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Sample records for chartarum induce immunotoxic

  1. Co-cultivation of Streptomyces californicus and Stachybotrys chartarum stimulates the production of cytostatic compound(s) with immunotoxic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Penttinen, Piia . E-mail: Piia.Penttinen@ktl.fi; Pelkonen, Jukka; Huttunen, Kati; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2006-12-15

    We have recently shown that the actinobacterium Streptomyces californicus and the fungus Stachybotrys chartarum originating from moisture damaged buildings possess both immunotoxic and immunostimulatory characteristics, which are synergistically potentiated by microbial interaction. In the search for the causative agent(s) behind the immunotoxicity, the cytostatic effects of the co-cultivated spores of S. californicus and S. chartarum were compared to those caused by widely used cytostatic agents produced by streptomycetes. The RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed to four doses of doxorubicin (DOX), actinomycin D (AMD), mitomycin C (MMC) or phleomycin (PHLEO) for 24 h. Kinetics of the spores of the co-cultivated and the separately cultivated microbes (1 x 10{sup 6} spores/ml) was compared to DOX (0.15 {mu}M). Apoptotic responses were analyzed by measuring DNA content and mitochondria membrane depolarization with flow cytometer, and by the fluorometric caspase-3 assay. The present data indicate that interactions during co-cultivation of S. californicus and S. chartarum stimulate the production of an unidentified cytostatic compound(s) capable of inducing mitochondria mediated apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at S-G{sub 2}/M. The spores of co-cultivated microbes caused a 4-fold collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and an almost 6-fold caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation when compared to control. Similar responses were induced by DNA cleaving compounds, especially DOX and AMD, at the relatively low concentrations, but not the spores of the same microbes when they were grown separately. These data suggest that when growing in the same habitat, interactions between S. californicus and S. chartarum stimulates the production of an unknown cytostatic compound(s) which evoke immunotoxic effects similar to those by chemotherapeutic drugs.

  2. Microcystin-LR Induced Immunotoxicity in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Yaqoob; Bhide, Mangla; Koiri, Raj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Microcystins are toxic molecules produced by cyanobacterial blooms due to water eutrophication. Exposure to microcystins is a global health problem because of its association with various other pathological effects and people all over the world are exposed to microcystins on a regular basis. Evidence shows that microcystin-LR (MC-LR) may adversely affect the immune system, but its specific effects on immune functions are lacking. In the present review, immunotoxicological effects associated with MC-LR in animals, humans, and in vitro models have been reported. Overall, the data shows that chronic exposure to MC-LR has the potential to impair vital immune responses which could lead to increased risk of various diseases including cancers. Studies in animal and in vitro models have provided some pivotal understanding into the potential mechanisms of MC-LR related immunotoxicity suggesting that further investigation, particularly in humans, is required to better understand the relationship between development of disease and the MC-LR exposure. PMID:26925102

  3. Processed Aloe vera Gel Ameliorates Cyclophosphamide-Induced Immunotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ki-Hyang; Kim, Hee-Suk; Lee, Ki-Hwa; Shin, Eunju; Do, Seon-Gil; Jo, Tae Hyung; Park, Young In; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2014-01-01

    The effects of processed Aloe vera gel (PAG) on cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced immunotoxicity were examined in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of CP significantly reduced the total number of lymphocytes and erythrocytes in the blood. Oral administration of PAG quickly restored CP-induced lymphopenia and erythropenia in a dose-dependent manner. The reversal of CP-induced hematotoxicity by PAG was mediated by the functional preservation of Peyer’s patch cells. Peyer’s patch cells isolated from CP-treated mice, which were administered PAG, produced higher levels of T helper 1 cytokines and colony-stimulating factors (CSF) in response to concanavalin A stimulation as compared with those isolated from CP-treated control mice. PAG-derived polysaccharides directly activated Peyer’s patch cells isolated from normal mice to produce cytokines including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, interferon-γ, granulocyte-CSF, and granulocyte-macrophage-CSF. The cytokines produced by polysaccharide-stimulated Peyer’s patch cells had potent proliferation-inducing activity on mouse bone marrow cells. In addition, oral administration of PAG restored IgA secretion in the intestine after CP treatment. These results indicated that PAG could be an effective immunomodulator and that it could prevent CP-induced immunotoxic side effects. PMID:25347273

  4. Systemic immunotoxicity reactions induced by adjuvanted vaccines.

    PubMed

    Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Portuondo, Deivys; Pérez, O; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2014-05-01

    Vaccine safety is a topic of concern for the treated individual, the family, the health care personnel, and the others involved in vaccination programs as recipients or providers. Adjuvants are necessary components to warrant the efficacy of vaccines, however the overstimulation of the immune system is also associated with adverse effects. Local reactions are the most frequent manifestation of toxicity induced by adjuvanted vaccines and, with the exception of the acute phase response (APR), much less is known about the systemic reactions that follow vaccination. Their low frequency or subclinical expression meant that this matter has been neglected. In this review, various systemic reactions associated with immune stimulation will be addressed, including: APR, hypersensitivity, induction or worsening of autoimmune diseases, modification of hepatic metabolism and vascular leak syndrome (VLS), with an emphasis on the mechanism involved. Finally, the authors analyze the current focus of discussion about vaccine safety and opportunities to improve the design of new adjuvanted vaccines in the future. PMID:24607449

  5. Oxidative stress and immunotoxicity induced by graphene oxide in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjie; Yin, Junfa; Liang, Yong; Yuan, Shaopeng; Wang, Fengbang; Song, Maoyong; Wang, Hailin

    2016-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively explored as a promising nanomaterial for applications in biology because of its unique properties. Therefore, systematic investigation of GO toxicity is essential to determine its fate in the environment and potential adverse effects. In this study, acute toxicity, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity of GO were investigated in zebrafish. No obvious acute toxicity was observed when zebrafish were exposed to 1, 5, 10 or 50mg/L GO for 14 days. However, a number of cellular alterations were detected by histological analysis of the liver and intestine, including vacuolation, loose arrangement of cells, histolysis and disintegration of cell boundaries. As evidence for oxidative stress, malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were increased and glutathione content was decreased in the liver after treatment with GO. GO treatment induced an immune response in zebrafish, as demonstrated by increased expression of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 β, and interleukin-6 in the spleen. Our findings demonstrated that GO administration in an aquatic system can cause oxidative stress and immune toxicity in adult zebrafish. To our knowledge, this is the first report of immune toxicity of GO in zebrafish. PMID:26921726

  6. Shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles induce lower immunotoxicity than their non-crosslinked analogs

    PubMed Central

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Samarajeewa, Sandani; Raymond, Jeffery E.; Clark, Corrie; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    The development of stable nanoparticles that can withstand the changing conditions experienced in a biological setting and also be of low toxicity and immunogenicity is of particular importance to address the problems associated with currently utilized nanotechnology-based therapeutics and diagnostics. The use of crosslinked nanoparticles continues to receive special impetus, due to their robust structure and high kinetic stability, and they have recently been shown to induce lower cytotoxicity than their non-crosslinked micellar counterparts. In the current study, poly(acrylamidoethylamine)-block-poly(DL-lactide) (PAEA90-b-PDLLA40) copolymers were synthesized, self-assembled in water to yield nanoscopic polymeric micelles, and the effects of decorating the micellar surface with poly(ethylene glycol) (i.e. PEGylation) and crosslinking the PAEA layer to varying extents on the physicochemical characteristics, cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity of the nanoparticles were studied. Herein, we report for the first time that crosslinking can efficiently reduce the immunotoxicity of polymeric nanomaterials. In addition, increasing the degree of crosslinking further reduced the accessibility of biomolecules to the core of the nanoparticles and decreased their cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity. It is also highlighted that crosslinking can be more efficient than PEGylation in reducing the immunotoxicity of nanomaterials. Shell-crosslinking of block copolymer micelles, therefore, is expected to advance their clinical development beyond the earlier known effects, and to broaden the implications in the field of nanomedicine. PMID:24187610

  7. Effect of thyroidectomy and thyroxine on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced immunotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Pazdernik, T.L.; Rozman, K.K.

    1985-02-18

    Radiothyroidectomy protected against 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced immunotoxicity in rats as assessed by the spleen anti-SRBC plaque-forming cell assay. Thyroxin (T/sub 4/) replacement therapy partially reversed the effects of thyroidectomy on T/sub 4/ and triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) serum levels, body weight and immune function as well as restored TCDD-induced immunotoxicity. Thus, hypothyroidism induced by TCDD exposure can be viewed as a protective response of the organism to reduce the insult caused by TCDD.

  8. Immunotoxicity of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are large molecules intended to bind to specific targets often expressed on the immune system, and to treat various immunopathological conditions. Therefore, mAbs can be considered to have a high potential for immunotoxicity, which is reflected in the clinical experience accumulated on mAbs-induced adverse effects related to immunosuppression, immunostimulation and hypersensitivity (immunogenicity). So far, non clinical immunotoxicity studies have been inadequate to address all safety issues in relation to the possible immunotoxicity of mAbs, because they are fraught with limitations and pitfalls primarily related to the lack of relevant animal species. In addition, clinical studies rarely include validated end-points dedicated to the prediction of immunotoxicity. With the ongoing development of mAbs as novel therapeutic strategies for a wide variety of diseases, efforts should be paid to improve our understanding of mAbs-induced immunotoxic effects and design dedicated strategies to assess their immunological safety, both non clinically and clinically. PMID:20061816

  9. Interactions between Streptomyces californicus and Stachybotrys chartarum can induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Penttinen, Piia . E-mail: Piia.Penttinen@ktl.fi; Pelkonen, Jukka; Huttunen, Kati; Toivola, Mika; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2005-02-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures of bacteria and fungi in moisture-damaged buildings is a potential cause of inflammatory related symptoms among occupants. The present study assessed interactions between two characteristic moldy house microbes Streptomyces californicus and Stachybotrys chartarum. Differences in cytotoxic and inflammatory responses in mouse (RAW264.7) macrophages were studied after exposure to the spores of co-cultivated microbes, the mixture of separately cultivated spores, and the spores of either of these microbes cultivated alone. The RAW264.7 cells were exposed to six doses (1 x 10{sup 4} to 3 x 10{sup 6} spores/ml) for 24 h, and the time course of the induced responses was evaluated after 4, 8, 16, and 24 h of exposure (1 x 10{sup 6} spores/ml). The cytotoxic potential of the spores was characterized by the MTT test, DNA content analysis, and enzyme assay for caspase-3 activity. The production of cytokines (IL-1{beta}, IL-6, IL-10, TNF{alpha}, and MIP2) was measured immunochemically and nitric oxide by the Griess method. Co-cultivation increased the ability of the spores to cause apoptosis by more than 4-fold and the proportion of RAW264.7 cells at the G{sub 2}/M stage increased nearly 2-fold when compared to the response induced by the mixture of spores. In contrast, co-cultivation decreased significantly the ability of the spores to trigger the production of NO and IL-6 in RAW264.7 cells. In conclusion, these data suggest that co-culture of S. californicus and S. chartarum can result in microbial interactions that significantly potentiate the ability of the spores to cause apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mammalian cells.

  10. IS YOUR STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM A GENUINE S. CHARTARUM?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fungus Stachybotrys chartarum is the type species of the genus Stachybotrys. Certain strains of the species are known to produce trichothecene mycotoxins,. It is a celluolytic saprophyte with worldwide distribution and frequently discovered in water-damaged buildings. Evid...

  11. Immunotoxicity and allergic potential induced by topical application of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey E; Franko, Jennifer; Anderson, Katie L; Munson, Albert E; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B Jean

    2013-01-01

    Dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is an industrial chemical, used as a paint and adhesive solvent, with the potential for significant increases in production. Using select immune function assays, the purpose of these studies was to evaluate the immunotoxicity of DMC following dermal exposure using a murine model. Following a 28-day exposure, DMC produced a significant decrease in thymus weight at concentrations of 75% and greater. No effects on body weight, hematological parameters (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and their differentials), or immune cell phenotyping (B-cells, T-cells, and T-cell sub-sets) were identified. The IgM antibody response to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) was significantly reduced in the spleen but not the serum. DMC was not identified to be an irritant and evaluation of the sensitization potential, conducted using the local lymph node assay (LLNA) at concentrations ranging from 50-100%, did not identify increases in lymphocyte proliferation. These results demonstrate that dermal exposure to DMC induces immune suppression in a murine model and raise concern about potential human exposure and the need for occupational exposure regulations. PMID:22953780

  12. Differential Immunotoxicity Induced by Two Different Windows of Developmental Trichloroethylene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Woodruff, William; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental exposure to environmental toxicants may induce immune system alterations that contribute to adult stage autoimmune disease. We have shown that continuous exposure of MRL+/+ mice to trichloroethylene (TCE) from gestational day (GD) 0 to postnatal day (PND) 49 alters several aspects of CD4+ T cell function. This window of exposure corresponds to conception-adolescence/young adulthood in humans. More narrowly defining the window of TCE developmental exposure causes immunotoxicity that would establish the stage at which avoidance and/or intervention would be most effective. The current study divided continuous TCE exposure into two separate windows, namely, gestation only (GD0 to birth (PND0)) and early-life only (PND0-PND49). The mice were examined for specific alterations in CD4+ T cell function at PND49. One potentially long-lasting effect of developmental exposure, alterations in retrotransposon expression indicative of epigenetic alterations, was found in peripheral CD4+ T cells from both sets of developmentally exposed mice. Interestingly, certain other effects, such as alterations in thymus cellularity, were only found in mice exposed to TCE during gestation. In contrast, expansion of memory/activation cell subset of peripheral CD4+ T cells were only found in mice exposed to TCE during early life. Different windows of developmental TCE exposure can have different functional consequences. PMID:24696780

  13. Investigations of immunotoxicity and allergic potential induced by topical application of triclosan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E.; Meade, B. Jean; Long, Carrie M.; Lukomska, Ewa; Marshall, Nikki B.

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial chemical commonly used occupationally and by the general public. Using select immune function assays, the purpose of these studies was to evaluate the immunotoxicity of triclosan following dermal exposure using a murine model. Triclosan was not identified to be a sensitizer in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) when tested at concentrations ranging from 0.75–3.0%. Following a 28-day exposure, triclosan produced a significant increase in liver weight at concentrations of ≥ 1.5%. Exposure to the high dose (3.0%) also produced a significant increase in spleen weights and number of platelets. The absolute number of B-cells, T-cells, dendritic cells and NK cells were significantly increased in the skin draining lymph node, but not the spleen. An increase in the frequency of dendritic cells was also observed in the lymph node following exposure to 3.0% triclosan. The IgM antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) was significantly increased at 0.75% – but not at the higher concentrations – in the spleen and serum. These results demonstrate that dermal exposure to triclosan induces stimulation of the immune system in a murine model and raise concerns about potential human exposure. PMID:25812624

  14. Tunisian radish (Raphanus sativus) extract prevents cadmium-induced immunotoxic and biochemical alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    ben Salah-Abbès, Jalila; Abbès, Samir; Zohra, Haous; Oueslati, Ridha

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a known carcinogen and potent immunotoxicant in humans and animals, is dispersed throughout the environment as a result of pollution from a variety of sources. Tunisian radish (Raphanus sativus) extract (TRE) is a known anti-oxidant and free radical scavenger that has been shown to help alleviate immune system disorders, including some induced by environmental toxicants. The present study was undertaken to investigate potential protective effects of TRE against Cd-induced immunotoxicities (and general toxicities) in situ. Cadmium chloride (at 2.5 mg CdCl2/kg BW) and TRE (5, 10, or 15 mg/kg BW) were given (alone or in combination [actually, in sequence of Cd and then TRE]) to rats daily by oral gavage for 2 weeks. Results indicated that treatment with CdCl2 alone resulted in significant decreases in plasma levels of total protein, triglycerides, creatine kinase, creatinine, IgG and IgA, T-lymphocyte sub-types (CD4(+), CD3(+), CD56(+), and CD8(+)), and in thymic and hepatic indices (relative weights). In contrast, CdCl2 treatment caused significant increases in serum LDH, AST, and ALT, in the formation/release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 and TNFα), and in the relative weights of host spleen and kidneys. Rats treated with TRE alone had no discernable changes compared to the controls with regard to all test parameters. Combined treatment of CdCl2 and TRE-at any dose-resulted in a significant improvement of all test parameters compared to those seen with Cd alone. These results illustrated (and provided further support for a continuing belief in) the beneficial effects of TRE in reducing the harmful outcomes of commonly encountered toxicants (like Cd) on the immune system and on overall host health status. PMID:24524755

  15. Immunotoxicity in mice induced by short-term exposure to methoxychlor, parathion, or piperonyl butoxide.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Tomoki; Kosaka, Tadashi; Hayashi, Koichi; Miyashita, Lisa; Tajima, Yukari; Wada, Kunio; Nishino, Risako; Ueda, Hideo; Harada, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to environmental agents can compromise numerous immunological functions. Immunotoxicology focuses on the evaluation of the potential adverse effects of xenobiotics on immune mechanisms that can lead to harmful changes in host responses such as: increased susceptibility to infectious diseases and tumorigenesis; the induction of hypersensitivity reactions; or an increased incidence of autoimmune disease. In order to assess the immunosuppressive response to short-term exposure to some commonly used pesticides, the studies here focused on the response of mice after exposures to the organochlorine pesticide methoxychlor, the organophosphorus pesticide parathion, or the agricultural insecticide synergist piperonyl butoxide. In these studies, 7-week-old mice were orally administered (by gavage) methoxychlor, parathion, or piperonyl butoxide daily for five consecutive days. On Day 2, all mice in each group were immunized with sheep red blood cells (SRBC), and their SRBC-specific IgM responses were subsequently assessed. In addition, levels of B-cells in the spleen of each mouse were also analyzed via surface antigen expression. The results of these studies indicated that treatments with these various pesticides induced marked decreases in the production of SRBC-specific IgM antibodies as well as in the expression of surface antigens in IgM- and germinal center-positive B-cells. Based on these outcomes, it is concluded that the short-term exposure protocol was able to detect potential immunosuppressive responses to methoxychlor, parathion, and piperonyl butoxide in situ, and, as a result, may be useful for detecting other environmental chemical-related immunotoxicities. PMID:22834942

  16. Benzanthrone induced immunotoxicity via oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Prachi; Roy, Ruchi; Mishra, Sakshi; Mandal, Payal; Yadav, Ashish; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Tripathi, Anurag; Das, Mukul

    2015-03-01

    Benzanthrone (BA) is an important dye intermediate which is used in the manufacturing of several polycyclic vat and disperse dyes in textile industries. Several studies have indicated that the general population is also exposed to BA owing to its release from furnace effluents and automobile exhausts in the environment. In several clinical studies, it has been shown that workers exposed to BA developed itching, burning sensation, erythema and hyperpigmentation of the skin, which could be an outcome of the dysregulated immune response. In this study, we have used female Balb/c mice as a model to study the immuno-inflammatory changes after systemic administration of BA (7.5mg/kgb.w. and 15mg/kgb.w.) for one week. BA exposed animals exhibited the signs of intense systemic inflammation as evident by enhanced DTH response, MPO activity, hyperplastic and dysplastic histopathological organization of spleen and lung tissue. Splenic evaluation revealed enhanced oxidative stress, upregulation of prominent inflammatory markers like iNOS and COX-2 and DNA damage. In coherence with the observed immuno-inflammatory alterations, the levels of several inflammatory and regulatory cytokines (IL-17, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1, IL-10, IL-4) were significantly enhanced in serum as well as the spleen. In addition, BA administration significantly induced the activation of ERK1/2, p38, JNK MAPKs and their downstream transcription factors AP-1 (c-fos, c-jun), NF-κB and Nrf2 which comprise important mechanistic pathways involved in inflammatory manifestations. These results suggest the immunotoxic nature of the BA and have implications for the risk assessment and management of occupational workers, and even common masses considering its presence as an environmental contaminant. PMID:25454808

  17. Walnut Polyphenol Extract Attenuates Immunotoxicity Induced by 4-Pentylphenol and 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol in Murine Splenic Lymphocyte.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lubing; Ma, Sihui; Han, Yu; Wang, Yuhan; Guo, Yan; Weng, Qiang; Xu, Meiyu

    2016-01-01

    4-pentylphenol (PP) and 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol (PNMC), two important components of vehicle emissions, have been shown to confer toxicity in splenocytes. Certain natural products, such as those derived from walnuts, exhibit a range of antioxidative, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we investigated the effects of walnut polyphenol extract (WPE) on immunotoxicity induced by PP and PNMC in murine splenic lymphocytes. Treatment with WPE was shown to significantly enhance proliferation of splenocytes exposed to PP or PNMC, characterized by increases in the percentages of splenic T lymphocytes (CD3+ T cells) and T cell subsets (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells), as well as the production of T cell-related cytokines and granzymes (interleukin-2, interleukin-4, and granzyme-B) in cells exposed to PP or PNMC. These effects were associated with a decrease in oxidative stress, as evidenced by changes in OH, SOD, GSH-Px, and MDA levels. The total phenolic content of WPE was 34,800 ± 200 mg gallic acid equivalents/100 g, consisting of at least 16 unique phenols, including ellagitannins, quercetin, valoneic acid dilactone, and gallic acid. Taken together, these results suggest that walnut polyphenols significantly attenuated PP and PNMC-mediated immunotoxicity and improved immune function by inhibiting oxidative stress. PMID:27187455

  18. Investigations into the Immunotoxicity and Allergic Potential Induced by Topical Application of N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBBS) in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Marrocco, Antonella; Meade, B. Jean; Long, Carrie M.; Lukomska, Ewa; Marshall, Nikki B.; Anderson, Stacey E.

    2015-01-01

    N-Butylbenzene sulfonamide (NBBS) is a commonly used plasticizer found in numerous products. Due to its extensive use, lack of adequate toxicological data, and suspicion of toxicity based on the presence of structural alerts, it was nominated to the National Toxicology Program for comprehensive toxicological testing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for hypersensitivity and immune suppression following dermal exposure to NBBS using a murine model. NBBS tested negative in a combined irritancy/local lymph node assay (LLNA), classifying it as nonirritating and nonsensitizing. To estimate the immunosuppressive potential of NBBS, assays that assessed immunotoxicity were performed, including the immumnoglobulin (Ig) M response to T-cell-dependent antigen sheep red blood cells (SRBC), using the plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay and immune cell phenotyping. After a 28-d treatment with NBBS, mice exposed to the lowest concentration (25% NBBS) showed a significant increase in IgM-producing B cells in the spleen. No marked changes were identified in immune cell markers in the lymph node. In contrast to body weight, a significant elevation in kidney and liver weight was observed following dermal exposure to all concentrations of NBBS. These results demonstrate that dermal exposure to NBBS, other than liver and kidney toxicity, did not apparently induce immunotoxicity in a murine model. PMID:26291892

  19. Walnut Polyphenol Extract Attenuates Immunotoxicity Induced by 4-Pentylphenol and 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol in Murine Splenic Lymphocyte

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lubing; Ma, Sihui; Han, Yu; Wang, Yuhan; Guo, Yan; Weng, Qiang; Xu, Meiyu

    2016-01-01

    4-pentylphenol (PP) and 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol (PNMC), two important components of vehicle emissions, have been shown to confer toxicity in splenocytes. Certain natural products, such as those derived from walnuts, exhibit a range of antioxidative, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we investigated the effects of walnut polyphenol extract (WPE) on immunotoxicity induced by PP and PNMC in murine splenic lymphocytes. Treatment with WPE was shown to significantly enhance proliferation of splenocytes exposed to PP or PNMC, characterized by increases in the percentages of splenic T lymphocytes (CD3+ T cells) and T cell subsets (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells), as well as the production of T cell-related cytokines and granzymes (interleukin-2, interleukin-4, and granzyme-B) in cells exposed to PP or PNMC. These effects were associated with a decrease in oxidative stress, as evidenced by changes in OH, SOD, GSH-Px, and MDA levels. The total phenolic content of WPE was 34,800 ± 200 mg gallic acid equivalents/100 g, consisting of at least 16 unique phenols, including ellagitannins, quercetin, valoneic acid dilactone, and gallic acid. Taken together, these results suggest that walnut polyphenols significantly attenuated PP and PNMC-mediated immunotoxicity and improved immune function by inhibiting oxidative stress. PMID:27187455

  20. Carbendazim has the potential to induce oxidative stress, apoptosis, immunotoxicity and endocrine disruption during zebrafish larvae development.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinhua; Wu, Shenggan; Wang, Yanhua; An, Xuehua; Cai, Leiming; Zhao, Xueping; Wu, Changxing

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence have suggested deleterious effects of carbendazim on reproduction, apoptosis, immunotoxicity and endocrine disruption in mice and rats, however, the developmental toxicity of carbendazim to aquatic organisms remains obscure. In the present study, we utilized zebrafish as an environmental monitoring model to characterize the effects of carbendazim on expression of genes related to oxidative stress, apoptosis, immunotoxicity and endocrine disruption during larval development. Different trends in gene expression were observed upon exposing the larvae to 4, 20, 100, and 500 μg/L carbendazim for 4 and 8d. The mRNA levels of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and manganese superoxide dismutase (CAT, GPX, and Mn/SOD) were up-regulated after exposure to different concentrations of carbendazim for 4 or 8d. The up-regulation of p53, Apaf1, Cas8 and the down-regulation of Bcl2, Mdm2, Cas3 in the apoptosis pathway, as well as the increased expression of cytokines and chemokines, including CXCL-C1C, CCL1, IL-1b, IFN, IL-8, and TNFα, suggested carbendazim might trigger apoptosis and immune response during zebrafish larval development. In addition, the alteration of mRNA expression of VTG, ERα, ERβ1, ERβ2, TRα, TRβ, Dio1, and Dio2 indicated the potential of carbendazim to induce endocrine disruption in zebrafish larvae. These data suggested that carbendazim could simultaneously induce multiple responses during zebrafish larval development, and bidirectional interactions among oxidative stress, apoptosis pathway, immune and endocrine systems might be present. PMID:26055223

  1. Assessing a theoretical risk of dolutegravir-induced developmental immunotoxicity in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Melissa; Laffan, Susan; Genell, Caroline; Gower, Jill; Maier, Curtis; Fukushima, Tamio; Nichols, Garrett; Bassiri, Ashlyn Eaton

    2012-11-01

    HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (INIs) are a promising class of antiretrovirals for the treatment of HIV in adults; there is interest in expanding their use into pediatric populations. A theoretical concern for developmental immunotoxicity was raised after a publication suggested that two HIV INI tool compounds inhibited in vitro cleavage activity of recombination activating genes 1 and 2 (RAG1/2) through the inhibition of their binding to recombination signal sequences. RAG1/2 are required for the development of mature B and T lymphocyte populations. The potential effects of the investigational INI dolutegravir on RAG1/2 were addressed by developing assays in juvenile rats to measure T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ usage by flow cytometry as an indicator of TCR repertoire diversity and a T cell dependent antibody response (TDAR) as an indicator of immunosuppression. These endpoints were incorporated into a juvenile rat toxicity study, along with immunophenotyping, hematology, and histopathology of immunologic organs. Dose levels of 0, 0.5, 2, or 75mg/kg/day dolutegravir were given via oral gavage from postnatal day 4 through 66. At the highest dose, there was decreased body weight gain and two preweanling deaths; however, there were no treatment-related effects on developmental parameters. There were no effects on immunologic competence, as measured by TDAR, and no effects on lymphocyte subsets or CD4 and CD8 TCR Vβ usage in peripheral blood. Histopathology of immunologic organs (spleen, thymus, lymph nodes) and hematology evaluation revealed no effects. The no observed adverse effect level for immunotoxicity endpoints was 75mg/kg/day. PMID:22790968

  2. Pretilachlor has the potential to induce endocrine disruption, oxidative stress, apoptosis and immunotoxicity during zebrafish embryo development.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinhua; Chen, Yanhong; Yu, Ruixian; Zhao, Xueping; Wang, Qiang; Cai, Leiming

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the toxic effects of pretilachlor on zebrafish during its embryo development. The results demonstrated that the transcription of genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal/thyroid (HPG/HPT) axis was increased after exposure to 50, 100, 200μg/L pretilachlor for 96h, the aromatase activity, vitellogenin (VTG) and thyroid hormones T3 and T4 levels in zebrafish were also up-regulated simultaneously. Pretilachlor exposure induced a noticeable increase in ROS level, increased the transcription and level of antioxidant proteins (e.g., CAT, SOD and GPX). Moreover, the up-regulation of P53, Mdm2, Bbc3 expression and Caspase3 and Caspase9 activities in the apoptosis pathway suggested pretilachlor might trigger cell apoptosis in zebrafish. In addition, the transcription of CXCL-C1C, IL-1β and IL-8 related to the innate immunity was down-regulated after pretilachlor exposure. These data suggested that pretilachlor could simultaneously induce endocrine disruption, apoptosis, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity during zebrafish embryo development. PMID:26851375

  3. Allergic Potential and Immunotoxicity Induced by Topical Application of 1-Chloro-4-(Trifluoromethyl)Benzene (PCBTF) in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Franko, Jennifer; Jackson, Laurel G.; Meade, B. Jean; Anderson, Stacey E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the studies in this paper was to evaluate the allergic potential, immunotoxicity, and irritancy of the occupationally relevant chemical, 1-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzene, also known as parachlorobenzotrifluoride (PCBTF), following dermal exposure in a murine model. Evaluation of the sensitization potential, conducted using the local lymph node assay (LLNA) at concentrations ranging from 50% to 100%, identified a dose-dependent increase in lymphocyte proliferation with a calculated EC3 value of 53.1%. While no elevations in total or specific IgE were observed after exposure to any concentration of the chemical, significant increases in IFN-γ protein production by stimulated draining lymphoid cells were observed, indicating a T-cell-mediated response. Dermal exposure to PCBTF was not found to alter the immune response to a T-cell-dependant antigen. These results demonstrate that PCBTF has the potential to induce allergic sensitization following dermal exposure and based on LLNA results would be classified as a weak sensitizer. PMID:21747864

  4. Embryonic exposure to carbendazim induces the transcription of genes related to apoptosis, immunotoxicity and endocrine disruption in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinhua; Wu, Shenggan; Wu, Changxing; An, Xuehua; Cai, Leiming; Zhao, Xueping

    2014-12-01

    Carbendazim is one of the most widespread environmental contaminant that can cause major concern to human and animal reproductive system. To date, very few studies have been conducted on the toxic effect of carbendazim in the non-target organism zebrafish (Danio rerio). The study presented here aimed to assess how carbendazim triggers apoptosis, immunotoxicity and endocrine disruption pathways in zebrafish during its embryo development. Our results demonstrated that the expression patterns of many key genes involved in cell apoptosis pathway (e.g. P53, Mdm2, Bbc3 and Cas8) were significantly up-regulated upon the exposure to carbendazim at the concentration of 500 μg/L, while the Bcl2 and Cas3 were down-regulated at the same concentration, interestingly, the expression level of Ogg1 decreased at all the exposure concentrations. It was also observed that the mRNA levels of CXCL-C1C, CCL1, IL-1b and TNFα which were closely related to the innate immune system, were affected in newly hatched zebrafish after exposed to different concentrations of carbendazim. Moreover, the expression of genes that are involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal/thyroid (HPG/HPT) axis including VTG, ERα, ERβ2, Dio1, Dio2, Thraa and Thrb were all down-regulated significantly after the exposure to carbendazim. The expression levels of two cytochrome P450 aromatases CYP19a and CYP19b were increased significantly after 20 and 100 μg/L carbendazim exposure, respectively. Taken together, our results indicated that carbendazim had the potential to induce cell apoptosis and cause immune toxicity as well as endocrine disruption in zebrafish during the embryo developmental stage. The information presented here also help to elucidate the environmental risks caused by the carbendazim-induced toxicity in aquatic organisms. PMID:25304545

  5. Introduction to Immunotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recognition that the immune system is vulnerable to adverse effects after exposure to xenobiotics led to the discipline of immunotoxicology and the subsequent addition of immunotoxicology testing to regulatory guidelines for toxicity. Immunotoxic effects can result in immunosuppr...

  6. Cytokines as biomarkers of nanoparticle immunotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale objects, whether of biologic origin or synthetically created, are being developed into devices for a variety of bionanotechnology diagnostic and pharmaceutical applications. However, the potential immunotoxicity of these nanomaterials and mechanisms by which they may induce adverse reactions have not received sufficient attention. Nanomaterials, depending on their characteristics and compositions, can interact with the immune system in several ways and either enhance or suppress immune system function. Cytokines perform pleiotropic functions to mediate and regulate the immune response and are generally recognized as biomarkers of immunotoxicity. While the specificity and validity of certain cytokines as markers of adverse immune response has been established for chemicals, small and macromolecular drugs, research on their applicability for predicting and monitoring the immunotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials is still ongoing. The goal of this review is to provide guidelines as to important cytokines that can be utilized for evaluating the immunotoxicity of nanomaterials and to highlight the role of those cytokines in mediating adverse reactions, which is of particular importance for the clinical development of nanopharmaceuticals and other nanotechnology-based products. Importantly, the rational design of nanomaterials of low immunotoxicity will be discussed, focusing on synthetic nanodevices, with emphasis on both the nanoparticle-forming materials and the embedded cargoes. PMID:23549679

  7. Developmental immunotoxicity testing of 4-methyl anisole.

    PubMed

    Tonk, Elisa C M; Verhoef, Aart; Gremmer, Eric R; van Loveren, Henk; Piersma, Aldert H

    2015-07-01

    The developmental immunotoxicity of 4-methyl anisole (4MA) was investigated in the rat. Four study designs were used, with either premating or post-weaning onset of exposure, continued to postnatal day 50, and with or without additional oral gavage of pups from postnatal day 10 onward. Reduced litter size (benchmark dose lower confidence limit (BMDL) 80mg/kg bw/day) was the most sensitive developmental parameter, with pup relative organ weight effects observed at similar BMDLs, in the absence of maternal toxicity. Eosinophil numbers were reduced at lower doses (BMDL 16mg/kg bw/day). KLH challenge resulted in increased IL-13 and TNF-α responses, and variably reduced IgG production (BMDL 27mg/kg bw/day). T4 levels were reduced by 11% at maximum with a BMDL of 73mg/kg bw/day. Differences between exposure cohorts were limited and were considered to be without biological significance. This study shows that 4MA induces developmental immunotoxicity at doses below those inducing developmental and general toxicity. These observations being independent of the study designs applied suggest that the post-weaning period, included in all designs, is the most relevant sensitive period for inducing 4MA mediated developmental immunotoxicity. Moreover, this study stresses the importance of including developmental immunotoxicity testing by default in regulatory toxicology. PMID:25882306

  8. [Cutaneous mold fungus granuloma from Ulocladium chartarum].

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, P; Schon, K

    1981-01-01

    Cutaneous granulomas due to the mold fungus Ulocladium chartarum (Preuss) are described in a 58 year old woman. This fungus is usually harmless for mammalian. It is thought that a consisting immunosuppression (Brill-Symmer's disease, therapy with corticosteroids) was a priming condition for the infection. The route of infection in this patient described is unknown. PMID:7194869

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HEMOLYSIN, FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum is a toxigenic fungus that has been associated with human health concerns, including pulmonary hemorrhage and hemosiderosis. This fungus produces a hemolysin, stachylysin, which in its apparent monomeric form has a molecular mass of 11,920
    Da as determ...

  10. DNA damage, redox changes, and associated stress-inducible signaling events underlying the apoptosis and cytotoxicity in murine alveolar macrophage cell line MH-S by methanol-extracted Stachybotrys chartarum toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huiyan; Yadav, Jagjit S. . E-mail: Jagjit.Yadav@uc.edu

    2006-08-01

    Spore-extracted toxins of the indoor mold Stachybotrys chartarum (SC) caused cytotoxicity (release of lactate dehydrogenase), inhibition of cell proliferation, and cell death in murine alveolar macrophage cell line MH-S in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptotic cell death, confirmed based on morphological changes, DNA ladder formation, and caspase 3/7 activation, was detectable as early as at 3 h during treatment with a toxin concentration of 1 spore equivalent/macrophage and was preceded by DNA damage beginning at 15 min, as evidenced by DNA comet formation in single cell gel electrophoresis assay. The apoptotic dose of SC toxins did not induce detectable nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1{beta}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha}) but showed exacerbated cytotoxicity in presence of a non-apoptotic dose of the known pro-inflammatory agent LPS (10 ng/ml). Intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level showed a significant decrease beginning at 9 h of the toxin treatment whereas oxidized glutathione (GSSG) showed a corresponding significant increase, indicating a delayed onset of oxidative stress in the apoptosis process. The toxin-treated macrophages accumulated p53, an indicator of DNA damage response, and showed activation of the stress-inducible MAP kinases, JNK, and p38, in a time-dependent manner. Chemical blocking of either p38 or p53 inhibited in part the SC toxin-induced apoptosis whereas blocking of JNK did not show any such effect. This study constitutes the first report on induction of DNA damage and associated p53 activation by SC toxins, and demonstrates the involvement of p38- and p53-mediated signaling events in SC toxin-induced apoptosis of alveolar macrophages.

  11. Biomarkers of immunotoxicity in man.

    PubMed

    Descotes, J; Nicolas, B; Vial, T; Nicolas, J F

    1996-01-01

    Abstract The immunotoxic consequences of chemical exposures include direct immunotoxicity (namely immunosuppression and immunostimulation), hypersensitivity and autoimmunity, and because the mechanisms involved are markedly different, no single immune parameter is likely to ever predict or assess all three types of immunotoxicity. A fairly large number of immunological endpoints have been proposed for use as biomarkers of immunotoxicity in man. Unfortunately, they are often not sensitive enough and/or poorly standardized, so that their relevance for assessing immunotoxic effects in humans is debatable, and actually debated. Immune-mediated sentinel events detected in individuals with a defined history of chemical exposure, may prove helpful until methodological advances, notably with the introduction of technologies derived from molecular biology, provide reliable parameters to be used as biomarkers of immunotoxicity. PMID:23888916

  12. PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ALLERGENS IN EXTRACTS OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ALLERGENS IN EXTRACTS OF Stachybotrys chartarum. M E Viana1, MJ Selgrade2, and M D Ward2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA. 2NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

    Exposure to Stachybotrys chartarum has been associated with the development of serious health ...

  13. Genome sequence of Stachybotrys chartarum Strain 51-11

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum strain 51-11 genome was sequenced by shotgun sequencing utilizing Illumina Hiseq 2000 and PacBio long read technology. Since Stachybotrys chartarum has been implicated in health impacts within water-damaged buildings, any information extracted from the geno...

  14. Photosensitization associated with exposure to Pithomyces chartarum in lambs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D E; McCoy, R D; Hedstrom, O R; Snyder, S P; Ballerstedt, P B

    1994-05-15

    An epidemic of photosensitization was observed in a group of lambs on irrigated autumn pasture in western Oregon. Signs included crusting, necrosis, and sloughing of the skin over the nostrils, lips, and ears, and of the mucous membranes of the buccal regions. Microscopic examination of plant material from the pasture disclosed spores of Pithomyces chartarum. This fungus has been documented as a causal factor in photosensitization in sheep and cattle (facial eczema) in other parts of the world. An infective agent or other plant material that could have induced the clinical signs in the lambs was not evident. Weather and humidity conditions were ideal for fungal growth during the grazing period, and the fungus was detected in large numbers before and during the epidemic. Even though facial eczema has not been reported previously in northwestern United States, we feel the circumstances surrounding this epidemic warrant such a diagnosis. PMID:8050952

  15. Protective effects of meat from lambs on selenium nanoparticle supplemented diet in a mouse model of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced immunotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ungvári, Éva; Monori, István; Megyeri, Attila; Csiki, Zoltán; Prokisch, József; Sztrik, Attila; Jávor, András; Benkő, Ilona

    2014-02-01

    Increased environmental oxidative stress caused primarily by chemicals like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, plays significant role in human diseases. A representative compound, 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), was used for modeling oxidative damages including the significant decrease of the antioxidant capacity of the blood. Selenium has antioxidant effects but with a narrow therapeutic window. In our current studies to avoid accidental overdose and toxicity selenium was given to meat-producing animals. The standard rodent diet of mice was replaced by meat from lambs either on standard or selenium-enriched diet. Selenium concentration of lamb meat was enhanced three times by nano-selenium administration and an increase in the antioxidant capacity of the blood of mice was measured after the indirect selenium supplementation. Protective effects were also observed against DMBA-induced immunotoxicity. Twice the amount of white blood cells and among them three times more phagocytes survived. Similarly, in their renewal system in bone marrow twice the amount of cells survived and regenerative capacity of granulopoiesis was four times higher than in control DMBA-damaged mice. Our findings suggest functional dietary benefits of lamb meat enriched with selenium by feeding lambs with nanoparticle selenium supplements. PMID:24315870

  16. Occurrence of Stachybotrys chartarum chemotype S in dried culinary herbs.

    PubMed

    Biermaier, Barbara; Gottschalk, Christoph; Schwaiger, Karin; Gareis, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Stachybotrys (S.) chartarum is an omnipresent cellulolytic mould which produces secondary metabolites, such as the highly toxic macrocyclic trichothecenes. While it is known to occur in animal feed like hay and straw as well as in water-damaged indoor environments, there is little knowledge about the occurrence of S. chartarum and its secondary metabolites in food. The objective of the present study was to examine selected dried culinary herbs for the presence of S. chartarum chemotype S, to assess the potential risk of a contamination of foods with macrocyclic trichothecenes. In total, 50 Stachybotrys isolates from different types of culinary herbs (n=100) such as marjoram (Origanum majorana Linné (L.)), oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), and savory (Satureja hortensis L.) were examined by MTT-cell culture test (effect-based bioassay), ELISA, and by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Selected toxic and non-toxic isolates (n=15) were genetically characterized by PCR and sequencing. Five isolates (10%) were highly toxic in the MTT-cell culture test, and the production of macrocyclic trichothecenes was proven by ELISA and LC-MS/MS. These five isolates were genetically confirmed as S. chartarum chemotype S. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about a contamination of dried culinary herbs with toxigenic S. chartarum. PMID:25346283

  17. Characterization of an extracellular laccase of Leptosphaerulina chartarum.

    PubMed

    Sajben-Nagy, Enikő; Manczinger, László; Škrbić, Biljana; Živančev, Jelena; Antić, Igor; Krisch, Judit; Vágvölgyi, Csaba

    2014-09-01

    Laccase-producing fungi were isolated from air, using selective media with a chromogenic substrate to indicate enzyme activity. The best laccase producer strain proved to be a Leptosphaerulina chartarum isolate. Laccase production was investigated in the presence of various inducers in different cultivation conditions. The extracellular laccase was purified for further investigations. SDS-PAGE showed that this laccase is a monomeric protein of 38 kDa molecular weight. The enzyme is active in the pH-range of 3.5-6, with an optimum at pH 3.8. It is active in the 10-60 °C temperature range, with an optimum at 40 °C. After 20 min incubation at temperatures above 70 °C the enzyme lost its activity. Degradation of seven aniline and phenol compounds (2,4-dichlorophenol; 2-methyl-4-chlorophenol; 3-chloroaniline; 4-chloroaniline; 2,6-dimethylaniline; 3,4-dichloroaniline and 3-chloro-4-methylaniline) was investigated, with or without guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) as mediator molecule. Addition of a mediator to the system significantly increased the degradation levels. These results confirmed that the isolated laccase is able to convert these harmful xenobiotics at in vitro conditions. PMID:24845167

  18. Immunotoxicity -- The Risk is Real

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several papers published over the last year represent significant progress in closing the gap between rodent immunotoxicity data and human risk and indicate that, at least for the developing immune system, the concern raised by rodent data is justified. The studies reviewed here...

  19. Immunotoxicity of trenbolone acetate in Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinn, M.J.; McKernan, M.; Lavoie, E.T.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Trenbolone acetate is a synthetic androgen that is currently used as a growth promoter in many meat-exporting countries. Despite industry laboratories classifying trenbolone as nonteratogenic, data showed that embryonic exposure to this androgenic chemical altered development of the immune system in Japanese quail. Trenbolone is lipophilic, persistent, and released into the environment in manure used as soil fertilizer. This is the first study to date to assess this chemical's immunotoxic effects in an avian species. A one-time injection of trenbolone into yolks was administered to mimic maternal deposition, and subsequent effects on the development and function of the immune system were determined in chicks and adults. Development of the bursa of Fabricius, an organ responsible for development of the humoral arm of the immune system, was disrupted, as indicated by lower masse, and smaller and fewer follicles at day 1 of hatch. Morphological differences in the bursas persisted in adults, although no differences in either two measures of immune function were observed. Total numbers of circulating leukocytes were reduced and heterophil-lymphocyte ratios were elevated in chicks but not adults. This study shows that trenbolone acetate is teratogenic and immunotoxic in Japanese quail, and provides evidence that the quail immune system may be fairly resilient to embryonic endocrine-disrupting chemical-induced alterations following no further exposure posthatch.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HEMOLYSIN, STACHYLYSIN, FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum is a toxigenic fungus that has been associated with human health concerns, including pulmonary hemorrhage/hemosiderosis. This fungus produces a hemolysin, stachylysin, which in its monomeric form, has a molecular wieght of 11,920 daltons as determined by m...

  1. STACHYLYSIN MAY BE CAUSE OF HEMORRAHAGING IN STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum is a toxigenic fungus that has been associated with human health concerns like nasal bleeding in adults and pulmonary hemosiderosis (PH) in infants. Stachylysin is a glycosylated protein, with the deglycosylated molecular mass of 21.5 kDa. Seven of eight ...

  2. New approaches to immunotoxicity testing.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, D L

    1982-01-01

    New approaches to immunotoxicity testing are reviewed and discussed. A method of activating T-cells in vivo is presented which circumvents artifacts dur to viability effects encountered with in vitro mitogen assays. The use of adoptive transfer approaches to combine the advantages of in vitro manipulation with in vivo function assays is discussed relative to natural killer cells. The need for an in vitro metabolic activation step coupled to other in vitro immunologic assays is discussed. PMID:7037382

  3. Roles of ROS mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage in 3-methyl-2-quinoxalin benzenevinylketo-1, 4-dioxide-induced immunotoxicity of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Wang, Di; Zhang, Shun; Xu, Mengjing; Yang, Wei; Yan, Peipei; Liu, Yang; Luo, Xiao; Wu, Hailei; Yao, Ping; Yan, Hong; Liu, Liegang

    2015-11-01

    3-methyl-2-quinoxalin benzenevinylketo-1, 4-dioxide (Quinocetone, QCT) has been broadly used to treat dysentery and promote animal growth in food producing animals. However, its potential toxicity could not been neglected as parts of safety assessment according to the acceptable guidelines for QCT administration. In this study, the immunotoxicity of QCT was investigated in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats following a 28-day oral exposure at doses of 0, 50, 800, and 2400 mg/kg/day. The food consumption, body weight gain and relative spleen weight were significantly decreased by QCT in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of rats with QCT also notably suppressed the T-cell proliferation and natural killer (NK) cell activity, accompanied by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, antioxidant system inhibition and DNA damage enhancement. Thus, the primary finding of this study is that QCT exposure (2400 mg/kg/day) could cause immunotoxicity in SD rats due to ROS mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage. PMID:26361855

  4. IMMUNOCYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF STACHYLYSIN IN STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM SPORES AND SPORE-IMPACTED MOUSE AND RAT LUNG TISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachylysin is a proteinaceous hemolytic agent that is producted by S. chartarum. Stachylysin was found, using immunohistochemistical and immunocytochemical methods, to be localized in S. chartarum spores/mycelia primarily in the inner wall suggesting that it is constitutively ...

  5. Modulation of Benzo[a]pyrene induced immunotoxicity in mice actively immunized with a B[a]P-diphtheria toxoid conjugate

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberger, Mario T.; Grova, Nathalie; Willieme, Stephanie; Farinelle, Sophie; Prodhomme, Emmanuel J.F.

    2009-10-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a small molecular weight carcinogen and the prototype of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). While these compounds are primarily known for their carcinogenicity, B[a]P and its metabolites are also toxic for mammalian immune cells. To develop a prophylactic immune strategy against detrimental effects of B[a]P, we have immunized mice with a B[a]P-diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine. We showed that high levels of antibodies against B[a]P and its metabolites modulate the redistribution of these PAHs in the blood. After immunization, increased levels of B[a]P and its metabolites were recovered in the blood. B[a]P significantly suppressed the proliferative response of both T and B cells after a sub-acute administration, an effect that was completely reversed by vaccination. In immunized mice also the immunotoxic effect of B[a]P on IFN-{gamma}, IL-12, TNF-{alpha} production and the reduced B cell activation was restored. Finally, our results showed that specific antibodies inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 by B[a]P in lymphocytes and Cyp1b1 in the liver, enzymes that are known to convert the procarcinogen B[a]P to the ultimate DNA-adduct forming metabolite, a major risk factor of chemical carcinogenesis. Thus, we demonstrate that vaccination with a B[a]P conjugate vaccine based on a carrier protein used in licensed human vaccines reduces immunotoxicity and possibly other detrimental effects associated with B[a]P.

  6. Transcriptional Profiling of Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-induced Spleen Atrophy Provides Mechanistic Insights into its Immunotoxicity in MutaMouse.

    PubMed

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Long, Alexandra S; Williams, Andrew; Kuo, Byron; Gagné, Rémi; Kennedy, Dean A; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M; White, Paul A; Yauk, Carole L

    2016-01-01

    Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) is the most carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) examined to date. We investigated the immunotoxicity of DBC, manifested as spleen atrophy, following acute exposure of adult MutaMouse males by oral gavage. Mice were exposed to 0, 2.0, 6.2, or 20.0 mg DBC /kg-bw per day, for 3 days. Genotoxic endpoints (DBC-DNA adducts and lacZ mutant frequency in spleen and bone marrow, and red blood cell micronucleus frequency) and global gene expression changes were measured. All of the genotoxicity measures increased in a dose-dependent manner in spleen and bone marrow. Gene expression analysis showed that DBC activates p53 signaling pathways related to cellular growth and proliferation, which was evident even at the low dose. Strikingly, the expression profiles of DBC exposed mouse spleens were highly inversely correlated with the expression profiles of the only published toxicogenomics dataset of enlarged mouse spleen. This analysis suggested a central role for Bnip3l, a pro-apoptotic protein involved in negative regulation of erythroid maturation. RT-PCR confirmed expression changes in several genes related to apoptosis, iron metabolism, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling that are regulated in the opposite direction during spleen atrophy versus benzo[a]pyrene-mediated splenomegaly. In addition, benchmark dose modeling of toxicogenomics data yielded toxicity estimates that are very close to traditional toxicity endpoints. This work illustrates the power of toxicogenomics to reveal rich mechanistic information for immunotoxic compounds and its ability to provide information that is quantitatively similar to that derived from standard toxicity methods in health risk assessment. PMID:26496743

  7. Modulation of benzo[a]pyrene induced immunotoxicity in mice actively immunized with a B[a]P-diphtheria toxoid conjugate.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Mario T; Grova, Nathalie; Willième, Stéphanie; Farinelle, Sophie; Prodhomme, Emmanuel J F; Muller, Claude P

    2009-10-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a small molecular weight carcinogen and the prototype of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). While these compounds are primarily known for their carcinogenicity, B[a]P and its metabolites are also toxic for mammalian immune cells. To develop a prophylactic immune strategy against detrimental effects of B[a]P, we have immunized mice with a B[a]P-diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine. We showed that high levels of antibodies against B[a]P and its metabolites modulate the redistribution of these PAHs in the blood. After immunization, increased levels of B[a]P and its metabolites were recovered in the blood. B[a]P significantly suppressed the proliferative response of both T and B cells after a sub-acute administration, an effect that was completely reversed by vaccination. In immunized mice also the immunotoxic effect of B[a]P on IFN-gamma, IL-12, TNF-alpha production and the reduced B cell activation was restored. Finally, our results showed that specific antibodies inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 by B[a]P in lymphocytes and Cyp1b1 in the liver, enzymes that are known to convert the procarcinogen B[a]P to the ultimate DNA-adduct forming metabolite, a major risk factor of chemical carcinogenesis. Thus, we demonstrate that vaccination with a B[a]P conjugate vaccine based on a carrier protein used in licensed human vaccines reduces immunotoxicity and possibly other detrimental effects associated with B[a]P. PMID:19573549

  8. GROWTH RESPONSE OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM TO MOISTURE VARIATION ON COMMON BUILDING MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mold Stachybotrys chartarum has been found to be associated with idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage in infants and has been studied for toxin production and its occurrence in water damaged buildings. Growth of S. chartarum on building materials such as drywall has been frequentl...

  9. FACTORS RELATING TO THE RELEASE OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM SPORES FROM CONTAMINATED SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes preliminary results of a research project to determine the factors that control the release of S. chartarum spores from a contaminated source and test ways to reduce spore release and thus exposure. As anticipated, S. chartarum spore emissions from gypsum boar...

  10. ELISA MEASUREMENT OF STACHYLYSIN IN SERUM TO QUANTIFY HUMAN EXPOSURES TO THE INDOOR MOLD STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem- To develop a measurable indicator of human exposure to Stachybotys chartarum.

    Methods- Antibodies were produced against the hemolytic agent stachylysin obtained from the mold S. chartarum. These antibodies were used to develop two enzyme-linked immunosorbent ass...

  11. GERMINATION, VIABILITY AND CLEARANCE OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM IN THE LUNGS OF INFANT RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fungus Stachybotrys chartarum has been associated with many adverse health effects including the condition known as idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage in infants. In order to gain some insight into possible mechanisms, viable conidia of S. chartarum were instilled into the lung...

  12. Use of SRBC antibody responses for immunotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Ladics, Gregory S

    2007-01-01

    The production of antigen-specific antibodies represents a major defense mechanism of humoral immune responses and involves the cooperation and interaction of several immune cell types: antigen presenting cells, T helper cells, and B cells. Thus, there are several cells or cell products (e.g., interleukins) that may be altered following xenobiotic exposure, making assays that evaluate the production of antigen specific antibody a relatively comprehensive and sensitive assessment of immune function. Data suggest that the primary antibody response to SRBC may be one of the most sensitive endpoints available to assess chemical-induced alterations to the immune system. As a result, this endpoint has become the cornerstone of several recently established guidelines for assessing the potential immunotoxicity of xenobiotics. Five types of antibody may be produced in a humoral immune response (i.e., IgGs of various subtypes, IgM, IgD, IgA, or IgE). For immunotoxicity assessment, the focus has primarily been on assays that assess production of IgM antibodies. Although a number of assays have been developed to evaluate antibody production, the antibody forming cell (AFC) assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are the two most frequently employed to evaluate the potential immunotoxicity of a xenobiotic. In this manuscript, background information, as well as the pros and cons of each of these assays are discussed and detailed methods on conducting each assay are provided. PMID:17161298

  13. The Peptide Toxin Amylosin of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens from Moisture-Damaged Buildings Is Immunotoxic, Induces Potassium Efflux from Mammalian Cells, and Has Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Teplova, Vera V.; Andersson, Maria A.; Mikkola, Raimo; Kankkunen, Päivi; Matikainen, Sampsa; Gahmberg, Carl G.; Andersson, Leif C.; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2015-01-01

    Amylosin, a heat-stable channel-forming non-ribosomally synthesized peptide toxin produced by strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens isolated from moisture-damaged buildings, is shown in this paper to have immunotoxic and cytotoxic effects on human cells as well as antagonistic effects on microbes. Human macrophages exposed to 50 ng of amylosin ml−1 secreted high levels of cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 within 2 h, indicating activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, an integral part of the innate immune system. At the same exposure level, expression of IL-1β and IL-18 mRNA increased. Amylosin caused dose-dependent potassium ion efflux from all tested mammalian cells (human monocytes and keratinocytes and porcine sperm cells) at 1 to 2 μM exposure. Amylosin also inhibited the motility of porcine sperm cells and depolarized the mitochondria of human keratinocytes. Amylosin may thus trigger the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequently cytokine release by causing potassium efflux from exposed cells. The results of this study indicate that exposure to amylosin activates the innate immune system, which could offer an explanation for the inflammatory symptoms experienced by occupants of moisture-damaged buildings. In addition, the amylosin-producing B. amyloliquefaciens inhibited the growth of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic indoor microbes, and purified amylosin also had an antimicrobial effect. These antimicrobial effects could make amylosin producers dominant and therefore significant causal agents of health problems in some moisture-damaged sites. PMID:25681192

  14. Immunotoxic effects of cyclophosphamide and cyclosporine in the dog.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Jean-Jacques; Bouchez, Caroline; Mimouni, Cécile; N'Guyen, Armelle; Bouchard, Johanne; Ameller, Thibault; Descotes, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Limited non-clinical immunotoxicity data are available in the dog, although this is a major non-rodent species in regulatory safety studies. The present study aimed to test whether widely accepted immunotoxicity endpoints including lymphocyte subset immunophenotyping, the anti-KLH TDAR assay, and histological examination of the main lymphoid organs were reliable to detect immunosuppression induced by cyclosporine and cyclophosphamide in dogs and could, therefore, be used for non-clinical immunotoxicity evaluation in this species. Male and female Beagle dogs were treated orally from Day 1 for 4 weeks with 25 mg/kg cyclosporine daily, or with 2 mg/kg cyclophosphamide on 4 consecutive days each week, or the same volume of drinking water daily. Blood samples were withdrawn pre-test and on Days 11, 18, and 23 to measure standard hematology parameters and analyze lymphocyte subsets. All animals received an intramuscular injection of 5 mg KLH on Day 11. Sandwich ELISA assays were used to quantify anti-KLH IgM and anti-KLH IgG levels in blood samples taken pre-test, on Days 18 and 23, and pre-test, on Days 23 and 28, respectively. At the end of the treatment period, all animals were submitted to histological examination of lymphoid organs, liver, and kidneys. No signs of marked toxicity were observed. No changes in lymphocyte subsets, but markedly decreased primary anti-KLH IgM and IgG responses, and a slightly-to-markedly increased cortex/medulla ratio in the thymus were observed in cyclosporine-treated dogs. Lower total WBC counts correlating with lower total and B-lymphocyte subset and decreased germinal center development in mesenteric lymph nodes, but no changes in primary anti-KLH IgM and IgG responses were observed in cyclophosphamide-treated dogs. These results demonstrate that widely accepted immunotoxicity endpoints can adequately detect the effects of known immunosuppressive drugs in the dog and support the conclusion that it is a relevant animal species

  15. From immunotoxicity to carcinogenicity: the effects of carbamate pesticides on the immune system.

    PubMed

    Dhouib, Ines; Jallouli, Manel; Annabi, Alya; Marzouki, Soumaya; Gharbi, Najoua; Elfazaa, Saloua; Lasram, Mohamed Montassar

    2016-05-01

    The immune system can be the target of many chemicals, with potentially severe adverse effects on the host's health. In the literature, carbamate (CM) pesticides have been implicated in the increasing prevalence of diseases associated with alterations of the immune response, such as hypersensitivity reactions, some autoimmune diseases and cancers. CMs may initiate, facilitate, or exacerbate pathological immune processes, resulting in immunotoxicity by induction of mutations in genes coding for immunoregulatory factors and modifying immune tolerance. In the present study, direct immunotoxicity, endocrine disruption and inhibition of esterases activities have been introduced as the main mechanisms of CMs-induced immune dysregulation. Moreover, the evidence on the relationship between CM pesticide exposure, dysregulation of the immune system and predisposition to different types of cancers, allergies, autoimmune and infectious diseases is criticized. In addition, in this review, we will discuss the relationship between immunotoxicity and cancer, and the advances made toward understanding the basis of cancer immune evasion. PMID:26988364

  16. Indoor Mold, Toxigenic Fungi, and Stachybotrys chartarum: Infectious Disease Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, D. M.; Ghannoum, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    Damp buildings often have a moldy smell or obvious mold growth; some molds are human pathogens. This has caused concern regarding health effects of moldy indoor environments and has resulted in many studies of moisture- and mold-damaged buildings. Recently, there have been reports of severe illness as a result of indoor mold exposure, particularly due to Stachybotrys chartarum. While many authors describe a direct relationship between fungal contamination and illness, close examination of the literature reveals a confusing picture. Here, we review the evidence regarding indoor mold exposure and mycotoxicosis, with an emphasis on S. chartarum. We also examine possible end-organ effects, including pulmonary, immunologic, neurologic, and oncologic disorders. We discuss the Cleveland infant idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage reports in detail, since they provided important impetus for concerns about Stachybotrys. Some valid concerns exist regarding the relationship between indoor mold exposure and human disease. Review of the literature reveals certain fungus-disease associations in humans, including ergotism (Claviceps species), alimentary toxic aleukia (Fusarium), and liver disease (Aspergillys). While many papers suggest a similar relationship between Stachybotrys and human disease, the studies nearly uniformly suffer from significant methodological flaws, making their findings inconclusive. As a result, we have not found well-substantiated supportive evidence of serious illness due to Stachybotrys exposure in the contemporary environment. To address issues of indoor mold-related illness, there is an urgent need for studies using objective markers of illness, relevant animal models, proper epidemiologic techniques, and examination of confounding factors. PMID:12525430

  17. Method for detection of Stachybotrys chartarum in pure culture and field samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Cruz-Perez, Patricia; Buttner, Mark P.

    2004-05-11

    A method for detecting the fungus Stachybotrys chartarum includes isolating DNA from a sample suspected of containing the fungus Stachybotrys chartarum. The method further includes subjecting the DNA to polymerase chain reaction amplification utilizing at least one of several primers, the several primers each including one of the base sequences 5'GTTGCTTCGGCGGGAAC3', 5'TTTGCGTTTGCCACTCAGAG3', 5'ACCTATCGTTGCTTCGGCG3', and 5'GCGTTTGCCACTCAGAGAATACT3'. The method additionally includes detecting the fungus Stachybotrys chartarum by visualizing the product of the polymerase chain reaction.

  18. Coexposure to Mercury Increases Immunotoxicity of Trichloroethylene

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Rowley, Benjamin; Gomez-Acevedo, Horacio; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    We have shown previously that chronic (32 weeks) exposure to occupationally relevant concentrations of the environmental pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) induced autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice. In real-life, individuals are never exposed to only one chemical such as TCE. However, very little is known about the effects of chemical mixtures on the immune system. The current study examined whether coexposure to another known immunotoxicant, mercuric chloride (HgCl2), altered TCE-induced AIH. Female MRL+/+ mice were treated for only 8 weeks with TCE (9.9 or 186.9 mg/kg/day in drinking water) and/or HgCl2 (260 μg/kg/day, sc). Unlike mice exposed to either TCE or HgCl2 alone, mice exposed to both toxicants for 8 weeks developed significant liver pathology commensurate with early stages of AIH. Disease development in the coexposed mice was accompanied by a unique pattern of anti-liver and anti-brain antibodies that recognized, among others, a protein of approximately 90 kDa. Subsequent immunoblotting showed that sera from the coexposed mice contained antibodies specific for heat shock proteins, a chaperone protein targeted by antibodies in patients with AIH. Thus, although TCE can promote autoimmune disease following chronic exposure, a shorter exposure to a binary mixture of TCE and HgCl2 accelerated disease development. Coexposure to TCE and HgCl2 also generated a unique liver-specific antibody response not found in mice exposed to a single toxicant. This finding stresses the importance of including mixtures in assessments of chemical immunotoxicity. PMID:21084432

  19. Value of phagocyte function screening for immunotoxicity of nanoparticles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) present in the environment and in consumer products can cause immunotoxic effects. The immune system is very complex, and in vivo studies are the gold standard for evaluation. Due to the increased amount of NPs that are being developed, cellular screening assays to decrease the amount of NPs that have to be tested in vivo are highly needed. Effects on the unspecific immune system, such as effects on phagocytes, might be suitable for screening for immunotoxicity because these cells mediate unspecific and specific immune responses. They are present at epithelial barriers, in the blood, and in almost all organs. This review summarizes the effects of carbon, metal, and metal oxide NPs used in consumer and medical applications (gold, silver, titanium dioxide, silica dioxide, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes) and polystyrene NPs on the immune system. Effects in animal exposures through different routes are compared to the effects on isolated phagocytes. In addition, general problems in the testing of NPs, such as unknown exposure doses, as well as interference with assays are mentioned. NPs appear to induce a specific immunotoxic pattern consisting of the induction of inflammation in normal animals and aggravation of pathologies in disease models. The evaluation of particle action on several phagocyte functions in vitro may provide an indication on the potency of the particles to induce immunotoxicity in vivo. In combination with information on realistic exposure levels, in vitro studies on phagocytes may provide useful information on the health risks of NPs. PMID:26060398

  20. Value of phagocyte function screening for immunotoxicity of nanoparticles in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) present in the environment and in consumer products can cause immunotoxic effects. The immune system is very complex, and in vivo studies are the gold standard for evaluation. Due to the increased amount of NPs that are being developed, cellular screening assays to decrease the amount of NPs that have to be tested in vivo are highly needed. Effects on the unspecific immune system, such as effects on phagocytes, might be suitable for screening for immunotoxicity because these cells mediate unspecific and specific immune responses. They are present at epithelial barriers, in the blood, and in almost all organs. This review summarizes the effects of carbon, metal, and metal oxide NPs used in consumer and medical applications (gold, silver, titanium dioxide, silica dioxide, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes) and polystyrene NPs on the immune system. Effects in animal exposures through different routes are compared to the effects on isolated phagocytes. In addition, general problems in the testing of NPs, such as unknown exposure doses, as well as interference with assays are mentioned. NPs appear to induce a specific immunotoxic pattern consisting of the induction of inflammation in normal animals and aggravation of pathologies in disease models. The evaluation of particle action on several phagocyte functions in vitro may provide an indication on the potency of the particles to induce immunotoxicity in vivo. In combination with information on realistic exposure levels, in vitro studies on phagocytes may provide useful information on the health risks of NPs. PMID:26060398

  1. Immunotoxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles with different size and electrostatic charge.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Su; Nguyen, Hai-Duong; Ignacio, Rosa Mistica; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Cho, Hyeon-Cheol; Maeng, Eun Ho; Kim, Yu-Ri; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Park, Bae-Keun; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2014-01-01

    While zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) have been recognized to have promising applications in biomedicine, their immunotoxicity has been inconsistent and even contradictory. To address this issue, we investigated whether ZnO NPs with different size (20 or 100 nm) and electrostatic charge (positive or negative) would cause immunotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, and explored their underlying molecular mechanism. Using Raw 264.7 cell line, we examined the immunotoxicity mechanism of ZnO NPs as cell viability. We found that in a cell viability assay, ZnO NPs with different size and charge could induce differential cytotoxicity to Raw 264.7 cells. Specifically, the positively charged ZnO NPs exerted higher cytotoxicity than the negatively charged ones. Next, to gauge systemic immunotoxicity, we assessed immune responses of C57BL/6 mice after oral administration of 750 mg/kg/day dose of ZnO NPs for 2 weeks. In parallel, ZnO NPs did not alter the cell-mediated immune response in mice but suppressed innate immunity such as natural killer cell activity. The CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio, a marker for matured T-cells was slightly reduced, which implies the alteration of immune status induced by ZnO NPs. Accordingly, nitric oxide production from splenocyte culture supernatant in ZnO NP-fed mice was lower than control. Consistently, serum levels of pro/anti-inflammatory (interleukin [IL]-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-10) and T helper-1 cytokines (interferon-γ and IL-12p70) in ZnO NP-fed mice were significantly suppressed. Collectively, our results indicate that different sized and charged ZnO NPs would cause in vitro and in vivo immunotoxicity, of which nature is an immunosuppression. PMID:25565837

  2. A comparison of immunotoxic effects of nanomedicinal products with regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements.

    PubMed

    Giannakou, Christina; Park, Margriet Vdz; de Jong, Wim H; van Loveren, Henk; Vandebriel, Rob J; Geertsma, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are attractive for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications because of their unique physicochemical and biological properties. A major application area of NMs is drug delivery. Many nanomedicinal products (NMPs) currently on the market or in clinical trials are most often based on liposomal products or polymer conjugates. NMPs can be designed to target specific tissues, eg, tumors. In virtually all cases, NMPs will eventually reach the immune system. It has been shown that most NMs end up in organs of the mononuclear phagocytic system, notably liver and spleen. Adverse immune effects, including allergy, hypersensitivity, and immunosuppression, have been reported after NMP administration. Interactions of NMPs with the immune system may therefore constitute important side effects. Currently, no regulatory documents are specifically dedicated to evaluate the immunotoxicity of NMs or NMPs. Their immunotoxicity assessment is performed based on existing guidelines for conventional substances or medicinal products. Due to the unique properties of NMPs when compared with conventional medicinal products, it is uncertain whether the currently prescribed set of tests provides sufficient information for an adequate evaluation of potential immunotoxicity of NMPs. The aim of this study was therefore, to compare the current regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements with the accumulating knowledge on immunotoxic effects of NMPs in order to identify potential gaps in the safety assessment. This comparison showed that immunotoxic effects, such as complement activation-related pseudoallergy, myelosuppression, inflammasome activation, and hypersensitivity, are not readily detected by using current testing guidelines. Immunotoxicity of NMPs would be more accurately evaluated by an expanded testing strategy that is equipped to stratify applicable testing for the various types of NMPs. PMID:27382281

  3. A comparison of immunotoxic effects of nanomedicinal products with regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements

    PubMed Central

    Giannakou, Christina; Park, Margriet VDZ; de Jong, Wim H; van Loveren, Henk; Vandebriel, Rob J; Geertsma, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are attractive for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications because of their unique physicochemical and biological properties. A major application area of NMs is drug delivery. Many nanomedicinal products (NMPs) currently on the market or in clinical trials are most often based on liposomal products or polymer conjugates. NMPs can be designed to target specific tissues, eg, tumors. In virtually all cases, NMPs will eventually reach the immune system. It has been shown that most NMs end up in organs of the mononuclear phagocytic system, notably liver and spleen. Adverse immune effects, including allergy, hypersensitivity, and immunosuppression, have been reported after NMP administration. Interactions of NMPs with the immune system may therefore constitute important side effects. Currently, no regulatory documents are specifically dedicated to evaluate the immunotoxicity of NMs or NMPs. Their immunotoxicity assessment is performed based on existing guidelines for conventional substances or medicinal products. Due to the unique properties of NMPs when compared with conventional medicinal products, it is uncertain whether the currently prescribed set of tests provides sufficient information for an adequate evaluation of potential immunotoxicity of NMPs. The aim of this study was therefore, to compare the current regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements with the accumulating knowledge on immunotoxic effects of NMPs in order to identify potential gaps in the safety assessment. This comparison showed that immunotoxic effects, such as complement activation-related pseudoallergy, myelosuppression, inflammasome activation, and hypersensitivity, are not readily detected by using current testing guidelines. Immunotoxicity of NMPs would be more accurately evaluated by an expanded testing strategy that is equipped to stratify applicable testing for the various types of NMPs. PMID:27382281

  4. AN EXTRACT OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM CAUSES ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN A BALB/C MOUSE MODEL: I. BIOCHEMICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental exposure to Stachybotrys chartarum has been associated with adverse health effects in humans. The goal of this study was to assess soluble components of this fungus for allergenic potential. Five isolates of S. chartarum were combined and extracted to form a crude...

  5. The effect of spaceflight on growth of Ulocladium chartarum colonies on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Gomoiu, Ioana; Chatzitheodoridis, Elias; Vadrucci, Sonia; Walther, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this 14 days experiment were to investigate the effect of spaceflight on the growth of Ulocladium chartarum, to study the viability of the aerial and submerged mycelium and to put in evidence changes at the cellular level. U. chartarum was chosen for the spaceflight experiment because it is well known to be involved in biodeterioration of organic and inorganic substrates covered with organic deposits and expected to be a possible contaminant in Spaceships. Colonies grown on the International Space Station (ISS) and on Earth were analysed post-flight. This study clearly indicates that U. chartarum is able to grow under spaceflight conditions developing, as a response, a complex colony morphotype never mentioned previously. We observed that spaceflight reduced the rate of growth of aerial mycelium, but stimulated the growth of submerged mycelium and of new microcolonies. In Spaceships and Space Stations U. chartarum and other fungal species could find a favourable environment to grow invasively unnoticed in the depth of surfaces containing very small amount of substrate, posing a risk factor for biodegradation of structural components, as well as a direct threat for crew health. The colony growth cycle of U. chartarum provides a useful eukaryotic system for the study of fungal growth under spaceflight conditions. PMID:23637980

  6. The Effect of Spaceflight on Growth of Ulocladium chartarum Colonies on the International Space Station

    PubMed Central

    Gomoiu, Ioana; Chatzitheodoridis, Elias; Vadrucci, Sonia; Walther, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this 14 days experiment were to investigate the effect of spaceflight on the growth of Ulocladium chartarum, to study the viability of the aerial and submerged mycelium and to put in evidence changes at the cellular level. U. chartarum was chosen for the spaceflight experiment because it is well known to be involved in biodeterioration of organic and inorganic substrates covered with organic deposits and expected to be a possible contaminant in Spaceships. Colonies grown on the International Space Station (ISS) and on Earth were analysed post-flight. This study clearly indicates that U. chartarum is able to grow under spaceflight conditions developing, as a response, a complex colony morphotype never mentioned previously. We observed that spaceflight reduced the rate of growth of aerial mycelium, but stimulated the growth of submerged mycelium and of new microcolonies. In Spaceships and Space Stations U. chartarum and other fungal species could find a favourable environment to grow invasively unnoticed in the depth of surfaces containing very small amount of substrate, posing a risk factor for biodegradation of structural components, as well as a direct threat for crew health. The colony growth cycle of U. chartarum provides a useful eukaryotic system for the study of fungal growth under spaceflight conditions. PMID:23637980

  7. Microbial volatile organic compound emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on gypsum wallboard and ceiling tile

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stachybotrys chartarum is a filamentous mold frequently identified among the mycobiota of water-damaged building materials. Growth of S. chartarum on suitable substrates and under favorable environmental conditions leads to the production of secondary metabolites such as mycotoxins and microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs). The aim of this study was to characterize MVOC emission profiles of seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum, isolated from water-damaged buildings, in order to identify unique MVOCs generated during growth on gypsum wallboard and ceiling tile coupons. Inoculated coupons were incubated and monitored for emissions and growth using a closed glass environmental growth chamber maintained at a constant room temperature. Gas samples were collected from the headspace for three to four weeks using Tenax TA tubes. Results Most of the MVOCs identified were alcohols, ketones, ethers and esters. The data showed that anisole (methoxybenzene) was emitted from all of the S. chartarum strains tested on both types of substrates. Maximum anisole concentration was detected after seven days of incubation. Conclusions MVOCs are suitable markers for fungal identification because they easily diffuse through weak barriers like wallpaper, and could be used for early detection of mold growth in hidden cavities. This study identifies the production of anisole by seven toxigenic strains of Stachybotrys chartarum within a period of one week of growth on gypsum wallboard and ceiling tiles. These data could provide useful information for the future construction of a robust MVOC library for the early detection of this mold. PMID:24308451

  8. In vitro evaluation of the immunotoxic potential of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Corsini, Emanuela; Avogadro, Anna; Galbiati, Valentina; Dell'Agli, Mario; Marinovich, Marina; Galli, Corrado L.; Germolec, Dori R.

    2011-01-15

    There is evidence from both epidemiology and laboratory studies that perfluorinated compounds may be immunotoxic, affecting both cell-mediated and humoral immunity. The overall goal of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the immunotoxic effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctane acid (PFOA), using in vitro assays. The release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-{alpha} was evaluated in lipolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human peripheral blood leukocytes and in the human promyelocytic cell line THP-1, while the release of IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-{gamma} was evaluated in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes. PFOA and PFOS suppressed LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} production in primary human cultures and THP-1 cells, while IL-8 was suppressed only in THP-1 cells. IL-6 release was decreased only by PFOS. Both PFOA and PFOS decreased T-cell derived, PHA-induced IL-4 and IL-10 release, while IFN-{gamma} release was affected only by PFOS. In all instances, PFOS was more potent than PFOA. Mechanistic investigations carried out in THP-1 cells demonstrated that the effect on cytokine release was pre-transcriptional, as assessed by a reduction in LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} mRNA expression. Using siRNA, a role for PPAR-{alpha} could be demonstrated for PFOA-induced immunotoxicity, while an inhibitory effect on LPS-induced I-{kappa}B degradation could explain the immunomodulatory effect of PFOS. The dissimilar role of PPAR-{alpha} in PFOA and PFOS-induced immunotoxicity was consistent with the differing effects observed on LPS-induced MMP-9 release: PFOA, as the PPAR-{alpha} agonist fenofibrate, modulated the release, while PFOS had no effect. Overall, these studies suggest that PFCs directly suppress cytokine secretion by immune cells, and that PFOA and PFOS have different mechanisms of action.

  9. PERFLUORINATED COMPOUNDS: EMERGING POPs WITH POTENTIAL IMMUNOTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Corsini, Emanuela; Luebke, Robert W.; Germolec, Dori R.; DeWitt, Jamie C.

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been recognized as an important class of environmental contaminants commonly detected in blood samples of both wildlife and humans. These compounds have been in use for more than 60 years as surface treatment chemicals, polymerization aids, and surfactants. They possess a strong carbon-fluorine bond, which leads to their environmental persistence. There is evidence from both epidemiology and laboratory studies that PFCs may be immunotoxic, affecting both cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Reported effects of PFCs include decreased spleen and thymus weights and cellularity, reduced antibody production, reduced survival after influenza infection, and altered cytokine production. Immunosuppression is a critical effect associated with exposure to PFCs, as it has been reported to reduce antibody responses to vaccination in children. Mounting evidence suggests that immunotoxicity in experimental animals can occur at serum concentrations below, within, or just above the reported range for highly exposed humans and wildlife. Considering bioaccumulation and exposure to multiple PFCs, the risk of immunotoxicity for humans and wildlife cannot be discounted. This review will discuss current and recently published work exploring the immunomodulatory effects of PFCs in experimental animals and humans. PMID:24503008

  10. Immunotoxic Effect of Low-Dose Methylmercury Is Negligible in Mouse Models of Ovalbumin or Mite-Induced Th2 Allergy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Takanezawa, Yasukazu; Sone, Yuka; Uraguchi, Shimpei; Sakabe, Kou; Kiyono, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is one of the most toxic environmental pollutants and presents a serious hazard to health worldwide. Although the adverse effects of MeHg, including neurotoxicity, have been studied, its effects on immune function, in particular the immune response, remain unclear. This study examined the effects of low-dose MeHg on immune responses in mice. Mice were orally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) or subcutaneously injected with mite extract to induce a T-helper 2 (Th2) allergic response. They were then exposed to MeHg (0, 0.02, 1.0, or 5.0 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)). Immunization with oral OVA or subcutaneous mite extract increased serum levels of OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E (OVA-IgE), OVA-IgG1, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-13, and total IgE, total IgG, and IL-13 when compared with levels in non-immunized mice. However, no interferon (IFN)-γ was detected. By contrast, serum levels of OVA-IgE, OVA-IgG1, IL-4, and IL-13, or total IgE, total IgG, and IL-13 in Th2 allergy model mice subsequently treated with MeHg were no higher than those in MeHg-untreated mice. These results suggest that MeHg exposure has no adverse effects on Th2 immune responses in antigen-immunized mice. PMID:27476942

  11. In vitro immunotoxicity of environmentally representative antibiotics to the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanata.

    PubMed

    Gust, M; Gélinas, M; Fortier, M; Fournier, M; Gagné, F

    2012-10-01

    The separate and combined in vitro toxic effects of antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, novobiocin, oxytetracycline, sulfamethazole and trimethoprim) commonly found in urban wastewater effluents were assessed on the immune parameters of Elliptio complanata at environmentally relevant concentrations. The observed responses were then compared to those produced by the physicochemical-treated wastewater effluent of a major city before and after the removal of microorganisms. Most of the selected antibiotics, separately and as mixture, induced changes in immune responses. The removal of microorganisms and fine particles from the effluent increased or decreased the resulting immunotoxic effects, depending of the observed parameter. The immunotoxic effects of erythromycin, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim were closely associated to the antibiotic mixture and the filtered effluent. In conclusion, the data revealed that the removal of fine particles and microorganisms from municipal effluents can alter the toxic nature of the effluent that is closely associated with the cumulative effects of antibiotics. PMID:22683480

  12. Cutaneous infection caused by Ulocladium chartarum in a heart transplant recipient: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Durán, María Teresa; Del Pozo, Jesús; Yebra, María Teresa; Crespo, María Generosa; Paniagua, María Jesús; Cabezón, María Angeles; Guarro, Josep

    2003-01-01

    A cutaneous mycoses caused by Ulocladium chartarum in a heart transplant recipient is reported. The infection cleared after complete surgical excision and 6 months of oral itraconazole therapy. In vitro activity of amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, ravuconazole and terbinafine against the clinical isolate is shown. PMID:12816160

  13. The relative allergenicity of Stachybotrys chartarum compared to house dust mite extracts in a mouse model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A report by the Institute of Medicine suggested that more research is needed to better understand mold effects on allergic disease, particularly asthma development. The authors compared the ability of the fungus Stachybotrys chartarum (SCE) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to i...

  14. Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on Gypsum Wallboard and Ceiling tile

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compared seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum found in water-damaged buildings to characterize the microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions profile while growing on gypsum wallboard (W) and ceiling tile (C) coupons. The inoculated coupons with their sub...

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROBIAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (MVOC) EMITTED BY STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum is a filamentous fungi usually found in water-damaged buildings. Severe illnesses have been reported after indoor exposure to this mold. Toxicity has caused the production of secondary metabolites or mycotoxins, and the emission of by-products, specifically...

  16. INITIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST THE FUNGAL HEMOLYSIN STACHYLYSIN FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum is known to produce the hemolysin stachylysin and its detection in human serum has been proposed as a biomarker for exposure to the fungus. In this study we report the initial characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against stachylysin and the dev...

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF PUTATIVE SEQUENCE SPECIFIC PCR PRIMERS FOR DETECTION OF THE TOXIGENIC FUNGAL SPECIES STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nucleotide sequence of a c 936 bp segment of the nuclear rRNA gene operon was determined for the toxigenic fungal species Stachybotrys chartarum and for other species of Stachbotrys and the related genus Memnoniella. This information was used to infer the phylogenetic relatio...

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF SEQUENCE SPECIFIC PCR PRIMERS FOR DETECTION OF THE TOXIGENIC FUNGAL SPECIES STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nucleotide sequence of a 936 bp segment of the nuclear rRNA gene operon was determined for the toxigenic fungal species Stachybotrys chartarum and for other species of Stachybotrys and the related genus Memnoniella. This information was used to infer the phylogenitic relati...

  19. QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM CONIDIA USING REAL TIME DETECTION OF PCR PRODUCTS WITH THE TAQMAN TM FLUOROGENIC PROBE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurence of Stachybotrys chartarum in indoor environments has been associated with a number of human health concerns, including fatal pulmonary haemosiderosis in infants. Currently used culture-based and microscopic methods of fungal species identification are poorly suited ...

  20. DESTRUCTION OF ASPERGILLUS VERSICOLOR, PENICILLIUM CRYSOGENUM, STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM, AND CLADOSPORIUM CLADOSPORIDES SPORES USING CHEMICAL OXIDATION TREATMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The survival of aqueous suspensions of Penicillium chrysogenum, Stachybotrys chartarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Cladosporium cladosporioides spores was evaluated using various combinations of hydrogen peroxide and iron (II) as catalyst. Spores were suspended in water and trea...

  1. Immunotoxic sesquiterpene lactone from Carpesium rosulatum Miq.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-In; Zee, Okpyo

    2011-06-01

    The whole plants of Carpesium rosulatum were chloroform extracted and the isolated sesquiterpene lactones and immunotoxicity effects were studied. The structures and stereochemistry of these compounds were established on the basis of analysis of spectra including mp, [α](D)(25), IR, UV, EI-MS, MS, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and some chemical transformations as follows: 1 (4β,10α-dihydroxy-guaia-8α,12-olide), 2 (4β,10α-dihydroxy-1(2),11 (13)-guaiadien -8α,12-olide), 3 (3β,8β-dihydroxy-1α,5α-guaian-10(14)-ene-6α,12-olide). 4 (2β,5-epoxy-5,10-dihydroxy-6α,9β-diangeloyloxy-germacran-8α,12-olide) The chloroform extracted had a significant toxic effect against early fourth-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L with an LC(50) value of 13.11 ppm and an LC(90) value of 20.33 ppm. The results could be useful in search for newer, safer, and more effective natural immunotoxicity agents against A. aegypti. PMID:20738151

  2. Study on the impact of lead acetate pollutant on immunotoxicity produced by thiamethoxam pesticide

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Suprita; Thaker, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The curtailed knowledge about neonicotinoids that it has low affinity for vertebrate relative to insect nicotinic receptors is a major factor for its widespread use assuming that it is much safer than the previous generation insecticides. But literature regarding effect of thiamethoxam (second generation neonicotinoid)on immune system is not available. Also, there might be chances of interaction of heavy persistent metals in the water table with these pesticides. So, this study was undertaken with the objective to find immunotoxic alterations of lead acetate after exposure with thiamethoxam in animal model. Materials and Methods: For this albino mice were randomly divided into 6 groups (numbered I to VI) each containing 6 mice. Animals of groups I and II were administered 87.1 mg/kg b.w.(body weight) and 43.5 mg/kg b.w. respectively of thiamethoxam. Group III animals, lead acetate was administered orally and IV and V mice were administered combination of lead acetate and thiamethoxam at higher and lower dose level for 28 days. The group VI was control group. On 29th day and humoral and cell mediated immune responses, TLC (Total leukocyte count), DLC (Differential leukocyte count), serum total protein, globulin and albumin, and histopathological studies were conducted. Result: The result obtained clearly indicated that on oral administration of thiamethoxam immunotoxicity was induced in mice in dose related manner. Lead acetate when administered for 28 days showed immunotoxic potential. Thiamethoxam and lead acetate when administered together did not lead to any new altered immunotoxic response but additive toxic effects of both were observed. PMID:25538329

  3. Immunotoxicity of cocaine and crack.

    PubMed

    Stefanidou, Maria; Loutsidou, Ariadni C; Chasapis, Christos T; Spiliopoulou, Chara A

    2011-06-01

    The toxicity of cocaine and crack was studied on the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis, using several endpoints, such as the DNA content of the macronuclei and the phagocytic ability. Both forms induced an increase in the DNA content of the protozoan, which indicates the stimulation of the mitotic process. In contrast, the phagocytic activity, of the protozoan was decreased after the administration of cocaine, an effect that was more extensive after the administration of crack. These results, derived from previous experiments, suggest a possible relationship between the observed immunosuppression in cocaine abusers and the immunosuppression found in the protozoan. This suppression subsequently may play a role in the development of other opportunistic infections in drug abusers. This paper, based on in vivo experiments with the protozoan Tetrahymena, suggests the compromised immune response in cocaine addicts and assures the reported effects of cocaine on immune cell function. PMID:21696343

  4. IMMUNOTOXICITY OF INDIVIDUAL ORGANOTIN COMPOUNDS IN SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organotins, used as stabilizers for polyvinyl chloride pipe, leach into drinking water from supply pipes and may cause multisystem toxicity, including immunotoxicity. We assessed immune function in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) or dimethyltin dichlor...

  5. The immunotoxic effects of dual exposure to PCP and TCDD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Min; Lee, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Rong-Jane; Chiu, Hui-Wen; Wang, Bour-Jr; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2013-11-25

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) was a commonly used fungicide, herbicide, insecticide, and bactericide in industrial, agricultural, and domestic settings; however, it was also contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). It has been reported that technical grade PCP had immunosuppressive effects and that the immune system was the major target of PCDD/PCDFs toxicity. Although the immune response after exposure to PCP or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been studied, the toxic effects of exposure to both PCP and TCDD have not yet been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on immune cells from mice intraperitoneally immunized with OVA and subsequently treated with PCP or TCDD alone or in combination by gavage. The animals were terminated on day 7 and 14, and the spleen and plasma samples were collected for immunotoxicity evaluation. The numbers and populations of splenocytes, T cell-derived cytokines produced by splenocytes, splenocyte-generated cytotoxicity and OVA-specific antibodies in plasma were investigated. Our results indicate that the spleen/body weight ratio and splenocyte number was reduced by TCDD alone; in addition, this reduction was enhanced when TCDD was combined with PCP. Exposure to TCDD alone or in conjunction with PCP suppressed many ovalbumin (OVA)-stimulated cytokines, including IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. Furthermore, the immunoglobulins IgG and IgM were suppressed in mice administered by PCP alone, but the suppressive effects were greater in mice treated with TCDD alone or in combination with PCP. Co-exposure to PCP and TCDD resulted in an antagonistic effect on TCDD-induced suppression of IFN-γ and IL-10. Our results demonstrate that PCP alone is immunotoxic, regardless of the presence of TCDD. PCP led to mild changes in cytokine secretion, and it compromised splenocyte-generated cytotoxicity and IgM and IgG antibody production on day 7. The finding

  6. QUANTIFICATION OF SIDEROPHORE AND HEMOLYSIN FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM STRAINS, INCLUDING A STRAIN ISOLATED FROM THE LUNG OF A CHILD WITH PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE AND HEMOSIDEROSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A strain of Stachybotrys chartarum was recently isolated from the lung of a pulmonary hemorrhage and hemosiderosis (PH) patient in Texas (designated the Houston strain). This is the first time that S. chartarum has been isolated from the lung of a PH patient. In this study, the ...

  7. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry fingerprinting: A diagnostic tool to differentiate dematiaceous fungi Stachybotrys chartarum and Stachybotrys chlorohalonata.

    PubMed

    Gruenwald, Maike; Rabenstein, Andreas; Remesch, Markko; Kuever, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Stachybotrys chartarum and Stachybotrys chlorohalonata are two closely related species. Unambiguous identification of these two species is a challenging task if relying solely on morphological criteria and therefore smarter and less labor-intensive approaches are needed. Here we show that even such closely related species of fungi as S. chartarum and S. chlorohalonata are unequivocally discriminated by their highly reproducible MALDI-TOF-MS fingerprints (matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry fingerprints). We examined 19 Stachybotrys and one Aspergillus isolate by MALDI-TOF-MS. All but one isolate produced melanin containing conidia on malt extract agar. Mass spectra were obtained in good quality from the analysis of hyaline and darkly pigmented conidia by circumventing the property of melanin which causes signal suppression. MALDI-TOF fingerprint analysis clearly discriminated not only the two morphologically similar species S. chartarum and S. chlorohalonata from each other but separated them precisely from Stachybotrys bisbyi and Aspergillus versicolor isolates. Furthermore, even S. chartarum chemotypes A and S could be differentiated into two distinct groups by their MALDI-TOF fingerprints. The chemotypes of S. chartarum isolates were identified by trichodiene synthase 5 (tri5) sequences prior to mass spectra analysis. Additionally, species identities of all isolates were verified by their 18S rRNA and tri5 gene sequences. PMID:26036596

  8. High dispersity of carbon nanotubes diminishes immunotoxicity in spleen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soyoung; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background From the various physiochemical material properties, the chemical functionalization order of single-walled carbon nanotubes (swCNTs) has not been considered as a critical factor for modulating immunological responses and toxicological aspects in drug delivery applications. Although most nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes, are specifically accumulated in spleen, few studies have focused on spleen immunotoxicity. For this reason, this study demonstrated that the dispersity of swCNTs significantly influenced immunotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Materials and methods For cytotoxicity of swCNTs, MTT assay, reactive oxygen species production, superoxide dismutase activity, cellular uptake, and confocal microscopy were used in macrophages. In the in vivo study, female BALB/c mice were intravenously administered with 1 mg/kg/day of swCNTs for 2 weeks. The body weight, organ weight, hematological change, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and lymphocyte population were evaluated. Results Different orders of chemical functionalization of swCNTs controlled immunotoxicity. In short, less-dispersed swCNTs caused cytotoxicity in macrophages and abnormalities in immune organs such as spleen, whereas highly dispersed swCNTs did not result in immunotoxicity. Conclusion This study clarified that increasing carboxyl groups on swCNTs significantly mitigated immunotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Our findings clarified the effective immunotoxicological factors of swCNTs by increasing dispersity of swCNTs and provided useful guidelines for the effective use of nanomaterials. PMID:25878502

  9. Evaluation of Apoptosis in Immunotoxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Vakharia, Dilip; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.

    2014-01-01

    Immunotoxicity testing is important in determining the toxic effects of chemical substances, medicinal products, airborne pollutants, cosmetics, medical devices, and food additives. The immune system of the host is a direct target of these toxicants, and the adverse effects include serious health complications such as susceptibility to infections, cancer, allergic reactions, and autoimmune diseases. One way to investigate the harmful effects of different chemicals is to study apoptosis in immune cell populations. Apoptosis is defined as the programmed cell death, and in general, this process helps in development and maintains homeostasis. However, in the case of an insult by a toxicant, apoptosis of the immune cells can lead to immunosuppression resulting in the development of cancer and the inability to fight infections. Apoptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation, changes in cell membrane and mitochondria, DNA fragmentation into 200 base oligomers, and protein degradation by caspases. Various methods are employed in order to investigate apoptosis. These methods include direct measurement of apoptotic cells with flow cytometry and in situ labeling, as well as RNA, DNA, and protein assays that are indicative of apoptotic molecules. PMID:19967519

  10. [Photosensitization in cattle grazing on pastures of Brahciaria decumbens Stapf infested with Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis].

    PubMed

    Andrade, S O; da Silva Lopes, H O; de Almeida Barros, M; Leite, G G; Dias, S M; Saueressig, M; Nobre, D; Temperini, J A

    1978-01-01

    Aspects of photosensitization in bovines grazing on pastures of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf infested with Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis infested all pastures 45(2):117-136, 1978. This paper reports experimental studies on photosensitization in bovines grazing on different pastures of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf in the "Cerrados" region (Planaltina, DF). Climatic conditions, zinc content and occurence of fungi on pastures were investigated. Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis infested all pastures examined. Photosensitization was observed in one animal maintained on a pasture of B. decumbens formed with seeds from Australia. Clinical and necropsy data were similar to those related in literature for sporidesmin-intoxicated animals. An isolate of P. chartarum and samples of bovine bile were assayed for sporidesmin presence. PMID:573108

  11. Enantioselective developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity of pyraclofos toward zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shulin; Zhang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Wenjing; Bao, Lingling; Xu, Chao; Zhang, Hu

    2015-02-01

    Pyraclofos, a relatively new organophosphorus pesticide, has shown potential ecotoxicities, however, its aquatic toxicity, especially enantioselective aquatic toxicity, remains largely unknown. Using zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a preeminent vertebrate aquatic model, the enantioselective differences in the developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity of pyraclofos were evaluated. Following 96-h exposure, pyraclofos enantiomers exhibited acute toxicity and showed lethal concentration 50 of 2.23 and 3.99 mg/L for (R)-Pyraclofos and (S)-Pyraclofos, respectively. Exposure to pyraclofos caused time- and concentration-dependent malformations such as pericardial edema, yolk sac edema, crooked bodies and hatching during the embryonic development, with markedly higher percentages of malformation at higher concentrations. The concentration-dependent immunotoxicity to zebrafish embryo exposed to low level pyraclofos was induced with significant up-regulation of mRNA levels of immune-related interleukin-1β (IL-1β) gene. (R)-Pyraclofos was consistently more toxic than (S)-Pyraclofos for the acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity to zebrafish. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that at the atomic level, (R)-Pyraclofos binds more potently to IL-1β protein than (S)-Pyraclofos. This enantioselective binding is mainly contributed by the distinct binding mode of pyraclofos enantiomers and their electrostatic interactions with IL-1β, which potentially affects IL-1β-dependent proinflammatory signal transduction. Our in vitro and in silico studies provided a better insight into the molecular basis for aquatic toxicity and thus improved the risk assessment for pyraclofos and other chiral organophosphorus pesticides. PMID:25540855

  12. Detection of Airborne Stachybotrys chartarum Macrocyclic Trichothecene Mycotoxins in the Indoor Environment

    PubMed Central

    Brasel, T. L.; Martin, J. M.; Carriker, C. G.; Wilson, S. C.; Straus, D. C.

    2005-01-01

    The existence of airborne mycotoxins in mold-contaminated buildings has long been hypothesized to be a potential occupant health risk. However, little work has been done to demonstrate the presence of these compounds in such environments. The presence of airborne macrocyclic trichothecene mycotoxins in indoor environments with known Stachybotrys chartarum contamination was therefore investigated. In seven buildings, air was collected using a high-volume liquid impaction bioaerosol sampler (SpinCon PAS 450-10) under static or disturbed conditions. An additional building was sampled using an Andersen GPS-1 PUF sampler modified to separate and collect particulates smaller than conidia. Four control buildings (i.e., no detectable S. chartarum growth or history of water damage) and outdoor air were also tested. Samples were analyzed using a macrocyclic trichothecene-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ELISA specificity was tested using phosphate-buffered saline extracts of the fungal genera Aspergillus, Chaetomium, Cladosporium, Fusarium, Memnoniella, Penicillium, Rhizopus, and Trichoderma, five Stachybotrys strains, and the indoor air allergens Can f 1, Der p 1, and Fel d 1. For test buildings, the results showed that detectable toxin concentrations increased with the sampling time and short periods of air disturbance. Trichothecene values ranged from <10 to >1,300 pg/m3 of sampled air. The control environments demonstrated statistically significantly (P < 0.001) lower levels of airborne trichothecenes. ELISA specificity experiments demonstrated a high specificity for the trichothecene-producing strain of S. chartarum. Our data indicate that airborne macrocyclic trichothecenes can exist in Stachybotrys-contaminated buildings, and this should be taken into consideration in future indoor air quality investigations. PMID:16269780

  13. Assessment of immunotoxicity using precision-cut tissue slices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    1. When the immune system encounters incoming infectious agents, this generally leads to immunity. The evoked immune response is usually robust, but can be severely perturbed by potentially harmful environmental agents such as chemicals, pharmaceuticals and allergens. 2. Immunosuppression, hypersensitivity and autoimmunity may occur due to changed immune activity. Evaluation of the immunotoxic potency of agents as part of risk assessment is currently established in vivo with animal models and in vitro with cell lines or primary cells. 3. Although in vivo testing is usually the most relevant situation for many agents, more and more in vitro models are being developed for assessment of immunotoxicity. In this context, hypersensitivity and immunosuppression are considered to be a primary focus for developing in vitro methods. Three-dimensional organotypic tissue models are also part of current research in immunotoxicology. 4. In recent years, there has been a revival of interest in organotypic tissue models. In the context of immunotoxicity testing, precision-cut lung slices in particular have been intensively studied. Therefore, this review is very much focused on pulmonary immunotoxicology. Respiratory hypersensitivity and inflammation are further highlighted aspects of this review. Immunotoxicity assessment currently is of limited use in other tissue models, which are therefore described only briefly within this review. PMID:23199366

  14. ASSESSMENT OF IMMUNOTOXIC POTENTIAL OF THE FUNGICIDE DINOCAP IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The immunotoxic potential of dinocap was evaluated in female C57BL/6J mice following in vivo and in vitro exposure to this fungicide. n in vivo studies, groups of mice were dosed by gavage with technical grade dinocap at dosages ranging from 12.5 to 50 mg/kg/d for seven or twelve...

  15. Immunotoxical evaluation of St. Lawrence beluga whales (Deiphinapterus leucas)

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, S. De; Fournier, M.; Martineau, D.; Beland, P.

    1995-12-31

    An isolated population of beluga whales live in the St. Lawrence estuary. From approximately 5,000 at the beginning of the century, they now number 500 and their number has not increased since the last 10 years. High concentrations of environmental contaminants including organohalogens (mostly PCBs and DDT), as well as heavy metals (mostly mercury and lead) and HAP exposure have been demonstrated in tissues of these animals. A high incidence of diverse and severe lesions including infections with mildly pathogenic bacteria and numerous tumors were found upon examination of carcasses from the same population. An immunotoxicological evaluation of St. Lawrence beluga whales compared to relatively unpolluted Arctic animals was undertaken to study the possibility of a contaminants induced immunosuppression which would explain the diversity and severity of those lesions. As a first step, several assays were developed to evaluate immune functions in beluga whales, and baseline data were established using Arctic animals. In vitro exposure of Arctic beluga lymphocytes to single contaminants present in St. Lawrence beluga blubber were also performed and showed a suppression of proliferation of lymphocytes with concentrations of mercury below those found in liver of adult St. Lawrence animals. Animal models were also developed to evaluate the immunotoxic potential of the mixture of contaminants found in blubber of St. Lawrence belugas. Rats were fed lipids from either St. Lawrence or Arctic belugas or a mixture of the two groups, and immune functions will be evaluated in these animals. Finally, the last step of the study will be to catch belugas in the St. Lawrence, evaluate their immune functions, compare them to those of Arctic animals and relate them to concentrations of the different contaminants measured in their blubber and plasma.

  16. N-acetylcysteine reverses immunotoxic effects of methyl mercury and augments murine lymphocyte proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Omara, F.; Fournier, M.; Bernier, J.; Blakley, B.

    1995-12-31

    N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) is a thiol antioxidant used clinically to treat chronic inflammatory lung disorders and acetaminophen poisoning in humans. The authors evaluated in vitro the effect of NAC on mitogen-induced blastogenesis in C57BI/6 mouse splenocytes by {sup 3}H-thymidine uptake, and its ability to protect against the immunotoxic effects of methyl mercury on lymphocyte proliferation. Lymphocyte proliferation stimulated by optimal and suboptimal concentrations of concanavalin A (Con A), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or a combination of calcium ionophore A23187 and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) were markedly enhanced by NAC. NAC itself was a weak mitogen. The kinetics of the NAC effect on splenocyte proliferation were mitogen dependent. NAC enhanced Con A-induced splenocyte proliferation in a dose-dependent and linear manner but enhanced the LPS-induced response at 50--400 {micro}g/ml of NAC followed by a decline in response to control value at higher concentrations. In splenocytes stimulated with PMA plus A23187, NAC increased proliferation at 50--200 pg/ml followed by a constant response at 200--1,000 {micro}g/ml NAC. When splenocytes were stimulated with higher concentrations of Con A (10 {micro}g/ml) or LPS (150 {micro}g/ml) which markedly suppress splenocyte proliferation, NAC significantly enhanced the Con A-induced response and reversed the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of LPS. NAC also protected lymphocytes against mitogen activation-induced cell death. Methyl mercury at 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}--1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} suppressed Con A- and LPS-induced splenocyte proliferation by over 80%. However, NAC completely reversed the immunotoxic effects of methyl mercury on the mitogen-induced splenocyte proliferation even when the cells were pre-incubated with methyl mercury for 6 or 24 hr before stimulation with the mitogens.

  17. Assessment of Immunotoxicity of Dextran Coated Ferrite Nanoparticles in Albino Mice

    PubMed Central

    Syama, Santhakumar; Gayathri, Viswanathan; Mohanan, Parayanthala Valappil

    2015-01-01

    In this study, dextran coated ferrite nanoparticles (DFNPs) of size <25 nm were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and oxidative stress by in vitro and in vivo methods. Cytotoxicity was performed in vitro using splenocytes with different concentrations of DFNPs. Gene expression of selected cytokines (IL-1, IL-10, and TNF β) secretion by splenocytes was evaluated. Also, 100 mg of DFNPs was injected intraperitoneally to 18 albino mice for immunological stimulations. Six animals each were sacrificed at the end of 7, 14, and 21 days. Spleen was subjected to immunotoxic response and liver was analyzed for antioxidant parameters (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase). The results indicated that DFNPs failed to induce any immunological reactions and no significant alternation in antioxidant defense mechanism. Also, mRNA expression of the cytokines revealed an increase in IL-10 expression and subsequent decreased expression of IL-1 and TNF β. Eventually, DNA sequencing of liver actin gene revealed base alteration in nonconserved regions (10–20 bases) of all the treated groups when compared to control samples. Hence, it can be concluded that the DFNPs were nontoxic at the cellular level and nonimmunotoxic when exposed intraperitoneally to mice. PMID:26576301

  18. Subchronic immunotoxicity and screening of reproductive toxicity and developmental immunotoxicity following single instillation of HIPCO-single-walled carbon nanotubes: purity-based comparison.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Choi, Je; Kim, Jae-Ho; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Yoon, Cheolho; Jeong, Uiseok; Kim, Younghun

    2016-10-01

    Impurity has been suggested as an important factor determining toxicity following exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this study, we first compared immunotoxicity based on iron content on day 90 after a single intratracheal instillation of SWCNTs in male and female mice. The inflammatory responses were generally stronger in mice exposed to acid-purified (P)-SWCNTs compared to raw (R)-SWCNTs. In addition, both R- and P-SWCNTs induced Th1-polarized immune responses with apoptotic death of BAL cells and systemically impaired the function of antigen-presenting cells (APC). We also screened reproductive and developmental toxicity by cohabitating male and female mice on day 14 after instillation. Interestingly, the pregnancy rate rapidly decreased following exposure to both types of SWCNTs, especially R-SWCNTs. In addition, we investigated developmental immunotoxicity of the offspring on day 28 after exposure to both types of SWCNTs. Their hematological changes were clearer relative to those of the parents and a significant decrease in the alkaline phosphatase and potassium levels was observed in mice of both sexes exposed to the higher dose of R- and P-SWCNTs. In conclusion, we suggest that SWCNTs may induce Th1-polarized immune responses accompanied by suppression of APC function on day 90 after a single instillation without significant iron content dependance. In addition, the consecutive exposure of SWCNTs to the subsequent generation may exacerbate metabolic and hematological disturbance. Furthermore, our results underscore the need to clarify the reproductive and developmental health effects of SWCNTs. PMID:27310831

  19. ELISA MEASUREMENT OF STACHYLYSIN (TM) IN SERUM TO QUANTIFY HUMAN EXPOSURES TO THE INDOOR MOLD STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Antibodies were produced against the hemolytic agent stachylysin obtained from the mold Stachybotryis chartarum. These antibodies were used to develop two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods for the analysis of stachylysin in human and rat sera and environmental sa...

  20. EVALUATION OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM IN THE HOUSE OF AN INFANT WITH PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE: QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum is an indoor mold that has been associated with pulmonary hemorrhage (PH) cases in the Cleveland, Ohio area. This study applied two new quantitative measurements to air samples from a home where an infant developed PH. Quantitative polymerase chain reacti...

  1. RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ALLERGIC-TYPE RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ALLERGIC-TYPE RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF Stachybotrys chartarum IN BALB/C MICE. ME Viana1, N Haykal-Coates2, S H Gavett2, MJ Selgrade2, and M D W Ward2. 1APR/CVM, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA. 2NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Rationale: assess the ab...

  2. 28-Day dietary exposure of mice to a low total dose (7 mg/kg) of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) alters neither the cellular compositions of the thymus and spleen nor humoral immune responses: does the route of administration play a pivotal role in PFOS-induced immunotoxicity?

    PubMed

    Qazi, Mousumi Rahman; Nelson, B Dean; Depierre, Joseph W; Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr

    2010-01-12

    Short-term exposure of mice to high doses of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), an ubiquitous and highly persistent environmental contaminant, induces various metabolic changes and toxic effects, including immunotoxicity. However, extrapolation of these findings to the long-term, low-dose exposures to which humans are subject is highly problematic. In this connection, recent studies have concluded that sub-chronic (28-day) exposure of mice by oral gavage to doses of PFOS that result in serum levels comparable to those found in general human populations suppress adaptive immunity. Because of the potential impact of these findings on environmental research and monitoring, we have examined here whether sub-chronic dietary exposure (a major route of human exposure) to a similarly low-dose of PFOS also suppress adaptive immune responses. Dietary treatment of male B6C3F1 mice for 28 days with a dose of PFOS that resulted in a serum concentration of 11mug/ml (ppm) significantly reduced body weight gain and increased liver mass. However, this treatment did not alter the cellular compositions of the thymus and spleen; the number of splenic cells secreting IgM antibodies against sheep red blood cell (SRBC); serum levels of IgM and IgG antibodies specifically towards SRBC; or circulating levels of IgM antibodies against the T-cell-independent antigen trinitrophenyl conjugated to lipopolysaccharide (TNP-LPS). These findings indicate that such sub-chronic dietary exposure of mice to PFOS resulting in serum levels approximately 8-85-fold greater than those observed in occupationally exposed individuals does not exert adverse effects on adaptive immunity. PMID:19900501

  3. Current status and burning issues in immunotoxicity testing of drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Laan, Jan Willem van der . E-mail: jan-willem.van.der.laan@rivm.nl; Loveren, Henk van

    2005-09-01

    Besides pathology endpoints, additional immune function endpoints have been included in the Note for Guidance on Repeated Dose Toxicity by the European Union (July 2001), which concern the analysis of antibody responses to a T-cell-dependent antigen. Guidance papers of other regulatory authorities are published as well. The main issue is the need for functional immunotoxicity testing to detect unintended immunosuppression. The International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) has surveyed studies from the files of the pharmaceutical industry to find the proportion of compounds that can be detected by additional immunotoxicity testing. Preliminary analysis shows that 10-15% of the compounds in the survey only react positively to the additional tests. More data are requested from the pharmaceutical industry. The Expert Working Group of the ICH has decided to choose a cause-for-concern approach to immmunotoxicity rather than a routine-screening approach. The causes for concern are to be defined during ICH negotiations.

  4. Immunotoxicity and immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals: design concepts and safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Nirmala

    2010-10-01

    The biopharmaceutical market has grown steadily since the early 1980s and today over 150 protein biopharmaceuticals have been approved for clinical use. These products often exhibit forms of immunotoxicity that often only come to light during clinical studies. The predictive value of animal studies and traditional in vitro screens is questionable, with few existing methods able to predict immunotoxicity in a way that is useful for estimating risk for entire patient populations for a specific, and often unique, product. Here, the relative merits of rational design and alternative strategies for immunotoxicity testing are considered with reference to the outcomes of preclinical and clinical studies on biopharmaceuticals. Specific reference is made to the prediction of immunogenicity using organotypic models, transgenic models of autoimmunity and immunogenicity as well as rodent models of hypersensitivity, immunosuppression and immunostimulation. The role played by human cell-based assays and in silico prediction models that have been developed and validated for the assessment of chemical classes is also appraised. PMID:20615176

  5. EVALUATION OF THE IMMUNOTOXICITY OF ORALLY ADMINISTERED 2-METHOXYACETIC ACID IN FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously demonstrated that the glycol ether 2-methoxyethanol (ME) immunotoxic in the rat. n this study, the immunotoxicity of 2-methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the principal metabolite of ME, was evaluated in adult male Fischer 3 rats. ats were dosed by gavage with MAA on ten cons...

  6. Recurrence of Stachybotrys chartarum during mycological and toxicological study of bioaerosols collected in a dairy cattle shed.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Caroline; André, Véronique; Séguin, Virginie; Heutte, Natacha; El Kaddoumi, Anne; Bouchart, Valérie; Picquet, Rachel; Garon, David

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural occupations associated with animal breeding and the processing of animal materials in confinement systems could potentially lead to bioaerosol exposures. Moulds and mycotoxins could be constituents of bioaerosols and should be studied because of their possible involvement in respiratory diseases and cancers. In order to characterize the fungal contamination of the indoor air in a dairy barn, bioaerosols were collected during 20 days in a cattle farm located in Normandy (France). Mycobiota, mycotoxins and the mutagenicity of bioaerosols were studied. The toxigenic ability of Aspergillus flavus group and Aspergillus fumigatus isolates was also evaluated in vitro. The prevalent airborne moulds were from the following potentially toxigenic species: Aspergillus flavus group, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium chrysogenum, Stachybotrys chartarum, and the allergenic species Ulocladium chartarum, Cladosporium cladosporioides. In comparison with harvesting, grain handling or broiler breeding, the concentrations of viable moulds were lower in the cattle shed. Seasonal variations in levels of several species were also observed. This study revealed that aflatoxins were detected in bioaerosols and, for the first time, showed that farmers are possibly exposed to Stachybotrys chartarum during routine barn work. Moreover, the finding of mutagenicity from bioaerosols needs further investigations on bioaerosol composition. PMID:22462447

  7. Immunotoxicity of nitrobenzene in female B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Burns, L A; Bradley, S G; White, K L; McCay, J A; Fuchs, B A; Stern, M; Brown, R D; Musgrove, D L; Holsapple, M P; Luster, M I

    1994-01-01

    Nitrobenzene (NBZ) is primarily employed as an oxidizing agent in the synthesis of analine and benzene compounds. It produces myelotoxic effects and effects on erythrocytes in both animal models and man. Reported hepatosplenomegaly and effects on the bone marrow are indicators that NBZ may be immunotoxic. In these studies, female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg of NBZ in corn oil by gavage for 14 consecutive days. To assess the immunotoxic potential of NBZ, body and organ weights were determined and selected immunologic and host resistance responses were studied. In these studies, the liver and spleen appeared to be the primary target organs. Both liver and spleen weights were dose dependently increased. Gross histopathologic examinations revealed significant changes in the spleen, consisting of severe congestion of the red pulp areas with erythrocytes and reticulocytes. Serum chemistry profiles showed increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, indicating liver toxicity. Hematologic studies showed a decrease in erythrocyte number and a concomitant increase in mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume. A dose-dependent increase in peripheral reticulocytes was also seen. DNA synthesis was enhanced, as was the number of formed elements and the number of monocyte/granulocyte stem cells in the bone marrow of treated mice. IgM responses were decreased and the phagocytic activity of macrophages in the liver was dose dependently increased with a concomitant decrease in the activities in the spleen and lung. Other immunological parameters examined were unchanged. Host resistance to microbial or viral infection was not markedly altered by NBZ; however, there were trends towards increased susceptibility where T-cell function contributes to host defense. These data indicate that NBZ-induced hemolysis and liver injury are linked to the observed alterations in bone marrow activity. PMID:7988385

  8. Safety and immunotoxicity assessment of immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Laura Dill; Spindeldreher, Sebastian; Kiessling, Andrea; Allenspach, Roy; Hey, Adam; Muller, Patrick Y; Frings, Werner; Sims, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) licensed for human use or in clinical development are indicated for treatment of patients with cancer and inflammatory/autoimmune disease and as such, are designed to directly interact with the immune system. A major hurdle for the development and early clinical investigation of many of these immunomodulatory mAbs is their inherent risk for adverse immune-mediated drug reactions in humans such as infusion reactions, cytokine storms, immunosuppression and autoimmunity. A thorough understanding of the immunopharmacology of a mAb in humans and animals is required to both anticipate the clinical risk of adverse immunotoxicological events and to select a safe starting dose for first-in-human (FIH) clinical studies. This review summarizes the most common adverse immunotoxicological events occurring in humans with immunomodulatory mAbs and outlines non-clinical strategies to define their immunopharmacology and assess their immunotoxic potential, as well as reduce the risk of immunotoxicity through rational mAb design. Tests to assess the relative risk of mAb candidates for cytokine release syndrome, innate immune system (dendritic cell) activation and immunogenicity in humans are also described. The importance of selecting a relevant and sensitive toxicity species for human safety assessment in which the immunopharmacology of the mAb is similar to that expected in humans is highlighted, as is the importance of understanding the limitations of the species selected for human safety assessment and supplementation of in vivo safety assessment with appropriate in vitro human assays. A tiered approach to assess effects on immune status, immune function and risk of infection and cancer, governed by the mechanism of action and structural features of the mAb, is described. Finally, the use of immunopharmacology and immunotoxicity data in determining a minimum anticipated biologic effect Level (MABEL) and in the selection of safe human

  9. Assessment of immunotoxicity parameters in individuals occupationally exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    García-Lestón, Julia; Roma-Torres, Joana; Mayan, Olga; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Fuchs, Dietmar; Moreira, Ana O; Pásaro, Eduardo; Méndez, Josefina; Teixeira, João Paulo; Laffon, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    Although adverse health effects produced by lead (Pb) have long been recognized, studies regarding the immunotoxic effects of occupational exposure report conflicting results. In a previous study, alterations in some immunological parameters were noted in 70 Pb-exposed workers. In view of these results, it was of interest to extend this study comprising a larger population and increasing the number of immunological endpoints assessed. Accordingly, in this study the immunotoxic effects of occupational exposure to Pb were assessed by analyzing (1) percentages of lymphocyte subsets (CD3⁺, CD4⁺, CD8⁺, CD19⁺, and CD56⁺/16⁺); (2) concentration of plasma cytokines, namely, interleukin (IL) 2, IL4, IL6, IL10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, and interferon (IFN) γ; and (3) plasma concentrations of neopterin, tryptophan (Trp), and kynurenine (Kyn). In addition, the possible influence of genetic polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) genes on immunotoxicity parameters was studied. Exposed workers showed significant decreases in %CD3⁺, %CD4⁺/%CD8⁺ ratio, IL4, TNFα, IFNγ, and Kyn to Trp ratio (Kyn/Trp), and significant increases in %CD8⁺, IL10, and Trp levels. All these parameters, except Trp, were significantly correlated with exposure biomarkers. No significant influence of genetic polymorphisms was observed. Significant correlation between Kyn/Trp and neopterin concentrations suggests an involvement of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in the Trp metabolic alterations, which may contribute to some of the immune alterations observed. Results obtained suggest that occupational exposure to PB may influence the immune system by impairing several mechanisms, which might ultimately produce deregulation of the immune response and diminish immunosurveillance in exposed individuals. PMID:22788368

  10. In vitro characterization of the immunotoxic potential of several perfluorinated compounds (PFCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Corsini, Emanuela; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Avogadro, Anna; Galbiati, Valentina; Viviani, Barbara; Marinovich, Marina; Galli, Corrado L.; Dell'Agli, Mario; Germolec, Dori R.

    2012-01-15

    We have previously shown that PFOA and PFOS directly suppress cytokine secretion in immune cells, with different mechanisms of action. In particular, we have demonstrated a role for PPAR-α in PFOA-induced immunotoxicity, and that PFOS has an inhibitory effect on LPS-induced I-κB degradation. These studies investigate the immunomodulatory effects of four other PFCs, namely PFBS, PFOSA, PFDA, and fluorotelomer using in vitro assays. The release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was evaluated in lipolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human peripheral blood leukocytes (hPBL) and in the human promyelocytic cell line THP-1, while the release of IL-10 and IFN-γ was evaluated in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated hPBL. All PFCs suppressed LPS-induced TNF-α production in hPBL and THP-1 cells, while IL-6 production was suppressed by PFOSA, PFOS, PFDA and fluorotelomer. PFBS, PFOSA, PFOS, PFDA and fluorotelomer inhibited PHA-induced IL-10 release, while IFN-γ secretion was affected by PFOSA, PFOS, PFDA and fluorotelomer. Leukocytes obtained from female donors appear to be more sensitive to the in vitro immunotoxic effects of PFCs when their responses are compared to the results obtained using leukocytes from male donors. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that inhibition of TNF-α release in THP-1 cells occurred at the transcriptional level. All PFCs, including PFOA and PFOS, decreased LPS-induced NF-κB activation. With the exception of PFOA, none of the PFCs tested was able to activate PPARα driven transcription in transiently transfected THP-1 cells, excluding a role for PPARα in the immunomodulation observed. PFBS and PFDA prevented LPS-induced I-κB degradation. Overall, these studies suggest that PFCs affect NF-κB activation, which directly suppresses cytokine secretion by immune cells. Our results indicate that PFOA is the least active of the PFCs examined followed by PFBS, PFDA, PFOS, PFOSA and fluorotelomer. -- Research Highlights: ► PFCs

  11. Screening tests for autoimmune-related immunotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Pieters, R; Albers, R

    1999-01-01

    A large number of chemicals induce or exacerbate autoimmune-like diseases in man. Because of the complexity of processes involved, these adverse effects are often if not always missed in standard toxicity testing. To date no validated and generally applicable predictive animal model exists and only a few chemicals have actually been shown to induce adverse autoimmune effects in certain animals. The popliteal lymph node assay (PLNA) is a very promising animal test to (pre)screen for systemic immunosensitizing, including autoimmunogenic potential. This review describes the essentials of the various PLNAs against the background of current understanding of chemically induced systemic immunostimulation. The most simple primary PLNA measures enlargement of the popliteal lymph node 6-8 days after subcutaneous injection of a chemical into the footpad. The primary PLNA can distinguish between immunostimulating (both sensitizers and irritants) and innocent chemicals but does not assess the involvement of T cells or immunosensitization. For this, but also for elucidation of relevant mechanisms, detection of anamnestic responses in secondary PLNAs or responses to reporter antigens in the modified PLNA are suitable. To date over 100 compounds (drugs and environmental pollutants) have been tested, and results show a good correlation with reported immunostimulating (both autoimmunogenic and allergic) potential. Importantly, no false-negative chemicals were detected if metabolism was considered. The various types of the PLNA, but in particular the secondary and modified PLNAs, await extensive validation before they can be recommended as a standard test for autoimmunogenic potential. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10502529

  12. The immunotoxicity of 3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PeCB) and tributyltin (TBT) in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C.D.; Banes, M.M.; Hurt, K.L.

    1994-12-31

    There is considerable evidence that planar PCBs and Tributyltin (TBT) may be immunotoxic to fish. Apparently the immune system is a target organ for both compounds in rodents. The mechanisms of action are different as PeCB immunotoxicity is associated with cytosolic Ah-R binding and induction of several nuclear response elements while TBT immunotoxicity is associated with membrane perturbation and layered calcium homeostasis. The authors have investigated the effects of a single i.p. dose of PeCB and TBT at 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 mg/kg on several innate immune responses including non-specific cytotoxic cell activity, neutrophil activation, and lymphocyte mitogenesis, as well as baseline hematology at days 3 and 7 post treatment. Hematocrits were affected in TBT treated fish at 1.0 mg/kg while neutrophilia and leukopenia were noted at 0.01 and 1.0 mg/kg. These observations are typical of stress hemograms. PeCB had no adverse effect on hematocrits or leukocyte % but did induce neutrophilia at 1.0 mg/kg. Neutrophil activation was suppressed in both PeCB and TBT treated animals but only at 1.0 mg/kg. NCC activity was suppressed at all three doses of PECB but only 1.0 mg/kg in TBT treated animals. Lymphocyte mitogenesis was affected by both compounds but only at 1.0 mg/kg. A note of interest is that both compounds have the same molecular weight and therefore their immunotoxic effects can be compared on a {micro}mole/kg basis.

  13. In vivo immunotoxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate in BALB/c mice: Identification of T-cell receptor and calcium-mediated signaling pathway disruption through gene expression profiling of the spleen.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi-Yan; Wan, Bin; Guo, Liang-Hong; Yang, Yu; Ren, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a persistent organic pollutant that is used worldwide and is continuously being detected in biota and the environment, thus presenting potential threats to the ecosystem and human health. Although PFOS is highly immunotoxic, its underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. The present study examined PFOS-induced immunotoxicity in the mouse spleen and explored its underlying mechanisms by gene expression profiling. Oral exposure of male BALB/c mice for three weeks followed by one-week recovery showed that a 10 mg/kg/day PFOS exposure damaged the splenic architecture, inhibited T-cell proliferation in response to mitogen, and increased the percentages of T helper (CD3(+)CD4(+)) and cytotoxic T (CD3(+)CD8(+)) cells, despite the decrease in the absolute number of these cells. A delayed type of PFOS immunotoxicity was observed, which mainly occurred during the recovery period. Global gene expression profiling of mouse spleens and QRT-PCR analyses suggest that PFOS inhibited the expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response, and upregulated those in TCR signaling, calcium signaling, and p38/MAPK signaling pathways. Western blot analysis confirmed that the expressions of CAMK4, THEMIS, and CD3G, which were involved in the upregulated pathways, were induced upon PFOS exposure. Acute PFOS exposure modulated calcium homoeostasis in splenocytes. These results indicate that PFOS exposure can activate TCR signaling and calcium ion influx, which provides a clue for the potential mechanism of PFOS immunotoxicity. The altered signaling pathways by PFOS treatment as revealed in the present study might facilitate in better understanding PFOS immunotoxicity and explain the association between immune disease and PFOS exposure. PMID:26300304

  14. Neurotoxicity and Immunotoxicity Outcomes following Gestational Exposure to Four Lab Drinking Water Concentrates

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate whether developmental exposure to drinking water concentrates altered other endpoints, standard neuro- and immunotoxicity tests were conducted on the offspring. Male and female offspring (10/sex/treatment) exposed to chlorinated concentrated water (CCW) or reverse os...

  15. Successful validation of genomic biomarkers for human immunotoxicity in Jurkat T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schmeits, Peter C J; Shao, Jia; van der Krieken, Danique A; Volger, Oscar L; van Loveren, Henk; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Hendriksen, Peter J M

    2015-07-01

    Previously, we identified 25 classifier genes that were able to assess immunotoxicity using human Jurkat T cells. The present study aimed to validate these classifiers. For that purpose, Jurkat cells were exposed for 6 h to subcytotoxic doses of nine immunotoxicants, five non-immunotoxicants and four compounds for which human immunotoxicity has not yet been fully established. RNA was isolated and subjected to Fluidigm quantitative real time (qRT)-PCR analysis. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the screening assay as based on the nine immunotoxicants and five non-immunotoxicants used in this study were 100%, 80% and 93%, respectively, which is better than the performance in our previous study. Only one compound was classified as false positive (benzo-e-pyrene). Of the four potential (non-)immunotoxicants, chlorantraniliprole and Hidrasec were classified immunotoxic and Sunset yellow and imidacloprid as non-immunotoxic. ToxPi analysis of the PCR data provided insight in the molecular pathways that were affected by the compounds. The immunotoxicants 2,3-dichloro-propanol and cypermethrin, although structurally different, affected protein metabolism and cholesterol biosynthesis and transport. In addition, four compounds, i.e. chlorpyrifos, aldicarb, benzo-e-pyrene and anti-CD3, affected genes in cholesterol metabolism and transport, protein metabolism and transcription regulation. qRT-PCR on eight additional genes coding for similar processes as defined in ToxPi analyzes, supported these results. In conclusion, the 25 immunotoxic classifiers performed very well in a screening with new non-immunotoxic and immunotoxic compounds. Therefore, the Jurkat screening assay has great promise to be applied within a tiered approach for animal free testing of human immunotoxicity. PMID:25424538

  16. Selenium reverses Pteridium aquilinum-induced immunotoxic effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) has immunomodulatory effects on mouse natural killer (NK) cells by reducing cytotoxicity. Alternatively, it has been demonstrated that selenium can enhance NK cell activity. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to evaluate if ...

  17. Histological and histometrical evidences for phenol immunotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Louei Monfared, Ali; Jaafari, Afsaneh; Sheibani, Mohammad Taghi

    2014-01-01

    Phenol is a common industrial and ubiquitous environmental chemical which is used to synthesize resins and plastics. Due to its anesthetic and disinfectant properties, phenol is also widely used in pharmaceutical products. Since there were no adequate data about phenol immunotoxicity, the purpose of the present study is to investigate its toxic effects on the histological structures of the lymphoid organs in the mice. A total of 80 mice were randomly distributed into one control group and three experimental groups. The control group received only distilled water, whereas experimental groups were orally administered phenol at the concentrations of 80, 180, and 320 mg/kg/day, respectively. After 28 consecutive days, tissue samples were taken and histological changes of the spleens, thymuses, adrenal glands, and lymph nodes were examined using optical microscopy. The results showed that in the phenol treated animals; splenic megakaryocyte counts increased, the diameter of the splenic follicles decreased, the thymocyte population in both cortex and medulla reduced, the thickness of the reticular layers of adrenal gland increased and lymphatic cells populations in the lymph node were reduced, significantly (P < 0.01). Also, remarkable histological changes were noted in the various lymphatic organs of the treated mice. Overall, present findings give some histological evidences that selected qualitative and quantitative parameters of the lymphatic organs were significantly altered by phenol administration. In conclusion, the significant decreases of the immune cell populations together with histological alterations in the immunocompetent organs of the mice exposed to phenol indicate the immunosuppressive and immunotoxic properties of this chemical material. PMID:24829551

  18. Satratoxin G from the Black Mold Stachybotrys chartarum Evokes Olfactory Sensory Neuron Loss and Inflammation in the Murine Nose and Brain

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Zahidul; Harkema, Jack R.; Pestka, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Satratoxin G (SG) is a macrocyclic trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Stachybotrys chartarum, the “black mold” suggested to contribute etiologically to illnesses associated with water-damaged buildings. Using an intranasal instillation model in mice, we found that acute SG exposure specifically induced apoptosis of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the olfactory epithelium. Dose–response analysis revealed that the no-effect and lowest-effect levels at 24 hr postinstillation (PI) were 5 and 25 μg/kg body weight (bw) SG, respectively, with severity increasing with dose. Apoptosis of OSNs was identified using immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 expression, electron microscopy for ultrastructural cellular morphology, and real-time polymerase chain reaction for elevated expression of the proapoptotic genes Fas, FasL, p75NGFR, p53, Bax, caspase-3, and CAD. Time-course studies with a single instillation of SG (500 μg/kg bw) indicated that maximum atrophy of the olfactory epithelium occurred at 3 days PI. Exposure to lower doses (100 μg/kg bw) for 5 consecutive days resulted in similar atrophy and apoptosis, suggesting that in the short term, these effects are cumulative. SG also induced an acute, neutrophilic rhinitis as early as 24 hr PI. Elevated mRNA expression for the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-1 and the chemokine macrophage-inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) were detected at 24 hr PI in both the ethmoid turbinates of the nasal airways and the adjacent olfactory bulb of the brain. Marked atrophy of the olfactory nerve and glomerular layers of the olfactory bulb was also detectable by 7 days PI along with mild neutrophilic encephalitis. These findings suggest that neurotoxicity and inflammation within the nose and brain are potential adverse health effects of exposure to satratoxins and Stachybotrys in the indoor air of water-damaged buildings. PMID:16835065

  19. Ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GAF01 to remove AFM1 in vitro and to counteract AFM1 immunotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abbès, Samir; Salah-Abbès, Jalila Ben; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Jebali, Rania; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Oueslati, Ridha

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) has been detected in many parts of the world both in raw milk and many dairy products, causing great economic losses and human disease. Unfortunately, there are few studies dealing with AFM1 immunotoxicity/interactions with lactic acid bacteria for potential application as a natural preventive agent. The aim of this study was to isolate (from dairy products) food-grade probiotic bacteria able to degrade/bind AFM1 in vitro and evaluate whether the same organism(s) could impart a protective role against AFM1-induced immunotoxicity in exposed Balb/c mice. Bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01) were isolated from Tunisian artisanal butter and then tested for abilities to eliminate AFM1 from phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and reconstituted milk (containing 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 µg AFM1/ml) after 0, 6, and 24 h at 37°C. Results showed that the selected bacteria could 'remove' AFM1 both in PBS and skimmed milk. The binding abilities of AFM1 by L. plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01 strains (at 10(8) CFU/ml) in PBS and reconstituted milk ranged, respectively, from 16.1-78.6% and 15.3-95.1%; overall, L. rhamnosus showed a better potential for removal than L. plantarum. 'Removal' appeared to be by simple binding; the bacteria/AFM1 complex was stable and only a very small proportion of mycotoxin was released back into the solution. L. rhamnosus GAF01 had the highest binding capacity and was selected for use in the in vivo study. Those results indicated that use of the organism prevented AFM1-induced effects on total white and red blood cells, and lymphocyte subtypes, after 15 days of host treatment. These studies clearly indicated that L. rhamnosus GAF01 was able to bind AFM1 in vitro and-by mechanisms that might also be related to a binding effect-counteract AFM1-induced immunotoxicity. Moreover, by itself, this bacterium was not toxic and could potentially be used as an additive in dairy products and in biotechnology for

  20. Biological Responses of Raw 264.7 Macrophage Exposed to Two Strains of Stachybotrys chartarum Spores Grown on Four Different Wallboard Types

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of this research was to provide a better understanding of the health impacts caused by Stachybotrys chartarum (Houston and 51-11) spores grown on four gypsum products two of which were resistant to microbes. Raw 264.7 cells were exposed to whole spores and fragmented 51...

  1. SOLVENT COMPARISON IN THE ISOLATION, SOLUBILIZATION, AND TOXICITY OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM SPORE TRICHOTHECENE MYCOTOXINS IN AN ESTABLISHED IN VITRO LUMINESCENCE PROTEIN TRANSLATION INHIBITION ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that non-viable mold contaminants such as macrocyclic trichothecene mycotoxins of Stachybotrys chartarum are highly toxinigenic to humans. However, there is no agreed upon method of recovering native mycotoxin. The purpose of this study was to provide quantitativ...

  2. The immunotoxicity of graphene oxides and the effect of PVP-coating.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiao; Fang, Hongliang; Bao, Chenchen; Shen, Guangxia; Zhang, Jiali; Wang, Kan; Guo, Shouwu; Wan, Tao; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) immunotoxicity is not clarified well up to date. Herein we reported the effects of GOs with and without polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating on human immune cells such as dendritic cells (DCs), T lymphocytes and macrophages. Human immune cells such as dendritic cells (DCs), T lymphocytes and macrophages were isolated from health donated bloods, PVP-coating GO (PVP-GO) exhibited lower immunogenicity compared with pure GO on the aspect of inducing differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs), the levels of secreted TNF-α and IL-1β had no obvious difference between two groups, yet the secretion of IL-6 remained in PVP-coating GO group. In addition, PVP-coating GO delayed significantly the apoptotic process of T lymphocytes, at the same time, and exhibited anti-phagocytosis ability against macrophages and markedly enhanced the physiological activity of macrophages. In conclusion, PVP-coating GO possesses good immunological biocompatibility and immunoenhancement effects in vitro, and is likely to be an available candidate of immunoadjuvant in the future. PMID:23566800

  3. Developmental Immunotoxicity, Perinatal Programming, and Noncommunicable Diseases: Focus on Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Dietert, Rodney R

    2014-01-01

    Developmental immunotoxicity (DIT) is a term given to encompass the environmentally induced disruption of normal immune development resulting in adverse outcomes. A myriad of chemical, physical, and psychological factors can all contribute to DIT. As a core component of the developmental origins of adult disease, DIT is interlinked with three important concepts surrounding health risks across a lifetime: (1) the Barker Hypothesis, which connects prenatal development to later-life diseases, (2) the hygiene hypothesis, which connects newborns and infants to risk of later-life diseases and, (3) fetal programming and epigenetic alterations, which may exert effects both in later life and across future generations. This review of DIT considers: (1) the history and context of DIT research, (2) the fundamental features of DIT, (3) the emerging role of DIT in risk of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and (4) the range of risk factors that have been investigated through human research. The emphasis on the human DIT-related literature is significant since most prior reviews of DIT have largely focused on animal research and considerations of specific categories of risk factors (e.g., heavy metals). Risk factors considered in this review include air pollution, aluminum, antibiotics, arsenic, bisphenol A, ethanol, lead (Pb), maternal smoking and environmental tobacco smoke, paracetamol (acetaminophen), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polyfluorinated compounds. PMID:26556429

  4. Developmental Immunotoxicity, Perinatal Programming, and Noncommunicable Diseases: Focus on Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dietert, Rodney R.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental immunotoxicity (DIT) is a term given to encompass the environmentally induced disruption of normal immune development resulting in adverse outcomes. A myriad of chemical, physical, and psychological factors can all contribute to DIT. As a core component of the developmental origins of adult disease, DIT is interlinked with three important concepts surrounding health risks across a lifetime: (1) the Barker Hypothesis, which connects prenatal development to later-life diseases, (2) the hygiene hypothesis, which connects newborns and infants to risk of later-life diseases and, (3) fetal programming and epigenetic alterations, which may exert effects both in later life and across future generations. This review of DIT considers: (1) the history and context of DIT research, (2) the fundamental features of DIT, (3) the emerging role of DIT in risk of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and (4) the range of risk factors that have been investigated through human research. The emphasis on the human DIT-related literature is significant since most prior reviews of DIT have largely focused on animal research and considerations of specific categories of risk factors (e.g., heavy metals). Risk factors considered in this review include air pollution, aluminum, antibiotics, arsenic, bisphenol A, ethanol, lead (Pb), maternal smoking and environmental tobacco smoke, paracetamol (acetaminophen), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polyfluorinated compounds. PMID:26556429

  5. Immunotoxic effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate on the marine fish Oryzias melastigma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiansheng; Chen, Yajie; Chi, Yulang; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Huanteng; Fang, Chao; Dong, Sijun

    2015-05-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) have both been reported to induce adverse effects including immunotoxicity. Despite the widespread presence of these two chemicals in estuaries and seawater, their health effects on marine fish have received little attention. Oryzias melastigma is a potential marine fish model for immunological studies. In the present study, immune-related genes in O. melastigma were enriched at the transcriptome level. Three-month-old fish were exposed to PFOS and DEHP (single or combined) for one week. The liver index-hepatosomatic index (HSI) of the fish was higher in the PFOS-exposed group and combined group than in the control group. This result indicates that PFOS might lead to liver toxicity. The mRNA level of interleukin-1 beta (IL1β) was upregulated after exposure. For catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3), single exposure did not affect mRNA levels, but the combined exposure did significantly alter the expression of these genes. In all, our study provides a useful reference for immunotoxicological studies with O. melastigma; it also highlights the importance of assessing the combined effects of pollutant mixtures when determining the risk to aquatic organisms. PMID:25687394

  6. Subchronic Immunotoxicity Assessment of Genetically Modified Virus-Resistant Papaya in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Tang; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Jhaol-Huei; Yen, Gow-Chin; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Cheng, Ying-Huey; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2016-07-27

    Papaya is an important fruit that provides a variety of vitamins with nutritional value and also holds some pharmacological properties, including immunomodulation. Genetically modified (GM) papaya plants resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) infection have been generated by cloning the coat protein gene of the PRSV which can be used as a valuable strategy to fight PRSV infection and to increase papaya production. In order to assess the safety of GM papaya as a food, this subchronic study was conducted to assess the immunomodulatory responses of the GM papaya line 823-2210, when compared with its parent plant of non-GM papaya, Tainung-2 (TN-2), in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Both non-GM and GM 823-2210 papaya fruits at low (1 g/kg bw) and high (2 g/kg bw) dosages were administered via daily oral gavage to male and female rats consecutively for 90 days. Immunophenotyping, mitogen-induced splenic cell proliferation, antigen-specific antibody response, and histopathology of the spleen and thymus were evaluated at the end of the experiment. Results of immunotoxicity assays revealed no consistent difference between rats fed for 90 days with GM 823-2210 papaya fruits, as opposed to those fed non-GM TN-2 papaya fruits, suggesting that with regard to immunomodulatory responses, GM 823-2210 papaya fruits maintain substantial equivalence to fruits of their non-GM TN-2 parent. PMID:27396727

  7. Biomarkers of Immunotoxicity for Environmental and Public Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Duramad, Paurene; Holland, Nina T.

    2011-01-01

    The immune response plays an important role in the pathophysiology of numerous diseases including asthma, autoimmunity and cancer. Application of biomarkers of immunotoxicity in epidemiology studies and human clinical trials can improve our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the associations between environmental exposures and development of these immune-mediated diseases. Immunological biomarkers currently used in environmental health studies include detection of key components of innate and adaptive immunity (e.g., complement, immunoglobulin and cell subsets) as well as functional responses and activation of key immune cells. The use of high-throughput assays, including flow cytometry, Luminex, and Multi-spot cytokine detection methods can further provide quantitative analysis of immune effects. Due to the complexity and redundancy of the immune response, an integrated assessment of several components of the immune responses is needed. The rapidly expanding field of immunoinformatics will also aid in the synthesis of the vast amount of data being generated. This review discusses and provides examples of how the identification and development of immunological biomarkers for use in studies of environmental exposures and immune-mediated disorders can be achieved. PMID:21655126

  8. Acephate immunotoxicity in White Leghorn cockerel chicks upon experimental exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tripathi, Syamantak Mani; Thaker, A. M.; Joshi, C. G.; Sankhala, Laxmi Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Immunotoxicity for subacute exposure to acephate (O,S-dimethyl-acetylphosphoramidothioate) was assessed in day old White Leghorn (WLH) cockerel chicks. The chicks were divided into five groups. Groups C1 and C2 served as plain control and vehicle control respectively. Chicks of groups T1, T2 and T3 were administered acephate suspended in groundnut oil at 21.3 mg/kg, 28.4 mg/kg and 42.6 mg/kg respectively orally for 28 days. A non-significant reduction in total leukocyte count was observed. Although, anti-Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) antibody titer, serum total protein (TP), serum globulin, serum albumin and organ:body weight ratios of immune organs were significantly suppressed. The delayed type hypersensitivity response to 2,4-dinitro-1-chlorobenzene (DNCB) was not significantly altered. Histopathologically, bursa and spleen showed mild depletion of lymphocytes. Furthermore, DNA fragmentation assay was performed and detected ladder pattern (180 bp) in DNA. It was concluded that subacute acephate exposure at low concentrations may affect immune responses in avian species.

  9. Perinatal Immunotoxicity: Why Adult Exposure Assessment Fails to Predict Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Piepenbrink, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    Recent research has pointed to the developing immune system as a remarkably sensitive toxicologic target for environmental chemicals and drugs. In fact, the perinatal period before and just after birth is replete with dynamic immune changes, many of which do not occur in adults. These include not only the basic maturation and distribution of immune cell types and selection against autoreactive lymphocytes but also changes designed specifically to protect the pregnancy against immune-mediated miscarriage. The newborn is then faced with critical immune maturational adjustments to achieve an immune balance necessary to combat myriad childhood and later-life diseases. All these processes set the fetus and neonate completely apart from the adult regarding immunotoxicologic risk. Yet for decades, safety evaluation has relied almost exclusively upon exposure of the adult immune system to predict perinatal immune risk. Recent workshops and forums have suggested a benefit in employing alternative exposures that include exposure throughout early life stages. However, issues remain concerning when and where such applications might be required. In this review we discuss the reasons why immunotoxic assessment is important for current childhood diseases and why adult exposure assessment cannot predict the effect of xenobiotics on the developing immune system. It also provides examples of developmental immunotoxicants where age-based risk appears to differ. Finally, it stresses the need to replace adult exposure assessment for immune evaluation with protocols that can protect the developing immune system. PMID:16581533

  10. Survey: immune function and immunotoxicity assessment in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lebrec, Hervé; O'Lone, Raegan; Freebern, Wendy; Komocsar, Wendy; Moore, Peter

    2012-01-01

    While immunotoxicology evaluations are often conducted in either rodents or non-human primates, findings in standard toxicology studies may trigger additional investigations in dogs. A survey sponsored by the HESI Immunotoxicology Technical Committee, and described herein, was conducted to gather information regarding the extent and nature of immunology and immunotoxicity assessments available in the dog, and the need thereof. The survey was issued via e-mail to scientists affiliated with 39 organizations in industry and academia, including contract research organizations, academic research organizations, pharmaceutical companies, and veterinary practices. Fifteen institutions responded, including 10 biotechnology or pharmaceutical industry organizations, 4 contract research organizations, and 1 academic institution. Responses indicated that indeed, immunological assessments in dogs are necessary for research and/or toxicology purposes. The survey demonstrated that multiple types of assays are used in the dog model, including assessment of T-cell-dependent antibody responses, immunoglobulins, complement CH(50), cytokines and cytokine mRNAs, lymphocyte proliferation in response to T-cell mitogens, neutrophil activation, phagocytosis, and immunophenotyping of several cell types. The survey also revealed that certain assays/endpoints are not available in the dog (complement components, NK immunophenotyping, T-cell activation and memory immunophenotyping) or require further optimization (ex vivo cytolysis assays such as CTL and NK function, B-cell proliferation in response to LPS). In addition, the survey indicated that a greater understanding of the specificity of the available immunophenotyping reagents is needed. PMID:22059464

  11. Cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity of cyclopiazonic acid on human cells.

    PubMed

    Hymery, Nolwenn; Masson, Floriane; Barbier, Georges; Coton, Emmanuel

    2014-08-01

    In this study, in vitro cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity of the mycotoxin cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) was evaluated on human cells. To evaluate cytoxicity, several cellular targets were used (CD34+, monocytes, THP-1 and Caco-2). Monocytes were more sensitive to CPA than the THP-1 monocytic cell line after 48h of incubation in the tested conditions. Half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) were determined to be 8.5 × 10(-8) and 1.75 × 10(-7)M for monocytes and THP1, respectively, while IC50>1.25 × 10(-7)M was observed for Caco-2 and CD34+ cells. The CPA effect on macrophage differentiation was also examined at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The monocyte differentiation process was markedly disturbed in the presence of CPA. After 6 days of culture, CD71 expression was downregulated, while CD14 and CD11a expressions did not change. Moreover, activated macrophages showed a raised burst activity and TNF-α secretion. Overall, the results indicated that CPA exhibited toxicity on various human cellular models. Moreover, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, CPA disturbed human monocytes differentiation into macrophages. This work contributes to understanding the immunosuppressive properties of this food-related toxin. PMID:24747294

  12. AMP-Conjugated Quantum Dots: Low Immunotoxicity Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Liu, Lu; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered nanoparticles that possess special optical and electronic properties and have shown great promise for future biomedical applications. In this work, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), a small biocompatible molecular, was conjugated to organic QDs to produce hydrophilic AMP-QDs. Using macrophage J774A.1 as the cell model, AMP-QDs exhibited both prior imaging property and low toxicity, and more importantly, triggered limited innate immune responses in macrophage, indicating low immunotoxicity in vitro. Using BALB/c mice as the animal model, AMP-QDs were found to be detained in immune organs but did not evoke robust inflammation responses or obvious histopathological abnormalities, which reveals low immunotoxicity in vivo. This work suggests that AMP is an excellent surface ligand with low immunotoxicity, and potentially used in surface modification for more extensive nanoparticles.

  13. Development and evaluation of the mallard duck as a model to investigate the immunotoxicity of environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Fowles, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize the mallard duck (Anas platyrhyncos) as a model for evaluating the immunotoxic effects of environmental chemicals. A battery of immunotoxicity tests was validated for the mallard, including natural killer cell (NKC) activity, lymphocyte mitogenesis, antibody titers to sheep erythrocytes, peripheral differential leukocyte counts, macrophage phagocytosis and prostaglandin-E[sub 2] (PGE2) production. To investigate potential hormonal-immune axes, dexamethasone (DEX), methimazole, and thyroxine (T4) were used to study the influence of glucocorticoid excess, hypo-, and hyperthyroidism on immunity, respectively. Subsequently, the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, Aroclor 1254) on immune, endocrine, and hepatic cytochrome-P450 function were evaluated and interpreted using results from the endocrine/immune studies. Results of these studies showed that antibody production was susceptible to suppression by DEX at doses which also caused significant changes in clinical plasma biochemistry values. NKC activity was enhanced by exposure to DEX in vivo, a phenomenon due to the inhibition of PGE2 production by adherent peripheral blood cells by DEX and mimicked in vitro with addition of indomethacin or DEX. Macrophage phagocytosis was significantly suppressed by DEX in vitro. Macrophage production of PGE2 ex vivo was suppressed in birds treated with DEX. In contrast to DEX, T4 or methimazole treatment elicited only slight physiologic changes in plasma albumin and cholesterol levels. No immune/thyroid axis was observed in mallards. Exposure to Aroclor 1254 induced significant hepatic microsomal ethoxy- and pentoxy-resorufin-O-deethylase activities in addition to increasing total cytochrome P450 content, but did not affect immune function, plasma corticosterone, or clinical biochemistry values. Total triiodothyronine, but not T4, was dose-dependently suppressed by PCB treatment.

  14. Immunotoxic effects of environmental pollutants in marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Desforges, Jean-Pierre W; Sonne, Christian; Levin, Milton; Siebert, Ursula; De Guise, Sylvain; Dietz, Rune

    2016-01-01

    immune function in marine mammals exposed to environmental contaminants. Exposure to immunotoxic contaminants may have significant population level consequences as a contributing factor to increasing anthropogenic stress in wildlife and infectious disease outbreaks. PMID:26590481

  15. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: immunotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    White, Kimber L; Peachee, Vanessa L; Armstrong, Sarah R; Twerdok, Lorraine E; Clark, Charles R; Schreiner, Ceinwen A

    2014-11-01

    Female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess potential immunotoxicity of evaporative emissions. Test articles included vapor condensates prepared from "baseline gasoline" (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000mg/mg(3) administered for 6h/day, 5days/week for 4weeks. The antibody-forming cell (AFC) response to the T-dependent antigen, sheep erythrocyte (sRBC), was used to determine the effects of the gasoline vapor condensates on the humoral components of the immune system. Exposure to BGVC, G/MTBE, G/TAME, and G/TBA did not result in significant changes in the IgM AFC response to sRBC, when evaluated as either specific activity (AFC/10(6) spleen cells) or as total spleen activity (AFC/spleen). Exposure to G/EtOH and G/DIPE resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the AFC response, reaching the level of statistical significance only at the high 20,000mg/m(3) level. Exposure to G/ETBE resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the AFC response at the middle (10,000mg/m(3)) and high (20,000mg/m(3)) exposure concentrations. PMID:24793263

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION AND THE IMMUNE SYSTEM: MECHANISMS OF IMMUNOTOXICITY ACROSS PHYLA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental pollution and the immune system: Mechanisms of immunotoxicity across phyla. Bob Luebke and Dori Germolec, US EPA, RTP, NC and NIEHS, RTP, NC

    Our current understanding of immunotoxicology comes largely from studies done in rodents or using in vitro systems, a...

  17. IMMUNOTOXICITY OF TRIBUTYLTIN OXIDE IN RATS EXPOSED AS ADULTS OR PRE-WEANLINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparison was made between adult and pre-weanling rats of the immunotoxic effects of acute dosing with bis(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBT0). dult (9 week old) male Fischer rats were dosed by oral gavage with TBT0 for 10 consecutive days at 2.5 to 10 mg/kg/dose or three times per w...

  18. IMMUNOTOXICITY OF 2-METHOXYETHANOL FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION IN FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The immunotoxicity of the glycol ether 2-methoxyethanol (ME) as evaluated in adult Fischer 344 rats using a variety of in vitro and in vivo immune function assays. n the first phase of this study, male rats are dosed by oral gavage with ME in water, at dosages ranging from 50 to ...

  19. EVALUATION OF THE IMMUNOTOXIC POTENTIAL OF CHLORDECONE WITH COMPARISON TO CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The immunotoxic potential of chlordecone was evaluated in male Fischer 344 rats following 10 days of dosing by oral gavage. These results were compared with a comparable dosing regimen with the known immunosuppressive drug cyclophosphamide. Significant changes in the immune param...

  20. Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) protects pregnant mother and fetus from the immunotoxic effects of TCDD

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Narendra P.; Singh, Ugra S.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.

    2011-01-01

    The “fetal basis of adult disease” hypothesis proposes that prenatal exposure to environmental stress can lead to increased susceptibility to clinical disorders later in life. Utero exposure of fetus to TCDD, leads to alterations in T cell differentiation in the thymus and increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease later in life. TCDD triggers a toxicity through activation of AhR and severely affects maternal immune system during pregnancy. In the current study, using a mouse model, we investigated if administration of resveratrol (RES) would inhibit immunotoxicity induced by TCDD during pregnancy in the mother and fetus. We observed that RES protected not only normal non-pregnant mice but also pregnant mothers and their fetuses from TCDD-induced thymic atrophy, apoptosis, and alterations in the expression of T cell receptor (TCR) and costimulatory molecules as well as T cell differentiation. Also, there was significantly reduced expression of CYP1A1 in thymi of both the mother and fetus when RES was used in vivo post-TCDD exposure. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that consumption of RES, a natural plant product, during pregnancy, may afford protection to the mother and the fetus from the toxicity induced by environmental pollutants that mediate their effects through activation of AhR. PMID:20715097

  1. Immunotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in an intravenous 28-day repeated-dose toxicity study in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nanosilver is used in a variety of medical and consumer products because of its antibacterial activity. This wide application results in an increased human exposure. Knowledge on the systemic toxicity of nanosilver is, however, relatively scarce. In a previous study, the systemic toxicity of 20 nm silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) was studied in a 28-day repeated-dose toxicity study in rats. Ag-NP were intravenously administered with a maximum dose of 6 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day. Several immune parameters were affected: reduced thymus weight, increased spleen weight and spleen cell number, a strongly reduced NK cell activity, and reduced IFN-γ production were observed. Methods Prompted by these affected immune parameters, we wished to assess exposure effects on the functional immune system. Therefore, in the present study the T-cell dependent antibody response (TDAR) to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was measured in a similar 28-day intravenous repeated-dose toxicity study. In addition, a range of immunological parameters was measured. Data obtained using the benchmark dose (BMD) approach were analyzed by fitting dose-response models to the parameters measured. Results A reduction in KLH-specific IgG was seen, with a lowest 5% lower confidence bound of the BMD (BMDL) of 0.40 mg/kg bw/day. This suggests that Ag-NP induce suppression of the functional immune system. Other parameters sensitive to Ag-NP exposure were in line with our previous study: a reduced thymus weight with a BMDL of 0.76 mg/kg bw/day, and an increased spleen weight, spleen cell number, and spleen cell subsets, with BMDLs between 0.36 and 1.11 mg/kg bw/day. Because the effects on the spleen are not reflected by increased KLH-specific IgG, they, however, do not suggest immune stimulation. Conclusions Intravenous Ag-NP administration in a 28-day repeated-dose toxicity study induces suppression of the functional immune system. This finding underscores the importance to study the TDAR to

  2. Immunotoxicity activity of the major essential oils of Valeriana fauriei Briq against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Kim, Eun-Hye; Moon, Hyung-In

    2011-03-01

    The rhizomes and roots of Valeriana fauriei were extracted and the major essential oil composition and immunotoxicity effects were studied. The analyses were conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) revealed that the essential oils of V. fauriei. The V. fauriei essential oil (VFEO) yield was 1.93%, and GC/MS analysis revealed that its major constituents were bornyl acetate (32.83%), terpinyl acetate (3.82%), bornyl isovalerate (2.11%), β-sesquiphellandrene (2.21%), sesquiterpene alcohol (7.32%), and cedrol (2.45%). The essential oil had a significant toxic effect against early fourth-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L with an LC(50) value of 30.44 ppm and an LC(90) value of 82.64 ppm. The results could be useful in search for newer, safer, and more effective natural immunotoxicity agents against Aedes aegypti L. PMID:20462349

  3. Immunotoxicity activity of the major essential oil of Filipendula glaberrima against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Moon, Hyung-In

    2010-12-01

    The aerial parts of Filipendula glaberrima were extracted and the composition and immunotoxicity effects of major essential oils were studied. The analyses conducted by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) revealed the essential oils of F. glaberrima. The F. glaberrima essential oil (FGEO) yield was 0.046%, and GC/MS analysis revealed that its major constituents were β-farnesol (2.96%), l-α-terpineol (2.43%), benzenemethanol (2.87%), (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol (5.23%), and 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol (1.91%). The essential oil had a significant toxic effect against early fourth stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L with an LC(50) value of 28.43 ppm and an LC(90) value of 76.21 ppm. The results could be useful in search for newer, safer, and more effective natural immunotoxicity agents against A. aegypti. PMID:20175741

  4. Immunotoxicity activity of sesquiterpenoids from black galingale (Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex. Baker) against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-In; Cho, Sang-Buem; Lee, Jun-Hyeong; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2011-06-01

    The roots of black galingale (Kaempferia parviflora) were chloroform-extracted and the isolated two sesquiterpene and immunotoxicity effects were studied. The structures and stereochemistry of these compounds were established on the basis of analysis of spectra including UV, MS, (1)H-NMR, and (13)C-NMR as follows: 1 (4α-acetoxycadina-2,9-diene-1,8-dione), 2 (1α,3α,4β-trihydroxy-9-cadinen-8-one). Compound 2 had a significant toxic effect against early fourth-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L. with an LC(50) value of 0.7 μM and an LC(90) value of 3.8 μM. The results could be useful in search for newer, safer, and more effective natural immunotoxicity agents against A. aegypti. PMID:20925462

  5. 'Fluorescent Cell Chip' for immunotoxicity testing: Development of the c-fos expression reporter cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Trzaska, Dominika; Zembek, Patrycja; Olszewski, Maciej; Adamczewska, Violetta; Ulleras, Erik; Dastych, JarosIaw . E-mail: jdastych@cbm.pan.pl

    2005-09-01

    The Fluorescent Cell Chip for in vitro immunotoxicity testing employs cell lines derived from lymphocytes, mast cells, and monocytes-macrophages transfected with various EGFP cytokine reporter gene constructs. While cytokine expression is a valid endpoint for in vitro immunotoxicity screening, additional marker for the immediate-early response gene expression level could be of interest for further development and refinement of the Fluorescent Cell Chip. We have used BW.5147.3 murine thymoma transfected with c-fos reporter constructs to obtain reporter cell lines expressing ECFP under the control of murine c-fos promoter. These cells upon serum withdrawal and readdition and incubation with heavy metal compounds showed paralleled induction of c-Fos expression as evidenced by Real-Time PCR and ECFP fluorescence as evidenced by computer-supported fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, we developed fluorescent reporter cell lines that could be employed in a simple and time-efficient screening assay for possible action of chemicals on c-Fos expression in lymphocytes. The evaluation of usefulness of these cells for the Fluorescent Cell Chip-based detection of immunotoxicity will require additional testing with a larger number of chemicals.

  6. Biomarkers of Methylmercury Exposure Immunotoxicity among Fish Consumers in Amazonian Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Fillion, Myriam; Barbosa, Fernando; Shirley, Devon L.; Chine, Chiameka; Lemire, Melanie; Mergler, Donna; Silbergeld, Ellen K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant with neurodevelopmental and immune system effects. An informative biomarker of Hg-induced immunotoxicity could aid studies on the potential contribution to immune-related health effects. Objectives: Our objectives were to test the hypothesis that methylmercury (MeHg) exposures affect levels of serum biomarkers and to examine interactions between Hg and selenium (Se) in terms of these responses. Methods: This cross-sectional epidemiological study assessed adults living along the Tapajós River, a system long affected by MeHg. We measured antinuclear (ANA) and antinucleolar (ANoA) autoantibody levels and eight cytokines in serum samples (n = 232). Total Hg (including MeHg) and Se were measured in blood, plasma, hair, and urine. Results: The median (range) total Hg concentrations were 14.1 μg/g (1.1–62.4), 53.5 μg/L (4.3–288.9), 8.8 μg/L (0.2–40), and 3.0 μg/L (0.2–16.1) for hair, blood, plasma, and urine, respectively. Elevated titers of ANA (but not ANoA) were positively associated with MeHg exposure (log-transformed, for blood and plasma), unadjusted [odds ratio (OR) = 2.6; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 6.2] and adjusted for sex and age (OR = 2.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 7.5). Proinflammatory [interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon (IFN)-©], anti-inflammatory (IL-4), and IL-17 cytokine levels were increased with MeHg exposure; however, in the subset of the population with elevated ANA, proinflammatory IL-1®, IL-6, IFN-©, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-〈 and anti-inflammatory (IL-4) cytokine levels were decreased with MeHg exposure. Although Se status was associated with MeHg level (correlation coefficient = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.29, 1.43), Se status was not associated with any changes in ANA and did not modify associations between Hg and ANA titers. Conclusions: MeHg exposure was associated with an increased ANA and changes in serum cytokine profile. Moreover, alterations in serum cytokine profiles

  7. FR901459, a novel immunosuppressant isolated from Stachybotrys chartarum No. 19392. Taxonomy of the producing organism, fermentation, isolation, physico-chemical properties and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, K; Tsujii, E; Miyauchi, M; Nakanishi, T; Yamashita, M; Shigematsu, N; Tada, T; Izumi, S; Okuhara, M

    1993-12-01

    FR901459, a novel immunosuppressant, has been isolated from the fermentation broth of Stachybotrys chartarum No. 19392. The molecular formula of FR901459 was determined as C62H111N11O13. FR901459 was found to be a member of the cyclosporin family. However, it is structurally distinct from any other cyclosporins discovered so far, in that Leu is present at position 5 instead of Val. FR901459 was capable of prolonging the survival time of skin allografts in rats with one third the potency of cyclosporin A. PMID:8294235

  8. The toxicity of chlorpyrifos on the early life stage of zebrafish: a survey on the endpoints at development, locomotor behavior, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Liu, Zhenzhen; Peng, Tao; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is one of the most toxic pesticides in aquatic ecosystem, but its toxicity mechanisms to fish are still not fully understood. This study examined the toxicity targets of CPF in early life stage of zebrafish on the endpoints at developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity. Firstly, CPF exposure decreased the body length, inhibited the hatchability and heart rate, and resulted in a number of morphological abnormalities, primarily spinal deformities (SD) and pericardial edema (PE), in larval zebrafish. Secondly, the free swimming activities and the swimming behaviors of the larvae in response to the stimulation of light-to-dark photoperiod transition were significantly influenced by the exposure to 100 and 300 μg/L CPF. In addition, the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the transcription of some genes related to neurotoxicity were also influenced by CPF exposure. Thirdly, CPF exposure induced oxidative stress in the larval zebrafish. The malondialdehyde (MDA) levels increased and the glutathione (GSH) contents decreased significantly in a concentration-dependent manner after the exposure to CPF for 96 hours post fertilization (hpf). CPF affected not only the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), but also the transcriptional levels of their respective genes. Finally, the mRNA levels of the main cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α (Tnfα), interferon (Ifn), interleukin-1 beta (Il-1β), interleukin 6 (Il6), complement factor 4 (C4) in the larvae increased significantly after the exposure to 100 or 300 μg/L CPF for 96 hpf, suggesting that the innate immune system disturbed by CPF in larvae. Taken together, our results suggested that CPF had the potential to cause developmental toxicity, behavior alterations, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in the larval zebrafish. PMID:25634256

  9. Toxicogenomic Profiles in Relation to Maternal Immunotoxic Exposure and Immune Functionality in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Hochstenbach, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    A crucial period for the development of the immune system occurs in utero. This results in a high fetal vulnerability to immunotoxic exposure, and indeed, immunotoxic effects have been reported, demonstrating negative effects on immune-related health outcomes and immune functionality. Within the NewGeneris cohort BraMat, a subcohort of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), immunotoxicity was demonstrated for polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins, showing associations between estimated maternal intake levels and reduced measles vaccination responses in the offspring at the age of 3. The present study aimed to investigate this link at the transcriptomic level within the same BraMat cohort. To this end, whole-genome gene expression in cord blood was investigated and found to be associated with maternal Food Frequency Questionnaires–derived exposure estimates and with vaccination responses in children at 3 years of age. Because the literature reports gender specificity in the innate, humoral, and cell-mediated responses to viral vaccines, separate analysis for males and females was conducted. Separate gene sets for male and female neonates were identified, comprising genes significantly correlating with both 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) exposure and with measles vaccination response. Noteworthy, genes correlating negatively with exposure in general show positive correlations with antibody levels and vice versa. For both sexes, these included immune-related genes, suggesting immunosuppressive effects of maternal exposure to TCDD and PCB at the transcriptomic level in neonates in relation to measles vaccination response 3 years later. PMID:22738990

  10. Immunotoxic effects of environmental toxicants in fish - how to assess them?

    PubMed

    Segner, Helmut; Wenger, Michael; Möller, Anja Maria; Köllner, Bernd; Casanova-Nakayama, Ayako

    2011-08-01

    Numerous environmental chemicals, both long-known toxicants such as persistent organic pollutants as well as emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, are known to modulate immune parameters of wildlife species, what can have adverse consequences for the fitness of individuals including their capability to resist pathogen infections. Despite frequent field observations of impaired immunocompetence and increased disease incidence in contaminant-exposed wildlife populations, the potential relevance of immunotoxic effects for the ecological impact of chemicals is rarely considered in ecotoxicological risk assessment. A limiting factor in the assessment of immunotoxic effects might be the complexity of the immune system what makes it difficult (1) to select appropriate exposure and effect parameters out of the many immune parameters which could be measured, and (2) to evaluate the significance of the selected parameters for the overall fitness and immunocompetence of the organism. Here, we present - on the example of teleost fishes - a brief discussion of how to assess chemical impact on the immune system using parameters at different levels of complexity and integration: immune mediators, humoral immune effectors, cellular immune defenses, macroscopical and microscopical responses of lymphoid tissues and organs, and host resistance to pathogens. Importantly, adverse effects of chemicals on immunocompetence may be detectable only after immune system activation, e.g., after pathogen challenge, but not in the resting immune system of non-infected fish. Current limitations to further development and implementation of immunotoxicity assays and parameters in ecotoxicological risk assessment are not primarily due to technological constraints, but are related from insufficient knowledge of (1) possible modes of action in the immune system, (2) the importance of intra- and inter-species immune system variability for the response against chemical stressors, and (3

  11. Immunotoxicity evaluation of jet a jet fuel in female rats after 28-day dermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Mann, Cynthia M; Peachee, Vanessa L; Trimmer, Gary W; Lee, Ji-Eun; Twerdok, Lorraine E; White, Kimber L

    2008-01-01

    The potential for jet fuel to modulate immune functions has been reported in mice following dermal, inhalation, and oral routes of exposure; however, a functional evaluation of the immune system in rats following jet fuel exposure has not been conducted. In this study potential effects of commercial jet fuel (Jet A) on the rat immune system were assessed using a battery of functional assays developed to screen potential immunotoxic compounds. Jet A was applied to the unoccluded skin of 6- to 7-wk-old female Crl:CD (SD)IGS BR rats at doses of 165, 330, or 495 mg/kg/d for 28 d. Mineral oil was used as a vehicle to mitigate irritation resulting from repeated exposure to jet fuel. Cyclophosphamide and anti-asialo GM1 were used as positive controls for immunotoxic effects. In contrast to reported immunotoxic effects of jet fuel in mice, dermal exposure of rats to Jet A did not result in alterations in spleen or thymus weights, splenic lymphocyte subpopulations, immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody-forming cell response to the T-dependent antigen, sheep red blood cells (sRBC), spleen cell proliferative response to anti-CD3 antibody, or natural killer (NK) cell activity. In each of the immunotoxicological assays conducted, the positive control produced the expected results, demonstrating the assay was capable of detecting an effect if one had occurred. Based on the immunological parameters evaluated under the experimental conditions of the study, Jet A did not adversely affect immune responses of female rats. It remains to be determined whether the observed difference between this study and some other studies reflects a difference in the immunological response of rats and mice or is the result of other factors. PMID:18338284

  12. Immunotoxicity in ascidians: antifouling compounds alternative to organotins: III--the case of copper(I) and Irgarol 1051.

    PubMed

    Cima, Francesca; Ballarin, Loriano

    2012-09-01

    After the widespread ban of TBT, due to its severe impact on coastal biocoenoses, mainly related to its immunosuppressive effects on both invertebrates and vertebrates, alternative biocides such as Cu(I) salts and the triazine Irgarol 1051, the latter previously used in agriculture as a herbicide, have been massively introduced in combined formulations for antifouling paints against a wide spectrum of fouling organisms. Using short-term (60 min) haemocyte cultures of the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri exposed to various sublethal concentrations of copper(I) chloride (LC(50)=281 μM, i.e., 17.8 mg Cu L(-1)) and Irgarol 1051 (LC(50)>500 μM, i.e., >127 mg L(-1)), we evaluated their immunotoxic effects through a series of cytochemical assays previously used for organotin compounds. Both compounds can induce dose-dependent immunosuppression, acting on different cellular targets and altering many activities of immunocytes but, unlike TBT, did not have significant effects on cell morphology. Generally, Cu(I) appeared to be more toxic than Irgarol 1051: it significantly (p<0.05) inhibited yeast phagocytosis at 0.1 μM (∼10 μg L(-1)), and affected calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial cytochrome-c oxidase activity at 0.01 μM (∼1 μg L(-1)). Both substances were able to change membrane permeability, induce apoptosis from concentrations of 0.1 μM (∼10 μg L(-1)) and 200 μM (∼50 mg L(-1)) for Cu(I) and Irgarol 1051, respectively, and alter the activity of hydrolases. Both Cu(I) and Irgarol 1051 inhibited the activity of phenoloxidase, but did not show any interactive effect when co-present in the exposure medium, suggesting different mechanisms of action. PMID:22542202

  13. Immunotoxicity of aflatoxin B1: Impairment of the cell-mediated response to vaccine antigen and modulation of cytokine expression

    SciTech Connect

    Meissonnier, Guylaine M.; Pinton, Philippe; Laffitte, Joelle; Cossalter, Anne-Marie; Gong, Yun Yun; Wild, Christopher P.; Bertin, Gerard; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2008-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus or A. parasiticus, is a frequent contaminant of food and feed. This toxin is hepatotoxic and immunotoxic. The present study analyzed in pigs the influence of AFB1 on humoral and cellular responses, and investigated whether the immunomodulation observed is produced through interference with cytokine expression. For 28 days, pigs were fed a control diet or a diet contaminated with 385, 867 or 1807 {mu}g pure AFB1/kg feed. At days 4 and 15, pigs were vaccinated with ovalbumin. AFB1 exposure, confirmed by an observed dose-response in blood aflatoxin-albumin adduct, had no major effect on humoral immunity as measured by plasma concentrations of total IgA, IgG and IgM and of anti-ovalbumin IgG. Toxin exposure did not impair the mitogenic response of lymphocytes but delayed and decreased their specific proliferation in response to the vaccine antigen, suggesting impaired lymphocyte activation in pigs exposed to AFB1. The expression level of pro-inflammatory (TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-6, IFN-{gamma}) and regulatory (IL-10) cytokines was assessed by real-time PCR in spleen. A significant up-regulation of all 5 cytokines was observed in spleen from pigs exposed to the highest dose of AFB1. In pigs exposed to the medium dose, IL-6 expression was increased and a trend towards increased IFN-{gamma} and IL-10 was observed. In addition we demonstrate that IL-6 impaired in vitro the antigenic- but not the mitogenic-induced proliferation of lymphocytes from control pigs vaccinated with ovalbumin. These results indicate that AFB1 dietary exposure decreases cell-mediated immunity while inducing an inflammatory response. These impairments in the immune response could participate in failure of vaccination protocols and increased susceptibility to infections described in pigs exposed to AFB1.

  14. Immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing for in-flight experiments under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter-Diedrich; Hansen, Peter-Diedrich; Unruh, Eckehardt

    Life Sciences as Related to Space (F) Influence of Spaceflight Environment on Biological Systems (F44) Immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing for In-flight experiments under microgravity Sensing approaches for ecosystem and human health Author: Peter D. Hansen Technische Universit¨t Berlin, Faculty VI - Planen, Bauen, Umwelt, a Institute for Ecological Research and Technology, Department for Ecotoxicology, Berlin, Germany Peter-diedrich.hansen@tu-berlin.de Eckehardt Unruh Technische Universit¨t Berlin, Faculty VI - Planen, Bauen, Umwelt, Institute a for Ecological Research and Technology, Department for Ecotoxicology, Berlin, Germany An immune response by mussel hemocytes is the selective reaction to particles which are identified as foreign by its immune system shown by phagocytosis. Phagocytotic activity is based on the chemotaxis and adhesion, ingestion and phagosome formation. The attachment at the surface of the hemocytes and consequently the uptake of the particles or bacteria can be directly quantified in the format of a fluorescent assay. Another relevant endpoint of phagocytosis is oxidative burst measured by luminescence. Phagocytosis-related production of ROS will be stimulated with opsonised zymosan. The hemocytes will be stored frozen at -80oC and reconstituted in-flight for the experiment. The assay system of the TRIPLELUX-B Experiment has been performed with a well-defined quantification and evaluation of the immune function phagocytosis. The indicator cells are the hemocytes of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). The signals of the immuno cellular responses are translated into luminescence as a rapid optical reporter system. The results expected will determine whether the observed responses are caused by microgravity and/or radiation (change in permeability, endpoints in genotoxicity: DNA unwinding). The samples for genotoxicity will be processed after returning to earth. The immune system of invertebrates has not been studied so far in space. The

  15. Assessment of the immunotoxic potential of the fungicide dinocap in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; Luebke, R.W.; Riddle, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    The immunotoxic potential of dinocap was evaluated in female C57BL/6J mice following in vivo and in vitro exposure to the fungicide. In in vivo studies, groups of mice were dosed with technical grade dinocap at dosages ranging from 12.5 to 50 mg/kg/d and selected immune functions examined. Twelve days of dosing with dinocap at 25 mg/kg/d resulted in decreased thymus weights and cellularity, and increased spleen weights. Lymphoproliferative responses to concanavalin A (Con A) and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) were reduced in thymocytes from mice dosed at 25 mg/kg/d dinocap. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to P815 mastocytoma cells was enhanced in mice exposed for 7 days to 25 mg/kg/d dinocap. In vitro studies using murine thymocytes cultured with dinocap (10 ug/ml for 72 hr) resulted in suppression of the proliferative response to Con A and PHA. These results suggest that dinocap is immunotoxic in the mouse, causing effects on T lymphocytes.

  16. Ecological impacts of the deepwater horizon oil spill: implications for immunotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Barron, Mace G

    2012-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill was the largest environmental disaster and response effort in U.S. history, with nearly 800 million liters of crude oil spilled. Vast areas of the Gulf of Mexico were contaminated with oil, including deep-ocean communities and over 1,600 kilometers of shoreline. Multiple species of pelagic, tidal, and estuarine organisms; sea turtles; marine mammals; and birds were affected, and over 20 million hectares of the Gulf of Mexico were closed to fishing. Several large-scale field efforts were performed, including assessments of shoreline and wildlife oiling and of coastal waters and sediments. The assessment of injuries, damages, and restoration options for the DWH spill is ongoing. Although petroleum and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon component of oils are known to affect the immune systems of aquatic organisms and wildlife, immunotoxicity is not typically assessed during oil spills and has not been a focus of the DHW assessment. The effects of oil spill contaminants on immune responses are variable and often exposure dependent, but immunotoxic effects seem likely from the DHW spill based on the reported effects of a variety of oils on both aquatic and wildlife species. PMID:22105647

  17. Acute and subchronic toxic effects of atrazine and chlorpyrifos on common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.): Immunotoxicity assessments.

    PubMed

    Xing, Houjuan; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Ziwei; Wang, Xiaolong; Xu, Shiwen

    2015-08-01

    Atrazine (ATR) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are widely used pesticides in agricultural practices throughout world. It has resulted in a series of toxicological and environmental problems, such as impacts on many non-target aquatic species, including fish. The spleen and head kidney in the bony fish are the major hematopoietic organs, and play a crucial part in immune responses. This study evaluated the subchronic effects of ATR and CPF on the mRNA and protein levels of HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90 in the immune organs of common carp and compared the acute and subchronic effects of ATR and CPF on the swimming speed (SS) of common carp. The results of acute toxicity tests showed that the 96 h-LC50 of ATR and CPF for common carp was determined to be 2.142 and 0.582 mg/L, respectively. Meanwhile, acute and subacute toxicity of ATR and CPF in common carp resulted in hypoactivity. We also found that the mRNA and protein levels of HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90 genes were induced in the spleen and head kidney of common carp exposed to ATR and CPF in the subchronic toxicity test. Our results indicate that ATR and CPF are highly toxic to common carp, and hypoactivity in common carp by acute and subchronic toxicity of ATR and CPF may provide a useful tool for assessing the toxicity of triazine herbicide and organophosphorous pesticides to aquatic organisms. In addition, the results from the subchronic toxicity test exhibited that increasing concentration of ATR and CPF in the environment causes considerable stress for common carp, suggesting that ATR and CPF exposure cause immunotoxicity to common carp. PMID:25917970

  18. Immunotoxicity of washing soda in a freshwater sponge of India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2015-03-01

    The natural habitat of sponge, Eunapius carteri faces an ecotoxicological threat of contamination by washing soda, a common household cleaning agent of India. Washing soda is chemically known as sodium carbonate and is reported to be toxic to aquatic organisms. Domestic effluent, drain water and various human activities in ponds and lakes have been identified as the major routes of washing soda contamination of water. Phagocytosis and generation of cytotoxic molecules are important immunological responses offered by the cells of sponges against environmental toxins and pathogens. Present study involves estimation of phagocytic response and generation of cytotoxic molecules like superoxide anion, nitric oxide and phenoloxidase in E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Sodium carbonate exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the phagocytic response of sponge cells under 4, 8, 16 mg/l of the toxin for 96h and all experimental concentrations of the toxin for 192h. Washing soda exposure yielded an initial increase in the generation of the superoxide anion and nitric oxide followed by a significant decrease in generation of these cytotoxic agents. Sponge cell generated a high degree of phenoloxidase activity under the experimental exposure of 2, 4, 8, 16 mg/l of sodium carbonate for 96 and 192 h. Washing soda induced alteration of phagocytic and cytotoxic responses of E. carteri was indicative to an undesirable shift in their immune status leading to the possible crises of survival and propagation of sponges in their natural habitat. PMID:25497767

  19. Immunotoxicity assessment for the novel Spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor R406

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Yanhong; Herlaar, Ellen; Masuda, Esteban S.; Burleson, Gary R.; Nelson, Andrew J.; Grossbard, Elliott B.; Clemens, George R. . E-mail: gclemens@rigel.com

    2007-06-15

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is a novel pharmaceutical target for treatment of allergic, autoimmune, and neoplastic disorders. Previous studies have indicated that Syk signaling plays critical roles in regulating the lymphohematopoietic system. These observations prompted us to investigate whether inhibition of Syk would promote immunotoxicity. In a series of studies, rats were treated orally with R406, at dose levels up to and including 100 mg/kg/day (or its prodrug R788 at dose levels up to and including 100 mg/kg/day, reduced to 50 mg/kg/day for females as MTD was exceeded), a potent Syk inhibitor, twice daily for 28 days. In addition to standard toxicological assessments, immunophenotyping by flow cytometric analysis, and a study of humoral immune response measuring anti-KLH IgM and IgG levels, were undertaken. Other immunotoxicity studies included three host resistance models in female Balb/c mice to further ascertain effects of R406 on innate and acquired immunity. Following R406 treatment, expected immunomodulating effects (e.g., decreased thymic and spleen weight, hypocellularity of bone marrow, and reduced lymphocyte counts, including T and B cells) were observed in the rat studies. These changes essentially resolved during a 14-day treatment-free recovery period. A KLH challenge in rats demonstrated no adverse effects on IgG or IgM response. R788/406, administered orally at dose levels up to and including 80 mg/kg/day for 28 days, did not affect bacterial or viral clearance in the Listeria, Streptococcal, or Influenza host resistance mouse models, respectively. This correlated with previous in vitro macrophage and neutrophil function assays (assessing migration, phagocytosis, oxidative burst and microbicidal activity), which revealed that R406 did not adversely affect macrophage or neutrophil function in innate immune responses. Collectively, these results demonstrate that R406 has minimal functional immunotoxicity notwithstanding its lymphocytopenic

  20. Immunotoxicity of silicon dioxide nanoparticles with different sizes and electrostatic charge

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Cheol-Su; Ignacio, Rosa Mistica Coles; Kim, Dong-Heui; Sajo, Ma Easter Joy; Maeng, Eun Ho; Qi, Xu-Feng; Park, Seong-Eun; Kim, Yu-Ri; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Kyu-Jae; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in the biomedical field, such as in drug delivery and gene therapy. However, little is known about the biological effects and potential hazards of SiO2. Herein, the colloidal SiO2 NPs with two different sizes (20 nm and 100 nm) and different charges (L-arginine modified: SiO2EN20[R], SiO2EN100[R]; and negative: SiO2EN20[−], SiO2EN100[−] were orally administered (750 mg/kg/day) in female C57BL/6 mice for 14 days. Assessments of immunotoxicity include hematology profiling, reactive oxygen species generation and their antioxidant effect, stimulation assays for B- and T-lymphocytes, the activity of natural killer (NK) cells, and cytokine profiling. In vitro toxicity was also investigated in the RAW 264.7 cell line. When the cellularity of mouse spleen was evaluated, there was an overall decrease in the proliferation of B- and T-cells for all the groups fed with SiO2 NPs. Specifically, the SiO2EN20(−) NPs showed the most pronounced reduction. In addition, the nitric oxide production and NK cell activity in SiO2 NP-fed mice were significantly suppressed. Moreover, there was a decrease in the serum concentration of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-12 (p70), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ. To elucidate the cytotoxicity mechanism of SiO2 in vivo, an in vitro study using the RAW 264.7 cell line was performed. Both the size and charge of SiO2 using murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells decreased cell viability dose-dependently. Collectively, our data indicate that different sized and charged SiO2 NPs would cause differential immunotoxicity. Interestingly, the small-sized and negatively charged SiO2 NPs showed the most potent in vivo immunotoxicity by way of suppressing the proliferation of lymphocytes, depressing the killing activity of NK cells, and decreasing proinflammatory cytokine production, thus leading to immunosuppression. PMID:25565836

  1. Composition and immunotoxicity activity of essential oils from Lindera obtusiloba Blume against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Moon, Hyung-In

    2011-03-01

    The leaves of Lindera obtusiloba Blume var. obtusiloba were extracted and the major essential oil composition and immunotoxicity effects were studied. The analyses were conducted by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) revealed that the essential oils of L. obtusiloba. The L. obtusiloba essential oil yield was 4.23%, and GC/MS analysis revealed that its major constituents were α-copaene (31.42%), β-caryophyllene (32.11%), α-humulene (4.12%), β-farnesene (4.15%), α- cadinene (3.21%) and Nerolidol (6.84%). The essential oil had a significant toxic effect against early fourth-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L with an LC(50) value of 24.32 ppm and an LC(90) value of 36.42 ppm. PMID:20477554

  2. Overlapping gene expression profiles of model compounds provide opportunities for immunotoxicity screening

    SciTech Connect

    Baken, Kirsten A. Pennings, Jeroen L.A.; Jonker, Martijs J.; Schaap, Mirjam M.; Vries, Annemieke de; Steeg, Harry van; Breit, Timo M.; Loveren, Henk van

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate immunotoxic effects of a set of model compounds in mice, a toxicogenomics approach was combined with information on macroscopical and histopathological effects on spleens and on modulation of immune function. Bis(tri-n-butyltin)oxide (TBTO), cyclosporin A (CsA), and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) were administered to C57BL/6 mice at immunosuppressive dose levels. Acetaminophen (APAP) was included in the study since indications of immunomodulating properties of this compound have appeared in the literature. TBTO exposure caused the most pronounced effect on gene expression and also resulted in the most severe reduction of body weight gain and induction of splenic irregularities. All compounds caused inhibition of cell division in the spleen as shown by microarray analysis as well as by suppression of lymphocyte proliferation after application of a contact sensitizer as demonstrated in an immune function assay that was adapted from the local lymph node assay. The immunotoxicogenomics approach applied in this study thus pointed to immunosuppression through cell cycle arrest as a common mechanism of action of immunotoxicants, including APAP. Genes related to cell division such as Ccna2, Brca1, Birc5, Incenp, and Cdkn1a (p21) were identified as candidate genes to indicate anti-proliferative effects of xenobiotics in immune cells for future screening assays. The results of our experiments also show the value of group wise pathway analysis for detection of more subtle transcriptional effects and the potency of evaluation of effects in the spleen to demonstrate immunotoxicity.

  3. Enteric reovirus infection as a probe to study immunotoxicity of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Cuff, C F; Fulton, J R; Barnett, J B; Boyce, C S

    1998-04-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract contains a complex immune system that defends the host against a wide range of pathogens and toxins. The GI tract is also exposed to many environmental toxins that could adversely affect intestinal immunity, and few systems to study immunotoxicity of the GI tract have been described. We demonstrate that intestinal reovirus infection can be used as a system to assess the effects of toxins on intestinal and systemic immunity. Mice were given various doses of cyclophosphamide (CY) for 5 days at doses ranging from 100 to 500 mg/kg by the oral route or 200 mg/kg by the intraperitoneal route. On day 3 of dosing, mice were orally infected with reovirus serotype 1, strain Lang. The effects of CY on viral clearance, intestinal and systemic immune responses, and distribution of intestinal lymphocytes were assessed. Mice treated with CY failed to clear the virus in a dose-dependent manner, and serum anti-reovirus antibody titers were suppressed. Virus-specific IgA in cultures of intestinal tissue from CY-treated mice was significantly reduced compared to controls, although total IgA production was not affected. The virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell response in spleen was also suppressed in CY-treated animals. Cyclophosphamide treatment reduced the number and percentage of B-cells in Peyer's patches. Reovirus infection did not increase cellularity of Peyer's patches in CY-treated mice. Cyclophosphamide treatment also had little effect on the phenotype of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes. These data demonstrate that intestinal reovirus infection is useful in studying exposure of the GI tract to immunotoxic agents. PMID:9579022

  4. Immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing of PLGA-PEO nanoparticles in human blood cell model.

    PubMed

    Tulinska, Jana; Kazimirova, Alena; Kuricova, Miroslava; Barancokova, Magdalena; Liskova, Aurelia; Neubauerova, Eva; Drlickova, Martina; Ciampor, Fedor; Vavra, Ivo; Bilanicova, Dagmar; Pojana, Giulio; Staruchova, Marta; Horvathova, Mira; Jahnova, Eva; Volkovova, Katarina; Bartusova, Maria; Cagalinec, Michal; Dusinska, Maria

    2015-05-01

    A human blood cell model for immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing was used to measure the response to polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA-PEO) nanoparticle (NP) (0.12, 3, 15 and 75 μg/cm(2) exposure in fresh peripheral whole blood cultures/isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures from human volunteers (n = 9-13). PLGA-PEO NPs were not toxic up to dose 3 μg/cm(2); dose of 75 μg/cm(2) displays significant decrease in [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA of proliferating cells after 4 h (70% of control) and 48 h (84%) exposure to NPs. In non-cytotoxic concentrations, in vitro assessment of the immunotoxic effects displayed moderate but significant suppression of proliferative activity of T-lymphocytes and T-dependent B-cell response in cultures stimulated with PWM > CON A, and no changes in PHA cultures. Decrease in proliferative function was the most significant in T-cells stimulated with CD3 antigen (up to 84%). Cytotoxicity of natural killer cells was suppressed moderately (92%) but significantly in middle-dosed cultures (4 h exposure). On the other hand, in low PLGA-PEO NPs dosed cultures, significant stimulation of phagocytic activity of granulocytes (119%) > monocytes (117%) and respiratory burst of phagocytes (122%) was recorded. Genotoxicity assessment revealed no increase in the number of micronucleated binucleated cells and no induction of SBs or oxidised DNA bases in PLGA-PEO-treated cells. To conclude on immuno- and genotoxicity of PLGA-PEO NPs, more experiments with various particle size, charge and composition need to be done. PMID:23859252

  5. Immunotoxicity of β-Diketone Antibiotic Mixtures to Zebrafish (Danio rerio) by Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fanghui; Wang, Hui; Liu, Jinfeng; Lin, Jiebo; Zeng, Aibing; Ai, Weiming; Wang, Xuedong; Dahlgren, Randy A.; Wang, Huili

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines are known as β-diketone antibiotics (DKAs) because of bearing a diketone group in their molecular structure. DKAs are the most widely used antibiotics to prevent generation of disease in humans and animals and to suppress bacterial growth in aquaculture. In recent years, overuse of DKAs has caused serious environmental risk due to their pseudo-persistence in the environment, even though their half-lives are not long. So far, no reports were concerned with the joint immunotoxicity of DKAs. Herein, we reported on the immunotoxicity of DKAs on zebrafish after a 3-month DKAs exposure using transcriptomic techniques. According to transcriptome sequencing, 10 differentially expressed genes were screened out among the genes related to KEGG pathways with high enrichment. The identified 7 genes showed to be consistent between RNA-seq and qRT-PCR. Due to DKAs exposure, the content or activity for a series of immune-related biomarkers (Complement 3, lysozyme, IgM and AKP) showed the inconsistent changing trends as compared with the control group. Histopathological observations showed that the number of goblet cells increased sharply, the columnar epithelial cells swelled, the nucleus became slender in intestinal villi, and numerous brown metachromatic granules occurred in spleens of DKAs-exposed groups. Overall, both detection of biomarkers and histopathological observation corroborated that chronic DKAs exposure could result in abnormal expression of immune genes and enzymes, and variable levels of damage to immune-related organs. These complex effects of DKAs may lead to zebrafish dysfunction and occurrence of diseases related to the immune system. PMID:27046191

  6. Effects of immunotoxic activity of the major essential oil of Angelica purpuraefolia Chung against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Park, Yool-Jin; Chung, Ill-Min; Moon, Hyung-In

    2010-12-01

    The rhizomes parts of Angelica purpuraefolia were extracted and the major essential oils composition and immunotoxic effects were studied. The analyses were conducted by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) revealed that the essential oils of A. purpuraefolia. The A. purpuraefolia essential oil (APEO) yield was 0.37%, and GC/MS analysis revealed that its major constituents were β-Phellandrene (32.11%), Nerolidol (10.11%), Pyrimidine derivative (27.33%), Heptadecane (4.33%), and Celorbicol (6.33%). The essential oil had a significant toxic effect against early fourth-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L with an LC(50) value of 31.21 ppm and an LC(90) value of 87.22 ppm. The results could be useful in search for newer, safer, and more effective natural immunotoxic agents against A. aegypti. PMID:20163192

  7. Immunotoxicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immunotoxicology is a subdiscipline of toxicology that focuses on unintended modulation of the immune system. Effects that may occur include immunosuppression, immunostimulation, hypersensitivity, or autoimmunity, which may result in outcomes such as increased incidences of infec...

  8. IMMUNOTOXICITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few D/DBPs have been evaluated for effects on the immune system, but certain studies suggest that immunosuppression may follow exposure to D/DBPs. Suppressed immune function is associated with increased susceptibility to infectious disease and certain types of cancer in humans a...

  9. Genotoxic and immunotoxic potential effects of selected psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Lacaze, Emilie; Pédelucq, Julie; Fortier, Marlène; Brousseau, Pauline; Auffret, Michel; Budzinski, Hélène; Fournier, Michel

    2015-07-01

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceuticals towards aquatic invertebrates is still poorly understood and sometimes controversial. This study aims to document the in vitro genotoxicity and immunotoxicity of psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on Mytilus edulis. Mussel hemocytes were exposed to fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and erythromycin, at concentrations ranging from μg/L to mg/L. Paroxetine at 1.5 μg/L led to DNA damage while the same concentration of venlafaxine caused immunomodulation. Fluoxetine exposure resulted in genotoxicity, immunotoxicity and cytotoxicity. In the case of antibiotics, trimethoprim was genotoxic at 200 μg/L and immunotoxic at 20 mg/L whereas erythromycin elicited same detrimental effects at higher concentrations. DNA metabolism seems to be a highly sensitive target for psychotropic drugs and antibiotics. Furthermore, these compounds affect the immune system of bivalves, with varying intensity. This attests the relevance of these endpoints to assess the toxic mode of action of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. PMID:25829077

  10. Vitamin E pretreatment prevents the immunotoxicity of dithiocarbamate pesticide mancozeb in vitro: A comparative age-related assessment in mice and chick.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Bano, Farhad; Mohanty, Banalata

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides used for crop protection cause life-threatening diseases affecting the immune system of non-target organisms including birds and mammals. Functionality of immune system is age-dependent; early- as well as old-life stages are more susceptible to toxic exposures because of less competent immune system. Vitamins are so far known to reduce toxic effect of several pesticides and/or xenobiotics. The present in vitro study elucidated immunotoxicity of fungicide mancozeb through comparable stages of immune system maturation in mice (1, 3, and 12months) and chicks (4, 8, and 11weeks). In vitro splenocytes viability on exposure to mancozeb was quantitatively assessed by MTT assay and qualitatively by acridine orange and ethidium bromide (AO/EB) double fluorescence staining. Mancozeb exposure dose dependently (250, 500, 1000, 2500, 5000 and 10,000ng/ml) decreased the splenocytes viability. The in vitro preventive effect of Vitamin E has also been explored on toxicity induced by mancozeb. The increased susceptibility observed both in early and aged groups was due to less/decline competence of the immune system. PMID:26778438

  11. Efficacy of Nigella sativa in alleviating benzo[a]pyrene-induced immunotoxicity in broilers.

    PubMed

    Latif, I K; Karim, A J; Zuki, A B Z; Zamri-Saad, M; Niu, J P; Noordin, M M

    2011-06-01

    The immune response of broiler chickens exposed to intra-tracheal (i.t.) administration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) with and without Nigella sativa (Ns) supplementation was investigated. A total of 120 day-old chicks were divided into four groups comprising 30 birds each, into a control, Ns, BaP, and BaP+Ns group. Immune responses to Newcastle disease (ND) were evaluated by haemagglutination inhibition (HI), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) skin test and carbon clearance assay (CCA). In most instances, there was a significant increase (p<0.05) in the ND-HI antibody titers, PHA skin-swelling response and phagocytic activity in the BaP + Ns group compared to that of the BaP group. Likewise, organ weight and indices of the spleen, bursa of Fabricius and thymus of birds from the BaP + Ns group were also higher (p<0.05) than that of the BaP group from day 1 until day 21. It is concluded that exposure to BaP may exert adverse effects on the immune system of broilers which may increase their susceptibility to disease, and Ns supplementation significantly reduces these alterations. PMID:21472685

  12. The influence of hydrocarbon composition and exposure conditions on jet fuel-induced immunotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hilgaertner, Jianhua W; He, Xianghui; Camacho, Daniel; Badowski, Michael; Witten, Mark; Harris, David T

    2011-11-01

    Chronic jet fuel exposure could be detrimental to the health and well-being of exposed personnel, adversely affect their work performance and predispose these individuals to increased incidences of infectious disease, cancer and autoimmune disorders. Short-term (7 day) JP-8 jet fuel exposure has been shown to cause lung injury and immune dysfunction. Physiological alterations can be influenced not only by jet fuel exposure concentration (absolute amount), but also are dependent on the type of exposure (aerosol versus vapor) and the composition of the jet fuel (hydrocarbon composition). In the current study, these variables were examined with relation to effects of jet fuel exposure on immune function. It was discovered that real-time, in-line monitoring of jet fuel exposure resulted in aerosol exposure concentrations that were approximately one-eighth the concentration of previously reported exposure systems. Further, the effects of a synthetic jet fuel designed to eliminate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were also examined. Both of these changes in exposure reduced but did not eliminate the deleterious effects on the immune system of exposed mice. PMID:21402657

  13. Lysozyme activity in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomic fluid and coelomocytes: Enzyme assay for immunotoxicity of xenobiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Goven, A.J.; Chen, S.C.; Fitzpatrick, L.C. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Venables, B.J. . Dept. of Biological Sciences TRAC Laboratories Inc., Denton, TX )

    1994-04-01

    Lysozyme activity in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomic fluid and coelomocytes appears sufficiently sensitive for use as a nonmammalian biomarker to detect toxic effects of sublethal body burdens of Cu[sup 2+]. Lysozyme, a phylogenetically conserved enzyme, is capable of bactericidal activity via action on peptidoglycan of gram-positive bacterial cell walls and functions as a component of an organism's innate antimicrobial defense mechanism. Coelomic fluid and coelomocyte lysozyme activities, which exhibit temperature-response patterns similar to those of human saliva, plasma, serum and leukocyte extracts, were sensitive to Cu[sup 2+] exposure. Lysozyme activity of coelomic fluid and coelomocyte extracts from earthworms exposed for 5 d to CuSO[sub 4], using filter paper contact exposure, decreased with increasing sublethal Cu[sup 2+] concentrations of 0.05 and 0.1 [mu]g/cm[sup 2]. Compared to controls, coelomic fluid lysozyme activity was suppressed significantly at both exposure concentrations, whereas coelomocyte extract lysozyme activity was suppressed significantly at the 0.1-[mu]g/cm[sup 2] exposure concentration. Low inherent natural variability and sensitivity to sublethal Cu[sup 2+] body burdens indicate that lysozyme activity has potential as a biomarker for assaying immunotoxicity of metals.

  14. Immunotoxicity activity from various essential oils of Angelica genus from South Korea against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Kim, Eun-Hye; Lee, Jai-Heon; Lee, Young-Choon; Moon, Hyung-In

    2012-02-01

    The leaves of Angelica anomala Lallemant, Angelica cartilagino-marginata var. distans (Nakai) Kitag, Angelica czernevia (Fisch. et Meyer) Kitagawa, Angelica dahurica Benth. et Hooker, Angelica decursiva (Miq.) Franch. & Sav, Angelica fallax Boissieu, Angelica gigas Nakai, Angelica japonica A. gray were essential oil extracted and immunotoxicity effects were studied. The Angelica anomala, A. cartilagino-marginata var. distans, A. czernevia, A. dahurica, A. decursiva, A. fallax, A. gigas, A. japonica essential oil yield were 4.13, 4.83, 4.45, 3.25, 4.11, 4.73, 4.34 and 4.21%. The A. dahurica essential oil had a significant toxic effect against early fourth-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L with a lethal concentration 50 (LC₅₀) value of 43.12 ppm and an LC₉₀ value of 65.23 ppm. The above indicates that essential oil contents may play a more important role in the toxicity of essential oil. PMID:21506693

  15. Immunotoxicity in plaice exposed to marine sediments in Baie des Anglais on the St. Lawrence Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Lacroix, A.; Nagler, J.; Lee, K.; Lebeuf, M.; Cyr, D.; Fournier, M.

    1995-12-31

    The sediments of Baie des Anglais on the St. Lawrence Estuary have a history of environmental contamination. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether or not the immune system of American Plaice (Hippoglossoides Platessoides) could be affected following in-situ exposure at three different sites in and near Baie des Anglais. These sites vary with their proximity to local industry, Sites 1 and 2 (within the bay) being the closest and Site 3 (outside the bay) the furthest away. Fishes placed in cages at each site for three weeks, displayed head kidney cell immune responses (i.e., phagocytosis) modifications indicating that Site 1 was most immunotoxic and site 3 the least. Sediment chemical analysis show a gradient in contaminant concentrations with the highest levels recorded at Site 1, about 10-fold less at Site 2 and 100-fold less at Site 3. Organics predominated (PAHs, PCBs, PCDFs) with heavy metal concentrations low and representative of background levels for the St. Lawrence Estuary. The results obtained indicate that contaminants present in the sediments are bioavailable to fish and significantly affect their immune system.

  16. Early life environment and developmental immunotoxicity in inflammatory dysfunction and disease

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, Cynthia A.; Dietert, Rodney R.

    2015-01-01

    Components of the innate immune system such as macrophages and dendritic cells are instrumental in determining the fate of immune responses and are, also, among the most sensitive targets of early life environmental alterations including developmental immunotoxicity (DIT). DIT can impede innate immune cell maturation, disrupt tissue microenvironment, alter immune responses to infectious challenges, and disrupt regulatory responses. Dysregulation of inflammation, such as that observed with DIT, has been linked with an increased risk of chronic inflammatory diseases in both children and adults. In this review, we discuss the relationship between early-life risk factors for innate immune modulation and promotion of dysregulated inflammation associated with chronic inflammatory disease. The health risks from DIT-associated inflammation may extend beyond primary immune dysfunction to include an elevated risk of several later-life, inflammatory-mediated diseases that target a wide range of physiological systems and organs. For this reason, determination of innate immune status should be an integral part of drug and chemical safety evaluation. PMID:26146439

  17. In vitro immunotoxicity assessment of culture-derived extracellular vesicles in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Lucia E; Elgamal, Ola A; Mo, Xiaokui; Phelps, Mitch A; Schmittgen, Thomas D; Papenfuss, Tracey L

    2016-09-01

    The potential to engineer extracellular vesicles (EV) that target specific cells and deliver a therapeutic payload has propelled a growing interest in their development as promising therapeutics. These EV are often produced from cultured cells. Very little is known about the interaction of cell culture-derived EV with cells of the immune system and their potential immunomodulatory effects. The present study evaluated potential immunotoxic effects of HEK293T-derived EV on the human monocytic cell lines THP-1 and U937. Incubation of cells with different doses of EV for 16-24 h was followed by assessment of cytotoxicity and cell function by flow cytometry. Changes in cell functionality were evaluated by the capacity of cells to phagocytize fluorescent microspheres. In addition, the internalization of labeled EV in THP-1 and U937 cells was evaluated. Exposure to EV did not affect the viability of THP-1 or U937 cells. Although lower doses of the EV increased phagocytic capacity in both cell lines, phagocytic efficiency of individual cells was not affected by EV exposure at any of the doses evaluated. This study also demonstrated that THP-1 and U937 monocytic cells are highly permissive to EV entry in a dose-response manner. These results suggest that, although HEK293T-derived EV are efficiently internalized by human monocytic cells, they do not exert a cytotoxic effect or alter phagocytic efficiency on the cell lines evaluated. PMID:27075513

  18. Major essential oils composition and immunotoxicity activity from leaves of Foeniculum vulgare against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Ro, Hee-Myong; Moon, Huyng-In

    2011-09-01

    The leaves of Foeniculum vulgare (Umbelliferae) were extracted and the major essential oil composition and immunotoxicity effects were studied. The analyses conducted by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) revealed the essential oils of F. vulgare leaves. The F. vulgare essential oil yield was 0.97%, and GC/MS analysis revealed that its major constituents were methyl clavicol (46.3%), α-phellandrene (18.2%), fenchone (10.6%), (E)-anethole (11.3%), myrcene (3.4%), and α-pinene (2.1%). The essential oil had a significant toxic effect against early fourth-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L with an LC(50) value of 41.23 ppm and an LC(90) value of 65.24 ppm. Also, methyl clavicol (≥98.0%), α-phellandrene (≥95.0%), fenchone (≥98.0%), (E)-anethole (≥99.0%), myrcene (≥99.0%), and α-pinene (≥99.0%) were tested against the F(21) laboratory strain of A. aegypti. Fenchone (≥98.0%) and (E)-anethole (≥99.0%) have medium activity with an LC(50) value of 73.11 ppm and 102.41 ppm. The above data indicate that major compounds interaction may play a more important role in the toxicity of essential oil. PMID:21077804

  19. Phagocytosis in earthworms: An environmentally acceptable endpoint to assess immunotoxic potential of contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Giggleman, M.A.; Fitzpatrick, L.C.; Goven, A.J.; Venables, B.J.; Callahan, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Phagocytosis, a host-defense mechanism phylogenetically conserved throughout the animal kingdom, by earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomocytes has potential as a surrogate for vertebrates to be used as an environmentally acceptable endpoint to assess sublethal immunotoxic risks of contaminated soils to environmental (eg. higher wildlife) and public health. Coelomocytes can be exposed in vivo to complex contaminated parent soils by placing earthworms in situ at hazardous waste sites (HWS) or into soil samples and their dilutions with artificial soil (AS) in the laboratory, or in vitro to soil extracts and their fractionations. Here the authors report on phagocytosis by coelomocytes in earthworms exposed to pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated soils from a wood treatment HWS, PCP-spiked AS and PCP treated filter paper (FP). HWS soil was diluted to 25% with AS to a sublethal concentration (ca. 125 mg kg{sup {minus}1}) and earthworms exposed for 14d at 10 C under light conditions. AS was spiked at ca. 125 mg kg{sup {minus}1} PCP and earthworms were similarly exposed. Controls for both consisted of earthworms exposed to 100% AS. Earthworms were exposed to FP treated with a sublethal PCP concentration (15 {micro}g cm{sup {minus}2}) at 10 C under dark conditions for 96H. Controls were similarly exposed without PCP. Phagocytosis by coelomocytes in earthworms exposed to HWS soil, spiked AS and treated FP was suppressed 37, 41 and 29%, respectively. Results are discussed in terms of PCP body burdens and exposure protocols.

  20. Data Mining as a Guide for the Construction of Cross-Linked Nanoparticles with Low Immunotoxicity via Control of Polymer Chemistry and Supramolecular Assembly.

    PubMed

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L

    2015-06-16

    The potential immunotoxicity of nanoparticles that are currently being approved, in different phases of clinical trials, or undergoing rigorous in vitro and in vivo characterizations in several laboratories has recently raised special attention. Products with no apparent in vitro or in vivo toxicity may still trigger various components of the immune system unintentionally and lead to serious adverse reactions. Cytokines are one of the useful biomarkers for predicting the effect of biotherapeutics on modulation of the immune system and for screening the immunotoxicity of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo, and they were recently found to partially predict the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of nanomaterials. Control of polymer chemistry and supramolecular assembly provides a great opportunity for the construction of biocompatible nanoparticles for biomedical clinical applications. However, the sources of data collected regarding immunotoxicities of nanomaterials are diverse, and experiments are usually conducted using different assays under specific conditions. As a result, making direct comparisons nearly impossible, and thus, tailoring the properties of nanomaterials on the basis of the available data is challenging. In this Account, the effects of chemical structure, cross-linking, degradability, morphology, concentration, and surface chemistry on the immunotoxicity of an expansive array of polymeric nanomaterials will be highlighted, with a focus on assays conducted using the same in vitro and in vivo models and experimental conditions. Furthermore, numerical descriptive values have been utilized uniquely to stand for induction of cytokines by nanoparticles. This treatment of available data provides a simple way to compare the immunotoxicities of various nanomaterials, and the values were found to correlate well with published data. On the basis of the polymeric systems investigated in this study, valuable information has been collected that

  1. Data Mining as a Guide for the Construction of Crosslinked Nanoparticles with Low Immunotoxicity via Controlling Polymer Chemistry and Supramolecular Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The potential immunotoxicity of nanoparticles that are currently being approved or in different phases of clinical trials or under rigorous in vitro and in vivo characterizations in several laboratories has recently raised special attention. Products with no apparent in vitro or in vivo toxicity may still trigger the various components of the immune system, unintentionally, and lead to serious adverse reactions. Cytokines are one of the useful biomarkers to predict the effect of biotherapeutics on modulating the immune system and for screening the immunotoxicity of nanoparticles, both in vitro and in vivo, and were found recently to partially predict the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of nanomaterials. Control of polymer chemistry and supramolecular assembly provides a great opportunity for construction of biocompatible nanoparticles for biomedical clinical applications. However, the sources of data collected regarding immunotoxicities of nanomaterials are diverse and experiments are usually conducted using different assays and under specific conditions, making direct comparisons nearly impossible and, thus, tailoring properties of nanomaterials based on the available data is challenging. In this account, the effects of chemical structure, crosslinking, degradability, morphology, concentration and surface chemistry on the immunotoxicity of an expansive array of polymeric nanomaterials will be highlighted, with focus being given on assays conducted using the same in vitro and in vivo models and experimental conditions. Furthermore, numerical descriptive values have been utilized, uniquely, to stand for induction of cytokines by nanoparticles. This treatment of available data provides a simple and easy way to compare the immunotoxicity of various nanomaterials, and the values were found to correlate-well with published data. Based on the investigated polymeric systems in this study, valuable information has been collected that aids in the

  2. Immunotoxicity of zearalenone in Balb/c mice in a high subchronic dosing study counteracted by Raphanus sativus extract.

    PubMed

    Salah-Abbès, Jalila Ben; Abbès, Samir; Abdel-Wahhab, Ma; Oueslati, Ridha

    2010-12-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus) is a cruciferous plant, rich on flavonoids, isothiocyanates, and phenolic acids. They show anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity both in vitro and in vivo. Isothiocyanates and flavonoids have been reported previously to prevent low-sub-chronic dose of zearalenone (ZEN) causing immunotoxicity. The present study focuses on the amelioration of fusarotoxicosis in Balb/c mice by feeding two concentrations of radish extract. The extract at 15 and 30 mg/kg bw, was evaluated to reduce the deleterious effects in immunological parameters of high subchronic doses of 40 and 80 mg of ZEN/kg bw on modulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). ZEN consuming mice showed a "dose-related" decrease in weight gain and in the immune relative weights organs. Moreover, Atrophy and lymphoid depletion were seen in the histopathology of spleen. Ingestion of ZEN at either level had a significant effect on total red blood cell numbers and on their relative number of lymphocytes. Likewise, ZEN alters the production of regulatory cytokines and antibody of LPS stimulated mice. By contrast, the additions of radish extract with a low or high dose of ZEN moderately decreased the affected mice and/or the severity of lesions, and all tested parameters were normal or at least near normal levels. In addition, the radish extract alone did not produce any significant changes in all tested parameters compared with the controls. In conclusion, radish extract was effective for the protection of high dose ZEN-immunotoxication in mice and it could contribute to a solution of the ZEN immunotoxicity in humans and in farm animals. PMID:20205508

  3. Biological responses of Raw 264.7 macrophage exposed to two strains of Stachybotrys chartarum spores grown on four different wallboard types.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Harvey, L A; Evans, A L; Byfield, G E; Betancourt, D A; Dean, T R

    2016-06-01

    The many benefits of building "green" have motivated the use of sustainable products in the design and execution of the built environment. However, the use of these natural or recycled materials, some of which have been treated with antimicrobials, provides a growth opportunity for microorganisms with the potential to elicit adverse health effects especially in the presence of an antimicrobial. The focus of this research was to determine the effects of Stachybotrys chartarum (strains Houston and 51-11) grown under different conditions on a macrophage cell line (Raw 264.7) using endpoints, including cytotoxicity, and those associated with immunity specifically inflammation and MHC class II expression. The fungi were grown on four different gypsum products, and macrophages were exposed to whole spores of both strains and fragmented spores of strain 51-11. Whole spores of the Houston strain elicited no cytotoxicity with some level of inflammation, while exposure to whole spores of 51-11 caused variable responses depending on the wallboard type supporting the fungal growth. High concentrations of fragmented 51-11 spores primarily resulted in the apoptosis of macrophage with no inflammation. None of the fungal strains caused elevated levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression on the surface of Raw cells. Mycotoxin levels of 51-11 spores from all of the wallboard types measured  >250 ng/μL of T2 equivalent toxin based on activity. Collectively, the data demonstrated that all of the wallboard types supported growth of fungi with the ability to elicit harmful biological responses with the potential to negatively impact human health. PMID:27097835

  4. Effect of Different Selenium Supplementation Levels on Oxidative Stress, Cytokines, and Immunotoxicity in Chicken Thymus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yachao; Jiang, Li; Li, Yuanfeng; Luo, Xuegang; He, Jian

    2016-08-01

    This study assessed the effects of different selenium (Se) supplementation levels on oxidative stress, cytokines, and immunotoxicity in chicken thymus. A total of 180 laying hens (1 day old; Mianyang, China) were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 45). The chickens were maintained either on a basic diet (control group) containing 0.2 mg/kg Se, a low-supplemented diet containing 5 mg/kg Se, a medium-supplemented diet containing 10 mg/kg Se, or a high-supplemented diet containing 15 mg/kg Se for 15, 30, and 45 days, respectively. Over the entire experimental period, serum and thymus samples were collected and used for the detection of the experimental index. The results indicated that the antioxidative enzyme activities and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of antioxidative enzymes, IFN-γ and IL-2 in the thymus, and the content of IFN-γ and IL-2 in the serum of excessive-Se-treated chickens at all time points (except for the 5 mg/kg Se supplement group at 15 days) were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared to the corresponding control groups. Interestingly, a significantly increase (P < 0.05) in the content of IFN-γ was observed in the serum and thymus in the 5 mg/kg Se supplement group at 15 and 30 days compared to the corresponding control groups. In histopathological examination, the thymus tissue from excessive-Se-treated chickens revealed different degrees of cortex drop, incrassation of the medulla, and degeneration of the reticular cells. These results suggested that the excessive Se could result in a decrease in immunity, an increase in oxidative damage, and a series of clinical pathology changes, such as cortex drop, incrassation of the medulla, and degeneration of the reticular cells. PMID:26740218

  5. Immunotoxicity of surface waters contaminated by municipal effluents to the snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Gust, M; Fortier, M; Garric, J; Fournier, M; Gagné, F

    2013-01-15

    The immunotoxic effects of surface waters contaminated by a municipal effluent dispersion plume were examined in the snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Snails were exposed to surface waters where changes in hemocyte counts, viability, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced thiols and phagocytic activity were tracked following exposure periods of 3h and 3 and 7d. Changes in mRNA expression of some genes in the hemocytes were also assessed after 7d of exposure, as follows: genes coding for catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GSR), selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGPX), two isoforms of the nitric oxide synthetase (NOS1 and NOS2), molluscan defensive molecule (MDM), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF), and heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70). At the sites closest to the discharge point, exposure led to impaired hemocyte viability and intracellular thiol levels and also an increase of hemocyte count, ROS levels and phagocytosis. Phagocytosis and ROS levels in hemocytes were correlated with heterotrophic bacterial counts in snails. We found four genes with increased mRNA expression as a response to exposure of municipal wastewaters: TLR4 (6-fold), HSP70 (2-fold), SeGPx (4-fold) and CAT (2-fold). Immunocompetence responses were analyzed by canonical analysis to seek out relationships with mRNA expression of the genes involved in stress, pattern recognition, cellular and humoral responses. The data revealed that genes involved in oxidative stress were strongly involved with immunocompetence and that the resulting immune responses were influenced both by the bacterial and pollutant loadings of the effluent. PMID:23021492

  6. Biological and immunotoxicity evaluation of antimicrobial peptide-loaded coatings using a layer-by-layer process on titanium

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jue; Liu, Yu; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Shifang; Yang, Guoli

    2015-01-01

    The prevention and control of peri-implantitis is a challenge in dental implant surgery. Dental implants with sustained antimicrobial coating are an ideal way of preventing peri-implantitis. This study reports development of a non- immunotoxicity multilayered coating on a titanium surface that had sustained antimicrobial activity and limited early biofilm formation. In this study, the broad spectrum AMP, Tet213, was linked to collagen IV through sulfo-SMPB and has been renamed as AMPCol. The multilayer AMPCol coatings were assembled on smooth titanium surfaces using a LBL technique. Using XPS, AFM, contact angle analysis, and QCM, layer-by-layer accumulation of coating thickness was measured and increased surface wetting compared to controls was confirmed. Non-cytotoxicity to HaCaT and low erythrocyte hemolysis by the AMPCol coatings was observed. In vivo immunotoxicity assays showed IP administration of AMPCol did not effect serum immunoglobulin levels. This coating with controlled release of AMP decreased the growth of both a Gram-positive aerobe (Staphylococcus aureus) and a Gram-negative anaerobe (Porphyromonas gingivalis) up to one month. Early S. aureus biofilm formation was inhibited by the coating. The excellent long-term sustained antimicrobial activity of this multilayer coating is a potential method for preventing peri-implantitis through coated on the neck of implants before surgery. PMID:26548760

  7. Biological and immunotoxicity evaluation of antimicrobial peptide-loaded coatings using a layer-by-layer process on titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jue; Liu, Yu; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Shifang; Yang, Guoli

    2015-11-01

    The prevention and control of peri-implantitis is a challenge in dental implant surgery. Dental implants with sustained antimicrobial coating are an ideal way of preventing peri-implantitis. This study reports development of a non- immunotoxicity multilayered coating on a titanium surface that had sustained antimicrobial activity and limited early biofilm formation. In this study, the broad spectrum AMP, Tet213, was linked to collagen IV through sulfo-SMPB and has been renamed as AMPCol. The multilayer AMPCol coatings were assembled on smooth titanium surfaces using a LBL technique. Using XPS, AFM, contact angle analysis, and QCM, layer-by-layer accumulation of coating thickness was measured and increased surface wetting compared to controls was confirmed. Non-cytotoxicity to HaCaT and low erythrocyte hemolysis by the AMPCol coatings was observed. In vivo immunotoxicity assays showed IP administration of AMPCol did not effect serum immunoglobulin levels. This coating with controlled release of AMP decreased the growth of both a Gram-positive aerobe (Staphylococcus aureus) and a Gram-negative anaerobe (Porphyromonas gingivalis) up to one month. Early S. aureus biofilm formation was inhibited by the coating. The excellent long-term sustained antimicrobial activity of this multilayer coating is a potential method for preventing peri-implantitis through coated on the neck of implants before surgery.

  8. Immunotoxicity activity of 1,2,4-trimethoxybenzene from the Paulownia coreana Uyeki. against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Moon, Hyung-In

    2011-03-01

    The flower parts of Paulownia coreana were extracted and the major essential oils composition and immunotoxicity effects were studied. The analyses were conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) revealed that the essential oils of P. coreana. The P. coreana essential oil (PCEO) yield was 0.175%, and GC/MS analysis revealed that its major constituents were benzyl alcohol (13.72%), phenol, 3,4-dimethoxy-methyl ester (3.64%), phenol, 2-methoxy-3-(2-popenyl)-methyl ester (6.24%), 1,2,4-Trimethoxybenzene (8.32%), tricosane (3.28%), and pentacosane (3.26%). The essential oil had a significant toxic effect against early fourth-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L with an LC(50) value of 31.64 ppm and an LC(90) value of 56.43 ppm. 1,2,4-Trimethoxybenzene was the most toxic among the major components with an LC(50) value near 23.1 ppm. The results could be useful in search for newer, safer, and more effective natural immunotoxicity agents against A. aegypti. PMID:20476845

  9. In vitro lymphotoxicity and selective T cell immunotoxicity of high doses of acyclovir and its derivatives in mice.

    PubMed

    Poluektova, L; Krzystyniak, K; Desjardins, R; Flipo, D; Fournier, M

    1996-01-01

    The antiviral drug acyclovir [9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)guanine (ACV)], its 7-isomer (7-ACV) and its two derivatives: N2-acetyl ACV (ac-ACV) and N2,O-diacetyl ACV (diac-ACV) were examined for their potential in vitro lymphotoxicity and in vivo immunotoxicity in mice. In vitro lymphotoxicity of ACV and its acetylated derivatives was low, whereas the 7-ACV isomer enhanced the in vitro cell proliferation in PHA-stimulated cultures. Addition of 2'-deoxyguanosine (dGuo) did not exhibit any inhibitory potential of ACV. However, reduction in the absolute number of CD3+, CD8+, and CD25+ cells, but not Ig+ cells, was noted at high concentrations of ACV and its derivatives, suggesting a selective T cell cytotoxicity. Similarly, the in vivo exposure revealed selective T cell immunotoxicity of ACV and its derivatives since the reduced number of Thy 1.2+ and CD8+ cells was not accompanied with any marked changes in the Ig+ population. The CD4+/CD8+ ratio was affected both in vitro and in vivo by high concentrations of ACV. PMID:9024946

  10. Immunotoxic effects of sodium tungstate dihydrate on female B6C3F1/N mice when administered in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Frawley, Rachel P; Smith, Matthew J; White, Kimber L; Elmore, Susan A; Herbert, Ron; Moore, Rebecca; Staska, Lauren M; Behl, Mamta; Hooth, Michelle J; Kissling, Grace E; Germolec, Dori R

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring, high-tensile strength element that has been used in a number of consumer products. Tungsten has been detected in soil, waterways, groundwater, and human tissue and body fluids. Elevated levels of tungsten in urine were reported for populations exposed to tungstate in drinking water in areas where natural tungsten formations were prevalent. Published reports indicated that sodium tungstate may modulate hematopoiesis, immune cell populations, and immune responses in rodent models. The objective of this study was to assess potential immunotoxicity of sodium tungstate dihydrate (STD), a drinking water contaminant. Female B6C3F1/N mice received 0-2000 mg STD/L in their drinking water for 28 d, and were evaluated for effects on immune cell populations in spleen and bone marrow, and humoral-mediated, cell-mediated, and innate immunity. Three different parameters of cell-mediated immunity were similarly affected at 1000 mg STD/L. T-cell proliferative responses against allogeneic leukocytes and anti-CD3 were decreased 32%, and 21%, respectively. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity was decreased at all effector:target cell ratios examined. At 2000 mg STD/L, the absolute numbers of CD3(+) T-cell progenitor cells in bone marrow were increased 86%, but the alterations in B-lymphocyte and other progenitor cells were not significant. There were no effects on bone marrow DNA synthesis or colony forming capabilities. STD-induced effects on humoral-mediated immunity, innate immunity, and splenocyte sub-populations were limited. Enhanced histopathology did not detect treatment-related lesions in any of the immune tissues. These data suggest exposure to STD in drinking water may adversely affect cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27223060

  11. Thymus-directed immunotoxicity of airborne dust particles from Upper Silesia (Poland) under acute extrapulmonary studies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowska, E.; Krzystniak, K.; Drela, N.

    1996-12-27

    Industrial air pollutants from Upper Silesia, Poland, contain over 250 polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals, including mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals that have been shown to from DNA adducts. Over 4 million habitants of Silesia are permanently exposed to the industrial pollution by pulmonary and dermal routes and by contaminated food and water. These chemicals, when examined separately in animals models, were proven immunotoxic. We studied the extrapulmonary immunotoxic potential of a typical mixture of Silesian filter-suspended matter from a selected area, over a specific season and time period. Early changes in the immune system were analyzed in BALB/c mice exposed ip to acute doses of 20-330 mg dust mixture/kg body weight (0.06-1.0 LD50). No major changes were noted for weight and the cellularity of spleen, liver and kidneys. However, dramatic decrease in thymus weight index and thymocyte cell count were noted as early as 24-72 h postexposure, which correlated with almost complete depletion of immature, double-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} thymocytes. Changes in spleen were less profound; however, increased depletion of B cells over T cells was noted at high doses of the suspended matter. Exposure to the airborne dust also decreased cytokine production by spleen cells, such as interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). Overall, a single exposure to Silesian dust, even at the relatively low 0.06 LD50 dose, affected lymphokine production, suppressed B-cell proliferative response, and depleted thymuses of immature, double-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} cells. A chemical synergism is suspected. To our knowledge, none of the known components of Silesian suspended matter, when examined as a single chemical, was shown to exert such a profound biological effect. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  12. In vitro immunotoxicity of untreated and treated urban wastewaters using various treatment processes to rainbow trout leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Gagné, François; Fortier, Marlène; Fournier, Michel; Smyth, Shirley-Anne

    2013-07-01

    Municipal effluents are known to impede the immune system of aquatic organisms. The purpose of this study was to examine the immunotoxicity of urban wastewaters before and after 6 treatment processes from 12 cities toward trout leucocytes. Freshly prepared trout leucocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations of solid phase (C18) extracts of wastewaters for 24 hr at 150C. Immunocompetence was determined by following changes in leucocyte viability and the proportion of cells able to ingest at least one (immunoactivity) and at least three (immunoefficiency) fluorescent beads. The influents were treated by six different treatment strategies consisting of facultative aerated lagoons, activated sludge, biological aerated filter, biological nutrient removal, chemically-assisted physical treatment and trickling filter/solid contact. Water quality parameters of the wastewaters revealed that the plants effectively removed total suspended solids and reduced the chemical oxygen demand. The results revealed that the effluents' immunotoxic properties were generally more influenced by the properties of the untreated wastewaters than by the treatment processes. About half of the incoming influents decreased leucocyte viability while 4 treatment plants were able to reduce toxicity. The influents readily increased phagocytosis activity for 8/12 influents while it was decreased in 4/12 influents. This increase was abolished for 4/12 of the effluents using treatments involving biological and oxidative processes. In conclusion, municipal effluents have the potential to alter the immune system in fish and more research will be needed to improve the treatments of wastewaters to better protect the quality of the aquatic environment. PMID:24218853

  13. In Vivo Immunotoxicity of SiO2@(Y0.5Gd0.45Eu0.05)2O3 as Dual-Modality Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiumei; Li, Ermao; Yang, Fanwen; Peng, Ye; Zhu, Jixiang; He, Fupo; Chen, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    We have successfully synthesized SiO2@(Y0.5Gd0.45Eu0.05)2O3 nanocomposites as a potential dual-modality nanoprobe for molecular imaging in vitro. However, their immunotoxicity assessment in vivo remains unknown. In this article, the in vitro biocompatibility of our dual-modality nanoprobes was assayed in terms of cell viability and apoptosis. In vivo immunotoxicity was investigated by monitoring the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and cytokines in Balb/c mice. The data show that the in vitro biocompatibility was satisfactory. In addition, the immunotoxicity data revealed there are no significant changes in the expression levels of CD11b and CD71 between the nanoprobe group and the Gd in a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) chelator (Gd-DTPA) group 24 h after injection in Balb/c mice (p > 0.05). Importantly, there are significant differences in the expression levels of CD206 and CD25 as well as the secretion of IL-4 and the generation of ROS 24 h after injection (p < 0.05). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that few nanoprobes were localized in the phagosomes of liver and lung. In conclusion, the toxic effects of our nanoprobes may mainly result from the aggregation of particles in phagosomes. This accumulation may damage the microstructure of the cells and generate oxidative stress reactions that further stimulate the immune response. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the in vivo immunotoxicity of these rare earth-based biomaterials at the molecular level before molecular imaging in vivo. PMID:25105724

  14. Subchronic toxicity and immunotoxicity of MeO-PEG-poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-PEG-OMe triblock copolymer nanoparticles delivered intravenously into rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Longfei; Zhang, Mengtian; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xuanmiao; Xie, Zhaolu; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2014-06-01

    Although monomethoxy(polyethyleneglycol)-poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-monomethoxy (PELGE) nanoparticles have been widely studied as a drug delivery system, little is known about their toxicity in vivo. Here we examined the subchronic toxicity and immunotoxicity of different doses of PELGE nanoparticles with diameters of 50 and 200 nm (PELGE50 and PELGE200) in rats. Neither size of PELGE nanoparticles showed obvious subchronic toxic effects during 28 d of continuous intravenous administration based on clinical observation, body weight, hematology parameters and histopathology analysis. PELGE200 nanoparticles showed no overt signs of immunotoxicity based on organ coefficients, histopathology analysis, immunoglobulin levels, blood lymphocyte subpopulations and splenocyte cytokines. Conversely, PELGE50 nanoparticles were associated with an increased organ coefficient and histopathological changes in the spleen, increased serum IgM and IgG levels, alterations in blood lymphocyte subpopulations and enhanced expression of spleen interferon-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that PELGE nanoparticles show low subchronic toxicity but substantial immunotoxicity, which depends strongly on particle size. These findings will be useful for safe application of PELGE nanoparticles in drug delivery systems.

  15. Role of Metabolism by Intestinal Bacteria in Arbutin-Induced Suppression of Lymphoproliferative Response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mi Jeong; Ha, Hyun Woo; Kim, Ghee Hwan; Lee, Sang Kyu; Ahn, Young Tae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2012-03-01

    Role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in arbutin-induced immunotoxicity was investigated in splenocyte cultures. Following an incubation of arbutin with 5 different intestinal bacteria for 24 hr, its aglycone hydroquinone could be produced and detected in the bacterial culture media with different amounts. Toxic effects of activated arbutin by intestinal bacteria on lymphoproliferative response were tested in splenocyte cultures from normal mice. Lipopolysaccharide and concanavalin A were used as mitogens for B- and T-cells, respectively. When bacteria cultured medium with arbutin was treated into the splenocytes for 3 days, the medium cultured with bacteria producing large amounts of hydroquinone induced suppression of lymphoproliferative responses, indicating that metabolic activation by intestinal bacteria might be required in arbutin-induced toxicity. The results indicated that the present testing system might be applied for determining the possible role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in certain chemical-induced immunotoxicity in animal cell cultures. PMID:24116295

  16. Interaction of aflatoxin B1 and fumonisin B1 in mice causes immunotoxicity and oxidative stress: Possible protective role using lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abbès, Samir; Ben Salah-Abbès, Jalila; Jebali, Rania; Younes, Ridha Ben; Oueslati, Ridha

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) are important foodborne mycotoxins implicated in human health and have immunocytotoxic effects. The aims of this study were to evaluate a new aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1)-binding/degrading micro-organism for biological detoxification, to examine its ability to degrade AFB1 and FB1 in liquid medium, and to evaluate its potential in vivo protective role against any combined effects from AFB1 and FB1 on host splenocyte caspase-3 activity (reflecting DNA damage/cell death) and mRNA levels of select inflammation-regulating cytokines. Balb/c mice were divided into groups (10/group) and treated daily for 2 weeks by oral gavage with AFB1 (80 µg/kg BW), FB1 (100 µg/kg), AFB1 + FB1, or lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus paracasei BEJ01, 2 × 10(9) CFU/L, ∼2 mg/kg) - alone or in combination with the AFB1 and/or FB1. After the exposures, spleens were collected for measures of caspase-3 activity, lipid peroxidation (LP), and glutathione (GSH) content, expression of anti-oxidation protective enzymes (GPx and SOD), and mRNA levels of inflammation-regulating cytokines (e.g. IL-10, IL-4, IFNγ, TNFα). Thymii were also removed for analysis of apoptosis. The results indicated that, in the spleen, exposure to the mycotoxins led to increased caspase-3 activity, LP, and IL-10 and IL-4 mRNA levels, but decreased GSH content and down-regulated expression of GPx and SOD, and of IFNγ and TNFα mRNA. Co-treatment using Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) with AFB1 or FB1 suppressed levels of DNA fragmentation, normalized splenic LP and increased GSH levels, up-regulated expression of GPx and SOD, and normalized mRNA levels of the analyzed cytokines. It is concluded that AFB1 and FB1 might have combinational (synergistic moreso than additive) toxic effects in situ. Further, it can be seen that use of LAB induced protective effects against the oxidative stress and (immuno)toxicity of these agents in part through adhesion (and so likely diminished

  17. Immunotoxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in a complex environmental mixture from the Love Canal.

    PubMed

    Silkworth, J B; Cutler, D S; Sack, G

    1989-02-01

    The organic phase of the leachate (OPL) from the Love Canal chemical dump site contains more than 100 organic compounds including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The immunotoxic potential of OPL was determined in two mouse strains which differ in their sensitivity to aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor-mediated toxicity. OPL was administered in corn oil in a single oral gavage to male BALB/cByJ (Ahb/Ahb) mice (0.5, 0.8, or 1.1 g/kg) and DBA/2J (Ahd/Ahd) mice (0.6, 0.9, or 1.3 g/kg). TCDD was similarly administered at 0.25, 1.0, 4.0, or 16.0 micrograms/kg. Two days later all mice were immunized with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). The antibody response (PFC) and organ weights were evaluated 4 days later. OPL produced thymic atrophy and hepatomegaly in both strains at all dose levels. The PFC/spleen in BALB/cByJ mice was significantly reduced at the three doses to 34, 13, and 15%, respectively, of the control response. Serum anti-SRBC antibody levels and relative spleen weights were also reduced. The only immune effect in the DBA/2J mice was a decrease of the PFC/spleen to 58% of the control at the highest dose. TCDD decreased the relative thymus and spleen weights only in BALB/cByJ mice. However, TCDD produced hepatomegaly, a decrease in serum antibody, and a decrease in PFC/spleen in both BALB/cByJ and DBA/2J mice to 3 and 15%, respectively, at 16 micrograms/kg. Thus, the TCDD dose required to cause a 50% suppression (ED50) of PFC/spleen for the BALB/cByJ and DBA/2J strains was 1.84 and 3.89 micrograms/kg, respectively. The ED50 for OPL was 0.24 g/kg in BALB/cByJ mice. The TCDD concentration in the OPL was estimated to be 7.6 ppm, which agrees closely with the chemical analysis (3 ppm). The results suggest that the immunosuppression caused by OPL in BALB/cByJ mice was primarily due to TCDD, that the non-TCDD components of OPL diminished the TCDD immunotoxicity in the DBA/2J strain, and that the thymic atrophy and hepatomegaly were caused primarily by the non

  18. Composition and immunotoxicity activity of essential oils from leaves of Zingiber officinale Roscoe against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-In; Cho, Sang-Buem; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The leaves of Zingiber officinale Roscoe were extracted and the major essential oil composition and immunotoxicity effects were studied. The analyses were conducted by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) revealed that the essential oils of Z. officinale leaves. The Z. officinale essential oil yield was 0.26%, and GC/MS analysis revealed that its major constituents were Camphene (5.26%), Phellandrene (6.58%), Zingiberene (36.48%), Geranial (4.32%), β-gurjunene (2.74%), and Citronellol β-sesguiphellandrene (12.31%). The essential oil had a significant toxic effect against early fourth-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L with an LC(50) value of 46.38 ppm and an LC(90) value of 84.32 ppm. Also, Camphene (≥95.0%), Phellandrene (≥95.0%), Zingiberene (≥95.0%), Geranial (≥95.0%), β-gurjunene (≥97.0%), and Citronellol (≥95.0%) were tested against the F21 laboratory strain of A. aegypti. Zingiberene (≥95.0%) and Citronellol (≥95.0%) have medium activity with an LC(50) value of 99.55 ppm and 141.45 ppm. This indicates that other major compounds may play a more important role in the toxicity of essential oil. PMID:20568951

  19. Immunotoxic potential of aeration lagoon effluents for the treatment of domestic and hospital wastewaters in the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanata.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Francois; André, Chantale; Fortier, Marlène; Fournier, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Municipal wastewaters are major sources of pollution for the aquatic biota. The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of some pharmaceutical products and the immunotoxic potential of a municipal wastewater aeration lagoon for the treatment of the domestic wastewaters of a small town with wastewater inputs from a 400-bed hospital complex. Endemic mussels were collected, caged and placed in the final aeration lagoon and at sites 1 km upstream and 1 km downstream of the effluent outfall in the receiving river for a period of 14 days. The results showed that the final aeration lagoon contained high levels of total coliforms, conductivity and low dissolved oxygen (2.9 mg/L) as well as detectable amounts of trimethoprim, carbamazepine, gemfibrozil, and norfloxacin at concentrations exceeding 50 ng/L. The lagoon effluent was indeed toxic to the mussel specimens, as evidenced by the appearance of mortality after 14 days (10% mortality), decreased mussel weight-to-shell-length ratio and loss of hemocyte viability. The number of adhering hemocytes, phagocytic activity, total nitrite levels and arachidonic cyclooxygenase activity were significantly higher in mussels placed in the final aeration lagoon. A multivariate analysis also revealed that water pH, conductivity, total coliforms and dissolved oxygen were the endpoints most closely linked with phagocytic activity, the amount of adhering hemocytes and loss of hemocyte viability. In conclusion, exposure of mussels to treated aerated lagoon wastewater is deleterious to freshwater mussels where the immune system is compromised. PMID:22893952

  20. Short-term exposure of rodents to diesel exhausts: usefulness for studies of genotoxic and immunotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, A; Trønnes, T; Westerholm, R; Rannug, U; Nilsen, O G; Helleberg, H; Kautiainen, A; Hedenskog, M; Törnqvist, M

    1999-03-01

    An exposure facility was tested with regard to the information obtainable from short-term animal experiments for the assessment of health hazards from automotive engine exhausts. Indicators of immunotoxicity and genotoxicity were studied in guinea pigs and mice, respectively, exposed for 2 weeks, 8 h/day, to ten times diluted exhausts from a one-cylinder research diesel engine running at constant load. Regulated and non-regulated pollutants were determined. Besides increased number of lavageable cells in the airways, exposed guinea pigs exhibited, after immunization and challenge to ovalbumin, reduced leukotrienes B4 and C4 in lavage fluid and reduced anti-ovalbumin IgG in serum. Absence of increased CYP1A activity indicated that the exposure was below the threshold for induction of these enzymes. Instead a certain reduction of this activity indicated interaction with active enzyme sites. In vivo doses of some reactive metabolites of low molecular mass were measured by adducts to hemoglobin. Doses from aliphatic epoxides were low, in accordance with low hydrocarbon levels in the exhaust. The levels of hemoglobin adducts from aldehydes showed no clearcut influences of exposure. Genetic effects determined by DNA fingerprint analysis were indicated. It is concluded that repeated dose inhalation exposure of small numbers of animals is a useful mode of exposure for studying parameters that may elucidate toxic effects of air pollutants emitted from automotive engines, with a possibility to evaluate engine and fuel with regard to health hazards. PMID:10227576

  1. IMMUNOTOXICITY AND BIODISTRIBUTION ANALYSIS OF ARSENIC TRIOXIDE IN C57Bl/6 MICE FOLLOWING A TWO-WEEK INHALATION EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Burchiel, Scott W.; Mitchell, Leah A.; Lauer, Fredine T.; Sun, Xi; McDonald, Jacob D.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2010-01-01

    In these studies the immunotoxicity of arsenic trioxide (ATO, As2O3) was evaluated in mice following 14 days of inhalation exposures (nose only, 3 hrs per day) at concentrations of 50 μg/m3 and 1 mg/m3. A biodistribution analysis performed immediately after inhalation exposures revealed highest levels of arsenic in the kidneys, bladder, liver, and lung. Spleen cell levels were comparable to those found in the blood, with the highest concentration of arsenic detected in the spleen being 150 μg/mg tissue following the 1 mg/m3 exposures. No spleen cell cytotoxicity was observed at either of the two exposure levels. There were no changes in spleen cell surface marker expression for B cells, T cells, macrophages, and natural killer (NK) cells. There were also no changes detected in the B cell (LPS-stimulated) and T cell (Con A-stimulated) proliferative responses of spleen cells, and no changes were found in the NK-mediated lysis of Yac-1 target cells. The primary T-dependent antibody response was, however, found to be highly susceptible to ATO suppression. Both the 50 μg/m3 and 1 mg/m3 exposures produced greater than 70% suppression of the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells. Thus, the primary finding of this study is that the T-dependent humoral immune response is extremely sensitive to suppression by ATO and assessment of humoral immune responses should be considered in evaluating the health effects of arsenic containing agents. PMID:19800901

  2. Immunotoxicity of skin acid secretion produced by the sea slug Berthellina citrina in mice spleen: Histological and Immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Awaad, Aziz; Moustafa, Alaa Y

    2016-07-01

    Acid secretion containing sulfuric and hydrochloric acids is a fascinating defensive phenomenon within many groups of marine organisms. This study aimed to investigate the mice spleen histology and immunotoxicity using skin acid secretion (SAS) of the sea slug Berthellina citrina after oral administration. The spleen showed atrophy in the white pulp, decrease in the splenocytes density, megakaryocytes cytoplasmic degeneration as well as inflammatory cells infiltrations. The white and red pulp splenocytes number decreased time-dependently in the treated spleens. Additionally, the size of the megakaryocytes increased as compared with the control. The administration with SAS increased the number of the IgA(+) cells aggregation in the splenic red pulp. Furthermore, after 7days of the administration, large number of dispersed IgA(+) cells were distributed in splenic parenchyma. The IgA(+) cells numbers increased time-dependently as compared with those in the control. The aggregation sizes and number of the F4/80(+) cell in the splenic red pulp were increased. Furthermore the F4/80(+) cells numbers increased time-dependently as compared with those in the control. The UEAI(+) cells were found as free cells but not in aggregations in the control splenic red pulp. Contradictory to the number of IgA(+) cells and F4/80(+) cells the number of the UEAI(+) cells decreased time-dependently after administration with SAS. Hematologically, abnormal numbers of WBCs different cells were observed after administration with SAS. This study provides new insight about the toxicity of a marine extract may be used in natural products industry or medical applications. PMID:27378377

  3. Immunotoxicity and biodistribution analysis of arsenic trioxide in C57Bl/6 mice following a 2-week inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Burchiel, Scott W.; Mitchell, Leah A.; Lauer, Fredine T.; Sun Xi; McDonald, Jacob D.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu Kejian

    2009-12-15

    In these studies the immunotoxicity of arsenic trioxide (ATO, As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was evaluated in mice following 14 days of inhalation exposures (nose only, 3 h per day) at concentrations of 50 mug/m{sup 3} and 1 mg/m{sup 3}. A biodistribution analysis performed immediately after inhalation exposures revealed highest levels of arsenic in the kidneys, bladder, liver, and lung. Spleen cell levels were comparable to those found in the blood, with the highest concentration of arsenic detected in the spleen being 150 mug/g tissue following the 1 mg/m{sup 3} exposures. No spleen cell cytotoxicity was observed at either of the two exposure levels. There were no changes in spleen cell surface marker expression for B cells, T cells, macrophages, and natural killer (NK) cells. There were also no changes detected in the B cell (LPS-stimulated) and T cell (Con A-stimulated) proliferative responses of spleen cells, and no changes were found in the NK-mediated lysis of Yac-1 target cells. The primary T-dependent antibody response was, however, found to be highly susceptible to ATO suppression. Both the 50 mug/m{sup 3} and 1 mg/m{sup 3} exposures produced greater than 70% suppression of the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells. Thus, the primary finding of this study is that the T-dependent humoral immune response is extremely sensitive to suppression by ATO and assessment of humoral immune responses should be considered in evaluating the health effects of arsenic containing agents.

  4. IMMUNOTOXICOGENOMICS: THE POTENTIAL OF GENOMICS TECHNOLOGY IN THE IMMUNOTOXICITY RISK ASSESSMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of xenobiotic-induced changes in gene expression as a method to identify and classify potential toxicants is being pursued by industry and regulatory agencies worldwide. A workshop was held at the Research Triangle Park campus of the Environmental Protection Agency to...

  5. In vitro hematological and in vivo immunotoxicity assessment of dextran stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Easo, Sheeja Liza; Mohanan, P V

    2015-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have attracted enormous interest as potential therapeutic agents. The purpose of this study was to examine the in vitro hematological toxicity and in vivo immune response toward previously synthesized and characterized dextran stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles (DIONPs) developed for hyperthermia application. Peripheral whole blood from human volunteers was used to investigate hemolysis, platelet aggregation, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine mRNA expression induced by DIONPs in vitro. In the concentration range of 0.008-1 mg/ml, DIONPs did not induce relevant levels of hemolysis or platelet aggregation. Assessment of lymphocyte function showed significant suppression of the proliferation activity of T-lymphocytes in cultures stimulated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA). In addition, inhibition of PHA-induced cytokine mRNA expressions was also seen. However, systemic administration of DIONPs resulted in enhanced proliferation of mitogen-stimulated spleen derived lymphocytes and secretion of IL-1β at day 7 post exposure. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that immune response is influenced variably by nanoparticles and its degradation milieu. Further investigation of the observed immunosuppressive effects of DIONPs in immune stimulated animal models is required to assess the functional impact of such a response. PMID:26183082

  6. Immunotoxicity of the colour additive caramel colour III; a review on complicated issues in the safety evaluation of a food additive.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; Penninks, A H

    1994-08-12

    Food additives can be regarded as the safest constituents of our daily food. Nevertheless, complicated issues with respect to their safety evaluation do also occur. In this review paper, some of these issues are illustrated by the description and evaluation of the research on the immunotoxicity of the food additive Caramel Colour III. Caramel Colour III is commonly used as a color additive in many products for human consumption. Toxicity studies conducted in the seventies demonstrated that administration of Caramel Colour III can cause a reduction in total white blood cell counts in rats, due to reduced lymphocyte counts. Studies reviewed in this paper demonstrated several other effects of Caramel Colour III on the immune system of rodents, including disturbed immune functions and changed resistance in infection models. In addition, studies in rats demonstrated that most of the effects occur only when the animals are fed a diet low in vitamin B6. The imidazole derivative 2-acetyl-4(5)-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxy-butyl)-imidazole (THI) was found to be responsible for the immunotoxicity. Issues such as the mechanism of action of THI and the role of vitamin B6 are discussed. Finally, the results of a human intervention study and the observed effect levels of THI in rats are discussed in terms of safety of the use of Caramel Colour III in our daily food supply. PMID:8079366

  7. Immunotoxicity activity of 2,6,10,15-tetrame-heptadecane from the essential oils of Clerodendron trichotomum Thunb. against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Moon, Hyung-In

    2010-12-01

    The leaf parts of Clerodendron trichotomum were extracted and the major essential oils composition and immunotoxicity effects were studied. The analyses were conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) revealed that the essential oils of C. trichotomum (CTEO). The CTEO yield was 0.071%, and GC/MS analysis revealed that its major constituents were Hexanal (3.31%), 5-Me-3-heptanone (1.71%), 2,6,6-trime-cyclohexanone (2.23%), 2,6,10,15-tetrame-heptadecane (24.21%) and Linalool (31.2%). The essential oil had a significant toxic effect against early fourth-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L with an LC(50) value of 32.78 ppm and an LC(90) value of 93.72 ppm. 2,6,10,15-tetrame-heptadecane was the most toxic among the two major components (2,6,10,15-tetrame-heptadecane and Linalool), with an LC(50) value near 43.9 ppm. The results could be useful in search for newer, safer, and more effective natural immunotoxicity agents against A. aegypti. PMID:20233126

  8. Surface Charges and Shell Crosslinks Each Play Significant Roles in Mediating Degradation, Biofouling, Cytotoxicity and Immunotoxicity for Polyphosphoester-based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Zhang, Shiyi; Zhang, Fuwu; Deng, Zhou J.; Lim, Young H.; Wang, Hai; Parsamian, Perouza; Hammond, Paula T.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    The construction of nanostructures from biodegradable precursors and shell/core crosslinking have been pursued as strategies to solve the problems of toxicity and limited stability, respectively. Polyphosphoester (PPE)-based micelles and crosslinked nanoparticles with non-ionic, anionic, cationic, and zwitterionic surface characteristics for potential packaging and delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents, were constructed using a quick and efficient synthetic strategy, and importantly, demonstrated remarkable differences in terms of cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and biofouling properties, as a function of their surface characteristics and also with dependence on crosslinking throughout the shell layers. For instance, crosslinking of zwitterionic micelles significantly reduced the immunotoxicity, as evidenced from the absence of secretions of any of the 23 measured cytokines from RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages treated with the nanoparticles. The micelles and their crosslinked analogs demonstrated lower cytotoxicity than several commercially-available vehicles, and their degradation products were not cytotoxic to cells at the range of the tested concentrations. PPE-nanoparticles are expected to have broad implications in clinical nanomedicine as alternative vehicles to those involved in several of the currently available medications. PMID:24264796

  9. Surface Charges and Shell Crosslinks Each Play Significant Roles in Mediating Degradation, Biofouling, Cytotoxicity and Immunotoxicity for Polyphosphoester-based Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Zhang, Shiyi; Zhang, Fuwu; Deng, Zhou J.; Lim, Young H.; Wang, Hai; Parsamian, Perouza; Hammond, Paula T.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-11-01

    The construction of nanostructures from biodegradable precursors and shell/core crosslinking have been pursued as strategies to solve the problems of toxicity and limited stability, respectively. Polyphosphoester (PPE)-based micelles and crosslinked nanoparticles with non-ionic, anionic, cationic, and zwitterionic surface characteristics for potential packaging and delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents, were constructed using a quick and efficient synthetic strategy, and importantly, demonstrated remarkable differences in terms of cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and biofouling properties, as a function of their surface characteristics and also with dependence on crosslinking throughout the shell layers. For instance, crosslinking of zwitterionic micelles significantly reduced the immunotoxicity, as evidenced from the absence of secretions of any of the 23 measured cytokines from RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages treated with the nanoparticles. The micelles and their crosslinked analogs demonstrated lower cytotoxicity than several commercially-available vehicles, and their degradation products were not cytotoxic to cells at the range of the tested concentrations. PPE-nanoparticles are expected to have broad implications in clinical nanomedicine as alternative vehicles to those involved in several of the currently available medications.

  10. Fate of silver nanoparticles in wastewater and immunotoxic effects on rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, A; Turcotte, P; Pilote, M; Gagné, F; Gagnon, C

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are currently used in technology, medicine and consumer products, even though the fate and the ecotoxicological risks on aquatic organisms of these new materials are not well known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the fate, bioavailability of AgNPs and their effects on fish in presence of municipal effluents. Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed for 96h to 40μg/L of AgNPs or 4μg/L of dissolved silver (AgNO3) in diluted (10%) municipal wastewater. Silver (Ag) concentrations were measured both on water samples and fish tissues (liver and gills). Toxicity was investigated by following immunological parameters in the pronephros (viability, phagocytosis) and biomarkers in liver and gills (cyclooxygenase activity, lipid peroxidation, glutathione-S-transferase, metallothioneins, DNA strand breaks and labile zinc). Results indicated that AgNPs appeared as small non-charged aggregates in wastewaters (11.7±1.4nm). In gills, the exposure to AgNPs induced morphological modifications without visible nanoparticle bioaccumulation. Dissolved Ag(+) was bioavailable in diluted effluent and induced oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation), labile zinc and a marginal decrease in superoxide dismutase in fish gills. Ag(+) also increased significantly metallothionein levels and inhibited the DNA repair activity in the liver. Finally, the two silver forms were found in liver and induced immunosuppression and inflammation (increase in cyclooxygenase activity). This study demonstrated that both forms of Ag produced harmful effects and AgNPs in wastewater were bioavailable to fish despite of their formation of aggregates. PMID:26921728

  11. Atrazine induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of T lymphocytes via the caspase-8-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Jang, Youngsaeng; Kang, Kwonyoon; Song, Da-Hyun; Kim, Rihyun; Chang, Hee-Won; Lee, Dong Eil; Song, Claire Ka-Eun; Choi, Bongkun; Kang, Min-Ji; Chang, Eun-Ju

    2016-08-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is one of the most commonly applied broad-spectrum herbicides. Although ATR is well known to be a biologically hazardous molecule with potential toxicity in the immune system, the molecular mechanisms responsible for ATR-induced immunotoxicity remain unclear. In this study, we found that the immunotoxic properties of ATR were mediated through the induction of apoptotic changes in T lymphocytes. Mice exposed to ATR for 4 weeks exhibited a significant decrease in the number of spleen CD3(+) T lymphocytes, while CD19(+) B lymphocytes and nonlymphoid cells were unaffected. ATR exposure also led to inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis in human Jurkat T-cells. Importantly, ATR triggered the activation of caspase-3 and the cleavage of caspase-8 and PARP, whereas it did not affect the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria in Jurkat T-cells. In addition, ATR activated the unfolded protein response signaling pathway, as indicated by eIF2α phosphorylation and CHOP induction. Our results demonstrate that ATR elicited an immunotoxic effect by inducing ER stress-induced apoptosis in T-cells, therefore providing evidence for the molecular mechanism by which ATR induces dysregulation of the immune system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 998-1008, 2016. PMID:25640594

  12. Immunotoxicity in ascidians: antifouling compounds alternative to organotins-IV. The case of zinc pyrithione.

    PubMed

    Cima, Francesca; Ballarin, Loriano

    2015-03-01

    New biocides such as the organometallic compound zinc pyrithione (ZnP) have been massively introduced by many countries in formulations of antifouling paints following the ban on tributyltin (TBT). The effects of sublethal concentrations (LC50=82.5 μM, i.e., 26.2 mg/l) on cultured haemocytes of the ascidian Botryllus schlosseri have been investigated and compared with TBT. The percentage of haemocytes with amoeboid morphology and containing phagocytised yeast cells were significantly (p<0.05) reduced after exposure to 0.1 (31.7 μg/l) and 0.5 μM (158 μg/l), respectively. An antagonistic interaction in inducing cytoskeletal alterations was observed when ZnP and TBT were co-present in the exposure medium. ZnP affected only the actin component. As caused by TBT, ZnP induced apoptosis and inhibited both oxidative phosphorylation and lysosomal activities. In contrast to the case of TBT, a decrement in Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and a decrease in cytosolic Ca(2+) were detected after incubation at the highest concentration (1 μM, i.e., 317.7 μg/l) used. In comparison with other antifouling compounds, ZnP shows as much toxicity as TBT to cultured haemocytes at extremely low concentrations interfering with fundamental cell activities. PMID:25576186

  13. Immunotoxic effects on freshwater mussels of a primary-treated wastewater before and after ozonation: a pilot plant study.

    PubMed

    Gagné, F; André, C; Cejka, P; Hausler, R; Fournier, M; Blaise, C

    2008-03-01

    The immunotoxic potential of a primary-treated municipal effluent following enhanced disinfection by ozonation was studied in the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanata. Mussels were exposed to increasing concentrations (0%, 1%, 3%, 10%, and 20% v/v) of the effluent before and after ozone treatment (approximately 10 mg/L of purged O(3)) in a continuous flow-through laboratory for 7 weeks. Immunocompetence was appraised by measuring phagocytosis, cell viability (fluorescein retention), cell adherence to polystyrene micro-wells, cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and total nitrite levels in peripheral hemocytes from the hemolymphs. The results showed that phagocytosis was significantly inhibited by the primary-treated effluent at a threshold concentration of 1.7% v/v. Cell viability was also significantly reduced three-fold compared to controls at the same effluent threshold concentration, but hemocyte adherence was unchanged. COX activity was increased 1.3-fold at a threshold concentration of 14% v/v. Total nitrite levels were significantly increased 2.2-fold at a threshold concentration of 5.5% v/v. Ozone treatment of the effluent was not successful in removing phagocytic inhibition, but did completely remove cytotoxicity from hemocytes. Ozonation also reduced cell adherence at a threshold concentration of 1.7% v/v. The inflammatory properties of the effluent appeared to be accentuated by the ozone, as evidenced by an increase in COX activity, which reached 2.6-fold activity compared to controls, as compared to the 1.3-fold increase witnessed in the primary-treated effluent. Furthermore, total nitrite levels reached a two-fold induction at a threshold concentration of 1.7% v/v in the ozone-enhanced effluent compared to 5.5% v/v in the primary-treated effluent. In conclusion, ozonation of a primary-treated effluent successfully reduced microbial loading and completely removed cytotoxicity, but increased the inflammatory properties of the effluent. Investigations aimed at

  14. Immunotoxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in a complex environmental mixture from the Love Canal

    SciTech Connect

    Silkworth, J.B.; Cutler, D.S.; Sack, G.

    1989-02-01

    The organic phase of the leachate (OPL) from the Love Canal chemical dump site contains more than 100 organic compounds including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The immunotoxic potential of OPL was determined in two mouse strains which differ in their sensitivity to aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor-mediated toxicity. OPL was administered in corn oil in a single oral gavage to male BALB/cByJ (Ahb/Ahb) mice (0.5, 0.8, or 1.1 g/kg) and DBA/2J (Ahd/Ahd) mice (0.6, 0.9, or 1.3 g/kg). TCDD was similarly administered at 0.25, 1.0, 4.0, or 16.0 micrograms/kg. Two days later all mice were immunized with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). The antibody response (PFC) and organ weights were evaluated 4 days later. OPL produced thymic atrophy and hepatomegaly in both strains at all dose levels. The PFC/spleen in BALB/cByJ mice was significantly reduced at the three doses to 34, 13, and 15%, respectively, of the control response. Serum anti-SRBC antibody levels and relative spleen weights were also reduced. The only immune effect in the DBA/2J mice was a decrease of the PFC/spleen to 58% of the control at the highest dose. TCDD decreased the relative thymus and spleen weights only in BALB/cByJ mice. However, TCDD produced hepatomegaly, a decrease in serum antibody, and a decrease in PFC/spleen in both BALB/cByJ and DBA/2J mice to 3 and 15%, respectively, at 16 micrograms/kg. Thus, the TCDD dose required to cause a 50% suppression (ED50) of PFC/spleen for the BALB/cByJ and DBA/2J strains was 1.84 and 3.89 micrograms/kg, respectively. The ED50 for OPL was 0.24 g/kg in BALB/cByJ mice. The TCDD concentration in the OPL was estimated to be 7.6 ppm, which agrees closely with the chemical analysis (3 ppm).

  15. Functionalized porous silica&maghemite core-shell nanoparticles for applications in medicine: design, synthesis, and immunotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zasońska, Beata A.; Líšková, Aurélia; Kuricová, Miroslava; Tulinská, Jana; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Čiampor, Fedor; Vávra, Ivo; Dušinská, Mária; Ilavská, Silvia; Horváthová, Mira; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine cytotoxicity and effect of silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on immune response, in particular lymphocyte proliferative activity, phagocytic activity, and leukocyte respiratory burst and in vitro production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and 8 (IL-8), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Methods Maghemite was prepared by coprecipitation of iron salts with ammonia, oxidation with NaOCl and modified by tetramethyl orthosilicate and aminosilanes. Particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cytotoxicity and lymphocyte proliferative activity were assessed using [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA of proliferating human peripheral blood cells. Phagocytic activity and leukocyte respiratory burst were measured by flow cytometry; cytokine levels in cell supernatants were determined by ELISA. Results γ-Fe2O3&SiO2-NH2 MNPs were 13 nm in size. According to TEM, they were localized in the cell cytoplasm and extracellular space. Neither cytotoxic effect nor significant differences in T-lymphocyte and T-dependent B-cell proliferative response were found at particle concentrations 0.12-75 μg/cm2 after 24, 48, and 72 h incubation. Significantly increased production of IL-6 and 8, and GM-CSF cytokines was observed in the cells treated with 3, 15, and 75 µg of particles/cm2 for 48 h and stimulated with pokeweed mitogen (PHA). No significant changes in TNF-α and IFN-γ production were observed. MNPs did not affect phagocytic activity of monocytes and granulocytes when added to cells for 24 and 48 h. Phagocytic respiratory burst was significantly enhanced in the cultures exposed to 75 µg MNPs/cm2 for 48 h. Conclusions The cytotoxicity and in vitro immunotoxicity were found to be minimal in the newly developed porous core-shell γ-Fe2

  16. Evaluation of nanoparticle immunotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskaia, Marina A.; Germolec, Dori R.; Weaver, James L.

    2009-07-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is developing increasing numbers of drugs and diagnostics based on nanoparticles, and evaluating the immune response to these diverse formulations has become a challenge for scientists and regulatory agencies alike. An international panel of scientists and representatives from various agencies and companies reviewed the imitations of current tests at a workshop held at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Maryland. This article outlines practical strategies for identifying and controlling interferences in common evaluation methods and the implications for regulation.

  17. ANIMAL MODELS FOR IMMUNOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greater susceptibility to infection is a hallmark of compromised immune function in humans and animals, and is often considered the benchmark against which the predictive value of immune function tests are compared. This focus of this paper is resistance to infection with the pa...

  18. IMMUNOTOXICITY OF AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most common ubiquitous air pollutants, as well as some point source (e.g. metals) air pollutants, decrease the function of pulmonary host defense mechanisms against infection. Most of this knowledge is based on animal studies and involves cellular antibacterial defenses such ...

  19. European medicinal and edible plants associated with subacute and chronic toxicity part II: Plants with hepato-, neuro-, nephro- and immunotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Kristanc, Luka; Kreft, Samo

    2016-06-01

    A tremendous surge of public interest in natural therapies has been reported in the past several decades in both developing and developed countries. Furthermore, edible wild-growing plants whose use had long been associated with poverty and famine have also gained in popularity among people in developed countries. An important fraction of herbal products evade all control measures and are generally perceived as safe. However, this may not always be true. It is important to recognize that some plants are not associated with acute toxicity but rather produce more insidious problems, which develop only with long-term exposure. In this review, we continue a systematic analysis of the subacute and chronic toxicity associated with the use of herbal preparations. The hepato-, neuro-, nephro- and immunotoxicity of plant species that either grow natively or are cultivated in Europe are discussed in some detail. The basic concepts regarding the molecular mechanisms implicated in their nonacute toxicity and their pathophysiological, clinical and epidemiological characteristics are included. Among others, we discuss the hepatotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, the nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid, the lathyrism associated with neurotoxin swainsonine, thiamine depletion and thyroid dysfunction of herbal cause, and finally address also the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids. PMID:27012588

  20. Composition and immunotoxicity activity of major essential oils from stems of Allium victorialis L. var. platyphyllum Makino against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Song, Hong-Keun; Yeo, Min-A; Moon, Hyung-In

    2011-09-01

    The stems of Allium victorialis L. var. platyphyllum were extracted and the major essential oil composition and immunotoxicity effects were studied. The analyses were conducted by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), which revealed the essential oils of A. victorialis L. var. platyphyllum stems. The A. victorialis L. var. platyphyllum essential oil yield was 1.45%, and GC/MS analysis revealed that its major constituents were allyl methyl disulfide (24.36%), dimethyl trisulfide (11.78%), allyl cis-1-propenyl disulfide (9.17%), allyl methyl trisulfide (4.13%), and dipropyl trisulfide (7.22%). The essential oil had a significant toxic effect against early fourth-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti L. with an LC(50) value of 24.12 ppm and an LC(90) value of 34.67 ppm. Also, allyl methyl disulfide (≥95.0%), dimethyl trisulfide (≥95.0%), allyl cis-1-propenyl disulfide (≥95.0%), allyl methyl trisulfide (≥95.0%), and dipropyl trisulfide (≥95.0%) were tested against the F(21) laboratory strain of A. aegypti. Allyl cis-1-propenyl disulfide (≥95.0%) has good activity with an LC(50) value of 15.35 ppm. Also, the above data indicate that other major compounds may play a more important role in the toxicity of essential oils. PMID:21162628

  1. Facts about Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program in Brief Related Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New ... be removed. Â Top of Page Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New ...

  2. Novel biomarkers of mercury-induced autoimmune dysfunction: a cross-sectional study in Amazonian Brazil.

    PubMed

    Motts, Jonathan A; Shirley, Devon L; Silbergeld, Ellen K; Nyland, Jennifer F

    2014-07-01

    Mercury is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, causing both neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity. Given its ability to amalgamate gold, mercury is frequently used in small-scale artisanal gold mining. We have previously reported that elevated serum titers of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) are associated with mercury exposures of miners in gold mining. The goal of this project was to identify novel serum biomarkers of mercury-induced immunotoxicity and autoimmune dysregulation. We conducted an analysis of serum samples from a cross-sectional epidemiological study on miners working in Amazonian Brazil. In proteomic screening analyses, samples were stratified based on mercury concentrations and ANA titer and a subset of serum samples (N=12) were profiled using Immune Response Biomarker Profiling ProtoArray protein microarray for elevated autoantibodies. Of the up-regulated autoantibodies in the mercury-exposed cohort, potential target autoantibodies were selected based on relevance to pro-inflammatory and macrophage activation pathways. ELISAs were developed to test the entire sample cohort (N=371) for serum titers to the highest of these autoantibodies (anti-glutathione S-transferase alpha, GSTA1) identified in the high mercury/high ANA group. We found positive associations between elevated mercury exposure and up-regulated serum titers of 3760 autoantibodies as identified by ProtoArray. Autoantibodies identified as potential novel biomarkers of mercury-induced immunotoxicity include antibodies to the following proteins: GSTA1, tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 13, linker for activation of T cells, signal peptide peptidase like 2B, stimulated by retinoic acid 13, and interferon induced transmembrane protein. ELISA analyses confirmed that mercury-exposed gold miners had significantly higher serum titers of anti-GSTA1 autoantibody [unadjusted odds ratio=89.6; 95% confidence interval: 27.2, 294.6] compared to emerald miners (referent population). Mercury

  3. Novel biomarkers of mercury-induced autoimmune dysfunction: a Cross-sectional study in Amazonian Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Motts, Jonathan A.; Shirley, Devon L.; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Nyland, Jennifer F.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is an ubiquitous environmental contaminant, causing both neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity. Given its ability to amalgamate gold, mercury is frequently used in small-scale artisanal gold mining. We have previously reported that elevated serum titers of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) are associated with mercury exposures of miners in gold mining. The goal of this project was to identify novel serum biomarkers of mercury-induced immunotoxicity and autoimmune dysregulation. We conducted an analysis of serum samples from a cross-sectional epidemiological study on miners working in Amazonian Brazil. In proteomic screening analyses, samples were stratified based on mercury concentrations and ANA titer and a subset of serum samples (N=12) were profiled using Immune Response Biomarker Profiling ProtoArray protein microarray for elevated autoantibodies. Of the up-regulated autoantibodies in the mercury-exposed cohort, potential target autoantibodies were selected based on relevance to pro-inflammatory and macrophage activation pathways. ELISAs were developed to test the entire sample cohort (N=371) for serum titers to the highest of these autoantibodies (anti-glutathione S-transferase alpha, GSTA1) identified in the high mercury/high ANA group. We found positive associations between elevated mercury exposure and up-regulated serum titers of 3760 autoantibodies as identified by ProtoArray. Autoantibodies identified as potential novel biomarkers of mercury-induced immunotoxicity include antibodies to the following proteins: GSTA1, tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 13, linker for activation of T cells, signal peptide peptidase like 2B, stimulated by retinoic acid 13, and interferon induced transmembrane protein. ELISA analyses confirmed that mercury-exposed gold miners had significantly higher serum titers of anti-GSTA1 autoantibody [unadjusted odds ratio = 89.6; 95% confidence interval: 27.2, 294.6] compared to emerald miners (referent population

  4. Meta-analysis of data from human ex vivo placental perfusion studies on genotoxic and immunotoxic agents within the integrated European project NewGeneris.

    PubMed

    Mose, T; Mathiesen, L; Karttunen, V; Nielsen, J K S; Sieppi, E; Kummu, M; Mørck, T A; Myöhänen, K; Partanen, H; Vähäkangas, K; Knudsen, L E; Myllynen, P

    2012-05-01

    In the E.U. integrated project NewGeneris, we studied placental transport of thirteen immunotoxic and genotoxic agents in three ex vivo placental perfusion laboratories. In the present publication, all placental perfusion data have been re-analyzed and normalized to make them directly comparable and rankable. Antipyrine transfer data differed significantly between the studies and laboratories, and therefore normalization of data was necessary. An antipyrine normalization factor was introduced making the variance significantly smaller within and between the studies using the same compound but performed in different laboratories. Non-normalized (regular) and normalized data showed a good correlation. The compounds were ranked according to their transplacental transfer rate using either antipyrine normalized AUC120 or transfer index (TI120(%)). Normalization generated a division of compounds in slow, medium and high transfer rate groups. The transfer rate differed slightly depending on the parameter used. However, compounds with passage similar to antipyrine which goes through the placenta by passive diffusion, and good recovery in media (no accumulation in the tissue or adherence to equipment) were highly ranked no matter which parameter was used. Antipyrine normalization resulted in the following ranking order of compounds according to AUC(120NORM) values: NDMA ≥ EtOH ≥ BPA ≥ IQ ≥AA ≥ GA ≥ PCB180 ≥ PhIP ≥ AFB1 > DON ≥ BP ≥ PCB52 ≥ TCDD. As the variance in all parameters within a study decreased after antipyrine normalization, we conclude that this normalization approach at least partially corrects the bias caused by the small methodological differences between studies. PMID:22374511

  5. Immunotoxic effects of cis-urocanic acid exposure in C57BL/6N and C3H/HeN mice.

    PubMed

    Prater, M Renee; Gogal, Robert M; De Fabo, Edward C; Longstreth, Janice; Holladay, Steven D

    2003-04-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation results in increased levels of intradermal cis-urocanic acid (cUCA) and alters cutaneous immunity by interfering with processing and presentation of antigen by Langerhans cells. Reports on effects of systemic immunotoxicity with 30 day cUCA exposure in laboratory rodents include thymic atrophy, thymic hypocellularity and decreased T-cell-mediated immunity; however, immune effects of single exposure or 5 day cUCA administration, which may better mimic human exposures, are poorly defined. The present study initially evaluated immune effects of single, 5 day, and 4 week cUCA exposure in C57BL/6N mice. Single administration of intradermal cUCA resulted in decreased splenocyte phagocytosis that persisted for 30 days after cUCA exposure. Five day consecutive cUCA exposure decreased numbers of phenotypically mature CD4(+)CD8(-) and CD4(-)CD8(+) (single positive) thymocytes, increased CD4(+)CD8(+) (double positive) immature thymocytes and increased splenocyte proliferation. Prolonged cUCA exposure (4 weeks) caused profound thymic hypocellularity and splenic hypercellularity and increased splenic macrophage chemiluminescence. Because of this apparent sensitivity of C57BL/6N mice to cUCA, thymic hypocellularity was compared between C57BL/6N and C3H/HeN mice dosed with cUCA, and was found to be more pronounced in the C57BL/6N strain. These results are an extension of previous conclusions on immune modulation caused by cUCA in the spleen and thymus. Further, the observed variation in sensitivity between the mouse strains is consistent with known genetic susceptibility of these strains to the immunomodulatory effects of exposure to sunlight. PMID:12733650

  6. Patterns of Immunotoxicity Associated with Chronic as Compared with Acute Exposure to Chemical or Physical Stressors and their Relevance with Regard to the Role of Stress and with Regard to Immunotoxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Pruett, Stephen B.; Fan, Ruping; Zheng, Qiang; Schwab, Carlton

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the stress response induced by some drugs and chemicals contributes in a predictable way to alteration of particular immunological parameters in mice. It has not been determined if mice can become tolerant or habituated with regard to the stress response and consequent immunological effects. Addressing this issue was the purpose of the present study. Mice were dosed daily for 28 days with atrazine, ethanol, propanil, or subjected to restraint, which are known to induce neuroendocrine stress responses and thereby to alter several immunological parameters. On day 29, a blood sample was taken and the spleen was removed for analysis of cellular phenotypes, differential cell counts (for blood), and natural killer (NK) cell activity. Corticosterone concentration at various times after dosing (or restraint) was also measured. Comparison of these results with results from previous studies with a single acute exposure revealed that the corticosterone response was almost completely absent in mice treated with ethanol, reduced in mice treated with restraint and propanil, and for atrazine the response was the same as noted for acute exposure. In most cases, the changes in immunological parameters were consistent with expectations based on these corticosterone responses. However, in a few cases (e.g., NK cell activity), it was clear that there were effects not mediated by stress. These results indicate that the nature of the stressor determines whether mice become tolerant with regard to the stress response and consequent immunological effects. This finding has practical implications for safety testing in mice. PMID:19357072

  7. In vitro immunotoxic and genotoxic activities of particles emitted from two different small-scale wood combustion appliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapanainen, Maija; Jalava, Pasi I.; Mäki-Paakkanen, Jorma; Hakulinen, Pasi; Happo, Mikko S.; Lamberg, Heikki; Ruusunen, Jarno; Tissari, Jarkko; Nuutinen, Kati; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Hillamo, Risto; Salonen, Raimo O.; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2011-12-01

    Residential wood combustion appliances emit large quantities of fine particles which are suspected to cause a substantial health burden worldwide. Wood combustion particles contain several potential health-damaging metals and carbon compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which may determine the toxic properties of the emitted particles. The aim of the present study was to characterize in vitro immunotoxicological and chemical properties of PM 1 ( Dp ≤ 1 μm) emitted from a pellet boiler and a conventional masonry heater. Mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed for 24 h to different doses of the emission particles. Cytotoxicity, production of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α and the chemokine MIP-2, apoptosis and phases of the cell cycle as well as genotoxic activity were measured after the exposure. The type of wood combustion appliance had a significant effect on emissions and chemical composition of the particles. All the studied PM 1 samples induced cytotoxic, genotoxic and inflammatory responses in a dose-dependent manner. The particles emitted from the conventional masonry heater were 3-fold more potent inducers of programmed cell death and DNA damage than those emitted from the pellet boiler. Furthermore, the particulate samples that induced extensive DNA damage contained also large amounts of PAH compounds. Instead, significant differences between the studied appliances were not detected in measurements of inflammatory mediators, although the chemical composition of the combustion particles differed considerably from each other. In conclusion, the present results show that appliances representing different combustion technology have remarkable effects on physicochemical and associated toxicological and properties of wood combustion particles. The present data indicate that the particles emitted from incomplete combustion are toxicologically more potent than those emitted from more complete combustion processes.

  8. GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics approach to study the cellular immunotoxicity of deoxynivalenol on murine macrophage ANA-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Sun, Jiadi; Pi, Fuwei; Zhang, Shuang; Sun, Chao; Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Yinzhi; Sun, Xiulan

    2016-08-25

    Gas chromatography-time of fly/mass spectrum (GC-TOF/MS) based complete murine macrophage ANA-1 cell metabolome strategy, including the endo-metabolome and the exo-metabolome, ANA-1 cell viability assays and apoptosis induced by diverse concentrations of DON were evaluated for selection of an optimized dose for in-depth metabolomic research. Using the optimized chromatography and mass spectrometry parameters, the metabolites detected by GC-TOF/MS were identified and processed with multivariate statistical analysis, including principal componentanalysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) analysis. The data sets were screened with a t-test (P) value < 0.05, VIP value > 1, similarity value > 500, leaving 16 exo-metabolite variables and 11 endo-metabolite variables for further pathway analysis. Implementing the integration of key metabolic pathways, the metabolism pathways were categorized into two dominating types, metabolism of amino acid and glycometabolism. Glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan biosynthesis and phenylalanine metabolism were the significant amino acids affected by the metabolic pathways, indicating statistically significant fold changes including pyruvate, serine, glycine, lactate and threonine. Glycolysis or gluconeogenesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and galactose metabolism, belonging to glycometabolism, were the pathways that were found to be primarily affected, resulting in abnormal metabolites such as glucose-1P, Glucose, gluconic acid, myo-inositol, sorbitol and glycerol. PMID:27350164

  9. Ability of Lactobacillus plantarum MON03 to mitigate aflatoxins (B1 and M1) immunotoxicities in mice.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Rania; Abbès, Samir; Salah-Abbès, Jalila Ben; Younes, Ridha Ben; Haous, Zohra; Oueslati, Ridha

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and M1 (AFM1) are mycotoxins produced by numerous Aspergillus species in pre- or post-harvest cereals and milk. AFB1 and AFM1 display a potent economic loss in livestock and also cause severe immunological problems. The aims of this study were to: evaluate a new AFB1 and AFM1-binding/degrading micro-organism for biological detoxification; examine its ability to degrade AFB1 and AFM1 in liquid medium; and evaluate its potential for in vivo preventative effects against AFB1- and AFM1-induced immunomodulation in mice. Lactobacillus plantarum MON03 (LP) isolated from Tunisian artisanal butter was found to display significant binding ability to AFB1 and AFM1 in PBS (i.e. 82% and 89%, respectively) within 24 h of incubation and able to tolerate gastric acidity, have strongly hydrophilic cells surface properties, and adhere efficacy to Caco-3 cells in vitro. The in vivo study was conducted using Balb/c mice that received by oral gavage vehicle (control), LP only (2 × 10(9) CFU/L, ~2 g/kg BW), AFB1 or AFM1 alone (0.25 and 0.27 mg/kg, respectively), or AFB1 + LP or AFM1 + LP daily for 15 days. Compared to in control mice, treatments with AFB1 and AFM1 led to significantly decreased body weight gains, histopathological changes, and decrements in all hematologic and immune parameters assessed. Co-treatment with LP strongly reduced the adverse effects of each mycotoxin. In fact, the mice receiving AFB1 + LP or AFM1 + LP co-treatment displayed no significant differences in the assayed parameters as compared to the control mice. By itself, the bacteria alone had no adverse effects in the mice. From these data, it is concluded that the tested bacteria could be beneficial in biotechnology detoxification of contaminated food and feed for humans and animals. PMID:25441623

  10. Melatonin Reverses Fas, E2F-1 and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediated Apoptosis and Dysregulation of Autophagy Induced by the Herbicide Atrazine in Murine Splenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shweta; Sarkar, Jayanta; Haldar, Chandana; Sinha, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to the herbicide Atrazine (ATR) can cause immunotoxicity, apart from other adverse consequences for animal and human health. We aimed at elucidating the apoptotic mechanisms involved in immunotoxicity of ATR and their attenuation by Melatonin (MEL). Young Swiss mice were divided into control, ATR and MEL+ATR groups based on daily (x14) intraperitoneal administration of the vehicle (normal saline), ATR (100 mg/kg body weight) and MEL (20 mg/kg body weight) with ATR. Isolated splenocytes were processed for detection of apoptosis by Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL assays, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress by immunostaining. Key proteins involved in apoptosis, ER stress and autophagy were quantified by immunoblotting. ATR treatment resulted in Fas-mediated activation of caspases 8 and 3 and inactivation of PARP1 which were inhibited significantly by co-treatment with MEL. MEL also attenuated the ATR-induced, p53 independent mitochondrial apoptosis through upregulation of E2F-1 and PUMA and suppression of their downstream target Bax. An excessive ER stress triggered by ATR through overexpression of ATF-6α, spliced XBP-1, CREB-2 and GADD153 signals was reversed by MEL. MEL also reversed the ATR-induced impairment of autophagy which was indicated by a decline in BECN-1, along with significant enhancement in LC3B-II and p62 expressions. Induction of mitochondrial apoptosis, ER stress and autophagy dysregulation provide a new insight into the mechanism of ATR immunotoxicity. The cytoprotective role of MEL, on the other hand, was defined by attenuation of ER stress, Fas-mediated and p53 independent mitochondria-mediated apoptosis as well as autophagy signals. PMID:25259610

  11. Tissue oxidative stress induced by patulin and protective effect of crocin.

    PubMed

    Boussabbeh, Manel; Ben Salem, Intidhar; Belguesmi, Faicel; Bacha, Hassen; Abid-Essefi, Salwa

    2016-03-01

    Patulin (PAT) is a secondary toxic metabolite produced principally by Penicillium expansum. This mycotoxin is known to be teratogenic, mutagenic, immunotoxic and neurotoxic, and it has been shown to cause damage in several organs in laboratory animals. This study focuses on the prevention of experimental murine PAT-induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. We investigate the ability of a natural product, crocin (CRO), to counteract the toxic effects of PAT. Pre-treatment of mice with CRO prevented PAT-induced oxidative damage in both liver and kidney. CRO reduced lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and restored redox status by regulating the endogenous antioxidant enzymatic system. These data corroborate and extend findings in PAT-induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, and further suggest that preventive effect of CRO towards other forms of PAT toxicity, including neurotoxicity, may be warranted. PMID:26584762

  12. DEVELOPMENTAL IMMUNOTOXICITY AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To compile literature information for web-based dissemination. The report will be on our current understanding of the science of development of the immune system, to provide examples of perturbations that can be brought about by environmental agents and that could produce effects...

  13. PARTNERSHIPS TO IMPROVE IMMUNOTOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research in ITB is focused on the effects that chemicals/environmental contaminants have on modulation of the immune system. Immune modulation may result in suppressed immune function, while exposure to certain contaminants may result in hypersensitivity reactions (e.g., asthma ...

  14. Workshop report. Children as a special subpopulation: focus on immunotoxicity. Federal Institute for Health Protection of Consumers and Veterinary Medicine (BgVV), 15-16 November 2001, Berlin, Germany.

    PubMed

    Richter-Reichhelm, H B; Althoff, J; Schulte, A; Ewe, S; Gundert-Remy, U

    2002-07-01

    relevant aspects into existing test guidelines for testing developmental immunotoxicity. In this context, it is recommended that animals culled otherwise in one- and two-generation studies be examined for developmental immunotoxicity according to the valid methods and parameters discussed. The majority of participants agreed that a safety factor of 10 is too low in risk assessment and management to protect a sensitive subpopulation of children against man-made environmental pollutants. PMID:12222155

  15. Comparative immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide and cyclophosphamide: Evaluation of L1210 tumor cell resistance, cell-mediated immunity, and humoral immunity. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.A.; Joiner, R.L.; Houchens, D.P.; Dill, G.S.; Hobson, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    The immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM),on humoral and cell-mediated immunity was compared with that of the nitrogen mustard 2-(bis(2-chloroethyl) amino)tetrahydro- 2H-1,3,2-oxazophosphorine 2-oxide (cyclophosphamide, CP). SM and CP had similar effects on thymic and splenic weights, spleen cell number, and the formation of antibody producing cells to sheep red blood cells (sRBC) when examined 5 days after exposure, but differed in their effects on body weights. Although there were no differences in the delayed hypersensitivity response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, CP and SM had different effects in the L1210 tumor cell allograft rejection assay. CP, but not SM, decreased the 28 day survival rate of allogeneic mice exposed to a sublethal L1210 tumor challenge. The differing effects on survival to the L1210 tumor challenge could not be attributed to a direct cytotoxic effect of SM on the L1210 tumor cells as SM did not increase the survival rate or mediansurvival time of syngeneic mice exposed to a lethal L1210 tumor cell challenge. In summary, SM and CP had immunosuppressive effects in the humoral immune assay. Although neither compound suppressed the delayed hypersensitivity response, CP was found to suppress host resistance to L1210 tumor cells.

  16. Tributyltin induces mitochondrial fission through Mfn1 degradation in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shigeru; Asanagi, Miki; Hirata, Naoya; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2016-08-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are well-known endocrine disruptors. TBT is also known to cause various forms of cytotoxicity, including neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity. However, TBT toxicity has not been identified in normal stem cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of TBT on cell growth in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We found that exposure to nanomolar concentrations of TBT decreased intracellular ATP levels and inhibited cell viability in iPSCs. Because TBT suppressed energy production, which is a critical function of the mitochondria, we further assessed the effects of TBT on mitochondrial dynamics. Staining with MitoTracker revealed that nanomolar concentrations of TBT induced mitochondrial fragmentation. TBT also reduced the expression of mitochondrial fusion protein mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), and this effect was abolished by knockdown of the E3 ubiquitin ligase membrane-associated RING-CH 5 (MARCH5), suggesting that nanomolar concentrations of TBT could induce mitochondrial dysfunction via MARCH5-mediated Mfn1 degradation in iPSCs. Thus, mitochondrial function in normal stem cells could be used to assess cytotoxicity associated with metal exposure. PMID:27133438

  17. Immunotoxicity of nanoparticles: a computational study suggests that CNTs and C60 fullerenes might be recognized as pathogens by Toll-like receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turabekova, M.; Rasulev, B.; Theodore, M.; Jackman, J.; Leszczynska, D.; Leszczynski, J.

    2014-03-01

    Over the last decade, a great deal of attention has been devoted to study the inflammatory response upon exposure to multi/single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and different fullerene derivatives. In particular, carbon nanoparticles are reported to provoke substantial inflammation in alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells, epidermal keratinocytes, cultured monocyte-macrophage cells, etc. We suggest a hypothetical model providing the potential mechanistic explanation for immune and inflammatory responses observed upon exposure to carbon nanoparticles. Specifically, we performed a theoretical study to analyze CNT and C60 fullerene interactions with the available X-ray structures of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) homo- and hetero-dimer extracellular domains. This assumption was based on the fact that similar to the known TLR ligands both CNTs and fullerenes induce, in cells, the secretion of certain inflammatory protein mediators, such as interleukins and chemokines. These proteins are observed within inflammation downstream processes resulted from the ligand molecule dependent inhibition or activation of TLR-induced signal transduction. Our computational studies have shown that the internal hydrophobic pockets of some TLRs might be capable of binding small-sized carbon nanostructures (5,5 armchair SWCNTs containing 11 carbon atom layers and C60 fullerene). High binding scores and minor structural alterations induced in TLR ectodomains upon binding C60 and CNTs further supported our hypothesis. Additionally, the proposed hypothesis is strengthened by the indirect experimental findings indicating that CNTs and fullerenes induce an excessive expression of specific cytokines and chemokines (i.e. IL-8 and MCP1).Over the last decade, a great deal of attention has been devoted to study the inflammatory response upon exposure to multi/single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and different fullerene derivatives. In particular, carbon nanoparticles are reported to provoke

  18. Immunotoxic effects of exposure of rats to xenobiotics via maternal lactation. Part I 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    PubMed Central

    Badesha, J. S.; Maliji, G.; Flaks, B.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of lactating female Leeds rats to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) resulted in a reduction in the body, spleen and liver weights of their male offspring at 130 days of age. None of the total administered doses (0.2, 1.0 or 5.0 micrograms/kg b.wt over 18 days) induced thymic atrophy in the offspring of either sex as adults. Most of the growth inhibition occurred during the suckling period and the effect was near maximal following maternal exposure to the lowest dose of TCDD. After this dose, at post-natal day 130 the body weights of the female offspring remained depressed, while those of the males had recovered to untreated control values. Maternal exposure to TCDD affected the immunocompetence of the adult offspring: in vitro T cell dependent and T cell independent responses and mitogen induced in vitro production of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) were suppressed at post-natal day 130. The total dose of TCDD that has to be administered to dams over an 18-day nursing period in order to reduce the humoral responses of their offspring as adults by 50% of the maximum was estimated to be in the range 0.3-1.0 micrograms/kg b.wt to the antigens SRBC, DNP-Ficoll or TNP-LPS and 3.5-3.9 micrograms/kg b.wt. to the antigen LPS. PMID:8652363

  19. EVALUATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY FOR CONTROL OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological contaminants in buildings are known to act as sources of indoor air pollution, discomfort, asthma and pulmonary disease to building occupants, Sick buildings are evidence of extremely problematic indoor air quality (lAO) often resulting from unacceptable concentration...

  20. In Vitro Nephrotoxicity Induced by Propanil

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Gary O.; Racine, Christopher; Sweeney, Adam; Kraynie, Alyssa; Anestis, Dianne K.; Barnett, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Propanil is a postemergence herbicide used primarily in rice and wheat production in the United States. The reported toxicities for propanil exposure include methemoglobinemia, immunotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity. A major metabolite of propanil, 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA), has been shown to be a nephrotoxicant in vivo and in vitro, but the nephrotoxic potential of propanil has not been examined in detail. The purpose of this study was to determine the nephrotoxic potential of propanil using an in vitro kidney model, determine whether in vitro propanil nephrotoxicity is due to metabolites arising from propanil hydrolysis, and examine mechanistic aspects of propanil nephrotoxicity in vitro. Propanil, 3,4-DCA, propionic acid (0.1–5.0 mM), or vehicle was incubated for 15–120 min with isolated renal cortical cells (IRCC; ~4 million cells/mL) obtained from untreated male Fischer 344 rats. Cytotoxicity was determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase release from IRCC. In 120-min incubations, propanil induced cytotoxicity at concentrations >0.5 mM. At 1.0 mM, propanil induced cytotoxicity following 60- or 120-min exposure. Cytotoxicity was observed with 3,4-DCA (2.0 mM) at 60 and 120 min, while propionic acid (5.0 mM) induced cytotoxicity at 60 min. In IRCC pretreated with an antioxidant, cytochrome P450(CYP) inhibitor, flavin adenine dinucleotide monooxygenase activity modulator, or cyclooxygenase inhibitor before propanil exposure (1.0 mM; 120 min), only piperonyl butoxide (0.1 mM), a CYP inhibitor, pretreatment decreased propanil cytotoxicity. These results demonstrate that propanil is an in vitro nephrotoxicant in IRCC. Propanil nephrotoxicity is not primarily due to metabolites resulting from hydrolysis of propanil, but a metabolite resulting from propanil oxidation may contribute to propanil cytotoxicity. PMID:18214888

  1. External gamma irradiation-induced effects in early-life stages of zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, B; Cavalié, I; Pereira, S; Floriani, M; Dubourg, N; Camilleri, V; Adam-Guillermin, C

    2015-12-01

    In the general context of validation of tools useful for the characterization of ecological risk linked to ionizing radiation, the effects of an external gamma irradiation were studied in zebrafish larvae irradiated for 96 h with two dose rates: 0.8 mGy/d, which is close to the level recommended to protect ecosystems from adverse effects of ionizing radiation (0.24 mGy/d) and a higher dose rate of 570 mGy/d. Several endpoints were investigated, such as mortality, hatching, and some parameters of embryo-larval development, immunotoxicity, apoptosis, genotoxicity, neurotoxicity and histological alterations. Results showed that an exposure to gamma rays induced an acceleration of hatching for both doses and a decrease of yolk bag diameter for the highest dose, which could indicate an increase of global metabolism. AChE activity decreased with the low dose rate of gamma irradiation and alterations were also shown in muscles of irradiated larvae. These results suggest that gamma irradiation can induce damages on larval neurotransmission, which could have repercussions on locomotion. DNA damages, basal ROS production and apoptosis were also induced by irradiation, while ROS stimulation index and EROD biotransformation activity were decreased and gene expression of acetylcholinesterase, choline acetyltransferase, cytochrome p450 and myeloperoxidase increased. These results showed that ionizing radiation induced an oxidative stress conducting to DNA damages. This study characterized further the modes of action of ionizing radiation in fish. PMID:26517177

  2. Immune System Toxicity and Immunotoxicity Hazard Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to chemicals may alter immune system health, increasing the risk of infections, allergy and autoimmune diseases. The chapter provides a concise overview of the immune system, host factors that affect immune system heal, and the effects that xenobiotic exposure may have ...

  3. Perfluorinated Compounds: Emerging POPs with Potential Immunotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been recognized as an important class of environmental contaminants commonly detected in blood samples of both wildlife and humans. These compounds have been in use for more than 60 years as surface treatment chemicals, polymerization aids, an...

  4. Selected new developments in asbestos immunotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, G J; Corsini, E; Simeonova, P

    1998-01-01

    Research over the past three decades has shown that the mammalian immune system can be altered by the occupational exposure of asbestos. Early clinical studies generally focused on systemic observations of immune alteration such as the number and function of peripheral lymphocytes and monocytes. More recently as the regulatory influence of local immunity in health and disease becomes more defined, immunologic changes occurring in the lung, the primary target organ of asbestos, have been significant areas of investigation. This review will focus on recent studies that examine the influence of asbestos on pulmonary immunity as well as the role of host immune competence in asbestos-related disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9539011

  5. 40 CFR 799.9780 - TSCA immunotoxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 799.9346. The exposure time for the anti-SRBC test shall be at least 28 days. (6) Observation... levels. (3) Test report. In addition to the reporting requirements as specified under 40 CFR part 792... study shall be conducted in compliance with the 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice. (j)...

  6. 40 CFR 799.9780 - TSCA immunotoxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 799.9346. The exposure time for the anti-SRBC test shall be at least 28 days. (6) Observation... levels. (3) Test report. In addition to the reporting requirements as specified under 40 CFR part 792... study shall be conducted in compliance with the 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice. (j)...

  7. 40 CFR 799.9780 - TSCA immunotoxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 799.9346. The exposure time for the anti-SRBC test shall be at least 28 days. (6) Observation... levels. (3) Test report. In addition to the reporting requirements as specified under 40 CFR part 792... study shall be conducted in compliance with the 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice. (j)...

  8. 40 CFR 799.9780 - TSCA immunotoxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 799.9346. The exposure time for the anti-SRBC test shall be at least 28 days. (6) Observation... levels. (3) Test report. In addition to the reporting requirements as specified under 40 CFR part 792... study shall be conducted in compliance with the 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice. (j)...

  9. 40 CFR 799.9780 - TSCA immunotoxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 799.9346. The exposure time for the anti-SRBC test shall be at least 28 days. (6) Observation... levels. (3) Test report. In addition to the reporting requirements as specified under 40 CFR part 792... study shall be conducted in compliance with the 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice. (j)...

  10. Induction of Heat Shock Proteins and Antioxidant Enzymes in 2,3,7,8-TCDD-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Sook; Park, So-Young; Yoo, Ki-Yeol

    2012-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) is an environmental toxicant with a polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbon structure and is one of the most toxic man-made chemicals. Exposure to 2,3,7,8-TCDD induces reproductive toxicity, immunotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity. In this study, we evaluated how 2,3,7,8-TCDD-induced hepatotoxicity affect the expression of heat shock proteins and antioxidant enzymes using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in rat. 2,3,7,8-TCDD increased heat shock protein (Hsp27, α-B-crystallin, Mortalin, Hsp105, and Hsp90s) and antioxidant enzymes (SOD-3, GST and catalase) expression after a 1 day exposure in livers of rats, whereas heat shock protein (α-B-crystallin, Hsp90, and GRP78) and antioxidant enzymes (SOD-1, SOD-3, catalase, GST, and GPXs) expression decreased on day 2 and then slowly recovered back to control levels on day 8. These results suggest that heat shock proteins and antioxidant enzymes were induced as protective mechanisms against 2,3,7,8-TCDD induced hepatotoxicity, and that prolonged exposure depressed their levels, which recovered to control levels due to reduced 2,3,7,8-TCDD induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:23269910

  11. ZnO nanoparticles induced inflammatory response and genotoxicity in human blood cells: A mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Violet Aileen; Kumar, Ashutosh; Gupta, Govind Sharan; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-11-01

    The wide application of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in cosmetics, paints, biosensors, drug delivery, food packaging and as anticancerous agents has increased the risk of human exposure to these NPs. Earlier in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated a cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of ZnO NPs. However, there is paucity of data regarding their immunomodulatory effects. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the immunotoxic potential of ZnO NPs using human monocytic cell line (THP-1) as model to understand the underlying molecular mechanism. A significant (p < 0.01) increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed with a concomitant concentration dependent (0.5, 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 μg/mL) decrease in the glutathione (GSH) levels as compared to control. The expression levels of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade proteins such as p-ERK1/2, p-p38 and p-JNK were also significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.01) induced. Also, at the concentration tested, NPs induced DNA damage as assessed by the Comet and micronucleus assays. Our data demonstrated that ZnO NPs induce oxidative and nitrosative stress in human monocytes, leading to increased inflammatory response via activation of redox sensitive NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathways. PMID:26146191

  12. Surface marker-defined head kidney granulocytes and B lymphocytes of rainbow trout express benzo[a]pyrene-inducible cytochrome P4501A protein.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Ayako; Riesen, Ivan; Köllner, Bernd; Eppler, Elisabeth; Segner, Helmut

    2008-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) are immunotoxic to fish. Metabolism of PAHs in immune cells has been implicated in PAH immunotoxicity in mammals, but for fish the presence of metabolic enzymes in immune cells is less clear. The objective of this study was to examine localization and induction of the BaP-metabolizing biotransformation enzyme, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A), in head kidney immune cells of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first step, we measured induction of CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity and CYP1A protein in head kidney of rainbow trout treated with a single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 25 mg BaP/kg body weight. From days 3 to 10 postinjection, the BaP treatment led to a significant elevation of EROD and CYP1A protein in head kidney and liver, with CYP1A expression levels in the head kidney being much lower than in the liver. Next, we examined the cellular localization of CYP1A protein in the head kidney cell types: vascular endothelial, endocrine and lymphoid cells. CYP1A immunoreactivity was detectable only in BaP-treated trout, where it was localized in endothelial and lymphoid cells. Finally, we aimed to clarify which of the hematopoietic cell types possess CYP1A protein. Using double immunostaining for CYP1A and surface markers of rainbow trout immune cells, we identified B lymphocytes and granulocytes expressing inducible CYP1A protein and being the likely sites of BaP metabolism in the head kidney. PMID:18281257

  13. DNA damage and S phase arrest induced by Ochratoxin A in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; He, Xiaoyun; Li, Xiaohong; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Yang, Xuan; Wang, Yan; Li, Yingcong; Huang, Kunlun

    2014-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a ubiquitous mycotoxin with potential nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic and immunotoxic effects. The mechanisms underlying the nephrotoxicity of OTA remain obscure. To investigate DNA damage and the changes of the cell cycle distribution induced by OTA, human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293 cells) were incubated with various concentrations of OTA for 24h in vitro. The results indicated that OTA treatment led to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to a decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). OTA-induced DNA damage in HEK 293 cells was evidenced by DNA comet tails formation and increased expression of γ-H2AX. In addition, OTA could induce cell cycle arrest at the S phase in HEK 293 cells. The expression of key cell cycle regulatory factors that were critical to the S phase, including cyclin A2, cyclin E1, and CDK2, were further detected. The expression of cyclin A2, cyclin E1, and CDK2 were significantly decreased by OTA treatment at both the mRNA and protein levels. The apoptosis of HEK 293 cells after OTA treatment was observed using Hoechst 33342 staining. The results confirmed that OTA did induce apoptosis in HEK 293 cells. In conclusion, our results provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which OTA might promote nephrotoxicity. PMID:25847125

  14. The pentachlorophenol metabolite tetrachlorohydroquinone induces massive ROS and prolonged p-ERK expression in splenocytes, leading to inhibition of apoptosis and necrotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Min; Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Chen, Rong-Jane; Wang, Bour-Jr; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been used extensively as a biocide and a wood preservative and has been reported to be immunosuppressive in rodents and humans. Tetrachlorohydroquinone (TCHQ) is a major metabolite of PCP. TCHQ has been identified as the main cause of PCP-induced genotoxicity due to reactive oxidant stress (ROS). However, the precise mechanisms associated with the immunotoxic effects of PCP and TCHQ remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of PCP and TCHQ on the induction of ROS and injury to primary mouse splenocytes. Our results shown that TCHQ was more toxic than PCP and that a high dose of TCHQ led to necrotic cell death of the splenocytes through induction of massive and sudden ROS and prolonged ROS-triggered ERK activation. Inhibition of ROS production by N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) partially restored the mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited ERK activity, elevated caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage, and, eventually, switched the TCHQ-induced necrosis to apoptosis. We suggest that prolonged ERK activation is essential for TCHQ-induced necrosis, and that ROS play a pivotal role in the different TCHQ-induced cell death mechanisms. PMID:24586814

  15. Quantitative alterations in the liver and adrenal gland in pregnant rats induced by Pyralene 3000

    SciTech Connect

    Vreci, M.; Sek, S.; Lorger, J.; Bavdek, S.; Pogacnik, A.

    1995-06-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are among the most widespread environmental pollutants known in the world. The half-life of PCBs is very long and, therefore, once released into the environment, they accumulate in food chains and tissues of various mammals, including man. Their presence can cause numerous toxic effects, e.g., hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity, dermatotoxicity, neurotoxicity, and disorders of the reproductive system, among others. These effects depend on the distribution route in the organism, the rate of metabolism and excretion. Their characteristics are closely associated with the number and position of the chlorine atoms in the molecule. Previous studies of trichlorobiphenyl distributions in various tissues demonstrated that low chlorinated trichlorobiphenyls do no accumulate in endocrine organs, whereas higher chlorinated biphenyls, such as hexa- and octachlorobiphenyl, are deposited and retained in the adrenal gland. A selective distribution of radioabelled tetrachlorobiphenyl to the zona fasciculata, accompanied by morphometric evidence of the hypertrophy of the zona fasciculata, was also noted. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in the tissue structure of the pregnant rat liver and adrenal gland induced experimentally by Pyralene 3000 administration. We chose this commercial low chlorinated PCB because it was in use in Slovenia and, discharged from the electroindustrial plants, caused a serious incidence of environmental pollution in the region of Bela Krajina. Our further aim was to research the transplacental influences of Pyralene 3000 in rats. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Contaminant-induced immunosuppression and mass mortalities among harbor seals.

    PubMed

    Van Loveren, H; Ross, P S; Osterhaus, A D; Vos, J G

    2000-03-15

    Virus-associated mass mortalities among seals inhabiting northwestern Europe have generated an interest in immunotoxicology in this species. A morbillivirus has been isolated from victims, but a contribution of immunotoxic contaminants to the severity of the outbreaks could not be ruled out. Fish-eating seals occupy high trophic levels in the aquatic food chain, and accumulate high levels of contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Such chemicals have been found to be immunotoxic at low doses in studies of laboratory animals. We carried out an immunotoxicological study, in which captive harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) were fed herring from either relatively uncontaminated sites of the Atlantic Ocean, or from the highly contaminated Baltic Sea. In this report we summarize the contaminant-related immunosuppression observed in the captive group of seals fed herring from the Baltic Sea. In addition, we describe two parallel studies, in which laboratory rats are exposed as adults or perinatally to the contaminants in the Baltic Sea herring, exhibiting immunotoxicity. On the basis of these studies we conclude that complex mixtures of environmental contaminants including PCBs, PCDFs, and PCDDs may represent a real immunotoxic risk to free-ranging seals. PMID:10720747

  17. Permethrin-induced oxidative stress and toxicity and metabolism. A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Martínez, María-Aránzazu; Dai, Menghong; Chen, Dongmei; Ares, Irma; Romero, Alejandro; Castellano, Victor; Martínez, Marta; Rodríguez, José Luis; Martínez-Larrañaga, María-Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-08-01

    Permethrin (PER), the most frequently used synthetic Type I pyrethroid insecticide, is widely used in the world because of its high activity as an insecticide and its low mammalian toxicity. It was originally believed that PER exhibited low toxicity on untargeted animals. However, as its use became more extensive worldwide, increasing evidence suggested that PER might have a variety of toxic effects on animals and humans alike, such as neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, reproductive, genotoxic, and haematotoxic effects, digestive system toxicity, and cytotoxicity. A growing number of studies indicate that oxidative stress played critical roles in the various toxicities associated with PER. To date, almost no review has addressed the toxicity of PER correlated with oxidative stress. The focus of this article is primarily to summarise advances in the research associated with oxidative stress as a potential mechanism for PER-induced toxicity as well as its metabolism. This review summarises the research conducted over the past decade into the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress as a consequence of PER treatments, and ultimately their correlation with the toxicity and the metabolism of PER. The metabolism of PER involves various CYP450 enzymes, alcohol or aldehyde dehydrogenases for oxidation and the carboxylesterases for hydrolysis, through which oxidative stress might occur, and such metabolic factors are also reviewed. The protection of a variety of antioxidants against PER-induced toxicity is also discussed, in order to further understand the role of oxidative stress in PER-induced toxicity. This review will throw new light on the critical roles of oxidative stress in PER-induced toxicity, as well as on the blind spots that still exist in the understanding of PER metabolism, the cellular effects in terms of apoptosis and cell signaling pathways, and finally strategies to help to protect against its oxidative

  18. Induced Abortion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Induced Abortion Patient Education FAQs Induced Abortion Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Induced Abortion FAQ043, May 2015 PDF Format Induced ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  19. EGFR-mediated Akt and MAPKs signal pathways play a crucial role in patulin-induced cell proliferation in primary murine keratinocytes via modulation of Cyclin D1 and COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shamshad; Pal, Anu; Kumar, Rahul; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Das, Mukul; Ansari, Kausar M

    2014-12-01

    Patulin (PAT), a present day major contaminant of commercial apple and apple products is reported to be carcinogenic, embryotoxic, and immunotoxic. While oral and inhalation are considered to be the most prevalent routes of exposure to this toxin, exposure through skin is now being extensively investigated. Our previous study showed that short-term dermal exposure to PAT resulted in toxicological injury to the skin, while long-term exposure induced skin tumorigenesis. In this study, we explore the mechanism involve in proliferation of mouse keratinocytes by PAT. Our study revealed that PAT rapidly induces phosphorylation of EGFR, activation of the Ras/MAPKs, and Akt pathways. This in-turn leads to the activation of NF-κB/AP-1 transcription factors which then binds to the promoter region of the cell growth regulatory genes Cyclin D1 and COX-2 inducing their expression leading ultimately to PMKs proliferation. Inhibition of EGFR or the Ras/MAPKs, PI3/Akt pathways with different pharmacological inhibitors or knockdown of NF-κB, c-jun, c-fos, Cyclin D1, and COX-2 with siRNA inhibited PAT-induced PMKs proliferation. PMID:23813870

  20. Antioxidant compounds in the seaweed Gelidiella acerosa protects human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells against TCDD induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ilavarasi, K; Chermakani, P; Arif Nisha, S; Sheeja Malar, D; Pandima Devi, K

    2015-04-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a persistent environmental toxin formed as an unintentional by-product of incomplete combustion. Several therapeutic approaches have evolved to combat its toxicity since it elicits immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, carcinogenicity and lethality. Search for drugs from natural resources especially from seaweeds has become intense due to their enormous pharmacological potential. Hence, the present study aims at revealing the protective effect of methanolic extract of G. acerosa (MEGA) in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) against TCDD induced toxicity, by assessing the antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and cytoprotective activities. The results of antioxidant assays suggests that MEGA reverted TCDD induced toxicity by causing an alteration in the levels of antioxidant enzymes (Catalase [CAT], Superoxide dismutase [SOD], Glutathione peroxidase [GPx], Glutathione-S-transferase [GST]) and Glutathione [GSH]. The results of lipid peroxidation assay and protein carbonyl content reveal that MEGA protects PBMC from TCDD induced macromolecular damage. MEGA was found to exhibit significant (p < 0.05) anti-apoptotic activity as verified by evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential and AO-EtBr dual staining. In addition, PBMC co-treated with MEGA prevented TCDD induced oxidative DNA damage. Levels of phase-I detoxification enzymes determined by EROD assay and semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that TCDD up-regulates the expression of CYP1A1 and upon co-treatment with MEGA, the expression got slightly decreased suggesting its protective role. Preliminary phytochemical analysis demonstrates that the extract is rich in cardiac glycosides and terpenoids. LC-MS analysis revealed the presence of antioxidants including caffeic acid, phytol and mannoheptulose in MEGA, which could be attributed for the observed protective effect against TCDD induced toxicity. PMID:24844840

  1. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced cytokine production and cytotoxicity of PAMAM dendrimers in J774A.1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Naha, Pratap C.; Davoren, Maria; Lyng, Fiona M.; Byrne, Hugh J.

    2010-07-15

    The immunotoxicity of three generations of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (G-4, G-5 and G-6) was evaluated in mouse macrophage cells in vitro. Using the Alamar blue and MTT assays, a generation dependent cytotoxicity of the PAMAM dendrimers was found whereby G-6 > G-5 > G-4. The toxic response of the PAMAM dendrimers correlated well with the number of surface primary amino groups, with increasing number resulting in an increase in toxic response. An assessment of intracellular ROS generation by the PAMAM dendrimers was performed by measuring the increased fluorescence as a result of intracellular oxidation of Carboxy H{sub 2}DCFDA to DCF both quantitatively using plate reader and qualitatively by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The inflammatory mediators macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), tumour necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6, (IL-6) were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) following exposure of mouse macrophage cells to PAMAM dendrimers. A generation dependent ROS and cytokine production was found, which correlated well with the cytotoxicological response and therefore number of surface amino groups. A clear time sequence of increased ROS generation (maximum at {approx} 4 h), TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 secretion (maximum at {approx} 24 h), MIP-2 levels and cell death ({approx} 72 h) was observed. The intracellular ROS generation and cytokine production induced cytotoxicity point towards the mechanistic pathway of cell death upon exposure to PAMAM dendrimers.

  2. The protective effect of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate against haematological, biochemical and pathological changes induced by Zearalenone in mice.

    PubMed

    Abbès, Samir; Ouanes, Zouhour; ben Salah-Abbès, Jalila; Houas, Zohra; Oueslati, Ridha; Bacha, Hassen; Othman, Omar

    2006-04-01

    Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS), an anticaking agent for mixed feed, was added alone or simultaneously with a toxic Zearalenone (ZEN) dose to balb/c mice and was evaluated for its ability to restore damages induced by ZEN. The latter is a mycotoxin produced by fusarium genera; it is mainly known to induce several toxic effects such as hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and nephrotoxicity on animals and humans. The experimental approach consisted of eight treatments of six mice each by 400 mg/kg bw or 5 g/kg bw of HSCAS. Two experimental groups have received respectively ZEN alone at 40 (8% of LD50) and at 500 mg/kg bw (LD50). Two other groups have received ZEN at 40 or 500 mg/kg bw combined respectively with HSCAS at 400 mg/kg bw and 5 g/kg bw. The control groups received water or olive oil. Forty-eight hours after treatment, blood samples were collected for haematological and serum biochemical parameters measurements. ZEN treatment significantly increased hematocrit, haemoglobin, white blood cells: lymphocytes, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes and the most of biochemical serum parameters; it significantly reduced platelets and induced degenerative changes in the hepatic and renal tissues; while, the mixture of HSCAS with ZEN induced a reestablishment of haematological parameters, levels of serum biochemical enzyme activities and histological pictures of both liver and kidney. It also prevented general toxicity of ZEN. This was observed by the shift of LD50 for this toxin. Thus, our data strongly suggested that deleterious effects of ZEN could be overcome or, at least, significantly were diminished by HSCAS. Moreover, this sorbent by itself did not show any toxic effects. PMID:16563452

  3. Screening New Drugs for Immunotoxic Potential: II. Assessment of the Effects of Selective and Nonselective COX-2 Inhibitors on Complement Activation, Superoxide Anion Production and Leukocyte Chemotaxis and Migration Through Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Furst, Sylvia M; Khan, K Nasir; Komocsar, Wendy J; Fan, Lian; Mennear, John

    2005-04-01

    Results from earlier experiments in our laboratories revealed that both selective and nonselective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 possess little potential for decreasing in vitro phagocytosis by rat macrophages or canine neutrophils and no potential for decreasing in vivo phagocytosis by the intact murine immune system. We now report the results of studies to assess in vitro and ex vivo effects of the drugs on 1) canine complement activation, 2) generation of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide (oxidative burst) by canine neutrophils, and 3) leukocytic chemotaxis and transmigration through endothelial cell monolayers. In vitro concentrations of naproxen sodium, SC-236, SC-245, and SC-791 ranging from 0.1 to 10 muM were tested for their abilities to inhibit canine complement-mediated hemolysis of opsonized sheep erythrocytes and to block phorbol myristate acetate-induced oxidative burst in canine neutrophils. Both models responded to known inhibitory agents, leupeptin in the complement activation test and staurosporine in the superoxide anion assay. In contrast, tested nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs produced only trivial changes in complement activation and superoxide anion production. Experiments on plasma and neutrophils isolated from dogs administered an experimental selective COX-2 inhibitor during a 28-day toxicology study revealed no evidence of drug-associated changes in complement activation or formation of superoxide anion. SC-791 reduced chemotaxis of canine leukocytes toward zymosan-activated dog plasma, but not toward leukotriene B(4). None of the other drugs tested significantly affected leukocytic chemotaxis. Ibuprofen, SC-245 and SC-791 but not SC-236, reduced transmigration of canine leukocytes through endothelial cell monolayers. Based on the results of these experiments and our earlier studies we have concluded that, although high (suprapharmacologic) concentrations of the drugs may induce in vitro evidence of apparent immunomodulation of

  4. IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF 2-METHOXYETHANOL ADMINISTERED DERMALLY OR ORALLY TO FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of rats to 2-methoxyethanol by gavage for 10 consecutive days results in immunotoxicity. o determine whether dermal exposure to ME also induces immunotoxicity, undiluted ME was applied to Fisher 344 male rats at dose levels of 150, 300, 600, 900 or 1200 mg/kg/d on shaved...

  5. Carbon fullerenes (C60s) can induce inflammatory responses in the lung of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hero; Kim, Younghun; Yi, Jongheop; Choi, Kyunghee; Park, Kwangsik

    2010-04-15

    Fullerenes (C60s) occur in the environment due to natural and anthropogenic sources such as volcanic eruptions, forest fires, and the combustion of carbon-based materials. Recently, production and application of engineered C60s have also rapidly increased in diverse industrial fields and biomedicine due to C60' unique physico-chemical properties, so toxicity assessment on environmental and human health is being evaluated as a valuable work. However, data related to the toxicity of C60s have not been abundant up to now. In this study, we studied the immunotoxic mechanism and change of gene expression caused by the instillation of C60s. As a result, C60s induced an increase in sub G1 and G1 arrest in BAL cells, an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, TNF-alpha, and IL-6, and an increase of Th1 cytokines such as IL-12 and IFN-r in BAL fluid. In addition, IgE reached the maximum at 1 day after treatment in both BAL fluid and the blood, and decreased in a time-dependent manner. Gene expression of the MHC class II (H2-Eb1) molecule was stronger than that of the MHC class I (H2-T23), and an increase in T cell distribution was also observed during the experiment period. Furthermore, cell infiltration and expression of tissue damage related genes in lung tissue were constantly observed during the experiment period. Based on this, C60s may induce inflammatory responses in the lung of mice.

  6. Bifidobacterium longum CECT 7347 Modulates Immune Responses in a Gliadin-Induced Enteropathy Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Laparra, José Moisés; Olivares, Marta; Gallina, Onofrio; Sanz, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten proteins (gliadin) that involves innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we hypothesise that the administration of Bifidobacterium longum CECT 7347, previously selected for reducing gliadin immunotoxic effects in vitro, could exert protective effects in an animal model of gliadin-induced enteropathy. The effects of this bacterium were evaluated in newborn rats fed gliadin alone or sensitised with interferon (IFN)-γ and fed gliadin. Jejunal tissue sections were collected for histological, NFκB mRNA expression and cytokine production analyses. Leukocyte populations and T-cell subsets were analysed in peripheral blood samples. The possible translocation of the bacterium to different organs was determined by plate counting and the composition of the colonic microbiota was quantified by real-time PCR. Feeding gliadin alone reduced enterocyte height and peripheral CD4+ cells, but increased CD4+/Foxp3+ T and CD8+ cells, while the simultaneous administration of B. longum CECT 7347 exerted opposite effects. Animals sensitised with IFN-γ and fed gliadin showed high cellular infiltration, reduced villi width and enterocyte height. Sensitised animals also exhibited increased NFκB mRNA expression and TNF-α production in tissue sections. B. longum CECT 7347 administration increased NFκB expression and IL-10, but reduced TNF-α, production in the enteropathy model. In sensitised gliadin-fed animals, CD4+, CD4+/Foxp3+ and CD8+ T cells increased, whereas the administration of B. longum CECT 7347 reduced CD4+ and CD4+/Foxp3+ cell populations and increased CD8+ T cell populations. The bifidobacterial strain administered represented between 75–95% of the total bifidobacteria isolated from all treated groups, and translocation to organs was not detected. These findings indicate that B. longum attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines and the CD4+ T-cell mediated immune response in an animal model

  7. ROLE OF FAS-FAS LIGAND INTERACTIONS IN 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD)-INDUCED IMMUNOTOXICITY: INCREASED RESISTANCE OF THYMOCYTES FROM FAS-DEFICIENT (LPR) AND FAS LIGAND-DEFECTIVE (GLD) MICE TO TCDD-INDUCED TOXICITY. (R825760)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. Silymarin protects PBMC against B(a)P induced toxicity by replenishing redox status and modulating glutathione metabolizing enzymes-An in vitro study

    SciTech Connect

    Kiruthiga, P.V.; Pandian, S. Karutha; Devi, K. Pandima

    2010-09-01

    PAHs are a ubiquitous class of environmental contaminants that have a large number of hazardous consequences on human health. An important prototype of PAHs, B(a)P, is notable for being the first chemical carcinogen to be discovered and the one classified by EPA as a probable human carcinogen. It undergoes metabolic activation to QD, which generate ROS by redox cycling system in the body and oxidatively damage the macromolecules. Hence, a variety of antioxidants have been tested as possible protectors against B(a)P toxicity. Silymarin is one such compound, which has high human acceptance, used clinically and consumed as dietary supplement around the world for its strong anti-oxidant efficacy. Silymarin was employed as an alternative approach for treating B(a)P induced damage and oxidative stress in PBMC, with an emphasis to provide the molecular basis for the effect of silymarin against B(a)P induced toxicity. PBMC cells exposed to either benzopyrene (1 {mu}M) or silymarin (2.4 mg/ml) or both was monitored for toxicity by assessing LPO, PO, redox status (GSH/GSSG ratio), glutathione metabolizing enzymes GR and GPx and antioxidant enzymes CAT and SOD. This study also investigated the protective effect of silymarin against B(a)P induced biochemical alteration at the molecular level by FT-IR spectroscopy. Our findings were quite striking that silymarin possesses substantial protective effect against B(a)P induced oxidative stress and biochemical changes by restoring redox status, modulating glutathione metabolizing enzymes, hindering the formation of protein oxidation products, inhibiting LPO and further reducing ROS mediated damages by changing the level of antioxidant enzymes. The results suggest that silymarin exhibits multiple protections and it should be considered as a potential protective agent for environmental contaminant induced immunotoxicity.

  9. The role of the immune system in hexachlorobenzene-induced toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Michielsen, C C; van Loveren, H; Vos, J G

    1999-01-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a persistent environmental pollutant. The toxicity of HCB has been extensively studied after an accidental human poisoning in Turkey and more recently it has been shown that HCB has immunotoxic properties in laboratory animals and probably also in man. Oral exposure of rats to HCB showed stimulatory effects on spleen and lymph node weights and histology, increased serum IgM levels, and an enhancement of several parameters of immune function. Moreover, more recent studies indicate that HCB-induced effects in the rat may be related to autoimmunity. In Wistar rats exposed to HCB, IgM antibodies against several autoantigens were elevated; in the Lewis rat, HCB differently modulated two experimental models of autoimmune disease. Oral exposure of rats to HCB induces skin and lung pathology in the rat. Recently several studies have been conducted to investigate whether these skin and lung lesions can be related to HCB-induced immunomodulation, and these studies will be discussed in this review. HCB-induced skin and lung lesions probably have a different etiology; pronounced strain differences and correlation of skin lesions with immune parameters suggest a specific involvement of the immune system in HCB-induced skin lesions. The induction of lung lesions by HCB was thymus independent. Thymus-dependent T cells were not likely to be required for the induction of skin lesions, although T cells enhanced the rate of induction and the progression of the skin lesions. No deposition of autoantibodies was observed in nonlesional or lesional skin of HCB-treated rats. Therefore, we concluded that it is unlikely that the mechanism by which most allergic or autoimmunogenic chemicals work, i.e., by binding to macromolecules of the body and subsequent T- and B-cell activation, is involved in the HCB-induced immunopathology in the rat. Such a thymus-independent immunopathology is remarkable, as HCB strongly modulates T-cell-mediated immune parameters. This

  10. Global protein phosphorylation dynamics during deoxynivalenol-induced ribotoxic stress response in the macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Xiao; Whitten, Douglas A.; Wu, Ming; Chan, Christina; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Pestka, James J.

    2013-04-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium that commonly contaminates food, is capable of activating mononuclear phagocytes of the innate immune system via a process termed the ribotoxic stress response (RSR). To encapture global signaling events mediating RSR, we quantified the early temporal (≤ 30 min) phosphoproteome changes that occurred in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage during exposure to a toxicologically relevant concentration of DON (250 ng/mL). Large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis employing stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with titanium dioxide chromatography revealed that DON significantly upregulated or downregulated phosphorylation of 188 proteins at both known and yet-to-be functionally characterized phosphosites. DON-induced RSR is extremely complex and goes far beyond its prior known capacity to inhibit translation and activate MAPKs. Transcriptional regulation was the main target during early DON-induced RSR, covering over 20% of the altered phosphoproteins as indicated by Gene Ontology annotation and including transcription factors/cofactors and epigenetic modulators. Other biological processes impacted included cell cycle, RNA processing, translation, ribosome biogenesis, monocyte differentiation and cytoskeleton organization. Some of these processes could be mediated by signaling networks involving MAPK-, NFκB-, AKT- and AMPK-linked pathways. Fuzzy c-means clustering revealed that DON-regulated phosphosites could be discretely classified with regard to the kinetics of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The cellular response networks identified provide a template for further exploration of the mechanisms of trichothecenemycotoxins and other ribotoxins, and ultimately, could contribute to improved mechanism-based human health risk assessment. - Highlights: ► Mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces immunotoxicity via ribotoxic stress response. ► SILAC phosphoproteomics using

  11. Zinc protects HepG2 cells against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by ochratoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Hao, Junran; Shen, Xiao Li; Yang, Xuan; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun

    2013-04-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage are the most studied mechanisms by which ochratoxin A (OTA) induces its toxic effects, which include nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Zinc, which is an essential trace element, is considered a potential antioxidant. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplement could inhibit OTA-induced oxidative damage and DNA damage in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of inhibition. The results indicated that that exposure of OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration; zinc supplement significantly reduced the OTA-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity but did not affect the OTA-induced decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}). Meanwhile, the addition of the zinc chelator N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) strongly aggravated the OTA-induced oxidative damage. This study also demonstrated that zinc helped to maintain the integrity of DNA through the reduction of OTA-induced DNA strand breaks, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation and DNA hypomethylation. OTA increased the mRNA expression of metallothionein1-A (MT1A), metallothionein2-A (MT2A) and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Zinc supplement further enhanced the mRNA expression of MT1A and MT2A, but it had no effect on the mRNA expression of SOD1 and catalase (CAT). Zinc was for the first time proven to reduce the cytotoxicity of OTA through inhibiting the oxidative damage and DNA damage, and regulating the expression of zinc-associated genes. Thus, the addition of zinc can potentially be used to reduce the OTA toxicity of contaminated feeds. - Highlights: ► OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration. ► OTA induced the formation of 8-OHdG in HepG2 cells. ► It was testified for the first time that OTA induced DNA hypomethylation. ► Zinc protects against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by

  12. Deltamethrin-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial caspase-dependent signaling pathways in murine splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anoop; Sasmal, D; Bhaskar, Amand; Mukhopadhyay, Kunal; Thakur, Aman; Sharma, Neelima

    2016-07-01

    Deltamethrin (DLM) is a well-known pyrethroid insecticide used extensively in pest control. Exposure to DLM has been demonstrated to cause apoptosis in various cells. However, the immunotoxic effects of DLM on mammalian system and its mechanism is still an open question to be explored. To explore these effects, this study has been designed to first observe the interactions of DLM to immune cell receptors and its effects on the immune system. The docking score revealed that DLM has strong binding affinity toward the CD45 and CD28 receptors. In vitro study revealed that DLM induces apoptosis in murine splenocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. The earliest markers of apoptosis such as enhanced reactive oxygen species and caspase 3 activation are evident as early as 1 h by 25 and 50 µM DLM. Western blot analysis demonstrated that p38 MAP kinase and Bax expression is increased in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas Bcl 2 expression is significantly reduced after 3 h of DLM treatment. Glutathione depletion has been also observed at 3 and 6 h by 25 and 50 µM concentration of DLM. Flow cytometry results imply that the fraction of hypodiploid cells has gradually increased with all the concentrations of DLM at 18 h. N-acetyl cysteine effectively reduces the percentage of apoptotic cells, which is increased by DLM. In contrast, buthionine sulfoxamine causes an elevation in the percentage of apoptotic cells. Phenotyping data imply the effect of DLM toxicity in murine splenocytes. In brief, the study demonstrates that DLM causes apoptosis through its interaction with CD45 and CD28 receptors, leading to oxidative stress and activation of the mitochondrial caspase-dependent pathways which ultimately affects the immune functions. This study provides mechanistic information by which DLM causes toxicity in murine splenocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 808-819, 2016. PMID:25534813

  13. TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL PAINT EFFICACY ON GYPSUM WALLBOARD CONTAMINATED WITH STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Often mold contaminated building materials are not properly removed, some surface cleaning is performed and paint is applied in an attempt to alleviate the problem. The efficacy of antimicrobial paints to eliminate or control mold regrowth on surfaces can easily be tested on non-...

  14. TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL CLEANER EFFICACY ON GYPSUM WALLBOARD CONTAMINATED WITH STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reducing occupant exposure to indoor mold growth is the goal of this research, through the efficacy testing of antimicrobial cleaners. Often mold contaminated building materials are not properly removed, but instead surface cleaners are applied in an attempt to alleviate the prob...

  15. Approaches to detecting immunotoxic effects of environmental contaminants in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Tryphonas, H

    2001-01-01

    Experimental animal studies indicate that environmental contaminants can have adverse effects on several organs and tissues of the immune system. Such effects are known to lead to increased host susceptibility to microbial infections and to compromised immunosurveillance mechanisms normally instrumental in the elimination of neoplastic cells and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Evaluation of the potential risk environmental contaminants pose to the human immune system is currently accomplished via extrapolation of experimentally derived animal data to humans. Presently, this process requires that uncertainty factors such as interspecies differences and genetic variability be considered. Naturally, the process of risk assessment would be greatly facilitated if it were based on clinically relevant data derived from studying humans known to be exposed to environmental contaminants. However, the existing human data are scarce and often described as very limited in scope. To generate the much-needed human data we need to identify a set of clinically relevant immunologic end points that, when adequately standardized, can be incorporated easily into the design of prospective epidemiologic studies. PMID:11744506

  16. ADULT AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY AND IMMUNOTOXICITY OF ORGANOTIN PVC LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary source of organotins in drinking water is believed to be PVC leachates. Limited occurrence data from residential surveys indicate as much as 300 ng/l of monomethyltin can be detected. Noland et al., (1982) reported that exposure of rats to monomethyltin (12, 40, 120 m...

  17. Immunotoxicity of heavy metals in relation to Great Lakes.

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, J; Brousseau, P; Krzystyniak, K; Tryphonas, H; Fournier, M

    1995-01-01

    Heavy metals including mercury, lead, and cadmium are present throughout the ecosystem and are detectable in small amounts in the Great Lakes water and fish. The main route of exposure of humans to these metals is via the ingestion of contaminated food, especially fish. Extensive experimental investigations indicated that heavy metals alter a number of parameters of the host's immune system and lead to increased susceptibility to infections, autoimmune diseases, and allergic manifestations. The existing limited epidemiologic data and data derived from in vitro systems in which human peripheral blood leukocytes were used suggested that the human immune system may also be at increased risk following exposure to these metals. The magnitude of the risk that the presence of such metals in the Great Lakes may pose to the human immune system, and consequently to their health, is not known. In this review, the available data with respect to potential adverse effects of heavy metals on the immune system of humans and experimental animals are discussed, and additional data requirements are suggested. PMID:8635436

  18. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID IMMUNOTOXICITY IN ADULT MICE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is used in the manufacture of fluoropolymers and may be formed by metabolism or degradation of other perfluoroalkyl acids. Safety concerns led the U.S. EPA to conduct a risk assessment of PFOA and related compounds due to their environmental persist...

  19. IMMUNOTOXICITY OF ORGANOTINS USED AS STABILIZERS IN PVC PIPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organotins, used as stabilizers in the production of PVC drinking water supply pipe, are known to leach into water, particularly from new pipe. Certain organotins (dibutyl-, dioctyl- and tributyltins) are known to suppress immune function following acute and subchronic exposure o...

  20. ASSESSMENT OF IMMUNOTOXICITY WITH THE PARASITIC INFECTION MODEL TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resistance to trichinella spiralis is known to require an intact immune system. his chapter presents an overview of the infection, the host response to infection, and methods for assessing infection in rats and mice.

  1. Immunotoxicity Monitoring in a Population Exposed to Polychlorinated Biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Hajo; Fahlenkamp, Astrid; Schettgen, Thomas; Esser, Andre; Gube, Monika; Ziegler, Patrick; Kraus, Thomas; Rink, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) burden and several indicators of immune function was investigated as part of the HELPcB (Health Effects in High-Level Exposure to PCB) program, offering bio-monitoring to workers, relatives, and neighbors exposed to PCBs by a German transformers and capacitors recycling company. The present retrospective observational study evaluates the correlation of plasma levels of total PCBs, five indicator congeners (28, 101, 138, 153, 180), and seven dioxin-like congeners (105, 114, 118, 156, 157, 167, 189) with several parameters of immune function. The cross-sectional study was performed immediately after the end of exposure (258 subjects), and one (218 subjects), and two (177 subjects) years later. At the first time point, measurements showed significant positive correlation between congeners with low to medium chlorination and the relative proportion of CD19 positive B-cells among lymphocytes, as well as a negative correlation of PCB114 with serum IgM, and of PCB 28 with suppressor T-cell and NK-cell numbers. Congeners with a high degree of chlorination, in particular PCB157 and 189, were positively associated with expression of the activation marker CD25 on T-cells in the cohort of the second time point. No associations between PCB levels and IFN-y production by T-cells and killing by NK-cells were found. In conclusion, there were several effects on the cellular composition of adaptive immunity, affecting both T- and B-cells. However, the values were not generally outside the reference ranges for healthy adult individuals and did not indicate overt functional immunodeficiency, even in subjects with the uppermost PCB burden. PMID:27005643

  2. Immunotoxicity Monitoring in a Population Exposed to Polychlorinated Biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Haase, Hajo; Fahlenkamp, Astrid; Schettgen, Thomas; Esser, Andre; Gube, Monika; Ziegler, Patrick; Kraus, Thomas; Rink, Lothar

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) burden and several indicators of immune function was investigated as part of the HELPcB (Health Effects in High-Level Exposure to PCB) program, offering bio-monitoring to workers, relatives, and neighbors exposed to PCBs by a German transformers and capacitors recycling company. The present retrospective observational study evaluates the correlation of plasma levels of total PCBs, five indicator congeners (28, 101, 138, 153, 180), and seven dioxin-like congeners (105, 114, 118, 156, 157, 167, 189) with several parameters of immune function. The cross-sectional study was performed immediately after the end of exposure (258 subjects), and one (218 subjects), and two (177 subjects) years later. At the first time point, measurements showed significant positive correlation between congeners with low to medium chlorination and the relative proportion of CD19 positive B-cells among lymphocytes, as well as a negative correlation of PCB114 with serum IgM, and of PCB 28 with suppressor T-cell and NK-cell numbers. Congeners with a high degree of chlorination, in particular PCB157 and 189, were positively associated with expression of the activation marker CD25 on T-cells in the cohort of the second time point. No associations between PCB levels and IFN-y production by T-cells and killing by NK-cells were found. In conclusion, there were several effects on the cellular composition of adaptive immunity, affecting both T- and B-cells. However, the values were not generally outside the reference ranges for healthy adult individuals and did not indicate overt functional immunodeficiency, even in subjects with the uppermost PCB burden. PMID:27005643

  3. CYP1A2 IS NOT REQUIRED FOR 2, 3, 7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN-INDUCED IMMUNOSUPPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    One of the most sensitive and reproducible immunotoxic endpoints of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure is suppression of the antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) in mice. Immunosuppression occurs in concert with hepatomegaly and associ...

  4. Effects of T-2 toxin on turkey herpesvirus–induced vaccinal immunity against Marek’s disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    T-2 toxin, a very potent immunotoxic Type A trichothecene, is a secondary metabolite produced primarily by Fusarium spp., which grows on cereal grains and can lead to contaminated livestock feed. Repeated exposure to T-2 toxin has been shown to cause immunosuppression and decrease the resistance of ...

  5. Inducing labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... surrounds your baby in the womb. It contains membranes or layers of tissue. One method of inducing ... break the bag of waters" or rupture the membranes. Your health care provider will do a pelvic ...

  6. Immunosuppression and oxidative stress induced by subchronic exposure to carbosulfan in rat spleen: immunomodulatory and antioxidant role of N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Dhouib, Ines Bini; Lasram, Mohamed Montassar; Abdeladhim, Maha; Gharbi, Najoua; Ahmed, Melika Ben; El-Fazaa, Saloua

    2014-09-01

    The present study was designed to determine the immunosuppressive effects of carbosulfan (CB) and their relationship with an increased formation of reactive oxygen species in rat. Further, we aimed to evaluate the protective effects of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) against immunopathological changes induced by CB. Carbosulfan (25 mg/kg) and NAC (2 g/l) were given daily to rats during 30 days, via oral gavage and drinking water, respectively. Cell-mediated immune function, cytokines production, biomarkers of cell redox state maintenance, lipid peroxidation and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were measured in the spleen. Our data showed an increase in WBC percent (28.42%), a reduction in spleen CD8 T-lymphocytes (-85.63%) and a decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines production such as INF-gamma and IL-4. There was a switch from Th1-type to Th2-type cytokines with an unbalance toward anti-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, a significant decrease in reduced glutathione (-71.68%) and total thiols (-39.81%) levels were observed in treated rats. Conversely, malondialdehyde level in spleen was increased (-42.3%), while glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were depleted. Our results suggest that subchronic CB administration affects cellular enzyme and non-enzyme-mediated antioxidant defense systems and promotes immunotoxicity in rat. On the other hand, our data showed protective effects of NAC. Indeed, there was a recovery of oxidative stress markers and cytokines production. The use of NAC, in our study, as a therapeutic agent showed interesting results against CB toxicity. PMID:24916794

  7. Anatoxin-a induces apoptosis of leukocytes and decreases the proliferative ability of lymphocytes of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bownik, A; Rymuszka, A; Sierosławska, A; Skowroński, T

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria (Cyanophyta, Cyanoprocaryota, Cyanobacteria) (blue-green algae) are procaryotic phototrophic microorganisms playing an important ecological role in the freshwater and marine environment as primary producers. However, as a consequence of water eutrophication observed in many reservoirs in different parts of the world, these microorganisms form massive scums, known as water blooms, releasing cyanotoxins hazardous to fish and other aquatic organisms. Cyanotoxins are cyanobacterial secondary metabolites of various chemical structures harmful to humans, terrestial and aquatic animals such as fish. The most abundant cyanotoxins are microcystins and hepatotoxins inducing toxic changes in fish liver, kidney, gills, digestive tract and immune system. Very little is known on the effects of alkaloid neurotoxic anatoxin-a on fish and their immunity. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro influence of anatoxin-a on immune cells isolated from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). The leukocyte intracellular level of ATP was reduced only at the highest concentration of anatoxin-a. Apoptotic and necrotic leukocytes were observed at the lower and the highest concentrations of anatoxin-a, respectively. Elevated activity of caspases 3/7 after 2 hours and a concentration-dependent decrease in the proliferative ability of T and B lymphocytes was also observed. The results suggest that anatoxin-a could be a possible immunotoxic agent in the aquatic environment and may increase the susceptibility of fish to infectious and neoplastic diseases. Therefore, constant monitoring of anatoxin-a and its producers in lakes and fish ponds should be performed. PMID:23214375

  8. In Utero exposure to genistein enhanced intranasal house dust mite allergen-induced respiratory sensitization in young adult B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tai L; Meng, Andrew H

    2016-06-24

    Despite many hypothesized benefits of dietary isoflavone genistein (GEN) deriving from soy-based products, questions surrounding GEN's developmental immunotoxic effects are increasing. To understand how in utero GEN exposure may modulate postnatal respiratory sensitization, we conducted a time course study using a common household allergen (house dust mites: HDM; 10μg/mouse) following intranasal instillation, a physiological route of allergen exposure. GEN was administered to dams by gavage from gestational day 14 to parturition at a physiologically relevant dose (20mg/kg bw). Female and male offspring were sensitized with HDM allergens beginning about one month prior to sacrifice followed by challenges with three weekly doses of HDM extracts, and they were euthanized at day 3 following the final HDM exposure at four different time points (postnatal day (PND) 80, 120, 160, and 200). In utero GEN combined with postnatal HDM exposures (GEN+HDM) increased total IgE production in both young female and male B6C3F1 offspring (e.g., PND 80 in females and PND 120 in males). Increased antigen-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b levels were also observed at various time points in both female and male offspring. In addition, increases in macrophage number in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of both female and male GEN+HDM offspring at PND 80 and PND 120, respectively, were observed when compared to the vehicle group. For T cells, an increase over the vehicle in female GEN+HDM offspring was observed at PND 80. Due to similar patterns of increases, it seems likely that GEN+HDM-induced increases in total IgE and macrophages are related. Overall, in utero GEN plus later-life HDM exposures exert increases in total IgE and HDM-specific IgG production as well as macrophage recruitments to the lung in young adult mice. PMID:27113705

  9. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  10. Stannous chloride induces alterations in enzyme activities, lipid peroxidation and histopathology in male rabbit: antioxidant role of vitamin C.

    PubMed

    El-Demerdash, F M; Yousef, M I; Zoheir, Malak A

    2005-12-01

    Stannous chloride (SnCl2) is widely used in daily human life to conserve soft drinks, in food manufacturing and biocidal preparations. It had genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity and oxidative stress. Therefore, the present experiment was carried out to determine the effectiveness of l-ascorbic acid (AA) in alleviating the toxicity of SnCl2 on some enzyme activities and oxidative damage in male New Zealand white rabbits. Six rabbits per group were assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups: 0 mg AA and 0 mg SnCl2/kg BW (control); 40 mg AA/kg BW; 20 mg SnCl2/kg BW (1/500 LD50); 20 mg SnCl2 plus 40 mg AA/kg BW. Rabbits were orally administered the respective doses every other day for 12 weeks. Liver and kidney specimens were processed for histopathologic studies. Results obtained showed that SnCl2 significantly (P < 0.05) induced free radicals in rabbit liver, testes, kidney, lung, brain and heart. While, the activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and the level of sulfhydryl groups (SH-group) were decreased (P < 0.05) in all tested organs except brain and heart. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity was increased (P < 0.05) in liver and decreased in testes, but alanine aminotransferase (ALT) did not change. The activities of alkaline phosphatase (AlP) and acid phosphatase (AcP) were decreased (P < 0.05) in liver, testes, kidney and lung. Also, the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was significantly decreased in brain and plasma of rabbits treated with SnCl2 compared to control group. Histopathologic studies showed marked changes in hepatocytes as well as proliferation of duct epithelium, dilatation and congestion of blood vessels as well as mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate. The kidney were also severely affected by SnCl2 the Bowman's space was increased, with infiltration of renal parenchyma by mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate and changes in cells lining convoluted tubule. Ascorbic acid alone significantly decreased the levels of free radicals

  11. Weather and plant age affect the levels of steroidal saponin and Pithomyces chartarum spores in Brachiaria grass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brachiaria species are cultivated worldwide in tropical and subtropical climates as the main forage source for ruminants. Numerous tropical and warm-season grasses cause hepatogenous photosensitization, among them several species of Brachiaria. Steroidal saponins present in these plants may be respo...

  12. QUANTIFICATION OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM CONIDIA IN INDOOR DUST USING REAL TIME, FLUORESCENT PROBE-BASED DETECTION OF PCR PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of fungal spores or conidia in indoor dust samples can be useful for determining the contamination status of building interiors and in signaling instances where potentially harmful exposures of building occupants to these organisms may exist. A recently developed method ...

  13. Drug-induced hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000310.htm Drug-induced hypoglycemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Drug-induced hypoglycemia is low blood sugar that results from medication. ...

  14. Avermectin induced autophagy in pigeon spleen tissues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ci; Zhao, Yanbing; Chen, Lijie; Zhang, Ziwei; Li, Ming; Li, Shu

    2015-12-01

    The level of autophagy is considered as an indicator for monitoring the toxic impact of pesticide exposure. Avermectin (AVM), a widely used insecticide, has immunotoxic effects on the pigeon spleen. The aim of this study was to investigate the status of autophagy and the expression levels of microtubule-associated protein1 light chain 3 (LC3), beclin-1, dynein, autophagy associated gene (Atg) 4B, Atg5, target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) and target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2) in AVM-treated pigeon spleens. Eighty two-month-old pigeons were randomly divided into four groups: a control group, a low-dose group, a medium-dose group and a high-dose group, which were fed a basal diet spiked with 0, 20, 40 and 60 mg AVM/kg diet, respectively. Microscopic cellular morphology revealed a significant increase in autophagic structures in the AVM-treated groups. The expression of LC3, beclin-1, dynein, Atg4B and Atg5 increased, while mRNA levels of TORC1 and TORC2 were decreased in the AVM-treated groups relative to the control groups at 30, 60 and 90 days in the pigeon spleen. These results indicated that AVM exposure could up-regulate the level of autophagy in a dose-time-dependent manner in the pigeon spleen. PMID:26541719

  15. The effect of brevenal on brevetoxin-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Andrew; Hu, Qing; Bourdelais, Andrea J.; Baden, Daniel G.; Gibson, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Brevenal is a nontoxic short-chain trans-syn polyether that competes with brevetoxin (PbTx) for the active site on voltage-sensitive sodium channels. The PbTxs are highly potent polyether toxins produced during blooms of several species of marine dinoflagellates, most notably Karenia brevis. Blooms of K. brevis have been associated with massive fish kills, marine mammal poisoning, and are potentially responsible for adverse human health effects such as respiratory irritation and airway constriction in beach-goers. Additionally, the consumption of shellfish contaminated with PbTxs results in neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether PbTx could induce DNA damage in a human cell type, the lymphocyte, and if so, whether the damage could be antagonized or ameliorated by brevenal, a brevetoxin antagonist. The DNA damage may occur through both endogenous and exogenous physiological and pathophysiological processes. Unrepaired or erroneously repaired DNA damage may result in gene mutation, chromosome aberration, and modulation of gene regulation, which have been associated with immunotoxicity and carcinogenesis. A single-cell gel electrophoresis assay, or comet assay, was used to determine and compare DNA damage following various treatments. The data were expressed as tail moments, which is the percentage of DNA in the tail multiplied by the length between the center of the head and center of the tail (in arbitrary units). The negative control tail moment was 29.2 (SE=±0.9), whereas the positive control (hydrogen peroxide) was 72.1 (1.5) and solvent (ethanol) was 24.2 (2.1). The PbTx-2 (from Sigma, St. Louis, MO, USA), 10−8 M was 41.3 (3.6), PbTx-9 (Sigma), 10−8 M was 57.0 (5.3), PbTx-2 (from University of North Carolina at Wilmington, UNCW), 10−8 M was 49.4 (9.9), and PbTx-3 (UNCW), 10−8 M was 64.0 (6.4). 1.0 μg/ml brevenal applied 1 h before the PbTxs protected the lymphocytes from DNA damage; PbTx-2 (Sigma

  16. The effect of brevenal on brevetoxin-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Andrew; Hu, Qing; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Baden, Daniel G; Gibson, James E

    2005-11-01

    Brevenal is a nontoxic short-chain trans-syn polyether that competes with brevetoxin (PbTx) for the active site on voltage-sensitive sodium channels. The PbTxs are highly potent polyether toxins produced during blooms of several species of marine dinoflagellates, most notably Karenia brevis. Blooms of K. brevis have been associated with massive fish kills, marine mammal poisoning, and are potentially responsible for adverse human health effects such as respiratory irritation and airway constriction in beach-goers. Additionally, the consumption of shellfish contaminated with PbTxs results in neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether PbTx could induce DNA damage in a human cell type, the lymphocyte, and if so, whether the damage could be antagonized or ameliorated by brevenal, a brevetoxin antagonist. The DNA damage may occur through both endogenous and exogenous physiological and pathophysiological processes. Unrepaired or erroneously repaired DNA damage may result in gene mutation, chromosome aberration, and modulation of gene regulation, which have been associated with immunotoxicity and carcinogenesis. A single-cell gel electrophoresis assay, or comet assay, was used to determine and compare DNA damage following various treatments. The data were expressed as tail moments, which is the percentage of DNA in the tail multiplied by the length between the center of the head and center of the tail (in arbitrary units). The negative control tail moment was 29.2 (SE=+/-0.9), whereas the positive control (hydrogen peroxide) was 72.1 (1.5) and solvent (ethanol) was 24.2 (2.1). The PbTx-2 (from Sigma, St. Louis, MO, USA), 10(-8) M was 41.3 (3.6), PbTx-9 (Sigma), 10(-8) M was 57.0 (5.3), PbTx-2 (from University of North Carolina at Wilmington, UNCW), 10(-8) M was 49.4 (9.9), and PbTx-3 (UNCW), 10(-8) M was 64.0 (6.4). 1.0 microg/ml brevenal applied 1 h before the PbTxs protected the lymphocytes from DNA damage; PbTx-2

  17. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  18. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton; Subbaraman, Maria R.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  19. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  20. Induced pluripotency with endogenous and inducible genes

    SciTech Connect

    Duinsbergen, Dirk; Eriksson, Malin; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Frisen, Jonas; Mikkers, Harald

    2008-10-15

    The recent discovery that two partly overlapping sets of four genes induce nuclear reprogramming of mouse and even human cells has opened up new possibilities for cell replacement therapies. Although the combination of genes that induce pluripotency differs to some extent, Oct4 and Sox2 appear to be a prerequisite. The introduction of four genes, several of which been linked with cancer, using retroviral approaches is however unlikely to be suitable for future clinical applications. Towards developing a safer reprogramming protocol, we investigated whether cell types that express one of the most critical reprogramming genes endogenously are predisposed to reprogramming. We show here that three of the original four pluripotency transcription factors (Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc or MYCER{sup TAM}) induced reprogramming of mouse neural stem (NS) cells exploiting endogenous SoxB1 protein levels in these cells. The reprogrammed neural stem cells differentiated into cells of each germ layer in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to mouse development in vivo. Thus a combinatorial approach taking advantage of endogenously expressed genes and inducible transgenes may contribute to the development of improved reprogramming protocols.

  1. Effects of diazinon on the lymphocytic cholinergic system of Nile tilapia fish (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Toledo-Ibarra, G A; Díaz-Resendiz, K J G; Pavón-Romero, L; Rojas-García, A E; Medina-Díaz, I M; Girón-Pérez, M I

    2016-08-01

    Fish rearing under intensive farming conditions can be easily disturbed by pesticides, substances that have immunotoxic properties and may predispose to infections. Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) are widely used in agricultural activities; however, the mechanism of immunotoxicity of these substances is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diazinon pesticides (OPs) on the cholinergic system of immune cells as a possible target of OP immunotoxicity. We evaluated ACh levels and cholinergic (nicotinic and muscarinic) receptor concentration. Additionally, AChE activity was evaluated in mononuclear cells of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a freshwater fish mostly cultivated in tropical regions around the world. The obtained results indicate that acute exposure to diazinon induces an increase in ACh concentration and a decrease in nAChR and mAChR concentrations and AChE activity in fish immune cells, This suggests that the non-neuronal lymphocytic cholinergic system may be the main target in the mechanism of OP immunotoxicity. This study contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms of immunotoxicity of pollutants and may help to take actions for animal health improvement. PMID:27260186

  2. Space Station Induced Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a conference convened May 10-11, 1988, to review plans for monitoring the Space Station induced environment, to recommend primary components of an induced environment monitoring package, and to make recommendations pertaining to suggested modifications of the Space Station External Contamination Control Requirements Document JSC 30426. The contents of this report are divided as Follows: Monitoring Induced Environment - Space Station Work Packages Requirements, Neutral Environment, Photon Emission Environment, Particulate Environment, Surface Deposition/Contamination; and Contamination Control Requirements.

  3. Mania Induced by Opipramol

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Kazhungil; Khaleel, Asfia; Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Manoj; Raghuram, TM

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants have propensity to induce manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder. Opipramol is an atypical anxiolytic and antidepressant drug which predominantly acts on sigma receptors. Although structurally resembles tricyclic antidepressant imipramine it does not have inhibitory action on the reuptake of norepinephrine/serotonin and hence it is not presumed to cause manic switch in bipolar depression. Here, we describe a case of mania induced by opipramol, in a patient with bipolar affective disorder who was treated for moderate depressive episode with lithium and opipramol and we discuss neurochemical hypothesis of opipramol-induced mania. PMID:25722522

  4. Mania induced by opipramol.

    PubMed

    Firoz, Kazhungil; Khaleel, Asfia; Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Manoj; Raghuram, Tm

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants have propensity to induce manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder. Opipramol is an atypical anxiolytic and antidepressant drug which predominantly acts on sigma receptors. Although structurally resembles tricyclic antidepressant imipramine it does not have inhibitory action on the reuptake of norepinephrine/serotonin and hence it is not presumed to cause manic switch in bipolar depression. Here, we describe a case of mania induced by opipramol, in a patient with bipolar affective disorder who was treated for moderate depressive episode with lithium and opipramol and we discuss neurochemical hypothesis of opipramol-induced mania. PMID:25722522

  5. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is noise-induced hearing ... additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound in our environment, ...

  6. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat (macular) and depigmented, but maintains ...

  7. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are a common cause of liver inflammation. These ... problem. However, if you took high doses of acetaminophen , treatment should be started as soon as possible ...

  8. Gasoline-induced mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.L.; Swanson, B.Z. Jr.; Lutins, N.D.

    1980-02-01

    Gasoline-induced mucositis may become more common because of fuel shortages or increased fuel cost. Dentists should, therefore, consider this oral irritant in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions.

  9. Thrombocytopenia - drug induced

    MedlinePlus

    ... and a seizure medicine called valproic acid may lead to this problem. Other medicines that cause drug-induced thrombocytopenia include: Furosemide Gold, used to treat arthritis Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( ...

  10. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  11. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  12. Drug-induced nightmares.

    PubMed

    2000-12-01

    (1) A wide variety of drugs have been implicated in nightmares, often on inadequate evidence. (2) Recurrent nightmares can be induced by many drugs, and not only agents with psychotropic or neurological effects. PMID:11475499

  13. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally occurs as a result of medications, as is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat (macular) and depigmented, but maintains the normal skin texture.

  14. Ethionamide-induced Pellagra.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yashashree; Shah, Ira

    2015-08-01

    Pellagra is a disorder characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death, resulting from a deficiency of niacin or its precursor tryptophan. Ethionamide (a second-line antituberculosis agent)-induced pellagra is rarely encountered in clinical practice. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with nicotinamide can prevent life-threatening complications. To date, only three cases have been reported. We report a 13-year-old girl presenting with ethionamide-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of niacin. PMID:25828829

  15. Isoniazid-induced alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, K. B.; Kumar, V.; Vishvkarma, S.; Shandily, R.

    2011-01-01

    Isoniazid is a safe and very effective antituberculosis drug. Antimitotic agents routinely cause alopecia. Drug-induced alopecia is usually reversible upon withdrawal of the drug. Isoniazid, thiacetazone and ethionamide are the antituberculosis drugs which have been associated with alopecia. Isoniazid-induced alopecia was observed in one case and confirmed by the finding that hair growth resumed when drug removed from the regimen. PMID:21654989

  16. COMPARING IMMUNOTOXICITY IN RATS AFTER IN UTERO VERSUS AN ADULT EXPOSURE: IS DEVELOPMENTAL EXPOSURE MORE SENSITIVE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using a known immunosuppresant, dexamethasone (DEX), pregnant Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were given subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of DEX (0.0, 0.0375, 0.075, 0.15, 0.3 mg/kg) during gestation days 6 to 21. Both male and female offspring were tested for immune dysfunction. In a ...

  17. Immunotoxic effects of the color additive caramel color III: immune function studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; Penninks, A H; Seinen, W; Vos, J G; Van Loveren, H

    1993-01-01

    Administration of the color additive caramel color III (AC) may cause a reduction in total white blood cell counts in rats due to reduced lymphocyte counts. Beside lymphopenia, several other effects in rat have been described. The effects are caused by the imidazole derivative 2-acetyl-4(5)-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI) and occur in rats fed a diet low in vitamin B6. In the present paper, immune function studies on AC and THI with rats fed a diet low, but not deficient in vitamin B6 are presented and discussed. Rats were exposed to 0.4 or 4% AC or to 5.72 ppm THI in drinking water during and for 28 days prior to the start of immune function assays. Resistance to Trichinella spiralis was examined in an oral infection model and clearance of Listeria monocytogenes upon an intravenous infection was studied. In addition, natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity of splenic and nonadherent peritoneal cells and the antibody response to sheep red blood cells were studied. From the results it is concluded that exposure of rats to AC or THI influenced various immune function parameters. Thymus-dependent immunity was suppressed, while parameters of the nonspecific resistance were also affected, as shown by a decreased natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the spleen and an enhanced clearance of L. monocytogenes. PMID:8432426

  18. IMMUNOTOXICITY IN CHANNEL CATFISH, ICTALURUS PUNCTATUS, FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE TO TRIBUTYLTIN. (R823881)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. Determining the relationship between nanoparticle characteristics and immunotoxicity: key challenges and approaches.

    PubMed

    David, Christopher Aw; Owen, Andrew; Liptrott, Neill J

    2016-06-01

    The growing wealth of information regarding the influence that physicochemical characteristics play on nanoparticle biocompatibility and safety is allowing improved design and rationale for their development and preclinical assessment. Accurate and appropriate measurement of these characteristics accompanied by informed toxicological assessment is a necessity for the development of safe and effective nanomedicines. While particle type, formulation and mode of administration dictate the individual causes for concern through development, the benefits of nanoformulation for treatment of the diseased state are great. Here we have proposed certain considerations and suggestions, which could lead to better-informed preclinical assessment of nanomaterials for nanomedicine, as well as how this information can and should be extrapolated to the physiological state of the end user. PMID:27171671

  20. DEVELOPMENTAL EXPOSURE TO DI-N-BUTYLTIN DICHLORIDE (DBTC): IMMUNOTOXIC AND NEUROTOXIC EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organotins are incorporated as stabilizers in PVC water supply pipe. Particularly when new, mono- and di-substituted methyl- and butyltins leach from the pipe and are thus of regulatory concern to EPA. These contaminants have adverse effects on both the immune and nervous systems...

  1. Using immunotoxicity information to improve cancer risk assessment for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zaccaria, Kimberly J; McClure, Peter R

    2013-07-01

    Estimating cancer risk from environmental mixtures containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is challenging. Ideally, each mixture would undergo toxicity testing to derive a cancer slope factor (CSF) for use in site-specific cancer risk assessments. However, this whole mixture approach is extremely costly in terms of finances, time, and animal usage. Alternatively, if an untested mixture is "sufficiently similar" to a well-characterized mixture with a CSF, the "surrogate" CSF can be used in risk assessments. We propose that similarity between 2 mixtures could be established using an in vitro battery of genotoxic and nongenotoxic tests. An observed association between carcinogenicity and immunosuppression of PAHs suggests that the addition of immune suppression assays may improve this battery. First, using published studies of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and other PAHs, we demonstrated a correlation between the derived immune suppression relative potency factors (RPFs) for 9 PAHs and their respective cancer RPFs, confirming observations published previously. Second, we constructed an integrated knowledge map for immune suppression by BaP based on the available mechanistic information. The map illustrates the mechanistic complexities involved in BaP immunosuppression, suggesting that multiple in vitro tests of immune suppression involving different processes, cell types, and tissues will have greater predictive value for immune suppression in vivo than a single test. Based on these observations, research strategies are recommended to validate a battery of in vitro immune suppression tests that, along with tests for genotoxic and other nongenotoxic modes of cancer action, could be used to establish "sufficient similarity" of 2 mixtures for site-specific cancer risk assessments. PMID:23922326

  2. From Immunotoxicity to Nanotherapy: The Effects of Nanomaterials on the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew J.; Brown, Jared M.; Zamboni, William C.; Walker, Nigel J.

    2014-01-01

    The potential for human exposure to the diverse and ever-changing world of nanoscale materials has raised concerns about their influence on health and disease. The novel physical and chemical properties of these materials, which are associated with their small size, complicate toxicological evaluations. Further, these properties may make engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) a prime target for interaction with the immune system following uptake by phagocytes. Undesired effects on antigen-presenting cells and other phagocytic cells are of concern due to the high likelihood of ENM uptake by these cells. In addition, ENM interactions with lymphocytes and other cell types can contribute to a varied spectrum of possible effects, including inflammation, hypersensitivity, and immunomodulation. Furthermore, the mast cell (a type of immune cell traditionally associated with allergy) appears to contribute to certain inflammatory and toxic effects associated with some ENMs. Although incidental exposure may be undesirable, nanomedicines engineered for various clinical applications provide opportunities to develop therapies that may or may not intentionally target the immune system. The interaction between ENMs and the immune system and the resulting pharmacokinetic and phenotypic responses are critical factors that dictate the balance between toxicity and clinical efficacy of nanotherapeutics. PMID:24431216

  3. Immunotoxicity of commercial-mixed glyphosate in broad snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris).

    PubMed

    Siroski, Pablo A; Poletta, Gisela L; Latorre, María A; Merchant, Mark E; Ortega, Hugo H; Mudry, Marta D

    2016-01-25

    The expansion and intensification of agriculture during the past 50 years is unprecedented, and thus environmental problems have been triggered at different scales. These transformations have caused the loss of habitat and biodiversity, and disruption of the structure and functioning of ecosystems. As a result of the expansion of the agricultural frontier in the recent past, many areas of the natural geographic distribution of the local wildlife, among them crocodilians and particularly the broad snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris), are being exposed to contaminants. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of commercially-mixed glyphosate (RU) on some parameters of the immune system of C. latirostris. Two groups of caimans were exposed for two months to different concentrations of RU recommended for its application in the field, while one group was maintained as an unexposed control. The RU concentration was progressively decreased through the exposure period to simulate glyphosate degradation in water. After exposure, total and differential white blood cell (WBC), and complement system activity (CS) were determined. In addition, the animals were injected with a solution of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli to trigger an immune response and evaluate the parameters associated with it. The results showed that an effect of the herbicide on CS was observed, as animals exposed to RU showed a lower CS activity than animals from the negative control (NC) but not in total WBC. In the case of leukocyte population counts, differences were only found for heterophils and lymphocytes. PMID:26658029

  4. EVALUATION OF THE IMMUNOTOXICITY OF LOW LEVEL PCB EXPOSURE IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Weanling male Fischer 344 rats were exposed daily by gastric intubation for up to 15 weeks to the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Aroclor 1254 at 0.1, 1, 10, or 25 mg/kg body weight. t 5, 10 and 15 weeks groups of Tats were killed and immune functions were evaluated. he immune par...

  5. Evaluation of somatic and reproductive immunotoxic effects of the porcine zona pellucida vaccination.

    PubMed

    Barber, M R; Fayrer-Hosken, R A

    2000-05-01

    Immunological, immunocytochemical and fertility analyses were performed to determine the potential toxic side effects of porcine zona pellucida (pZP) vaccinations on target animals, including horses and dogs. The study was designed to determine the effect of antibodies, raised against highly purified pZP, on somatic tissues. Immunocytochemical studies performed with fixed tissues showed that rabbit anti-pZP antiserum did not crossreact with brain, heart, lung, kidney, liver, bladder, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, muscle, skin, spleen, pancreas, or lymph node of either the dog or horse. To determine the effect or oral intake on nontarget animals, female rabbits were fed a contraceptive vaccine containing pZP glycoproteins and the synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate in drakeol (S-TDCM) adjuvant. Enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (LISA) analyses showed that rabbits fed with the adjuvanted pZP proteins did not develop circulating anti-pZP IgG antibodies that crossreacted with pZP. Furthermore, fertility studies performed on rabbits fed with adjuvanted pZP revealed no significant differences in the number of embryos or stage of the embryos produced between the treated and control animals. Results of these studies suggest that the pZP vaccine delivered to dogs or horses in field studies have no recognizable somatic tissue effects. Moreover, there were no side effects on nontarget animals should they eat the vaccine. This substantiates field trials results about the safety of the pZP immunocontraceptive vaccine. PMID:10766973

  6. A COMPARISON OF MULTIPLE TOXICITIES FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENTAL EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES: NEUROTOXICITY, IMMUNOTOXICITY, AND REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NAS report (Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children, 1993) called for significant research effort into the long-term effects of perinatal pesticide exposure on the nervous, immune, and reproductive systems. In response, the US EPA and NIEHS collaborated on a series o...

  7. INTRODUCTION: INHALATION EXPOSURE AND SYSTEMIC IMMUNOTOXICITY: MECHANISMS LINKING THE LUNG AND IMMUNE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory


    Concerns regarding inhaled compounds, immune suppression and increased risk of disease have focused primarily on suppression of local immune responses in the lung and susceptibility to respiratory infections. However, a number of studies have shown that both gaseous (O3, NO2)...

  8. THE DEVELOPMENTAL IMMUNOTOXICITY OF DIBUTYLTIN DICHLORIDE IN SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl- and butyltin compounds used as stabilizers in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe production are of concern as they leach from supply pipes into drinking water and have been associated with multisystem toxicity. This study assessed immune function in Sprague-Dawley (CD) rats d...

  9. The effect of diesel (DE) exposure in utero on reproductive and developmental immunotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiology studies are beginning to show that in utero exposure to traffic related pollutants might increase the incidence of immune mediated lung diseases. Time pregnant BALB/c mice were exposed to air or two concentrations of diesel exhaust (0.5 and 2 mg/m3...

  10. Effect of the protein corona on nanoparticles for modulating cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon Kyung; Choi, Eun-Ju; Webster, Thomas J; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Khang, Dongwoo

    2015-01-01

    Although the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) is greatly influenced by their interactions with blood proteins, toxic effects resulting from blood interactions are often ignored in the development and use of nanostructured biomaterials for in vivo applications. Protein coronas created during the initial reaction with NPs can determine the subsequent immunological cascade, and protein coronas formed on NPs can either stimulate or mitigate the immune response. Along these lines, the understanding of NP-protein corona formation in terms of physiochemical surface properties of the NPs and NP interactions with the immune system components in blood is an essential step for evaluating NP toxicity for in vivo therapeutics. This article reviews the most recent developments in NP-based protein coronas through the modification of NP surface properties and discusses the associated immune responses. PMID:25565807

  11. SELECTIVE IMMUNOTOXIC EFFECTS IN MICE TREATED WITH THE ADENOSINE DEAMINASE INHIBITOR 2-DEOXYCOFORMYCIN (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mice given the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2-deoxycoformycin, for five days were evaluated 24 h, 72 h and 6 days after the final dose. Spleen weight was decreased for up to 6 days after treatment. The number and relative percentage of circulating lymphocytes were decreased 24 a...

  12. THE COMPARATIVE IMMUNOTOXICITY OF FIVE SELCTED COMPOUNDS FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENTAL OR ADULT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well established that human diseases associated with abnormal immune function, including some common infectious diseases and asthma, are considerably more prevalent at younger ages. Although not established absolutely, it is generally believed that development constitutes ...

  13. IMMUNOTOXICITY STUDIES ON SELECTED DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBPS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few DBPs have been evaluated for effects on the immune system, but certain studies suggest that immunosuppression may follow exposure to DBPs. Suppressed immune function is associated with increasesd susceptibility to infectious disease and certain types of cancer in humans and l...

  14. The Toxicological Impacts of the Fusarium Mycotoxin, Deoxynivalenol, in Poultry Flocks with Special Reference to Immunotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Wageha; Ghareeb, Khaled; Böhm, Josef; Zentek, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common Fusarium toxin in poultry feed. Chickens are more resistant to the adverse impacts of deoxynivalenol (DON) compared to other species. In general, the acute form of DON mycotoxicosis rarely occurs in poultry flocks under normal conditions. However, if diets contain low levels of DON (less than 5 mg DON/kg diet), lower productivity, impaired immunity and higher susceptibility to infectious diseases can occur. The molecular mechanism of action of DON has not been completely understood. A significant influence of DON in chickens is the impairment of immunological functions. It was known that low doses of DON elevated the serum IgA levels and affected both cell-mediated and humoral immunity in animals. DON is shown to suppress the antibody response to infectious bronchitis vaccine (IBV) and to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in broilers (10 mg DON/kg feed) and laying hens (3.5 to 14 mg of DON/kg feed), respectively. Moreover, DON (10 mg DON/kg feed) decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the plasma of broilers. DON can severely affect the immune system and, due to its negative impact on performance and productivity, can eventually result in high economic losses to poultry producers. The present review highlights the impacts of DON intoxication on cell mediated immunity, humoral immunity, gut immunity, immune organs and pro-inflammatory cytokines in chickens. PMID:23628787

  15. Ecological impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: implications for immunotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Summary of major Federal and multi-stake holder research efforts in response to the DWH spill, including laboratory oil dispersant testing, estimation of oil release rates and oil fate calculations, subsea monitoring, and post-spill assessments. Impacts from shoreline oiling, wil...

  16. EVALUATION OF IMMUNOTOXICITY OF AN URBAN PROFILE OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE: ACUTE, SUBCHRONIC, AND CHRONIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    While a number of studies have demonstrated suppression of extra- pulmonary immune responses following exposure to NO2, an ubiquitous ambient and indoor air pollutant, most of these studies have utilized extremely high concentrations of NO2 relative to the environment. ur intent ...

  17. Approaches and Considerations for the Assessment of Immunotoxicity for Environmental Chemicals: A Workshop Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    As additional experience is gained with current toxicology testing approaches and as new assays and technologies are developed, it is critical for all stakeholders to engage in active dialog about potential opportunities to advance our overall testing strategies. To facilitate t...

  18. Efficacy of polyvinylpolypyrrolidone in reducing the immunotoxicity of aflatoxin in growing broilers.

    PubMed

    Celik, I; Oğuz, H; Demet, O; Dönmez, H H; Boydak, M; Sur, E

    2000-09-01

    1. Protective action of an enzyme-linked polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP, Mycofix Plus) against the immunosuppressive effect of afatoxins (AF) was evaluated by determination of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte proportions and splenic plasma cell counts. Histological changes in lymphoid organs were also investigated by light microscopy. One-d-old broiler chicks (Hybro) received 2.5 mg/kg diet AF (83.06% AFB1, 12.98% AFB2, 2.84% AFG1, 1.12% AFG2) with or without PVPP (3g/kg diet) until 21 d of age. When compared with controls, AF treatment significantly decreased peripheral T-lymphocyte counts. AF caused a slight decrease in splenic plasma cell counts. The addition of PVPP to an AF-containing diet significantly increased T-lymphocyte counts. Splenic plasma cell counts were numerically intermediate between control and AF groups. 3. The dietary addition of PVPP to AF-free diet did not significantly alter either T-lymphocyte or splenic plasma cell counts. PMID:11215492

  19. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  20. The multi-xenobiotic resistance (MXR) efflux activity in hemocytes of Mytilus edulis is mediated by an ATP binding cassette transporter of class C (ABCC) principally inducible in eosinophilic granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Rioult, Damien; Pasquier, Jennifer; Boulangé-Lecomte, Céline; Poret, Agnès; Abbas, Imane; Marin, Matthieu; Minier, Christophe; Le Foll, Frank

    2014-08-01

    In marine and estuarine species, immunotoxic and/or immunomodulatory mechanisms are the crossroad of interactions between xenobiotics, microorganisms and physicochemical variations of the environment. In mussels, immunity relies exclusively on innate responses carried out by cells collectively called hemocytes and found in the open hemolymphatic circulatory system of these organisms. However, hemocytes do not form a homogenous population of immune cells since distinct subtypes of mussel blood cells can be distinguished by cytochemistry, flow cytometry or cell motility analysis. Previous studies have also shown that these cells are able to efflux xenobiotics by means of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter activities conferring a multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) phenotype. ABC transporters corresponding to vertebrate class B/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and to class C/multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) are characterized in Mytilidae. Herein, we have investigated the relative contributions of ABCB- and ABCC-mediated efflux within the different hemocyte subpopulations of Mytilus edulis mussels, collected from areas differentially impacted by chemical contaminants in Normandy (France). RT-PCR analyses provide evidence for the presence of ABCB and ABCC transporters transcripts in hemocytes. Immunodetection of ABCB/P-gp with the monoclonal antibody UIC2 in living hemocytes revealed that expression was restricted to granular structures of spread cells. Efflux transporter activities, with calcein-AM as fluorescent probe, were measured by combining flow cytometry to accurate Coulter cell size measurements in order to get a cell-volume normalized fluorescence concentration. In these conditions, basal fluorescence levels were higher in hemocytes originating from Yport (control site) than in cells collected from the harbor of Le Havre, where mussels are more exposed to with persistent pollutants. By using specific ABCB/P-gp (verapamil, PSC833, zosuquidar) and ABCC/MRP (MK

  1. Drug-induced panniculitides.

    PubMed

    Borroni, G; Torti, S; D'Ospina, R M; Pezzini, C

    2014-04-01

    A substantial number of all panniculitides fails to recognize a specific etiology, and that is true also for a relatively frequent type of panniculitis, such as erythema nodosum (EN). Between the recognized causative factors of panniculitides, infectious, physical agents, autoimmune mechanisms and neoplastic disorders are well known. On the contrary, the role of drugs as inducers of panniculitides is marginally considered, and their report limited to anecdotal observations, often without due histopathological support. Since the clinical and histopathological features of drug-induced panniculitides are indistinguishable from those caused by other agents, the causative relationship may be demonstrated by the history of previous drug intake and by clinical improvement after drug discontinuation. We reviewed the currently reported descriptions of drug-induced panniculitis, including a few exemplificative original observations. EN results as the most frequently reported drug-induced panniculitis. Among the causative drugs of EN a variety of medications, with disparate, or even opposite, mechanisms of action are reported, thus limiting the understanding of the pathogenesis. Common causative drugs include oral contraceptives, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiobiotics and leukotriene-modifying agents. Unfortunately, in several cases, the diagnosis of drug-induced EN is done on clinical findings alone. In those cases, the lack of histopathological support does not allow to define a precise clinicopathological correlation on etiologic grounds. Drug-induced lobular and mixed panniculitides, including eosinophilic panniculitis, are even more rarely described. Reported causative agents are glatiramer acetate, interferon beta and heparin (at sites of injections), and systemic steroids, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and BRAF with subcutaneous fat involvement at distance. In view of the recent introduction of new classes of drugs, attention should be paid to disclose their

  2. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  3. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  4. Crystalglobulin-Induced Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vinay; El Ters, Mireille; Kashani, Kianoush; Leung, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Crystalline nephropathy refers to renal parenchymal deposition of crystals leading to kidney damage. The most common forms of crystalline nephropathy encountered in renal pathology are nephrocalcinosis and oxalate nephropathy. Less frequent types include urate nephropathy, cystinosis, dihydroxyadeninuria, and drug-induced crystalline nephropathy (e.g., caused by indinavir or triamterene). Monoclonal proteins can also deposit in the kidney as crystals and cause tissue damage. This occurs in conditions such as light chain proximal tubulopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, and crystalglobulinemia. The latter is a rare complication of multiple myeloma that results from crystallization of monoclonal proteins in the systemic vasculature, leading to vascular injury, thrombosis, and occlusion. In this report, we describe a case of crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy and discuss its pathophysiology and the differential diagnosis of paraprotein-induced crystalline nephropathy. PMID:25190731

  5. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed Central

    Carratala, C.; Gea, J. G.; Aguar, M. C.; Grau, S.; Espadaler-Medina, J. M.; Broquetas, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  6. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed

    Carratala, C; Gea, J G; Aguar, M C; Grau, S; Espadaler-Medina, J M; Broquetas, J M

    1995-03-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  7. DRUG INDUCED CHOLESTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Padda, Manmeet S.; Sanchez, Mayra; Akhtar, Abbasi J.; Boyer, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of bile formation and cholestasis have led to new insights into the pathogenesis of drug induced cholestasis. This review summarizes their variable clinical presentations, examines the, role of transport proteins in hepatic drug clearance and toxicity and addresses the increasing importance of genetic determinants, as well as practical aspects of diagnosis and management. PMID:21480339

  8. Does formaldehyde induce aneuploidy?

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Kühner, Stefanie; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Schütz, Petra

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) was tested for a potential aneugenic activity in mammalian cells. We employed tests to discriminate between aneugenic and clastogenic effects in accordance with international guidelines for genotoxicity testing. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus test (CBMNT) in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with a pan-centromeric probe was performed with cultured human lymphocytes and the human A549 lung cell line. FA induced micronuclei (MN) in binuclear cells of both cell types under standard in vitro test conditions following the OECD guideline 487. FISH analysis revealed that the vast majority of induced MN were centromere negative, thus indicating a clastogenic effect. A similar result was obtained for MN induced by γ-irradiation, whereas the typical aneugens colcemid (COL) and vincristine (VCR) predominantly induced centromere-positive MN. Furthermore, COL and VCR clearly enhanced the MN frequency in mononuclear lymphocytes in the CBMNT, whereas such an effect was not observed for γ-irradiation and FA. In experiments with the Chinese hamster V79 cell line, the aneugens COL and VCR clearly increased the frequency of tetraploid second division metaphases, whereas FA did not cause such an effect. Altogether, our results confirm the clastogenicity of FA in cultured mammalian cells but exclude a significant aneugenic activity. PMID:21804075

  9. Ethionamide-induced gynecomastia

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Ramakant; George, Jacob; Sharma, Arun K.; chhabra, Naveen; Jangir, Suresh K.; Mishra, Vikas

    2012-01-01

    Gynecomastia is very rare during antituberculosis chemotherapy. We describe a 38-year-old male patient who developed a painful gynecomastia following second-line drug therapy for multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. Gynecomastia disappeared after stopping the ethionamide. A published literature on antituberculosis-induced gynecomastia is also briefly discussed. PMID:22629101

  10. Irradiation-Induced Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ewing, R.C.; Matzke, Hj.; Meldrum, A.; Newcomer, P.P.; Wang, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Weber, W.J.

    1999-08-09

    This paper summarizes the results of the studies of the irradiation-induced formation of nanostructures, where the injected interstitials from the source of irradiation are not major components of the nanophase. This phenomena has been observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a number of intermetallic compounds and ceramics during high-energy electron or ion irradiations when the ions completely penetrate through the specimen. Beginning with single crystals, electron or ion irradiation in a certain temperature range may result in nanostructures composed of amorphous domains and nanocrystals with either the original composition and crystal structure or new nanophases formed by decomposition of the target material. The phenomenon has also been observed in natural materials which have suffered irradiation from the decay of constituent radioactive elements and in nuclear reactor fuels which have been irradiated by fission neutrons and other fission products. The mechanisms involved in the process of this nanophase formation are discussed in terms of the evolution of displacement cascades, radiation-induced defect accumulation, radiation-induced segregation and phase decomposition, as well as the competition between irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization.

  11. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, Sen Y.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in a pump including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means 32,36 which cooperate with a first vortex cell 38 and a series of secondary vortex cells 40 to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow.

  12. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  13. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  14. Schedule-Induced Stereotypy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric; Howard, Denise

    1992-01-01

    The phenomena of the induction and entrainment of adjunctive behaviors was investigated in 8 people (ages 5-51) with severe or profound mental retardation who exhibited stereotypic behaviors. Seven of the eight demonstrated evidence of schedule-induced stereotypic behavior, whereas five also showed evidence of the entrainment of these behaviors by…

  15. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it is…

  16. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia. PMID:25047526

  17. Injection-induced earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-07-12

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard. PMID:23846903

  18. Exercise-induced purpura.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, Albert-Adrien

    2004-01-01

    Exercise-induced purpura (EIP) occurs on the lower legs after unusual or major muscular activity, as in marathon runners or as after long walks, especially in the mountains in hot weather. In leisure walkers, patients are otherwise healthy females. There is no relation with chronic venous disorder. Erythematous, urticarial or purpuric plaques arise on the lower leg, usually sparing the skin compressed by socks. Symptoms include itch, pain and a burning sensation. Histopathology demonstrates leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The lesions fade after some days, with frequent relapses at further muscular exercises and may be prevented in some cases by compression, intake of venoactive drugs and local application of steroids. EIP is not uncommon, even if very few descriptions have yet been published. It appears to be consecutive to venous stasis induced by an acute failure of the muscle pump of the calf and thermoregulation decompensation, after a prolonged and unusual exercise, such as running or walking in hot weather. PMID:15178910

  19. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  20. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  1. Hypoxia-Inducible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is vital for the existence of all multicellular organisms, acting as a signaling molecule regulating cellular activities. Specifically, hypoxia, which occurs when the partial pressure of oxygen falls below 5%, plays a pivotal role during development, regeneration, and cancer. Here we report a novel hypoxia-inducible (HI) hydrogel composed of gelatin and ferulic acid that can form hydrogel networks via oxygen consumption in a laccase-mediated reaction. Oxygen levels and gradients within the hydrogels can be accurately controlled and precisely predicted. We demonstrate that HI hydrogels guide vascular morphogenesis in vitro via hypoxia-inducible factors activation of matrix metalloproteinases and promote rapid neovascularization from the host tissue during subcutaneous wound healing. The HI hydrogel is a new class of biomaterials that may prove useful in many applications, ranging from fundamental studies of developmental, regenerative and disease processes through the engineering of healthy and diseased tissue models towards the treatment of hypoxia-regulated disorders. PMID:24909742

  2. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  3. Asthma induced by enkephalin.

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, R D; Bellamy, D; Pyke, D A

    1980-01-01

    A total of 291 diabetics were studied to see whether an asthmatic reaction was associated with facial flushing induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol. Of these patients, 191 reported facial flushing, of whom 12 reported breathlessness as well. Of these 12, five also described wheezing, and respiratory function tests showed them to have asthma. Three of these five patients underwent further tests, which showed that the asthmatic reaction could be prevented by giving disodium cromoglycate and the specific opiate antagonist naloxone. One patient developed wheezing when given an enkephalin analogue with opiate-like activity. Asthma induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol was concluded to be mediated by endogenous peptides with opiate-like activity such as enkephalin. PMID:7357255

  4. Drug-induced Photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zuba, Ewelina Bogumiła; Koronowska, Sandra; Osmola-Mańkowska, Agnieszka; Jenerowicz, Dorota

    2016-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is considered the main environmental physical hazard to the skin. It is responsible for photoaging, sunburns, carcinogenesis, and photodermatoses, including drug-induced photosensitivity. Drug-induced photosensitivity is an abnormal skin reaction either to sunlight or to artificial light. Drugs may be a cause of photoallergic, phototoxic, and photoaggravated dermatitis. There are numerous medications that can be implicated in these types of reactions. Recently, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been shown to be a common cause of photosensitivity. As both systemic and topical medications may promote photosensitive reactions, it is important to take into consideration the potential risk of occurrence such reactions, especially in people chronically exposed to ultraviolet radiation. PMID:27149132

  5. Anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Norred, Carol L

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this course is to update nurse anesthetists about anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis. This course discusses the pathophysiologic process of anaphylaxis with descriptions of the allergic immune response and the mediators and mechanisms of mast cell activation. The preoperative identification of patients at high risk and the assessment of potential anesthetic triggers of a hypersensitivity and/or allergic reaction are prudent strategies to minimize the risk of anaphylaxis. Other practices recommended for clinicians include suggestions for anesthetic management to decrease threat of an allergic response in high-risk patients. Furthermore, the identification of the severity grade of hypersensitivity reactions and the appropriate treatment of perioperative anaphylaxis is discussed. In addition, postoperative and follow-up interventions, including testing for patients who have had an anesthetic-induced hypersensitivity reaction, are considered. PMID:22586882

  6. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  7. Levetiracetam-induced pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Talal; Kay, Dana; Alqahtani, Saeed A; Makke, Yamane; Lesky, Linda; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2015-01-01

    Pancytopenia is a rare side effect of levetiracetam (LEV) that is associated with severe morbidity that requires hospitalization. Here, we report a patient with a right temporoparietal tumor who underwent a temporal craniotomy with resection of the mass and was started on LEV for seizure prophylaxis per the neurosurgery local protocol. The patient developed LEV-induced pancytopenia, which was successfully managed by discontinuation of this medication. Our report aims to increase awareness of this rare cause of pancytopenia among clinicians. PMID:26744695

  8. Radiation-induced osteochondromas

    SciTech Connect

    Libshitz, H.I.; Cohen, M.A.

    1982-03-01

    Radiation-induced osteochondromas, either single or multiple, occur more commonly than is generally recognized. The incidence following irradiation for childhood malignancy is approximately 12%. Any open epiphysis is vulnerable. Age at irradiation, time of appearance following therapy, dose and type of radiation, and clinical course in 14 cases are dicussed. Due to growth of the lesion and/or pain, 3 tumors were excised. None revealed malignant degeneration.

  9. [Induced autotetraploid grape mutants].

    PubMed

    Kuliev, V M

    2011-01-01

    The methods of experimental mitotic and meiotic polyploidy in grapes are represented in the article. Results of cytological, histo-anatomical, biomorphological researches of induced autotetraploids are shown. Genetic characteristics, parameters of generative organs, quantitative and structural genome changes were studied. Comparative quantitative changes in the content of chloroplast and mitochondrion DNAs and RNAs in diploids and autotetraploids were defined. Also are shown. The biology-economic evaluation of autotetraploids on comparison with the initial grape variety is represented. PMID:21774401

  10. Fluoroscopy-induced radionecrosis.

    PubMed

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Kamangar, Faranak; Ho, Baran; Chang, Shurong; Dahle, Sara E; Schulman, Joshua M; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2016-01-01

    Complications from radiation exposure during fluoroscopic guidance of cardiac catheterization may occur. With repeated procedures, the risk for cutaneous injuries increases. Herein, we describe a 59-year-old man with extensive coronary artery disease, who had undergone multiple revascularization procedures and developed a non-healing ulcer on his left inferior scapula. The patient's medical history, physical exam findings, and histopathology gave clues to a case of radiation-induced dermatitis and necrosis. PMID:27617939

  11. Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Muraleedharan, Anupama; Gangadhar, Reneega; Das, Soumitra

    2015-01-01

    Sodium valproate induced hyperammonaemic delirium with normal liver function tests is a relatively uncommon adverse effect. It may be mistaken for psychosis or worsening of mania leading to wrong diagnosis and improper management. Plasma ammonia levels should be monitored in all patients developing altered mental status after receiving valproate therapy. This is a case series of hyperammonaemic delirium due to valproate reported to the Department of Pharmacology from Department of Psychiatry over a period of one year. PMID:26816916

  12. Remotely induced atmospheric lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Penano, Joseph; Gordon, Daniel; Hafizi, Bahman; Scully, Marlan

    2011-05-23

    We propose and analyze a remote atmospheric lasing configuration which utilizes a combination of an ultrashort pulse laser to form a plasma filament (seed electrons) by tunneling ionization and a heater pulse which thermalizes the seed electrons. Electrons collisionally excite nitrogen molecules and induce lasing in the ultraviolet. The lasing gain is sufficiently high to reach saturation within the length of the plasma filament. A remotely generated ultraviolet source may have applications for standoff detection of biological and chemical agents.

  13. Polarization induced doped transistor

    DOEpatents

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  14. 2,5-hexanedione-induced immunomodulatory effect in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Upreti, R.K.; Shanker, R.

    1987-06-01

    The immunotoxic potential of 2,5-hexanedione (2,5-Hxdn), the end metabolite of n-hexane/methyl n-butyl ketone, was evaluated in a mouse model involving multiple pathomorphological, hematological, and immunological assays. Young adult male Swiss albino mice were given either single or seven consecutive oral doses of 0.2 x LD/sub 50/ of 2.5-Hxdn. None of the treated mice exhibited any sign of hind limb weakness up to 1 week. On the eighth day, half the animals were sacrificed for initial pathomorphological studies of various organs and the other half were subjected to several immune function tests. The results revealed treatment-related reduction in cellularity of spleen, thymus, and mesentric lymph nodes and pathotoxicological changes. Further, immune function tests such as delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, plaque-forming cell assay, phagocytosis by adherent peritoneal exudate cells, and resistance to endotoxin shock were considerably impaired. These results suggest that 2,5-Hxdn treatment causes profound impairment of immunity in mice even before the onset of peripheral neuropathy.

  15. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  16. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  17. Sildenafil induced priapism.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, T; Hayakawa, K; Miyaji, K; Ishikawa, H; Hata, M

    1999-11-01

    A 53 year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital for persistent priapism, which had been induced by 200 mg (usual dose 25-50 mg) of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) three days earlier. He had a history of erectile dysfunction and had undergone penile injection therapy elsewhere; however, he had not used injection therapy this time. He obtained sildenafil personally without a doctor's prescription. He had not taken any other drugs that affect the metabolism of sildenafil, nor did he have any medical complications that might induce priapism. Since needle aspiration and irrigation were ineffective as first line therapy, surgical treatment was indicated to relieve the condition; a incision of tunica albuginea of both corpora cavernosa was made, and vigorous irrigation of saline washed out the blood clots. This is the first case report of priapism induced by sildenafil. Although this drug can be obtained through private commerce, it should be used under professional guidance as its abuse may lead to severe morbidity. PMID:11933312

  18. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  19. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Briot, Karine; Roux, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis and the first cause in young people. Bone loss and increased rate of fractures occur early after the initiation of corticosteroid therapy, and are then related to dosage and treatment duration. The increase in fracture risk is not fully assessed by bone mineral density measurements, as it is also related to alteration of bone quality and increased risk of falls. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a treat-to-target strategy focusing on low disease activity including through the use of low dose of prednisone, is a key determinant of bone loss prevention. Bone loss magnitude is variable and there is no clearly identified predictor of the individual risk of fracture. Prevention or treatment of osteoporosis should be considered in all patients who receive prednisone. Bisphosphonates and the anabolic agent parathyroid hormone (1–34) have shown their efficacy in the treatment of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. Recent international guidelines are available and should guide management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, which remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Duration of antiosteoporotic treatment should be discussed at the individual level, depending on the subject's characteristics and on the underlying inflammation evolution. PMID:26509049

  20. Swimming pool-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Beretta, S; Vivaldo, T; Morelli, M; Carlucci, P; Zuccotti, G V

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old elite swimmer presented with wheezing after indoor swimming training. On the basis of her clinical history and the tests performed, exercise-induced asthma and mold-induced asthma were ruled out and a diagnosis of chlorine-induced asthma was made. PMID:21548454

  1. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  2. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  3. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  4. Polyglycolic acid induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ceonzo, Kathleen; Gaynor, Anne; Shaffer, Lisa; Kojima, Koji; Vacanti, Charles A.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    Tissue and organ replacement have quickly outpaced available supply. Tissue bioengineering holds the promise for additional tissue availability. Various scaffolds are currently used, whereas polyglycolic acid (PGA), which is currently used in absorbable sutures and orthopedic pins, provides an excellent support for tissue development. Unfortunately, PGA can induce a local inflammatory response following implantation, so we investigated the molecular mechanism of inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Degraded PGA induced an acute peritonitis, characterized by neutrophil (PMN) infiltration following intraperitoneal injection in mice. Similar observations were observed using the metabolite of PGA, glycolide. Dissolved PGA or glycolide, but not native PGA, activated the classical complement pathway in human sera, as determined by classical complement pathway hemolytic assays, C3a and C5a production, C3 and immunoglobulin deposition. To investigate whether these in vitro observations translated to in vivo findings, we used genetically engineered mice. Intraperitoneal administration of glycolide or dissolved PGA in mice deficient in C1q, factor D, C1q and factor D or C2 and factor B demonstrated significantly reduced PMN infiltration compared to congenic controls (WT). Mice deficient in C6 also demonstrated acute peritonitis. However, treatment of WT or C6 deficient mice with a monoclonal antibody against C5 prevented the inflammatory response. These data suggest that the hydrolysis of PGA to glycolide activates the classical complement pathway. Further, complement is amplified via the alternative pathway and inflammation is induced by C5a generation. Inhibition of C5a may provide a potential therapeutic approach to limit the inflammation associated with PGA derived materials following implantation. PMID:16548688

  5. Fission induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments was investigated, as well as the probability of utilizing the energy of these particles to create population inversion leading to laser action. Eventually, it is hoped that the same medium could be used for both fissioning and lasing, thus avoiding inefficiences in converting one form of energy to the other. A central problem in understanding a fission induced plasma is to obtain an accurate model of the electron behavior; some calculations are presented to this end. The calculations are simple, providing a compendium of processes for reference.

  6. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes. PMID:7652089

  7. Bupropion-induced somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Khazaal, Yasser; Krenz, Sonia; Zullino, Daniele Fabio

    2003-09-01

    Whereas there are some case reports of bupropion-induced vivid dreaming and nightmares, until now it has not been associated with somnambulism. A case is reported of a patient treated with bupropion as a smoking cessation medication, who developed somnambulism during nicotine withdrawal. Furthermore, the sleepwalking episodes were associated with eating behaviour. Amnesia was reported for all episodes. As, on one hand,bupropion is a noradrenergic and dopaminergic drug and nicotine withdrawal, on the other hand, is associated with alterations in monoaminergic functions, an interaction at the level of these neurotransmitters is suggested as the underlying mechanism. PMID:13129839

  8. Antioxidant-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Cleva; Kross, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are among the most popular health-protecting products, sold worldwide without prescription. Indeed, there are many reports showing the benefits of antioxidants but only a few questioning the possible harmful effects of these “drugs”. The normal balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the body is offset when either of these forces prevails. The available evidence on the harmful effects of antioxidants is analyzed in this review. In summary, a hypothesis is presented that “antioxidant-induced stress” results when antioxidants overwhelm the body’s free radicals. PMID:22408440

  9. Cannabis induced asystole.

    PubMed

    Brancheau, Daniel; Blanco, Jessica; Gholkar, Gunjan; Patel, Brijesh; Machado, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis or marijuana is the most used recreational, and until recently illegal, drug in the United States. Although cannabis has medicinal use, its consumption has been linked to motor vehicle accidents in dose dependent fashion. Marijuana and other cannabinoids produce a multitude of effects on the human body that may result in these motor vehicle accidents. Some of the effects that marijuana has been known to cause include altered sensorium, diminished reflexes, and increased vagal tone. We present a case of cannabis induced asystole from hypervagotonia. PMID:26520167

  10. Cephalexin induced cholestatic jaundice.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Rao, Mana; Jasdanwala, Sarfaraz; Mathur, Ajay; Eng, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Cephalexin is a very commonly prescribed orally administered antibiotic which has many potential side effects. Amongst these cholestatic jaundice has been infrequently reported as an adverse reaction. We present a case of a 57-year-old male who exhibited features of cholestatic jaundice including elevated liver function tests (LFTs) after taking cephalexin and showed improvement on removal of the offending agent. During this time he was symptomatically treated with cholestyramine. Complete resolution of LFTs was seen in four weeks. Cephalexin induced cholestasis is rare and hence requires a high degree of clinical suspicion for prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25180107

  11. Alcohol induced liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, K A; McGee, J O

    1984-01-01

    Alcohol induces a variety of changes in the liver: fatty change, hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The histopathological appearances of these conditions are discussed, with special attention to differential diagnosis. Many forms of alcoholic liver disease are associated with Mallory body formation and fibrosis. Mallory bodies are formed, at least in part, from intermediate filaments. Associated changes in intermediate filament organisation in alcoholic liver disease also occur. Their significance in the pathogenesis of hepatocyte death may be related to abnormalities in messenger RNA function. The mechanisms underlying hepatic fibrogenesis are also discussed. Images PMID:6086722

  12. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  13. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  14. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  15. Transient induced drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weihs, D.; Katz, J.

    1986-01-01

    In the present treatment of the calculation of forces on a wing that is suddenly brought into motion at a constant speed, attention is given to the unsteady potential's contribution to the force balance. Total bound vorticity is produced at the initial impulse. The results obtained are independent of wing aspect ratio; as time increases, this effect on the drag force becomes smaller as the vortex emanating from the trailing edge is left behind. The second contributor to induced drag is the spanwise vorticity shedding that results from the spanwise load distribution of three-dimensional wings. This contribution grows with time as the length of the wake grows.

  16. Induced drag of multiplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prandtl, L

    1924-01-01

    The most important part of the resistance or drag of a wing system,the induced drag, can be calculated theoretically, when the distribution of lift on the individual wings is known. The calculation is based upon the assumption that the lift on the wings is distributed along the wing in proportion to the ordinates of a semi-ellipse. Formulas and numerical tables are given for calculating the drag. In this connection, the most favorable arrangements of biplanes and triplanes are discussed and the results are further elucidated by means of numerical examples.

  17. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously.

  18. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-31

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously. PMID:26274420

  19. Induced superconductivity in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heersche, Hubert B.; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Oostinga, Jeroen B.; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2007-07-01

    Graphene layers, prepared by mechanical exfoliation, were contacted by superconducting electrodes consisting of a titanium-aluminium bilayer. Quantum hall measurements in the normal state confirmed the single layer nature of the graphene samples. Proximity induced supercurrents were observed in all samples, below 1 K. Using a backgate, the Fermi energy could be swept from valence to conduction band via the Charge neutrality point, demonstrating supercurrents carried by holes and electrons, respectively. Interestingly, a finite supercurrent was also observed at the charge neutrality (or Dirac) point, where the density of carrier states vanishes. Our results demonstrate phase coherence in graphene.

  20. DETECTION OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM USING rRNA, tri5, AND Β-TUBULIN PRIMERS AND DETERMINING THEIR RELATIVE COPY NUMBER BY REAL TIME PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research utilizes the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to determine ribosomal copy number of fungal organisms found in unhealthy indoor environments. Knowing specific copy numbers will allow for greater accuracy in quantification when utilizing current pQCR tec...

  1. Production of proinflammatory mediators by indoor air bacteria and fungal spores in mouse and human cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Huttunen, Kati; Hyvärinen, Anne; Nevalainen, Aino; Komulainen, Hannu; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2003-01-01

    We compared the inflammatory and cytotoxic responses caused by household mold and bacteria in human and mouse cell lines. We studied the fungi Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium spinulosum, and Stachybotrys chartarum and the bacteria Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Streptomyces californicus for their cytotoxicity and ability to stimulate the production of inflammatory mediators in mouse RAW264.7 and human 28SC macrophage cell lines and in the human A549 lung epithelial cell line in 24-hr exposure to 10(5), 10(6), and 10(7) microbes/mL. We studied time dependency by terminating the exposure to 10(6) microbes/mL after 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hr. We analyzed production of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukins 6 and 1ss (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1ss, respectively) and measured nitric oxide production using the Griess method, expression of inducible NO-synthase with Western Blot analysis, and cytotoxicity with the MTT-test. All bacteria strongly induced the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and, to a lesser extent, the formation of IL-1ss in mouse macrophages. Only the spores of Str. californicus induced the production of NO and IL-6 in both human and mouse cells. In contrast, exposure to fungal strains did not markedly increase the production of NO or any cytokine in the studied cell lines except for Sta. chartarum, which increased IL-6 production somewhat in human lung epithelial cells. These microbes were less cytotoxic to human cells than to mouse cells. On the basis of equivalent numbers of bacteria and spores of fungi added to cell cultures, the overall potency to stimulate the production of proinflammatory mediators decreased in the order Ps. fluorescens > Str. californicus > B. cereus > Sta. chartarum > A. versicolor > P. spinulosum. These data suggest that bacteria in water-damaged buildings should also be considered as causative agents of adverse inflammatory effects. PMID:12515684

  2. Disorder-induced amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Li, Mo

    1997-03-01

    Many crystalline materials undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition when subjected to energetic particle irradiation at low temperatures. By focusing on the mean-square static atomic displacement as a generic measure of chemical and topological disorder, we are led quite naturally to a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion as a conceptual framework for a unified thermodynamic approach to solid-state amorphizing transformations. In its simplest form, the generalized Lindemann criterion assumes that the sum of the static and dynamic mean-square atomic displacements is constant along the polymorphous melting curve so that c-a transformations can be understood simply as melting of a critically-disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature where the supercooled liquid can persist indefinitely in a configurationally-frozen state. Evidence in support of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion for amorphization is provided by a large variety of experimental observations and by molecular dynamics simulations of heat-induced melting and of defect-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds.

  3. Statin-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Michał; Stępień, Karolina M; Tomaszewska, Joanna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2011-01-01

    Statins are considered to be safe, well tolerated and the most efficient drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, one of the main risk factor for atherosclerosis, and therefore they are frequently prescribed medications. The most severe adverse effect of statins is myotoxicity, in the form of myopathy, myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe adverse effect of statins, which may result in acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and death. The exact pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy is not fully known. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms may contribute to statin myotoxicity. This review focuses on a number of them. The prevention of statin-related myopathy involves using the lowest statin dose required to achieve therapeutic goals and avoiding polytherapy with drugs known to increase systemic exposure and myopathy risk. Currently, the only effective treatment of statin-induced myopathy is the discontinuation of statin use in patients affected by muscle aches, pains and elevated CK levels. PMID:22001973

  4. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  5. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  6. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, António J; Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-18

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  7. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-08-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional Λ-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing.

  8. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional Λ-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing. PMID:26314514

  9. [Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction].

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Terms exercise-induced asthma (EIA) or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) are used to describe transient bronchoconstriction occurring during or immediately after vigorous exercise in some subjects. For the diagnosis of EIB it is necessary to show at least 10% decrease in FEV1 from baseline following physical exercise. The prevalence of EIB has been reported to be 12-15% in general population, 10-20% in summer olympic athletes, affecting up to 50-70% of winter athletes (particularly ski runners and skaters). There are two key theories explaining EIB: thermal and osmotic. Differential diagnosis of EIB should include chronic cardio-pulmonary diseases, vocal cord dysfunction, hyperventilation syndrome and poor physical fitness or overtraining. According to the ATS guidelines from 1999 for the diagnosis of EIB a standardized exercise on a treadmill or cycle ergometer test with stable environmental conditions regarding temperature and humidity of inhaled air, should be employed. Other laboratory tests assessing bronchial hyperresponsiveness to indirect stimuli including eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH), mannitol, hypertonic saline, AMP or measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) are also successfully used. In the prevention of EIB include both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment. In patients with poorly controlled asthma intensification of anti-inflammatory treatment can decrease the frequency and severity of EIB. Short and long acting beta2-agonists, antileukotriene drugs can be used prior to exercise to prevent EIB. PMID:21190152

  10. [Drug-induced laryngospasm].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, T; Munakata, K

    1997-02-01

    We report a case of drug-induced laryngospasm due to Chlorpromazine. A drug-induced laryngospasm has not been previously reported in the literature. A 70-year-old male with the proximal end fracture of the femur was scheduled for the operative fixation. He had a past history of alcoholism and had underwent a long-term chlorpromazine therapy for 45 years until admission to our hospital. There have been a few reports on unexplained sudden deaths of patients receiving long-term treatment with chlorpromazine. Caution was therefore needed in general anesthesia, which was thought to be safer than epidural or spinal anesthesia in this case. Accordingly for the preparation of an emergency operation, the central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein was performed under subcutaneous injection of lidocaine. Severe dyspnea and cyanosis occurred a few minutes after the administration of lidocaine. The specific diagnosis of laryngospasm was made by inspection of the vocal cords. Immediate oral intubation was performed and no complications ensued during and after the operation. This episode strongly suggests that one reason of the unexplained sudden deaths of patients receiving long term treatment with chlorpromazine could be laryngospasm. In conclusion, anesthesiologists should be aware of the possibility of laryngospasm under similar conditions. PMID:9071116

  11. [Radiation-induced neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Dobrzyńska-Rutkowska, Aneta; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-12-01

    Radiation-induced neuropathy is commonly observed among oncological patients. Radiation can affect the nervous tissue directly or indirectly by inducing vasculopathy or dysfunction of internal organs. Symptoms may be mild and reversible (e.g., pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, drowsiness, fatigue, paresthesia) or life-threatening (cerebral oedema, increased intracranial pressure, seizures). Such complications are clinically divided into peripheral (plexopathies, neuropathies of spinal and cranial nerves) and central neuropathy (myelopathy, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment). The degree of neuronal damages primarily depends on the total and fractional radiation dose and applied therapeutic methods. The conformal and megavoltage radiotherapy seems to be the safeties ones. Diagnostic protocol includes physical examination, imaging (in particular magnetic resonance), electromyography, nerve conduction study and sometimes histological examination. Prevention and early detection of neurological complications are necessary in order to prevent a permanent dysfunction of the nervous system. Presently their treatment is mostly symptomatic, but in same cases a surgical intervention is required. An experimental and clinical data indicates some effectiveness of different neuroprotective agents (e.g. anticoagulants, vitamin E, hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline, bevacizumab, methylphenidate, donepezil), which should be administered before and/or during radiotherapy. PMID:24490474

  12. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  13. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  14. Cytokinin activity induced by thidiazuron.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J C; Katterman, F R

    1986-06-01

    The diphenylurea derivative thidiazuron induces a variety of cytokinin responses. Levels above 5 x 10(-9) molar and 4 x 10(-7) molar stimulate maximum soybean callus growth and radish cotyledon expansion, respectively. A wider range of dose response related effects follows thidiazuron induced tobacco plant regeneration. Analysis of soybean callus extracts strongly suggests that thidiazuron treatment creates an accumulation and/or synthesis of purine cytokinins, able to induce the growth, expansion and regeneration, mentioned above. PMID:16664878

  15. Uncertainty-induced quantum nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shao-xiong; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chang-shui; Song, He-shan

    2014-01-01

    Based on the skew information, we present a quantity, uncertainty-induced quantum nonlocality (UIN) to measure the quantum correlation. It can be considered as the updated version of the original measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN) preserving the good computability but eliminating the non-contractivity problem. For 2×d-dimensional state, it is shown that UIN can be given by a closed form. In addition, we also investigate the maximal uncertainty-induced nonlocality.

  16. [Radiation-induced cancers].

    PubMed

    Dutrillaux, B

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low dose range i.e., population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations of tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. PMID:9868399

  17. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  18. [Designer drug induced psychosis].

    PubMed

    Fullajtar, Mate; Ferencz, Csaba

    2012-06-01

    3,4-methylene-dioxy-pyrovalerone (MDPV) is a popular designer drug in Hungary, known as MP4. We present a case of a 34-year-old man, whose first psychotic episode was observed in the presence of MP4 use. The paranoid ideas of reference and the dereistic thinking could be the consequence of drug-induced psychosis. Within 24 hours after the intoxication was over delirium set in. The patient's history included only the use of MP4, use of other kinds of drugs was negated. The drug tests were negative, amphetamine derivates were not detectable in the urine sample. It is most likely that the MP4 pill contained an amount of MDPV less than detectable. In conclusion we suggest that the clinical picture could be the consequence of regular MDPV use. PMID:22710853

  19. Induced seismicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.

    1997-09-18

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

  20. Induced abortion in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hull, T H; Sarwono, S W; Widyantoro, N

    1993-01-01

    Induced abortion is one of the most difficult sociomedical problems facing the Indonesian government. While well-known in traditional society, the practice was discouraged by all Indonesian religious groups, and forbidden by the Dutch colonial authorities. Although abortion was technically illegal under the criminal code, a judicial interpretation in the early 1970s permitted medical professionals to offer the procedure so long as they were discreet and careful. The numbers of medical abortions carried out in Indonesia rose dramatically, and there was evidence of matching declines in the incidence of morbidity and mortality caused by dangerous illegal procedures. Medical and community groups campaigned for a more liberal abortion law to protect legal practitioners and stamp out illegal traditional practices. Their efforts appeared to bear fruit in the draft Health Law, but when the law was passed by the legislature in late 1992, the issue was again clouded by contradictions and inconsistencies. PMID:8212094

  1. Trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya; Cutro, Raymond; Mishkin, Joseph D

    2008-06-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. It improves survival and increases response to chemotherapy. The major side effect of trastuzumab is cardiotoxicity manifesting as a reduction in left ventricular systolic function, either asymptomatic or with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Although reversible in most cases, cardiotoxicity frequently results in the discontinuation of trastuzumab. The objective of this review is to summarize facts about trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity and to highlight the areas of future investigations. We searched PubMed for trials involving trastuzumab used as an adjuvant therapy for breast cancer, including the metastatic breast cancer setting, and focused on cardiotoxicity. PMID:18514938

  2. Discreteness induced extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira; da Silva, Linaena Méricy

    2015-11-01

    Two simple models based on ecological problems are discussed from the point of view of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. It is shown how discrepant may be the results of the models that include spatial distribution with discrete interactions when compared with the continuous analogous models. In the continuous case we have, under certain circumstances, the population explosion. When we take into account the finiteness of the population, we get the opposite result, extinction. We will analyze how these results depend on the dimension d of the space and describe the phenomenon of the "Discreteness Inducing Extinction" (DIE). The results are interpreted in the context of the "paradox of sex", an old problem of evolutionary biology.

  3. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  4. Laser-induced bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Lynch, R.V. III

    1981-01-01

    A project has been initiated to determine the feasibility of developing a complete airborne remote sensing system for rapidly mapping high concentration patches of bioluminescent organisms in the world's oceans. Conceptually, this system would be composed of a laser illuminator to induce bioluminescence and a low light level image intensifier for detection of light. Initial laboratory measurements consisted of using a 2-J flash lamp pulsed optical dye laser to excite bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocustis lunula at ambient temperature using Rhodamine 6G as the lasing dye (585 nm) and a laser pulse width of 1 microsec. After a latency period of 15-20 msec, the bioluminescence maximum occurred in the blue (480 nm is the wavelength maximum for most dinoflagellate bioluminescence) with the peaking occurring approximately 65 msec after the laser pulse. Planned experiments will investigate the effect of different excitation wavelengths and energies at various temperatures and salinities of the cultures.

  5. Sport-induced lipoma.

    PubMed

    Copcu, E

    2004-04-01

    Lipoma is the most common benign soft tissue tumour in human beings. It can be seen in all parts of the body and occupies the subcutaneous compartment predominantly. The pathogenesis of lipoma is still unknown, but trauma is one of the most implicated etiological factors. We report about two athletes with a very quickly grown lipoma on their right scapular area. One was a professional volleyball player and the other one was a table-tennis player. Both patients were right-handed. To our knowledge, there has been no report on sport-induced lipoma in the literature. We speculate that chronically minor traumas especially to the scapular area, in which fat tissue is located between the bone and the firm skin, may trigger the formation and enlargement of lipoma. PMID:15088241

  6. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF. PMID:26768242

  7. Baboon syndrome induced by hydroxyzine.

    PubMed

    Akkari, Hayet; Belhadjali, Hichem; Youssef, Monia; Mokni, Sana; Zili, Jamelediine

    2013-05-01

    Hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions are very rare. We report here a typical case of drug-related Baboon syndrome or symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE) which was induced by hydroxyzine in a 60-year-old man. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive patch and oral accidental provocation tests with hydroxyzine. Patch tests and oral provocation tests with cetirizine and levocetirizine were negative. A review of the literature identified only 17 reported cases of hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first case of hydroxyzine-induced SDRIFE. PMID:23723506

  8. Baboon Syndrome Induced by Hydroxyzine

    PubMed Central

    Akkari, Hayet; Belhadjali, Hichem; Youssef, Monia; Mokni, Sana; Zili, Jamelediine

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions are very rare. We report here a typical case of drug-related Baboon syndrome or symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE) which was induced by hydroxyzine in a 60-year-old man. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive patch and oral accidental provocation tests with hydroxyzine. Patch tests and oral provocation tests with cetirizine and levocetirizine were negative. A review of the literature identified only 17 reported cases of hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first case of hydroxyzine-induced SDRIFE. PMID:23723506

  9. Bellows flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, P. J.; Smyly, H. M.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The bellows flow excitation mechanism and results of comprehensive test program are summarized. The analytical model for predicting bellows flow induced stress is refined. The model includes the effects of an upstream elbow, arbitrary geometry, and multiple piles. A refined computer code for predicting flow induced stress is described which allows life prediction if a material S-N diagram is available.

  10. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  11. Captopril-induced cholestatic jaundice.

    PubMed

    Hagley, M T

    1991-01-01

    I have reported a case of captopril-induced cholestatic jaundice. This drug is being used with increasing frequency, so it is important that physicians recognize this adverse effect. Captopril-induced jaundice resolves after cessation of captopril therapy. PMID:1986415

  12. Laser induced ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedl, G.; Schuöcker, D.; Geringer, B.; Graf, J.; Klawatsch, D.; Lenz, H. P.; Piock, W. F.; Jetzinger, M.; Kapus, P.

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays, combustion engines and other combustion processes play an overwhelming and important role in everyday life. As a result, ignition of combustion processes is of great importance, too. Usually, ignition of a combustible material is defined in such a way that an ignition initiates a self-sustained reaction which propagates through the inflammable material even in the case that the ignition source has been removed. In most cases, a well defined ignition location and ignition time is of crucial importance. Spark plugs are well suited for such tasks but suffer from some disadvantages, like erosion of electrodes or restricted positioning possibilities. In some cases, ignition of combustible materials by means of high power laser pulses could be beneficial. High power lasers offer several different possibilities to ignite combustible materials, like thermal ignition, resonant ignition or optical breakdown ignition. Since thermal and resonant ignitions are not well suited on the requirements mentioned previously, only optical breakdown ignition will be discussed further. Optical breakdown of a gas within the focal spot of a high power laser allows a very distinct localization of the ignition spot in a combustible material. Since pulse duration is usually in the range of several nanoseconds, requirements on the ignition time are fulfilled easily, too. Laser peak intensities required for such an optical breakdown are in the range of 10 11 W/cm2. The hot plasma which forms during this breakdown initiates the following self-propagating combustion process. It has been shown previously that laser ignition of direct injection engines improves the fuel consumption as well as the exhaust emissions of such engines significantly. The work presented here gives a brief overview on the basics of laser induced ignition. Flame propagation which follows a successful ignition event can be distinguished into two diffrent regimes. Combustion processes within an engine are usually

  13. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  14. Clofibrate-Induced Antidiuresis

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Arnold M.; Howanitz, Joan; Gemert, Marcia Van; Miller, Myron

    1973-01-01

    Normal subjects and patients with antidiuretic hormone (ADH) deficiency were studied to determine the mechanism of the antidiuretic action of clofibrate. Before clofibrate treatment, the patients' ability to concentrate urine with a standardized dehydration procedure correlated with the amount of ADH which was excreted. During clofibrate administration all six patients with ADH deficiency developed an antidiuresis which was like that of ADH, since there was no change in sodium, potassium, total solute, or creatinine excretion. There was a correlation between the patients' ability to concentrate urine during dehydration and the subsequent response to clofibrate, and the excretion of ADH during dehydration correlated with the excretion of ADH on clofibrate therapy. Clofibrate-induced antidiuresis in these patients was partially overcome by ethanol and by water loading. Clofibrate interfered with the ability of patients and subjects to excrete a water load and prevented the water load from inhibiting ADH excretion in the normal subjects. These studies suggested that clofibrate was acting through endogenous ADH and this thesis was supported by the failure of clofibrate to produce an antidiuresis when injected into rats with total ADH deficiency (Brattleboro strain) although an antidiuresis was produced in water-loaded normal rats. When the drug was injected into Brattleboro rats with exogenous ADH, clofibrate either did not alter or it inhibited the action of the ADH. The data demonstrate that clofibrate has a significant ADH-like action. This action appears to be mediated through the release of endogenous ADH. Images PMID:4685079

  15. Fission-induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments, and to utilize the energy of the particles to create population inversion that would lead to laser action is investigated. An investigation was made of various laser materials which could be used for nuclear-pumped lasing. The most likely candidate for a fissioning material in the gaseous form is uranium hexafluoride - UF6, and experiments were performed to investigate materials that would be compatible with it. One of the central problems in understanding a fission-induced plasma is to obtain a model of the electron behavior, and some preliminary calculations are presented. In particular, the rates of various processes are discussed. A simple intuitive model of the electron energy distribution function is also shown. The results were useful for considering a mathematical model of a nuclear-pumped laser. Next a theoretical model of a (3)He-Ar nuclear-pumped laser is presented. The theory showed good qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Waterflood-induced fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Dikken, B.J.; Niko, H.

    1987-01-01

    Fracturing occurs quite often in water injection wells, with sometimes unforeseen consequences on waterflood sweep efficiency. One of the causes of fracturing is often the cooling of hot formations by cold injection water. A special version of a thermal reservoir simulator for prototype applications has thus been constructed that is capable of dealing with propagating waterflood-induces hydraulic fractures. With this simulator, fracture propagation and the effect of growing fractures on the sweep efficiency are studied. Infinite fracture conductivity is assumed. The limitation to a very high leak-off fractures justifies disregarding the changes in fracture volume. Fracture growth is calculated using the concept of a critical stress intensity factor. Both poro- and thermo-elastic changes in the horizontal stresses are calculated numerically and their influence on the fracture initiation/propagation is continuously taken into account. In addition, a model of fracture wall impairment because of filter-cake build-up due to poor quality injection water is included. Results are presented for both thermal and isothermal situations. It is observed in isothermal cases that the voidage replacement ratio (volume balance during injection) determined to a great extent the length to which the fracture eventually may grow.

  17. Opioid-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Bishal; Hayashi, Naomi; Tsukuura, Hiroaki; Honda, Kazunori; Shimokata, Tomoya; Ando, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a very troublesome, difficult to manage and a nearly universal complication of chronic opioid use to control pain associated with advanced illness. Some studies have reported that OIC is so intolerable in some patients that they skip their opioid medications and bear pain instead of OIC. Laxatives have commonly been used as a prophylaxis and treatment of OIC but they are frequently ineffective because the commonly available laxatives do not target the underlying mechanism of OIC, which is the blockade of peripheral mu-receptors. Recently, there have been a number of advances in the treatment of OIC, which any physician involved with opioid-prescribing discipline should be aware of. This review will update the new options and strategies available for treating OIC along with the relevant clinical trials. Finally, this review also provides a recommendation on the preferred way to approach a patient with OIC in the modern era as well as highlight on the importance of doctor-patient communication in this setting. PMID:26061717

  18. Laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Merante, Alfonso; Gareri, Pietro; Marigliano, Norma Maria; De Fazio, Salvatore; Bonacci, Elvira; Torchia, Carlo; Russo, Gaetano; Lacroce, Pasquale; Lacava, Roberto; Castagna, Alberto; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ruotolo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes a case of laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis in an elderly patient. An 87-year-old woman was hospitalized for the onset of confusion, tremors, an inability to walk, and a fever that she had been experiencing for 36 hours. She often took high dosages of lactulose and sorbitol syrup as a laxative (about 70 g/day). During her physical examination, the patient was confused, drowsy, and she presented hyposthenia in her upper and lower limbs, symmetric and diffuse moderate hyporeflexia, and her temperature was 37.8°C. Laboratory tests revealed severe hyponatremia with hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypochloremia, and metabolic alkalosis. Moreover, rhabdomyolysis markers were found. The correction of hydroelectrolytic imbalances with saline, potassium and sodium chlorure, calcium gluconate was the first treatment. During her hospitalization the patient presented acute delirium, treated with haloperidol and prometazine chloridrate intramuscularly. She was discharged 12 days later, after resolution of symptoms, and normalized laboratory tests. Over-the-counter drugs such as laxatives are usually not considered dangerous; on the other hand, they may cause serum electrolytic imbalance and rhabdomyolysis. A careful monitoring of all the drugs taken by the elderly is one of the most important duties of a physician since drug interactions and their secondary effects may be fatal. PMID:20396636

  19. Undulator induced resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.; Morton, P.; Spencer, J.; Winick, H.

    1983-08-01

    Undulators appear to be nearly ideal radiation sources for use in storage rings because of their high brightness and small perturbation on stored beam characteristics. We consider the effects of higher-order magnetic field errors and show how they increase beam size and may lead to unstable growth of betatron oscillations. We have observed such effects in SPEAR at betatron tunes satisfying the equations: 3nu/sub x/ + nu/sub y/ = 21 and nu/sub x/ + 3nu/sub y/ = 21. The widths of these resonances were measured to be GAMMA = 0.008 +- 0.004. They are clearly visible on the synchrotron light monitors with a very dynamic and characteristic beam blow-up pattern (reminiscent of a Miller beer label). A model is developed which predicts the locations of resonances, their widths and the projected shapes observed on the light monitors. By inducing such high-order coupling resonances one could study such things as the beam distribution in electron rings or possibly turbulent motion in proton rings.

  20. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Brieger, D B; Mak, K H; Kottke-Marchant, K; Topol, E J

    1998-06-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a potentially serious complication of heparin therapy and is being encountered more frequently in patients with cardiovascular disease as use of anticoagulant therapy becomes more widespread. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of this immune-mediated condition has improved in recent years, with heparin-platelet factor 4 complex as the culprit antigen in most patients. New sensitive laboratory assays for the pathogenic antibody are now available and should permit an earlier, more reliable diagnosis, but their optimal application remains to be defined. For patients in whom HIT is diagnosed, immediate discontinuation of heparin infusions and elimination of heparin from all flushes and ports are mandatory. Further management of patients with HIT is problematic at present, as there are no readily available alternative anticoagulant agents in the United States with proven efficacy in acute coronary disease. The direct thrombin inhibitors appear to be the most promising alternatives to heparin, when continued use of heparin is contraindicated, and the results of several multicenter trials evaluating their application in patients with HIT are awaited. PMID:9626819

  1. Dialysis induced hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Habte, B; Carter, R; Shamebo, M; Veicht, J; Boulton Jones, J M

    1982-09-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which hypoxemia is produced in patients on dialysis by studying changes in neutrophil count, blood gases and pulmonary function in a patient with only trace amounts of circulating C3 associated with Type II mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis and a control group of 6 patients with normal C3 levels during a 4 hour hemodialysis. Fifteen minutes after the start of dialysis the neutrophil count fell to 13% of pre-dialysis values in the control group while it only fell to 71% in the study patient. A further fall to 47% occurred in the patient at 30 minutes. A drop in PaO2 by 15% of initial values occurred at 15 and 30 minutes in the controls and the patient respectively matching the trend of fall in the neutrophil count. PaCO2 fell sharply across the dialysis membrane with reciprocol changes in the dialysis bath. Alveolar oxygen tension showed a significant reduction starting at 15 minutes correlating with the reduction in PaO2. The A-a O2 gradient was not altered significantly. These data strongly suggest that the principal mechanism leading to hypoxemia during dialysis is hypoventilation resulting from CO2 loss into the dialysis bath. Complement mediated pulmonary leucostasis may play a secondary role in inducing a quicker fall in PaO2 in the early part of dialysis. PMID:7140022

  2. Coffee-induced Hypokalaemia

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Taking an excess amount of caffeine (e.g. overdrinking caffeinated beverages) sometimes causes hypokalaemia. Although the detailed mechanism has not been clarified yet, an increased loss of potassium via the urine stream caused by the diuretic action of caffeine is proposed as one of the possibilities. We report the case of a 50-year-old female outpatient who rapidly developed severe generalized muscle weakness and fatigue. Her symptoms were considered to be principally due to hypokalaemia. Since her blood urea nitrogen concentration decreased greatly, it was suggested that she had massive polyuria due to overhydration (i.e. dilution of her body fluids). Initially, we considered that a urinary tract infection might have caused her illness. However, we found that she was a heavy coffee drinker and had constantly experienced massive diuresis. After a course of oral antibiotics, potassium replacement and stopping coffee (caffeine) ingestion, her symptoms resolved quickly. In conclusion, it was considered that overdrinking coffee (caffeine) induced her hypokalaemia. Probably, loss of potassium via the urine stream with secondary aldosteronism was the main cause of the hypokalaemia. PMID:21769248

  3. Carbimazole-induced agranulocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Anisha; Joseph, Siby; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Murali, Dhanya

    2015-01-01

    A 47 year old lady with hyperthyroidism for past 1½ years was initially on Carbimazole 20 mg orally then changed to 30 mg (during Hysterectomy) but was taking 10 mg for last 1 year. She had intermittent fever with severe B/L bifrontal headache since 3 weeks. Routine investigations showed anaemia, neutropenia, leucopenia and CRP elevation. Peripheral smear showed normocytic normochromic anaemia with Rouleaux formation, leucopenia with 2% atypical cells and mild thrombocytosis. Widal test, RA factor (Rheumatoid factor) test, Ig M (Immunoglobulin M) dengue, Ig M Lepto, TORCH infections (Toxoplasmosis, Other (Syphilis, varicella-zoster, parvovirus B19), Cytomegalovirus and Herpes infections), ANA (Antinuclear antibody) screen cANCA (Cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) and pANCA (Perinuclear Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies) tests were negative. Bone marrow aspiration showed normo to hypercellular marrow with 15% atypical cells and plasma cells. Multiple myeloma workup was done. Carbimazole was withheld. Conclusion: Drug induced agranulocytosis occurs with in 1-2 months of taking the antithyroid medication but onset delayed by 1½ year. De-challenge resulted normalization of blood parameters. PMID:26813922

  4. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Chong, William H; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Chen, Clara C; Collins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare and fascinating paraneoplastic syndrome in which patients present with bone pain, fractures, and muscle weakness. The cause is high blood levels of the recently identified phosphate and vitamin D-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). In TIO, FGF23 is secreted by mesenchymal tumors that are usually benign, but are typically very small and difficult to locate. FGF23 acts primarily at the renal tubule and impairs phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, leading to hypophosphatemia and low levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. A step-wise approach utilizing functional imaging (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and octreotide scintigraphy) followed by anatomical imaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and, if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23 is usually successful in locating the tumors. For tumors that cannot be located, medical treatment with phosphate supplements and active vitamin D (calcitriol or alphacalcidiol) is usually successful; however, the medical regimen can be cumbersome and associated with complications. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and provides guidance in evaluating and treating these patients. Novel imaging modalities and medical treatments, which hold promise for the future, are also reviewed. PMID:21490240

  5. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  6. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics. PMID:26918138

  7. Does stress induce bowel dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ming; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Kao, John Y

    2014-08-01

    Psychological stress is known to induce somatic symptoms. Classically, many gut physiological responses to stress are mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is, however, a growing body of evidence of stress-induced corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) release causing bowel dysfunction through multiple pathways, either through the HPA axis, the autonomic nervous systems, or directly on the bowel itself. In addition, recent findings of CRF influencing the composition of gut microbiota lend support for the use of probiotics, antibiotics, and other microbiota-altering agents as potential therapeutic measures in stress-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:24881644

  8. Seizures induced by playing music.

    PubMed

    Sutherling, W W; Hershman, L M; Miller, J Q; Lee, S I

    1980-09-01

    A 67-year-old organist and minister with diabetes mellitus had stereotyped focal seizures of the left lower face, jaw, and neck. Attacks occurred spontaneously or were induced when he played a specific hymn on the organ. The seizures were not induced by reading, singing, hearing, or playing the hymn silently. The patient had interictal weakness of the left lower face and left side of the tongue. Focal seizures were recorded on an electroencephalogram (EEG) at the right temporofrontal area. This patient illustrates partial seizures induced by playing music. PMID:6775246

  9. Geothermal induced seismicity program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    A plan for a National Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program has been prepared in consultation with a panel of experts from industry, academia, and government. The program calls for baseline seismic monitoring in regions of known future geothermal development, continued seismic monitoring and characterization of earthquakes in zones of geothermal fluid production and injection, modeling of the earthquake-inducing mechanism, and in situ measurement of stresses in the geothermal development. The Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program (GISP) will have as its objectives the evaluation of the seismic hazard, if any, associated with geothermal resource exploitation and the devising of a technology which, when properly utilized, will control or mitigate such hazards.

  10. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis.

    PubMed

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs' characteristics. PMID:26918138

  11. Drug-induced visceral angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Thalanayar, Prashanth M.; Ghobrial, Ibrahim; Lubin, Fritz; Karnik, Reena; Bhasin, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Angioedema associated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) is due to the accumulation of bradykinin and its metabolites. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) produce anti-hypertensive effects by blocking the angiotensin II AT1 receptor action; hence bradykinin-related side effects are not expected. However, we notice the occurrence of ARB-induced angioedema as not a very rare side effect. Visceral drug-induced angioedema has been reported with ACEIs, not with ARBs. This underlying review will help educate readers on the pathophysiology and recent guidelines pertaining to ACEI- and ARB-induced visceral angioedema. PMID:25317271

  12. Drug-Induced Urinary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Matlaga, Brian R; Shah, Ojas D; Assimos, Dean G

    2003-01-01

    Urinary calculi may be induced by a number of medications used to treat a variety of conditions. These medications may lead to metabolic abnormalities that facilitate the formation of stones. Drugs that induce metabolic calculi include loop diuretics; carbonic anhydrase inhibitors; and laxatives, when abused. Correcting the metabolic abnormality may eliminate or dramatically attenuate stone activity. Urinary calculi can also be induced by medications when the drugs crystallize and become the primary component of the stones. In this case, urinary supersaturation of the agent may promote formation of the calculi. Drugs that induce calculi via this process include magnesium trisilicate; ciprofloxacin; sulfa medications; triamterene; indinavir; and ephedrine, alone or in combination with guaifenesin. When this situation occurs, discontinuation of the medication is usually necessary. PMID:16985842

  13. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  14. Fluoxetine-induced pill oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Shiekh, Abdul Gaffar; Hussain, Waleed M; Miamini, Wail Al; Khoujah, Amer M; Zayyani, Najah R

    2011-01-01

    Pill-induced oesophagitis is well reported in people of all ages (range 3–98 years), with females outnumbering males by 1.5:1. Antibiotic pills, cardiac pills and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and alendronate are the most common culprits. We report a case of fluoxetine-induced pill oesophagitis in a young adult without any underlying pathological abnormalities of the oesophagus. PMID:22693306

  15. Irradiation Induced Creep of Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Murty, Prof K.L.; Eapen, Dr. Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The current status of graphite irradiation induced creep strain prediction is reviewed and the major creep models are described. The ability of the models to quantitatively predict the irradiation induced creep strain of graphite is reported. Potential mechanisms of in-crystal creep are reviewed as are mechanisms of pore generation under stress. The case for further experimental work is made and the need for improved creep models across multi-scales is highlighted.

  16. Vection and induced visual motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Ian P.

    1991-12-01

    When exposed to a large moving visual display, a person experiences illusory self motion (vection). Specialized devices were used to investigate the relation between illusory visual motion of stationary objects and illusory self motion induced by motion of a visual scene. In a first set of experiments, two distinct components of induced visual motion were measured: exocentric induced motion which causes a stationary object to appear to move with the self, and egocentric induced motion which causes an object to seem to move relative to the self. Another set of experiments was designed to reveal the extent to which vection depends on the presence of stationary objects in the field of view and to explore what types of relative motion between the moving display and the stationary objects most strongly induce vection. It was observed that when all stationary objects were removed, vection had a long latency and was very weak when it occurred. A third set of experiments was designed to reveal the extent to which illusory body tilt induced by viewing a tilted or rotating scene depends on the motion of a visual stimulus and on the geometrical features of the stimulus. The results reveal the relative contributions of visual polarity and visual motion to illusory body tilt and the extent to which visual stimuli can override conflicting stimuli arising from the otolith organs.

  17. Bulgy tadpoles: inducible defense morph.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kinya

    2004-08-01

    Predator induced morphological defenses are marked morphological shifts induced directly by cues associated with a predator. Generally, remote cues, i.e., chemical substances emitted from predators or injured conspecifics, are considered to be ideal signals to induce morphological change in aquatic environments rather than close cues, i.e., close chemical or tactile cues, since chemical substances that can propagate over relatively long distances and persist for a long period may allow organisms to keep safe and to deliberately change their morph. In fact, most organisms adopting an inducible morphological defense utilize remote chemical cues to detect predation risk and to produce morphological defenses. In this paper, we report a unique and functionally well designed inducible morphological defense strategy where the induction process requires close cues from a predator. The tadpoles of Rana pirica exhibited a bulgy bodied morphology when threatened with predation by larval salamanders, Hynobius retardatus, in close proximity. Predation trials and a function experiment showed that the induced bulgy morph is an adaptive defense phenotype against the gape-limited predator larval H. retardatus. Furthermore, R. pirica tadpoles use two adaptive strategies in terms of cost saving, i.e., adjustment of the extent of bulginess according to predation risk and reversibility by actual shrink of bulgy body after removing the predation threat. In general, R. pirica hatch earlier than H. retardatus. In natural ponds, during the early developmental stage R. pirica tadpoles live in close proximity to young H. retardatus larvae. As they grow, the salamanders gradually become serious predators and the predator-prey interaction becomes intimate. After a while, predation, cannibalism and metamorphosis decrease the number of salamanders in the ponds, and the predator-prey interaction weakens. Such a phenology in the predator-prey interaction allows the evolution of a close

  18. Drug-Induced Itch Management.

    PubMed

    Ebata, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Drugs may cause itching as a concomitant symptom of drug-induced skin reactions or in the form of pruritus without skin lesions. Drug-induced itch is defined as generalized itching without skin lesions, caused by a drug. Itching associated with drug-induced cholestasis is among the common dermatologic adverse events (dAEs) that induce itching. Some drugs such as opioids, antimalarials, and hydroxyethyl starch are known to induce itching without skin lesions. The clinical features and underlying proposed mechanisms of itching caused by these drugs have been specifically investigated. The recent application of targeted anticancer drugs has increased the survival rate of cancer patients. These new agents cause significant dAEs such as acneiform rashes, dry skin, hand-foot syndrome, paronychia, and itching. Itching is a common side effect of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. Though not life-threatening, these dAEs have a negative impact on a patient's quality of life, leading to dose reduction and possibly less effective cancer therapy. It is important to provide an effective supportive antipruritic treatment without interruption of the administration of these drugs. This chapter concludes by describing basic measures to be taken for diagnosis and treatment of drug-induced itch. The principle of treatment is discontinuation of suspected causative drugs in general except for anticancer medications. In case itching lasts long after drug withdrawal or the causative drug cannot be stopped, vigorous symptomatic antipruritic treatment and specific therapies for different types of drug-induced itch should be undertaken. PMID:27578085

  19. Phase modulation induced by cooperative effects in electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischhaker, Robert; Evers, Joerg; Dey, Tarak N.

    2010-07-15

    We analyze the influence of dipole-dipole interactions in an electromagnetically induced transparency set up for a density at the onset of cooperative effects. To this end, we include mean-field models for the influence of local-field corrections and radiation trapping into our calculation. We show both analytically and numerically that the polarization contribution to the local field strongly modulates the phase of a weak pulse. We give an intuitive explanation for this local-field-induced phase modulation and demonstrate that it distinctively differs from the nonlinear self-phase-modulation that a strong pulse experiences in a Kerr medium.

  20. Clindamycin-induced hypersensitivity reaction.

    PubMed

    Bulloch, Marilyn N; Baccas, Jonathan T; Arnold, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Drug-induced anaphylaxis is an unpredictable adverse reaction. Although it may occur with any medication, antibiotics induce more cases of anaphylaxis than any other medication class with most cases being induced by β-lactam antibiotics. Clindamycin is an antibiotic with good gram-positive and anaerobe coverage which is often used in patients with β-lactam allergies. We report the case of a 46-year-old female who experienced anaphylaxis after a dose of intravenous (IV) clindamycin. Following treatment with methylprednisolone, epinephrine, diphenhydramine, and albuterol, the patient stabilized. The patient's score on the Naranjo's algorithm was 8 (probable); a score of 9 (definite) limited only by absence of drug re-challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a clindamycin-induced anaphylaxis where the patient was not exposed to any other agent that may have triggered the response, the first case in the United States, and only the third documented case in the literature. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for drug-induced anaphylaxis in all medications. PMID:26216470

  1. Flash photography-induced maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Veugelen, Tim; Coutteel, Carine; Leys, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report a flash photography-induced maculopathy. Methods: A professional photographer blinded himself accidentally and he consulted 3 days after the event with a scotoma in his dominant left eye. A unilateral acute light-induced maculopathy with hemorrhage was observed. The lesion was studied with colour photography, fluorescein and indocyanin angiography, autofluorescence imaging and repeated optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Results: At age 43, this professional photographer was blinded by the flash light of his camera and subsequently realized he had a scotoma in his dominant eye. Three days after the event visual acuity (VA) was 20/70 and an acute light-induced maculopathy was noted. Another three days later, VA was 20/50 and the lesions were less prominent. After one month, the photographer still had problems making sharp pictures, VA was 20/25 and a macular scar was observed. During further follow-up, he regained full vision and experienced no professional problems. Conclusions: This case illustrates that the light of flash photography can accidentally hit an eye and induce a light-induced maculopathy.

  2. Static behaviour of induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-12-01

    The standard paradigm to describe seismicity induced by fluid injection is to apply nonlinear diffusion dynamics in a poroelastic medium. I show that the spatiotemporal behaviour and rate evolution of induced seismicity can, instead, be expressed by geometric operations on a static stress field produced by volume change at depth. I obtain laws similar in form to the ones derived from poroelasticity while requiring a lower description length. Although fluid flow is known to occur in the ground, it is not pertinent to the behaviour of induced seismicity. The proposed model is equivalent to the static stress model for tectonic foreshocks generated by the Non-Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory. This study hence verifies the explanatory power of this theory outside of its original scope.

  3. Psychotropic drug-induced neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Harpreet S; Singh, Ira

    2005-08-01

    Psychotropic medications have been known to cause blood dyscrasias, including neutropenia, and since the advent of clozapine, this side effect is now increasingly being recognized. Almost all the major classes of psychotropic medications have been associated with neutropenia. Operational definitions for blood dyscrasias have allowed us to create an epidemiological database on this rare side effect of psychotropic medications. With increased awareness of drug-induced neutropenia among physicians, methods of early detection and treatment of this side effect have also been the focus of recent literature. Another area of active research has been identifying the risk factors and mechanism of drug-induced neutropenia. This article attempts to synthesize our current understanding of psychotropic drug-induced neutropenia and also provide insights into future research in this realm. PMID:16234875

  4. The surgically induced stress response.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A; Herndon, David N

    2013-09-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes that induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Burn injuries provide an extreme model of trauma induced stress responses that can be used to study the long-term effects of a prolonged stress response. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to confer improved chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  5. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  6. Drug-induced renal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ghane Shahrbaf, Fatemeh; Assadi, Farahnak

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced nephrotoxicity are more common among infants and young children and in certain clinical situations such as underlying renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Drugs can cause acute renal injury, intrarenal obstruction, interstitial nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and acid-base and fluid electrolytes disorders. Certain drugs can cause alteration in intraglomerular hemodynamics, inflammatory changes in renal tubular cells, leading to acute kidney injury (AKI), tubulointerstitial disease and renal scarring. Drug-induced nephrotoxicity tends to occur more frequently in patients with intravascular volume depletion, diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and sepsis. Therefore, early detection of drugs adverse effects is important to prevent progression to end-stage renal disease. Preventive measures requires knowledge of mechanisms of drug-induced nephrotoxicity, understanding patients and drug-related risk factors coupled with therapeutic intervention by correcting risk factors, assessing baseline renal function before initiation of therapy, adjusting the drug dosage and avoiding use of nephrotoxic drug combinations. PMID:26468475

  7. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  8. Late Onset Clozapine Induced Agranulocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, Rajmohan; Kakkan, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Agranulocytosis is defined as an absolute neutrophil count less than 100/mm3 in association with infectious disease. The risk of agranulocytosis is 0.38% of all clozapine treated cases and there is a relatively lesser incidence in Indian population. The risk of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis and neutropenia is highest in the first 6 months and higher in the initial 18 months after the onset of treatment. There have been very few reports of neutropenia and agranulocytosis after this period. There have so far been no reports of late onset clozapine induced agranulocytosis has been reported from India. A case of late onset clozapine induced agranulocytosis with possible mechanism of the same is reported. PMID:25336778

  9. Induced abortion and contraception use

    PubMed Central

    du Prey, Beatrice; Talavlikar, Rachel; Mangat, Rupinder; Freiheit, Elizabeth A.; Drummond, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine what proportion of women seeking induced abortion in the Calgary census metropolitan area were immigrants. Design For 2 months, eligible women were asked to complete a questionnaire. Women who refused were asked to provide their country of birth (COB) to assess for selection bias. Setting Two abortion clinics in Calgary, Alta. Participants Women presenting at or less than 15 weeks’ gestational age for induced abortion for maternal indications. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the proportion of women seeking induced abortion services who were immigrants. Secondary outcomes compared socioeconomic characteristics and contraception use between immigrant and Canadian-born women. Results A total of 752 women either completed a questionnaire (78.6%) or provided their COB (21.4%). Overall, 28.9% of women living in the Calgary census metropolitan area who completed the questionnaire were immigrants, less than the 31.2% background proportion of immigrant women of childbearing age. However, 46.0% of women who provided only COB were immigrants. When these data were combined, 34.2% of women presenting for induced abortion identified as immigrant, a proportion not significantly different from the background proportion (P = .127). Immigrant women presenting for induced abortion tended to be older, more educated, married with children, and have increased parity. They were similar to Canadian-born women in number of previous abortions, income status, and employment status. Conclusion This study suggests that immigrant women in Calgary are not presenting for induced abortion in disproportionately higher numbers, which differs from existing European literature. This is likely owing to differing socioeconomic characteristics among the immigrant women in our study from what have been previously described in the literature (typically lower socioeconomic status). Much still needs to be explored with regard to factors influencing the use of

  10. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  11. Coating-induced wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiley, Daniel J.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1992-12-01

    The coatings which are used on telescope mirrors and other optical interfaces can have a profound effect on the image quality formed by an optical system. This paper evaluates the defocus and astigmatism which are caused by the s- and p-phase shifts of coatings. These coating-induced wavefront aberrations are usually insignificant, but can, under certain circumstances, overshadow the geometric wavefront aberrations of the system. The wavefront aberrations induced by reflection-enhanced coatings on an f/1.5 Cassegrain telescope are numerically evaluated as an example.

  12. Induced piezoelectricity in isotropic biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R L

    1976-12-01

    Isotropic material can be made to exhibit piezoelectric effects by the application of a constant electric field. For insulators, the piezoelectric strain constant is proportional to the applied electric field and for semiconductors, an additional out-of-phase component of piezoelectricity is proportional to the electric current density in the sample. The two induced coefficients are proportional to the strain-dependent dielectric constant (depsilon/dS + epsilon) and resistivity (drho/dS - rho), respectively. The latter is more important at frequencies such that rhoepsilonomega less than 1, often the case in biopolymers. Signals from induced piezoelectricity in nature may be larger than those from true piezoelectricity. PMID:990389

  13. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Method for induced polarization logging

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1987-04-14

    A method is described for generating a log of the formation phase shift, resistivity and spontaneous potential of an earth formation from data obtained from the earth formation with a multi-electrode induced polarization logging tool. The method comprises obtaining data samples from the formation at measurement points equally spaced in time of the magnitude and phase of the induced voltage and the magnitude and phase of the current supplied by a circuit through a reference resistance R/sub 0/ to a survey current electrode associated with the tool.

  15. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  16. Anaphylaxis induced by lentil inhalation.

    PubMed

    Ayşenur, Kaya; Akan, Ayşegül; Mustafa, Erkoçoğlu; Müge, Toyran; Kocabaş, Can Naci

    2012-06-01

    Anaphylaxis is a rapid onset serious allergic reaction which may be fatal. Foods are the most common allergens leading to anaphylaxis especially for childhood. Most of the food-induced anaphylactic reactions take place after ingestion of the allergic food and only a few cases exist with anaphylactic reactions induced by inhalation of foods such as peanut, soybean and lupine. The case we present is unusual in that an 8 1/2-year-old boy developed anaphylaxis with the inhalation of steam from boiling lentils. PMID:22830298

  17. Key aspects governing induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijze, Loes; Wassing, Brecht; Fokker, Peter

    2013-04-01

    In the past decades numerous examples of earthquakes induced by human-induced changes in subsurface fluid pressures have been reported. This poses a major threat to the future development of some of these operations and calls for an understanding and quantification of the seismicity generated. From geomechanical considerations and insights from laboratory experiments the factors controlling induced seismicity may be grouped into 4 categories; the magnitude of the stress disturbance, the pre-existing stress conditions, the reservoir/fault rock properties and the local geometry. We investigated whether the (relative) contributions of these factors and their influence on magnitudes generated could be recognized by looking at the entire dataset of reported cases of induced seismicity as a whole, and what this might imply for future developments. An extensive database has been built out of over a 160 known cases of induced seismicity worldwide, incorporating the relevant geological, seismological and fluid-related parameters. The cases studied include hydrocarbon depletion and secondary recovery, waste water injection, (enhanced) geothermal systems and hydraulic fracturing with observed magnitudes ranging from less than -1.5 to 7. The parameters taken into account were based on the theoretical background of the mechanisms of induced seismicity and include the injection/depletion-related parameters, (spatial) characteristics of seismicity, lithological properties and the local stress situation. Correlations between the seismic response and the geological/geomechanical characteristics of the various sites were investigated. The injected/depleted volumes and the scale of the activities are major controlling factors on the maximum magnitudes generated. Spatial signatures of seismicity such as the depth and lateral spread of the seismicity were observed to be distinct for different activities, which is useful when considering future operations. Where available the local

  18. A quantitative multiplex nuclease protection assay reveals immunotoxicity gene expression profiles in the rabbit model for vaginal drug safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fichorova, Raina N; Mendonca, Kevin; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Murray, Ryan; Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2015-06-15

    Any vaginal product that alters the mucosal environment and impairs the immune barrier increases the risk of sexually transmitted infections, especially HIV infection, which thrives on mucosal damage and inflammation. The FDA-recommended rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI) model serves as a first line selection tool for vaginal products; however, for decades it has been limited to histopathology scoring, insufficient to select safe anti-HIV microbicides. In this study we incorporate to the RVI model a novel quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA) to quantify mRNA levels of 25 genes representing leukocyte differentiation markers, toll-like receptors (TLR), cytokines, chemokines, epithelial repair, microbicidal and vascular markers, by designing two multiplex arrays. Tissue sections were obtained from 36 rabbits (6 per treatment arm) after 14 daily applications of a placebo gel, saline, 4% nonoxynol-9 (N-9), and three combinations of the anti-HIV microbicides tenofovir (TFV) and UC781 in escalating concentrations (highest: 10% TFV+2.5%UC781). Results showed that increased expression levels of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, interleukin (IL)-1β, CXCL8, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 (P<0.05), and decreased levels of TLR2 (P<0.05), TLR3 and bactericidal permeability increasing protein (BPI) (P<0.001) were associated with cervicovaginal mucosal alteration (histopathology). Seven markers showed a significant linear trend predicting epithelial damage (up with CD4, IL-1β, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL21, EMP1 and down with BPI). Despite the low tissue damage RVI scores, the high-dose microbicide combination gel caused activation of HIV host cells (SLC and CD4) while N-9 caused proinflammatory gene upregulation (IL-8 and TLR4) suggesting a potential for increasing risk of HIV via different mechanisms depending on the chemical nature of the test product. PMID:25818602

  19. Stress response, biotransformation effort, and immunotoxicity in captive birds exposed to inhaled benzene, toluene, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martinez, Luis; Smits, Judit E G; Fernie, Kim

    2015-02-01

    In the oil sands of Alberta, Canada, toxicology research has largely neglected the effects of air contaminants on biota. Captive Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) and American kestrels (Falco sparverius) were exposed to mixtures of volatile organic compounds and oxidizing agents (benzene, toluene, NO2 and SO2) in a whole-body inhalation chamber, to test for toxicological responses. Hepatic biotransformation measured through 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) tended to be increased in exposed kestrels (p=0.06) but not in quail (p=0.15). Plasma corticosterone was increased in the low dose group for quail on the final day of exposure (p=0.0001), and midway through the exposure period in exposed kestrels (p=0.04). For both species, there was no alteration of T and B-cell responses, immune organ mass, or histology of immune organs (p>0.05). This study provides baseline information valuable to complement toxicology studies and provides a better understanding of potential health effects on wild avifauna. PMID:25463874

  20. IMMUNOTOXICITY OF DlBROMOACETIC ACID ADMINISTERED VIA DRINKING WATER TO FEMALE B6C3Fl MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dibromoacetic acid (DBA) is a disinfection by product commonly found in drinking water as a result of chlorination/ozonation processes. The EPA estimates that more than 200 million people consume disinfected water in the U.S. (EPA 1998). This study was conducted to evaluate the p...

  1. Immunotoxicity of environmentally relevant mixtures of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons with methyl mercury on rat lymphocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Omara, F.O.; Brochu, C.; Flipo, D.; Denizeau, F.; Fournier, M.

    1997-03-01

    The immunosuppressive effects of methyl mercury (MHg), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are well established at higher exposure levels but unclear at low exposure levels. The authors exposed Fischer 344 rat splenocytes, thymocytes, and peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro for 72 h to MHg of three PCDDs and two PCDFs PCB mixtures, or combinations of MHg/PCB/PCDD/PCDF mixtures Mitogenic responses of lymphocytes to concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, or lipopolysaccharide/dextran sulfate were determined by {sup 3}H-thymidine uptake; cytotoxicity and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} were determined by flow cytometry. Methylmercury mixtures with 2 {micro}g/ml MHg decreased the viability of splenocytes to 57 and 40% at 4 and 24 h, respectively. Basal intracellular calcium ion levels were unaffected by the treatments. Methylmercury suppressed the responses of lymphocytes to T and B cell mitogens. All combinations of MHg/PCB/PCDD/PCDF mixtures decreased mitogenic responses to levels similar to those to MHg alone. In contrast, PCB and PCDD/PCDF mixtures did not suppress but augmented responses of splenocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes to T cell mitogens. Overall, no interactive toxicity was observed with MHg/PCB/PCDD/PCDF mixtures on cytotoxicity and lymphocyte mitogenic responses. Therefore, MHg may pose a greater threat than organochlorines to the mammalian immune system.

  2. A quantitative multiplex nuclease protection assay reveals immunotoxicity gene expression profiles in the rabbit model for vaginal drug safety evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fichorova, Raina N.; Mendonca, Kevin; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Murray, Ryan; Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2015-06-15

    Any vaginal product that alters the mucosal environment and impairs the immune barrier increases the risk of sexually transmitted infections, especially HIV infection, which thrives on mucosal damage and inflammation. The FDA-recommended rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI) model serves as a first line selection tool for vaginal products; however, for decades it has been limited to histopathology scoring, insufficient to select safe anti-HIV microbicides. In this study we incorporate to the RVI model a novel quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA) to quantify mRNA levels of 25 genes representing leukocyte differentiation markers, toll-like receptors (TLR), cytokines, chemokines, epithelial repair, microbicidal and vascular markers, by designing two multiplex arrays. Tissue sections were obtained from 36 rabbits (6 per treatment arm) after 14 daily applications of a placebo gel, saline, 4% nonoxynol-9 (N-9), and three combinations of the anti-HIV microbicides tenofovir (TFV) and UC781 in escalating concentrations (highest: 10% TFV + 2.5%UC781). Results showed that increased expression levels of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, interleukin (IL)-1β, CXCL8, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 (P < 0.05), and decreased levels of TLR2 (P < 0.05), TLR3 and bactericidal permeability increasing protein (BPI) (P < 0.001) were associated with cervicovaginal mucosal alteration (histopathology). Seven markers showed a significant linear trend predicting epithelial damage (up with CD4, IL-1β, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL21, EMP1 and down with BPI). Despite the low tissue damage RVI scores, the high-dose microbicide combination gel caused activation of HIV host cells (SLC and CD4) while N-9 caused proinflammatory gene upregulation (IL-8 and TLR4) suggesting a potential for increasing risk of HIV via different mechanisms depending on the chemical nature of the test product. - Highlights: • A transcriptome nuclease protection assay assessed microbicides for vaginal safety. • Biomarkers were correlated with histopathology in paraffin-embedded rabbit tissues. • Compounds differed by effects on putative pathways of increased risk of HIV. • Nonsoxynol-9 caused inflammatory tissue damage involving TLR4 and IL-8. • An antiretroviral combination stimulated immune cells evidenced by SLC and CD4.

  3. Immunotoxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate and the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferators, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), are environmentally widespread and persistent and multiple toxicities have been reported in experimental animals and humans. These compounds trigger biological activity via activation of the alpha isotype of pero...

  4. Determination of the immunotoxic potential of heavy metals on the functional activity of bottlenose dolphin leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cámara Pellissó, S; Muñoz, M J; Carballo, M; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2008-02-15

    Heavy metals may affect the immune system of cetaceans. But no information exists on their effects on the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) immune system, although this species is a coastal top predator which can bioaccumulate high concentrations of them. This work studies the effects of Hg (1, 5 and 10mg/L), Al (2,5, 25 and 50mg/L), Cd (1, 10, 20 and 40mg/L), Pb (1, 10, 20 and 50mg/L) and Cr (1 and 10mg/L), on the function of phagocytes and lymphocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of bottlenose dolphins under in vitro conditions. Cell viability, apoptosis, lymphocyte proliferation and phagocytosis were evaluated. Viability and lymphoproliferation were measured with Alamar Blue assay, and apoptosis and phagocytosis were evaluated with flow cytometry. Apoptosis was detected as mechanism of cell death after cadmium and mercury exposure. A significant reduction in the lymphoproliferative response was registered by exposure to 1mg/L of mercury, 10mg/L of cadmium and 50mg/L of lead. Decreased phagocytosis was also observed at 5mg/L of mercury, 50mg/L of aluminium and 10mg/L of cadmium. Chromium did not present any effects on any immune assay at the concentrations tested. The concentrations of heavy metals that were found to affect the functional activity of bottlenose dolphin leukocytes are within the environmental ranges reported in the tissues of bottlenose dolphins. These results support the hypothesis that exposure to these contaminants, particularly mercury and cadmium could lead to a reduction in host resistance to disease in these animals. PMID:17997166

  5. Cis-urocanic acid increases immunotoxicity and lethality of dermally administered permethrin in C57BL/6N mice.

    PubMed

    Prater, M R; Gogal, R M; Blaylock, B L; Holladay, S D

    2003-01-01

    Immunomodulatory effects of a single topical permethrin exposure, 5-day exposure to cis-urocanic acid (cUCA), or a combination of the two chemicals were evaluated in 4- to 5-week-old female C57BL/6N mice. Permethrin alone decreased thymic weight and cellularity. Although cUCA alone did not affect thymic end points, coexposure to topical permethrin and cUCA exacerbated the thymolytic effects of permethrin. The single topical dose of permethrin also depressed several immune responses in isolated splenic leukocytes. This included splenic T-cell proliferative response to mitogen, splenic macrophage hydrogen peroxide production, and splenic B lymphocyte-specific antibody production. Unlike the effect of coexposure to these agents on thymic end points, cUCA did not exacerbate permethrin's adverse effect on any of the splenic end points examined. These results appear to suggest divergent mechanisms by which these compounds affect precursor and functionally mature T cells. At the doses used in this study, permethrin caused neurotoxic effects, including lethality, in a portion of the mice. For undetermined reasons, cUCA significantly increased the rate of lethality caused by permethrin. Although the permethrin doses used in this study exceed that typically used in human medicine, these results raise some concerns about the possibility that sunlight, via cUCA, may increase the risk of adverse central nervous system and immune effects caused by permethrin alone. PMID:12573947

  6. Static behaviour of induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    The standard paradigm to describe seismicity induced by fluid injection is to apply non-linear diffusion dynamics in a poroelastic medium. I show that the spatio-temporal behaviour and rate evolution of induced seismicity can, instead, be expressed by geometric operations on a static stress field produced by volume change at depth. I obtain laws similar in form to the ones derived from poroelasticity while requiring a lower description length. Although fluid flow is known to occur in the ground, it is not pertinent to the geometrical description of the spatio-temporal patterns of induced seismicity. The proposed model is equivalent to the static stress model for tectonic foreshocks generated by the Non-Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory. This study hence verifies the explanatory power of this theory outside of its original scope and provides an alternative physical approach to poroelasticity for the modelling of induced seismicity. The applicability of the proposed geometrical approach is illustrated for the case of the 2006, Basel enhanced geothermal system stimulation experiment. Applicability to more problematic cases where the stress field may be spatially heterogeneous is also discussed.

  7. INDUCED SECONDARY COMBUSTION IN WOODSTOVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper provides information useful for woodstove designers concerned with reducing emissions. A dual-chamber woodstove was modified to induce secondary combustion by utilizing an ignition source and forced flow of secondary air. The ignition source was an electric glow plug in...

  8. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  9. Photo-induced isotopic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Charles E.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2000-12-01

    This paper presents a systematic method for the analysis of photo-induced isotopic fractionation. The physical basis for this fractionation mechanism centers on the fact that isotopic substitution alters the energy levels, molecular symmetries, spin statistical weights and other fundamental molecular properties, producing spectroscopic signatures distinguishable from that of the parent isotopomer. These mass-dependent physical properties are identical to those invoked by Urey to explain stable isotope fractionation in chemical systems subject to thermodynamic equilibrium. Photo-induced isotopic fractionation is a completely general phenomenon and should be observable in virtually all gas phase photochemical systems. Water photo-induced isotopic fractionation has been examined in detail using experimental and theoretical data. These results illustrate the salient features of this fractionation mechanism for molecules possessing continuous UV absorption spectra and unit photodissociation quantum yields. Using the photo-induced isotopic fractionation methodology in conjunction with standard photochemical models, we predict substantial deuterium enrichment of water vapor in the planetary atmospheres of Earth and Mars.

  10. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  11. Noncoercive Inducements in International Conflicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriesberg, Louis

    This paper examines noncoercion in international struggles, reviews instances in which positive inducements were combined with or used instead of coercion, and analyzes conditions affecting the utilization and effectiveness of noncoercive means in conducting international relations. Coercion refers to actual and threatened violent and nonviolent…

  12. Foscarnet-induced penile ulceration.

    PubMed

    Torres, T; Fernandes, I; Sanches, M; Selores, M

    2011-01-01

    Foscarnet is used to treat herpes viruses, including drug-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2). There are some reports of intravenous foscarnet-induced penile and vulvar ulceration. The authors report a case of the development of severe penile ulcers after the initiation of intravenous foscarnet therapy. PMID:21879205

  13. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  14. MECHANISMS OF ARSENICAL INDUCED MALFORMATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our research uses the whole embryo culture system to expose mouse embryos to arsenic at the neurulation stage of development (This stage of development is most susceptible to arsenical-induced defects). This includes studies to assess the distribution of cells in the cell cycle a...

  15. Palatine perforation induced by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Rosas, Miguel; Jimenez-Santos, Cecilia Irene; García-González, Claudia Lorena

    2006-05-01

    Worldwide, the use of cocaine has an increased over the years, various secondary effects have been described. Here we present a 48 years old female with a 2-month evolution bucconasal ulcer in the hard palate induced by cocaine usage accompanied by swallow and phonation dysfunctions. Ethiopathogenesis, differential diagnoses and treatment are discussed. PMID:16648760

  16. Adrafinil-induced orofacial dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Thobois, Stéphane; Xie, Jing; Mollion, Helena; Benatru, Isabelle; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2004-08-01

    We describe the first case of orofacial abnormal movements induced by adrafinil, a vigilance promoting agent of the same pharmacological class as modafinil. The dyskinesias did not spontaneously recover despite adrafinil withdrawal for a 4-month period. They were secondly dramatically improved by tetrabenazine, a presynaptic dopaminergic depleting drug which was introduced after the 4-month adrafinil-free period. PMID:15300665

  17. Rowell's syndrome induced by terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Murad, Aizuri; Shudell, Emma; Mulligan, Niall

    2015-01-01

    Terbinafine, a systemic antifungal commonly prescribed for onychomycosis (fungal infection involving the nails) has been reported to cause various cutaneous adverse effects. We describe an overlap syndrome between cutaneous lupus and erythaema multiforme induced by this medication with a review of other reported cases. PMID:26021384

  18. [Readers' position against induced abortion].

    PubMed

    1981-08-25

    Replies to the request by the Journal of Nursing on readers' positions against induced abortion indicate there is a definite personal position against induced abortion and the assistance in this procedure. Some writers expressed an emotional "no" against induced abortion. Many quoted arguments from the literature, such as a medical dictionary definition as "a premeditated criminally induced abortion." The largest group of writers quoted from the Bible, the tenor always being: "God made man, he made us with his hands; we have no right to make the decision." People with other philosophies also objected. Theosophical viewpoint considers reincarnation and the law of cause and effect (karma). This philosophy holds that induced abortion impedes the appearance of a reincarnated being. The fundamental question in the abortion problem is, "can the fetus be considered a human life?" The German anatomist Professor E. Bleckschmidt points out that from conception there is human life, hence the fertilized cell can only develop into a human being and is not merely a piece of tissue. Professional nursing interpretation is that nursing action directed towards killing of a human being (unborn child) is against the nature and the essence of the nursing profession. A different opinion states that a nurse cares for patients who have decided for the operation. The nurse doesn't judge but respects the individual's decision. Some proabortion viewpoints considered the endangering of the mother's life by the unborn child, and the case of rape. With the arguments against abortion the question arises how to help the woman with unwanted pregnancy. Psychological counseling is emphasized as well as responsible and careful assistance. Referral to the Society for Protection of the Unborn Child (VBOK) is considered as well as other agencies. Further reader comments on this subject are solicited. PMID:6913282

  19. Distinguishing warming-induced drought from drought-induced warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, M. L.; Yin, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is usually observed that temperatures, especially maximum temperatures are higher during drought. A very widely held public perception is that the increase in temperature is a cause of drought. This represents the warming-induced drought scenario. However, the agricultural and hydrologic scientific communities have a very different interpretation with drought being the cause of increasing temperature. In essence, those communities assume the warming is a surface feedback and their interpretation is for drought-induced warming. This is a classic cause-effect problem that has resisted definitive explanation due to the lack of radiative observations at suitable spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation we first summarise the observations and then use theory to untangle the cause-effect relationships that underlie the competing interpretations. We then show how satellite data (CERES, NASA) can be used to disentangle the cause-effect relations.

  20. An inducible offense: carnivore morph tadpoles induced by tadpole carnivory

    PubMed Central

    Levis, Nicholas A; de la Serna Buzón, Sofia; Pfennig, David W

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is commonplace, and plasticity theory predicts that organisms should often evolve mechanisms to detect and respond to environmental cues that accurately predict future environmental conditions. Here, we test this prediction in tadpoles of spadefoot toads, Spea multiplicata. These tadpoles develop into either an omnivore ecomorph, which is a dietary generalist, or a carnivore ecomorph, which specializes on anostracan shrimp and other tadpoles. We investigated a novel proximate cue – ingestion of Scaphiopus tadpoles – and its propensity to produce carnivores by rearing tadpoles on different diets. We found that diets containing tadpoles from the genus Scaphiopus produced more carnivores than diets without Scaphiopus tadpoles. We discuss why Scaphiopus tadpoles are an excellent food source and why it is therefore advantageous for S. multiplicata tadpoles to produce an inducible offense that allows them to better utilize this resource. In general, such inducible offenses provide an excellent setting for investigating the proximate and evolutionary basis of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25897380