity. The unadjusted and risk-adjusted HRs for early reoperation after total hip replacement (THR) were increased at the closure stage (adjusted HR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2–2.8). The reoperation risk at the closure stage after total knee replacement (TKR) was not increased. Interpretation — The results indicate that closure of units performing total hip replacements poses an increased risk of reoperation. Closures need to be managed carefully to prevent the quality from deteriorating when performing the final arthroplasties. PMID:26541178

  17. Preoperative planning and postoperative evaluation of total hip arthroplasty that takes combined anteversion.

    PubMed

    Imai, Hiroshi; Miyawaki, Joji; Kamada, Tomomi; Takeba, Jun; Mashima, Naohiko; Miura, Hiromasa

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether postoperative combined anteversion (CA) can be kept within the safe zone while using cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) using the operative technique which prepares the socket first for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), by estimating the anteversion of the metaphyseal fit stem using preoperative three-dimensional (3D) computerized planning and by adjusting the anteversion of the socket using a navigation system that considers CA. Our subjects were 65 patients (65 hips) that had undergone cementless THA for DDH that could be observed for 1 year or more. Clinical assessments were made using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association's (JOA) hip score. For a radiological evaluation, we investigated 3D-planned stem versions, postoperative stem versions, preoperative and postoperative CA, and the relationship between CA and dislocation tendencies with temporary intraoperative reductions. JOA hip scores improved from 52.3 ± 11.4 points to 88.9 ± 8.6 points. CT evaluations revealed that 3D-planned stem versions were strongly correlated with postoperative stem versions (r = 0.80; p < 0.01). Preoperative CA was 50.5° ± 7.2°, and postoperative CA was 41.3° ± 8.6°. Postoperative CA was kept within the safe zone in 61 hips. No intraoperative dislocation tendencies were observed in any hips. By estimating the anteversion of the cementless metaphyseal fit stem using 3D planning preoperatively and adjusting the angle of anteversion of the socket using a navigation system that considers CA intraoperatively, postoperative CA can very frequently be kept within the safe zone, even with cementless THA using the operative technique which prepares the socket first for DDH. PMID:27154291

  18. Total hip replacement in two dogs with unsuccessful femoral head ostectomy

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Su-Young

    2015-01-01

    An English setter (case 1) and a Tibetan mastiff (case 2) presented with intermittent weight-bearing lameness on the right hind limb when trotting. The dogs had a history of femoral head and neck ostectomy (FHNO). Orthopedic examination revealed pain and crepitus on the right hip joint. The dogs underwent total hip replacement (THR). At the 2-year (case 1) and 1-year (case 2) follow-up, both dogs had resumed normal activity without lameness. The muscle mass and range of motion were significantly improved in the affected hind limb. In conclusion, FHNO with poor functional outcomes can be successfully ameliorated with THR. PMID:25269715

  19. Total hip replacement in two dogs with unsuccessful femoral head ostectomy.

    PubMed

    Heo, Su-Young; Seol, Jae-Won; Lee, Hae-Beom

    2015-01-01

    An English setter (case 1) and a Tibetan mastiff (case 2) presented with intermittent weight-bearing lameness on the right hind limb when trotting. The dogs had a history of femoral head and neck ostectomy (FHNO). Orthopedic examination revealed pain and crepitus on the right hip joint. The dogs underwent total hip replacement (THR). At the 2-year (case 1) and 1-year (case 2) follow-up, both dogs had resumed normal activity without lameness. The muscle mass and range of motion were significantly improved in the affected hind limb. In conclusion, FHNO with poor functional outcomes can be successfully ameliorated with THR. PMID:25269715

  20. Severe Pelvic Obliquity Affects Femoral Offset in Patients with Total Hip Arthroplasty but Not Leg-Length Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong; Chen, Yunsu; Peng, Xiaochun; Mao, Yuanqing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Beigang; Wang, Xiuhui; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Leg-length inequality is an extensively studied complication of total hip arthroplasty in normal patients. However, few studies have focused on the pelvic obliquity of coronal pelvic malrotation. We hypothesized that pelvic obliquity with a fixed abduction/adduction contracture deformity of the hip may intraoperatively affect the release of soft tissues, ultimately resulting in a leg-length inequality. This study also investigated whether the femoral and vertical offsets of total hip arthroplasty were correlated with pelvic obliquity. This prospective study divided 98 patients into six groups based on the inclination of pelvic obliquity before total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality, variation of pelvic obliquity, offset, and vertical offset were measured after total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality and vertical offset were not significantly different among groups, whereas the variation of pelvic obliquity was significantly higher in type IIC pelvic obliquity than in other groups. Type IC pelvic obliquity had a significantly shorter offset than did the other groups, which may have been an important factor leading to type IC pelvic obliquity. Pelvic obliquity exhibited no significant effect on leg-length inequality in patients with total hip arthroplasty. A shorter offset may be caused by the higher tension of the abductor in the operated hip, which may result in the formation of type IC pelvic obliquity. Releasing the abductor contracture and restoring femoral offset are important for increasing hip stability and maintaining pelvic balance following total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26673427

  1. Unconstrained tripolar implants for primary total hip arthroplasty in patients at risk for dislocation.

    PubMed

    Guyen, Olivier; Pibarot, Vincent; Vaz, Gualter; Chevillotte, Christophe; Carret, Jean-Paul; Bejui-Hugues, Jacques

    2007-09-01

    We performed a retrospective study on 167 primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) procedures in 163 patients at high risk for instability to assess the reliability of unconstrained tripolar implants (press-fit outer metal shell articulating a bipolar polyethylene component) in preventing dislocations. Eighty-four percent of the patients had at least 2 risk factors for dislocation. The mean follow-up length was 40.2 months. No dislocation was observed. Harris hip scores improved significantly. Six hips were revised, and no aseptic loosening of the cup was observed. The tripolar implant was extremely successful in achieving stability. However, because of the current lack of data documenting polyethylene wear at additional bearing, the routine use of tripolar implants in primary THA is discouraged and should be considered at the present time only for selected patients at high risk for dislocation and with limited activities. PMID:17826276

  2. The Choice Between Total Hip Arthroplasty and Arthrodesis in Adolescent Patients: A Survey of Orthopedic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Mark G; Studdert, David M; Callaghan, John J; Farid, Monica S; Titan, Ashley L; Dietz, Frederick R

    2016-01-01

    For adolescent patients with end-stage hip disease, the choice between total hip arthroplasty (THA) and arthrodesis is complex; the clinical evidence is not definitive, and there are difficult trade-offs between clear short-term benefits from THA and uncertain long-term risks. We surveyed nearly 700 members of the Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Respondents chose between a recommendation of THA or arthrodesis in four clinical vignettes. A clear majority of surgeons recommended THA in two of the vignettes, however opinion was somewhat divided in one vignette (overweight adolescent) and deeply divided in another (adolescent destined for manual labor job). Across all vignettes, recommendations varied systematically according to surgeons' age and their attitudes regarding tradeoffs between life stages. PMID:26298281

  3. Long-term results of the threaded Weill cup in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Clarius, Michael; Jung, Alexander W.; Raiss, Patric; Streit, Marcus R.; Merle, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Uncemented, threaded acetabular components with smooth surface treatment were widely used in continental Europe in the 1970s and 1980s for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Previously published studies showed high failure rates in the mid-term. In a consecutive series of 116 patients, 127 threaded cups with smooth surface treatment (Weill cup; Zimmer, Winterthur, Switzerland) were implanted in combination with one type of uncemented stem. Patients were followed up clinically and radiographically. Mean time of follow-up was 17 years (range 15–20). At the time of follow-up, the acetabular component had been revised or was awaiting revision in 30 hips (24%). Two hips were revised for infection and 23 for aseptic loosening. Four polyethylene liners were exchanged because of excessive wear. One hip was awaiting revision. The survival rate for all acetabular revisions including one hip awaiting revision was 75% (95%CI: 65–85%) at 17 years. These results support the view that smooth, threaded acetabular components do not provide satisfactory long-term fixation and should be abandoned. It is important to closely monitor patients with these components as the failure rate remains high in the long-term. PMID:19629480

  4. Gait and stair function in total and resurfacing hip arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shrader, M Wade; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; Jacofsky, Marc C; Jacofsky, David J

    2009-06-01

    Standard total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the established surgical treatment for patients older than 65 years with progressive osteoarthritis but survivorship curves wane in patients younger than 50. Resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA) is an alternative for younger, active patients reportedly providing superior range of motion. Quantitative investigation of functional recovery following arthroplasty may elucidate limitations that aid in device selection. Although limited long-term kinematic data are available, the early rate of recovery and gait compensations are not well described. This information may aid in refining rehabilitation protocols based on limitations specific to the implant. We presumed hip motion and forces for subjects receiving RHA are more similar to age-matched controls during physically demanding tasks, such as stair negotiation, at early time points than those for THA. In a pilot study, we quantified walking and stair negotiation preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively for seven patients with RHA (mean age, 49 years), seven patients with standard THA (mean age, 52 years), and seven age-matched control subjects (mean age, 56 years). Although both treatment groups demonstrated trends toward functional recovery, the RHA group had greater improvements in hip extension and abduction moment indicating typical loading of the hip. Further investigation is needed to determine if differences persist long term or are clinically meaningful. PMID:19305961

  5. Formation of a pseudotumor in total hip arthroplasty using a tribological metal–polyethylene pair☆

    PubMed Central

    Fagotti, Lorenzo; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Miyahara, Helder Souza; de Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Bernabé, Antônio Carlos; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to report a case of a young adult patient who evolved with tumor formation in the left thigh, 14 years after revision surgery on hip arthroplasty. Davies in 2005 made the first description of this disease in patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. Over the last decade, however, pseudotumors around metal-on-polyethylene surfaces have become more prevalent. Our patient presented with increased volume of the left thigh 8 years after hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Two years before the arising of the tumor in the thigh, a nodule in the inguinal region was investigated to rule out a malignant neoplastic process, but the results were inconclusive. The main preoperative complaints were pain, functional limitation and marked reduction in the range of motion of the left hip. Plain radiographs showed loosening of acetabular and femoral, and a large mass between the muscle planes was revealed through magnetic resonance imaging of the left thigh. The surgical procedure consisted of resection of the lesion and removal of the components through lateral approach. In respect of total hip arthroplasty, pseudotumors are benign neoplasms in which the bearing surface consists of metal-on-metal, but they can also occur in different tribological pairs, as presented in this case. PMID:27218090

  6. Wake-up test in total hip arthroplasty with high-riding developmental dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Hui; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2014-07-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) for patients with Crowe type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip is technically challenging. This group of patients has a higher incidence of nerve injury during THA. Although neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring has been developed to provide nerve monitoring, it is not always available. The wake-up test has been used for intraoperative spinal cord monitoring during major spinal surgery, but no study has reported the use of the wake-up test for neurologic monitoring during THA in patients with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip. The authors retrospectively reviewed 22 THA procedures in 20 patients with Crowe type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip who underwent the wakeup test during THA. In the current study, 1 patient could not dorsiflex her foot during the wake-up test. Therefore, the authors immediately reduced the length of limb lengthening by 1 cm. Postoperative drop foot and numbness occurred but resolved completely 2 months later. None of the patients who showed no deficits in motion of the feet during the intraoperative wake-up test had signs of postoperative nerve injury. In the current study, there was no false-positive or false-negative finding. The authors concluded that the wake-up test, which is simple, safe, and reliable, is a useful technique and a possible alternative to neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring in checking nerve function during THA in patients with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:24992057

  7. Impingement and stability of total hip arthroplasty versus femoral head resurfacing using a cadaveric robotics model.

    PubMed

    Colbrunn, R W; Bottros, J J; Butler, R S; Klika, A K; Bonner, T F; Greeson, C; van den Bogert, A J; Barsoum, W K

    2013-07-01

    We identified and compared the impingent-free range of motion (ROM) and subluxation potential for native hip, femoral head resurfacing (FHR), and total hip arthroplasty (THA). These constructs were also compared both with and without soft tissue to elucidate the role of the soft tissue. Five fresh-frozen bilateral hip specimens were mounted to a six-degree of freedom robotic manipulator. Under load-control parameters, in vivo mechanics were recreated to evaluate impingement free ROM, and the subluxation potential in two "at risk" positions for native hip, FHR, and THA. Impingement-free ROM of the skeletonized THA was greater than FHR for the anterior subluxation position. For skeletonized posterior subluxations, stability for THA and FHR constructs were similar, while a different pattern was observed for specimens with soft tissues intact. FHR constructs were more stable than THA constructs for both anterior and posterior subluxations. When the femoral neck is intact the joint has an earlier impingement profile placing the hip at risk for subluxation. However, FHR design was shown to be more stable than THA only when soft tissues were intact. PMID:23494830

  8. Does bearing size influence metal ion levels in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty? A comparison of three total hip systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was twofold: first, to determine whether there is a statistically significant difference in the metal ion levels among three different large-head metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip systems. The second objective was to assess whether position of the implanted prostheses, patient demographics or factors such as activity levels influence overall blood metal ion levels and whether there is a difference in the functional outcomes between the systems. Methods In a cross-sectional cohort study, three different metal-on-metal total hip systems were assessed: two monoblock heads, the Durom socket (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Birmingham socket (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA), and one modular metal-on-metal total hip system (Pinnacle, Depuy Orthopedics, Warsaw, IN, USA). Fifty-four patients were recruited, with a mean age of 59.7 years and a mean follow-up time of 41 months (12 to 60). Patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and biochemically. Statistical analysis was performed on all collected data to assess any differences between the three groups in terms of overall blood metal ion levels and also to identify whether there was any other factor within the group demographics and outcomes that could influence the mean levels of Co and Cr. Results Although the functional outcome scores were similar in all three groups, the blood metal ion levels in the larger monoblock large heads (Durom, Birmingham sockets) were significantly raised compared with those of the Pinnacle group. In addition, the metal ion levels were not found to have a statistically significant relationship to the anteversion or abduction angles as measured on the radiographs. Conclusions When considering a MOM THR, the use of a monoblock large-head system leads to higher elevations in whole blood metal ions and offers no advantage over a smaller head modular system. PMID:24472283

  9. Total Hip Arthroplasty Complicated by a Gluteal Hematoma Resulting in Acute Foot Drop.

    PubMed

    Khattar, Nicolas K; Parry, Phillip V; Agarwal, Nitin; George, Hope K; Kretz, Eric S; Larkin, Timothy M; Gruen, Gary S; Abla, Adnan A

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a prevalent orthopedic intervention in the United States. Massive postoperative hematomas are a rare albeit serious complication of the procedure. Sequelae of these hematomas can include lower extremity paralysis from compression of the sciatic nerve. A 66-year-old woman taking aspirin and clopidogrel for coronary stents presented with a complete foot drop, paresthesias, and lower extremity pain 10 days after a total hip arthroplasty. The patient was initially seen by a neurology service at another hospital and thought to have lateral recess stenosis. At the authors' center, magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine failed to show lateral recess stenosis. Urgent pelvic computed tomography showed a large hematoma and raised suspicion of sciatic nerve compression. Hip magnetic resonance imaging showed a right gluteal hematoma compressing the sciatic nerve. The patient was then taken to the operating room for the clot to be evacuated and was later referred for rehabilitation. Massive hematomas after total hip arthroplasty are an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of nontraumatic acute foot drop. Prompt diagnosis may correlate with improved neurological outcome and help reduce overall morbidity. PMID:26966944

  10. Influence of cementless cup surface on stability and bone fixation 2 years after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urbański, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Artur; Dragan, Szymon Ł; Kulej, Mirosław; Dragan, Szymon F

    2012-01-01

    Loss of fixation between bone and implant surface is one of the main treatment problems in total hip arthroplasty. It might lead to implant instability, bone loss and treatment failure resulting in revision surgery. Surface modification is a method for improving bone response to implant and increasing implant osseointegration. However, the currently applied modifications such as hydroxyapatite coatings do not meet expectation and do not provide good clinical result. The object of the study was to evaluate the influence of acetabular cup surface modification on fixation and bone remodelling in total hip arthroplasty. Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated in patients two years after cementless total hip replacement. Two groups were compared: patients with acetabular component with uncoated titanium surface and patients with hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular surface. Hips X-rays were analysed for early signs of losing stability of acetabular cups. Two years after surgery the analysis of X-rays did not reveal any statistical differences in stability, migration of acetabular components of endoprosthesis between both groups. No differences were also observed in bone remodelling around implants. Particularly high percentage of cups, i.e. 17.64%, were classified into the group with high risk of early implant loosening, i.e., the group with HA coatings. Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium cementless acetabular cups implanted by press-fit technique have no influence on their stability, bone-implant fixation and the remodelling of bone surrounding an implant two years after surgery. PMID:22793261

  11. Differences in the trajectory of bone mineral density change measured at the total hip and femoral neck between men and women following hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Rathbun, Alan M.; Shardell, Michelle; Orwig, Denise; Hebel, J. Richard; Hicks, Gregory E.; Beck, Thomas; Hochberg, Marc C.; Magaziner, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Summary Research has not examined changes in bone mineral density (BMD) between men and women following hip fracture. The aim was to evaluate sex differences in BMD following hip fracture. Men experienced significant declines in BMD, while not statistically greater than women, underscoring the necessity for better osteoporosis care in men. Introduction Each year in the USA, approximately 260,000 older adults experience a hip fracture. Women experiencing hip fracture have excess decline in BMD in the year following fracture compared to expected decrements due to aging, but few studies have assessed sex differences in the sequelae of hip fracture. Thus, our objective was to examine sex differences in BMD change in the year after hip fracture. Methods The sample (n = 286) included persons enrolled in the Baltimore Hip Studies 7th cohort, a study that matched (1:1) men and women experiencing hip fracture. Weighted estimating equations that accounted for missing data and selective survival were used to estimate sex differences in 12-month total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN) BMD changes. Results Men had larger average adjusted percent decline in TH and FN BMD. Adjusted 12-month decreases at the FN showed a statistically significant decline of −4.60 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] −7.76 %, −0.20 %) in men and an insignificant change of-1.62 % (95 % CI −4.57 %, 1.32 %) in women. Yet, the difference in change between men and women was not statistically significant (P = 0.17). The estimated sex differences for TH BMD loss were smaller in magnitude. Conclusions There is evidence of significant BMD loss among men at the FN in the year after hip fracture. Although not statistically greater than women, these clinically significant findings highlight the need for improved osteoporosis care among men prior to and after hip fracture. PMID:26847627

  12. Acrylic fragmentation in total hip replacements and its biological consequences.

    PubMed

    Jasty, M; Jiranek, W; Harris, W H

    1992-12-01

    Loosening of total joint prostheses is in part related to the fragmentation of the acrylic cement mantle surrounding the prosthesis and the biologic consequences to the particulate acrylic. Fractographic studies of femoral cement mantles retrieved at revision surgery and autopsy showed frequent fractures in varying stages of development in the cement and wear at the fracture surfaces. Defects in the cement mantle, thin mantles, sharp corners on the prosthesis, separation at the cement mantle interface, and pores in the cement were frequently associated with cement fractures. The progressive fractures and wear led to the liberation of particulate acrylic debris into the surrounding tissues. The tissues at the bone-cement interface removed at revision surgery showed that a macrophage, giant-cell foreign-body granulomatous reaction occurs in response to the particulate, but not bulk cement. This tissue can produce a variety of chemical mediators of inflammation and bone resorption, and can resorb bone in organ cultures. A granulomatous tissue reaction with a very similar appearance can be produced in experimental animals using particulate-form polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), but not the bulk form of PMMA. The tissue reaction is not mediated by the classic cell or humeral immune mechanisms. Subcutaneous injection of particulate PMMA powder into fully immunocompetent C3Hf/SED mice as well as three strains of mice with progressive immunologic deficiencies (nude/nude, SCID, and triple deficient Nu-bg-XID/SED mice) led to a foreign-body reaction in all strains at five weeks as shown by histologic and immunohistochemical examination despite the differences in immune deficiency. This, along with the scarcity of lymphocytes in the human tissues, suggests that the biologic reactions to fragmented cement can be produced and sustained by nonimmune phagocytosis and activation by macrophages and giant cells without significant contribution by the immune system. PMID:1446427

  13. Dislodgement of a cemented exeter femoral stem during closed manipulative reduction of a dislocated total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Aysha; Mohamed, Abdalla; Shaikh, Mazharuddin; Banaszkiewicz, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cemented femoral stem migration and dislodgement even though has been described is extremely unusual. There is a high chance of polished femoral stem displacement happening while trying to reduce a dislocated total hip replacement by closed measures. Presentation of the case A 73 year old lady who had an Exeter cemented total hip replacement about two weeks back was admitted from Accident and Emergency with a dislocation. During the closed manipulative reduction under general anaesthesia it was noted that the femoral stem has dislodged from the canal. She underwent revision of the total hip replacement with good outcome. Discussion Femoral stem dislodgement occurs in total hip replacement if polished stem or inadequate cementing of the collar is carried out. Conclusion Gentle manipulative reduction under general anaesthesia of dislocated total hip replacement should be carried out if the polished femoral stem is used. PMID:27060643

  14. Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty: Literature review of variations in surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Keith P; Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-01

    The direct anterior approach to the hip has been suggested to have several advantages compared to previously popular approaches through its use of an intra-muscular and intra-nervous interval between the tensor fasciae latae and sartorius muscles. Recent increased interest in tissue-sparing and minimally-invasive arthroplasty has given rise to a sharp increase in the utilization of direct anterior total hip arthroplasty. A number of variations of the procedure have been described and several authors have published their experiences and feedback to successfully accomplishing this procedure. Additionally, improved understanding of relevant soft tissue constraints and anatomic variants has provided improved margin of safety for patients. The procedure may be performed using specially-designed instruments and a fracture table, however many authors have also described equally efficacious performance using a regular table and standard arthroplasty tools. The capacity to utilize fluoroscopy intra-operatively for component positioning is a valuable asset to the approach and can be of particular benefit for surgeons gaining familiarity. Proper management of patient and limb positioning are vital to reducing risk of intra-operative complications. An understanding of its limitations and challenges are also critical to safe employment. This review summarizes the key features of the direct anterior approach for total hip arthroplasty as an aid to improving the understanding of this important and effective method for modern hip replacement surgeons. PMID:26807354

  15. Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty: Literature review of variations in surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Keith P; Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-18

    The direct anterior approach to the hip has been suggested to have several advantages compared to previously popular approaches through its use of an intra-muscular and intra-nervous interval between the tensor fasciae latae and sartorius muscles. Recent increased interest in tissue-sparing and minimally-invasive arthroplasty has given rise to a sharp increase in the utilization of direct anterior total hip arthroplasty. A number of variations of the procedure have been described and several authors have published their experiences and feedback to successfully accomplishing this procedure. Additionally, improved understanding of relevant soft tissue constraints and anatomic variants has provided improved margin of safety for patients. The procedure may be performed using specially-designed instruments and a fracture table, however many authors have also described equally efficacious performance using a regular table and standard arthroplasty tools. The capacity to utilize fluoroscopy intra-operatively for component positioning is a valuable asset to the approach and can be of particular benefit for surgeons gaining familiarity. Proper management of patient and limb positioning are vital to reducing risk of intra-operative complications. An understanding of its limitations and challenges are also critical to safe employment. This review summarizes the key features of the direct anterior approach for total hip arthroplasty as an aid to improving the understanding of this important and effective method for modern hip replacement surgeons. PMID:26807354

  16. Impact on red blood cell immunity patterns in postoperative phase following total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Defu; Fu, Changma; Yu, Runze

    2014-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to measure changes in red blood cell (RBC) immunity and cytokine levels after performing total hip replacement surgery. Material and methods Twenty patients receiving total hip arthroplasty were investigated by measuring presurgical and postoperative RBC natural tumor erythrocyte rosette rate (NTERR), RBC C3b receptor rosette rate (RC3bRR), RBC membrane CD35, CD58 and CD59 expression and cytokine levels [including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)]. Blood samples were collected on the day before surgery and on the first day after hip arthroplasty. Results Postoperative NTERR and RC3bRR were significantly lower than presurgical levels (p < 0.05). The RBC membrane CD35, CD58 and CD59 expressions were significantly decreased in the postoperative phase compared to pre-operative levels. Importantly, RBC promoting lymphocyte proliferation rates were significantly reduced after surgery. In addition, postoperative TNF-α, IL-2 and IFN-γ levels in RBC and lymphocyte culture fluid were lower than those pre-operation, whereas IL-10 and PGE2 were significantly increased compared to presurgical levels (p < 0.05). Conclusions The modification of RBC immune function may be involved in the occurrence and development of the infection following hip arthroplasty, and this suggests a novel strategy to prevent such infection. PMID:26155151

  17. Ten to twelve-year results with the Zweymüller cementless total hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Vervest, Ton M J S; Anderson, Patricia G; Van Hout, Freek; Wapstra, Frits-Hein; Louwerse, Robert T; Koetsier, Juriaan W A

    2005-04-01

    Between January 1987 and December 1990, 221 Zweymüller cementless total hip arthroplasties were performed in 211 patients with idiopathic osteoarthritis. A total of 136 patients (142 prostheses) were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 134 months (SD 9.5). The study group consisted of 78 Hochgezogen and 64 Stepless stem prostheses, all with a threaded titanium cup and ceramic head. No clinical and radiological differences were found between the 2 stem prostheses. Seven cups had been revised because of aseptic loosening; 17 cups showed radiolucent lines, osteolysis, or migration. Mean linear polyethylene wear of 105 (74%) cups was 0.46 mm (SD 0.27), with an annual wear of 0.04 mm (SD 0.02). Wear did not correlate with pain, cup migration, radiolucent lines, or osteolysis. Cumulative survival was 96%. Zweymüller cementless total hip arthroplasty showed good midterm results. PMID:15809956

  18. Increased Long-Term Cardiovascular Risk After Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Max; Rysinska, Agata; Garland, Anne; Rolfson, Ola; Aspberg, Sara; Eisler, Thomas; Garellick, Göran; Stark, André; Hailer, Nils P; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-02-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a common and important treatment for osteoarthritis patients. Long-term cardiovascular effects elicited by osteoarthritis or the implant itself remain unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine if there is an increased risk of late cardiovascular mortality and morbidity after total hip arthroplasty surgery.A nationwide matched cohort study with data on 91,527 osteoarthritis patients operated on, obtained from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register. A control cohort (n = 270,688) from the general Swedish population was matched 1:3 to each case by sex, age, and residence. Mean follow-up time was 10 years (range, 7-21).The exposure was presence of a hip replacement for more than 5 years. The primary outcome was cardiovascular mortality after 5 years. Secondary outcomes were total mortality and re-admissions due to cardiovascular events.During the first 5 to 9 years, the arthroplasty cohort had a lower cardiovascular mortality risk compared with the control cohort. However, the risk in the arthroplasty cohort increased over time and was higher than in controls after 8.8 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.0-10.5). Between 9 and 13 years postoperatively, the hazard ratio was 1.11 (95% CI 1.05-1.17). Arthroplasty patients were also more frequently admitted to hospital for cardiovascular reasons compared with controls, with a rate ratio of 1.08 (95% CI 1.06-1.11).Patients with surgically treated osteoarthritis of the hip have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality many years after the operation when compared with controls. PMID:26871792

  19. Patient characteristics affecting the prognosis of total hip and knee joint arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Santaguida, Pasqualina L.; Hawker, Gillian A.; Hudak, Pamela L.; Glazier, Richard; Mahomed, Nizar N.; Kreder†, Hans J.; Coyte, Peter C.; Wright, James G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Total joint arthroplasty is a highly efficacious and cost-effective procedure for moderate to severe arthritis in the hip and knee. Although patient characteristics are considered to be important determinants of who receives total joint arthroplasty, no systematic review has addressed how they affect the outcomes of total joint arthroplasty. This study addresses how patient characteristics influence the outcomes of hip and knee arthroplasty in patients with osteoarthritis. Methods We searched 4 bibliographic databases (MEDLINE 1980–2001, CINAHL 1982–2001, EMBASE 1980–2001, HealthStar 1998–1999) for studies involving more than 500 patients with osteoarthritis and 1 or more of the following outcomes after total joint arthroplasty: pain, physical function, postoperative complications (short-and long-term) and time to revision. Prognostic patient characteristics of interest included age, sex, race, body weight, socioeconomic status and work status. Results Sixty-four of 14 276 studies were eligible for inclusion and had extractable data. Younger age (variably defined) and male sex increased the risk of revision 3-fold to 5-fold for hip and knee arthroplasty. The influence of weight on the risk of revision was contradictory. Mortality was greatest in the oldest age group and among men. Function for older patients was worse after hip arthroplasty (particularly in women). Function after knee arthroplasty was worse for obese patients. Conclusion Although further research is required, our findings suggest that, after total joint arthroplasty, younger age and male sex are associated with increased risk of revision, older age and male sex are associated with increased risk of mortality, older age is related to worse function (particularly among women), and age and sex do not influence the outcome of pain. Despite these findings, all subgroups derived benefit from total joint arthroplasty, suggesting that surgeons should not restrict access to these

  20. A Case Series of Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Cementless Hip Stem Customized for Patients of a Specific Race: 10- to 15-Year Results.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Sachiyuki; Wakui, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    We report a minimum of 10-year results of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) using the cementless BiCONTACT N stem, which was developed to fit the femur in a specific race in which the predominant etiology of hip diseases was developmental dysplasia. A total of 108 hips were evaluated with a mean follow-up of 11.9 ± 1.4 years. The etiology for THA was secondary osteoarthritis due to developmental dysplasia in 90.3% of patients. No evidence of aseptic loosening of the BiCONTACT N stem was observed. The survivorship with the end point as revision surgery for any reason was 94.4% (95% confidence interval 88.7%-97.3%) at 15.0 years postoperatively. BiCONTACT N stem may be an effective alternative for patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:26321076

  1. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  2. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Elaine W.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D.; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A.; Giles, Graham G.; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M.; Guymer, Robyn H.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003–2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001–2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00–1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25–12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur

  3. Survival analysis of cementless grit-blasted titanium total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C; Kapandji, A I

    2001-04-01

    Although about 200000 cementless Zweymüller-Alloclassic total hip arthroplasties (THAs) were carried out worldwide in the last decade, the survival analysis of these prostheses was not available in the 2000 report of the Swedish national hip arthroplasty registry. We report a prospective survivorship analysis of 200 consecutive grit-blasted cementless Alloclassic primary THAs carried out since 1988. Using surgical, clinical and radiological endpoints for the stem and the threaded cup the ten-year survivorship was 91.5% for reoperation for any cause, 96.4% for hip pain (Merle d'Aubigné score < 5 points, clinical failure), 99.4% for definite aseptic loosening (radiological failure) and 99.3% for revision for aseptic loosening. Using the Swedish registry criteria of primary osteoarthritis and revision for aseptic loosening as the endpoint, the survival rate of 99.1% at ten years for the subgroup of 157 Alloclassic THAs in osteoarthritis compares favourably with that of the best modern cemented hip replacements reported in the Swedish arthroplasty registry. PMID:11341429

  4. A Dual Biomechanical Failure: Exeter Stem and Pubic Rami Insufficiency Fracture, following Hybrid Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Samra, Inderpaul; Paliobeis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Incidence of Exeter stem fracture is extremely uncommon. Pubic rami insufficiency fractures following arthroplasty are also rare. To our knowledge no cases of spontaneous stem failure with previous insufficiency fractures have yet been reported. Case Presentation. This report describes a case of spontaneous fracture through a cemented Exeter stem in a 66-year-old patient who had previously undergone a hybrid total hip replacement and was found to have bifocal pubic rami insufficiency fractures. The patient presented 18-year postprimary surgery with spontaneous fracture of the middle third of the cemented femoral stem and adjacent proximal femur. Conclusion. This report demonstrates a unique case of Exeter stem fracture with previous pelvic insufficiency fractures. The case adds to the rare occurrences of Exeter stem failure in the literature and highlights the risk of potential insufficiency fractures in patients undergoing total hip replacement. PMID:26236519

  5. Thirty years of experience with alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hannouche, Didier; Zaoui, Amine; Zadegan, Frédéric; Sedel, Laurent; Nizard, Rémy

    2011-02-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty have been developed in an attempt to minimise debris and the occurrence of osteolytic lesions. The outstanding tribological properties of this bearing system are explained by low surface roughness, high hardness for major scratch resistance, and high wettability. Since the 1970s, technological improvements in the manufacturing process of alumina components together with a better understanding of Morse taper technology have provided a surgical grade material with high density, high purity and small grains. Published studies on the outcome of total hip arthroplasty performed with this new generation of implants showed high survivorship especially in young and active patients, with survival rates free of revision of 90.8% to 97.4% at ten years. However, concern remains over ceramic liner fracture and squeaking, which has been noted recently with increasing prevalence. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the use of alumina-on-alumina bearings. PMID:21191579

  6. Thirty years of experience with alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zaoui, Amine; Zadegan, Frédéric; Sedel, Laurent; Nizard, Rémy

    2010-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty have been developed in an attempt to minimise debris and the occurrence of osteolytic lesions. The outstanding tribological properties of this bearing system are explained by low surface roughness, high hardness for major scratch resistance, and high wettability. Since the 1970s, technological improvements in the manufacturing process of alumina components together with a better understanding of Morse taper technology have provided a surgical grade material with high density, high purity and small grains. Published studies on the outcome of total hip arthroplasty performed with this new generation of implants showed high survivorship especially in young and active patients, with survival rates free of revision of 90.8% to 97.4% at ten years. However, concern remains over ceramic liner fracture and squeaking, which has been noted recently with increasing prevalence. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the use of alumina-on-alumina bearings. PMID:21191579

  7. Do larger femoral heads improve the functional outcome in total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Allen, Charlotte L; Hooper, Gary J; Frampton, Christopher M A

    2014-02-01

    Use of larger diameter femoral heads has been popularised in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Recent studies have implicated larger femoral heads in early failure. We evaluated what effect the size of the femoral head had on the early functional outcome in order to determine the optimal head size for the maximal functional outcome. There were 726 patients who underwent elective THA and were divided into 3 groups according to head size then compared with respect to functional outcome scores and dislocation rates. This study failed to show that increasing the size of the femoral head significantly improved the functional outcome at 1 year after total hip arthroplasty but that the use of a 36 mm or greater femoral head did reduce the dislocation rate. PMID:23891058

  8. Modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov external fixator as a salvage method in the management of severely infected total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kliushin, Nikolai M; Ababkov, Yuri V; Ermakov, Artem M; Malkova, Tatiana A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resection arthroplasty or hip arthrodesis after total hip replacement (THR) can be used to salvage the limb in case with deep infection and severe bone loss. The Ilizarov fixator provides stability, axial correction, weight-bearing and good fusion rates. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively assessed the outcomes of 37 patients with severe periprosthetic infection after THR treated between 1999 and 2011. The treatment included implant removal, debridement and a modified Girdestone arthroplasty (29 cases) or hip arthrodesis (seven cases) using the Ilizarov fixator. The Ilizarov fixation continued from 45 to 50 days in the modified arthroplasty group and 90 days in the arthrodesis group. One case was treated using the conventional resection arthroplasty bilaterally. Results: Eighteen months after treatment, infection control was seen in 97.3% cases. Six hips were fused as one patient died in this group. Limb length discrepancy (LLD) averaged 5.5 cm. The Harris hip score ranged from 35 to 92 points. Hip joint motion ranged from 10° to 30° in the modified arthroplasty group. All subjects could walk independently or using support aids. No subluxation or LLD progression was observed. Conclusion: The modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov apparatus results in sufficient ability for ambulation and good infection control in cases of failed THR associated with severe infection. PMID:26955173

  9. Radiation-blocking shields to localize periarticular radiation precisely for prevention of heterotopic bone formation around uncemented total hip arthroplasties

    SciTech Connect

    Jasty, M.; Schutzer, S.; Tepper, J.; Willett, C.; Stracher, M.A.; Harris, W.H. )

    1990-08-01

    Sixteen patients (18 hips) were treated with localized radiation therapy limited to periarticular regions surrounding the femoral neck by shielding the prosthesis and the adjacent regions to prevent heterotopic bone formation around the uncemented prosthesis. All hips received 1500 rads. Eight of these hips were irradiated after excising severe heterotopic bone, five because they developed extensive heterotopic ossification in the opposite hip, and five others because they were considered to be at high risk for developing heterotopic ossification. Only two of the 18 hips developed a small amount of heterotopic bone after localized periarticular radiation. All wounds healed primarily. No progressive radiolucencies developed at the bone-prosthesis interface. There was only one trochanteric nonunion of six trochanteric osteotomies. Localized periarticular radiation therapy with precision shielding of the prosthetic components and adjacent skeletal structures is an effective means to prevent heterotopic bone formation around cementless total hip arthroplasties. It also has the advantage of not adversely affecting the healing of the trochanteric osteotomy.

  10. Fabrication and wear test of a continuous fiber/particulate composite total surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous fiber woven E-glass composite femoral shells having the ame elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle were tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these shells atriculating with the acetabular cups are comparable to a vitallium bal articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene cup.

  11. Online follow-up after total hip replacement: a first case

    PubMed Central

    Dexter, Caroline; Bradley, Benjamin; Williams, Daniel H

    2013-01-01

    With the current challenging financial climate in the NHS there is an increasing drive to reduce the number of postoperative follow-up appointments. We report on a patient who has successfully used a new online platform, www.myclinicaloutcomes.co.uk, to record condition-specific and generic wellbeing scores following total hip replacement. This case highlights the potential for remote follow-up of routine postoperative patients. PMID:23396931

  12. Dislocation of a dual mobility total hip replacement following fracture of the polyethylene liner.

    PubMed

    Vedrine, Bertrand; Guillaumot, Pierre; Chancrin, Jean-Luc

    2016-05-18

    An eight-year-old male English Setter was referred for management of a dislocation of a cemented dual mobility canine total hip prosthesis that occurred four months after the initial surgery. Revision surgery showed that the dislocation was associated with fracture of the ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene liner. The dislocation was successfully reduced after replacing the liner. A dual mobility acetabular component is composed of a mobile polyethylene liner inside a metallic cemented cup. Chronic wear of the components of a canine dual mobility total hip replacement has not been described previously. The use of this type of implant is fairly recent and limited long term follow-up of the implanted cases may be the explanation. Acute rupture of a polyethylene liner has never been described in humans, the only case of rupture of a polyethylene liner occurred 10 years after implantation. The case presented here of rupture of the polyethylene liner of a dual mobility total hip replacement is a hitherto unreported failure mode in this model of acetabular cup in the dog. PMID:26991949

  13. Mechanical evaluation of unipolar hip spacer constructs.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J; Strauss, Eric; Wright, Kevin; Kubiak, Erik N; Di Cesare, Paul E

    2008-10-01

    The strengths of 3 hip spacer constructs--Steinmann pins, a short intramedullary nail (both cement-incorporated), and a Charnley prosthesis--were determined and compared with the strength of a commercially available hip spacer. The hip prosthesis construct was more than twice as strong as the other 2 constructs and was equivalent in strength to the commercial spacer. For spacer applications in which limited weight-bearing is anticipated, the hip prosthesis construct appears more efficacious, but its pros and cons should be compared with those of the commercial product. PMID:19081880

  14. Soft-tissue balance in short and straight stem total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Windhagen, Henning; Chincisan, Andra; Choi, Hon Fai; Thorey, Fritz

    2015-03-01

    The growing numbers of short stem hip implants have redefined total hip arthroplasty with new stem geometries and possible functional differences. Several systematic reviews have reported good clinical results with this new class of stems, although kinematic alterations are still unclear in many aspects. The good clinical results obtained at the authors' institution led to the current study. The authors hypothesized that the geometric alignment of the prosthetic components may be closer to the anatomy of the healthy hip joint, thus leading to better function and clinical satisfaction. An examination via finite element analysis was chosen to model the hip joint and virtually implant a short and a standard straight stem. Findings indicated that anchoring of the short stem allowed favorable positioning in the proximal femur, with the femoral head already in the center of the cup. This positioning was not possible for the straight stem, which required further reduction of the femur by a significant translation into the cup, leading to abnormal soft-tissue balancing. The results from the simulation showed an absolute average deviation of ligamentous fiber strains of 6% for the short stem in 30° of flexion and extension versus 29% and 36% for the standard straight stem in 30° of flexion and extension, respectively. A femoral neck guided orientation of the short stem implant seems to allow a more anatomical reconstruction and thus a more balanced hip in terms of the modeled soft tissues. In contrast, the straight stem alters the head position and induces nonphysiological capsular strains. PMID:25826627

  15. Omnifit-HA stem in total hip arthroplasty. A 2- to 5-year followup.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, D D; Walker, R H; Colwell, C W

    1999-06-01

    Outcomes of the first 60 noncemented Omnifit-HA total hip arthroplasties in 56 patients were studied prospectively for 2 to 5 years. The femoral prosthesis had a proximal third circumferential hydroxyapatite coated surface treatment. The acetabular component was a hemispheric modular, porous, nonhydroxyapatite press fit cup, supplemented with screw fixation. One cup was revised for recurrent dislocation, with no femoral revisions. The mean Harris hip score was 54 (range, 20-76) before surgery and 96 (range, 83-100) at final followup, with all patients having an excellent or good outcome. Mild thigh pain occurred in 6% of hips. Subsidence occurred in 9% of hips (range, 1-2.8 mm); in all cases, subsidence was nonprogressive after 1 year. Stable bone ingrowth fixation was evident at the hydroxyapatite coated portion in 100%. A sclerotic reactive line adjacent to the nonhydroxyapatite portion of the stem occurred in 81% but was not adjacent to the hydroxyapatite coated portion of any stem. Endosteal condensation occurred in 90% and correlated with a higher Harris hip score (mean score, 96 with, 91 without). Endosteal lysis adjacent to or distal to the hydroxyapatite coating did not occur. Lytic lesions at the calcar occurred in 19% and correlated with a greater linear acetabular polyethylene wear rate (mean, 0.30 mm/year with lytic lesions, 0.17 mm/year without). This noncemented stem with proximal third hydroxyapatite coating showed excellent short term clinical and radiographic outcome. Absence of distal endosteal lysis, along with correlation of calcar erosion to polyethylene wear, suggests that early circumferential bony ingrowth afforded by hydroxyapatite coating prevents distal endosteal access to polyethylene debris at short term followup. PMID:10379318

  16. Adherence to guidelines regarding total hip replacement for fractured neck of femur.

    PubMed

    Fishlock, A; Scarsbrook, C; Marsh, R

    2016-07-01

    Introduction In 2011 the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published guidelines suggesting that clinicians offer total hip replacement (THR) to patients with displaced intracapsular hip fractures who could walk independently outside with no aids or one stick, who are not cognitively impaired and are ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade ≤2. They also stated that best practice is operating within 36 hours of presentation. This audit aimed to determine whether Scarborough Hospital was following these guidelines and compared the results with the national average. Methods Two years of data (January 2012 - December 2013) were collected retrospectively from Scarborough Hospital's hip fracture database on all patients presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture. Data were analysed to determine whether patients who had a THR fulfilled NICE criteria. Furthermore, patients with hemiarthroplasties who were eligible for THRs were identified. Finally, the time to surgery was calculated to examine whether patients receiving THRs waited longer than patients receiving hemiarthroplasties. Results In 2012, 48.6% of all eligible patients received a THR while in 2013 the figure was 55.9%. These percentages are much higher than the national average. However, 36 (53.7%) of the 67 patients who received a THR did not fulfil all the NICE criteria, mainly owing to high ASA grade. The mean time from presentation to theatre for THR was 8 hours and 37 minutes longer for THR patients than for hemiarthroplasty in 2012. This difference was reduced to 2 hours and 12 minutes in 2013. Conclusions Small general hospitals can meet and even exceed the standards regarding treatment strategies for hip factures. However, there is still room for improvement. Departmental training may be useful in achieving this aim. The anaesthetic team should be involved at the earliest opportunity, to help optimise patients preoperatively and determine whether patients listed for

  17. Three-dimensional modeling of in vitro hip kinematics under micro-separation regime for ceramic on ceramic total hip prosthesis: an analysis of vibration and noise.

    PubMed

    Sariali, Elhadi; Stewart, Todd; Jin, Zongmin; Fisher, John

    2010-01-19

    Micro-separation corresponds to a medial-lateral hip laxity after total hip replacement (THR). This laxity has been shown to generate higher wear rates and a specific pattern of stripe wear caused by edge loading of the head on the rim of the cup. Recently some authors have implicated edge loading as a source of noise generation and in particular squeaking. The goal of this study was to model hip kinematics under the micro-separation regime in a computational simulation of total hip prosthesis including joint laxity and to analyze the vibration frequencies and the potential for noise generation. A three-dimensional computer model of the Leeds II hip simulator was developed using ADAMS((R)) software, simulating a controlled micro-separation during the swing phase of the walking cycle and replicating the experimental conditions previously reported. There was an excellent correlation between the theoretical values and the experimental values of the medial-lateral separation during the walking cycle. Vibratory frequencies were in the audible zone but were lower in magnitude than those reported clinically in relation to squeaking. Micro-separation and rim loading may explain the generation of some sounds from noisy hips after THR. However, the computational model, and the experimental model of micro-separation were unable to replicate the higher frequency squeaking reported clinically. In contrast, other experimental studies involving normal kinematics in combination with third-body particles have replicated clinically relevant frequencies and noises. PMID:19892358

  18. REVISION TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY USING A MODULAR CEMENTLESS DISTAL FIXATION PROSTHESIS: THE ZMR® HIP SYSTEM. CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF 30 CASES

    PubMed Central

    Canella, Richard Prazeres; de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; Ganev, Gerson Gandhi; de Vincenzi, Luiz Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from 30 cases of revision of total hip arthroplasty using a modular cementless distal fixation prosthesis: the ZMR® Hip System. Method: Between July 2005 and December 2008, 30 operations were performed, on 14 men and 14 women. Two male patients had bilateral surgery. The mean age was 59.2 years (29-81 years), with a mean follow-up of 24 months. The Paprosky classification was used for periprosthetic bone loss, and the Harris Hip Score (HHS) was used to evaluate clinical results. On radiographs, distal migration of the femoral stem was defined in accordance with Sporer. Proximal bone remodeling was classified using the Callaghan criteria. Results: The mean preoperative HHS was 39, and there was a significant increase to 93 points in the final evaluation, which indicated excellent clinical results. No femoral stem migration greater than 5 mm (Sporer) was observed on radiographs, thus suggesting that all the femoral prostheses presented osseointegration and remained stable from the time of the surgery until the final evaluation. The proximal femoral remodeling was either type B or type C in 29 hips, according to Callaghan. Seven patients had complications, but without interfering with osseointegration of the femoral components. Conclusion: Our results from revision of total hip arthroplasty using the ZMR® Hip System were extremely encouraging, and all the components became osseointegrated and remained fixed at the time of the final evaluation. PMID:27022553

  19. Cost of Radiotherapy Versus NSAID Administration for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Jonathan B. Chen, Sea S.; Shah, Anand P.; Coon, Alan B.; Dickler, Adam

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO), or abnormal bone formation, is a common sequela of total hip arthroplasty. This abnormal bone can impair joint function and must be surgically removed to restore mobility. HO can be prevented by postoperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use or radiotherapy (RT). NSAIDs are associated with multiple toxicities, including gastrointestinal bleeding. Although RT has been shown to be more efficacious than NSAIDs at preventing HO, its cost-effectiveness has been questioned. Methods and Materials: We performed an analysis of the cost of postoperative RT to the hip compared with NSAID administration, taking into account the costs of surgery for HO formation, treatment-induced morbidity, and productivity loss from missed work. The costs of RT, surgical revision, and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding were estimated using the 2007 Medicare Fee Schedule and inpatient diagnosis-related group codes. The cost of lost wages was estimated using the 2006 median salary data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Results: The cost of administering RT was estimated at $899 vs. $20 for NSAID use. After accounting for the additional costs associated with revision total hip arthroplasty and gastrointestinal bleeding, the corresponding estimated costs were $1,208 vs. $930. Conclusion: If the costs associated with treatment failure and treatment-induced morbidity are considered, the cost of NSAIDs approaches that of RT. Other NSAID morbidities and quality-of-life differences that are difficult to quantify add to the cost of NSAIDs. These considerations have led us to recommend RT as the preferred modality for use in prophylaxis against HO after total hip arthroplasty, even when the cost is considered.

  20. New Joints, Same Old Weight: Weight Changes After Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hurwit, Daniel J; Trehan, Samir K; Cross, Michael B

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for postoperative complications following total joint arthroplasty. However, because the operation is often successful, orthopedic surgeons continue to operate on obese individuals, and many surgeons do so under the assumption that patients will lose weight after they are able to walk and exercise without pain. In this article, we review a recent study by Ast et al., who performed a retrospective review, using a single-center institutional registry, to determine (1) whether patients do actually lose weight after total hip and/or total knee arthroplasty, (2) whether there are predictors of postoperative weight change, and (3) whether postoperative weight changes affect patient-reported clinical outcomes. The principle conclusion was that most patients maintained their body mass index (BMI) after total hip and total knee arthroplasty (73 and 69%, respectively). However, patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, patients who had a higher preoperative BMI, and female patients were more likely to lose weight postoperatively. When examined in the context of the current literature, this study provides valuable information for the preoperative counseling of total joint arthroplasty candidates, especially in the setting of obesity. PMID:27385952

  1. Correlation of corrosion and biomechanics in the retrieval of a single modular neck total hip arthroplasty design: modular neck total hip arthroplasty system.

    PubMed

    Lanting, Brent A; Teeter, Matthew G; Vasarhelyi, Edward M; Ivanov, Todor G; Howard, James L; Naudie, Douglas D R

    2015-01-01

    Increased modularity of total hip arthroplasty components has occurred, with theoretical advantages and disadvantages. Recent literature indicates the potential for elevated revision rates of modular neck systems and the potential for local pseudotumor and metallosis formation at the modular neck/stem site. Retrieval analysis of one modular neck implant design including SEM (SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY) assessment was done and correlated with FEA (finite element analysis) as well as clinical features of patient demographics, implant and laboratory analysis. Correlation of the consistent corrosion locations to FEA indicates that the material and design features of this system may result in a biomechanical reason for failure. The stem aspect of the modular neck/stem junction may be at particular risk. PMID:25060562

  2. Botulinum toxin type A injections for the management of muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Anil; Zywiel, Michael G; Ulrich, Slif D; McGrath, Mike S; Seyler, Thorsten M; Marker, David R; Delanois, Ronald E; Mont, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Background Development of hip adductor, tensor fascia lata, and rectus femoris muscle contractures following total hip arthroplasties are quite common, with some patients failing to improve despite treatment with a variety of non-operative modalities. The purpose of the present study was to describe the use of and patient outcomes of botulinum toxin injections as an adjunctive treatment for muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty. Methods Ten patients (14 hips) who had hip adductor, abductor, and/or flexor muscle contractures following total arthroplasty and had been refractory to physical therapeutic efforts were treated with injection of botulinum toxin A. Eight limbs received injections into the adductor muscle, 8 limbs received injections into the tensor fascia lata muscle, and 2 limbs received injection into the rectus femoris muscle, followed by intensive physical therapy for 6 weeks. Results At a mean final follow-up of 20 months, all 14 hips had increased range in the affected arc of motion, with a mean improvement of 23 degrees (range, 10 to 45 degrees). Additionally all hips had an improvement in hip scores, with a significant increase in mean score from 74 points (range, 57 to 91 points) prior to injection to a mean of 96 points (range, 93 to 98) at final follow-up. There were no serious treatment-related adverse events. Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injections combined with intensive physical therapy may be considered as a potential treatment modality, especially in difficult cases of muscle tightness that are refractory to standard therapy. PMID:19709429

  3. Late Nontraumatic Dissociation of the Femoral Head and Trunnion in a Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Simon J. M.; Khan, Wasim; Mellor, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background. Modular total hip arthroplasties are increasingly popular because customisation allows optimal restoration of patient biomechanics. However, the introduction of component interfaces provides greater opportunities for failure. We present a case of late nontraumatic dissociation of the head-neck interface, more than 10 years after insertion. Case Description. A 58-year-old woman had a left metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty in 2002 for hip dysplasia. Following an uneventful 10-year period, she presented to hospital in severe pain after standing from a seated position, and radiographs demonstrated complete dissociation of the modular femoral head from the stem, with the femoral head remaining in its cup. There was no prior trauma or infection. Mild wear and metallosis were present on the articulating surface between the femoral head and trunnion. Soft tissues were unaffected. Discussion and Conclusions. This is the latest occurrence reported to date for nontraumatic component failure in such an implant by more than 7 years. The majority of cases occur in the context of dislocation and attempted closed reduction. We analyse and discuss possible mechanisms for failure, aiming to raise awareness of this potential complication and encouraging utmost care in component handling and insertion, as well as the long term follow-up of such patients. PMID:26078899

  4. Correlation between patient age at total hip replacement surgery and lifeexpectancy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann1, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Crestani, Marcus Vinicius; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most cost-effective hip surgeries among orthopedic procedures. We conducted an extensive literature review with 5,394 papers regarding survival rates after THA. We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library from January 1st, 1970 to July 31th, 2014 looking for all citations about total hip arthroplasty with a long term follow-up (longer than 10 years). The criteria were rigorous: no loss of follow-up, and follow-up more than 10 years. The authors should have known the complete history of patients (whether the patient is alive or dead). Considering the criteria, we found only 15 papers. To evaluate the relationship between follow-up and survival, a linear regression analysis was applied. Considering the papers analysed, and applying the search criteria, we obtained a mean age for the patients above 57.5 years. The chance of survival at 15 years was 57.6%, at 20 years it was 34.6% and at 25 years it is only 11.6%. The relationship between follow-up and survival was significantly linear (p <0.001). Only 11.6% of patients undergoing THA will be still alive 25 years after the surgical procedure. Level of Evidence I, Prognostic Study. PMID:27057147

  5. Initial Stability of Subtrochanteric Oblique Osteotomy in Uncemented Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Preliminary Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangtao; Yu, Mingyang; Ma, Renshi; Zhu, Dong; Gu, Guishan

    2015-01-01

    Background Subtrochanteric oblique osteotomy (SOO) has been widely used to reconstruct highly dislocated hips in uncemented total hip arthroplasty. The occurrence of complications can be attributed to the instability of the osteotomy region. The aim of this study was to evaluate the initial stability of SOO in uncemented total hip arthroplasty. Material/Methods A 3-dimensional finite element femur-stem model was created, and a virtual SOO was performed at 4 oblique angles: 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90°. The von Mises stress distribution in the femur-stem complex and the displacement under different oblique angles were evaluated in the SOO models, in comparison with that of the intact model. Results The study demonstrated that the distal fragment of the femur bore more stresses than the proximal fragment, and the maximum stress was concentrated in the femoral neck and the cortical bone, which contacted with the distal end of the stem. SOO increased the stress of both the femur and the stem, and fractures may occur in the stress concentration sites. Additionally, comparing the displacement at different oblique angles, the lateral region was larger than that of the medial region on the subtrochanteric osteotomy plane. The minimum micromotion on the osteotomy plane was obtained when the oblique angle was 45°. Conclusions The fit and fill of the distal fragment of the femur and the stem is essential for the stability of the subtrochanteric osteotomy region. The optimal oblique angle for SOO appears to be 45°. PMID:26153071

  6. Influence of Pelvic Tilt on Polyethylene Wear after Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Taro; Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Ike, Hiroyuki; Kubota, So; Kawamura, Masaki; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of pelvic tilt on polyethylene wear after total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 105 joints treated with primary THA were included; conventional polyethylene (CPE) liners were used in 43 hips and highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) liners were used in the remaining 62 hips. The pelvis was tilted 6° posteriorly in the standing position as compared to the supine position, which resulted in significant increases of 1.7° and 2.8° in cup inclination in the CPE and HXLPE groups, respectively. Moreover, the change in pelvic tilt resulted in significant increases of 3.6° and 4.9° in cup anteversion in the CPE and HXLPE groups, respectively. For the CPE group, multiple regression analysis showed a significant association between the angle of pelvic tilt (PTA) and cup inclination and the polyethylene wear ratio. The adjusted R2 of the regression model was larger for measures obtained in the standing position as compared to the supine position. For the HXLPE group, there was no significant relationship between radiographic parameters and polyethylene wear. Close observation of polyethylene wear is recommended for patients with severe posterior pelvic tilt who have undergone THA with conventional polyethylene. PMID:26258136

  7. A Review of Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures Associated With Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Marsland, Daniel; Mears, Simon C.

    2012-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the femur in association with total hip arthroplasty are increasingly common and often difficult to treat. Patients with periprosthetic fractures are typically elderly and frail and have osteoporosis. No clear consensus exists regarding the optimal management strategy because there is limited high-quality research. The Vancouver classification facilitates treatment decisions. In the presence of a stable prosthesis (type-B1 and -C fractures), most authors recommend surgical stabilization of the fracture with plates, strut grafts, or a combination thereof. In up to 20% of apparent Vancouver type-B1 fractures, the femoral stem is loose, which may explain the high failure rates associated with open reduction and internal fixation. Some authors recommend routine opening and dislocation of the hip to perform an intraoperative stem stability test to rule out a loose component. Advances in plating techniques and technology are improving the outcomes for these fractures. For fractures around a loose femoral prosthesis (types B2 and 3), revision using an extensively porous-coated uncemented long stem, with or without additional fracture fixation, appears to offer the most reliable outcome. Cement-in-cement revision using a long-stem prosthesis is feasible in elderly patients with a well-fixed cement mantle. It is essential to treat the osteoporosis to help fracture healing and to prevent further fractures. We provide an overview of the causes, classification, and management of periprosthetic femoral fractures around a total hip arthroplasty based on the current best available evidence. PMID:23569704

  8. Corrosion of the Head-neck Junction After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Jason M; Dennis, Douglas A; Yang, Charlie C

    2016-06-01

    Corrosion of the head-neck junction of implants used in total hip arthroplasty is a complex problem. Clinical severity appears to be multifactorial, and the predictive variables have yet to be consistently identified in the literature. Corrosion should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hip pain following total hip arthroplasty regardless of the type of bearing surface used. The most common presentation, pain followed by instability, is similar to complications associated with metal-on-metal articulations. The diagnosis of implant corrosion of the head-neck junction can be challenging; an infection workup should be performed along with analysis of serum metal ion levels and cross-sectional imaging. In the short term, a well-fixed stem may be retained, and the exchange of an isolated head with a ceramic femoral head seems to be a promising option for certain implants. Further research with longer follow-up is warranted, and high levels of evidence are needed to determine whether this approach is generalizable. PMID:27213620

  9. Total hip arthroplasty in patients 50 years or less: do we improve activity profiles?

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Margaret; Harris-Hayes, Marcie; Steger-May, Karen; Pashos, Gail; Clohisy, John C

    2013-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to use step activity monitoring to quantify activity changes after total hip arthroplasty in patients 50 years or less. Secondly, we investigated whether step activity measurements correlated with the Harris hip and UCLA scores. We prospectively analyzed 37 patients (age ≤ 50) treated with primary THA. Patient activity was recorded with a step activity monitor. Harris hip and UCLA scores were analyzed. Total daily stride counts increased by an average of 30.0%. Increases were noted in the percent of daily time spent at high, moderate and low activity. Increases in daily time spent at high activity moderately correlated with the UCLA activity score but did not correlate with the HHS. Both the UCLA score and the HHS did not correlate with mean daily strides. Following THA, patients ≤ 50 years of age increase their activity by taking more daily strides and improve their activity profile by spending more time at higher activity. Improvements in step activity moderately correlate with improvements in UCLA scores. PMID:23499406

  10. Incidental discovery of an undisplaced ceramic liner fracture at total hip arthroplasty revision for squeaking.

    PubMed

    Dacheux, C; Bocquet, D; Migaud, H; Girard, J

    2013-09-01

    Squeaking has been reported after ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA), but its pathomechanics is not fully understood. Impaired lubrication is suspected to be the main reason. The management of patients impacted by this phenomenon is not well defined and, as it is not considered to be cause for alarm, revision is not strongly recommended. Here, we describe a ceramic insert fracture discovered during revision surgery performed to correct severe squeaking. Preoperative investigation (plain X-rays, ultrasound and computed tomography) did not reveal ceramic fracture or definite component malposition. To date, there are no other published cases of incidental discovery of a bearing component fracture during revision of ceramic-on-ceramic hip replacement due to squeaking. We believe that squeaking is not a trivial phenomenon and recommend careful management of patients suffering with this symptom. PMID:23911133

  11. The Norwich method of total hip replacement: development and main indications.

    PubMed

    McKee, G K

    1974-02-01

    The early experience with total prosthetic replacement of the hip from the making up of the first models in 1940 and the actual insertion of a small series in 1951 is described. The introduction of modified designs and the teething troubles experienced with them is dealt with, including the use of acrylic cement as a grouting agent in 1960 and finally the manufacture of a specially made femoral component in 1965. Since then minor improvements have been made in the design of the artificial hip joint itself, and also modifications in the operative technique. The main indications are shown from an analysis of a series of 300 cases in which this procedure has been used. As the success of the operation has become established the scope of the operation has been extended and the age group reduced. PMID:4594300

  12. Metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty: is there still a role in 2016?

    PubMed

    Silverman, Edward J; Ashley, Blair; Sheth, Neil P

    2016-03-01

    The use of metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA) was popularized due to its enhanced wear profile and the ability to use large femoral heads to reduce post-operative instability. However, enthusiasm for the bearing declined following serious complications encountered at the primary articulation. This review discusses the development of MoM and the subsequent unexpected downstream challenges, most notably elevated serum metal ion levels, aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesions (ALVAL), pseudotumor formation, and subsequent soft tissue and bone destruction. Both patient centered risk factors as well as component design led to high early failure rates resulting in product recalls and an overall decline in the use of MoM. In 2016, there is not a role for large-head MoM bearing in THA. Alternatively, the bearing has shown promise in hip resurfacing procedures for carefully selected patients. PMID:26791173

  13. Is There a Benefit to Head Size Greater Than 36 mm in Total Hip Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Haughom, Bryan D; Plummer, Darren R; Moric, Mario; Della Valle, Craig J

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the rate of dislocation and revision for instability between 36-mm and anatomic femoral heads (large diameter metal-on-metal THA, dual-mobility bearings, and hip resurfacing arthroplasty) in patients at high risk for dislocation. A total of 501 high-risk patients, over a 10-year period, were identified (282 36-mm THA, 24 dual-mobility bearings, 83 metal-on-metal arthroplasty, and 112 hip resurfacing arthroplasty). There were 13 dislocations in the 36-mm group compared to 1 in the anatomic group (4.6% vs 0.5%; P = .005). Four patients dislocated more than once in the 36-mm group (1.4% vs 0%; P = .04), and 2 patients in the 36-mm group required a revision for instability (0.7% vs 0%; P = .11). These results suggest that anatomic head sizes significantly lower the risk of dislocation in high-risk patients. PMID:26360768

  14. The Norwich method of total hip replacement: development and main indications

    PubMed Central

    McKee, G K

    1974-01-01

    The early experience with total prosthetic replacement of the hip from the making up of the first models in 1940 and the actual insertion of a small series in 1951 is described. The introduction of modified designs and the teething troubles experienced with them is dealt with, including the use of acrylic cement as a grouting agent in 1960 and finally the manufacture of a specially made femoral component in 1965. Since then minor improvements have been made in the design of the artificial hip joint itself, and also modifications in the operative technique. The main indications are shown from an analysis of a series of 300 cases in which this procedure has been used. As the success of the operation has become established the scope of the operation has been extended and the age group reduced. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4594300

  15. Cementless cup fixation in total hip arthroplasty after 5-8 years.

    PubMed

    Spicer, D D; Schaper, L A; Pomeroy, D L; Badenhausen, W E; Curry, J I; Suthers, K E; Smith, M W

    2001-01-01

    A series of 199 total hip arthroplasties was performed using a porous-coated, hemispherical press-fit acetabular cup. At a mean follow-up of 91.5 months 158 cups were available for clinical and radiological review. The mean age of the patients at the time of the index arthroplasty was 62.5 years. The mean Harris Hip score at final follow-up was 87.3. No shells were revised although eccentric polyethylene wear prompted liner replacement in two cases. Osteolysis was noted in six cases but predominantly in relation to the femoral stem. Focal pelvic osteolytic lesions were rare. All the cups were classified as stable on radiography. PMID:11794260

  16. Clinical outcomes of total hip arthroplasty for fractured neck of femur in patients over 75 years.

    PubMed

    Travis, Elizabeth C; Tan, Ruth S; Funaki, Penisimani; McChesney, Steve J; Patel, Sandeep C; Brogan, Kit

    2015-02-01

    To date, there has been little research into the clinical outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) for intracapsular neck of femur (NOF) fracture in the very elderly. 44 patients over 75years underwent THA for an intracapsular NOF fracture over a two year period. Oxford Hip Scores were obtained from 37 patients with a mean score of 39.7 (range 11-47). Katz Index Scores were collected from 36 patients with a mean pre-operative score of 5.9 and post operative score of 5.7. THA in this population gives patients the best opportunity to return to premorbid function. When complications occur there is a catastrophic effect on independence. Therefore it is important to select these patients' appropriately and to optimise their medical condition peri-operatively. PMID:25311164

  17. [Research progress in strategy of lateral femoral offset reconstruction in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiu-ping; Wang, Bo; Ji, Wei-ping

    2016-02-01

    As an important indicator of total hip arthroplasty (THA) the rate and degree of offset reconstruction play an important role in improving the prognosis and life quality of patients. The reconstruction of femoral offset is closely related to reserved length of calcar femorale, the head and neck length of prosthesis, angle degree of neck shaft and whether lower limb is isometric. Reconstruction strategy includes making a meticulous and standard measurement before the surgery, predicting the reserved length of calcar femorale, selecting a prosthesis with approximate anatomical neck-shaft angle and reconstructing offset by adjusting the head and neck length of the prosthetic during the operation. The aim of this article was to introduce the research progress and influence of offset on hip function, prosthetic wear and postoperative complications such as pain, limp and unequal leg length, and to discuss the reconstruction strategy. PMID:27141794

  18. Responsiveness and ceiling effects of the Forgotten Joint Score-12 following total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Giesinger, J. M.; MacDonald, D. J.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.; Howie, C. R.; Giesinger, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the responsiveness and ceiling/floor effects of the Forgotten Joint Score -12 and to compare these with that of the more widely used Oxford Hip Score (OHS) in patients six and 12 months after primary total hip arthroplasty. Methods We prospectively collected data at six and 12 months following total hip arthroplasty from 193 patients undergoing surgery at a single centre. Ceiling effects are outlined with frequencies for patients obtaining the lowest or highest possible score. Change over time from six months to 12 months post-surgery is reported as effect size (Cohen’s d). Results The mean OHS improved from 40.3 (sd 7.9) at six months to 41.9 (sd 7.2) at 12 months. The mean FJS-12 improved from 56.8 (sd 30.1) at six months to 62.1 (sd 29.0) at 12 months. At six months, 15.5% of patients reached the best possible score (48 points) on the OHS and 8.3% obtained the best score (100 points) on the FJS-12. At 12 months, this percentage increased to 20.8% for the OHS and to 10.4% for the FJS-12. In terms of the effect size (Cohen’s d), the change was d = 0.10 for the OHS and d = 0.17 for the FJS-12. Conclusions The FJS-12 is more responsive to change between six and 12 months following total hip arthroplasty than is the OHS, with the measured ceiling effect for the OHS twice that of the FJS-12. The difference in effect size of change results in substantial differences in required sample size if aiming to detect change between these two time points. This has important implications for powering clinical trials with patient-reported measures as the primary outcome. Cite this article: Dr D. F. Hamilton. Responsiveness and ceiling effects of the Forgotten Joint Score-12 following total hip arthroplasty. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:87–91. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.53.2000480. PMID:26965167

  19. Metal release and metal allergy after total hip replacement with resurfacing versus conventional hybrid prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Klas; Jakobsen, Stig S; Lorenzen, Nina D; Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Bonefeld, Charlotte M; Stilling, Maiken; Baad-Hansen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip arthroplasties were reintroduced because of the problems with osteolysis and aseptic loosening related to polyethylene wear of early metal-on-polyethylene (MOP) arthroplasties. The volumetric wear rate has been greatly reduced with MOM arthroplasties; however, because of nano-size wear particles, the absolute number has been greatly increased. Thus, a source of metal ion exposure with the potential to sensitize patients is present. We hypothesized that higher amounts of wear particles result in increased release of metal ions and ultimately lead to an increased incidence of metal allergy. Methods 52 hips in 52 patients (median age 60 (51–64) years, 30 women) were randomized to either a MOM hip resurfacing system (ReCap) or a standard MOP total hip arthoplasty (Mallory Head/Exeter). Spot urine samples were collected preoperatively, postoperatively, after 3 months, and after 1, 2, and 5 years and tested with inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry. After 5 years, hypersensitivity to metals was evaluated by patch testing and lymphocyte transformation assay. In addition, the patients answered a questionnaire about hypersensitivity. Results A statistically significant 10- to 20-fold increase in urinary levels of cobalt and chromium was observed throughout the entire follow-up in the MOM group. The prevalence of metal allergy was similar between groups. Interpretation While we observed significantly increased levels of metal ions in the urine during the entire follow-up period, no difference in prevalence of metal allergy was observed in the MOM group. However, the effect of long-term metal exposure remains uncertain. PMID:24930546

  20. Prospective monitoring improves outcomes of primary total hip replacement: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Philipp N; Pachón, Marcela; Kerguelén, Carlos A; Navas, José; Portocarrero, Julio; Pesantez, Rodrigo F; Zayed, Gamal; Carrillo, Germán; Llinás, Adolfo M

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the past decade several studies have questioned current standards of patient safety in health care delivery. In response, our institution started a clinical pathway for total hip replacement in 1996. Prospective monitoring with regular feedback sessions to the individuals involved in patient care did however not start until 2003. The present study evaluates the effect of prospective monitoring on outcomes of total hip replacement. Methods Clinical records of patients undergoing primary elective total hip replacement between 1997 and 2004 were reviewed. Data on adverse events as well as adherence to protocols for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis were extracted retrospectively for the period 1997 to 2001 and prospectively from 2003 to 2004. Results were compared and analyzed in order to establish possible improvement in outcomes. Data was analyzed with Chi-square or Fisher's Exact test for categorical variables and Student's t-test for continuous variables. Alpha was set as less than 5% and analysis was performed with Stata 9.0 for Macintosh. Results Two-hundred and eighty-three patients were included from 1997 to 2001, and 62 from 2003 to 2004. Mean age, male to female ratio and initial diagnosis were similar in both groups. At least one adverse event occurred in 45% of patients in 1997–2001 and in 21% in 2003–2004 (p < 0.001). In-hospital hip dislocations occurred in 6% and 0% (p = 0.05), oliguria in 19% and 5% (p = 0.007), SSI and VTE in 3% and 0% (p = 0.37), adverse drug reactions in 11% and 13% (p = 0.66) and non-adherence to VTE prophylaxis protocols in 15% and 2% of cases respectively (p = 0.002). Conclusion Overall rate of adverse events as well as in-hospital hip dislocations, oliguria and non-adherence to VTE prophylaxis protocols were significantly reduced during the second period. We conclude that clinical pathways alone are insufficient to improve patient safety and require prospective monitoring and continuous feedback to health

  1. Identifying the procedural gap and improved methods for maintaining accuracy during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gross, Allan; Muir, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    Osteoarthritis is a ubiquitous condition, affecting 26 million Americans each year, with up to 17% of adults over age 75 suffering from one variation of arthritis. The hip is one of the most commonly affected joints and while there are conservative options for treatment, as symptoms progress, many patients eventually turn to surgery to manage their pain and dysfunction. Early surgical options such as osteotomy or arthroscopy are reserved for younger, more active patients with less severe disease and symptoms. Total hip arthroplasty offers a viable solution for patients with severe degenerative changes; however, post-surgical discrepancies in leg length, offset and component malposition are common and cause significant complications. Such discrepancies are associated with consequences such as low back pain, neurological deficits, instability and overall patient dissatisfaction. Current methods for managing leg length and offset during hip arthroplasty are either inaccurate and susceptible to error or are cumbersome, expensive and lengthen surgical time. There is currently no viable option that provides accurate, real-time data to surgeons regarding leg length, offset and cup position in a cost-effective manner. As such, we hypothesize that a procedural gap exists in hip arthroplasty, a gap into which fall a large majority of arthroplasty patients who are at increased risk of complications following surgery. These complications and associated treatments place significant stress on the healthcare system. The costs associated with addressing leg length and offset discrepancies can be minor, requiring only heel lifts and short-term rehabilitation, but can also be substantial, with revision hip arthroplasty costs of up to $54,000 per procedure. The need for a cost-effective, simple to use and unobtrusive technology to address this procedural gap in hip arthroplasty and improve patient outcomes is of increasing importance. Given the aging of the population, the projected

  2. Sciatic Nerve Palsy Caused by Ruptured and Contracted Short External Rotator Muscles after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Seok; Hong, Chang-Hwa; Soh, Jae-Wan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Suh, You-Sung; Lee, Hwan-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Although the incidence of sciatic nerve palsy following total hip arthroplasty is low, this complication can cause devastating permanent nerve palsy. The authors experienced a case of sciatic nerve palsy caused by ruptured and contracted external rotator muscles following total hip arthroplasty in a patient suffering from osteonecrosis of the femoral head. We report this unusual case of sciatic nerve palsy with a review of the literature.

  3. Painful prosthesis: approaching the patient with persistent pain following total hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, Prisco; Iolascon, Giovanni; Innocenti, Massimo; Civinini, Roberto; Rubinacci, Alessandro; Muratore, Maurizio; D’Arienzo, Michele; Leali, Paolo Tranquilli; Carossino, Anna Maria; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Symptomatic severe osteoarthritis and hip osteoporotic fractures are the main conditions requiring total hip arthroplasty (THA), whereas total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is mainly performed for pain, disability or deformity due to osteoarthritis. After surgery, some patients suffer from “painful prosthesis”, which currently represents a clinical problem. Methods A systematic review of scientific literature has been performed. A panel of experts has examined the issue of persistent pain following total hip or knee arthroplasty, in order to characterize etiopathological mechanisms and define how to cope with this condition. Results Four major categories (non infective, septic, other and idiopathic causes) have been identified as possible origin of persistent pain after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Time to surgery, pain level and function impairment before surgical intervention, mechanical stress following prosthesis implant, osseointegration deficiency, and post-traumatic or allergic inflammatory response are all factors playing an important role in causing persistent pain after joint arthroplasty. Diagnosis of persistent pain should be made in case of post-operative pain (self-reported as VAS ≥3) persisting for at least 4 months after surgery, or new onset of pain (VAS ≥3) after the first 4 months, lasting ≥2 months. Acute pain reported as VAS score ≥7 in patients who underwent TJA should be always immediately investigated. Conclusions The cause of pain needs always to be indentified and removed whenever possible. Implant revision is indicated only when septic or aseptic loosening is diagnosed. Current evidence has shown that peri-and/or post-operative administration of bisphosphonates may have a role in pain management and periprosthetic bone loss prevention. PMID:24133526

  4. Determinants of return to work 12 months after total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Leichtenberg, C S; Tilbury, C; Kuijer, Ppfm; Verdegaal, Shm; Wolterbeek, R; Nelissen, Rghh; Frings-Dresen, Mhw; Vliet Vlieland, Tpm

    2016-07-01

    Introduction A substantial number of patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA) do not or only partially return to work. This study aimed to identify differences in determinants of return to work in THA and TKA. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of working patients aged <65 years undergoing THA or TKA for osteoarthritis. The primary outcome was full versus partial or no return to work 12 months postoperatively. Factors analysed included preoperative sociodemographic and work characteristics, alongside the Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS)/Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Oxford Hip and Knee Scores. Results Of 67 THA and 56 TKA patients, 9 (13%) and 10 (19%), respectively, returned partially and 5 (7%) and 6 (11%), respectively, did not return to work 1 year postoperatively. Preoperative factors associated with partial or no return to work in THA patients were self-employment, absence from work and a better HOOS Activities of Daily Living (ADL) subscale score, whereas only work absence was relevant in TKA patients. Type of surgery modified the impact of ADL scores on return to work. Conclusions In both THA and TKA, absence from work affected return to work, whereas self-employment and better preoperative ADL subscale scores were also associated in THA patients. The impact of ADL scores on return to work was modified by type of surgery. These results suggest that strategies aiming to influence modifiable factors should consider THA and TKA separately. PMID:27138849

  5. Treatment of Arthritis Associated With Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease With Modular Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Seufert, Christopher R; McGrory, Brian J

    2015-10-01

    Legg-Calve-Perthes (LCP) disease can result in morphological deformities and associated adult hip arthritis. Thirty-five consecutive total hip arthroplasties (THA) were performed in 28 patients with a history of LCP using a non-cemented modular femoral component. There was one revision for late hematogenous infection and no evidence of prosthesis failure. Harris hip scores, on average, improved from 49.8 (26-73) to 93.9 (82-100) (P<0.05) after a minimum of 2 years follow-up (average, 8.2 years, range 2-14 years). Clinically, patients demonstrated diminished or no limping (94%, 33/35) and improved leg length equality post-operatively (100%, 35/35). This style of stem accommodated metaphyseal/diaphyseal size mismatch in 80% (28/35), allowed for abnormal anteversion in 71% (25/35), and resulted in radiographic improvements in trochanteric height (P<0.05), body weight lever arm (P<0.05), and leg length (P<0.05). PMID:25979188

  6. Short-term results with the Zweymueller-SL metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Petsinis, Georgios; Repanti, Maria; Papazisis, Zisis; Iliopoulos, Panagiotis; Soucacos, Panagiotis N

    2002-01-01

    In a prospective study we followed 266 consecutive patients who received 350 Zweymueller-SL uncemented total hip replacements with metal-on-metal articulation for osteoarthritis. Mean follow-up was 52 (range 37-92) months. Patient age at the time of surgery was 55±9 (25-70) years. Pre-operative Harris score of 45±19 was increased post-operatively to 96±4. Pre-operative invalidity was significantly improved post-operatively (P<0.001), and 97% of the patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with the results. There was no aseptic loosening of either component. Revision was made in six hips (1.8%) because of either septic loosening (five, 1.5%) or technical error (one, 0.3%). At revision, surgical microscopic evidence for metalosis (Mirra grades 1 and 2) was shown in all revised hips. The reasons for early loosening were unrelated to the metal-on-metal bearing but rather were the result of either low-grade deep infection or inadequate surgical technique. Survival rate for Zweymueller screw socket and stem 7.6 years after implantation was 99.4% and 96.8% respectively. There was no evidence that metal-on-metal articulation gives rise to new problems or complications. PMID:24570158

  7. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  8. In Vitro Bioactivity Study of RGD-Coated Titanium Alloy Prothesis for Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Man, Zhentao; Sha, Dan; Sun, Shui; Li, Tao; Li, Bin; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Laibo; Wu, Changshun; Jiang, Peng; Han, Xiaojuan; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a common procedure for the treatment of end-stage hip joint disease, and the demand for revision THA will double by 2026. Ti6Al4V (Titanium, 6% Aluminum, and 4% Vanadium) is a kind of alloy commonly used to make hip prothesis. To promote the osseointegration between the prothesis and host bone is very important for the revision THA. The peptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) could increase cell attachment and has been used in the vascular tissue engineering. In this study, we combined the RGD with Ti6Al4V alloy using the covalent cross-linking method to fabricate the functional Ti6Al4V alloy (FTA). The distribution of RGD oligopeptide on the FTA was even and homogeneous. The FTA scaffolds could promote mouse osteoblasts adhesion and spreading. Furthermore, the result of RT-qPCR indicated that the FTA scaffolds were more beneficial to osteogenesis, which may be due to the improvement of osteoblast adhesion by the RGD oligopeptide coated on FTA. Overall, the FTA scaffolds developed herein pave the road for designing and building more efficient prothesis for osseointegration between the host bone and prothesis in revision THA. PMID:27493968

  9. High Re-Operation Rates Using Conserve Metal-On-Metal Total Hip Articulations

    PubMed Central

    Mogensen, S.L.; Jakobsen, T.; Christoffersen, H.; Krarup, N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Metal-on-metal hip articulations have been intensely debated after reports of adverse reactions and high failure rates. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the implant of a metal-on.metal total hip articulation (MOM THA) from a single manufacture in a two-center study. Materials and Methods: 108 CONSERVE® MOM THA were implanted in 92 patients between November 2005 and December 2010. Patients had at time of retrospective evaluation their journals reviewed for re-operations and adverse reactions. Results: 20 hips were re-operated (18.4%) at a mean follow up of 53 months. 4 pseudotumors were diagnosed at time of follow up but no substantiated link was made between adverse reactions and re-operations. Conclusion: The high re-operation rates found in this study raised concern about the usage of the MOM THA and subsequently lead to the termination of implantation of this MOM THA at the two orthopaedic departments. PMID:27099640

  10. Comparison of the hospital cost of primary and revision total hip arthroplasty after cost containment.

    PubMed

    Iorio, R; Healy, W L; Richards, J A

    1999-02-01

    This study compared the hospital cost of primary and revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) after the introduction of cost-containment programs (clinical pathway, hip implant standardization, and competitive bid purchasing of hip implants). Hospital financial records for 290 primary and 85 revision THAs performed from October 1993 through September 1995 were analyzed. A cost-accounting system provided actual hospital cost data for each procedure. Accurate calculation of hospital income or loss was determined. Average hospital length of stay was 4.9 days for primary THA and 5.9 days for revision THA. Average hospital cost was $11,104 for primary THA and $14,935 for revision THA. Average net income (hospital revenue hospital expense) for primary THA was $2486. Average loss from revision THA was $401. The payer mix included commercial insurance, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, managed care, Medicare, Medicaid, and workmen's compensation. For primary THA, all payers were profitable except Medicaid and selected managed care contracts. For revision THA, profit was achieved with payment from commercial insurance only. Despite the introduction of cost-containment programs, revision THA did not achieve profitability at our institution. PMID:10037332

  11. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  12. In Vitro Bioactivity Study of RGD-Coated Titanium Alloy Prothesis for Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Man, Zhentao; Sha, Dan; Sun, Shui; Li, Tao; Li, Bin; Yang, Guang; Wu, Changshun; Jiang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a common procedure for the treatment of end-stage hip joint disease, and the demand for revision THA will double by 2026. Ti6Al4V (Titanium, 6% Aluminum, and 4% Vanadium) is a kind of alloy commonly used to make hip prothesis. To promote the osseointegration between the prothesis and host bone is very important for the revision THA. The peptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) could increase cell attachment and has been used in the vascular tissue engineering. In this study, we combined the RGD with Ti6Al4V alloy using the covalent cross-linking method to fabricate the functional Ti6Al4V alloy (FTA). The distribution of RGD oligopeptide on the FTA was even and homogeneous. The FTA scaffolds could promote mouse osteoblasts adhesion and spreading. Furthermore, the result of RT-qPCR indicated that the FTA scaffolds were more beneficial to osteogenesis, which may be due to the improvement of osteoblast adhesion by the RGD oligopeptide coated on FTA. Overall, the FTA scaffolds developed herein pave the road for designing and building more efficient prothesis for osseointegration between the host bone and prothesis in revision THA. PMID:27493968

  13. Long-term Outcome of Polished Stems in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Han, Hong-Joon; Baik, Seok-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes and radiologic findings of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) using cemented polished femoral stems. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 91 hips (91 patients) that had undergone primary THA with cemented polished femoral stems who were followed for at least 10 years. The mean age at surgery was 57 years (47-75 years). Mean follow up period was 12.8 years (10.1-14.0 years). Harris Hip Score (HHS) was used for clinical evaluation. Radiologic evaluation was focused on cementing technique including subsidence within the cement mantle, radiolucent lines at the cement-bone or cement-stem interface, cortical hypertrophy, and calcar resorption. Results The average HHS was 55.2 points before the surgery that improved to an average of 93.2 points at the final follow-up. According to Barrack classification, there were 50, 32, and 9 cases in A, B, and C grades, respectively. Subsidence of femoral stem was less than 2 mm except in one patient. There were no progressing radiolucent line or loosening of the femoral stem. Conclusion In this study, THA using cemented polished femoral stems was found to have favorable outcomes in long term follow-up.

  14. Acute delayed infection: increased risk in failed metal on metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Hernan A; Berbari, Elie F; Sierra, Rafael J

    2014-09-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions occurring in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) could potentially lead to secondary failure modes such as dislocation or infection. The authors report a series of 124 patients treated with MoM hip arthroplasty between 2006 and 2010 with a minimum follow-up of 3 years. Eight hips presented with acute delayed or late periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) (defined as an infection occurring after 3 months in an otherwise well functioning implant). The rate of infection observed was higher than expected, almost 4 times higher (5.6%) compared to previous historical cohorts from our institution (1.3%). This high risk of infection in patients with DePuy ASR implants requires further study but we theorize that the increased prevalence of infection could be due to a combination of particulate debris, molecular (rather than particulate) effects of Co and Cr ions on soft tissues, and/or products of corrosion that may change the local environment predisposing to infection. PMID:24851788

  15. The effect of stem fit on bone hypertrophy and pain relief in cementless total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A

    1989-10-01

    This study was designed to clinically evaluate the effects of a tight distal fit and collar seating in hips with a cylindrical distal stem, collar, and proximal porous coating. A clinical assessment of pain and a roentgenographic assessment of patterns of proximal femoral hypertrophy were made in 105 patients. Intraoperative evaluations of the distal stem fit were performed so that a tight distal fit was ensured in 67 patients. Thirty-eight patients who did not have intraoperative sizing were determined roentgenographically to have a loose distal fit. Pain was significantly more likely to occur in those patients with a loose distal fit (20 of 38) than in those with a tight distal fit (two of 67). Collar seating was associated with hypertrophy under the seated portion of the collar in all cases, and failure to seat the collar was associated with recession and rounding of the upper femoral cortical edge. Distal hypertrophy occurred in 24 of the 67 hips with a tight distal fit, and a tight distal fit did not prevent proximal hypertrophy. It was concluded that a tight distal fit is associated with more complete pain relief in cementless total hip arthroplasty and that a tight distal fit of a cylindrical stem does not prevent proximal load bearing. PMID:2791383

  16. The Geometry of the Bone Structure Associated with Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhang; Jian, Wang; Zhi-han, Li; Jun, Xiao; Liang, Zhao; Ge, Yan; Zhan-jun, Shi

    2014-01-01

    Close adaptation of the prosthesis to the bone is the key to achieving optimal stability and fixation for total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, there have been no adequate studies of bone morphology, especially in different races. The aim of this study was to analyze the geometry of the acetabulum and proximal femur of people from South China, based on three-dimensional reconstruction, and to detect differences between different population subsets. CT scans were performed on 80 healthy volunteers (160 hips) from South China, comprising 40 males (80 hips) and 40 females (80 hips). The images were imported into Mimics 10.01 to perform 3D reconstruction. THA-associated anatomical parameters were measured and compared with other published data. In comparison with published data, it seemed that people from South China have smaller acetabular abduction angle, larger acetabular supro-inferior diameter, larger neck-shaft angle, smaller offset, thinner femoral shaft and more proximal isthmus, which needed to be further confirmed. There were significant differences between the genders in most parameters. As significant differences in canal flare index (CFI) and distal canal flare index (DCFI) were found between genders, it was concluded the most significant differences lay in the isthmus of the femur. Among the femora, according to Noble’s classification we identified more normal types and fewer stovepipe and champagne-flute types than expected from the literature, indicating that uncemented prostheses would be suitable for most people from South China. Our findings reveal that simply choosing the smallest of a series of prostheses would not necessarily provide a good fit, due to the different trends from the proximal to the distal part of the femur. Significant variation exists in THA-associated anatomy between genders and population subsets. It is therefore imperative that each patient receives individual consideration rather than assuming all patients have the same

  17. The geometry of the bone structure associated with total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhang; Jian, Wang; Li, Zhi-han; Jun, Xiao; Liang, Zhao; Ge, Yan; Shi, Zhan-jun

    2014-01-01

    Close adaptation of the prosthesis to the bone is the key to achieving optimal stability and fixation for total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, there have been no adequate studies of bone morphology, especially in different races. The aim of this study was to analyze the geometry of the acetabulum and proximal femur of people from South China, based on three-dimensional reconstruction, and to detect differences between different population subsets. CT scans were performed on 80 healthy volunteers (160 hips) from South China, comprising 40 males (80 hips) and 40 females (80 hips). The images were imported into Mimics 10.01 to perform 3D reconstruction. THA-associated anatomical parameters were measured and compared with other published data. In comparison with published data, it seemed that people from South China have smaller acetabular abduction angle, larger acetabular supro-inferior diameter, larger neck-shaft angle, smaller offset, thinner femoral shaft and more proximal isthmus, which needed to be further confirmed. There were significant differences between the genders in most parameters. As significant differences in canal flare index (CFI) and distal canal flare index (DCFI) were found between genders, it was concluded the most significant differences lay in the isthmus of the femur. Among the femora, according to Noble's classification we identified more normal types and fewer stovepipe and champagne-flute types than expected from the literature, indicating that uncemented prostheses would be suitable for most people from South China. Our findings reveal that simply choosing the smallest of a series of prostheses would not necessarily provide a good fit, due to the different trends from the proximal to the distal part of the femur. Significant variation exists in THA-associated anatomy between genders and population subsets. It is therefore imperative that each patient receives individual consideration rather than assuming all patients have the same

  18. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patient with the Sequelae of Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young Wook; Kim, Myung Jin; Lee, Yong Suk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Patients who have secondary hip osteoarthritis as sequelae of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) are severe deformities of femoral head and acetabulum. A few studies have presented that the clinical results and risks associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA) for patients with a history of LCPD were not satisfactory. In this study, we reported the radiographic and clinical outcomes of THA in patients with sequelae of LCPD. Materials and Methods Between March 2007 and May 2012, 23 hips (23 patients) underwent cementless THA and were followed up at least 2 years after surgery. There were 11 male patients and 12 female patients with an average age of 49.2 years old (range, 25 to 69 years old), and the average follow up period was 40.8 months (range, 24 to 84 months). The clinical and radiological evaluations were performed. Results The Harris hip score improved from 48.3 points preoperatively to 92.4 points at the time of the last follow-up. The shortening of affected limb was improved from -1.6 cm to 0.2 cm. The complications included one case of sciatic nerve palsy that developed after extensive lengthening of lower extremity, three cases of intraoperative femur fractures. There was no component loosening. Conclusion Fractures and motor nerve palsies may be more frequent in this population. Careful preoperative planning should be performed to overcome the technical pitfalls. If overcoming this early complication, the clinical and radiological evaluations showed excellent outcomes at average 40-month follow-ups.

  19. Sexual Activity after Total Hip Replacement in Korean Patients: How They Do, What They Want, and How to Improve

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Byung-Ho; Lee, Kyung-Hag; Noh, Serae; Ha, Yong-Chan; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2013-01-01

    Background Concerns of patients on sexual activity after total hip arthroplasty have not been well studied in Asian patients. This study aimed to determine the following: (1) what are the concerns of patients related to sexual activity after total hip arthroplasty? (2) what are the changes in sexual activity after total hip replacement in Korean patients? Methods Details of sexual activity and concerns were obtained using a questionnaire designed specifically for the study. The questionnaire was administered to 64 patients in a face-to-face interview at an outpatient clinic. Results Preoperatively, 53.1% of patients experienced difficulties, primarily due to hip pathology and limitations of motion. The median time to the resumption of sexual activity was 3 months postoperatively, and most patients had no increase in the frequency of sexual activity after the total hip replacement. In 39.1% of patients were seen having difficulties with leg positioning following total hip replacement, and they were likely to change coital positions. The most common concern regarding sexual activity of patients was the fear of dislocation. Furthermore, patients with a higher stress level had lower satisfaction rates. Most patients were unable to obtain information on sexual activity following the total hip arthroplasty, and they did not consult with a physician due to the private nature of the topic. Conclusions Dislocation was the most common concern of patients during sexual activity following a total hip arthroplasty, and a higher stress level was found to be associated with a lower satisfaction rate. Because most patients were unprepared to consult a physician, the provision of appropriate information before a consultation might be beneficial. PMID:24340146

  20. Metal release and corrosion effects of modular neck total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowitz, Eike; Krachler, Michael; Thomsen, Marc; Heisel, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Modular neck implants are an attractive treatment tool in total hip replacement. Concerns remain about the mechanical stability and metal ion release caused by the modular connection. Five different implant designs were investigated in an experimental set-up. In vivo conditions were simulated and the long-term titanium release was measured. Finally, the modular connections were inspected for corrosion processes and signs of fretting. No mechanical failure or excessive corrosion could be identified for the implants tested. The titanium releases measured were extremely low compared to in vivo and in vitro studies and were not in a critical range. PMID:19219434

  1. Penetration of moxifloxacin and levofloxacin into cancellous and cortical bone in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Metallidis, S; Topsis, D; Nikolaidis, J; Alexiadou, E; Lazaraki, G; Grovaris, L; Theodoridou, A; Nikolaidis, P

    2007-12-01

    Penetration of levofloxacin and moxifloxacin into cancellous and cortical bone was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 16 patients who underwent routine total hip arthroplasty. Our results demonstrate a good degree of penetration into bone for both quinolones. The mean cancellous penetration was 53.86% for moxifloxacin and 54.13% for levofloxacin. The penetration into cortical bone was 41.59% and 34.26% respectively. The concentrations for both quinolones were above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC(90s)) for the most common pathogens, so they can be used for the treatment of osteomyelitis. PMID:18230551

  2. Removal of trabecular metal osteonecrosis intervention implant and conversion to primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Owens, Joshua B; Ely, Erin E; Guilliani, Nathania M Figueroa; Suarez, Juan C; Patel, Preetesh D

    2012-06-01

    Core decompression and placement of the Trabecular Metal Osteonecrosis Intervention Implant have shown to be initially successful in treating early osteonecrosis. When treatment fails, however, patients often undergo primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) requiring removal of a previously inserted trabecular metal implant. We describe a technical tip for removal of a well-ingrown trabecular metal screw. A metal-cutting trephine placed over the screw allows for removal in an efficient manner while minimizing additional dissection and bone loss during conversion to THA. PMID:22425306

  3. Titanium-copper-nitride coated spacers for two-stage revision of infected total hip endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Haenle, Maximilian; Lenz, Robert; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Within the first two years after total hip arthroplasty implant-associated infection has become the second most common reason for a revision surgery. Two-stage implant exchange is frequently conducted using temporary spacers made of antibiotic-loaded cement in order to prevent a bacterial colonization on the spacer. Avoiding several disadvantages of cement spacers, a conventional hemi-endoprosthesis was equipped with a copper-containing implant coating for inhibition of bacterial biofilms. In the present paper details of this novel treatment concept are presented including a case report. PMID:22242097

  4. In vitro experiments with an injection technique for cup fixation in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Somville, J M; Moldenaers, P F; Mulier, J C; Mewis, J J

    1987-01-01

    A new technique has been developed to position the cup rigidly into the acetabulum during total hip joint replacement. After positioning the flanged cup on the acetabulum by means of screws, a low-viscosity cement is injected through a hole in the rim of the cup. A comparison with the standard cementing technique was made on the basis of in vitro experiments. For this purpose a mold was constructed to produce castings simulating the human acetabulum. The distribution of the cement, the pressure developed in the acetabulum, and the penetration of the cement are compared for the two cementing techniques. PMID:3606358

  5. [Dislocation after total hip arthroplasty--the problem is still present, reasons and treatments].

    PubMed

    Pepłoński, Artur; Płomiński, Janusz

    2014-03-01

    Dislocation after total hip replacement remains a significant problem in orthopedic practice. Despite the use of more modem implants risk of instability is estimated at a few percent for primary treatment and for several procedures. The standard procedure in case of the first dislocation is reduction of the prosthesis in general anesthesia. Further investigation is individual, each case must be thoroughly examined for proper execution of the original surgery and the risk of the next dislocation. Regardless of the subsequent procedures performed a key role in the event of instability prosthesis plays properly conducted rehabilitation and patient education. PMID:24779210

  6. Allogenic Blood Transfusion Following Total Hip Arthroplasty: Results from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 2000 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Anas; Small, Travis; Chandran Pillai, Aiswarya Lekshmi Pillai; Schiltz, Nicholas K.; Klika, Alison K.; Barsoum, Wael K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The large-scale utilization of allogenic blood transfusion and its associated outcomes have been described in critically ill patients and those undergoing high-risk cardiac surgery but not in patients undergoing elective total hip arthroplasty. The objective of this study was to determine the trends in utilization and outcomes of allogenic blood transfusion in patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty in the United States from 2000 to 2009. Methods: An observational cohort of 2,087,423 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty from 2000 to 2009 was identified in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes 99.03 and 99.04 were used to identify patients who received allogenic blood products during their hospital stay. Risk factors for allogenic transfusions were identified with use of multivariable logistic regression models. We used propensity score matching to estimate the adjusted association between transfusion and surgical outcomes. Results: The rate of allogenic blood transfusion increased from 11.8% in 2000 to 19.0% in 2009. Patient-related risk factors for receiving an allogenic blood transfusion include an older age, female sex, black race, and Medicaid insurance. Hospital-related risk factors include rural location, smaller size, and non-academic status. After adjusting for confounders, allogenic blood transfusion was associated with a longer hospital stay (0.58 ± 0.02 day; p < 0.001), increased costs ($1731 ± $49 [in 2009 U.S. dollars]; p < 0.001), increased rate of discharge to an inpatient facility (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.26 to 1.31), and worse surgical and medical outcomes. In-hospital mortality was not affected by allogenic blood transfusion (odds ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.77 to 1.21). Conclusions: The increase in allogenic blood transfusion among total hip arthroplasty patients is concerning

  7. Clinical outcome of Zweymüller total hip arthroplasty for patients with high congenital hip dislocation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongyang; Xu, Zhihong; Shi, Dongquan; Qiu, Xusheng; Dai, Jin; Yuan, Tao; Weng, Wenjie; Jiang, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of high congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH) remains controversial. We report the outcome of hip arthroplasty using a cementless threaded cup and a cementless straight stem in patients with high congenital hip dislocation. Between January 2001 and August 2004, 17 patients with high congenital hip dislocation were treated. During surgery, at least 25% of the cup was anchored in bone. By monitoring somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) of the common peroneal nerve we were able to reduce the femoral head into position in the true acetabulum by releasing soft tissues. A bulk autogenous femoral head bone graft was implanted in 5 patients to achieve at least 75% bony coverage of the acertabular component. Follow-up ranged from 48 months to 91 months with an average of 69.7 months. The mean Harris hip score increased from 43 points preoperatively to 89 points at the time of final follow-up (P<0.001). Radiographic analysis showed bony union of the bone graft in all cases. PMID:21279967

  8. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Metal Head on a Highly Cross-linked Polyethylene Liner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Yook; Park, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This retrospective study was performed to evaluate the clinical results and measure polyethylene liner wear in total hip arthroplasty (THA) with highly cross-linked polyethylene. Materials and Methods Except for patients who had died or were unable to have follow-up at least 2 years, 60 of 78 hips that underwent THA were included this study. The mean age was 64.5 years (range, 25-81 years) and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 23.0 kg/m2 (18.1-32.3 kg/m2). Diagnosis at the time of the operation was osteonecrois of the femoral head in 28 hips, primary osteoarthritis in 14, hip fracture in 13, and other diseases in 5. The mean follow-up period was 3.8 years (2.1-7.1 years). Harris hip score (HHS) was reviewed before THA and at the last follow-up. On the anteroposterior pelvic radiographs, acetabular cup inclination and ante-version were also measured. The annual linear wear rate was measured using Livermore's method on the radiographs. Results The mean HHS was 60.1 (28-94) before operation and 90.4 (47-100) at the last follow-up. In the immediate post-operation, the average inclination and anteversion angles of the acetabular cups were 46.3° (standard deviation, ±6.7°) and, 21.4°(±10.1°) respectively. The mean of the annual linear polyethylene wear was 0.079 mm/year (0.001-0.291 mm/year). Age, gender and BMI were not statistically related to linear polyethylene wear but the period of follow-up and the acetabular cup's inclination showed significant negative and positive correlation respectively. Conclusion The wear rate of a highly cross-linked polyethylene was shown to correlate negatively with duration of follow-up. However, our study was based on a short-term follow-up, so a long-term follow-up study is necessary in the future. PMID:27536629

  9. Good short-term outcome of primary total hip arthroplasty with cementless bioactive glass ceramic bottom-coated implants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Cementless total hip arthroplasty is currently favored by many orthopedic surgeons. The design of the porous surface is critically important for long-term fixation. We examined the clinical and radiographic outcome of the cementless titanium hip implant with a bottom coating of apatite-wollastonite containing bioactive glass ceramic. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 109 hips (92 patients) that had undergone primary cementless total hip arthroplasty with bioactive glass ceramic bottom-coated implants. The mean follow-up period was 7 (3–9) years. Hip joint function was evaluated with the Merle d’Aubigné and Postel hip score, and radiographic changes were determined from anteroposterior radiographs. Results The mean hip score improved from 9.7 preoperatively to 17 at the final follow-up. The overall survival rate was 100% at 9 years, when radiographic loosening or revision for any reason was used as the endpoint. 3 stems in 2 patients subsided more than 3 mm vertically within 1 year after implantation. Radiographs of the interface of the stem and femur were all classified as bone ingrowth fixation. Conclusions The short-term results of this study show good outcome for cementless implants with a bottom coating of apatite-wollastonite containing bioactive glass ceramic. PMID:23043270

  10. Outcome Analysis of Hemiarthroplasty vs. Total Hip Replacement in Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Bhanu; Kumar, Krishna; Kohli, Navneet; Katoch, Punit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Management of displaced fracture neck femur in the elderly population is frequently done by Hemiarthroplasty or Total Hip Replacement (THR). It avoids high rates of nonunion and avascular necrosis which usually occur after internal fixation of neck femur fractures in this age group. Aim The present study aimed to evaluate patient function and complications following hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement in elderly population with displaced femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods Patients above 60 years of age with displaced fracture neck femur were studied over the period of four years. All the clinical parameters and co-morbid conditions were noted at the time of presentation. The patients associated with co-morbid conditions and underlying pathology were excluded from study. Garden’s classification was used for classification of neck femur fractures. After due informed consent patients of displaced fracture neck femur were randomized by simple randomization and allocated for hemiarthroplasty or THR. Antibiotics were given preoperatively at the time of induction and postoperatively for 5-7 days. Surgery was carried out by Modified Gibson approach. Any complications during pre and postoperative period were noted. Follow-up of patients was done 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year interval with the help of Harris hip score. Results Total 80 patients were enrolled in the study group, with 40 patients in each group. The mean age of patients was 73 years in hemiarthroplasty group and 78 years in THR group. Female to male ratio was 55:45. Mean operative time was 35 minutes in hemiarthroplasty group and 45 minutes in THR. Average intraoperative blood loss was 200cc and 300cc in hemiarthroplasty and THR respectively. The mean hospital stay was 14 days in both the groups. Superficial wound infection was noted in hemiarthroplasty group while in THR group deep wound infection (n=1) and prolonged ICU stay (n=1) were noted. The mean Harris hip score

  11. Development of an extremely wear-resistant ultra high molecular weight polyethylene for total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Shen, F W; Lu, B; Campbell, P; Salovey, R

    1999-03-01

    Osteolysis induced by ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris is one of the primary factors limiting the lifespan of total hip replacements. Crosslinking polyethylene is known to improve its wear resistance in certain industrial applications, and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups have shown improved wear resistance in two clinical studies. In the present study, crosslinked polyethylene cups were produced by two methods. Chemically crosslinked cups were produced by mixing a peroxide with ultra high molecular weight polyethylene powder and then molding the cups directly to shape. Radiation-crosslinked cups were produced by exposing conventional extruded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene bar stock to gamma radiation at various doses from 3.3 to 100 Mrad (1 Mrad = 10 kGy), remelting the bars to extinguish residual free radicals (i.e., to minimize long-term oxidation), and then machining the cups by conventional techniques. In hip-joint simulator tests lasting as long as 5 million cycles, both types of cross-linked cups exhibited dramatically improved resistance to wear. Artificial aging of the cups by heating for 30 days in air at 80 degrees C induced oxidation of the chemically crosslinked cups. However, a chemically crosslinked cup that was aged 2.7 years at room temperature had very little oxidation. Thus, whether substantial oxidation of chemically crosslinked polyethylene would occur at body temperature remains unclear. The radiation-crosslinked remelted cups exhibited excellent resistance to oxidation. Because crosslinking can reduce the ultimate tensile strength, fatigue strength, and elongation to failure of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, the optimal crosslinking dose provides a balance between these physical properties and the wear resistance of the implant and might substantially reduce the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis with total hip replacements. PMID:10221831

  12. Postoperative changes in in vivo measured friction in total hip joint prosthesis during walking.

    PubMed

    Damm, Philipp; Bender, Alwina; Bergmann, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the artificial cup and inlay is the most common reasons for total hip replacement failures. Polyethylene wear and aseptic loosening are frequent reasons. Furthermore, over the past few decades, the population of patients receiving total hip replacements has become younger and more active. Hence, a higher level of activity may include an increased risk of implant loosening as a result of friction-induced wear. In this study, an instrumented hip implant was used to measure the contact forces and friction moments in vivo during walking. Subsequently, the three-dimensional coefficient of friction in vivo was calculated over the whole gait cycle. Measurements were collected from ten subjects at several time points between three and twelve months postoperative. No significant change in the average resultant contact force was observed between three and twelve months postoperative. In contrast, a significant decrease of up to 47% was observed in the friction moment. The coefficient of friction also decreased over postoperative time on average. These changes may be caused by 'running-in' effects of the gliding components or by the improved lubricating properties of the synovia. Because the walking velocity and contact forces were found to be nearly constant during the observed period, the decrease in friction moment suggests an increase in fluid viscosity. The peak values of the contact force individually varied by 32%-44%. The friction moment individually differed much more, by 110%-129% at three and up to 451% at twelve months postoperative. The maximum coefficient of friction showed the highest individual variability, about 100% at three and up to 914% at twelve months after surgery. These individual variations in the friction parameters were most likely due to different 'running-in' effects that were influenced by the individual activity levels and synovia properties. PMID:25806805

  13. Improving Planning and Post-Operative Assessment for Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pétursson, Þröstur; Edmunds, Kyle; Magnúsdóttir, Gígja; Halldórsson, Grétar; jr., Halldór Jónsson; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) remains the gold standard of treatment for patients who suffer with a variety of hip-related pathological degeneration or trauma. These patients often exhibit significantly less post-operative pain and an increase in the range of motion of the joint, but there are still relatively common instances of debilitating periprosthetic complications that call into question the method for pre-surgical implant choice. Currently, there are two principal options for THA prostheses: cemented or non cemented. Utilizing the cemented procedure ensures a faster acquisition of adequate implant stability than with the non cemented procedure, but can eventually lead to an increased periprosthetic fracture risk. Non cemented prosthetic stems are more frequently revised within the first few years following THA due to periprosthetic fracture, but non cemented revision surgeries generally result in fewer complications than those of cemented implants. Surgeons typically rely on experience or simple patient metrics such as age and sex to prescribe which implant procedure is optimal, and while this may work for most patients, there is a clear need to analyze more rigoriously patient conditions that correlate to optimal post-THA outcomes. The results from the investigation reported herein indicate that an understanding of how the percent composition and quality of a patient's quadriceps muscle in both healthy and operated legs may be a better indicator for prosthetic choice. Additionally, these data emphasize that the traditional metrics of age and sex inadequately predict changes in quadriceps composition and quality and thereby have comparatively minor utility in determining the patient-appropriate prosthetic type. Key Words: Total Hip Arthroplasty, Prosthetic selection, Muscle size and quality, Anatomical modeling, Surgical planning. PMID:26913152

  14. Postoperative Changes in In Vivo Measured Friction in Total Hip Joint Prosthesis during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Philipp; Bender, Alwina; Bergmann, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the artificial cup and inlay is the most common reasons for total hip replacement failures. Polyethylene wear and aseptic loosening are frequent reasons. Furthermore, over the past few decades, the population of patients receiving total hip replacements has become younger and more active. Hence, a higher level of activity may include an increased risk of implant loosening as a result of friction-induced wear. In this study, an instrumented hip implant was used to measure the contact forces and friction moments in vivo during walking. Subsequently, the three-dimensional coefficient of friction in vivo was calculated over the whole gait cycle. Measurements were collected from ten subjects at several time points between three and twelve months postoperative. No significant change in the average resultant contact force was observed between three and twelve months postoperative. In contrast, a significant decrease of up to 47% was observed in the friction moment. The coefficient of friction also decreased over postoperative time on average. These changes may be caused by ‘running-in’ effects of the gliding components or by the improved lubricating properties of the synovia. Because the walking velocity and contact forces were found to be nearly constant during the observed period, the decrease in friction moment suggests an increase in fluid viscosity. The peak values of the contact force individually varied by 32%-44%. The friction moment individually differed much more, by 110%-129% at three and up to 451% at twelve months postoperative. The maximum coefficient of friction showed the highest individual variability, about 100% at three and up to 914% at twelve months after surgery. These individual variations in the friction parameters were most likely due to different ‘running-in’ effects that were influenced by the individual activity levels and synovia properties. PMID:25806805

  15. Changes of center of rotation and femoral offset in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, Jon A.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a challenge to reconstruct the center of rotation (COR) and femoroacetabular offset anatomically in total hip arthroplasty (THA). We addressed the controversy how we manage to preserve the COR and femoroacetabular offset with an uncemented total hip prosthesis implanted with free hand technique. Methods We analyzed a prospective series of 73 patients who underwent primary THA. The series was composed of 40 females and 33 males, mean age 64 years (range, 35–90 years). The reasons for THA were primary osteoarthritis (n=63) and developmental dysplasia of the hip (n=10). Pre- and postoperative X-rays were done in a standardized format for anterior-posterior (AP) radiographs of the pelvis, and digitalized measurements were done using SectraTM. We compared preoperative measurements with the final outcome to determine changes in COR and femoral offset. Results We found that 40 patients had their COR and 34 patients had their femoral offset preserved within preoperative 5.0 mm limits. Twenty-three patients had both their values of COR and femoral offset preserved within 5.0 mm limits. While a significant correlation was found between changes of femoral and global offset (r=0.786, P<0.001), there were no correlation between changes of acetabular and femoral offset (r=−0.027, P=0.822). Conclusions Using an uncemented THA and free hand technique, there is a fair reproducibility of anatomy. The variations were mostly minor, but our results indicate a potential for better restoring the location of COR and femoral offset when planning and implanting an uncemented THA. PMID:26807410

  16. Leg lengthening of more than 5 cm is a risk factor for sciatic nerve injury after total hip arthroplasty for adult hip dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Yoshitoshi; Hasegawa, Yukiharu; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with high hip dislocation is challenging and technically demanding. Nerve injury is a problem associated with leg lengthening after THA. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors for sciatic nerve injury after THA in patients with high hip dislocation. Thirty-seven patients (41 THAs) with Crowe type IV hips were consecutively treated. The average leg lengthening (LL) was 3.2 cm. The average Harris hip score was improved from 57.5 points to 83.1 points at the final follow-up. The clinical outcomes after an average 6.4-years follow-up were satisfactory. Sciatic nerve injury was observed in two joints. LL in the two joints (two patients) with sciatic nerve injury was 5.2 cm and 6.7 cm, respectively. Leg lengthening of >5 cm was a risk factor for sciatic nerve injury. Therefore, leg lengthening of >5 cm should be avoided to prevent sciatic nerve injury. PMID:26412892

  17. Revision total hip replacement using the cement-in-cement technique for the acetabular component: technique and results for 60 hips.

    PubMed

    Brogan, K; Charity, J; Sheeraz, A; Whitehouse, S L; Timperley, A J; Howell, J R; Hubble, M J W

    2012-11-01

    The technique of femoral cement-in-cement revision is well established, but there are no previous series reporting its use on the acetabular side at the time of revision total hip replacement. We describe the technique and report the outcome of 60 consecutive acetabular cement-in-cement revisions in 59 patients at a mean follow-up of 8.5 years (5 to 12). All had a radiologically and clinically well-fixed acetabular cement mantle at the time of revision. During the follow-up 29 patients died, but no hips were lost to follow-up. The two most common indications for acetabular revision were recurrent dislocation (46, 77%) and to complement femoral revision (12, 20%). Of the 60 hips, there were two cases of aseptic loosening of the acetabular component (3.3%) requiring re-revision. No other hip was clinically or radiologically loose (96.7%) at the latest follow-up. One hip was re-revised for infection, four for recurrent dislocation and one for disarticulation of a constrained component. At five years the Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 100% for aseptic loosening and 92.2% (95% CI 84.8 to 99.6), with revision for any cause as the endpoint. These results support the use of cement-in-cement revision on the acetabular side in appropriate cases. Theoretical advantages include preservation of bone stock, reduced operating time, reduced risk of complications and durable fixation. PMID:23109626

  18. Alcohol Misuse is an Independent Risk Factor for Poorer Postoperative Outcomes Following Primary Total Hip and Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Best, Matthew J; Buller, Leonard T; Gosthe, Raul G; Klika, Alison K; Barsoum, Wael K

    2015-08-01

    The influence of alcohol misuse on outcomes following primary total hip (THA) or knee (TKA) arthroplasty is poorly understood. Using the National Hospital Discharge Survey, a cohort representative of 8,372,232 patients (without cirrhosis) who underwent THA or TKA between 1990 and 2007 was identified and divided into two groups: (1) those who misused alcohol (n=50,861) and (2) those who did not (n=8,321,371). Differences in discharge status, comorbidities and perioperative complications were analyzed. Compared to patients with no diagnosis of alcohol misuse, alcohol misusers were nine times more likely to leave against medical advice and had longer hospital stays (P<0.001). Alcohol misuse was independently associated with higher odds of in hospital complications (OR: 1.334, range: 1.307-1.361), surgery related complications (OR: 1.293, range: 1.218-1.373) and general medical complications (OR: 1.300, range: 1.273-1.327). PMID:25769745

  19. Prescription trajectories and effect of total hip arthroplasty on the use of analgesics, hypnotics, antidepressants, and anxiolytics: results from a population of total hip arthroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Blågestad, Tone; Nordhus, Inger H; Grønli, Janne; Engesæter, Lars B; Ruths, Sabine; Ranhoff, Anette H; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2016-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been shown to reduce pain and improve function. In addition, it is suggested that THA improves sleep and alleviates symptoms of anxiety and depression. Patients with chronic pain are frequent users of analgesic and psychotropic drugs and thereby risk adverse drug events. The impact of THA on such drug use has not been thoroughly investigated. Based on merged data from the Norwegian Prescription Database and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, this study sought to investigate redeemed medications in a complete population (N = 39,688) undergoing THA in 2005 to 2011. User rates and redeemed drug volume of analgesics (nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, and nonopioids) and psychotropics (hypnotics, anxiolytics, and antidepressants) were calculated for 4 quarters before and 4 quarters after surgery. We analysed preoperative prescription trends (Q1 vs Q4), postoperative prescription (Q4 vs Q5), and long-term effect of surgery (Q4 vs Q8). Before surgery, use of all drug groups increased from Q1 to Q4. Use of opioids, nonopioids, and hypnotics dramatically increased from Q4 to Q5. Long-term (Q4 vs Q8) surgery reduced prescriptions of analgesics, hypnotics, and anxiolytics, but not antidepressants. Overall, the present results extend the positive effects of THA to include reduced reliance on medication to alleviate symptoms. PMID:26588693

  20. Total hip arthroplasty using S-ROM prosthesis in elder patients with type C and B bone

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhong-Shou; Sun, Jun-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results using S-ROM prosthesis in patients with type C and B femoral bone requiring primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) for multiple reasons. Methods Sixteen hips were followed up for a mean of 38 months (range, 26–48), with a mean age at surgery of 72 years (range, 65–75). Results The average Harris hip score improved from 52.2 points to 88.5 points. All femoral stems showed stable fixation. Neither osteolysis around the femoral stem nor subsidence of the femoral stem were found at the final follow-up. Conclusion For the patients with poor bone quality, total hip arthroplasty with the use of the proximal modular femoral stem yielded good short-to-mid-term results with respect to the clinical and radiological criteria. PMID:24403752

  1. Using acetabular fossa as a guide for anticipated inclination of uncemented cup in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junwei; Gao, Xu; Yang, Guanghui; Zhang, Yanru

    2015-01-01

    Positions of acetabular implant generally are considered to be major causative factors of dislocation. Accurate and consistent achievement of the preoperatively anticipated orientation of the acetabular cup is a great challenge in total hip replacement (THR). In the present study, we investigated the surgical application of acetabular fossa as a guide for anticipated inclination of uncemented cup, and evaluated its accuracy as an anatomic reference for achieving the preoperatively anticipated abduction of the acetabular cup in comparison with traditional device method on cadaveric specimens. Sixteen normal adult pelvic cadaveric specimens were collected. On each of the sixteen normal adult pelvic cadaveric specimens, acetabular fossa related anatomic sites were marked and studied on pelvic radiographs. Our results showed that there is close correlation between most medial aspect of acetabular sourcil and central axis of the acetabular cup at anticipated inclination of 40° ± 5°. And the fossa group can achieve the preoperatively anticipated cup abduction more accurately than the device group. The current results demonstrated that acetabular fossa can be a reasonable alternative, or as a complement to the currently used methods guiding total hip replacement. PMID:25784987

  2. Proliferative cell response to loosening of total hip replacements: a cytofluorographic cell cycle analysis.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, S; Pajamäki, J; Eskola, A; Konttinen, Y T; Lindholm, T

    1991-01-01

    Monocyte/macrophages and fibroblasts are the major reactive cells in the periprosthetic connective tissue in a loose totally replaced hip. Monocyte/macrophages are bone-marrow-derived, hematogenous cells, whereas mesenchymal fibroblasts replenish by local proliferation. The cell-cycle-phase frequency distribution therefore reflects the local mitotic fibroblast response to the loose total hip replacement (THR) implant. In 13 patients who underwent revision of a loose THR implant, most of the local cells were in the resting G0/G1 phase (88.1 +/- 6.3%, mean +/- SD), whereas 8.6 +/- 3.7% were in the S phase of the cycle, and 3.4 +/- 2.9% had already reached the G2/M phase. The highest DNA values were recorded in an osteoarthritic patient undergoing revision 4 years after the primary uncemented THR, while the lowest values were observed in a rheumatoid arthritis patient with a loose cemented prosthesis 15 years after the primary operation. The results suggest that the local proliferative fibroblast response in general is uniform and does not seem to depend on the type of prosthesis or the use of cement. The responses in aggressive granulomatous-type loosening and the common type of loosening were similar. PMID:1772725

  3. Subject-specific finite element model with an optical tracking system in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Li, Qing; Chen, Youngang; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Intra-operative peri-prosthetic femoral fractures are a significant concern in total hip arthroplasty and can occur at any time during surgery, with the highest incidence during implant insertion. This study combines subject-specific finite element analysis modeling with an optical tracking system to characterize the resultant strain in the bone and results of impaction during total hip replacement surgery. The use of ABG II femoral stem (Stryker Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ, USA) in the model yielded the following results. Hammer velocity was measured experimentally using a three-dimensional optical tracking system and these data were input into the finite element analysis model so that intra-operative loading scenario could be simulated. A quasi-static explicit simulation and a dynamic loading step using two implant-bone interface friction (0.1 and 0.4 friction coefficients) states were simulated. The maximum swing velocity of a mallet was experimentally measured at 1.5 m/s and occurred just before impaction of the hammer with implant introducer. Two friction states resulted in different results with the lower friction coefficient generating higher strains in the anterior regions of the model and higher displacement of the implant with respect to the femur when compared to the high friction state. PMID:25934257

  4. Mechanical effects of stem cement interface characteristics in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Verdonschot, N; Huiskes, R

    1996-08-01

    Stem cement debonding is 1 of the most common forms of fixation failure and is thought to be a prelude to gross loosening of a total hip reconstruction. However, the immediate consequences of debonding remains a matter of controversy. The dynamic effects of stem cement debonding in total hip reconstruction were analyzed using 3-dimensional finite element techniques. Stem cement interface conditions were assumed as completely bonded or unbonded, with or without friction. The dynamic effects were accounted for, as presented by the stance and swing phases of the gait cycle. It was found that both cyclic micromotions at the stem cement interface and stresses in the cement mantle were effectively reduced by friction. The friction cases produced failure probabilities of the cement mantle that were relatively close to the one generated by the bonded stem. The probability of mechanical failure of the cement bone interface decreased after debonding and decreased more with reduced stem cement friction. These results show that, although a firm and lasting bond between stem and cement may be desirable for preventing cement failure, the mechanical effects of a debonded stem are less detrimental than were assumed earlier. For straight tapered stem shapes subjected to the loading conditions described, a polished stem may be desirable for the cement bone interface mechanics. PMID:8769468

  5. Two-stage revision of implant-associated infections after total hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Lenz, Robert; Haenle, Maximilian; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Septic loosening of total hip and knee endoprostheses gains an increasing proportion of revision arthroplasties. Operative revisions of infected endoprostheses are mentally and physically wearing for the patient, challenging for the surgeon and a significant economic burden for healthcare systems. In cases of early infection within the first three weeks after implantation a one-stage revision with leaving the implant in place is widely accepted. The recommendations for the management of late infections vary by far. One-stage revisions as well as two-stage or multiple revision schedules have been reported to be successful in over 90% of all cases for certain patient collectives. But implant associated infection still remains a severe complication. Moreover, the management of late endoprosthetic infection requires specific logistics, sufficient and standardized treatment protocol, qualified manpower as well as an efficient quality management. With regard to the literature and experience of specialized orthopaedic surgeons from several university and regional hospitals we modified a commonly used treatment protocol for two-stage revision of infected total hip and knee endoprostheses. In addition to the achievement of maximum survival rate of the revision implants an optimisation of the functional outcome of the affected artificial joint is aimed for. PMID:22242098

  6. Preventing venous thromboembolic events after total hip arthroplasty: new developments in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Deitelzweig, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a frequently performed orthopedic surgical procedure, and the number of these surgeries is expected to increase significantly over the coming years. Patients undergoing joint arthroplasty are at a particularly high risk for developing venous thromboembolic events (eg, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism). Prevention of postoperative complications is an important responsibility not only for orthopedic surgeons, but also for other clinicians involved in patients' care. Effective thromboprophylaxis is crucial to reduce the risk of developing venous thromboembolism following total hip arthroplasty and is an important goal of therapy. In response to some of the practical limitations of traditional anticoagulants, a new generation of oral anticoagulants has been developed. These agents include the selective factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, and the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran etexilate. The objective of this review article is to update hospitalists on the trial data and clinical considerations surrounding the new anticoagulants. Hospitalists play a key role in caring for surgical patients either in a consultative role or in conjunction with surgical teams. Thus, a practical knowledge of recent developments in thromboprophylaxis is essential for providing high-quality, evidence-based care. PMID:22615082

  7. OPTIMAL IMPROVEMENT IN FUNCTION AFTER TOTAL HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT: HOW DEEP DO YOU KNOW YOUR PATIENT’S MIND?

    PubMed

    De Caro, M F; Vicenti, G; Abate, A; Picca, G; Leoncini, V; Lomuscio, M; Casalino, A; Solarino, G; Moretti, B

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee causes pain and loss of joint mobility, leading to limitations in physical function. When conservative treatment fails total hip and knee replacement is a cost-effective surgical option. Patients have high expectations regarding functional outcome after these procedures. If such expectations are not met, they may still be dissatisfied with the outcome of a technically successful procedure. Recently, numerous studies reported that psychological factors can influence the outcome of total knee replacement (tkr) and total hip artrhoplasty with total hip replacement (thr). We conducted a prospective study on a consecutive sample of 280 patients affected by hip or knee OA who underwent total joint replacement. At patients’ admission, Harris Hip Score (HHS) and Knee Society Score (KSS) were used to assess pain and function. Furthermore, SF-36, Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (BRIEF-COPE) and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) were administered. Patients had clinical and radio graphical follow up at 1, 3 and 6 months post-operatively. The HHS and KSS values before surgery showed a linear correlation with both SCL-90-R and MMSE. None of the investigated variables influenced post-operative HHS and KSS scores; however, the improvement of functional scores resulted conditioned by SCL-90-R values, VAS score, schooling and MMSE. Psychological factors and mental status in primary total hip and knee replacement can affect outcome and patient satisfaction. Strategies focused on identification and facing of these conditions must be considered to improve outcome of total replacement. PMID:26652495

  8. Simulated studies of wear and friction in total hip prosthesis components with various ball sizes and surface finishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swikert, M. A.; Johnson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a newly designed total hip joint simulator. The apparatus closely simulates the complex motions and loads of the human hip in normal walking. The wear and friction of presently used appliance configurations and materials were determined. A surface treatment of the metal femoral ball specimens was applied to influence wear. The results of the investigation indicate that wear can be reduced by mechanical treatment of metal femoral ball surfaces. A metallographic examination and surface roughness measurements were made.

  9. Relationship between cup position and obturator externus muscle in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is often challenging to find the causes for postoperative pain syndromes after total hip replacement, since they can be very allotropic. One possible cause is the muscular impingement syndrome. The most commonly known impingement syndrome is the psoas impingement. Another recently described impingement syndrome is the obturator externus muscle impingement. The aim of this study is to analyze pathological conditions of the Obturator externus and to show possible causes. Methods 40 patients who had undergone a total hip replacement were subjected to clinical and MRI examinations 12 months after the surgery. The Harris Hip Score (HHS) was used to analyze pain and function. Additionally, a satisfaction score and a pain score (VAS) were determined. The MRI allowed for the assessment of the spatial relation between the obturator externus muscle and the acetabulum. Also measured were the acetabular inclination angle as well as the volume and cross-sectional area of the obturator externus muscle. Results The patients were assigned to 3 groups in accordance with their MRI results. Group 1 patients (n = 18) showed no contact between the obturator externus and the acetabulum. Group 2 (n = 13) showed contact, and group 3 (n = 9) an additional clear displacement of the muscle in its course. It was not possible to establish a connection between the imaging findings, the HHS, the VAS, and patient satisfaction. What was striking, however, was a significant difference between the median inclination angle in group 1 (40° ± 5.4°) and group 3 (49° ± 4.7°) (p < 0.05), and the corresponding image-morphological pathology. The average inclination angle in group 2 was 43.3° ± 3.8° Conclusion Contact between the obturator externus muscle and the caudal acetabula border occurs frequently, but is only rarely accompanied by a painful muscular impingement. The position of the acetabula must be seen as one of the main risk factors for contact between the acetabula border

  10. No influence of immigrant background on the outcome of total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Total Hip Replacement (THA) is one of the most successful and cost-effective operations. Despite its benefits, marked ethnic differences in the utilization of THA are well documented. However, very little has been published on the influence of ethnicity on outcome. We investigate whether the outcome—in terms of reoperation within 2 years or revision up to 14 years after the primary operation—varies depending on ethnic background. Methods Records of total hip arthroplasties performed between 1992 and 2007 were retrieved from the Swedish Hip Arthropalsty Registry and integrated with data on ethnicity of patients from 2 demographical databases (i.e. Patient Register and Statistics Sweden). The first operated side in patients with THA recorded in the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register (SHAR) between 1992 and 2007 were generally included. We excluded patients with 1 Swedish and 1 non-Swedish parent and patients born abroad with 2 Swedish parents. After these exclusions 151,838 patients were left for analysis. There were 11,539 Swedish patients born outside Sweden. We used a Cox regression model including age, sex, diagnosis, type of fixation, whether or not there was comorbidity according to Elixhauser or not, marital status and educational level. Results The mean age was lowest in the group of patient coming from outside Europe including the former Soviet Union (61 years), and highest in the Swedish population (70 years). Before adjustment, for covariates, patients born in Europe outside the Nordic countries showed a lower risk to undergo early reoperation (HR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.56–0.97), which increased after adjustment to (HR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.58–1.01). Before adjustment, patients born in the Nordic countries outside Sweden and those born outside Europe (including the former Soviet Union) showed a higher risk to undergo revision than patients born in Sweden (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.02–1.27; HR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.2–1.9), but this

  11. Qualifying CT for wrist arthroplasty: extending techniques for total hip arthroplasty to total wrist arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, Yvonne; Olivecrona, Henrik; Olivecrona, Lotta; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Sollerman, Christer

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous work to detect migration of total wrist arthroplasty non-invasively, and with greater accuracy. Two human cadaverous arms, each with a cemented total wrist implant, were used in this study. In one of the arms, 1 mm tantalum balls were implanted, six in the carpal bones and five in the radius. Five CT scans of each arm were acquired, changing the position of the arm each time to mimic different positions patients might take on repeated examinations. Registration of CT volume data sets was performed using an extensively validated, 3D semi-automatic volume fusion tool in which co-homologous point pairs (landmarks) are chosen on each volume to be registered. Three sets of ten cases each were obtained by placing landmarks on 1) bone only (using only arm one), 2) tantalum implants only, and 3) bone and tantalum implants (both using only arm two). The accuracy of the match was assessed visually in 2D and 3D, and numerically by calculating the distance difference between the actual position of the transformed landmarks and their ideal position (i.e., the reference landmark positions). All cases were matched visually within one width of cortical bone and numerically within one half CT voxel (0.32 mm, p = 0.05). This method matched only the bone/arm and not the prosthetic component per se, thus making it possible to detect prosthetic movement and wear. This method was clinically used for one patient with pain. Loosening of the carpal prosthetic component was accurately detected and this was confirmed at surgery.

  12. Risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture in cementless total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Simo S A; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Kostensalo, Inari; Mäkelä, Keijo; Huhtala, Heini; Kettunen, Jukka S; Remes, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Intraoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture is a known complication of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). We determined the incidence of—and risk factors for—intraoperative calcar fracture, and assessed its influence on the risk of revision. Patients and methods — This retrospective analysis included 3,207 cementless THAs (in 2,913 patients). 118 intraoperative calcar fractures were observed in these hips (3.7%). A control group of 118 patients/hips without calcar fractures was randomly selected. The mean follow-up was 4.2 (1.8–8.0) years. Demographic data, surgical data, type of implant, and proximal femur morphology were evaluated to determine risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. Results — The revision rates in the calcar fracture group and the control group were 10% (95% CI: 5.9–17) and 3.4% (CI: 1.3–8.4), respectively. The revision rate directly related to intraoperative calcar fracture was 7.6%. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for calcar fracture. In the fracture group, 55 of 118 patients (47%) had at least one risk factor, while only 23 of118 patients in the control group (20%) had a risk factor (p = 0.001). Radiological analysis showed that in the calcar fracture group, there were more deviated femoral anatomies and proximal femur bone cortices were thinner. Interpretation — Intraoperative calcar fracture increased the risk of revision. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. To avoid intraoperative fractures, special attention should be paid when cementless stems are used with deviant-shaped proximal femurs and with thin cortices. PMID:26541230

  13. Mid term results of total hip arthroplasty using polyethylene-ceramic composite (Sandwich) liner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Sun, Jun-Ying; Zha, Guo-Chun; Dong, Sheng-Jie; Zhao, Xi-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ceramic-on-ceramic (COC) couplings are an attractive alternative bearing surfaces that have been reported to eliminate or reduce problems related to polyethylene wear debris. However, the material in total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains one of the major concern regarding the risk of fracture. The present study aims at reporting the fracture rate of bearings in a series of COC THAs with the use of a sandwich liner and attempt to detect the relative risk factors, the possible cause and assess the clinical results. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 153 patients (163 hips) using the sandwich liner COC THA between 2001 and 2009. Patient assessment was based on demographic factors, including age, weight, gender and body-mass index (BMI). All patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically or using computed tomography viz-a-viz dislocation, osteolysis, periprosthetic fracture, infection, loosening and implant fracture. Results: Three ceramic sandwich liners fracture (1.84%) were observed at an average of 7.3 years’ followup. The factors which were found to be non-significant to the ceramic liner fracture, included age (P = 0.205), weight (P = 0.241), gender (P = 0.553), BMI (P = 0.736), inclination (P = 0.199) and anteversion (P = 0.223). The overall survival was 91.4% at 12-year with revision as the endpoint. Other complications included osteolysis in 4 (2.45%), dislocation in one and periprosthetic fracture in one. In no hip aseptic loosening of the implants was seen. Conclusions: Our experience with the ceramic-polyethylene sandwich liner acetabular component has been disappointing because of the high rate of fracture and osteolyis. We have discontinued the use of this device and recommend the same. PMID:26952027

  14. No effect of risedronate on femoral periprosthetic bone loss following total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Muren, Olle; Akbarian, Ehsan; Salemyr, Mats; Bodén, Henrik; Eisler, Thomas; Stark, André

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We have previously shown that during the first 2 years after total hip arthroplasty (THA), periprosthetic bone resorption can be prevented by 6 months of risedronate therapy. This follow-up study investigated this effect at 4 years. Patients and methods A single-center, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial was carried out from 2006 to 2010 in 73 patients with osteoarthritis of the hip who were scheduled to undergo THA. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either 35 mg risedronate or placebo orally, once a week, for 6 months postoperatively. The primary outcome was the percentage change in bone mineral density (BMD) in Gruen zones 1 and 7 in the proximal part of the femur at follow-up. Secondary outcomes included migration of the femoral stem and clinical outcome scores. Results 61 of the 73 patients participated in this 4-year (3.9- to 4.1-year) follow-up study. BMD was similar in the risedronate group (n = 30) and the placebo group (n = 31). The mean difference was −1.8% in zone 1 and 0.5% in zone 7. Migration of the femoral stem, the clinical outcome, and the frequency of adverse events were similar in the 2 groups. Interpretation Although risedronate prevents periprosthetic bone loss postoperatively, a decrease in periprosthetic BMD accelerates when therapy is discontinued, and no effect is seen at 4 years. We do not recommend the use of risedronate following THA for osteoarthritis of the hip. PMID:25885280

  15. Patient versus Provider Characteristics Impacting Hospital Lengths of Stay Following Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Styron, Joseph F.; Koroukian, Siran; Klika, Alison; Barsoum, Wael K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to identify whether patient-level or provider-level characteristics are most influential on a patient’s length of stay in the acute care hospital. Materials and Methods A dataset containing a nationally representative sample of inpatient discharge abstracts was used. Multi-level linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations between patient- and provider-level characteristics on patients’ lengths of stay. Results The target population included 322,894 discharges with a primary procedure code for primary total knee arthroplasty and 193,553 discharges for total hip arthroplasty. The variables associated with the greatest increases in length of stay were a higher co-morbidity level among patient level attributes (+17.4%) and low surgeon volume among provider-level characteristics (+18.8%). Discussion Provider-level characteristics, particularly provider volume, had a greater impact on length of stay. PMID:21277159

  16. Patient vs provider characteristics impacting hospital lengths of stay after total knee or hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Styron, Joseph F; Koroukian, Siran M; Klika, Alison K; Barsoum, Wael K

    2011-12-01

    This study aims to identify whether patient-level or provider-level characteristics are most influential on a patient's length of stay in the acute care hospital. A data set containing a nationally representative sample of inpatient discharge abstracts was used. Multilevel linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations between patient-level and provider-level characteristics on patients' lengths of stay. The target population included 322,894 discharges with a primary procedure code for primary total knee arthroplasty and 193,553 discharges for total hip arthroplasty. The variables associated with the greatest increases in length of stay were a higher comorbidity level among patient level attributes (+17.4%) and low surgeon volume among provider-level characteristics (+18.8%). Provider-level characteristics, particularly provider volume, had a greater impact on length of stay. PMID:21277159

  17. The Efficacy of Bipolar Sealer on Blood Loss in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ji-Kang; Zhang, Qiang-Hua; Li, Hai-Dong; Li, Heng; Guo, Pan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The blood loss during total hip arthroplasty is difficult to manage and there is no consensus about the effect of bipolar sealer used during operation. Thus, a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of blood loss using bipolar sealer after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Relevant literature of comparisons of bipolar sealer after THA for blood loss were searched for in Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Google scholar from their inception to October, 2015. High-quality RCTs were selected to evaluate the need for transfusion, blood loss, and other complications. The software RevMan 5.30 was used for the meta-analysis. Six studies reporting on 6 RCTs comprising 751 patients were included. Compared with standard electrocautery, bipolar sealer was associated with lower rates of need for transfusion (relative risk [RR] = 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39–0.94), estimated blood loss (mean differences [MD] = −127.39; 95% CI −233.32 to −21.46; P = 0.02), and lower total blood loss (MD = −226.57; 95% CI −350.80–102.34; P = 0.0004). There is no significant difference between the hemoglobin drop, blood loss in drainage, intraoperative blood loss, Harris score, and rates of infection. The present meta-analysis indicated that bipolar sealer can decrease the need for transfusion and total blood loss; however, there is no benefit of bipolar sealer from the recovery. It is still need for samples to determine the balance between the economic cost and transfusion. PMID:27175643

  18. Midterm results of 36 mm metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Akrawi, Hawar; Hossain, Fahad S; Niculescu, Stefan; Hashim, Zaid; Ng, Arron Biing; Shetty, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the many perceived benefits of metal-on-metal (MoM) articulation in total hip arthroplasty (THA), there have been growing concerns about metallosis and adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD). Analysis of size 36 mm MoM articulation THAs is presented. These patients were evaluated for patient characteristics, relationship between blood metal ions levels and the inclination as well as the version of acetabular component, cumulative survival probability at final followup and functional outcome at final followup. Materials and Methods: 288, size 36 mm MoM THAs implanted in 269 patients at our institution from 2004 to 2010 were included in this retrospective study. These patients were assessed clinically for hip symptoms, perioperative complications and causes of revision arthroplasty were analysed. Biochemically, blood cobalt and chromium metal ions level were recorded and measurements of acetabular inclination and version were examined. Radiological evaluation utilizing Metal Artefact Reduction Sequence (MARS) MRI was undertaken and implant cumulative survivorship was evaluated. Results: The mean followup was 5 years (range 2–7 years), mean age was 73 years and the mean Oxford hip score was 36.9 (range 5–48). Revision arthroplasty was executed in 20 (7.4%) patients, of which 15 patients underwent single-stage revision THA. The causes of revision arthroplasty were: ARMD changes in 6 (2.2%) patients, infection in 5 (1.9%) patients and aseptic loosening in 5 (1.9%) patients. Three (1.1%) patients had their hips revised for instability, 1 (0.3%) for raised blood metal ions levels. The implant cumulative survival rate, with revision for any reason, was 68.9% at 7 years. Conclusions: Although medium-sized MoM THA with a 36 mm head has a marginally better survivorship at midterm followup, compared to larger size head MoM articulating THA, our findings nonetheless are still worryingly poor in comparison to what has been quoted in the literature

  19. Psychometric properties of the Brief Pain Inventory among patients with osteoarthritis undergoing total hip replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pain is a cardinal symptom of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and important for deciding when to operate. This study assessed the internal consistency reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) among patients with OA undergoing total hip replacement (THR). Methods We prospectively included 250 of 356 patients who were accepted to the waiting list for primary THR surgery. All participants responded to the BPI, WOMAC and SF-36 at baseline and 1 year after surgery. Results Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α) was >0.80 for the BPI, the WOMAC and five of the eight SF-36 scales The pattern of associations of the two BPI scales with corresponding and non-corresponding scales of the WOMAC and SF-36 largely supported the construct validity of the BPI. The responsiveness indices for change from baseline to 1 year after THR ranged from 1.52 to 2.05 for the BPI scales, from 1.69 to 2.84 for the WOMAC scales, and from 0.25 (general health) to 2.77 (bodily pain) for the SF-36 scales. Conclusions The BPI showed acceptable reliability, construct validity and responsiveness in patients with OA undergoing THR. BPI is short and therefore is easy to use and score, though the instrument offers few advantages over and duplicates scales of more comprehensive instruments, such as the WOMAC and SF-36. PMID:21143926

  20. A multiplanar radiography method for assessing cup orientation in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Shahram; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald; Anglin, Carolyn; Wilson, David R

    2012-10-01

    Correct orientation of the acetabular cup considering patient-specific functional pelvic angles is an important factor for improving outcomes and avoiding complications after total hip arthroplasty. This study introduces a new, noninvasive radiographic tool for accurately determining a patient's specific pelvic tilt angle preoperatively, as well as accurately assessing acetabular cup orientation with respect to bony landmarks intraoperatively and postoperatively. The method was validated by imaging a bone replica model of the pelvis with implanted hip components, in comparison to digitized references, and verified with a cadaveric specimen. Pelvic tilt was measured with an accuracy of 0.1 deg and SD of 0.4 deg. Operative cup inclination and anteversion showed accuracies of 0.6 deg and 2.5 deg, with SD of 0.4 deg and 0.6 deg, respectively; these could be improved further by subtracting systematic bias. The method shows accuracy advantages over existing radiographic and fluoroscopic methods and exposes the subjects to a lower radiation dose compared to the similar computed tomography methods. These results suggest that the proposed method is feasible for assessing cup placement with reference to the functional and anatomical references. Furthermore, the ability to reference the same bony landmarks preoperatively, intraoperatively, and postoperatively has important research and clinical advantages. PMID:23083199

  1. The utility and precision of analogue and digital preoperative planning for total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Fernando; Taveras, Nicole; Salvati, Eduardo A.

    2007-01-01

    We prospectively compared the utility and precision of preoperative templating performed in printed films (analogue) with that performed on digital radiographs (digital) in 69 patients undergoing primary total hip replacement. Five patients were excluded when misplacement of the marker resulted in a magnification error greater that 10%; in the remaining patients (64 hips), the cup size was within ± one size in 62 (97%) of the analogue and 52 (81%) of the digital (p = 0.01) plans. The stem size was within ± one size in 63 (98%) of the analogue and 60 (94%) of the digital (p = 0.39) plans. The distance from the proximal corner of the lesser trochanter to the center of the prosthetic head (LTCD) in the analogue differed by 5 mm or more from the digital plan in nine cases (14%). Analogue preoperative planning yielded more predictable results than digital planning, particularly in terms of acetabular component size and LTCD that dictates limb lengthening-shortening. The sources of error were not clearly explained by variations in magnification. Inconsistent positioning of the magnification marker may jeopardise the safe implementation of digital templating. PMID:17404731

  2. Predicting bone remodeling in response to total hip arthroplasty: computational study using mechanobiochemical model.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Klika, Václav; Bougherara, Habiba

    2014-05-01

    Periprosthetic bone loss following total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a serious concern leading to the premature failure of prosthetic implant. Therefore, investigating bone remodeling in response to hip arthroplasty is of paramount for the purpose of designing long lasting prostheses. In this study, a thermodynamic-based theory, which considers the coupling between the mechanical loading and biochemical affinity as stimulus for bone formation and resorption, was used to simulate the femoral density change in response to THA. The results of the numerical simulations using 3D finite element analysis revealed that in Gruen zone 7, after remarkable postoperative bone loss, the bone density started recovering and got stabilized after 9% increase. The most significant periprosthetic bone loss was found in Gruen zone 7 (-17.93%) followed by zone 1 (-13.77%). Conversely, in zone 4, bone densification was observed (+4.63%). The results have also shown that the bone density loss in the posterior region of the proximal metaphysis was greater than that in the anterior side. This study provided a quantitative figure for monitoring the distribution variation of density throughout the femoral bone. The predicted bone density distribution before and after THA agree well with the bone morphology and previous results from the literature. PMID:24509505

  3. Poor short term outcome with a metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Levy, Yadin D; Ezzet, Kace A

    2013-08-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings for total hip arthroplasty (THA) have come under scrutiny with reports of high failure rates. Clinical outcome studies with several commercially available MoM THA bearings remain unreported. We evaluated 78 consecutive MoM THAs from a single manufacturer in 68 patients. Sixty-six received cobalt-chrome (CoCr) monoblock and 12 received modular titanium acetabular cups with internal CoCr liners. Femoral components were titanium with modular necks. At average 2.1 years postoperatively, 12 THAs (15.4%) demonstrated aseptic failure (10 revisions, 2 revision recommended). All revised hips demonstrated capsular necrosis with positive histology reaction for aseptic lymphocytic vasculitis-associated lesions/adverse local tissue reactions. Prosthetic instability following revision surgery was relatively common. Female gender was a strong risk factor for failure, though smaller cups were not. Both monoblock and modular components fared poorly. Corrosion was frequently observed around the proximal and distal end of the modular femoral necks. PMID:23538122

  4. An Unusual Cause of Fever in a Patient with Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a challenging clinical problem despite recent advances in the diagnostic modalities. The diagnosis of the cause of fever is especially difficult in the postoperative period as the focus remains on the operative site. We present an unusual cause of PUO in a patient with advanced HIV disease during an immediate postoperative period following total hip arthroplasty (THA) for osteoarthritis (OA) of the left hip. The fever started on the eighth postoperative day, and after an extensive workup to rule out infection it was found that the patient was allergic to sulfa drugs. The fever subsided after discontinuation of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Fever in an immunocompromised patient should not be attributed only to infection. A high index of suspicion along with careful history making is required to diagnose drug fever. An early diagnosis of drug fever can reduce hospital stay and the costs of investigations and treatment. PMID:27014530

  5. An Unusual Cause of Fever in a Patient with Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a challenging clinical problem despite recent advances in the diagnostic modalities. The diagnosis of the cause of fever is especially difficult in the postoperative period as the focus remains on the operative site. We present an unusual cause of PUO in a patient with advanced HIV disease during an immediate postoperative period following total hip arthroplasty (THA) for osteoarthritis (OA) of the left hip. The fever started on the eighth postoperative day, and after an extensive workup to rule out infection it was found that the patient was allergic to sulfa drugs. The fever subsided after discontinuation of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Fever in an immunocompromised patient should not be attributed only to infection. A high index of suspicion along with careful history making is required to diagnose drug fever. An early diagnosis of drug fever can reduce hospital stay and the costs of investigations and treatment. PMID:27014530

  6. Size of metallic and polyethylene debris particles in failed cemented total hip replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Salvati, E. A.; Betts, F.; DiCarlo, E. F.; Doty, S. B.; Bullough, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of differing failure rates of total hip prostheses made of various metals prompted us to measure the size of metallic and polyethylene particulate debris around failed cemented arthroplasties. We used an isolation method, in which metallic debris was extracted from the tissues, and a non-isolation method of routine preparation for light and electron microscopy. Specimens were taken from 30 cases in which the femoral component was of titanium alloy (10), cobalt-chrome alloy (10), or stainless steel (10). The mean size of metallic particles with the isolation method was 0.8 to 1.0 microns by 1.5 to 1.8 microns. The non-isolation method gave a significantly smaller mean size of 0.3 to 0.4 microns by 0.6 to 0.7 microns. For each technique the particle sizes of the three metals were similar. The mean size of polyethylene particles was 2 to 4 microns by 8 to 13 microns. They were larger in tissue retrieved from failed titanium-alloy implants than from cobalt-chrome and stainless-steel implants. Our results suggest that factors other than the size of the metal particles, such as the constituents of the alloy, and the amount and speed of generation of debris, may be more important in the failure of hip replacements.

  7. Delayed Presentation of Sciatic Nerve Injury after Total Hip Arthroplasty: Neurosurgical Considerations, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linda W.; Veeravagu, Anand; Azad, Tej D.; Harraher, Ciara; Ratliff, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Background  Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an established treatment for end-stage arthritis, congenital deformity, and trauma with good long-term clinical and functional outcomes. Delayed sciatic nerve injury is a rare complication after THA that requires prompt diagnosis and management. Methods  We present a case of sciatic nerve motor and sensory deficit in a 52-year-old patient 2 years after index left THA. Electromyography (EMG) results and imaging with radiographs and CT of the affected hip demonstrated an aberrant acetabular cup screw in the posterior-inferior quadrant adjacent to the sciatic nerve. Case Description  The patient underwent surgical exploration that revealed injury to the peroneal division of the sciatic nerve due to direct injury from screw impingement. A literature review identified 11 patients with late-onset neuropathy after THA. Ten patients underwent surgical exploration and pain often resolved after surgery with 56% of patients recovering sensory function and 25% experiencing full recovery of motor function. Conclusions  Delayed neuropathy of the sciatic nerve is a rare complication after THA that is most often due to hardware irritation, component failure, or wear-related pseudotumor formation. Operative intervention is often pursued to explore and directly visualize the nerve with limited results in the literature showing modest relief of pain and sensory symptoms and poor restoration of motor function. PMID:27602309

  8. Total Hip Arthroplasty in A Young Patient with Bernard-Soulier Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bisland, Stuart; Smith, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The management of patients with coagulopathic disorders undergoing orthopaedic surgery requires a dedicated, multi-disciplinary team with detailed perioperative planning. Bernard-Soulier Syndrome (BSS) is an extremely rare disorder, affecting 1 in 1 million individuals worldwide. It is caused by a deficiency in glycoprotein 1b-V-IX which is required for normal platelet-mediated clot formation. The deficiency results in prolonged bleeding time with high risk of spontaneous bleeds. Few reports exist in the clinical literature of BSS patients undergoing major surgery. Case Report: A 40 year old, female with known BSS and developmental dysplasia of her left hip (DDH) was referred to us for consideration of left total hip arthroplasty (THA). Consultation with her Haematologist for pre-operative optimization of platelets and related clotting times together with detailed discussions of her intended anaesthesia protocol and surgery resulted in a successful operation with less than anticipated blood loss. She entered our rehabilitation program just one week after surgery. Conclusion: BSS is an extremely rare bleeding disorder that puts patients at very high risk of blood loss following surgery. This is the first report that we are aware of describing a BSS patient undergoing a THA. A cohesive, highly specialized, multi-disciplinary team is crucial to the success of these patients.

  9. Total Hip Arthroplasty Dislocations Are More Complex Than They Appear: A Case Report of Intraprosthetic Dislocation of an Anatomic Dual-Mobility Implant After Closed Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Bradford S.; De Martino, Ivan; Sculco, Thomas; Sculco, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty is a successful operation for the treatment of hip pain. One of the common complications of hip arthroplasty is dislocation. While reduction of standard prosthetic dislocations is highly successful, new prostheses add the potential for new complications. Case Report: We present the case of a patient who experienced intraprosthetic dislocation of an anatomic dual-mobility total hip prosthesis after a closed hip reduction and include the prereduction and postreduction radiographic findings. Conclusion: Emergency department physicians should be aware of intraprosthetic dislocation. This complication can be easily missed because the metal/ceramic femoral head appears to be reduced in the acetabulum. PMID:27303232

  10. Clinical and radiographic results for the Richards Modular Hip System prosthesis in total hip arthroplasty: average 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Suehara, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Inoue, Shigehiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2010-04-01

    The clinical results of total hip arthroplasty using the Richards Modular Hip System prosthesis were evaluated in 41 patients (44 joints). The mean Harris hip score improved from 42 points before surgery to 82 after 1 year, 85 at 5 years, and 79 at the final examination. The average polyethylene wear rate was 0.09 +/- 0.07 mm/y. Forty joints (90.9%) achieved press fit in either of the proximal or the distal stem portion, and only 4 joints (9.1%) failed to achieve press fit in both the proximal and distal stem portions. Although the 10-year survival of the stem was 94.5% and no revisions of the stem were performed, osteolysis was found at high frequency at a distal stem. The high incidence of osteolysis has been the limiting factor in the long-term success of Richards Modular Hip System. Achievement of good canal fill in both the proximal and distal stem portions did not contribute to the good long-term result of the stem. PMID:19195834

  11. Outcomes Following Primary Total Hip or Knee Arthroplasty in Substance Misusers.

    PubMed

    Best, Matthew J; Buller, Leonard T; Klika, Alison K; Barsoum, Wael K

    2015-07-01

    The influence of drug misuse on outcomes following primary total hip (THA) or knee (TKA) arthroplasty is poorly understood. The National Hospital Discharge Survey was used to identify patients who underwent primary THA or TKA between 1990 and 2007. Patients were divided into two groups: 1) those with a diagnosis of drug misuse (cannabis, opioids, cocaine, amphetamines, sedatives, inhalants or mixed combinations) (n=13,163) and 2) those with no diagnosis of misuse (n=8,366,327). Patients with a diagnosis of drug misuse had longer hospital stays (P<0.001), nearly eight times the odds of leaving against medical advice (P<0.001) and five times the mortality rate (P<0.001). Drug misuse was associated with higher odds (P<0.001) of complications including postoperative infection, anemia, convulsions, osteomyelitis, and blood transfusion. PMID:25765129

  12. Displacement and Stress Analysis around the Artificial Acetabular Cup in a Total Hip Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakunai, Satoshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Tohru; Abo, Masayoshi; Ikeda, Daisaku; Fujiwara, Hiroo

    In order to improve the service life of the artificial acetabular cup in a total hip replacement, it is important to determine the best material and design, and to assess the mechanical behavior around the cup. In this study, electronic speckle interferometry (ESPI) and the two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) are employed to investigate the mechanical behavior. The influence of the cancellous bone and cup thickness on mechanical behavior around the cup was investigated. Good agreement of the cup model was found between the ESPI measurements and FEM predictions. The following results were obtained. (1) Cancellous bone with a porous structure can be measured by the ESPI method. (2) There are discontinuities of the displacement distribution in the transverse direction in each boundary region of the cup, bone cement and cancellous bone. (3) The maximum shear stress exists in the boundary region of the cup and bone cement.

  13. Improving acetabular cup orientation in total hip arthroplasty by using smartphone technology.

    PubMed

    Peters, Frank M; Greeff, Richard; Goldstein, Neal; Frey, Chris T

    2012-08-01

    Acetabular cup placement in total hip arthroplasty is often difficult to assess, especially in the lateral position and using the posterior approach. Conventional techniques and computer-assisted surgery are the 2 most popular methods for proper placement of the acetabular cup in Lewinnek's safe zone of orientation (anteversion 15° ± 10° and lateral inclination 40° ± 10°). We developed a system that uses the accelerometer and camera function of the iPhone. A level indicator application and protractor application were downloaded to the iPhone and used to improve acetabular cup placement. This system has proven to be accurate and quick. Our series of 50 prospective cases showed good results with all our acetabular cups being placed within a narrow range in the safe zone and with less than 5% difference between the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative acetabular inclinations. PMID:22245126

  14. Biomechanical Study on Distal Filling Effects in Cementless Total Hip Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Soo-Won; Lee, Jun-Hyoung; Choi, Hyung-Yun

    In cementless total hip replacement, initial stability of the femoral component is important in the long term fixation of the femoral stem. Initial stability is closely related to the relative displacement between the prosthesis and the cancellous bone of the proximal femur. After implantation of the prosthesis, the surrounding bone is partially shielded from load carrying and starts to resorb. Stress shielding causes the loss of the proximal bone. The stress distribution of femur must be assessed to predict stress shielding. The initial stability and the stress shielding were investigated for two loading conditions approximating a single leg stance and stair climbing. Two types of stems involving a distal filling and a distal short stem were studied by the finite element method to investigate the biomechanical distal filling effects. The distal short stem produced less stress shielding at the proximal bone than the distal filling stem, while both types of stems seemed to satisfy the initial stability requirement.

  15. Review article: Perioperative care in enhanced recovery for total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Marinus D J; Lemanu, Daniel P; Coleman, Brendan; Hill, Andrew G; Munro, Jacob T

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced recovery pathways for total hip and knee arthroplasty can reduce length of hospital stay and perioperative morbidity. 22 studies were reviewed for identification of perioperative care interventions, including preoperative (n=4), intra-operative (n=8), and postoperative (n=4) care interventions. Factors that improve outcomes included use of pre-emptive and multimodal analgesia regimens to reduce opioid consumption, identification of patients with poor nutritional status and provision of supplements preoperatively to improve wound healing and reduce length of hospital stay, use of warming systems and tranexamic acid, avoidance of drains to reduce operative blood loss and subsequent transfusion, and early ambulation with pharmacological and mechanical prophylaxis to reduce venous thromboembolism and to speed recovery. PMID:25550024

  16. Limb shortening osteotomy in a patient with achondroplasia and leg length difference after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Galata, Christian L.; Rieger, Bertram; Friederich, Niklaus F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Achondroplasia is the most common reason for disproportionate short stature. Normally, orthopedic limb lengthening procedures must be discussed in the course of this genetic disorder and have been successful in numerous achondroplastic patients in the past. In some cases, the disease may lead to leg length differences with need for surgical correction. Case Report: We report a case of achondroplastic dysplastic coxarthrosis with symptomatic leg length difference after bilateral total hip arthroplasty in a 52-year-old female patient, in which a distal femoral shortening osteotomy was successfully performed. Conclusion: Femoral shortening osteotomy is very uncommon in patients with achondroplasia. We conclude, however, that in rare cases it can be indicated and provide the advantage of shorter operation time, less perioperative complications and faster recovery compared to leg lengthening procedures. PMID:27298915

  17. A novel formulation for scratch-based wear modelling in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Karen M; Tikekar, Nishant M; Heiner, Anneliese D; Baer, Thomas E; Lannutti, John J; Callaghan, John J; Brown, Thomas D

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the femoral head in total hip arthroplasty often takes the form of discrete scratches, which can lead to dramatic wear acceleration of the polyethylene (PE) liner. Here, a novel formulation is reported for finite element (FE) analysis of wear acceleration due to scratch damage. A diffused-light photography technique was used to globally locate areas of damage, providing guidance for usage of high-magnification optical profilometry to determine individual scratch morphology. This multiscale image combination allowed comprehensive input of scratch-based damage patterns to an FE Archard wear model, to determine the wear acceleration associated with specific retrieval femoral heads. The wear algorithm imposed correspondingly elevated wear factors on areas of PE incrementally overpassed by individual scratches. Physical validation was provided by agreement with experimental data for custom-ruled scratch patterns. Illustrative wear acceleration results are presented for four retrieval femoral heads. PMID:23305334

  18. Preventing Venous Thromboembolism with Use of Intermittent Pneumatic Compression after Total Hip Arthroplasty in Korean Patients.

    PubMed

    Jo, Woo-Lam; Lee, Young-Kyun; Ha, Yong-Chan; Lee, Kyung-Min; Kang, Bun-Jung; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2016-08-01

    Intermittent Pneumatic Compression (IPC) device has been used to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study investigated the effectiveness of IPC device. We evaluated incidences of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients after use of IPC device, and compared with historical incidences from our institution. We applied IPC device in 741 patients who underwent 870 elective primary THAs from January 2010 to December 2013, DVT was detected in 3 patients (0.3%) by sonography, and one (0.1%) of them was symptomatic. Symptomatic PE occurred in 1 patient (0.1%) and there were no cases of fatal PE. The incidence of symptomatic DVT was significantly lower than the historical control (P = 0.042). The IPC is a safe and effective prophylaxis of VTE after primary THA in Korea. PMID:27478345

  19. A Novel Formulation for Scratch-Based Wear Modeling in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Karen M.; Tikekar, Nishant M.; Heiner, Anneliese D.; Baer, Thomas E.; Lannutti, John J.; Callaghan, John J.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    Damage to the femoral head in total hip arthroplasty often takes the form of discrete scratches, which can lead to dramatic wear acceleration of the polyethylene (PE) liner. Here, a novel formulation is reported for finite element analysis of wear acceleration due to scratch damage. A diffused-light photography technique was used to globally locate areas of damage, providing guidance for usage of high-magnification optical profilometry to determine individual scratch morphology. This multiscale image combination allowed comprehensive input of scratch-based damage patterns to a finite element (FE) Archard wear model, to determine the wear acceleration associated with specific retrieval femoral heads. The wear algorithm imposed correspondingly elevated wear factors on areas of PE incrementally overpassed by individual scratches. Physical validation was provided by agreement with experimental data for custom-ruled scratch patterns. Illustrative wear acceleration results are presented for four retrieval femoral heads. PMID:23305334

  20. Three-dimensional printing for preoperative planning of total hip arthroplasty revision: case report.

    PubMed

    Zerr, Joseph; Chatzinoff, Yonatan; Chopra, Rajiv; Estrera, Kenneth; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2016-10-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing can be used to create material models to aid preoperative planning of complex orthopedic procedures as exemplified by this case of total hip arthroplasty failure due to infection with resulting severe acetabular bone stock deficiency. The 3D model allowed for trialing of the acetabular component to determine cup size, position, and screw placement. Most importantly, the model confirmed that there was not a pelvic discontinuity and the revision shell would be sufficient for the reconstruction. Previously, the cost and complexity of utilization of 3D printers were prohibitive. Recent improvements in commercially available 3D printers have made rapid prototype model creation a realistic option, which can facilitate difficult surgery. PMID:27480617

  1. Preventing Venous Thromboembolism with Use of Intermittent Pneumatic Compression after Total Hip Arthroplasty in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent Pneumatic Compression (IPC) device has been used to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study investigated the effectiveness of IPC device. We evaluated incidences of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients after use of IPC device, and compared with historical incidences from our institution. We applied IPC device in 741 patients who underwent 870 elective primary THAs from January 2010 to December 2013, DVT was detected in 3 patients (0.3%) by sonography, and one (0.1%) of them was symptomatic. Symptomatic PE occurred in 1 patient (0.1%) and there were no cases of fatal PE. The incidence of symptomatic DVT was significantly lower than the historical control (P = 0.042). The IPC is a safe and effective prophylaxis of VTE after primary THA in Korea. PMID:27478345

  2. Postoperative analgesia following total hip replacement: a comparison of intrathecal morphine and diamorphine.

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, D J; Milligan, K R

    1995-01-01

    Sixty patients undergoing elective total hip replacement under spinal anaesthesia were randomly assigned to receive either intrathecal (IT) diamorphine 0.75 mg (n = 30) or IT morphine 1.0 mg (n = 30). Postoperative pain scores, analgesic requirements and side effects were assessed by a blinded observer. Postoperative pain scores were broadly similar and satisfactory for both groups but the amount of additional IV morphine required to achieve this was significantly reduced in the morphine compared with the diamorphine group (P < 0.05). Twelve of the morphine group required no postoperative analgesics compared with four in the diamorphine group (P < 0.02). There were no differences between the groups in the incidence of side effects such as emesis and pruritus. No significant postoperative respiratory depression was noted. In the doses used intrathecal morphine provided superior postoperative analgesia to that of intrathecal diamorphine. PMID:7769597

  3. Large-diameter femoral heads in total hip arthroplasty: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Pivec, Robert; Issa, Kimona; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Khanuja, Harpal S; Mont, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in the wear characteristics and material properties of highly cross-linked polyethyl-ene and fourth-generation ceramic bearings have led to increasing use of large-diameter (≥ 36 mm) femoral heads in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this article, we review the current concepts and principles behind use of large-diameter ceramic or cobalt-chromium femoral heads on polyethylene bearings in THA. We specifically review the biomechanics, some of the early concerns about polyethylene wear and rim fractures, recent improvements in material properties of polyethylene and ceramic bearings, dislocation rates, and clinical and functional outcomes of large-diameter heads in THA. Recent literature suggests that the incidence of dislocation has been substantially reduced because of improvements in jump distance and impingement-free range of motion with use of large-diameter heads. Limited evidence suggests excellent short-term and midterm clinical and functional outcomes with these heads. PMID:25379747

  4. Vascular complications following total hip arthroplasty: a case study and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Olivier; Pierret, Charles; Bazile, Fabrice; De Kerangal, Xavier; Duverger, Vincent; Versier, Gilbert

    2012-11-01

    Vascular complications after total hip arthroplasty (THA) are rare but represent a real risk. The diversity of clinical presentations can make diagnosis difficult. They could manifest as an immediate and acute hemorrhage or subsequent ischemia. We report the case of a patient who presented a thrombosis of the femoral artery associated with a sciatic palsy after THA for a coxa profunda. The diagnosis was actually made 3 years after surgery because of atypical symptoms. The mechanism involved was either a crash of the artery by a retractor on the anterior wall of the acetabulum, or a stretching of the artery. A review of the literature of vascular complications occurring after THA recalls the multiplicity of clinical presentations and the diagnostic difficulties. They could manifest as an immediate and acute hemorrhage or deferred ischemia, as in our case. Knowledge of these complications should help prevent them, and the diagnosis should be considered in atypical sequences after THA. PMID:26662762

  5. Cancer risk estimates from radiation therapy for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theoharris; Damilakis, John; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication following total hip arthroplasty. This study was conducted to calculate the radiation dose to organs-at-risk and estimate the probability of cancer induction from radiotherapy for HO prophylaxis.Methods: Hip irradiation for HO with a 6 MV photon beam was simulated with the aid of a Monte Carlo model. A realistic humanoid phantom representing an average adult patient was implemented in Monte Carlo environment for dosimetric calculations. The average out-of-field radiation dose to stomach, liver, lung, prostate, bladder, thyroid, breast, uterus, and ovary was calculated. The organ-equivalent-dose to colon, that was partly included within the treatment field, was also determined. Organ dose calculations were carried out using three different field sizes. The dependence of organ doses upon the block insertion into primary beam for shielding colon and prosthesis was investigated. The lifetime attributable risk for cancer development was estimated using organ, age, and gender-specific risk coefficients.Results: For a typical target dose of 7 Gy, organ doses varied from 1.0 to 741.1 mGy by the field dimensions and organ location relative to the field edge. Blocked field irradiations resulted in a dose range of 1.4–146.3 mGy. The most probable detriment from open field treatment of male patients was colon cancer with a high risk of 564.3 × 10{sup −5} to 837.4 × 10{sup −5} depending upon the organ dose magnitude and the patient's age. The corresponding colon cancer risk for female patients was (372.2–541.0) × 10{sup −5}. The probability of bladder cancer development was more than 113.7 × 10{sup −5} and 110.3 × 10{sup −5} for males and females, respectively. The cancer risk range to other individual organs was reduced to (0.003–68.5) × 10{sup −5}.Conclusions: The risk for cancer induction from radiation therapy for HO prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty varies considerably by the

  6. Surrogate markers of long-term outcome in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Malak, T. T.; Broomfield, J. A. J.; Palmer, A. J. R.; Hopewell, S.; Carr, A.; Brown, C.; Prieto-Alhambra, D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives High failure rates of metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty implants have highlighted the need for more careful introduction and monitoring of new implants and for the evaluation of the safety of medical devices. The National Joint Registry and other regulatory services are unable to detect failing implants at an early enough stage. We aimed to identify validated surrogate markers of long-term outcome in patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies evaluating surrogate markers for predicting long-term outcome in primary THA. Long-term outcome was defined as revision rate of an implant at ten years according to National Institute of Health and Care Excellence guidelines. We conducted a search of Medline and Embase (OVID) databases. Separate search strategies were devised for the Cochrane database and Google Scholar. Each search was performed to include articles from the date of their inception to June 8, 2015. Results Our search strategy identified 1082 studies of which 115 studies were included for full article review. Following review, 17 articles were found that investigated surrogate markers of long-term outcome. These included one systematic review, one randomised control trial (RCT), one case control study and 13 case series. Validated surrogate markers included Radiostereometric Analysis (RSA) and Einzel-Bild-Röntgen-Analyse (EBRA), each measuring implant migration and wear. We identified five RSA studies (one systematic review and four case series) and four EBRA studies (one RCT and three case series). Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) at six months have been investigated but have not been validated against long-term outcomes. Conclusions This systematic review identified two validated surrogate markers of long-term primary THA outcome: RSA and EBRA, each measuring implant migration and wear. We recommend the consideration of RSA in the pre-market testing of new implants. EBRA can

  7. Morphometric evaluation of proximal femur in patients with unilateral total hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Iyem, Cıhan; Güvençer, Mustafa; Karatosun, Vasfı; Unver, Bayram

    2014-04-01

    It is important to know the morphometric characteristics of the proximal femur. This is necessary to reduce the risk of complications related to surgical procedures performed in the area due to vascular, metabolic, or traumatic causes. It is of importance for achieving the alignment of the prosthesis to be implanted as well. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphometric characteristics of the proximal femur and to establish a database for making and performing total hip prosthesis. Anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs of 162 cases, with a mean age of 65.6 years, who had undergone unilateral total hip arthroplasty were used in this study. Femoral head diameter (FHD), femoral neck width (FNW), femoral neck length (FNL), femoral neck axis length (FNAL), intertrochanteric line length (ILL), and neck-shaft angle (NSA) were measured on radiographs obtained digitally using setrapacs media. FHD was found to be 48.1 ± 3.7 mm, FNW 35.4 ± 4.2 mm, FNL 30.8 ± 6.1 mm, FNAL 98.6 ± 9.4 mm, ILL 81.1 ± 7.9 mm, and NSA 130.4 ± 5.1° on average. The comparison of the mean values for females and males revealed a statistically significant difference between the FHD, FNW, FNL, FNAL, and ILL (P = 0.000). There was no statistically significant difference in NSA between males and females (P = 0.356). A weak correlation was found between age and parameter values using correlation analysis (r < 0.24, P > 0.05). In morphometric assessment of the proximal femur, taking into consideration regional and sexual differences is of importance for prosthesis design and surgical success. PMID:23650122

  8. Preoperative planning of primary total hip arthroplasty using conventional radiographs☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Miashiro, Edson Hidenori; Fujiki, Edson Noboru; Yamaguchi, Eduardo Nagashigue; Chikude, Takeshi; Rodrigues, Luiz Henrique Silveira; Fontes, Gustavo Martins; Rosa, Fausto Boccatto

    2014-01-01

    Objective the objective of this study was to present an analog method for preoperative planning of primary total hip arthroplasty procedures based on measuring the components by overlaying the transparencies of the prosthesis on the preoperative radiographs and checking the accuracy, both for predicting the size of the acetabular and femoral components used and for restoring the offset and correcting the dysmetria. Methods between March 2005 and July 2009, 56 primary total hip arthroplasty procedures performed on 56 patients at the Mario Covas State Hospital in Santo André were analyzed. The measurements on the femoral and acetabular components obtained through planning were compared with those that were used in the surgery. The offsets measured through the preoperative planning were compared with those measured on the postoperative radiographs. Dysmetria was evaluated before and after the operation. Results accuracy of 78.6% (p < 0.001) in predicting the size of the acetabular component and 82.2% (p < 0.001) in predicting the femoral nail was observed. The offsets measured through preoperative planning were statistically similar to the offsets measured on the postoperative radiographs. After the operation, we observed absolute equalization in 48.2% of the cases. In 87.5%, the dysmetria was less than or equal to 1 cm and in 69.6%, it was less than or equal to 0.5 cm. Conclusions the accuracy was 78.6% and 82.2%, respectively, for the acetabular and femoral components. The offsets that were planned preoperatively were statistically similar to those measured on postoperative radiographs. We found absolute equalization in 48.2% of the cases. PMID:26229790

  9. Clinical outcome following primary total hip or knee replacement in nonagenarians.

    PubMed

    Skinner, D; Tadros, B J; Bray, E; Elsherbiny, M; Stafford, G

    2016-04-01

    Introduction The Elective Orthopaedic Centre in Epsom has an established patient reported outcome measures programme, into which all patients are enrolled. Postoperative complications, Oxford hip/knee scores (OHS/OKS) and EQ-5D™ (EuroQol, Rotterdam, Netherlands) scores are collected up to the second postoperative year. Our population is ageing and the number of joint replacements being performed on the very elderly is rising. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of joint replacements in a nonagenarian population. Methods Our dataset was reviewed retrospectively for a cohort of nonagenarians undergoing either a primary total hip replacement (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) between April 2008 and October 2011. Postoperative complications, mortality rates and functional outcomes were compared with those of a time matched 70-79-year-old cohort. Results Nonagenarians requiring a THR presented with a lower preoperative OHS (p=0.020) but made a greater improvement in the first postoperative year than the younger cohort (p=0.040). The preoperative OKS was lower for nonagenarians than for the control group (p=0.022). At one and two years after TKR, however, there was no significant difference between the age groups. The nonagenarians had a greater risk of requiring a blood transfusion following both THR (p=0.027; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11-5.75) and TKR (p=0.037; 95% CI: 1.08-16.65) while the latter cohort also required a longer stay than their younger counterparts (p=0.001). Mortality rates were higher in the nonagenarian group but these were in keeping with the life expectancy projections identified by the Office for National Statistics. Conclusions Over a two-year period, the functional outcome and satisfaction rates achieved by nonagenarians following a THR or TKR are comparable with 70-79-year-olds. PMID:26924477

  10. Ceramic-on-ceramic versus ceramic-on-polyethylene bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dongcai; Yang, Xiao; Tan, Yang; Alaidaros, Mohammed; Chen, Liaobin

    2015-04-01

    The choice between ceramic-on-ceramic (COC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (COP) in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and durability of COC vs COP bearing surfaces in THA. Based on published randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) identified in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the authors performed a meta-analysis comparing the clinical and radiographic outcomes of COC with those of COP. Two investigators independently selected the studies and extracted the data. The methodological quality of each RCT was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals from each trial were pooled using random-effects or fixed-effects models depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Nine RCTs involving 1575 patients (1747 hips) met the predetermined inclusion criteria. Eight of 9 included RCTs had high methodological quality. The heterogeneity was not significant, and all the results were pooled using a fixed-effects model. The results demonstrated that COC significantly increased the risks of squeaking and total implant fracture compared with COP. No significant differences with respect to revision, osteolysis and radiolucent lines, loosening, dislocation, and deep infection were observed between the COC and COP bearing surfaces. This meta-analysis resulted in no sufficient evidence to identify any clinical or radiographic advantage of COC vs COP bearing surfaces in the short- to mid-term follow-up period. Long-term follow-up is required for further evaluation. PMID:25901628

  11. Revision of hemiarthroplasty to total hip arthroplasty using the cement-in-cement technique.

    PubMed

    Mounsey, E J; Williams, D H; Howell, J R; Hubble, M J

    2015-12-01

    Revision of a cemented hemiarthroplasty of the hip may be a hazardous procedure with high rates of intra-operative complications. Removing well-fixed cement is time consuming and risks damaging already weak bone or perforating the femoral shaft. The cement-in-cement method avoids removal of intact cement and has shown good results when used for revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). The use of this technique for the revision of a hemiarthroplasty to THA has not been previously reported. A total of 28 consecutive hemiarthroplasties (in 28 patients) were revised to a THA using an Exeter stem and the cement-in-cement technique. There were four men and 24 women; their mean age was 80 years (35 to 93). Clinical and radiographic data, as well as operative notes, were collected prospectively and no patient was lost to follow-up. Four patients died within two years of surgery. The mean follow up of the remainder was 70 months (25 to 124). Intra-operatively there was one proximal perforation, one crack of the femoral calcar and one acetabular fracture. No femoral components have required subsequent revision for aseptic loosening or are radiologically loose. Four patients with late complications (14%) have since undergone surgery (two for a peri-prosthetic fracture, and one each for deep infection and recurrent dislocation) resulting in an overall major rate of complication of 35.7%. The cement-in-cement technique provides reliable femoral fixation in this elderly population and may reduce operating time and rates of complication. PMID:26637675

  12. Small Increase of Actual Physical Activity 6 Months After Total Hip or Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Hans J.; Stam, Henk J.; Verhaar, Jan A.

    2008-01-01

    Limitation in daily physical activity is one of the reasons for total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, studies of the effects of THA or TKA generally do not determine actual daily activity as part of physical functioning. We determined the effect of THA or TKA on patients’ actual physical activity and body function (pain, stiffness), capacity to perform tasks, and self-reported physical functioning. We also assessed whether there are differences in the effect of the surgery between patients undergoing THA or TKA and whether the improvements vary between these different outcome measures. We recruited patients with long-standing end-stage osteoarthritis of the hip or knee awaiting THA or TKA. Measurements were performed before surgery and 3 and 6 months after surgery. Actual physical activity improved by 0.7%. Patients’ body function, capacity, and self-reported physical functioning also improved. The effects of the surgery on these aspects of physical functioning were similar for THA and TKA. The effect on actual physical activity (8%) was smaller than on body function (80%–167%), capacity (19%–36%), and self-reported physical functioning (87%–112%). Therefore, in contrast to the large effect on pain and stiffness, patients’ capacity, and their self-reported physical functioning, the improvement in actual physical activity of our patients was less than expected 6 months after surgery. Level of Evidence: Level I, prospective study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18506555

  13. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Contact Pattern between the Cortical Bone and Femoral Prosthesis after Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Hajime; Sugaya, Hisashi; Nishino, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The cementless stem Excia (B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany) implant has a rectangular cross-sectional shape with back-and-forth flanges and a plasma-sprayed, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating from the middle to proximal portion to increase initial fixation and early bone formation. Here, the conformity of the Excia stem to the femoral canal morphology was three-dimensionally assessed using computed tomography. Forty-three patients (45 hips) were examined after primary total hip arthroplasty with a mean follow-up of 27 ± 3 months (range: 24–36 months). Spot welds occurred at zone 2 in 16 hips and at zone 6 in 24 hips, with 83% (20/24 hips) of those occurring within 3 months after surgery. First- (n = 12 hips), second- (n = 32), and third- (n = 1) degree stress shielding were observed. The stem was typically in contact with the cortical bone in the anterolateral mid-portion (100%) and posteromedial distal portions (85%). Stress shielding did not progress, even in cases where the stems were in contact with the distal portions. The anterior flange was in contact with the bone in all cases. The stability of the mid-lateral portion with the dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating and the anterior flange may have inhibited the progression of stress shielding beyond the second degree. PMID:26881087

  14. Can Optimism, Pessimism, Hope, Treatment Credibility and Treatment Expectancy Be Distinguished in Patients Undergoing Total Hip and Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Haanstra, Tsjitske M.; Tilbury, Claire; Kamper, Steven J.; Tordoir, Rutger L.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Cuijpers, Pim; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Dekker, Joost; Knol, Dirk L.; Ostelo, Raymond W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The constructs optimism, pessimism, hope, treatment credibility and treatment expectancy are associated with outcomes of medical treatment. While these constructs are grounded in different theoretical models, they nonetheless show some conceptual overlap. The purpose of this study was to examine whether currently available measurement instruments for these constructs capture the conceptual differences between these constructs within a treatment setting. Methods Patients undergoing Total Hip and Total Knee Arthroplasty (THA and TKA) (Total N = 361; 182 THA; 179 TKA), completed the Life Orientation Test-Revised for optimism and pessimism, the Hope Scale, the Credibility Expectancy Questionnaire for treatment credibility and treatment expectancy. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine whether the instruments measure distinct constructs. Four theory-driven models with one, two, four and five latent factors were evaluated using multiple fit indices and Δχ2 tests, followed by some posthoc models. Results The results of the theory driven confirmatory factor analysis showed that a five factor model in which all constructs loaded on separate factors yielded the most optimal and satisfactory fit. Posthoc, a bifactor model in which (besides the 5 separate factors) a general factor is hypothesized accounting for the commonality of the items showed a significantly better fit than the five factor model. All specific factors, except for the hope factor, showed to explain a substantial amount of variance beyond the general factor. Conclusion Based on our primary analyses we conclude that optimism, pessimism, hope, treatment credibility and treatment expectancy are distinguishable in THA and TKA patients. Postdoc, we determined that all constructs, except hope, showed substantial specific variance, while also sharing some general variance. PMID:26214176

  15. A Literature Review of Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: Perioperative Considerations and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Putnis, S.E; Wartemberg, G.K; Khan, W.S; Agarwal, S

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a spondyloarthropathy affecting the sacro-iliac joints with subsequent progression to the spine and the hip joints. The hip joints are affected by synovitis, enthesial inflammation, involvement of medullary bone, progressive degeneration and secondary osteoarthritis. Clinical presentation is usually in the form of pain and stiffness progressing to disabling fixed flexion contractures and in some instances, complete ankylosis. Hip arthroplasty should be considered for hip pain, postural and functional disability, or pain in adjacent joints due to hip stiffness. We conducted a literature review to determine peri-operative considerations and outcome in ankylosing spondylitis patients undergoing hip arthroplasty. In this review, we have discussed pre-operative surgical planning, thromboprophylaxis, anaesthetic considerations and heterotopic ossification. Outcomes of arthroplasty include range of movement, pain relief, survivorship and complications. PMID:26587066

  16. A Literature Review of Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: Perioperative Considerations and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Putnis, S E; Wartemberg, G K; Khan, W S; Agarwal, S

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a spondyloarthropathy affecting the sacro-iliac joints with subsequent progression to the spine and the hip joints. The hip joints are affected by synovitis, enthesial inflammation, involvement of medullary bone, progressive degeneration and secondary osteoarthritis. Clinical presentation is usually in the form of pain and stiffness progressing to disabling fixed flexion contractures and in some instances, complete ankylosis. Hip arthroplasty should be considered for hip pain, postural and functional disability, or pain in adjacent joints due to hip stiffness. We conducted a literature review to determine peri-operative considerations and outcome in ankylosing spondylitis patients undergoing hip arthroplasty. In this review, we have discussed pre-operative surgical planning, thromboprophylaxis, anaesthetic considerations and heterotopic ossification. Outcomes of arthroplasty include range of movement, pain relief, survivorship and complications. PMID:26587066

  17. Fracture of Fully-coated Femoral Stem after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty for Nonunion of Intertrochanteric Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young Soo; Juh, Hyung Suk; Cho, Yoon Je

    2015-01-01

    Femoral stem fracture is an uncommon reason for the failure of total hip arthroplasty, with only 16 cases of fully coated stem fractures reported to date. Here we report a case in which a fully coated primary femoral stem fracture occurred after conversion to total hip arthroplasty for the non-union of an intertrochanteric fracture of the femur. Metallurgic evaluation of the etiology and mechanism revealed that the fracture was initiated by fatigue-related failure and completed by ductile failure on the posterior side of the fracture. Considering the recent trend of treating an intertrochanteric fracture with hip arthroplasty, possible stem failure should be considered, since most patients will have at least one of the known risk factors for stem fracture. PMID:27536622

  18. [Cementless total hip arthroplasty--results of 8-year follow-up study].

    PubMed

    Wall, Andrzej; Dragan, Szymon

    2006-01-01

    The subjects of the clinical examinations were 382 patients who from 1994 to 1999 were treated with the method of total cementless arthroplasty. The observation time ranged from 3 to 8 years. In the examined group the secondary cause of degenerative changes was identified in 210 (55%) patients. In the remaining 172 cases (45%) the primary cause of degenerative changes in the hip was diagnosed. Four types of cementless endoprostheses, varied in their construction, structure of their surfaces and material they were made of, were used to carry out the postoperative treatment of the degenerative changes in the hip: Antega, Zweymüller SL PLUS (Endoprosthetic) or Alloclasic type of stem, GSS-CL and PM-Plasmapore. The findings of the clinical investigation made it possible to determine the probability of surviving of an endoprosthesis up to the 8th year after an operation depending on a type of implanted stem, which according to Kaplan-Meier's method, amounted to 0.9603. The results of Harris scale evaluation of the function of the operated joints demonstrated the existence of the relationship between the function and the course of bone osteointegration and growth process. The detailed analysis of the X-ray examinations, and especially of the roentgenometric ones, taking into account stability of the endoprosthesis stem enabled to distinguish two stages of the clinical and roentgenological changes: the early stage (up to 6 months after an operation) characterised by settling and micromotions of the stem and the late stage (starting 6-9 months after an operation) with slowly gradual increasing of the function and holding back of stem settling. PMID:17017478

  19. Total hip arthroplasty in secondary systemic lupus erythematosus femoral head avascular necrosis.

    PubMed

    Orban, H; Cîrstoiu, C; Adam, R

    2007-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multisystem disease with a large spectrum of clinical manifestations and a variable course. Lupus is marked by both humoral and cellular immunologic abnormalities, including multiple auto-antibodies especially anti DNA antibodies. Epidemiology - female predominance, occurring usually between second and fourth decade of life, more frequently in hispanic and black patients. Family predominance has been noticed. Provocative agents - ultraviolet light, viral infections, drugs and situational stresses. Pathogenesis - pathological features can affect a large spectrum of internal organs and systems - osteoarticulary injuries, skin rash, lymphadenopathy, glomerulonephritis, myocarditis, digestive system lesions. Musculo skeletal abnormalities include migratory arthritis, effusion and stiffness in small and large joints. Articular erosions are uncommon. Skeletal abnormalities include osteopenia and osteonecrosis, due to two pathological mechanisms: vasculitis and long term corticotherapy. Fifteen to twenty percent of SLE patients are affected by femoral head avascular necrosis (FHAN). Diagnosis rests on clinical signs - hip pain, limited range of motion, walking with a limp.; radiological findings - best grouped in Arlet-Ficat standing system; MRI - high sensitivity, especially in infraradiological stages. Treatment - in incipient stages core decompression represents the best therapeutical option. In advanced, arthritis stages, total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the standart treatment. Three implant types are available: bipolar, uncemented and cemented. An increased number of cotyloidites occurred after bipolar implants. Emphasised osteopenia and excessive bleeding represent contraindications for uncemented implants. Considering all of this, cemented implants are considered, the right choice, methacrylate cement providing strong and durable fixation of THA implants to bone. No meaningful differences were observed in postoperative functional

  20. The Short-term Clinical Outcome of Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Short Metaphyseal Loading Femoral Stem

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoo Wang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the short-term clinical and radiological outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) with short metaphyseal loading femoral stem. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 56 cases in 47 patients who had undergone THA with short metaphyseal loading femoral stem from April 2010 to December 2011. There were 20 males and 27 females. The mean age was 54 years (range, 26-77 years). The average follow up period was 4.6 years. Clinical results were evaluated by Harris hip scores (HHS) before the operation and at the last follow-up. Radiographic analysis was done by evaluating osteolysis, loosening, stress shielding, and alignement. Results The mean HHS significantly improved from 45 (range, 15-58) preoperatively to 98 (range, 85-100) at the last follow-up. In radiographic analyses, there was no evidence of osteolysis or loosening around the stems and the acetabuluar components. All cases showed rounding off of the calcar, grade 1 bone resorption of the proximal femur. With regard to implant alignment, 51 femoral component (91.1%) were in neutral position, and 5 (8.9%) were in varus position. There was 1 intraoperative fracture treated by cerclage wiring and no case was revised during follow-up period. Conclusion Although longer follow-up is needed to confirm the durability of the short metaphyseal loading femoral stem, this short stem might provide stable fixation without diaphyseal fixation and demonstrated good clinical result at mean 4.6 year short term follow-up. PMID:27536649

  1. Short-term Outcomes With a Second-Generation Uncemented Stem in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Meding, John B; Berend, Michael E; Brunsman, Matthew J; Ritter, Merrill A

    2016-01-01

    An uncemented stem has been used successfully in total hip arthroplasty for 2 decades, and some implants have been updated. The authors have used second-generation uncemented proximal porous coating stems, the Echo Bi-Metric Full Proximal Profile stem (Echo FPP; Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana) and the Echo Reduced Proximal Profile stem (Echo RPP; Biomet). This article reports short-term outcomes with these stems compared with their predecessor, the Bi-Metric stem (Biomet). The authors reviewed 1280 Echo FPP stems, 366 Echo RPP stems, and 1497 Bi-Metric stems. With more than 5 years of follow-up, both the Echo FPP and the Echo RPP stems had 100% survivorship with stem revision as the endpoint, and the Bi-Metric stems also had 100% survivorship for more than 20 years. Average Harris Hip Scores for the Echo FPP, the Echo RPP, and the Bi-Metric stems were 53.3, 49.7, and 51.5 preoperatively, 93.8, 94.6, and 95.2 at 1 year, and 94.0, 95.8, and 95.4 at 3 years postoperatively, respectively. Dislocation after surgery was significantly lower with the Echo FPP and the Echo RPP stems than with the Bi-Metric stems, but this was more relevant to the surgical approach and head size. All radiographs of the Echo FPP, the Echo RPP, and the Bi-Metric stems showed proximal femoral remodeling consistent with osseous ingrowth. Distal cortical hypertrophy around the implanted stem and spot-welding were comparably observed in all 3 cohorts. The short-term outcomes of the updated uncemented stems were as excellent as the previously used stem regarding survivorship, complications, and radiographic assessment. PMID:26881463

  2. A Novel Approach for Dynamic Testing of Total Hip Dislocation under Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Sven; Kluess, Daniel; Kaehler, Michael; Grawe, Robert; Rachholz, Roman; Souffrant, Robert; Zierath, János; Bader, Rainer; Woernle, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Constant high rates of dislocation-related complications of total hip replacements (THRs) show that contributing factors like implant position and design, soft tissue condition and dynamics of physiological motions have not yet been fully understood. As in vivo measurements of excessive motions are not possible due to ethical objections, a comprehensive approach is proposed which is capable of testing THR stability under dynamic, reproducible and physiological conditions. The approach is based on a hardware-in-the-loop (HiL) simulation where a robotic physical setup interacts with a computational musculoskeletal model based on inverse dynamics. A major objective of this work was the validation of the HiL test system against in vivo data derived from patients with instrumented THRs. Moreover, the impact of certain test conditions, such as joint lubrication, implant position, load level in terms of body mass and removal of muscle structures, was evaluated within several HiL simulations. The outcomes for a normal sitting down and standing up maneuver revealed good agreement in trend and magnitude compared with in vivo measured hip joint forces. For a deep maneuver with femoral adduction, lubrication was shown to cause less friction torques than under dry conditions. Similarly, it could be demonstrated that less cup anteversion and inclination lead to earlier impingement in flexion motion including pelvic tilt for selected combinations of cup and stem positions. Reducing body mass did not influence impingement-free range of motion and dislocation behavior; however, higher resisting torques were observed under higher loads. Muscle removal emulating a posterior surgical approach indicated alterations in THR loading and the instability process in contrast to a reference case with intact musculature. Based on the presented data, it can be concluded that the HiL test system is able to reproduce comparable joint dynamics as present in THR patients. PMID:26717236

  3. Hard-on-Hard Total Hip Impingement Causes Extreme Contact Stress Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Jacob M.; O’Brien, Megan K.; Stroud, Nicholas J.; Pedersen, Douglas R.; Callaghan, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Impingement events, in addition to their role immediately proximate to frank dislocation, hold the potential to damage new-generation hard-on-hard bearings as a result of the relatively unforgiving nature of the materials and designs. Because of the higher stiffness and tighter design tolerances of metal-on-metal and ceramic implants, surgical positioning plausibly has become even more important. Questions/purposes We asked (1) whether, and under what cup orientation conditions, hard-on-hard impingements might challenge implant material failure strength; and (2) whether particle generation propensity at impingement and egress sites would show similar dependence on cup orientation. Methods Realistic computational simulations were enabled by multistage finite element analyses, addressing both global construct motion and loading, and focal stress concentrations at neck impingement and rim egress sites. The global model, validated by a cadaveric simulation in a servohydraulic hip simulator, included both hardware components and advanced anisotropic capsule characterization. Parametric computational runs explored the effect of cup orientation for both ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal bearing couples for two distinct motion sequences associated with dislocation. Results Stress concentrations from impingement increased nearly linearly with increased cup tilt and with cup anteversion. In some situations, peak values of stress approached or exceeded 1 GPa, levels challenging the yield strength of cobalt-chromium implants, and potentially the fracture strength of ceramics. The tendency for impingement events to generate debris, indexed in terms of a new scraping severity metric, showed orientation dependences similar to that for bulk material failure. Conclusions Damage propensity arising from impingement events in hard total hip bearings is highly orientation-dependent. PMID:20953853

  4. A Novel Approach for Dynamic Testing of Total Hip Dislocation under Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Sven; Kluess, Daniel; Kaehler, Michael; Grawe, Robert; Rachholz, Roman; Souffrant, Robert; Zierath, János; Bader, Rainer; Woernle, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Constant high rates of dislocation-related complications of total hip replacements (THRs) show that contributing factors like implant position and design, soft tissue condition and dynamics of physiological motions have not yet been fully understood. As in vivo measurements of excessive motions are not possible due to ethical objections, a comprehensive approach is proposed which is capable of testing THR stability under dynamic, reproducible and physiological conditions. The approach is based on a hardware-in-the-loop (HiL) simulation where a robotic physical setup interacts with a computational musculoskeletal model based on inverse dynamics. A major objective of this work was the validation of the HiL test system against in vivo data derived from patients with instrumented THRs. Moreover, the impact of certain test conditions, such as joint lubrication, implant position, load level in terms of body mass and removal of muscle structures, was evaluated within several HiL simulations. The outcomes for a normal sitting down and standing up maneuver revealed good agreement in trend and magnitude compared with in vivo measured hip joint forces. For a deep maneuver with femoral adduction, lubrication was shown to cause less friction torques than under dry conditions. Similarly, it could be demonstrated that less cup anteversion and inclination lead to earlier impingement in flexion motion including pelvic tilt for selected combinations of cup and stem positions. Reducing body mass did not influence impingement-free range of motion and dislocation behavior; however, higher resisting torques were observed under higher loads. Muscle removal emulating a posterior surgical approach indicated alterations in THR loading and the instability process in contrast to a reference case with intact musculature. Based on the presented data, it can be concluded that the HiL test system is able to reproduce comparable joint dynamics as present in THR patients. PMID:26717236

  5. The Results of Long-term Follow-up of Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Hydroxyapatite-coated Cups

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang-Dong; Shin, Keun-Young; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Yang, Ick-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to report the long-term outcome and the failure mechanism of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) using hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated acetabular cup. Materials and Methods From January 1992 to May 1994, a total of 123 consecutive cementless primary THAs were performed using a HA-coated acetabular cup with metal-on-polyethylene articulation. We retrospectively evaluated 66 hips available for follow-up at a mean 18.3 years (range, 10.4-23.6 years). The survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method. We defined end point as any failure that required a reoperation of acetabular component. Results Thirty-nine of 66 hips (59.1%) were defined as a failure for progressive acetabular osteolysis or aseptic loosening of the cup. Acetabular osteolysis was observed in 47 hips (71.2%) and 33 hips (50.0%) were revised because of cup loosening. The Kaplan-Meier method showed the survival rate of the acetabular cup to be 46.3% at 15 years and 34.8% at 20 years for any failure that required a reoperation of acetabular component. Conclusion The long-term survival rate of THA using HA-coated acetabular cup was unsatisfactory, and it was attributed to vulnerable property of HA coating and progressive osteolysis. PMID:27536628

  6. Ceramic-on-Ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Twelve-Year-Old Patient: Case Report with a 27-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Save, Ameya V; Varthi, Arya; Talusan, Paul G; Gala, Raj; Nelson, Stephen; Keggi, Kristaps J

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty in the juvenile patient with a severely diseasedjoint can provide long-term pain relief and improvement in function. We present a patient with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who underwent a Mittelmeier ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty at age 12 in 1986. The implant provided the patient with a functioning hip for 24 years, but subsequently required revision due to femoral component loosening. This case report represents the longest reported clinical follow-up of noncemented, ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty in a juvenile patient and depicts an excellent outcome at 27 years. Our case is also unique in that the Mittelmeier ceramic acetabulum was left in place during revision surgery. In this report, we also describe the senior author's choice of the Mittelmeier hip prosthesis within its historical context and provide a brief review of the literature as it relates to total hip arthroplasty in the juvenile patient. PMID:27509640

  7. Long-duration metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties with low wear of the articulating surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schmalzried, T P; Peters, P C; Maurer, B T; Bragdon, C R; Harris, W H

    1996-04-01

    The 20-year performance of metal-on-metal hip articulations has not been reported. Five McKee-Farrar total hip prostheses and one Sivash prosthesis were obtained at revision surgery after a mean implantation time of 21.3 years. A radiographic, histologic, implant, and wear analysis was performed on these total hip implants with cobalt-chrome metal-on-metal articulations. All cases were associated with femoral component loosening, but the bearing surfaces performed remarkably well. The worst case estimate of combined femoral and acetabular linear wear was 4.2 microns per year, about 25 times less than that typically seen with polyethylene. Metal particles and foreign-body inflammation were seen in all cases, but the volume of reactive tissue was small compared with what is generally seen at revision of hips with a polyethylene acetabular bearing. This may be due to a reduced particle burden or a decreased inflammatory reaction to particulate metal, or both. In addition to articular wear, other sources of metal particles included femoral neck impingement on the acetabular rim, stem burnishing, and corrosion. Prosthetic hip reconstructions can fail for many reasons, including suboptimal femoral stem and/or acetabular cup design and/or fixation. By today's standards, the McKee-Farrar and Sivash stem and acetabular component designs are suboptimal; however, after more than 20 years of use, the metal-on-metal bearing surfaces in these cases demonstrated low wear and do not appear to be the cause of failure. Recent advances in total hip arthroplasty, which include improved implant design, materials, manufacturing, and fixation, combined with a better understanding of the mechanisms of implant loosening and failure, suggest that the cobalt-chrome metal-on-metal bearing be reexamined as an alternative to polyethylene when exceptional durability is required. PMID:8713913

  8. What do we tell patients about elective total hip replacement in the UK? An analysis of patient literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although hip information literature is given to people following total hip replacement (THR) almost routinely, little evaluation has been conducted on it to date. Our aim was therefore to analyse and evaluate the literature provided to patients by occupational therapists concerning elective hip surgery in the UK. Methods This was a pragmatic, descriptive analysis of information leaflets routinely given to patients undergoing primary total hip replacement (THR). The literature was collected as part of a national survey of occupational therapy practice. In the absence of a suitable evaluation tool, the patient leaflets were compared using a checklist devised by the researchers. The three areas of interest were: accessibility including presentation of information, breadth of information covered and specific activities of daily living described. Results 111 information leaflets and booklets were examined. These ranged from hospital publications which were professionally printed to those produced by individual departments. There was a variation in the readability of the leaflets ranging from 13% to 83%; the mean was 45% (SD 15). There was also variation in the content ranging from those covering surgery and possible complications, to those including diet and hip exercises. The most commonly covered activity of daily living was advice on sitting (99; 89%); the least commonly covered was work (26; 23%). Only 3 (2.7%) booklets had involved patients in their production and only 22 (20%) signposted obtaining information in another language or in Braille. Conclusions There was a range of literature in terms of presentation and content given to people who had a total hip replacement (THR). Although some booklets and leaflets scored highly, some did not meet basic standards such as providing contact details for help, using good quality diagrams, suggesting further reading or involving patients in their design. These results highlight important and fundamental

  9. Perioperative local infiltration anesthesia with ropivacaine has no effect on postoperative pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hofstad, Janne Kristin; Winther, Siri B; Rian, Torbjørn; Foss, Olav A; Husby, Otto S; Wik, Tina S

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — The local infiltration analgesia (LIA) technique has been widely used to reduce opioid requirements and to improve postoperative mobilization following total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, the evidence for the efficacy of LIA in THA is not yet clear. We determined whether single-shot LIA in addition to a multimodal analgesic regimen would reduce acute postoperative pain and opioid requirements after THA. Patients and methods — 116 patients undergoing primary THA under spinal anesthesia were included in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. All patients received oral opioid-sparing multimodal analgesia: etoricoxib, acetaminophen, and glucocorticoid. The patients were randomized to receive either 150 mL ropivacaine (2 mg/mL) and 0.5 mL epinephrine (1 mg/mL) or 150 mL 0.9% saline. Rescue analgesic consisted of morphine and oxycodone as needed. The primary endpoint was pain during mobilization in the recovery unit. Secondary endpoints were pain during mobilization on the day after surgery and total postoperative opioid requirements on the first postoperative day. Results — The levels of pain during mobilization—both in the recovery unit and on the day after surgery—and consumption of opioids on the first postoperative day were similar in the 2 groups. Interpretation — LIA did not provide any extra analgesic effect after THA over and above that from the multimodal analgesic regimen used in this study. PMID:25997827

  10. Role of negative pressure wound therapy in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Marcelo Bp; Ramanathan, Deepak; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K

    2016-01-18

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been a successful modality of wound management which is in widespread use in several surgical fields. The main mechanisms of action thought to play a role in enhancing wound healing and preventing surgical site infection are macrodeformation and microdeformation of the wound bed, fluid removal, and stabilization of the wound environment. Due to the devastating consequences of infection in the setting of joint arthroplasty, there has been some interest in the use of NPWT following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. However, there is still a scarcity of data reporting on the use of NPWT within this field and most studies are limited by small sample sizes, high variability of clinical settings and end-points. There is little evidence to support the use of NPWT as an adjunctive treatment for surgical wound drainage, and for this reason surgical intervention should not be delayed when indicated. The prophylactic use of NPWT after arthroplasty in patients that are at high risk for postoperative wound drainage appears to have the strongest clinical evidence. Several clinical trials including single-use NPWT devices for this purpose are currently in progress and this may soon be incorporated in clinical guidelines as a mean to prevent periprosthetic joint infections. PMID:26807353

  11. Role of negative pressure wound therapy in total hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Ramanathan, Deepak; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K

    2016-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been a successful modality of wound management which is in widespread use in several surgical fields. The main mechanisms of action thought to play a role in enhancing wound healing and preventing surgical site infection are macrodeformation and microdeformation of the wound bed, fluid removal, and stabilization of the wound environment. Due to the devastating consequences of infection in the setting of joint arthroplasty, there has been some interest in the use of NPWT following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. However, there is still a scarcity of data reporting on the use of NPWT within this field and most studies are limited by small sample sizes, high variability of clinical settings and end-points. There is little evidence to support the use of NPWT as an adjunctive treatment for surgical wound drainage, and for this reason surgical intervention should not be delayed when indicated. The prophylactic use of NPWT after arthroplasty in patients that are at high risk for postoperative wound drainage appears to have the strongest clinical evidence. Several clinical trials including single-use NPWT devices for this purpose are currently in progress and this may soon be incorporated in clinical guidelines as a mean to prevent periprosthetic joint infections. PMID:26807353

  12. Validation of a Kinect-based telerehabilitation system with total hip replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Antón, David; Nelson, Mark; Russell, Trevor; Goñi, Alfredo; Illarramendi, Arantza

    2016-04-01

    The evolving telecommunications industry combined with medical information technology has been proposed as a solution to reduce health care cost and provide remote medical services. This paper aims to validate and show the feasibility and user acceptance of using a telerehabilitation system called Kinect Rehabilitation System (KiReS) in a real scenario, with patients attending repeated rehabilitation sessions after they had a Total Hip Replacement (THR). We present the main features of KiReS, how it was set up in the considered scenario and the experimental results obtained in relation to two different perspectives: patients' subjective perceptions (gathered through questionnaires) and the accuracy of the performed exercises (by analysing the data captured using KiReS). We made a full deployment of KiReS, defining step by step all the elements of a therapy: postures, movements, exercises and the therapy itself. Seven patients participated in this trial in a total of 19 sessions, and the system recorded 3865 exercise executions. The group showed general support for telerehabilitation and the possibilities that systems such as KiReS bring to physiotherapy treatment. PMID:26130735

  13. The Effect of Hydroxyapatite Coating on Long-term Results of Total Hip Arthroplasty with Hydroxyapatite-coated Anatomic Femoral Stem

    PubMed Central

    Im, Chae-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Hee; Heo, Ju-Yeong; Jang, Young-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical and radiological results, as well as the survival rate, associated with total hip arthroplasty using a hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated anatomical femoral stem at a follow-up of ≥12 years. Materials and Methods From April 1992 to May 1997, 86 patients (102 hips) underwent total hip arthroplasty with a HA-coated ABG I (Anatomical Benoist Giraud; Howmedica) hip prosthesis. The average age at the time of surgery was 53.4 years and the mean duration of follow-up was 17.1 years (range, 12.1-21.0 years). The Harris hip score (HHS) and radiographic assessments of thigh pain were used to evaluate the clinical results. We observed osteointegration, cortical hypertrophy, reactive line, calcar resorption and osteolysis around the femoral stems. The survival rate of the femoral stems was evaluated by using the span of time to a revision operation for any reasons was defined as the end point. Results The mean HHS was 50.5 preoperatively and 84.2 at the time of last follow-up. Osteolysis only around the HA-coated proximal portion of the femoral stem was observed in 72 hips, cortical hypertrophy all around the distal portion of the femoral stem was observed in 38 hips, and calcar resorption was observed in 44 hips. A reactive line was observed in 13 hips, but was unrelated to component loosening. Stem revision operations were performed in 24 (23%) hips due to osteolysis (14 hips), fracture (5 hips) and infection (5 hips). The femoral stem survival rate was 75% over the mean duration of follow-up. Conclusion Total hip arthroplasty using a HA-coated anatomical femoral stem showed necessitated a high rate of revision operations due to osteolysis around the femoral stem in this long term follow-up study.

  14. Radiographic Determination of Hip Rotation Center and Femoral Offset in Japanese Adults: A Preliminary Investigation toward the Preoperative Implications in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Taichiro; Shishido, Takaaki; Takahashi, Yasuhito; Masaoka, Toshinori; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Kosuke; Endo, Kenji; Aoki, Masaya; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    The values of hip rotation center (HRC) and femoral offset (FO) evaluated according to Caucasian anatomical landmarks have been regarded as a useful reference also for Japanese patients in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In a strict sense, however, since there can be racial differences among their anatomical morphologies, it is clinically important to reconsider those parameters for the Japanese. In the present study, in order to investigate correlations among hip and pelvic morphometric parameters, frontal radiographs were taken from 98 Japanese adults (60 males and 38 females) without acetabular dysplasia and arthropathy in the standing position. Their mean age was 62.0 ± 16.7 years. The horizontal position of HRC was significantly correlated with the pelvic width in both genders (P = 0.0026 and 0.0010 for the males and the females, resp.). The vertical position of HRC was significantly correlated with the teardrop-sacroiliac distance in the males (P = 0.0003) and with the pelvic cavity height in the females (P = 0.0067). However, in both genders, there were no correlations among FO and the other parameters analyzed in this study. Our present findings might contribute to theoretical implications of an appropriate HRC position for Japanese OA patients in THA. PMID:26576428

  15. Radiographic Determination of Hip Rotation Center and Femoral Offset in Japanese Adults: A Preliminary Investigation toward the Preoperative Implications in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Taichiro; Shishido, Takaaki; Takahashi, Yasuhito; Masaoka, Toshinori; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Kosuke; Endo, Kenji; Aoki, Masaya; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    The values of hip rotation center (HRC) and femoral offset (FO) evaluated according to Caucasian anatomical landmarks have been regarded as a useful reference also for Japanese patients in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In a strict sense, however, since there can be racial differences among their anatomical morphologies, it is clinically important to reconsider those parameters for the Japanese. In the present study, in order to investigate correlations among hip and pelvic morphometric parameters, frontal radiographs were taken from 98 Japanese adults (60 males and 38 females) without acetabular dysplasia and arthropathy in the standing position. Their mean age was 62.0 ± 16.7 years. The horizontal position of HRC was significantly correlated with the pelvic width in both genders (P = 0.0026 and 0.0010 for the males and the females, resp.). The vertical position of HRC was significantly correlated with the teardrop-sacroiliac distance in the males (P = 0.0003) and with the pelvic cavity height in the females (P = 0.0067). However, in both genders, there were no correlations among FO and the other parameters analyzed in this study. Our present findings might contribute to theoretical implications of an appropriate HRC position for Japanese OA patients in THA. PMID:26576428

  16. Transverse Subtrochanteric Shortening Osteotomy During Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty in Crowe Type-III or IV Developmental Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Sofu, Hakan; Kockara, Nizamettin; Gursu, Sarper; Issin, Ahmet; Oner, Ali; Sahin, Vedat

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of transverse subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy during cementless total hip arthroplasty in Crowe Type-III or IV developmental dysplasia. Seventy-three osteotomies were included in our study. Mean follow-up was 61 months. Harris hip score, leg length discrepancy, neurological status, union status of the osteotomy, and femoral component stability were the criteria for evaluation. All complications were noted. The mean Harris hip score improved from 38.6 points to 83.7 points. The mean leg length discrepancy decreased from 56.5 mm to 10.7 at the latest follow-up. The mean union time was 5.2 months. We observed 4 non-unions. Transverse subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy is an effective and reliable method in restoration of a more normal limb. PMID:25707993

  17. Outcomes of total hip arthroplasty in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head-a current review.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Todd P; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Verna, Daniel F; Mont, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this review was to analyze (1) patient-reported outcomes and implant survivorship of osteonecrosis (ON) patients following total hip arthroplasty (THA), (2) if prior hip-preserving procedures influence these outcomes, (3) if resurfacing procedures alter outcomes; and (4) how these outcomes may have been impacted by the choice of different bearing surfaces. Today, with implant innovations such as cementless constructs, ceramic bearing surfaces, and highly cross-linked polyethylene, ON patients derive great benefit and have high survivorship following THA. Most studies have shown that previous hip-preserving procedures do not have a deleterious effect on outcomes. Literature on the use of ceramic and highly cross-linked polyethylene bearing surfaces have shown that these implant designs are useful in younger and more active patients. Future research should evaluate the long-term outcomes and survivorship of these new THA constructs. PMID:26045086

  18. Pre-operative ambulatory measurement of asymmetric lower limb loading during walking in total hip arthroplasty patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty is a successful surgical procedure to treat hip osteoarthritis. Clinicians use different questionnaires to assess the patient’s pain and functional capacity. Furthermore, they assess the quality of gait in a very global way. This clinical evaluation usually shows significant improvement after total hip arthroplasty, however, does not provide objective, quantifiable information about the movement patterns underlying the functional capacity, which can currently only be obtained in a gait laboratory. Instrumented force shoes can quantify gait velocity, ground reaction forces and the gait pattern easily in an outpatient setting. The main goal of this study was to investigate how mobility characteristics during walking, relate to gait velocity and questionnaire outcomes of patients with hip osteoarthritis in an outpatient setting. Methods 22 patients with primary osteoarthritis of the hip selected for a total hip arthroplasty participated in this study. For each patient the Harris Hip Score, the Traditional Western Ontario and the McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index were administered. Subsequently, the patients were instructed to walk through the corridor while wearing instrumented shoes. The gait velocity estimated with the instrumented force shoes was validated measuring the time required to walk a distance of 10 m using a stopwatch and a measuring tape as a reference system. A regression analysis between spatial, temporal, ground reaction force parameters, including asymmetry, and the gait velocity and the questionnaires outcomes was performed. Results The velocity estimated with the instrumented shoes did not differ significantly from the velocity measured independently. Although gait parameters correlated significantly with velocity, symmetry index parameters were not correlated with velocity. These symmetry index parameters show significant inter-limb asymmetry during walking. No correlation was found between any of the

  19. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using the S-ROM-A Prosthesis for Anatomically Difficult Asian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hozumi, Akira; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Tsuru, Nobuhisa; Miyamoto, Chikara; Maeda, Jyunichiro; Chiba, Ko; Goto, Hisataka; Osaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Background. The S-ROM-A prosthesis has been designed for the Asian proximal femur with a small deformed shape and narrow canal. In this study, the clinical and radiological results using the S-ROM-A prosthesis for Japanese patients with severe deformity due to dysplasia and excessive posterior pelvic tilt were examined. Methods. 94 hips were followed up for a mean of 55 months, with a mean age at surgery of 61 years. The primary diagnoses were 94 coxarthritis cases, including 51 dysplasia and 37 primary OA, 1 avascular necrosis, 2 traumatic arthritis, and 3 Perthes disease. Thirty-one hips had been treated with osteotomy of the hip joints. Preoperative intramedullary canal shapes were stovepipe in 23 hips, normal in 51 hips, and champagne-flute in 5 hips. The maximum pelvic inclination angle was 56°. Results. The mean JOA score improved from 46 points preoperatively to 80 points at final follow-up. On radiological evaluation of the fixation of the implants according to the Engh classification, 92 (97%) hips were classified as “bone ingrown fixation.” Conclusion. In primary THA, using the S-ROM-A prosthesis for Asian patients with proximal femoral deformity, even after osteotomy and with posterior pelvic tilt, provided good short- to midterm results. PMID:26582575

  20. Eponymous hip joint approaches.

    PubMed

    Somford, Matthijs P; Hoornenborg, Daniël; Wiegerinck, Johannes I; Bolder, Stefan B T; Schreurs, Berend W

    2016-07-01

    After the low friction arthroplasty by John Charnley was no longer confined to specialized hospitals but commonplace in the general orthopedic practice, the issue remained how to most optimally reach the hip. The names of the authors of these approaches remain in a lot of cases connected to the approach. By evaluating the original articles in which the approaches are described we ascertain the original description and technique. By various sources we obtained the (short) biography of the people whose name is connected to the approach. Our research covers the biographies of colleagues Smith-Petersen, Watson-Jones, Hardinge, Charnley, Moore and Ludloff. The eponymous approaches are shown and described after the short biography on each individual. This study shows that without the work of our colleagues we cannot proceed in our profession. An understanding and knowledge of the people who dedicated themselves to developing the orthopedic surgery to the high standard it has today is the least honour we should give them. PMID:27139185

  1. Adverse reaction to metal debris after ReCap-M2A-Magnum large-diameter-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The clinical findings of adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) following large-diameter-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (LDH MoM THA) may include periarticular fluid collections, soft tissue masses, and gluteal muscle necrosis. The ReCap-M2a-Magnum LDH MoM THA was the most commonly used hip device at our institution from 2005 to 2012. We assessed the prevalence of and risk factors for ARMD with this device. Methods 74 patients (80 hips) had a ReCap-M2a-Magnum LDH MoM THA during the period August 2005 to December 2006. These patients were studied with hip MRI, serum chromium and cobalt ion measurements, the Oxford hip score questionnaire, and by clinical examination. The prevalence of ARMD was recorded and risk factors for ARMD were assessed using logistic regression models. The mean follow-up time was 6.0 (5.5–6.7) years. Results A revision operation due to ARMD was needed by 3 of 74 patients (3 of 80 hips). 8 additional patients (8 hips) had definite ARMD, but revision was not performed. 29 patients (32 hips) were considered to have a probable or possible ARMD. Altogether, 43 of 80 hips had a definite, probable, or possible ARMD and 34 patients (37 hips) were considered not to have ARMD. In 46 of 78 hips, MRI revealed a soft tissue mass or a collection of fluid (of any size). The symptoms clicking in the hip, local hip swelling, and a feeling of subluxation were associated with ARMD. Interpretation ARMD is common after ReCap-M2a-Magnum total hip arthroplasty, and we discourage the use of this device. Asymptomatic patients with a small fluid collection on MRI may not need instant revision surgery but must be followed up closely. PMID:24171688

  2. A complication during femoral broaching in total hip arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Waldstein, Wenzel; Boettner, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Press-fit component fixation is one of the primary goals in uncemented total hip arthroplasty. When aiming at proximal load transfer, the stem size has to be selected with regard to the shape of the proximal femoral canal. This can be challenging in patients with 'champagne flute' femurs with a relatively narrow diaphysis, especially when a long stem femoral component is used. The present case report describes a complication during femoral broaching for a primary uncemented femoral component. Because of the narrow diaphysis, the distal portion of the broach got caught in the narrow canal and it became impossible to remove the broach with conventional techniques. Via a second distal incision, the femur was split from the distal tip of the broach to approximately 5 cm distal of the femoral neck cut along the posterior aspects of the femur. This loosened the broach enough to allow for an uncomplicated removal. The longitudinal split was secured with cables before a similar size primary implant was press fitted into the femoral canal. PMID:23961301

  3. Heterotopic ossification after total hip replacement and the HLA system in the Sicilian population.

    PubMed

    Sessa, G; Costarella, L; Mollica, R; Pavone, V

    2002-06-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication following total hip arthroplasty (THA). At present, the etiology HO is unknown, however, genetic predisposition may be a cause of HO in individuals in whom no risk factors can be detected. The goal of this study was to investigate the HLA system, searching for any correlation with the presence of HO after THA. Thirty-five patients of Sicilian origin were operated on between January 1997 and January 1999 for cementless THA under regional anesthesia. The entire series was divided into three groups and all underwent histocompatibility typing. Group I was made up of 10 patients who presented with HO Brooker grades 1 and 2 after THA; group 2 comprised 7 patients affected by grades 3 and 4 HO after THA; and group 3 was made up of 18 subjects who presented with one or more preoperative risk factors for developing peri-prosthetic HO before undergoing THA. No positivity for HLA-B27 antigen was observed, but there was as an increase in HLA-B18 (with respect to that in the Sicilian population) in patients with HO following THA. The main conclusion from the study is that there is a strong correlation between the presence of the antigens HLA-A2 and HLA-B18 in patients with HO grades 3 and 4. PMID:24604489

  4. Bone remodeling adjacent to total hip replacements: A naturally occurring material design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Timothy P.; Hamilton, James J.

    1993-10-01

    The reaction of bone to orthopedic implants is an example of a self-adjusting material which changes from a ‘normal state’ to an altered state, based on the mechanical features of the implant and the loads applied to it. The changes in bone around cemented and uncemented femoral total hip components are well documented, and many numerical characterizations of the material reaction to stress have attempted to mimic the natural remodeling process. In this study we review the development of a simple material remodeling rule which yields a stable structure which is optimal and which allows a unique solution. We then use this algorithm to assess the effect of prosthesis stiffness and the presence of a compliant layer on bone remodeling around these implants. An axisymmetric model for axial loading is used to model changes in bone density through the thickness of the cancellous bone around the implants. With cortical remodeling left out of the simulation, the simulations showed density distributions that agreed in general with the results in the literature, and showed a marked difference in response if a compliant layer was added to the prosthesis.

  5. Macrophage activation and migration in interface tissue around loosening total hip arthroplasty components.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, N; Kojima, T; Ito, T; Saga, S; Anma, H; Kurokouchi, K; Iwahori, Y; Iwase, T; Iwata, H

    1997-06-01

    The bone-cement interface tissue of failed total hip arthroplasty (THA) has inflammatory characteristics, such as the presence of prostaglandin E2 and interleukin 1 (IL-1). We considered that the bone-cement interface tissue could be the site of granulomatous inflammation caused by a foreign-body reaction. It has been demonstrated that inflammatory cytokines and chemokines have an important role in granulomatous inflammation. Bone-cement interface tissue was obtained at revision from nine patients with failed cemented THA, and the role of macrophages was assessed by immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and molecular biological techniques. We used the reverse-transcriptional polymerase chain reaction to examine the expression of mRNA for IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein. Polyethylene debris surrounded by macrophages and phagocytosis of debris by macrophages was frequently observed in the interface tissue. Macrophage activation and the production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 and TNF alpha might induce the development of interface tissue. Expression of chemokine mRNAs was also commonly seen, suggesting that this led to recruitment of macrophages into the bone-cement interface tissue. Debris released from implants appears to cause activation of macrophages and the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that induce cellular recruitment into interface tissue. This mechanism might form a vicious cycle that aggravates THA loosening. PMID:9138074

  6. Sensor of total hip arthoplasty wear designed on principle of scanning profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Tomas; Mandat, Dusan; Gallo, Jiri; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Pochmon, Michal; Havranek, Vitezslav

    2008-12-01

    Total hip arthroplasty significantly improves the quality of life in majority of patients with osteoarthritis. However, prosthetic wear is a problem because of inducing the development of aseptic loosening and periprosthetic osteolysis which needs the revision surgery. Thus, the polyethylene wear measurement is the central to contemporary orthopaedics and this interesting has encouraged the development and improvement of both radiologic (in vivo) and non-radiologic (in vitro) methods for polyethylene wear quantification. The principles of polyethylene liner wear measurements are predominantly geometric; nevertheless, the realization of individual types of in vivo measurements brings with it the necessity of many simplifications and compromising steps to acquire approximately accurate values. In fact, the volumetric wear can be obtained by mathematical conversion based on the most linear shift of femoral head in the cup. However, such approach is understood to be somewhat insufficient. Our ongoing research pointed to the development of optical non-contact method for wear measurement and its results are introduced in this paper including the methodology designed for the usability validation of the method for the given purpose and the description of sensor, its principle, technical realization, design and parameters.

  7. Increased risk of revision for infection in rheumatoid arthritis patients with total hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Fenstad, Anne M; Dale, Håvard; Havelin, Leif; Hallan, Geir; Overgaard, Søren; Pedersen, Alma B; Kärrholm, Johan; Garellick, Göran; Pulkkinen, Pekka; Eskelinen, Antti; Mäkelä, Keijo; Engesæter, Lars B; Fevang, Bjørg-Tilde

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Medical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, including immune modulation. We investigated the risk of revision for infection after primary total hip replacement (THR) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis over a 16-year period, and compared it with that in THR patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods We identified 13,384 THRs in RA patients and 377,287 THRs in OA patients from 1995 through 2010 in a dataset from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA). Kaplan-Meier survival curves, with revision for infection as the endpoint, were constructed. Cox regression analyses were performed to calculate the relative risk (RR) of revision for infection adjusted for age, sex, fixation technique, and year of primary surgery. Results RA patients had a 1.3 times (95% CI 1.0–1.6) higher risk of revision for infection. After 2001, this risk increased more for RA patients than for OA patients. During the first 3 months and from 8 years postoperatively, the risk of revision for infection was higher in RA patients with THRs fixated with antibiotic-loaded cement than in corresponding OA patients. Interpretation We found a slightly higher overall risk of revision for infection in RA patients than in OA patients, but this difference was only present after 2001. In THRs with antibiotic-loaded cement, the risk of very early and late infections leading to revision was higher in RA patients than in OA patients. PMID:25782042

  8. Measurement of pelvic osteolytic lesions in follow-up studies after total hip arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaneda, Benjamin; Tamez-Pena, Jose G.; Totterman, Saara; O'Keefe, Regis; Looney, R. John

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the plausibility of using volumetric computerized tomography to provide an accurate representation and measurement of volume for pelvic osteolytic lesions following total hip joint replacement. These studies have been performed manually (or computed-assisted) by expert radiologists with the disadvantage of poor reproducibility of the experiment. The purpose of this work is to minimize the effect of user interaction in these experiments by introducing Laplacian level set methods in the volume segmentation process and using temporal articulated registration in order to follow the evolution of a lesion over time. Laplacian level set methods reduce the inter and intra-observer variability by attaching the segmented contour to edges defined in the image while keeping smoothness. The registration process allows the information of the lesion from the first visit to be used in the segmentation process of the current visit. This work compares the automated results on 7 volunteers versus the volume measured manually. Results have shown that the proposed technique is able to track osteolytic lesions and detect changes in volume over time. Intra-reader and inter-observer variabilities were reduced.

  9. Development of a non-invasive diagnostic technique for acetabular component loosening in total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Alshuhri, Abdullah A; Holsgrove, Timothy P; Miles, Anthony W; Cunningham, James L

    2015-08-01

    Current techniques for diagnosing early loosening of a total hip replacement (THR) are ineffective, especially for the acetabular component. Accordingly, new, accurate, and quantifiable methods are required. The aim of this study was to investigate the viability of vibrational analysis for accurately detecting acetabular component loosening. A simplified acetabular model was constructed using a Sawbones(®) foam block. By placing a thin silicone layer between the acetabular component and the Sawbones block, 2- and 4-mm soft tissue membranes were simulated representing different loosening scenarios. A constant amplitude sinusoidal excitation with a sweep range of 100-1500 Hz was used. Output vibration from the model was measured using an accelerometer and an ultrasound probe. Loosening was determined from output signal features such as the number and relative strength of observed harmonic frequencies. Both measurement methods were sufficient to measure the output vibration. Vibrational analysis reliably detected loosening corresponding to both 2 and 4 mm tissue membranes at driving frequencies between 100 and 1000 Hz (p < 0.01) using the accelerometer. In contrast, ultrasound detected 2-mm loosening at a frequency range of 850-1050 Hz (p < 0.01) and 4-mm loosening at 500-950 Hz (p < 0.01). PMID:26054805

  10. Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk Assessment to Optimize Prosthesis Selection in Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pétursson, Þröstur; Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnús Kjartan; Magnússon, Benedikt; Magnúsdóttir, Gígja; Halldórsson, Grétar; Jónsson, Halldór; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The variability in patient outcome and propensity for surgical complications in total hip replacement (THR) necessitates the development of a comprehensive, quantitative methodology for prescribing the optimal type of prosthetic stem: cemented or cementless. The objective of the research presented herein was to describe a novel approach to this problem as a first step towards creating a patient-specific, presurgical application for determining the optimal prosthesis procedure. Finite element analysis (FEA) and bone mineral density (BMD) calculations were performed with ten voluntary primary THR patients to estimate the status of their operative femurs before surgery. A compilation model of the press-fitting procedure was generated to define a fracture risk index (FRI) from incurred forces on the periprosthetic femoral head. Comparing these values to patient age, sex, and gender elicited a high degree of variability between patients grouped by implant procedure, reinforcing the notion that age and gender alone are poor indicators for prescribing prosthesis type. Additionally, correlating FRI and BMD measurements indicated that at least two of the ten patients may have received nonideal implants. This investigation highlights the utility of our model as a foundation for presurgical software applications to assist orthopedic surgeons with selecting THR prostheses. PMID:26417376

  11. Evaluation of silicon nitride as a wear resistant and resorbable alternative for total hip joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Johanna; Grehk, T. Mikael; Berlind, Torun; Persson, Cecilia; Jacobson, Staffan; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Many of the failures of total joint replacements are related to tribology, i.e., wear of the cup, head and liner. Accumulation of wear particles at the implants can be linked to osteolysis which leads to bone loss and in the end aseptic implant loosening. Therefore it is highly desirable to reduce the generation of wear particles from the implant surfaces. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) has shown to be biocompatible and have a low wear rate when sliding against itself and is therefore a good candidate as a hip joint material. Furthermore, wear particles of Si3N4 are predicted to slowly dissolve in polar liquids and they therefore have the potential to be resorbed in vivo, potentially reducing the risk for aseptic loosening. In this study, it was shown that α-Si3N4-powder dissolves in PBS. Adsorption of blood plasma indicated a good acceptance of Si3N4 in the body with relatively low immune response. Si3N4 sliding against Si3N4 showed low wear rates both in bovine serum and PBS compared with the other tested wear couples. Tribofilms were built up on the Si3N4 surfaces both in PBS and in bovine serum, controlling the friction and wear characteristics. PMID:23507807

  12. New Approach and Stem Increased Femoral Revision Rate in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Panichkul, Phonthakorn; Parks, Nancy L; Ho, Henry; Hopper, Robert H; Hamilton, William G

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the femoral stem revision and loosening rates in primary total hip arthroplasty between 2 different approaches and stem designs. Recent reports comparing the direct anterior approach with either the posterior or lateral approach showed that patients undergoing the direct anterior approach have less pain and an accelerated functional recovery in the early postoperative period. After converting to an anterior approach, the authors observed an increased rate of femoral stem revision. From 2003 to 2009, a posterior or lateral approach was used to insert 514 stems of 2 designs. These cases included the use of an extensively coated cobalt-chrome stem (n=232) or a straight, dual-tapered, proximally porous-coated titanium stem (n=282). In the following years, from 2009 to 2012, 594 short, proximally coated, titanium tapered-wedge stems were inserted through a direct anterior approach. The revision rates of femoral stems inserted through a posterior approach or a lateral approach were compared with those inserted via a direct anterior approach. No stem revisions occurred in the posterior approach group or the lateral approach group, and 5 stems were revised in the anterior approach group for periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening (0.8%). Significantly more stem revisions occurred after the use of the new stem design and a direct anterior approach (P=.04). PMID:26726989

  13. Total hip arthroplasty head-neck contact mechanics: a stochastic investigation of key parameters.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Finn E; Coburn, James C; Siegel, Karen Lohmann

    2014-05-01

    A variety of design and patient parameters have been implicated in recent reports of fretting corrosion at modular connections in total hip arthroplasty. We sought to identify the relative sensitivity of mechanical fretting to a comprehensive set of parameters such that attention may be focused on key variables. Stochastic finite element simulation of the head-neck taper-trunnion junction was performed. Four-hundred parameter sets were simulated using realistic variations of design variables, material properties and loading parameters to predict contact pressures (P), micromotions (M) and fretting work (coefficient of friction×P×M) over cycles of gait. Results indicated that fretting work was correlated with only three parameters: angular mismatch, center offset and body weight (r=0.47, 0.53 and 0.43, p<0.001). Maximum contact pressure increased by 85MPa for every 0.1° of angular mismatch. Maximum micromotion increased by 5µm per 10mm additional head offset and 1µm per 10kg increased body weight. Uncorrelated parameters included trunnion diameter, trunnion length and impaction forces. It was concluded that appropriate limiting of angular mismatch and center offset could minimize fretting, and hence its contribution to corrosion, at modular connections. PMID:24657104

  14. Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk Assessment to Optimize Prosthesis Selection in Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Pétursson, Þröstur; Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnús Kjartan; Magnússon, Benedikt; Magnúsdóttir, Gígja; Halldórsson, Grétar; Jónsson, Halldór; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The variability in patient outcome and propensity for surgical complications in total hip replacement (THR) necessitates the development of a comprehensive, quantitative methodology for prescribing the optimal type of prosthetic stem: cemented or cementless. The objective of the research presented herein was to describe a novel approach to this problem as a first step towards creating a patient-specific, presurgical application for determining the optimal prosthesis procedure. Finite element analysis (FEA) and bone mineral density (BMD) calculations were performed with ten voluntary primary THR patients to estimate the status of their operative femurs before surgery. A compilation model of the press-fitting procedure was generated to define a fracture risk index (FRI) from incurred forces on the periprosthetic femoral head. Comparing these values to patient age, sex, and gender elicited a high degree of variability between patients grouped by implant procedure, reinforcing the notion that age and gender alone are poor indicators for prescribing prosthesis type. Additionally, correlating FRI and BMD measurements indicated that at least two of the ten patients may have received nonideal implants. This investigation highlights the utility of our model as a foundation for presurgical software applications to assist orthopedic surgeons with selecting THR prostheses. PMID:26417376

  15. Finite element analysis of retroacetabular osteolytic defects following total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Munro, Jacob T; Anderson, Iain A; Walker, Cameron G; Shim, Vickie B

    2013-09-27

    Periprosthetic osteolysis in the retroacetabular region with cancellous bone loss is a recognized phenomenon in the long-term follow-up of total hip replacement. The effects on load transfer in the presence of defects are less well known. A finite element model incorporating a retroacetabular defect behind a cementless component was validated against a 4th generation sawbone pelvis. Computational predictions of surface strain and von Mises stresses were closely correlated to experimental findings. The presence of a cancellous defect increased von Mises stress in the cortical bone of the medial wall of the pelvis. At a load of 600 N this was under the predicted failure stress for cortical bone. Increases in the cup size relative to the acetabulum caused increased stress in the cortical bone of the lateral wall of the pelvis, adjacent to the acetabulum. We are confident that our modeling approach can be applied to patient specific defects to predict pelvis stress with large loads and a range of activities. PMID:23972431

  16. Metallic debris from metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty regulates periprosthetic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Christoph H; Singh, Gurpal; Willert, Hans-Georg; Buchhorn, Gottfried H

    2014-01-01

    The era of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty has left the orthopaedic community with valuable insights and lessons on periprosthetic tissue reactions to metallic debris. Various terms have been used to describe the tissue reactions. Sometimes the nomenclature can be confusing. We present a review of the concepts introduced by Willert and Semlitsch in 1977, along with further developments made in the understanding of periprosthetic tissue reactions to metallic debris. We propose that periprosthetic tissue reactions be thought of as (1) gross (metallosis, necrosis, cyst formation and pseudotumour); (2) histological (macrophage-dominated, lymphocyte-dominated or mixed); and (3) molecular (expression of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha). Taper corrosion and modularity are discussed, along with future research directions to elucidate the antigen-presenting pathways and material-specific biomarkers which may allow early detection and intervention in a patient with adverse periprosthetic tissue reactions to metal wear debris. PMID:25405095

  17. Research synthesis of recommended acetabular cup orientations for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Claire L; Thomson, Avril I; Cutts, Steven; Rowe, Philip J; Riches, Philip E

    2014-02-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is regarded as one of the most successful surgical procedures of modern times yet continues to be associated with a small but significant complication rate. Many early failures may be associated with poor component positioning with, in particular, acetabular component orientation dependent on the subjective judgement of the surgeon. In this paper, we compare the manufacturers' instructions on acetabular cup orientation with the literature-based recommended safety zones and surgical technique, by transforming them onto a single, clinically-relevant framework in which the different reference systems, safety guidelines and current instrumentation surgical techniques can be evaluated. The observed limited consensus between results reflects ongoing uncertainty regarding the optimum acetabular component positioning. As malpositioning of the acetabular cup increases the risk of revision surgery, any ambiguity over the correct position can have a causal effect. Our analysis highlights the need for a surgical reference system which can be used to describe the position of the acetabular cup intra-operatively. PMID:23958234

  18. Stem length and canal filling in uncemented custom-made total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sakai, T; Sugano, N; Nishii, T; Haraguchi, K; Ochi, T; Ohzono, K

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed 60 custom-made femoral components of two different lengths : 125 mm (group A) and 100 mm (group B), in order to investigate the relationship between stem length and canal filling in uncemented custom-made total hip arthroplasty. There were no statistical differences between the two groups in age, gender, height, body weight, canal flare index, or bowing angle of the femur. Postoperatively there was no statistical difference between the two groups in the proximal canal filling, but significant difference in the distal canal filling (75.5% vs 85.8% on the anteroposterior view and 76.0% vs 82.5% in the lateral view, P<0.001). The distal canal filling inversely correlated with the ratio of the proximal portion and the distal portion of the stem curvature on the lateral view (lateral curve ratio of the stem, P=0.002). We conclude that superior filling at both the proximal and the distal levels can be obtained by using 100-mm custom made components with a small lateral curve ratio. PMID:10591939

  19. Role of parenteral iron in transfusion requirements after total hip replacement. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Naveira, E; Seara, J; Palmer, J H; Cuenca, J; García-Erce, J A

    2006-04-01

    An important percentage of patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) receive allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) to avoid the risks of acute anaemia. However, concerns about the risks of ABT have led to the search for alternatives, such as stimulation of erythropoiesis. We prospectively investigated the effect of postoperative administration of 300 mg of intravenous iron sucrose on ABT requirements in THR patients (group 2; n = 24). A previous series of 22 THR patients served as the control group (group 1). All patients were operated on by the same surgeon, using the same implant, and a set of clinical data was gathered. No adverse reactions to iron administration were observed. The group-given iron showed a trend to a lower transfusion rate (46 vs. 73%; P = 0.067) and lower transfusion index (0.96 vs. 1.68 units/patient; P = 0.038). Moreover, amongst the non-transfused patients, admission haemoglobin levels were lower in those coming from the iron group than those from the control group (12.7 +/- 0.9 vs. 14.0 +/- 1.2 g dL(-1), respectively; P = 0.017). Postoperative parenteral iron administration could be a safe and effective way to reduce ABT requirements in the THR patients. A large, randomized controlled trial to confirm these results is warranted. PMID:16623920

  20. Wear in alumina-on-alumina ceramic total hip replacements: a retrieval analysis of edge loading.

    PubMed

    Esposito, C I; Walter, W L; Roques, A; Tuke, M A; Zicat, B A; Walsh, W R; Walter, W K

    2012-07-01

    We analysed 54 alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings from total hip replacements retrieved at one centre after a mean duration of 3.5 years (0.2 to 10.6) in situ. These implants were obtained from 54 patients (16 men and 38 women) with a mean age of 67 years (33 to 88) who underwent revision for a variety of reasons. Posterior edge loading was found in the majority of these retrievals (32 out of 54). Anterosuperior edge loading occurred less often but produced a higher rate of wear. Stripe wear on the femoral heads had a median volumetric wear rate of 0.2 mm(3)/year (0 to 7.2). The wear volume on the femoral heads corresponded to the width of edge wear on the matching liner. Anteversion of the acetabular component was found to be a more important determinant than inclination for wear in ceramic bearings. Posterior edge loading may be considered to be a normal occurrence in ceramic-on-ceramic bearings, with minimal clinical consequences. Edge loading should be defined as either anterosuperior or posterior, as each edge loading mechanism may result in different clinical implications. PMID:22733943

  1. Pelvic lysis and polyethylene wear at 5-8 years in an uncemented total hip.

    PubMed

    Barrack, R L; Folgueras, A; Munn, B; Tvetden, D; Sharkey, P

    1997-02-01

    The clinical and radiographic results of 160 primary, uncemented porous coated total hip replacements performed at 3 teaching hospitals were reviewed. Followup was obtained in 132 of 148 (89%) nondeceased patients. The acetabular component is a full hemisphere, fabricated of cobalt chrome with a sintered bead coating and was implanted with screws in all cases. A 32 mm cobalt chrome femoral head was used in all cases. At 2 to 4 years the incidence of pelvic lysis was 0 and no acetabular revisions had been performed. At 5 to 8 years followup, 3 of 132 (2%) femoral stems had been revised, while on the acetabulum side discrete expansile pelvic lytic lesions occurred in 15 cases (11%) with 8 cases (5%) requiring revision. Abrasion of the screwhead against the backside of the polyethylene liner was seen in all retrieved cases and may have contributed to the development of the lytic lesions seen. Use of this uncemented press fit hemispheric acetabular components, using adjunctive screw fixation resulted in an unacceptably high rate of polyethylene wear and aggressive pelvic lysis. While the results on the femoral side were good, the results with this uncemented acetabular system did not represent an improvement over previous cemented or uncemented acetabular components. PMID:9020220

  2. A randomized, prospective study of total hip wound closure with resorbable subcuticular staples.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David A; Bengero, Lowell L; Clapp, Brenda C; Burgess, Mary

    2010-09-01

    Resorbable subcuticular staples are a new way to close surgical wounds and have not been reported in the orthopedic literature. This randomized, controlled study compared a resorbable subcuticular staple system with stainless steel wound stapling in patients undergoing unilateral primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Institutional Review Board approval and patient consent was obtained for all patients. Sixty patients (30 each group) were randomized to receive either resorbable subcuticular staples or stainless steel staples after primary THA. Incision length, number of staples used, and any staple insertion problems were recorded. Subjective reports of pain levels or incision complaints were solicited, and wound photographs were obtained on days 1 and 14 and 6 weeks postoperatively. The presence of wound drainage, erythema, wound separation, or echymosis was recorded at each visit, as well as all postoperative complications. The average incision length in the resorbable group was 13.2 cm and required 16 staples for closure, compared to 15 cm and 20 staples for the metal staple group. No infections occurred in either group, although the incidence of erythema and wound drainage at 2 weeks was higher for patients in the stainless steel group. One patient with metal staples had a postoperative hematoma requiring secondary irrigation and debridement. Patient satisfaction was higher with the resorbable staples. A resorbable subcuticular staple system can provide comparable wound closure to stainless steel staples following THA and may do so with less local discomfort, wound drainage, or erythematous reaction. PMID:20839703

  3. The modern, hybrid total hip arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis at the Hospital for Special Surgery.

    PubMed

    González Della Valle, A; Sharrock, N; Barlow, M; Caceres, L; Go, G; Salvati, E A

    2016-01-01

    We describe our technique and rationale using hybrid fixation for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) at the Hospital for Special Surgery. Modern uncemented acetabular components have few screw holes, or no holes, polished inner surfaces, improved locking mechanisms, and maximised thickness and shell-liner conformity. Uncemented sockets can be combined with highly cross-linked polyethylene liners, which have demonstrated very low wear and osteolysis rates after ten to 15 years of implantation. The results of cement fixation with a smooth or polished surface finished stem have been excellent, virtually eliminating complications seen with cementless fixation like peri-operative femoral fractures and thigh pain. Although mid-term results of modern cementless stems are encouraging, the long-term data do not show reduced revision rates for cementless stems compared with cemented smooth stems. In this paper we review the conduct of a hybrid THA, with emphasis on pre-operative planning, surgical technique, hypotensive epidural anaesthesia, and intra-operative physiology. PMID:26733642

  4. Lower Limb Loading during Gait in Patients Long Period after Total Hip Arthroplasty Revision.

    PubMed

    Kubonova, Eliska; Svoboda, Zdenek; Janura, Miroslav; Gallo, Jiri; Duskova, Sarka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess lower limb loading during walking after unilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision. Twenty-three THA revision subjects (12 men, 11 women) were divided into three groups according to time since surgery as 1 to 6 years, 6 to 11 years, and over 11 years. Two force plates were used to measure the ground reaction force during the stance phase. On the operated limb, compared to nonoperated limb, we found lower first vertical peak in the group of 1 to 6 years after revision and lower propulsion peak in the group of 6 to 11 years since revision. In the group of 11 years since THA revision, no significant difference was found. With advancing years after surgery, the stance phase duration got reduced and propulsion peak increased in the operated limb; minimal vertical force decreased and the time of minimal vertical force increased in the nonoperated limb. The study findings suggest the tendency to a more gradual and safer weight acceptance on the operated limb during the first years after THA revision, followed by limitation of foot propulsion. Despite this fact, lower limb loading can be considered as symmetrical across the whole measured period. PMID:27579321

  5. Lower Limb Loading during Gait in Patients Long Period after Total Hip Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Kubonova, Eliska; Janura, Miroslav; Duskova, Sarka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess lower limb loading during walking after unilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision. Twenty-three THA revision subjects (12 men, 11 women) were divided into three groups according to time since surgery as 1 to 6 years, 6 to 11 years, and over 11 years. Two force plates were used to measure the ground reaction force during the stance phase. On the operated limb, compared to nonoperated limb, we found lower first vertical peak in the group of 1 to 6 years after revision and lower propulsion peak in the group of 6 to 11 years since revision. In the group of 11 years since THA revision, no significant difference was found. With advancing years after surgery, the stance phase duration got reduced and propulsion peak increased in the operated limb; minimal vertical force decreased and the time of minimal vertical force increased in the nonoperated limb. The study findings suggest the tendency to a more gradual and safer weight acceptance on the operated limb during the first years after THA revision, followed by limitation of foot propulsion. Despite this fact, lower limb loading can be considered as symmetrical across the whole measured period. PMID:27579321

  6. Total hip arthroplasty in an outpatient setting in 27 selected patients

    PubMed Central

    den Hartog, Yvon M; Mathijssen, Nina M C; Vehmeijer, Stephan B W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — As a result of introduction of a fast-track program, length of hospital stay after total hip arthroplasty (THA) decreased in our hospital. We therefore wondered whether THA in an outpatient setting would be feasible. We report our experience with THA in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods — In this prospective cohort study, we included 27 patients who were selected to receive primary THA in an outpatient setting between April and July 2014. Different patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were recorded preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. Furthermore, anchor questions on how patients functioned in daily living were scored at 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. Results — 3 of the 27 patients did not go home on the day of surgery because of nausea and/or dizziness. The remaining 24 patients all went home on the day of surgery. PROMs improved substantially in these patients. Moreover, anchor questions on how patients functioned in their daily living indicated that the patients were satisfied with the postoperative results. 1 re-admission occurred at 11 days after surgery because of seroma formation. There were no other complications or reoperations. Interpretation — At our hospital, with a fast-track protocol, outpatient THA was found to be feasible in selected patients with satisfying results up to 3 months postoperatively, without any outpatient procedure-specific complications or re-admissions. PMID:26139431

  7. Survival of Bi-Metric femoral stems in 77 total hip arthroplasties for juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lybäck, C C; Lybäck, C O; Kyrö, A; Kautiainen, H J; Belt, E A

    2004-12-01

    The survival of 77 cementless total hip arthroplasties using a Bi-Metric femoral stem and two types of acetabular components was analysed in 55 patients with juvenile chronic arthritis. The patients were treated between 1986 and 1996. Their mean age was 8.0 years at the onset of the disease and 28.1 years at the time of surgery. The mean follow-up period was 9.6 years. Follow-up evaluations were conducted 3 months and 1, 4, 8, 12 and 16 years post-operatively. The endpoints of survival analysis were revision surgery, death of the patient or the end of the year 2002. The 10-year survival was 77.6% for the Romanus cup and 49.1% for the TTAP-ST cup. In contrast to these inadequate outcomes, the cementless Bi-Metric stem yielded excellent results with a survival rate of 100% for aseptic loosening during a mean follow-up period of 10 years. PMID:15316677

  8. Assessment of accuracy of acetabular cup orientation in CT-free navigated total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Shigeo; Fukui, Tomokazu; Imamura, Fumiaki; Nishio, Shoji

    2008-10-01

    We have used the Orthopilot (Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany) computed tomography (CT)-free navigation system to ensure accurate and reproducible acetabular cup orientation. In this system, cup orientation is assessed with respect to bony configuration as determined by palpation of the anatomical landmarks (the bilateral anterosuperior iliac spines and the upper margin of the pubic symphysis). In this study, intraoperative cup orientation as presented by the OrthoPilot navigation system was compared with the value obtained through postoperative radiological assessment using CT Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data and Medical Image Processing, Analysis, and Visualization (MIPAV; National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland). Intra- and postoperative results obtained from 27 consecutive navigated total hip arthroplasties (THAs) were analyzed. For cup positioning, the desired inclination and anteversion angles were set within the "safe zone" proposed by Lewinnek. In the intraoperative evaluation, the mean inclination angle as determined by the navigation system was 43.5 degrees +/- 2.17 degrees (range, 39.9 degrees to 46.6 degrees ) after the final implantation. In contrast, the mean inclination angle determined by postoperative calculation using MIPAV was 44.9 +/- 3.3 degrees (range, 38.1 degrees to 55.0 degrees ). A discrepancy of >5 degrees was observed in only 1 hip. For the anteversion, the mean intra- and postoperative values were 11.1 degrees +/- 5.6 degrees (range, 0 degrees to 17.8 degrees ) and 13.5 degrees +/- 5.9 degrees (range, 5.1 degrees to 21.6 degrees ), respectively. Again, a discrepancy of >5 degrees was observed in 1 case. Mean differences between the intra- and postoperative values were 1.9 degrees +/- 1.9 degrees and 2.6 degrees +/- 1.6 degrees for inclination and anteversion, respectively. A good agreement between the intraoperative values presented by the navigation system

  9. Evaluation of ranges of motion of a new constrained acetabular prosthesis for canine total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement (THR) is considered to be the most effective treatment option for advanced osteoarthritis of the hip in large breed dogs. However, a proportion of post-THR patients suffer prosthesis dislocation for various reasons, which may be addressed by a constrained acetabular prosthesis design. The study proposed a new THR with constrained acetabular component that aimed to decrease the incidence of postoperative dislocation while maintaining the necessary range of motion (ROM); and, through computer-simulated implantations, evaluated the ROM of the THR with and without malpositioning of the acetabular component. Methods A new THR with a constrained acetabular component that had an inward eccentric lining and a 60° cut-out on the dorsal side was designed, and its computer-aided design models were implanted into the pelvic and femoral models reconstructed from the computed tomography data of six healthy Labrador Retriever dogs. The allowable and functional ROM of the implanted THR were determined via computer simulations. The contact patterns between the bone or the prosthetic components at extreme positions of the THR were analyzed. Influence of malpositioning of the acetabular component on the ROM was assessed. Results The means (SD) of the functional ranges for flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, internal rotation and external rotation were 51.8° (6.6°), 163.3° (7.3°), 33.5° (5.7°), 74.0° (3.7°), 41.5° (8.3°) and 65.2° (9.9°), respectively. Malpositioning of the acetabular component by 20° in one direction was found to reduce ROM in other directions (reducing lateral opening: flexion: 12°, adduction: 20°, internal/external rotations: < 20°; increasing lateral opening: extension and abduction: < 16°; reducing retroversion: extension: < 20°, abduction: 15°, external rotation: < 20°; increasing retroversion: flexion: < 20°, abduction, adduction and internal rotation: 20°). Conclusions From the computer

  10. Etiology of osteolysis around porous-coated cementless total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Jasty, M; Bragdon, C; Jiranek, W; Chandler, H; Maloney, W; Harris, W H

    1994-11-01

    The prosthetic components and tissues retrieved from 12 hips with osteolysis in association with well-fixed cementless porous-coated total hip prostheses (5 Porous Coated Anatomic, 6 Harris-Galante Porous, and 1 Omniflex) were examined using a variety specific techniques including electron microscopy, standard histology, immunohistochemistry, and particle identification. The patients were young and active. Extensive osteolysis developed in all 12 femurs and 3 acetabula between 36 and 84 months after arthroplasty (mean, 63 months). All of the polyethylene liners were noted to be worn substantially (mean volumetric wear, 1140 +/- 810 mm3). The wear was unrelated to the head diameter in this small number of cases. In all 12 cases, the articulating surfaces were wear polished and contained numerous fine multidirectional scratches, suggesting 3-body abrasive wear mechanisms in addition to adhesive wear liberating very small (micron to submicron) wear particles. In 4 cases, surface delamination and flaking of polyethylene were also found, suggesting fatigue wear liberating larger wear particles. Nine of 10 cobalt alloy heads showed numerous fine scratches with sharp edges presumably from 3-body abrasive wear. Corrosion and fretting at the femoral head-neck junction in 5 cases, burnishing of the femoral stem against bone in 4 cases, and metal staining of tissues opposite the porous coatings in 7 cases provided evidence for the liberation of fine metal particles from outside the articulation. Histologic and immunohistochemical studies of tissue in the regions of osteolysis in all cases showed numerous focal aggregates of KP1 antibody positive activated macrophages containing large amounts of submicron intracellular particles of polyethylene (presumably related to the 3-body abrasive wear polishing) and giant cells within a fibrous stroma. In 5 cases, some of the macrophages also contained submicron metal particles but smaller in numbers. T lymphocytes, plasma cells, and

  11. Computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery and robotic surgery in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Various systems of computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) were reviewed. The first clinically applied system was an active robotic system (ROBODOC), which performed femoral implant cavity preparation as programmed preoperatively. Several reports on cementless THA with ROBODOC showed better stem alignment and less variance in limb-length inequality on radiographic evaluation, less incidence of pulmonary embolic events on transesophageal cardioechogram, and less stress shielding on the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis than conventional manual methods. On the other hand, some studies raise issues with active systems, including a steep learning curve, muscle and nerve damage, and technical complications, such as a procedure stop due to a bone motion during cutting, requiring re-registration and registration failure. Semi-active robotic systems, such as Acrobot and Rio, were developed for ease of surgeon acceptance. The drill bit at the tip of the robotic arm is moved by a surgeon's hand, but it does not move outside of a milling path boundary, which is defined according to three-dimensional (3D) image-based preoperative planning. However, there are still few reports on THA with these semi-active systems. Thanks to the advancements in 3D sensor technology, navigation systems were developed. Navigation is a passive system, which does not perform any actions on patients. It only provides information and guidance to the surgeon who still uses conventional tools to perform the surgery. There are three types of navigation: computed tomography (CT)-based navigation, imageless navigation, and fluoro-navigation. CT-based navigation is the most accurate, but the preoperative planning on CT images takes time that increases cost and radiation exposure. Imageless navigation does not use CT images, but its accuracy depends on the technique of landmark pointing, and it does not take into account the individual uniqueness of the anatomy

  12. Computer-Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery and Robotic Surgery in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Various systems of computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) were reviewed. The first clinically applied system was an active robotic system (ROBODOC), which performed femoral implant cavity preparation as programmed preoperatively. Several reports on cementless THA with ROBODOC showed better stem alignment and less variance in limb-length inequality on radiographic evaluation, less incidence of pulmonary embolic events on transesophageal cardioechogram, and less stress shielding on the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis than conventional manual methods. On the other hand, some studies raise issues with active systems, including a steep learning curve, muscle and nerve damage, and technical complications, such as a procedure stop due to a bone motion during cutting, requiring re-registration and registration failure. Semi-active robotic systems, such as Acrobot and Rio, were developed for ease of surgeon acceptance. The drill bit at the tip of the robotic arm is moved by a surgeon's hand, but it does not move outside of a milling path boundary, which is defined according to three-dimensional (3D) image-based preoperative planning. However, there are still few reports on THA with these semi-active systems. Thanks to the advancements in 3D sensor technology, navigation systems were developed. Navigation is a passive system, which does not perform any actions on patients. It only provides information and guidance to the surgeon who still uses conventional tools to perform the surgery. There are three types of navigation: computed tomography (CT)-based navigation, imageless navigation, and fluoro-navigation. CT-based navigation is the most accurate, but the preoperative planning on CT images takes time that increases cost and radiation exposure. Imageless navigation does not use CT images, but its accuracy depends on the technique of landmark pointing, and it does not take into account the individual uniqueness of the anatomy

  13. Wear of polyethylene cups in total hip arthroplasty. A study of specimens retrieved post mortem.

    PubMed

    Sychterz, C J; Moon, K H; Hashimoto, Y; Terefenko, K M; Engh, C A; Bauer, T W

    1996-08-01

    The wear of polyethylene components of total hip replacements has previously been studied radiographically and by analysis of retrieved components. The extent of wear, however, has largely been determined from components retrieved at reoperation and has therefore been based on a subset of patients in whom the prosthesis is more likely to show excessive wear. The study of cups retrieved post mortem provides a better indication of the extent of wear of well functioning components. Twenty-six polyethylene liners were retrieved at autopsy from nineteen patients, after a mean of ninety-one months (range, thirty-three to 206 months) in situ. Each component had articulated with a thirty-two-millimeter-diameter femoral head. The components were evaluated visually for evidence of polyethylene wear such as pitting, scratching, and burnishing. Additionally; a shadowgraph technique was used to examine molds of the inner surface of the liner to determine the direction and extent of wear. The mean extent of linear wear of the retrieved liners was 0.45 millimeter (range, 0.17 to 1.07 millimeters), and the mean rate of wear was 0.07 millimeter (range, 0.02 to 0.18 millimeter) per year. The mean volumetric wear was 245.3 cubic millimeters (range, 13.0 to 779.1 cubic millimeters), and the mean rate of volumetric wear was 39.8 cubic millimeters (range, 1.0 to 131.3 cubic millimeters) per year. The mean rate of wear for the twenty-six liners was 45 to 69 per cent less than the rates reported in the literature for polyethylene liners retrieved at reoperation. Examination of the articulating surface did not reveal gross evidence of surface failure such as delamination or fatigue cracks. In general, the surfaces were merely burnished and scratched. The rates of wear of press-fit, metal-backed liners were significantly higher than those of all-polyethylene cemented components (p < 0.05). Additionally, statistical analysis revealed no correlation between wear and the patient's age, weight

  14. Prevalence and risk factors for periprosthetic fracture in older recipients of total hip replacement: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The growing utilization of total joint replacement will increase the frequency of its complications, including periprosthetic fracture. The prevalence and risk factors of periprosthetic fracture require further study, particularly over the course of long-term follow-up. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence and risk factors for periprosthetic fractures occurring in recipients of total hip replacement. Methods We identified Medicare beneficiaries who had elective primary total hip replacement (THR) for non-fracture diagnoses between July 1995 and June 1996. We followed them using Medicare Part A claims data through 2008. We used ICD-9 codes to identify periprosthetic femoral fractures occurring from 2006–2008. We used the incidence density method to calculate the annual incidence of these fractures and Cox proportional hazards models to identify risk factors for periprosthetic fracture. We also calculated the risk of hospitalization over the subsequent year. Results Of 58,521 Medicare beneficiaries who had elective primary THR between July 1995 and June 1996, 32,463 (55%) survived until January 2006. Of these, 215 (0.7%) developed a periprosthetic femoral fracture between 2006 and 2008. The annual incidence of periprosthetic fracture among these individuals was 26 per 10,000 person-years. In the Cox model, a greater risk of periprosthetic fracture was associated with having had a total knee replacement (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.30, 2.55) or a revision total hip replacement (HR1.40, 95% CI 0.95, 2.07) between the primary THR and 2006. Compared to those without fractures, THR recipients who sustained periprosthetic femoral fracture had three-fold higher risk of hospitalization in the subsequent year (89% vs. 27%, p < 0.0001). Conclusion A decade after primary THR, periprosthetic fractures occur annually in 26 per 10,000 persons and are especially frequent in those with prior total knee or revision total hip replacements. PMID:24885707

  15. Prostaglandin E2 level in tissue surrounding aseptic failed total hips. Effects of materials.

    PubMed

    Sedel, L; Simeon, J; Meunier, A; Villette, J M; Launay, S M

    1992-01-01

    Production of inflammatory mediators (IM) by cells and specifically macrophages around loosened implants may be responsible for their loosening. Our hypothesis was that different materials give rise to different amounts of these IM. It is thought that alumina/alumina for total hip replacement (THR), which has been used for 15 years in our orthopedic department, may produce less IM than other systems. We initiated a clinical prospective study to measure the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in tissue surrounding loosened prostheses to quantify PGE2 production regarding the types of material involved in the friction couple, i.e., alumina/alumina versus metal/polyethylene, and the type of fixation, i.e., cemented versus cementless. A total of 29 THR revisions were performed in 28 patients. Four implant groups were identified: alumina/alumina cemented, alumina/alumina cementless, metal/polyethylene cemented, and metal/polyethylene cementless. For each revision, tissues surrounding the failed implants were harvested and processed, and the PGE2 was measured in a blind manner using an immunoassay technique. As the measuring technique was difficult, at least three determinations for each sample were necessary. Some samples were excluded from the analysis for various reasons, for example, second or further revisions involving many different materials in the past, conjunction of metallic and alumina debris and samples taken from non-loosened components. Finally, 15 samples were considered adequate for inclusion in this study. Two groups were analyzed and compared: the alumina/alumina couple and the metal/polyethylene couple. Tissue surrounding the first group demonstrated a PGE2 level of 69 +/- 56 fmol/mg wet weight compared to 202 +/- 156 fmol/mg for the second.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1389776

  16. Postoperative opioid use as an early indication of total hip arthroplasty failure.

    PubMed

    Namba, Robert S; Inacio, Maria C S; Pratt, Nicole L; Graves, Stephen E; Roughead, Elizabeth E; Craig Cheetham, T; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2016-07-01

    Background and purpose - A criticism of total hip arthroplasty (THA) survivorship analysis is that revisions are a late and rare outcome. We investigated whether prolonged opioid use is a possible indicator of early THA failure. Patients and methods - We conducted a cohort study of THAs registered in a total joint replacement registry from January 2008 to December 2011. 12,859 patients were evaluated. The median age was 67 years and 58% were women. Opioid use in the year after surgery was the exposure of interest, and the cumulative daily amounts of oral morphine equivalents (OMEs) were calculated. Post-THA OMEs per 90 day periods were categorized into quartiles. The endpoints were 1- and 5-year revisions. Results - After the first 90 days, 27% continued to use opioids. The revision rate was 0.9% within a year and 1.7% within 5 years. Use of medium-low (100-219 mg), medium-high (220-533 mg), and high (≥ 534 mg) amounts of OMEs in days 91-180 after surgery was associated with a 6 times (95% confidence interval (CI): 3-15), 5 times (CI: 2-13), and 11 times (CI: 2.9-44) higher adjusted risk of 1 year revision, respectively. The use of medium-low and medium-high amounts of OMEs in days 181-270 after surgery was associated with a 17 times (CI: 6-44) and 14 times (95% CI: 4-46) higher adjusted risk of 1-year revision. There was a similar higher risk of 5-year revision. Interpretation - Persistent postoperative use of opioids was associated with revision THA surgery in this cohort, and it may be an early indicator of potential surgical failures. PMID:27168377

  17. The Epidemiology and National Trends of Bearing Surface Usage in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Kim, Yunjung; Yoo, Seungmi; Lee, Sahnghoon; Kim, Hee Joong

    2016-01-01

    Background We analyzed the data for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) in the Korean nationwide database to assess (1) the epidemiology and national trends of bearing surface usage in THAs and (2) the prevalence of each type of bearing surface according to age, gender, hospital type, primary payer, and hospital procedure volume. Methods A total of 30,881 THAs were analyzed using the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database for 2007 through 2011. Bearing surfaces were sub-grouped according to device code for national health insurance claims and consisted of ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC), metal-on-polyethylene (MoP), ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP), and metal-on-metal (MoM). The prevalence of each type of bearing surface was calculated and stratified by age, gender, hospital type, primary payer, and procedure volume of each hospital. Results CoC was the most frequently used bearing surface (76.7%), followed by MoP (11.9%), CoP (7.3%), and MoM (4.1%). The proportion of THAs using a CoC bearing surface increased steadily from 71.6% in 2007 to 81.4% in 2011, whereas the proportions using CoP, MoP, and MoM bearing surfaces decreased. The order of prevalence was identical to that in the general population regardless of age, gender, hospital type, primary payer, and hospital procedure volume. Conclusions The trends and epidemiology of bearing surface usage in THAs in Korea are different from those in other countries, and the CoC bearing surface is the most prevalent articulation. In future, the results of a large-scale study using nationwide data of THAs involving a CoC bearing surface will be reported in Korea. PMID:26929796

  18. Total hip arthroplasty outcomes assessment using functional and radiographic scores to compare canine systems.

    PubMed

    Iwata, D; Broun, H C; Black, A P; Preston, C A; Anderson, G I

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective multi-centre study was carried out in order to compare outcomes between cemented and uncemented total hip arthoplasties (THA). A quantitative orthopaedic outcome assessment scoring system was devised in order to relate functional outcome to a numerical score, to allow comparison between treatments and amongst centres. The system combined a radiographic score and a clinical score. Lower scores reflect better outcomes than higher scores. Consecutive cases of THA were included from two specialist practices between July 2002 and December 2005. The study included 46 THA patients (22 uncemented THA followed for 8.3 +/- 4.7M and 24 cemented THA for 26.0 +/- 15.7M) with a mean age of 4.4 +/- 3.3 years at surgery. Multi-variable linear and logistical regression analyses were performed with adjustments for age at surgery, surgeon, follow-up time, uni- versus bilateral disease, gender and body weight. The differences between treatment groups in terms of functional scores or total scores were not significant (p > 0.05). Radiographic scores were different between treatment groups. However, these scores were usually assessed within two months of surgery and proved unreliable predictors of functional outcome (p > 0.05). The findings reflect relatively short-term follow-up, especially for the uncemented group, and do not include clinician-derived measures, such as goniometry and thigh circumference. Longer-term follow-up for the radiographic assessments is essential. A prospective study including the clinician-derived outcomes needs to be performed in order to validate the outcome instrument in its modified form. PMID:18536848

  19. Postoperative autotransfusion drain after total hip arthroplasty: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hui; Pan, Jian-Ke; Hong, Kun-Hao; Guo, Da; Fang, Jian; Yang, Wei-Yi; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The use of a postoperative autotransfusion drain (PATD) to reduce allogenic blood transfusions in total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains controversial. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this technique. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Thirteen RCTs (1,424 participants) were included in our meta-analysis. The results showed that PATD reduced the rate of allogenic transfusions (RR = 0.56; 95% CI [0.40, 0.77]) and total blood loss (MD = −196.04; 95% CI [−311.01, −81.07]). Haemoglobin (Hb) levels were higher in the PATD group on postoperative day 1 (MD = 0.28; 95% CI [0.06, 0.49]), but no significant differences on postoperative days 2 or 3 (MD = 0.29; 95% CI [−0.02, 0.60]; MD = 0.26; 95% CI [−0.04, 0.56]; respectively). There were no differences in length of hospital stay (MD = −0.18; 95% CI [−0.61, 0.25]), febrile reaction (RR = 1.26; 95% CI [0.95, 1.67]), infection (RR = 0.95; 95% CI [0.54, 1.65]), wound problems (RR = 1.07; 95% CI [0.87, 1.33]), or serious adverse events (RR = 0.59; 95% CI [0.10, 3.58]). Our findings suggest that PATD is effective in reducing the rate of allogenic transfusion. However, the included studies are inadequately powered to conclusively determine the safety of this technique. PMID:27364944

  20. Postoperative opioid use as an early indication of total hip arthroplasty failure

    PubMed Central

    Inacio, Maria C S; Pratt, Nicole L; Graves, Stephen E; Roughead, Elizabeth E; Craig Cheetham, T; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — A criticism of total hip arthroplasty (THA) survivorship analysis is that revisions are a late and rare outcome. We investigated whether prolonged opioid use is a possible indicator of early THA failure. Patients and methods — We conducted a cohort study of THAs registered in a total joint replacement registry from January 2008 to December 2011. 12,859 patients were evaluated. The median age was 67 years and 58% were women. Opioid use in the year after surgery was the exposure of interest, and the cumulative daily amounts of oral morphine equivalents (OMEs) were calculated. Post-THA OMEs per 90 day periods were categorized into quartiles. The endpoints were 1- and 5-year revisions. Results — After the first 90 days, 27% continued to use opioids. The revision rate was 0.9% within a year and 1.7% within 5 years. Use of medium-low (100–219 mg), medium-high (220–533 mg), and high (≥ 534 mg) amounts of OMEs in days 91–180 after surgery was associated with a 6 times (95% confidence interval (CI): 3–15), 5 times (CI: 2–13), and 11 times (CI: 2.9–44) higher adjusted risk of 1 year revision, respectively. The use of medium-low and medium-high amounts of OMEs in days 181–270 after surgery was associated with a 17 times (CI: 6–44) and 14 times (95% CI: 4–46) higher adjusted risk of 1-year revision. There was a similar higher risk of 5-year revision. Interpretation — Persistent postoperative use of opioids was associated with revision THA surgery in this cohort, and it may be an early indicator of potential surgical failures. PMID:27168377

  1. Missed low-grade infection in suspected aseptic loosening has no consequences for the survival of total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boot, Willemijn; Moojen, Dirk Jan F; Visser, Els; Lehr, A Mechteld; De Windt, Tommy S; Van Hellemondt, Gijs; Geurts, Jan; Tulp, Niek J A; Schreurs, B Wim; Burger, Bart J; Dhert, Wouter J A; Gawlitta, Debby; Vogely, H Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — Aseptic loosening and infection are 2 of the most common causes of revision of hip implants. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces not only the rate of revision due to infection but also the rate of revision due to aseptic loosening. This suggests under-diagnosis of infections in patients with presumed aseptic loosening and indicates that current diagnostic tools are suboptimal. In a previous multicenter study on 176 patients undergoing revision of a total hip arthroplasty due to presumed aseptic loosening, optimized diagnostics revealed that 4–13% of the patients had a low-grade infection. These infections were not treated as such, and in the current follow-up study the effect on mid- to long-term implant survival was investigated. Patients and methods — Patients were sent a 2-part questionnaire. Part A requested information about possible re-revisions of their total hip arthroplasty. Part B consisted of 3 patient-related outcome measure questionnaires (EQ5D, Oxford hip score, and visual analog scale for pain). Additional information was retrieved from the medical records. The group of patients found to have a low-grade infection was compared to those with aseptic loosening. Results — 173 of 176 patients from the original study were included. In the follow-up time between the revision surgery and the current study (mean 7.5 years), 31 patients had died. No statistically significant difference in the number of re-revisions was found between the infection group (2 out of 21) and the aseptic loosening group (13 out of 152); nor was there any significant difference in the time to re-revision. Quality of life, function, and pain were similar between the groups, but only 99 (57%) of the patients returned part B. Interpretation — Under-diagnosis of low-grade infection in conjunction with presumed aseptic revision of total hip arthroplasty may not affect implant survival. PMID:26364842

  2. Post-operative gait analysis in total hip replacement patients-a review of current literature and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Alistair M; Stewart, Su; St Clair Gibson, Alan; Kashyap, Shankar N; Caplan, Nick

    2012-05-01

    Gait analysis has been used to measure gait adaptations following total hip replacement (THR) for many years. In this time, advances have been made in implant technology and surgical procedure. However, gait adaptations persist after surgery. This review of seven published studies, where gait characteristics were compared between post-operative THR patients and healthy controls, had the objective of investigating current practice in gait analysis of this patient population and to determine if there is a consensus on post-operative gait changes associated with THR. Levels of methodological quality and study design were found to be variable. Meta-analyses were performed on all gait variables reported by at least three studies to determine overall Cohen's d effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals. Reductions in walking velocity (d=-0.79; CI=-1.54, -0.04), stride length (d=-1.06; CI=-1.62, -0.49) and sagittal hip range of motion (d=-1.58; CI=-2.12, -1.04) were observed. Increases in peak hip flexion (d=0.52; CI=-0.01, 1.09) and extension (d=0.54; CI=-0.10, 1.09) moments were found, although these were likely to be of less clinical significance. Reduced peak hip abduction was also observed (d=-0.58; CI=-1.09, -0.06). Future developments in THR technology and surgical methods should therefore aim to reduce the differences between patients and controls in terms of walking velocity, stride length, hip range of motion and hip abduction moments. PMID:22410129

  3. Comparative 5-year results of short hip total hip arthroplasty with Ti- or CoCr-neck adapters.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg, Ralf H; Steffen, Reinhard

    2015-03-01

    This prospective study investigated revision after modular short stem implantation. Results are presented for 2 different types of neck adapters (titanium and cobalt-chromium [CoCr]). Eighty-five patients with titanium adapters and 87 patients with CoCr adapters underwent follow-up examination after an average of 5.7 and 5.2 years, respectively. Mean patient age was 57 years in both groups. Indications were primary osteoarthritis (80%), cup dysplasia (14%), and other (6%). Mean Harris Hip Scores were 98 and 99 points (titanium and CoCr groups, respectively). Ninety percent and 96% of patients were very satisfied or satisfied (titanium and CoCr groups, respectively); 3% of patients in both groups were dissatisfied. Pain decreased from visual analog scale score 7 and 6 preoperatively to 0.37 and 0.15 postoperatively for the titanium and CoCr groups, respectively. No joint dislocation occurred. Six patients needed revision within the first year (2 for infection, 1 for via falsa position, and 2 for aseptic loosening in the titanium group, and 1 for aseptic loosening in the CoCr group). Nine revisions occurred due to neck adapter failure (titanium group). Primary standard stems were used in all revisions. Excluding material-related adapter failures in the titanium group, the 5-year survival rate was 94.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 88.9-97.6 for titanium) and 99% (95% CI, 93.7-99.8 for CoCr). No radiographic signs of loosening were seen at last follow-up. Fine sclerotic lines were detected in Gruen zones 1 (17.2%) and 2 (14%), hypertrophies in zone 3 (4.3%), and periprosthetic cancellous bone compressions in zone 6 (75.8%). No adapter fractures occurred for CoCr components. The treatment and anchoring system of the short stem studied yielded good results and allowed revision using standard stems in all patients. PMID:25826630

  4. Semi-automated CT-based analysis of regional bone-density in contra lateral total hip replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Tamez-Pena, Jose; Crilly, Therese; Looney, John R.; O'Keefe, R.; Campbell, Debbie; Totterman, Saara M.

    2004-04-01

    Methods for quantifying hip prosthesis induced changes in the adjacent bone are of great interest to orthopedics. In this work, we present a semi-automated technique for measuring the differences in bone density between the prosthetic and contra lateral hips within a CT volumetric data set. In order to reliably compare the bone-density measurements between the prosthetic and the contra laterals hips, a standardized zoning was developed. Using a spherical model of the outer surface of the prosthetic cup, the superior volume of the acetabular region was subdivided into four distance zones: 0-1mm, 1-6mm, 6-11mm, and 11-16mm, respectively. Furthermore, these regions were divided into four positional zones: medial, lateral, anterior, and posterior. At the same time, the positional zones were divided into four angular regions 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees from the apex of the acetabular cup. The bone density is computed as the average density in Hounsfield unit (HU) measured from the CT scan using all the voxels within each of the 64 zones. Preliminary analysis has been completed on 3 subjects with total hip replacement. The zonal densities on the prosthetic hip and the contra lateral hip were computed and compared. Contrary to initial expectations, a paired t-test showed no statistical significance between the prosthetic and contra lateral bone-densities at any of the four distance zones. Further analysis with a larger sample subject is needed to detect differences in bone-density between the hips in the stress/weight bearing areas in the 15 to 30 degree regions. A method for reliably and consistently measuring the bone-density within standardized zones has been developed and applied on prosthetic and contra lateral hips. The average bone-density for each of the zones takes into account the entire volumetric data set within that region, which is a considerable improvement over the subjective, user driven region of interest estimate selected within one slice practiced in

  5. Incidence, risk factors and the healthcare cost of falls postdischarge after elective total hip and total knee replacement surgery: protocol for a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Anne-Marie; Ross-Adjie, Gail; McPhail, Steven M; Monterosso, Leanne; Bulsara, Max; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Powell, Sarah-Jayne; Hardisty, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The number of major joint replacement procedures continues to increase in Australia. The primary aim of this study is to determine the incidence of falls in the first 12 months after discharge from hospital in a cohort of older patients who undergo elective total hip or total knee replacement. Methods and analyses A prospective longitudinal observational cohort study starting in July 2015, enrolling patients aged ≥60 years who are admitted for elective major joint replacement (n=267 total hip replacement, n=267 total knee replacement) and are to be discharged to the community. Participants are followed up for 12 months after hospital discharge. The primary outcome measure is the rate of falls per thousand patient-days. Falls data will be collected by 2 methods: issuing a falls diary to each participant and telephoning participants monthly after discharge. Secondary outcomes include the rate of injurious falls and health-related quality of life. Patient-rated outcomes will be measured using the Oxford Hip or Oxford Knee score. Generalised linear mixed modelling will be used to examine the falls outcomes in the 12 months after discharge and to examine patient and clinical characteristics predictive of falls. An economic evaluation will be conducted to describe the nature of healthcare costs in the first 12 months after elective joint replacement and estimate costs directly attributable to fall events. Ethics and dissemination The results will be disseminated through local site networks and will inform future services to support older people undergoing hip or knee joint replacement and also through peer-reviewed publications and medical conferences. This study has been approved by The University of Notre Dame Australia and local hospital human research ethics committees. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000653561; Pre-results. PMID:27412102

  6. Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Third Generation Ceramic-Ceramic Articulation: Results after a Minimum of Three-years of Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Woo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the short term clinicoradiological results of primary total hip arthroplasty using third generation ceramic-ceramic articulation Accolade TMZF femoral stems. Materials and Methods Two hundred and seventy two patients (294 hips) with primary total hip arthroplasty using third generation ceramic-ceramic articulation Accolade TMZF femoral stems who had been followed-up for a minimum of 3 years were included. Clinicoradiological results were analyzed and postoperative complications were observed. Results At final follow-up, mean Harris hip score was increased from 52 to 94 points. On radiogical evaluation, the average acetabular inclination was 42 degrees and the average acetabular anteversion was 15 degrees. Neither osteolysis nor loosening were observed around the acetabulum or proximal femur. Among 294 acetabular cups, 293 cups (99.66%) achieved stable fixation. Regarding the 294 femoral stems, 286 (97.28%) had bony fixation, 7 (2.38%) had fibrous fixation, and none were found to have unstable stem fixation. Proximal bone resorption was observed in 17 hips (5.78%; only Grade 1) and radiolucent lines were observed in 88 hips (29.93%), however, all were around the distal smooth portion of the stems. Postoperative complications included dislocation in 6 hips (2.04%), heterotopic ossification in 3 hips (1.02%), ceramic fractures in 4 hips (1.36%), superficial infection in 1 hip (0.34%), and squeaking in 8 hips (2.72%). Conclusion The short term clinicoradiological results of primary total hip arthroplasty using third generation ceramic-ceramic articulation and Accolade TMZF femoral stems together with Secur-Fit acetabular cups were satisfactory. However, problems such as ceramic fractures and squeaking after arthroplasty were observed. Additional studies are necessary in order to develop methods that may reduce or eliminate these complications.

  7. Mechanical characteristics of impacted morsellised bone grafts used in revision of total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Giesen, E B; Lamerigts, N M; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P; Schreurs, B W; Huiskes, R

    1999-11-01

    The use of impacted, morsellised bone grafts has become popular in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). The initial stability of the reconstruction and the effectiveness of any subsequent process of revitalisation and incorporation will depend on the mechanical integrity of the graft. Our aim in this study was to document the time-dependent mechanical properties of the morsellised graft. This information is useful in clinical application of the graft, in studies of migration of the implant and in the design of the joint. We used 16 specimens of impacted, morsellised cancellous bone from the sternum of goats to assess the mechanical properties by confined compression creep tests. Consideration of the graft material as a porous, permeable solid, filled with fluid, allowed determination of the compressive modulus of the matrix, and its permeability to fluid flow. In all specimens the compression tests showed large, irreversible deformations, caused by flow-independent creep behaviour as a result of rolling and sliding of the bone chips. The mean permeability was 8.82 *10(-12) m4/Ns (SD 43%), and the compressive modulus was 38.7 MPa (SD 34%). No correlation was found between the apparent density and the permeability or between the apparent density and the compressive modulus. The irreversible deformations in the graft could be captured by a creep law, for which the parameters were quantified. We conclude that in clinical use the graft is bound to be subject to permanent deformation after operation. The permeability of the material is relatively high compared with, for example, human cartilage. The confined compression modulus is relatively low compared with cancellous bone of the same apparent density. Designs of prostheses used in revision surgery must accommodate the viscoelastic and permanent deformations in the graft without causing loosening at the interface. PMID:10615985

  8. Effect of preparatory information prior to elective total hip replacement on psychological coping outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gammon, J; Mulholland, C W

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of preparatory information on psychological coping outcomes among total hip replacement (THR) patients. A quasi-experimental design within an ethnographic clinical context was used. Eighty-two healthy individuals, scheduled for elective THR were recruited for the study and nonrandom selection techniques were used. The subjects in the experimental group were given procedural, sensory and coping information relating to the whole surgical procedure of a THR. In addition, written information was given to support the verbal information. Subjects in the control group received only the advice and support that would routinely be given to THR patients by ward, medical and nursing staff. The main outcomes were measured using standard questionnaires, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) measuring anxiety and depression, Rosenburg Self-Esteem Scale measuring self-esteem, and Health Illness Questionnaire measuring sense of control. Lastly, a Linear Analogue Coping Scale was developed and applied to assess a subject's personal perception of coping with a THR. Providing information had positive effects on the psychological coping outcomes measured. Subjects in the experimental group had significantly less anxiety and depression with a high self-esteem and sense of control. The Linear Analogue Coping Scale demonstrated a strong correlation between how subjects believed they were coping and that measured using the standard questionnaires. The study concluded that preparatory information of various types and in different forms appears to have positive effects on psychological coping outcomes for THR patients, which may have influenced postoperative recovery. PMID:8858434

  9. Observations on the initial stability of acetabular components in total hip arthroplasty. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Pitto, R P; Sterzl, M; Hohmann, D

    1996-01-01

    It was the purpose of the study to investigate the initial stability, with or without screws, of 3 acetabular components with press-fit anchoring, by measuring bone-prosthesis micromovements during the application of physiological loading on the hip simulated in the laboratory. The prostheses, already used clinically, were characterized by different shapes and coatings. For the purposes of the study a total of 30 acetabula were used in 10 human pelves in polyurethane and 5 human pelves preserved at -20 degrees. The pelves were assembled on a hydraulic bench test with a steel jig that could be oriented, and they were cemented with polymethylmethacrylate. Three electromagnetic transducers with sensitivity of up to 1 micron (+ 500 microns) were used to measure the micromovements between the prosthesis and the acetabular rim in its three anatomical quadrants. Bone-prosthesis micromovements were recorded during 5 consecutive load tests, from 0 to 2.39 kN (244 kg). Experimental studies have shown that bone-prosthesis micromovement that exceeds 150 microns obstructs bone integration. The most significant micromovement was observed for all of the prostheses, without accessory screws, in the iliac quadrant, but only the hemispherical one with a semi-smooth surface in zirconium oxide surpassed the threshold of 150 microns. Prostheses with a porous surface demonstrated good stability (102 +/- 33 microns and 94 +/- 36 microns, respectively). None of the prostheses demonstrated micromovement exceeding 90 microns in the area corresponding to the pubis and the ischium. The use of 2 accessory screws sensitively increased the stability of all of the prostheses on the ilium, reducing the average micromovement by 40 microns. Reduction of micromovement was less on the pubis and on the ischium. PMID:8968114

  10. Late Anterior Dislocation Due to Posterior Pelvic Tilt in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroki; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Takagishi, Kenji; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    Background: Excessive pelvic tilt may be one of the factors leading to instability in total hip arthroplasty (THA), even when the acetabular cup is placed properly. To our knowledge, only a few studies have described late anterior dislocation due to posterior pelvic tilt. We present 3 cases with late anterior dislocations possibly due to posterior pelvic tilt. Cases Presentations: Case-1: An 84-years-old woman fell and presented with an anterior dislocation 12-years after THA. Her pelvis had tilted to approximately 30° posteriorly in a supine position. After conservative treatment, she presented with 10 recurrent anterior dislocations. She had thoracolumbar kyphosis due to multiple compression fractures. Revision with anterior placement of an elevated liner and a 32-mm head corrected the dislocation, and no further dislocations occurred. Case-2: A 78-years-old woman fell and presented with an anterior dislocation 4-years after THA. Her posterior pelvic tilt had increased 23° due to a lumbar compression fracture. Revision by decreasing the cup anteversion was performed, but recurrent posterior dislocations occurred. Owing to her worsened general condition, further treatment was abandoned. Case-3: A 79-years-old woman twisted her body and presented an anterior dislocation 3-years after THA. After manual reduction and conservative treatment, the dislocation recurred. Her posterior pelvic tilt had increased 16°. Conclusion: Although minor trauma triggered the anterior instability in these patients, the underlying pathomechanism existed in the progressive pelvic posterior tilt due to thoracolumbar kyphosis. As longer life expectancy as well as implant survivorship is predicted, attention must be paid to the change of pelvic tilt in elderly patients. PMID:27398108

  11. A visual-aided wireless monitoring system design for total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Gao, Jiyang; Su, Shaojie; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Zhihua

    2015-04-01

    To improve the positioning accuracy of implants in Total Hip Replacement (THR) surgeries, a visual-aided wireless monitoring system for THR surgery is proposed in this paper. This system aims to measure and display the contact distribution and relative pose between femoral head and acetabulum prosthesis during the surgery to help surgeons obtain accurate position of implants. The system consists of two parts: the Sensors Array Measuring System (SAMS) and the display part. The SAMS is composed of a sensors array (including contact sensors and an image sensor), signal conditioning circuits, a low power microcontroller (MCU), and a low-power transceiver. The SAMS is designed to estimate the relative pose of femoral head component to acetabular component. The display part processes the data from sensors and demonstrates the contact distribution and the pose of the prothesis during the surgery in 3-D graphics. The two parts of the system communicate with each other on an RF link at the band of 400 MHz. The signal conditioning circuits have been designed and fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS process. Testing results show that the resolution of the signal conditioning circuits is 60.1 μ Vpp (1.35 g) with ±100 mVpp input. The chip can operate under 1.2-to-3.6 V supply voltage for single battery applications with 116-160 μ A current consumption. The system has been verified by the simulation with rotation quaternion and translation vector. The experimental results show that the contact distribution and relative pose of the two components could be measured and demonstrated in real time. The relative error of rotation is less than 8% and the actual relative error of translation is less than 10%. PMID:25879970

  12. The dimensional accuracy of preparation of femoral cavity in cementless total hip arthroplasty*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-dong; Hahne, HJ; Hassenpflug, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the accuracy of femoral preparation and the position of the cementless prosthesis in femoral cavity, and to compare the results between the computer-assisted surgical group (CASPAR) and the conventional group. Methods: Ten femoral components were implanted either manually or by CASPAR in cadaver femurs. The specimens were cut to 3 mm thick slices. Microradiograms of every slice were sent to a computer for analysis with special software (IDL). The gaps and the medullary cavities between component and bone, the direct bone contact area of the implant surface, the gap width and the percentage of gap and bone contact area were measured in every slice. Results: In the proximal implant coated with HA of the CASPAR group, the average percentage of bone contact reached 93.2% (ranging from 87.6% to 99.7%); the average gap percentage was 2.9% (ranging from 0.3% to 7.8%); the maximum gap width was 0.81 mm and the average gap width was only 0.20 mm. While in the conventional group, the average percentage of bone contact reached 60.1% (ranging from 49.2% to 70.4%); the average gap percentage was 32.8% (ranging from 25.1% to 39.9%); the maximum gap width was 2.97 mm and the average gap width was 0.77 mm. The average gap around the implant in the CASPAR group was only 9% of that in the manual group; the maximum and average gap widths were only about 26% of those in the manual group. On the other hand, the CASPAR group showed 33% higher bone contact than the manual group. Conclusion: With the use of robotics-assisted system, significant progress can be achieved for femoral preparation in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:15362200

  13. Friction and stem stiffness affect dynamic interface motion in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, J H; Huiskes, R

    1996-01-01

    Large cyclic movements between the femoral stem and bone during the first weeks after total hip arthroplasty may hamper bone ingrowth and adversely affect the eventual success of the arthroplasty. Little is known, however, about the magnitude of the motions and its relationship to design and surgical factors. A two-dimensional finite element model of a cementless prosthesis inserted into the proximal femur was constructed to study the effects of two mechanical variables--the stiffness of the implant and the coefficient of friction between bone and implant--on the magnitude of the motions. We investigated the influences of these variables on the subsidence of the prosthesis, the magnitudes of the cyclic motions, and the level of the interface stresses. The presence of friction reduced cyclic motions by about 85% compared with a frictionless interface. Once friction was assumed, varying the coefficient of friction had little effect. The effect of friction on the interface stress state and gross subsidence of the prosthesis was not as great as on cyclic motion. Implant stiffness also affected the magnitudes and distributions of the cyclic motions along the interface. A flexible stem generated motions about three to four times larger proximally than those of a stiff stem, which generated larger motions distally. The influence of stem stiffness on interface stresses and prosthetic subsidence was less than on cyclic motion. The location of the peak shear stresses at the interface around a bonded prosthesis corresponded to the location where cyclic interface motion was maximal for an unbonded prosthesis. However, no direct relationship was found between the magnitudes of peak stresses and the amplitudes of cyclic motions. PMID:8618164

  14. A Stereophotogrammetric System For The Detection Of Prosthesis Loosening In Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumrind, Sheldon; Genant, Harry K.; Hunter, John; Miller, David; Moffitt, Francis; Murray, William R.; Ross, Steven E.

    1980-07-01

    Loosening of the prosthetic device occurs in about 5% of cases following placement of total hip prostheses (THP). Early detection of loosening is much desired but is difficult to achieve using conventional methods. Due to errors of projection, it is quite possible to fail to detect mobility of even as much as 5 mm on single x-ray films. We are attempting to develop a simplified photogrammetric system suitable for general hospital use which could detect loosening of 0.8 mm at the 95 % level of confidence without use of complex stereoplotting equipment. Metal reference markers are placed in the shaft of the femur and in the acetabular region of the pelvis at the time of surgery. The distances between these reference markers and certain unambiguous points on the prostheses are computed analytically using an X-Y acoustical digitizer (accuracy ± 0.1 mm) and software developed previously for craniofacial measurement. Separate stereopairs of the joint region are taken under weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing conditions. Differences in the measured distances between the bo-ne markers and the prosthetic components on the two stereopairs are taken as indicators of prosthesis loosening. Measurements on a phantom using ten different x-ray stereopairs taken from as many different perspectives have established that true linear distances between reference points and prostheses can be measured at the desired reliability with the present low precision system. Preliminary in vivo measurements indicate that the main unresolved problem is the movement of the subject between the two exposures of each single stereopair. Two possible solutions to this problem are discussed.

  15. Does Physical Activity Increase After Total Hip or Knee Arthroplasty for Osteoarthritis? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Arnold, John B; Walters, Julie L; Ferrar, Katia E

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Background Despite improvements in self-reported symptoms and perceived functional ability after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), it is unclear whether changes in objectively measured physical activity (PA) occur after surgery. Objective To determine if objectively measured PA increases after THA and TKA in adults with osteoarthritis. Methods Five electronic databases were searched from inception to March 3, 2015. All study designs objectively measuring PA before and after THA or TKA were eligible, including randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies. Two reviewers independently screened abstracts and full texts and extracted study demographic, PA, and clinical outcome data. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for accelerometer- and pedometer-derived estimates of PA. Risk of methodological bias was assessed with Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklists. Results Eight studies with a total of 373 participants (238 TKA, 135 THA) were included. Findings were mixed regarding improvement in objectively measured PA at 6 months after THA (SMDs, -0.20 to 1.80) and TKA (SMDs, -0.36 to 0.63). Larger improvements from 2 studies at 1 year postsurgery were generally observed after THA (SMDs, 0.39 to 0.79) and TKA (SMDs, 0.10 to 0.85). However, at 1 year, PA levels were still considerably lower than those of healthy controls (THA SMDs, -0.25 to -0.77; TKA SMDs, -1.46 to -1.80). Risk-of-bias scores ranged from 3 to 9 out of 11 (27%-82%) for cohort studies, and from 3 to 8 out of 10 (30%-80%) for case-control studies. Conclusion The best available evidence indicates negligible changes in PA at 6 months after THA or TKA, with limited evidence for larger changes at 1 year after surgery. In the 4 studies that reported control-group data, postoperative PA levels were still considerably less than those of healthy controls. Improved perioperative

  16. Mid-to long-term results of revision total hip replacement in patients aged 50 years or younger.

    PubMed

    Lee, P T H; Lakstein, D L; Lozano, B; Safir, O; Backstein, J; Gross, A E

    2014-08-01

    Revision total hip replacement (THR) for young patients is challenging because of technical complexity and the potential need for subsequent further revisions. We have assessed the survivorship, functional outcome and complications of this procedure in patients aged < 50 years through a large longitudinal series with consistent treatment algorithms. Of 132 consecutive patients (181 hips) who underwent revision THR, 102 patients (151 hips) with a mean age of 43 years (22 to 50) were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 11 years (2 to 26) post-operatively. We attempted to restore bone stock with allograft where indicated. Using further revision for any reason as an end point, the survival of the acetabular component was 71% (sd 4) and 54% (sd 7) at ten- and 20 years. The survival of the femoral component was 80% (sd 4) and 62% (sd 6) at ten- and 20 years. Complications included 11 dislocations (6.1%), ten periprosthetic fractures (5.5%), two deep infections (1.1%), four sciatic nerve palsies (2.2%; three resolved without intervention, one improved after exploration and freeing from adhesions) and one vascular injury (0.6%). The mean modified Harris Hip Score was 41 (10 to 82) pre-operatively, 77 (39 to 93) one year post-operatively and 77 (38 to 93) at the latest review. This overall perspective on the mid- to long-term results is valuable when advising young patients on the prospects of revision surgery at the time of primary replacement. PMID:25086120

  17. Clinical evaluation following the use of mineralized collagen graft for bone defects in revision total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Qin, Liwu; Yan, Wei; Weng, Xisheng; Huang, Xiangjie

    2015-01-01

    Revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) with massive bone loss has been a real challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Here we describe an approach using mineralized collagen (MC) graft to reconstruct acetabulum and femur with massive bone defects. We identified 89 patients suffering acetabular or femoral bone defects after primary THA, who required revision THA for this study. During the surgery, MC was applied to reconstruct both the acetabular and femoral defects. Harris hip score was used to evaluate hip function while radiographs were taken to estimate bone formation in the defect regions. The average follow-up period was 33.6 ± 2.4 months. None of the components needed re-revised. Mean Harris hip scores were 42.5 ± 3.5 before operation, 75.2 ± 4.0 at 10th month and 95.0 ± 3.6 at the final follow-up. There were no instances of deep infection, severe venous thrombosis or nerve palsy. The present study demonstrated that MC graft can serve as a promising option for revision THA with massive bone deficiency. Meanwhile, extended follow-up is needed to further prove its long-term performance. PMID:26816647

  18. Management of a full-thickness burn to the foot following sciatic nerve palsy secondary to primary total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Jabir, Shehab; Frew, Quentin; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic nerve palsy following total hip replacement is a rare but serious complication. The neurological sequelae that follow range from pure sensory loss to combined motor and sensory loss involving most of the lower limb. The loss of nociceptive feedback predisposes patients to accidental damage to the lower limb. We present the case of a lady with sciatic nerve palsy who sustained full-thickness burn injuries to her foot via a hot water bottle. The dilemma between debridement and grafting following a recent history of surgical trauma (ie, total hip replacement) versus secondary healing via dressings and regular review is discussed. Although grafting is the standard treatment in such burns, we recommend secondary healing over grafting provided the burns are not extensive. This enables potential recovery of sensation and reduces operative trauma to the limb which may retard resolution of the neuropraxia. PMID:23595171

  19. Long-term results of the threaded Mecron cup in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Clarius, Michael; Jung, Alexander W.; Streit, Marcus R.; Merle, Christian; Raiss, Patric

    2009-01-01

    In the 1970s, high failure rates of cemented acetabular components, especially in young patients, in the middle- and long-term prompted a search for alternatives. The Mecring was one of the most popular first generation uncemented, threaded cups widely used in the 1980s for arthroplasty of the hip. First generation threaded cups commonly had smooth surface treatment and showed unacceptably high failure rates in the mid-term. In a consecutive series of 209 patients, 221 threaded uncemented acetabular cups with smooth surface treatment (Mecring) had been implanted in combination with one type of uncemented stem. Patients were followed up clinically and radiographically. The mean time of follow-up was 17 (range 15–20) years. In 91 (41%) hips the acetabular component had been revised or was awaiting revision: two hips for infection and 84 (38%) for aseptic loosening. Five hips were awaiting revision. The survival rate for all revisions including hips awaiting revision was 49% (95% CI: 41–57%) at 17 years. These results support the view that smooth, threaded acetabular components do not provide satisfactory long-term fixation and should be abandoned. Patients with these components must be closely monitored as the failure rate remains high in the long-term. PMID:19629481

  20. The validity of a novel radiological method for measuring femoral stem version on anteroposterior radiographs of the hip after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Weber, M; Lechler, P; von Kunow, F; Völlner, F; Keshmiri, A; Hapfelmeier, A; Grifka, J; Renkawitz, T

    2015-03-01

    Femoral stem version has a major influence on impingement and early post-operative stability after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of a novel radiological method for measuring stem version. Anteroposterior (AP) radiographs and three-dimensional CT scans were obtained for 115 patients (female/male 63/72, mean age 62.5 years (50 to 75)) who had undergone minimally invasive, cementless THA. Stem version was calculated from the AP hip radiograph by rotation-based change in the projected prosthetic neck-shaft (NSA*) angle using the mathematical formula ST = arcos [tan (NSA*) / tan (135)]. We used two independent observers who repeated the analysis after a six-week interval. Radiological measurements were compared with 3D-CT measurements by an independent, blinded external institute. We found a mean difference of 1.2° (sd 6.2) between radiological and 3D-CT measurements of stem version. The correlation between the mean radiological and 3D-CT stem torsion was r = 0.88 (p < 0.001). The intra- (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.94) and inter-observer agreement (mean concordance correlation coefficient = 0.87) for the radiological measurements were excellent. We found that femoral tilt was associated with the mean radiological measurement error (r = 0.22, p = 0.02). The projected neck-shaft angle is a reliable method for measuring stem version on AP radiographs of the hip after a THA. However, a highly standardised radiological technique is required for its precise measurement. PMID:25737512

  1. No association between serum metal ions and implant fixation in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Søballe, Kjeld; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of failure of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been related to a high rate of metal wear debris, which is partly generated from the head-trunnion interface. However, it is not known whether implant fixation is affected by metal wear debris. Patients and methods 49 cases of MoM THA in 41 patients (10 women) with a mean age of 52 (28–68) years were followed with stereoradiographs after surgery and at 1, 2, and 5 years to analyze implant migration by radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients also participated in a 5- to 7-year follow-up with measurement of serum metal ions, questionnaires (Oxford hip score (OHS) and Harris hip score (HHS)), and measurement of cup and stem positions and systemic bone mineral density. Results At 1–2 years, mean total translation (TT) was 0.04 mm (95% CI: –0.07 to 0.14; p = 0.5) for the stems; at 2–5 years, mean TT was 0.13 mm (95% CI: –0.25 to –0.01; p = 0.03), but within the precision limit of the method. For the cups, there was no statistically significant TT or total rotation (TR) at 1–2 and 2–5 years. At 2–5 years, we found 4 cups and 5 stems with TT migrations exceeding the precision limit of the method. There was an association between cup migration and total OHS < 40 (4 patients, 4 hips; p = 0.04), but there were no statistically significant associations between cup or stem migration and T-scores < –1 (n = 10), cup and stem positions, or elevated serum metal ion levels (> 7µg/L (4 patients, 6 hips)). Interpretation Most cups and stems were well-fixed at 1–5 years. However, at 2–5 years, 4 cups and 5 stems had TT migrations above the precision limits, but these patients had serum metal ion levels similar to those of patients without measurable migrations, and they were pain-free. Patients with serum metal ion levels > 7 µg/L had migrations similar to those in patients with serum metal ion levels < 7 µg/L. Metal wear debris does not appear to influence the

  2. Risk stratification algorithm for management of patients with dual modular taper total hip arthroplasty: consensus statement of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the Hip Society.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Min; Fehring, Thomas K; Lombardi, Adolph V; Barnes, C Lowry; Cabanela, Miguel E; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2014-11-01

    Although 'dual taper' modular stems with interchangeable modular necks have the potential to optimize hip biomechanical parameters, there is increasing concern regarding the occurrence of adverse local tissue reactions from mechanically assisted crevice corrosion at the neck-stem taper junction. A systematic treatment approach (risk stratification algorithm) based on the currently available data is recommended to optimize patient management. While specialized tests such as metal ion analysis and MARS MRI are useful modalities in evaluating for adverse tissue reactions, over-reliance on any single investigative tool in the clinical decision-making process should be avoided. There should be a low threshold to perform a systematic evaluation of patients with dual taper stem total hip arthroplasty as early recognition and diagnosis will facilitate the initiation of appropriate treatment. PMID:25189673

  3. Effects of Continuous Intravenous Infusion of Methoxamine on the Intraoperative Hemodynamics of Elderly Patients Undergoing Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Defeng; Wu, Yue; Yang, Lin; Han, Jun; Liu, Ruochuan; Wang, Lijie

    2014-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic disturbances are common during continuous epidural anesthesia in elderly patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. This study aimed to investigate the effects of methoxamine on the intraoperative hemodynamics in elderly patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty under epidural anesthesia. Material/Methods This prospective study included 150 elderly patients undergoing elective total hip arthroplasty under epidural anesthesia. Patients were randomly assigned into 5 groups (n=30 per group): a control group receiving saline (Group C), a dopamine group receiving 7 μg/kg/min dopamine (Group D), and methoxamine groups receiving 1, 2, or 3 μg/kg/min methoxamine (Groups M1, M2, and M3, respectively). Hemodynamic parameters were assessed 10 min before anesthesia (T1); 10 min (T2), 20 min, (T3), 30 min (T4), and 60 min (T5) after anesthesia; and at the conclusion of surgery (T6). Results At T2–T6, the mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, cardiac output, stroke volume, stroke volume ratio, and pulmonary vascular resistance were higher in Groups D, M2, and M3 compared to Group C (p<0.05). Compared to Group D, the heart rate and rate pressure product were significantly lower in Groups M1–M3. Infusion volume, ephedrine dose, and postoperative 24-h urine volume were significantly lower and intraoperative urine volume was significantly greater in Groups D, M2, and M3 compared with Group C. Hypertension occurred more frequently in Group M3 than in any other group. Conclusions Continuous intravenous infusion of 2 μg/kg/min methoxamine is safe and effective in maintaining hemodynamic stability in elderly patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. PMID:25326008

  4. Do we need hip-ankle radiographs to assess the coronal alignment and implant position after total knee replacement?

    PubMed Central

    Dargel, Jens; Oppermann, Johannes; Eysel, Peer; Penning, Lenhard

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Restoration of the coronal alignment of the knee is known to be one of the major criteria of a successful total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It therefore appears to be mandatory to routinely assess the postoperative limb alignment using hip-ankle radiographs and to identify implants that may be at risk of premature failure. However, there is no clear consensus whether weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs or rather standardized a-p knee-radiographs should be used to assess implant position and coronal alignment after TKA. It is the aim of the present study to investigate if implant position and the mechanical alignment after TKA can reproducibly be assessed using standardized a-p knee-radiographs or rather if weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs are needed. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 100 postoperative weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs after conventional primary TKA. The true mechanical and anatomical femorotibial angle as well as coronal implant position (MPTA, LDFA) was assessed using the MediCAD software, which served as a control. The hip-ankle radiographs were then digitally cropped to 80%, 60% and 40% of the leg-length. In each cropped radiograph, tibial coronal implant position was assessed by referencing against the visible mid-shaft, whereas femoral implant position was referenced against the visible mid-shaft (anatomical axis) or against a surrogate mechanical axis, which was drawn perpendicular to the distal tangent of the femoral component. Each measurement was performed by three independent observers. The difference between the alignment parameters in the hip-ankle radiographs were statistically compared with the cropped radiographs and the inter-observer correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for each parameter. Results: The ICC for inter-observer agreement of measurement of the mechanical femorotibial angle was significantly higher in hip-ankle radiographs (.95) when compared with a radiograph cropped

  5. Impact of an Automated Surveillance to Detect Surgical-Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Perdiz, Luciana B; Yokoe, Deborah S; Furtado, Guilherme H; Medeiros, Eduardo A S

    2016-08-01

    In this retrospective study, we compared automated surveillance with conventional surveillance to detect surgical site infection after primary total hip or knee arthroplasty. Automated surveillance demonstrated better efficacy than routine surveillance in SSI diagnosis, sensitivity, and predictive negative value in hip and knee arthroplasty. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:991-993. PMID:27072598

  6. [Delayed paresis of the femoral nerve after total hip arthroplasty associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP)].

    PubMed

    Schuh, A; Dürr, V; Weier, H; Zeiler, G; Winterholler, M

    2004-07-01

    Delayed lesions of the femoral or sciatic nerve are a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty. Several cases in association with cement edges, scar tissue, broken cerclages, deep hematoma, or reinforcement rings have been published. We report about a 62-year-old female who developed a pure motor paresis of the quadriceps muscle 2 weeks after total hip arthroplasty. After electrophysiological evaluation had revealed an isolated femoral nerve lesion, revision of the femoral nerve was performed. During operative revision no pathologic findings could be seen. One week later the patient developed paralysis of the left wrist and finger extensors after using crutches. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed several nerve conduction blocks in physiological entrapments and the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) was established. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a rare disease with increased vulnerability of the peripheral nerve system with mostly reversible sensorimotor deficits. It should be taken into consideration in cases of atypical findings of compression syndromes of peripheral nerves or delayed neuropathy, e. g., after total hip arthroplasty. PMID:15083272

  7. Good outcome of total hip replacement in patients with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    King, Garry; Hunt, Linda P; Wilkinson, J Mark; Blom, Ashley W

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — People with cerebral palsy (CP) often have painful deformed hips, but they are seldom treated with hip replacement as the surgery is considered to be high risk. However, few data are available on the outcome of hip replacement in these patients. Patients and methods — We linked Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) records to the National Joint Registry for England and Wales to identify 389 patients with CP who had undergone hip replacement. Their treatment and outcomes were compared with those of 425,813 patients who did not have CP. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated to describe implant survivorship and the curves were compared using log-rank tests, with further stratification for age and implant type. Reasons for revision were quantified as patient-time incidence rates (PTIRs). Nationally collected patient-reported outcomes (PROMS) before and 6 months after operation were compared if available. Cumulative mortality (Kaplan-Meier) was estimated at 90 days and at 1, 3, and 5 years. Results — The cumulative probability of revision at 5 years post-surgery was 6.4% (95% CI: 3.8–11) in the CP cohort as opposed to 2.9% (CI 2.9–3%) in the non-CP cohort (p < 0.001). Patient-reported outcomes showed that CP patients had worse pain and function preoperatively, but had equivalent postoperative improvement. The median improvement in Oxford hip score at 6 months was 23 (IQR: 14–28) in CP and it was 21 (14–28) in non-CP patients. 91% of CP patients reported good or excellent satisfaction with their outcome. The cumulative probability of mortality for CP up to 7 years was similar to that in the controls after stratification for age and sex. Interpretation — Hip replacement for cerebral palsy appears to be safe and effective, although implant revision rates are higher than those in patients without cerebral palsy. PMID:26863583

  8. Structural allograft and cemented long-stem prosthesis for complex revision hip arthroplasty: use of a trochanteric claw plate improves final hip function

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, Camille Thevenin; Kerboull, Marcel; Courpied, Jean Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Extensive bone loss raises formidable challenges in total hip revision. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of reconstruction using a cemented long-stem and massive structural allograft implanted in a filleted proximal femur, with and without the use of a trochanteric claw plate. Between 1988 and 2001, 44 revisions were performed in 42 patients. After a transtrochanteric approach, the femur was cut longitudinally. A long, cemented Charnley-type prosthesis was used, and flaps of the residual femur were folded around the allograft. The greater trochanter was reinserted with wires in all revisions, and with both wires and a claw plate in 20 revisions. Mean follow-up was 7.15 years (range: 3–16); seven patients, died and four were lost to follow-up. The follow-up exceeded five years in 34 patients. The major complication was nonunion of the greater trochanter, which occurred in 25 cases. Six dislocations, one recurrence of infection, two mechanical loosening, and two fractures below the stem were also recorded. The use of a trochanteric claw plate significantly improved final hip stability, even in patients with nonunion. Femoral reconstruction with a massive structural allograft is reliable and long-lived, and serious complications and long-term resorption are uncommon. The use of a trochanteric claw plate significantly improves final hip stability. Level of evidence: Therapeutic study, level III (retrospective comparative study). PMID:18008098

  9. Hydroxyapatite coating does not improve uncemented stem survival after total hip arthroplasty!

    PubMed Central

    Hailer, Nils P; Lazarinis, Stergios; Mäkelä, Keijo T; Eskelinen, Antti; Fenstad, Anne M; Hallan, Geir; Havelin, Leif; Overgaard, Søren; Pedersen, Alma B; Mehnert, Frank; Kärrholm, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose It is still being debated whether HA coating of uncemented stems used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) improves implant survival. We therefore investigated different uncemented stem brands, with and without HA coating, regarding early and long-term survival. Patients and methods We identified 152,410 THA procedures using uncemented stems that were performed between 1995 and 2011 and registered in the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) database. We excluded 19,446 procedures that used stem brands less than 500 times in each country, procedures performed due to diagnoses other than osteoarthritis or pediatric hip disease, and procedures with missing information on the type of coating. 22 stem brands remained (which were used in 116,069 procedures) for analysis of revision of any component. 79,192 procedures from Denmark, Norway, and Sweden were analyzed for the endpoint stem revision. Unadjusted survival rates were calculated according to Kaplan-Meier, and Cox proportional hazards models were fitted in order to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for the risk of revision with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Unadjusted 10-year survival with the endpoint revision of any component for any reason was 92.1% (CI: 91.8–92.4). Unadjusted 10-year survival with the endpoint stem revision due to aseptic loosening varied between the stem brands investigated and ranged from 96.7% (CI: 94.4–99.0) to 99.9% (CI: 99.6–100). Of the stem brands with the best survival, stems with and without HA coating were found. The presence of HA coating was not associated with statistically significant effects on the adjusted risk of stem revision due to aseptic loosening, with an HR of 0.8 (CI: 0.5–1.3; p = 0.4). The adjusted risk of revision due to infection was similar in the groups of THAs using HA-coated and non-HA-coated stems, with an HR of 0.9 (CI: 0.8–1.1; p = 0.6) for the presence of HA coating. The commonly used Bimetric stem (n = 25,329) was

  10. Early surgical and functional outcomes comparison of the supercapsular percutaneously-assisted total hip and traditional posterior surgical techniques for total hip arthroplasty: protocol for a randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Michael D.; Gofton, Wade; Erwin, Lindsey; Chow, James

    2015-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most commonly performed and successful orthopaedic surgeries. While the long-term success of THA is well documented, there is still significant room for improving patient speed of recovery and return to activities. The surgical technique used during THA has the potential to affect these early outcomes. Methods The described design is a single center, prospective, randomized, controlled study. Subjects will be randomized to receive THA using either the supercapsular percutaneously-assisted total hip (SuperPath) or traditional posterior surgical techniques. Subjects will be evaluated using Timed Up and Go (TUG), Timed Stair Climb (TSC), Hip Dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain level estimation preoperatively, during the hospital stay, and at 2, 6 weeks, and 100 days post-discharge. Other endpoints to be evaluated include: length of stay (LOS); discharge status; transfusion rates; readmission rates; complication rates; operative time; date returned to work; and acetabular component anteversion and inclination angles. Discussion The described study will determine the effect of a tissue-sparing surgical technique on short term subject recovery following THA in comparison to the most commonly used technique in clinical practice. PMID:26734645

  11. Regional uptake an variations in orthopaedic enhanced recovery pathways in knee and hip total arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mawdsley, M J; Baker, P N; Desai, A; Green, R N; Jevons, L

    2016-05-01

    The use of enhanced recovery (ER) pathways for hip and knee arthroplasty has increased over the last decade, and the adoption within orthopaedics is becoming more common. We have demonstrated a regional variation and institutional inconsistency of uptake and delivery of ER pathways in our region. Units that have a unified pathway were more likely to have consistency in treatment and early analgesia for patients. We would advocate that units use an agreed enhanced recovery pathway to optimise patient recovery from hip and knee arthroplasties. PMID:27400490

  12. Modular titanium alloy neck failure in total hip replacement: analysis of a relapse case.

    PubMed

    Ceretti, Marco; Falez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Modular neck hip prosthesis born in the 1990 with the aim of allowing the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intra-operatively restoring patient's original biomechanics. In order to achieve the best biomechanics of the reconstructed hip, preoperative planning is essential. In the last few years modularity has been questioned and an argument made for the return to mono block stems due to events of breakage or disconnection of modular components. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such modular device due to the contamination inside the modular coupling or to high loads. We present a case of repetitive modular femoral neck prosthesis fracture. PMID:27163109

  13. Nonmodular flexible press-fit cup in primary total hip arthroplasty: 15-year followup.

    PubMed

    Berli, Bernhard J; Ping, Gu; Dick, Walter; Morscher, Erwin W

    2007-08-01

    The key rationale for a nonmodular flexible press-fit cup was to maximize long-term stability with a cementless, porous metal-coated cup that is low in stiffness (no metal shell) and to achieve fixation solely through biradial eccentricity between the cup and the acetabular cavity. We asked whether the promising results achieved at 5 and 10 years would be maintained at 15 years. We reviewed 261 patients who received the first 280 Morscher Press-Fit Cups. One hundred twenty patients (126 hips) died. One hundred one patients (112 hips) had a clinical and radiographic followup after a minimum of 13.5 years (mean, 14.7 years; range, 13.5-17.0 years). Twenty-four patients with 26 hips were clinically examined or interviewed by telephone. Three of the 101 patients were lost to followup. We judged the results excellent or good in 96% of the hips. The 15-year overall survivorship was 95.3% and with the end point of aseptic loosening, the survivorship was 97.5%. Wear was greater in cups with an inclination greater than 45 degrees and in metal-polyethylene pairings compared with ceramic-polyethylene pairings. This cup design performs well over the long term. PMID:17415011

  14. Low in vitro third-body wear on total hip prostheses induced by calcium sulphate used for local antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, R; Wahl, P; Krieg, J; Gautier, E

    2014-01-01

    In case of implant associated infection, implant preservation is associated with high failure rates. Therefore, a removal or exchange of the implant is most often mandatory for treatment success. Alternatively, under cer