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Sample records for chemical biodynamics division

  1. Chemical Biodynamics Division. Annual report 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Chemical Biodynamics Division of LBL continues to conduct basic research on the dynamics of living cells and on the interaction of radiant energy with organic matter. Many aspects of this basic research are related to problems of environmental and health effects of fossil fuel combustion, solar energy conversion and chemical/ viral carcinogenesis.

  2. Chemical Biodynamics Division: Annual report, October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    The research in the Laboratory of Chemical Biodynamics is almost entirely fundamental research. The biological research component is strongly dominated by a long term interest in two main themes which make up our Structural Biology Program. The first interest has to do with understanding the molecular dynamics of photosynthesis. The Laboratory's investigators are studying the various components that make up the photosynthetic reaction center complexes in many different organisms. This work not only involves understanding the kinetics of energy transfer and storage in plants, but also includes studies to work out how photosynthetic cells regulate the expression of genes encoding the photosynthetic apparatus. The second biological theme is a series of investigations into the relationship between structure and function in nucleic acids. Our basic mission in this program is to couple our chemical and biophysical expertise to understand how not only the primary structure of nucleic acids, but also higher levels of structure including interactions with proteins and other nucleic acids regulate the functional activity of genes. In the chemical sciences work in the Laboratory, our investigators are increasing our understanding of the fundamental chemistry of electronically excited molecules, a critical dimension of every photosynthetic energy storage process. We are developing approaches not only toward the utilization of sophisticated chemistry to store photon energy, but also to develop systems that can emulate the photosynthetic apparatus in the trapping and transfer of photosynthetic energy.

  3. Chemical Biodynamics Division: Annual report, October 1, 1986-September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Investigators are studying the various components that make up the photosynthetic reaction center complexes in many different organisms. This work not only involves understanding the kinetics of energy transfer and storage in plants, but also includes studies to work out how photosynthetic cells regulate the expression of genes encoding the photosynthetic apparatus. The second biological theme is a series of investigations into the relationship between structure and function in nucleic acids. Our basic mission in this program is to couple our chemical and biophysical expertise to understand how not only the primary structure of nucleic acids, but also higher levels of structure including interactions with proteins and other nucleic acids regulate the functional activity of genes. In the chemical sciences investigators are increasing our understanding of the fundamental chemistry of electronically excited molecules, a critical dimension of every photosynthetic energy storage process. We are developing approaches not only toward the utilization of sophisticated chemistry to store photon energy, but also to develop systems that can emulate the photosynthetic apparatus in the trapping and transfer of photosynthetic energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base.

  4. Chemical Engineering Division Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical Engineering Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The 1978 ASEE Chemical Engineering Division Lecturer was Theodore Vermeulen of the University of California at Berkeley. Other chemical engineers who received awards or special recognition at a recent ASEE annual conference are mentioned. (BB)

  5. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  6. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

  7. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1997 are presented.

  8. 1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

    1999-08-06

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

  9. 2002 Chemical Engineering Division annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.; Graziano, D.; Miller, J. F.

    2003-05-22

    The Chemical Engineering Division is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. The Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory; Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services; and Dosimetry and Radioprotection services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors. Our wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by

  10. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, N.

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  11. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.; Gay, E. C.; Miller, J. C.; Boparai, A. S.

    2002-07-02

    The Chemical Technology Division (CMT) is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. CMT is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory and Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors.

  12. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Laidler, J.J.; Myles, K.M.; Green, D.W.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems.

  13. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  14. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  15. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  18. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1994-04-01

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

  19. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  20. The Division of Chemical Education Revisited, 25 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines what has happened over a period of 25 years since a separate Division of Chemical Education was created within the Department of Chemistry at Purdue University. It argues that the faith in the chemical education graduate program that was demonstrated when the division was created was well-placed, and that chemical education has…

  1. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1990 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for coal- fired magnetohydrodynamics and fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for a high-level waste repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, concentrating plutonium solids in pyrochemical residues by aqueous biphase extraction, and treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 66 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    CMT is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. It conducts R&D in 3 general areas: development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, materials chemistry of electrified interfaces and molecular sieves, and the theory of materials properties. It also operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at ANL and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1996 are presented.

  3. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1993-06-01

    In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste, mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and municipal solid waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, treating water contaminated with volatile organics, and concentrating radioactive waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (EFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials (corium; Fe-U-Zr, tritium in LiAlO{sub 2} in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel` ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, and molecular sieve structures; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  4. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures.

  5. Chemical Engineering Division research highlights, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, L.; Webster, D. S.; Barney, D. L.; Cafasso, F. A.; Steindler, M. J.

    1980-06-01

    In 1979, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-temperature, rechargeable lithium/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and electric utility load leveling; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (4) coal technology - mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO/sub 2/ sorbent of limestone; (5) heat- and seed- recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (6) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (7) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (8) fuel cycle technology - reprocessing of nuclear fuels, management of nuclear wastes, geologic migration studies, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; (9) magnetic fusion research - lithium processing technology and materials research; and (10) basic energy sciences - homogeneous catalysis, thermodynamics of inorganic and organic materials, environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, and physical properties of salt vapors. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these areas.

  6. The Chemical Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory: Applying chemical innovation to environmental problems

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Chemical Technology Division is one of the largest technical divisions at Argonne National Laboratory, a leading center for research and development related to energy and environmental issues. Since its inception in 1948, the Division has pioneered in developing separations processes for the nuclear industry. The current scope of activities includes R&D on methods for disposing of radioactive and hazardous wastes and on energy conversion processes with improved efficiencies, lower costs, and reduced environmental impact. Many of the technologies developed by CMT can be applied to solve manufacturing as well as environmental problems of industry.

  7. The ORNL Chemical Technology Division, 1950-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, R.L.; Genung, R.K.; McNeese, L.E.; Mrochek, J.E.

    1994-10-01

    This document attempts to reconstruct the role played by the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the atomic era since the 1940`s related to the development and production of nuclear weapons and power reactors. Chem Tech`s early contributions were landmark pioneering studies. Unknown and dimly perceived problems like chemical hazards, radioactivity, and criticality had to be dealt with. New chemical concepts and processes had to be developed to test the new theories being developed by physicists. New engineering concepts had to be developed and demonstrated in order to build facilities and equipment that had never before been attempted. Chem Tech`s role was chemical separations, especially uranium and plutonium, and nuclear fuel reprocessing. With diversification of national and ORNL missions, Chem Tech undertook R&D studies in many areas including biotechnology; clinical and environmental chemistry; nuclear reactors; safety regulations; effective and safe waste management and disposal; computer modeling and informational databases; isotope production; and environmental control. The changing mission of Chem Tech are encapsulated in the evolving activities.

  8. Problems in modeling man machine control behavior in biodynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Reviewed are some current problems in modeling man-machine control behavior in a biodynamic environment. It is given in two parts: (1) a review of the models which are appropriate for manual control behavior and the added elements necessary to deal with biodynamic interfaces; and (2) a review of some biodynamic interface pilot/vehicle problems which have occurred, been solved, or need to be solved.

  9. Biodynamics of deformable human body motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, A. M.; Huston, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The objective is to construct a framework wherein the various models of human biomaterials fit in order to describe the biodynamic response of the human body. The behavior of the human body in various situations, from low frequency, low amplitude vibrations to impact loadings in automobile and aircraft crashes, is very complicated with respect to all aspects of the problem: materials, geometry and dynamics. The materials problem is the primary concern, but the materials problem is intimately connected with geometry and dynamics.

  10. Chemical Technology Division progress report, January 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This progress report presents a summary of the missions and activities of the various sections and administrative groups in this Division for this period. Specific projects in areas such as energy research, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing are highlighted, and special programmatic activities conducted by the Division are identified and described. The administrative summary portion features information about publications and presentations of Chemical Technology Division staff, as well as a listing of patents awarded to Division personnel during this period.

  11. 75 FR 9437 - Wacker Chemical Corporation Wacker Polymers Division a Subsidiary of Wacker Chemie AG Including...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... September 2, 2009 (74 FR 45476). At the request of the Company, the Department reviewed the certification... Employment and Training Administration Wacker Chemical Corporation Wacker Polymers Division a Subsidiary of... Chemical Corporation Wacker Polymers Division a Subsidiary of Wacker Chemie AG Including On-Site...

  12. AN OVERVIEW OF PATHOGEN RESEARCH IN THE MICROBIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Microbiological and Chemical Exposure Assessment Research Division of the EPA Office of Research and Development's National Exposure Research Laboratory has a robust in-house research program aimed at developing better occurrence and exposure methods for waterborne pathogens....

  13. Mathematical biodynamic feedthrough model applied to rotorcraft.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, Joost; Mulder, Mark; Abbink, David A; van Paassen, Marinus M; Mulder, Max; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bulthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-07-01

    Biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) occurs when vehicle accelerations feed through the human body and cause involuntary control inputs. This paper proposes a model to quantitatively predict this effect in rotorcraft. This mathematical BDFT model aims to fill the gap between the currently existing black box BDFT models and physical BDFT models. The model structure was systematically constructed using asymptote modeling, a procedure described in detail in this paper. The resulting model can easily be implemented in many typical rotorcraft BDFT studies, using the provided model parameters. The model's performance was validated in both the frequency and time domain. Furthermore, it was compared with several recent BDFT models. The results show that the proposed mathematical model performs better than typical black box models and is easier to parameterize and implement than a recent physical model. PMID:24013832

  14. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April-June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during th eperiod April-June 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  15. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  16. (1)H NMR foodomics reveals that the biodynamic and the organic cultivation managements produce different grape berries (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Sangiovese).

    PubMed

    Picone, Gianfranco; Trimigno, Alessia; Tessarin, Paola; Donnini, Silvia; Rombolà, Adamo Domenico; Capozzi, Francesco

    2016-12-15

    The increasing demand for natural foods and beverages, i.e. prepared by excluding synthetic chemicals along the whole production chain, has boosted the adoption of organic and biodynamic cultivation methods which are based on protocols avoiding use of synthetic pesticides. This trend is striking in viticulture, since wine production is largely shaped by the varying drinking attitudes of environment-friendly consumers. Using (1)H NMR, the compositions of grape berries, collected at harvest in 2009 and 2011, in experimental plots cultivated either with biodynamic or organic methods, were compared. Although the analysis provides a comprehensive metabolic profile of berries, the resulting distinctive pattern consists of a few molecules. Lower content of sugars, coumaric and caffeic acids, as well as higher amount of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were observed in biodynamic grapes. The (1)H NMR foodomics approach evidenced a diverse fruit metabolome that could be associated to a different physiological response of plants to the agronomic environment. PMID:27451171

  17. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described. (CBS)

  18. Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division progress report for the period January 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides brief summaries of progress in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) during 1993 and 1994. The first four chapters, which cover the research mission, are organized to mirror the major organizational units of the division and indicate the scope of the research portfolio. These divisions are the Analytical Spectroscopy Section, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Section, Organic Chemistry Section, and Physical and Materials Chemistry Section. The fifth and sixth chapters summarize the support activities within CASD that are critical for research progress. Finally, the appendices indicate the productivity and recognition of the staff in terms of various forms of external publications, professional activities, and awards.

  19. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program.

  20. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H[sub 2], and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO[sub 2], potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-[Tc] systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  1. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-{Tc} systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  2. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January-March 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies.

  3. Biodynamics: Why the Wirewalker Doesn't Fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Griffin, Lori A.

    2003-11-01

    You can never step in the same river twice, goes the old adage of philosophy. An observation on the transitory nature of fluids in motion, this saying also describes the endless variations researchers face when studying human movement. Understanding these biodynamics-why the wirewalker doesn't fall-requires a grasp of the constant fluctuations and fine tunings which maintain balance in the complex, fluid system of human locomotion. Taking a comprehensive approach to the phenomenon of locomotion, Biodynamics: Why the Wirewalker Doesn't Fall integrates physical laws and principles with concepts of fractals, chaos, and randomness. In so doing, it formulates a description of both the large-scale, smooth aspects of locomotion and the more minute, randomized mechanisms of this physiological process. Ideal for beginners in this subject, Biodynamics provides an elegant explanation without assuming the reader's understanding of complex physical principles or mathematical equations. Chapter topics include: * Dimensions, measurement, and scaling * Mechanics and dynamics * Biometrics * Conservation of momentum * Biomechanics * Bioelectricity * Bioenergetics * Fluid mechanics and dynamics * Data analysis * Biostatistics Packed with problem sets, examples, and original line drawings, Biodynamics is an invaluable text for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and instructors in medicine, biology, physiology, biophysics, and bioengineering.

  4. Chemical Technology Division progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Genung, R.K.; Hightower, J.R.; Bell, J.T.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period July 1, 1991, through December 31, 1992. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Special programmatic activities conducted by the division are identified and described. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  5. Symposium introduction: the first joint American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division (AGFD) and the ACS International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand (ICSCT) worked together to stage the “1st Joint ACS AGFD - ACS ICSCT Symposium on Agricultural and Food Chemistry,” which was held in Bangkok, Thailand ...

  6. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1997. Created in March 1997 when the CTD Chemical Development and Energy Research sections were combined, the Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within seven major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, and Biotechnology Research. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described in the report, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  7. Using biodynamic models to reconcile differences between laboratory toxicity tests and field biomonitoring with aquatic insects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchwalter, D.B.; Cain, D.J.; Clements, W.H.; Luoma, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    Aquatic insects often dominate lotic ecosystems, yet these organisms are under-represented in trace metal toxicity databases. Furthermore, toxicity data for aquatic insects do not appear to reflect their actual sensitivities to metals in nature, because the concentrations required to elicit toxicity in the laboratory are considerably higher than those found to impact insect communities in the field. New approaches are therefore needed to better understand how and why insects are differentially susceptible to metal exposures. Biodynamic modeling is a powerful tool for understanding interspecific differences in trace metal bioaccumulation. Because bioaccumulation alone does not necessarily correlate with toxicity, we combined biokinetic parameters associated with dissolved cadmium exposures with studies of the subcellular compartmentalization of accumulated Cd. This combination of physiological traits allowed us to make predictions of susceptibility differences to dissolved Cd in three aquatic insect taxa: Ephemerella excrucians, Rhithrogena morrisoni, and Rhyacophila sp. We compared these predictions with long-term field monitoring data and toxicity tests with closely related taxa: Ephemerella infrequens, Rhithrogena hageni, and Rhyacophila brunea. Kinetic parameters allowed us to estimate steady-state concentrations, the time required to reach steady state, and the concentrations of Cd projected to be in potentially toxic compartments for different species. Species-specific physiological traits identified using biodynamic models provided a means for better understanding why toxicity assays with insects have failed to provide meaningful estimates for metal concentrations that would be expected to be protective in nature. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  8. Visions, Achievements, and Challenges of the Division of Chemical Education during the Early Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benfey, Theodor

    2003-06-01

    The first decade of the American Chemical Society Division of Chemical Education (DIVCHED) was most extraordinary. It began in 1924 with grand visions, plans, and accomplishments, and ended in the Depression. The period was dominated by two figures, Neil Gordon, founding editor of the Journal of Chemical Education, and Francis Garvan, the United States Alien Property Custodian who, through the Chemical Foundation, poured money into chemical education for his own purposes. At Garvan's urging, DIVCHED also published a journal for high school teachers, The Chemistry Leaflet, edited by Pauline Beery Mack, later famous for advising NASA on bone density loss in space travel. The Chemistry Leaflet later appeared as the ACS educational magazine, Chemistry. Woven into the paper are three continuing concerns of the DIVCHED: sustained service to the high school teacher, participation of university and industrial leaders in DIVCHED, and women in chemical education.

  9. Materials dispersion and biodynamics project research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1992-01-01

    The Materials Dispersion and Biodynamics Project (MDBP) focuses on dispersion and mixing of various biological materials and the dynamics of cell-to-cell communication and intracellular molecular trafficking in microgravity. Research activities encompass biomedical applications, basic cell biology, biotechnology (products from cells), protein crystal development, ecological life support systems (involving algae and bacteria), drug delivery (microencapsulation), biofilm deposition by living organisms, and hardware development to support living cells on Space Station Freedom (SSF). Project goals are to expand the existing microgravity science database through experiments on sounding rockets, the Shuttle, and COMET program orbiters and to evolve,through current database acquisition and feasibility testing, to more mature and larger-scale commercial operations on SSF. Maximized utilization of SSF for these science applications will mean that service companies will have a role in providing equipment for use by a number of different customers. An example of a potential forerunner of such a service for SSF is the Materials Dispersion Apparatus (MDA) 'mini lab' of Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc. (ITA) in use on the Shuttle for the Commercial MDAITA Experiments (CMIX) Project. The MDA wells provide the capability for a number of investigators to perform mixing and bioprocessing experiments in space. In the area of human adaptation to microgravity, a significant database has been obtained over the past three decades. Some low-g effects are similar to Earth-based disorders (anemia, osteoporosis, neuromuscular diseases, and immune system disorders). As new information targets potential profit-making processes, services and products from microgravity, commercial space ventures are expected to expand accordingly. Cooperative CCDS research in the above mentioned areas is essential for maturing SSF biotechnology and to ensure U.S. leadership in space technology

  10. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  11. A biodynamic feedthrough model based on neuromuscular principles.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, Joost; Abbink, David A; Mulder, Mark; van Paassen, Marinus M; Mulder, Max; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bulthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-07-01

    A biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) model is proposed that describes how vehicle accelerations feed through the human body, causing involuntary limb motions and so involuntary control inputs. BDFT dynamics strongly depend on limb dynamics, which can vary between persons (between-subject variability), but also within one person over time, e.g., due to the control task performed (within-subject variability). The proposed BDFT model is based on physical neuromuscular principles and is derived from an established admittance model-describing limb dynamics-which was extended to include control device dynamics and account for acceleration effects. The resulting BDFT model serves primarily the purpose of increasing the understanding of the relationship between neuromuscular admittance and biodynamic feedthrough. An added advantage of the proposed model is that its parameters can be estimated using a two-stage approach, making the parameter estimation more robust, as the procedure is largely based on the well documented procedure required for the admittance model. To estimate the parameter values of the BDFT model, data are used from an experiment in which both neuromuscular admittance and biodynamic feedthrough are measured. The quality of the BDFT model is evaluated in the frequency and time domain. Results provide strong evidence that the BDFT model and the proposed method of parameter estimation put forward in this paper allows for accurate BDFT modeling across different subjects (accounting for between-subject variability) and across control tasks (accounting for within-subject variability). PMID:24043420

  12. Chemical Technology Division: Progress report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period January 1, 1987, to June 30, 1988. The following major areas are covered: waste management and environmental programs, radiochemical and reactor engineering programs, basic science and technology, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, and administrative resources and facilities. The Administrative Summary, an appendix, presents a comprehensive listing of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this period. A staffing level and financial summary and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included.

  13. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  14. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech's energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  15. Program for the Division of Chemical Education: Chicago, March 25 29, 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlecamp, Catherine H.; Bodner, George M.; Jones, Wayne E., Jr.

    2007-03-01

    Program for the Division of Chemical Education March 2007 meeting in Chicago. All CHED technical sessions including the High School Program will be held in the McCormick Place Convention Complex North, 2301 South Lake Shore Drive. Exceptions are the Undergraduate Program (in the Westin Hotel Michigan Avenue), the Undergraduate Research Poster Sessions (in the Sheraton Chicago Hotel), and any evening programs. Unless otherwise noted, morning sessions begin at 8:30 a.m., afternoon sessions at 1:30 p.m.

  16. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period April 1, 1985, through December 31, 1986. The following major areas are covered in the discussion: nuclear and chemical waste management, environmental control technology, basic science and technology, biotechnology research, transuranium-element processing, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, radioactive materials production, computer/engineering applications, fission energy, environmental cleanup projects, and various other work activities. As an appendix, the Administrative Summary presents a comprehensive compilation of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this report period. An organization chart, a staffing level and financial summary, and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included to provide additional information. 78 figs., 40 tabs.

  17. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-02-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

  18. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1997-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1996. The report describes 12 tasks conducted in 4 major areas of research and development within the section. The name of a contact is included with each task in the report, and readers are encouraged to consult these individuals if they need additional information. The first major research area--Chemical Processes for Waste Management-- includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Sludge Treatment Studies, and Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents. Within the third research area--Thermodynamics--efforts continued in the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Energy-Related Materials task. The fourth major research area--Processes for Waste Management--includes work on these tasks: Ion-Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Hot Cell Cross-Flow Filtration Studies of Gunite Tank Sludges, and Chemical Conversion of Nitrate Directly to Nitrogen Gas: A Feasibility Study.

  19. 75 FR 879 - National Starch and Chemical Company Specialty Starches Division Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ..., applicable to workers of National Starch and Chemical Company, Specialty Starches Division, Island Falls, Maine. The notice was published in the Federal Register on December 31, 2007 (72 FR 74343). At the... Employment and Training Administration National Starch and Chemical Company Specialty Starches...

  20. Biodynamic Doppler imaging of subcellular motion inside 3D living tissue culture and biopsies (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Biodynamic imaging is an emerging 3D optical imaging technology that probes up to 1 mm deep inside three-dimensional living tissue using short-coherence dynamic light scattering to measure the intracellular motions of cells inside their natural microenvironments. Biodynamic imaging is label-free and non-invasive. The information content of biodynamic imaging is captured through tissue dynamics spectroscopy that displays the changes in the Doppler signatures from intracellular constituents in response to applied compounds. The affected dynamic intracellular mechanisms include organelle transport, membrane undulations, cytoskeletal restructuring, strain at cellular adhesions, cytokinesis, mitosis, exo- and endo-cytosis among others. The development of 3D high-content assays such as biodynamic profiling can become a critical new tool for assessing efficacy of drugs and the suitability of specific types of tissue growth for drug discovery and development. The use of biodynamic profiling to predict clinical outcome of living biopsies to cancer therapeutics can be developed into a phenotypic companion diagnostic, as well as a new tool for therapy selection in personalized medicine. This invited talk will present an overview of the optical, physical and physiological processes involved in biodynamic imaging. Several different biodynamic imaging modalities include motility contrast imaging (MCI), tissue-dynamics spectroscopy (TDS) and tissue-dynamics imaging (TDI). A wide range of potential applications will be described that include process monitoring for 3D tissue culture, drug discovery and development, cancer therapy selection, embryo assessment for in-vitro fertilization and artificial reproductive technologies, among others.

  1. The past and future of chemical information - A report of the Chemical Information Division Session of the 200th Meeting of the American Chemical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokizane, Soichi

    At the historical meeting of the ACS CINF Division, the 1990 Herman Skolnik Award was presented to Dr. Ernst Meyer, who at BASF in Germany had developed a computer storage and retrieval system of chemical structures in 1960s. His and his colleagues' speeches in the award symposium were about the history of the development of chemical structure information in Germany. In the symposium of the Markush structure system, a hottest topic in this field, CAS's MARPAT and Markush-DARC co-developed by Questel, INPI, and Derwent were discussed by many papers. Other topics of this meeting were discussed, too.

  2. Growth, Yield and Fruit Quality of Grapevines under Organic and Biodynamic Management

    PubMed Central

    Döring, Johanna; Frisch, Matthias; Tittmann, Susanne; Stoll, Manfred; Kauer, Randolf

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine growth, yield and fruit quality of grapevines under organic and biodynamic management in relation to integrated viticultural practices. Furthermore, the mechanisms for the observed changes in growth, yield and fruit quality were investigated by determining nutrient status, physiological performance of the plants and disease incidence on bunches in three consecutive growing seasons. A field trial (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Riesling) was set up at Hochschule Geisenheim University, Germany. The integrated treatment was managed according to the code of good practice. Organic and biodynamic plots were managed according to Regulation (EC) No 834/2007 and Regulation (EC) No 889/2008 and according to ECOVIN- and Demeter-Standards, respectively. The growth and yield of the grapevines differed strongly among the different management systems, whereas fruit quality was not affected by the management system. The organic and the biodynamic treatments showed significantly lower growth and yield in comparison to the integrated treatment. The physiological performance was significantly lower in the organic and the biodynamic systems, which may account for differences in growth and cluster weight and might therefore induce lower yields of the respective treatments. Soil management and fertilization strategy could be responsible factors for these changes. Yields of the organic and the biodynamic treatments partially decreased due to higher disease incidence of downy mildew. The organic and the biodynamic plant protection strategies that exclude the use of synthetic fungicides are likely to induce higher disease incidence and might partially account for differences in the nutrient status of vines under organic and biodynamic management. Use of the biodynamic preparations had little influence on vine growth and yield. Due to the investigation of important parameters that induce changes especially in growth and yield of grapevines under

  3. Growth, Yield and Fruit Quality of Grapevines under Organic and Biodynamic Management.

    PubMed

    Döring, Johanna; Frisch, Matthias; Tittmann, Susanne; Stoll, Manfred; Kauer, Randolf

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine growth, yield and fruit quality of grapevines under organic and biodynamic management in relation to integrated viticultural practices. Furthermore, the mechanisms for the observed changes in growth, yield and fruit quality were investigated by determining nutrient status, physiological performance of the plants and disease incidence on bunches in three consecutive growing seasons. A field trial (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Riesling) was set up at Hochschule Geisenheim University, Germany. The integrated treatment was managed according to the code of good practice. Organic and biodynamic plots were managed according to Regulation (EC) No 834/2007 and Regulation (EC) No 889/2008 and according to ECOVIN- and Demeter-Standards, respectively. The growth and yield of the grapevines differed strongly among the different management systems, whereas fruit quality was not affected by the management system. The organic and the biodynamic treatments showed significantly lower growth and yield in comparison to the integrated treatment. The physiological performance was significantly lower in the organic and the biodynamic systems, which may account for differences in growth and cluster weight and might therefore induce lower yields of the respective treatments. Soil management and fertilization strategy could be responsible factors for these changes. Yields of the organic and the biodynamic treatments partially decreased due to higher disease incidence of downy mildew. The organic and the biodynamic plant protection strategies that exclude the use of synthetic fungicides are likely to induce higher disease incidence and might partially account for differences in the nutrient status of vines under organic and biodynamic management. Use of the biodynamic preparations had little influence on vine growth and yield. Due to the investigation of important parameters that induce changes especially in growth and yield of grapevines under

  4. Quarterly progress report for the chemical development section of the Chemical Technology Division: October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1996-03-01

    This quarterly report is intended to provide a timely summary of the major activities being conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period September-December 1995. The report summarizes ten major tasks conducted within five major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area-Chemical Processes for Waste Management-includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Compounds by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, and Sludge Washing and Dissolution of ORNL Waste: Data for Modeling Sludge Science. The Comprehensive Supernate task is currently evaluating several sorbents in batch tests for removing strontium, technetium, and cesium from ORNL Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernatant solutions. Nine sorbents have been evaluated for removing strontium from MVST W-29 supernatant, and seven have been tested for technetium removal. All planned batch testing of cesium sorbents has been completed; however, additional cesium tests may be made as new sorbents become available. At the request of Hanford personnel, some batch tests were made to evaluate the effect on cesium distribution of selected sorbents which had been treated with an organic such as tributyl phosphate.

  5. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1996-06-01

    This report provides a timely summary of the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1996. The report summarizes ten major tasks conducted with five major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area--Chemical Processes for Waste Management--includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Compounds by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT{asterisk}DE{asterisk}CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, and Sludge Washing and Dissolution of ORNL Waste: Data for Modeling Sludge Science. The other four tasks are: Reactor fuel chemistry--Technical assistance in review of advanced reactors; Thermodynamics and kinetics of energy-related materials; Processes for waste management--Ion-exchange process for heavy metals removal; and US Army field artillery liquid propellant stability program.

  6. AICD -- Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program. 1993 Annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  7. Biodynamic profiling of three-dimensional tissue growth techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Merrill, Dan; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional tissue culture presents a more biologically relevant environment in which to perform drug development than conventional two-dimensional cell culture. However, obtaining high-content information from inside three dimensional tissue has presented an obstacle to rapid adoption of 3D tissue culture for pharmaceutical applications. Biodynamic imaging is a high-content three-dimensional optical imaging technology based on low-coherence interferometry and digital holography that uses intracellular dynamics as high-content image contrast. In this paper, we use biodynamic imaging to compare pharmaceutical responses to Taxol of three-dimensional multicellular spheroids grown by three different growth techniques: rotating bioreactor, hanging-drop and plate-grown spheroids. The three growth techniques have systematic variations among tissue cohesiveness and intracellular activity and consequently display different pharmacodynamics under identical drug dose conditions. The in vitro tissue cultures are also compared to ex vivo living biopsies. These results demonstrate that three-dimensional tissue cultures are not equivalent, and that drug-response studies must take into account the growth method.

  8. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period April--June 1996. The report describes 12 tasks conducted in 4 major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area--Chemical Processes for Waste Management--includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Sludge Treatment Studies, and Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents. Within the second research area--Reactor Fuel Chemistry--a new scope of work for the Technical Assistance in Review of Advanced Reactors task has been established to include assessments of iodine behavior nd pH control in operating nuclear reactor containments as well as in advanced reactor systems. This task is on hold, awaiting finalization of the revised proposal and receipt of the necessary information from Westinghouse to permit the start of the study. Within the third research area--Thermodynamics--the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Energy-Related Materials task has used a differential thermal analysis (DTA)/thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to study the phase transitions of phase-pure YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (123). The fourth major research area--Processes for Waste Management--includes work on these tasks: Ion Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Hot Cell Cross-Flow Filtration Studies of Gunite Tank Sludges, and Chemical Conversion of Nitrate Directly to Nitrogen Gas: A Feasibility Study.

  9. The frequency of induced premature centromere division in human populations occupationally exposed to genotoxic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Major, J; Jakab, M G; Tompa, A

    1999-09-30

    Premature (early) centromere division (PCD, i.e., the separation of centromeres during the prometaphase/metaphase of the mitotic cycle) seems to be a possible manifestation of chromosome instability in human chromosome-breakage syndromes. Chromosome instability also frequently occurs in the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of humans occupationally exposed to clastogenic agents, and is considered an etiologic factor of neoplastic diseases. In order to investigate the importance of PCD in cancer risk assessment, we studied the frequency of PCDs in PBL of 400 Hungarian subjects. The various groups comprised 188 control donors and 212 subjects occupationally exposed to different genotoxic chemicals, such as acrylonitrile (ACN) and/or dimethylformamide (DMF), benzene, cytostatic drugs, ethylene oxide (ETO), mixed exposure in the rubber industry, mixed organic solvents including CCl4, hot oil-mist, bitumen, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). Data were compared with chromosomal aberration frequencies determined in the same samples. PCD yields are significantly higher in populations exposed to mixed chemicals, crude oil and cytostatic drugs, compared with controls. PCDs involving more than three chromosomes are also more frequent in ETO- and oil mist-exposed groups than in the others. The results indicate that the induction of PCDs is neither incidental nor artificial. As a consequence, we suggest that PCD can be developed into a new, exposure-related cytogenetic biomarker for a more adequate occupational cancer risk assessment. A further, follow-up epidemiological and cytogenetic investigation of PCD is in progress. PMID:10575433

  10. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    2001-04-16

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within ten major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Physical Properties Research, Biochemical Engineering, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structures and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of the Cell Operations involved the testing of two continuously stirred tank reactors in series to evaluate the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium and transuranics from supernatant. Within the area of Process Chemistry, various topics related to solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge were addressed. Saltcake dissolution efforts continued, including the development of a predictive algorithm. New initiatives for the section included modeling activities centered on detection of hydrogen in {sup 233}U storage wells and wax formation in petroleum mixtures, as well as support for the Spallation Neutron Source (investigation of transmutation products formed during operation). Other activities involved in situ grouting and evaluation of options for use (i.e., as castable shapes) of depleted uranium. In a continuation of activities of the preceding

  11. Suppression of biodynamic interference in head-tracked teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lifshitz, S.; Merhav, S. J.; Grunwald, A. J.; Tucker, G. E.; Tischler, M. B.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of helmet-tracked sights to provide pointing commands for teleoperation of cameras, lasers, or antennas in aircraft is degraded by the presence of uncommanded, involuntary heat motion, referred to as biodynamic interference. This interference limits the achievable precision required in pointing tasks. The noise contributions due to biodynamic interference consists of an additive component which is correlated with aircraft vibration and an uncorrelated, nonadditive component, referred to as remnant. An experimental simulation study is described which investigated the improvements achievable in pointing and tracking precision using dynamic display shifting in the helmet-mounted display. The experiment was conducted in a six degree of freedom motion base simulator with an emulated helmet-mounted display. Highly experienced pilot subjects performed precision head-pointing tasks while manually flying a visual flight-path tracking task. Four schemes using adaptive and low-pass filtering of the head motion were evaluated to determine their effects on task performance and pilot workload in the presence of whole-body vibration characteristic of helicopter flight. The results indicate that, for tracking tasks involving continuously moving targets, improvements of up to 70 percent can be achieved in percent on-target dwelling time and of up to 35 percent in rms tracking error, with the adaptive plus low-pass filter configuration. The results with the same filter configuration for the task of capturing randomly-positioned, stationary targets show an increase of up to 340 percent in the number of targets captured and an improvement of up to 24 percent in the average capture time. The adaptive plus low-pass filter combination was considered to exhibit the best overall display dynamics by each of the subjects.

  12. Proceedings of the frst joint american chemical society agricultural and food chemistry division – american chemical society international chemical sciences chapter in Thailand symposium on agricultural and food chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Proceedings is a compilation of papers from contributed oral and poster presentations presented at the first joint symposium organized by the American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand ...

  13. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-11-01

    This reports summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within eight major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included column loading of cesium from Melton Valley Storage Tank supematants using an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate. A second task was to design and construct a continuously stirred tank reactor system to test the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium, and transuranics from supematant. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed, including issues such as pipeline plugging and viscosity measurements. Investigation of solution conditions required to dissolve Hanford saltcake was also continued. MSRE Remediation Studies focused on recovery of {sup 233}U and its transformation into a stable oxide and radiolysis experiments to permit remediation of MSRE fuel salt. In the area of Chemistry Research, activities included studies relative to molecular imprinting for

  14. Ernst Haeckel's biodynamics 1866 and the occult basis of organic farming.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    One hundred and 50 years ago (Sept. 1866), Ernst Haeckel published a monograph entitled General Morphology of Organisms, wherein key terms, such as Protista, Monera, ontogeny, phylogeny, ecology and the 'biogenetic law' where introduced. In addition, Haeckel coined the word "biodynamics" as a synonym for "general physiology." In contrast, Rudolf Steiner's "biodynamic agriculture," which originated in 1924, and was promoted via Ehrenfried Pfeiffer's book of 1938 with the same title, is an occult pseudoscience still popular today. The misuse of Haeckel's term to legitimize disproven homeopathic principles and esoteric rules within the context of applied plant research is unacceptable. PMID:27322020

  15. Application of biodynamic imaging for personalized chemotherapy in canine lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custead, Michelle R.

    Biodynamic imaging (BDI) is a novel phenotypic cancer profiling technology which characterizes changes in cellular and subcellular motion in living tumor tissue samples following in vitro or ex vivo treatment with chemotherapeutics. The ability of BDI to predict clinical response to single-agent doxorubicin chemotherapy was tested in ten dogs with naturally-occurring non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Pre-treatment tumor biopsy samples were obtained from all dogs and treated with doxorubicin (10 muM) ex vivo. BDI captured cellular and subcellular motility measures on all biopsy samples at baseline and at regular intervals for 9 hours following drug application. All dogs subsequently received treatment with a standard single-agent doxorubicin protocol. Objective response (OR) to doxorubicin and progression-free survival time (PFST) following chemotherapy were recorded for all dogs. The dynamic biomarkers measured by BDI were entered into a multivariate logistic model to determine the extent to which BDI predicted OR and PFST following doxorubicin therapy. The model showed that the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of BDI for predicting treatment outcome were 95%, 91%, and 93%, respectively. To account for possible over-fitting of data to the predictive model, cross-validation with a one-left-out analysis was performed, and the adjusted sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy following this analysis were 93%, 87%, and 91%, respectively. These findings suggest that BDI can predict, with high accuracy, treatment outcome following single-agent doxorubicin chemotherapy in a relevant spontaneous canine cancer model, and is a promising novel technology for advancing personalized cancer medicine.

  16. NON-CHEMICAL IMPACTS (SYSTEMS ANALYSIS BRANCH, SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-chemical ecological impacts include those that are caused by physical or biological disturbances. Non-chemical stressors identified by SETAC include ionizing radiation, heat, noise, environmental disturbances (habitat alteration, including changes to biochemical cycling, biod...

  17. Research programs for Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    A chemical sciences review meeting was held in which research programs in chemistry were discussed. Major topics included: chemistry of actinides and fission products, interactions of solvents, solutes and surfaces in supercritical extraction, chemical and physical principles in multiphase separations, and chemical kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  18. Soil response to biodynamic farming practices in estevia -Stevia Rebaudiana- (Extremadura, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrador, Juana; Colmenares, Ricardo; Sánchez, Eduardo; Creus, Juan; García, Nieves; Blázquez, Jaime; Moreno, Marta M.

    2014-05-01

    The first results of the evolution of an organic-biodynamic cultivation of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) in Extremadura (Spain) are shown here. The organic-biodynamic approach permits experimentally for a more holistic view of the crop development process what means the understanding and quantification of its evolution at different scales. The research methodology applied includes not only quantitative individual parameters of the crop development but also global parameters which make a contribution of very relevant information concerning unbalances between growth and differentiation processes, as well as other aspects linked to the product intrinsic quality. The crop cultivation has been done over a plot of 2.5 has, on acid soils (pH 5.18) and very poor organic matter content (0.5 %). On this first year of cultivation two cuts were given to the plant with an average total yield of 4,500 kg/ha without any supply of solid organic matter, only with the application of the biodynamic preparations. So far results regarding soil improvement and crop productivity, taking into consideration the practices used, let us introduce this pioneer crop in Extremadura, not only as an alternative crop to the current tobacco crop in this area, but also as a development resource for the rural environment of this region. Key words: Agroecology, Organic Biodynamic Agriculture, Stevia Rebaudiana

  19. Biodynamics of the ankle in spastic children--effect of chronic stretching of the calf musculature.

    PubMed

    Walsh, E G; Wright, G W; Brown, K; Bell, E

    1990-05-01

    The biodynamics of the feet of spastic children have been studied by estimating the resonant frequency using a printed motor to supply rhythmic torques. Changes induced when the muscles have been stretched by casting for four weeks are trivial or absent. The position of the feet, however, after the procedure became more nearly normal. PMID:2350521

  20. Molecular properties of a fermented manure preparation used as field spray in biodynamic agriculture.

    PubMed

    Spaccini, R; Mazzei, P; Squartini, A; Giannattasio, M; Piccolo, A

    2012-11-01

    Manure products fermented underground in cow horns and commonly used as field spray (preparation 500) in the biodynamic farming system, were characterized for molecular composition by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance [(13) C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning NMR ((13) C-CPMAS-NMR)] spectroscopy and offline tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Both thermochemolysis and NMR spectroscopy revealed a complex molecular structure, with lignin aromatic derivatives, polysaccharides, and alkyl compounds as the predominant components. CPMAS-NMR spectra of biodynamic preparations showed a carbon distribution with an overall low hydrophobic character and significant contribution of lignocellulosic derivatives. The results of thermochemolysis confirmed the characteristic highlighted by NMR spectroscopy, revealing a molecular composition based on alkyl components of plant and microbial origin and the stable incorporation of lignin derivatives. The presence of biolabile components and of undecomposed lignin compounds in the preparation 500 should be accounted to its particularly slow maturation process, as compared to common composting procedures. Our results provide, for the first time, a scientific characterization of an essential product in biodynamic agriculture, and show that biodynamic products appear to be enriched of biolabile components and, therefore, potentially conducive to plant growth stimulation. PMID:22707205

  1. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  2. Chemical profiles, division of labor and social status in Pachycondyla queens (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tentschert, J.; Kolmer, K.; Hölldobler, B.; Bestmann, H.-J.; Delabie, J. H. C.; Heinze, J.

    2001-03-01

    Queens of the neotropical ponerine ant Pachycondyla cf. 'inversa' may co-operate during colony founding. One of several co-founding queens specializes in foraging, whereas the others remain in the nest and guard the brood. Division of labor is achieved by aggressive interactions, which result in the formation of dominance hierarchies. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry of cuticular hydrocarbons obtained from live queens by SPME revealed consistent differences between the patterns of cuticular hydrocarbons of queens with high versus low rank: only high-ranking queens showed considerable amounts of cuticular pentadecane (n-C15) and heptadecene (n-C17:1). These two substances presumably originate from the queens' Dufour glands.

  3. Chemical Technology Division progress report, April 1, 1983-March 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: fission energy; nuclear and chemical waste management; environmental control technology; basic science and technology; biotechnology programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project; radioactive materials production; computer 1 engineering applications; and miscellanous programs.

  4. Inter-Division IV/V WG on Chemically Peculiar and Related Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Werner W.

    2007-03-01

    A meeting of the IAU Working Group on Chemically Peculiar and Related Stars was held in Sydney on July 16th, 2003. The focus of the business session was on possible effects on our WG due to plans for restructuring the IAU. Working Groups are to be evaluated every 3 years and in general, will be limited to a period of 3 or 6 years.

  5. Application of the response probability density function technique to biodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Hershey, R L; Higgins, T H

    1978-01-01

    A method has been developed, which we call the "response probability density function technique," which has applications in predicting the probability of injury in a wide range of biodynamic situations. The method, which was developed in connection with sonic boom damage prediction, utilized the probability density function of the excitation force and the probability density function of the sensitivity of the material being acted upon. The method is especially simple to use when both these probability density functions are lognormal. Studies thus far have shown that the stresses from sonic booms, as well as the strengths of glass and mortars, are distributed lognormally. Some biodynamic processes also have lognormal distributions and are, therefore, amenable to modeling by this technique. In particular, this paper discusses the application of the response probability density function technique to the analysis of the thoracic response to air blast and the prediction of skull fracture from head impact. PMID:623590

  6. SU-E-J-31: Biodynamic Imaging of Cancer Tissue and Response to Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, D; Turek, J; Childress, M; An, R; Merrill, D; Matei, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure intracellular motions inside three-dimensional living cancer tissue samples to establish a novel set of biodynamic biomarkers that assess tissue proliferative activity and sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy. Methods: Biodynamic imaging (BDI) uses digital holography with low-coherence low-intensity light illumination to construct 3D holograms from depths up to a millimeter deep inside cancer tissue models that include multicellular tumor spheroids and ex vivo cancer biopsies from canine non-Hodgkins lymphoma and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) mouse explants. Intracellular motions modulate the holographic intensity with frequencies related to the Doppler effect caused by the motions of a wide variety of intracellular components. These motions are affected by applied therapeutic agents, and BDI produces unique fingerprints of the action of specific drugs on the motions in specific cell types. In this study, chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin for canine lymphoma and oxoplatin for ovarian) are applied to the living tissue models and monitored over 10 hours by BDI. Results: Multicellular spheroids and patient biopsies are categorized as either sensitive or insensitive to applied therapeutics depending on the intracellular Doppler signatures of chemotherapy response. For both lymphoma and EOC there is strong specificity to the two types of sensitivities, with sensitive cell lines and biopsies exhibiting a global cessation of proliferation and strong suppression of metabolic activity, while insensitive cell lines and biopsies show moderate activation of Doppler frequencies associated with membrane processes and possible membrane trafficking. Conclusion: This work supports the hypothesis that biodynamic biomarkers from three-dimensional living tumor tissue, that includes tissue heterogeneity and measured within 24 hours of surgery, is predictive of near-term patient response to therapy. Future work will correlate biodynamic biomarkers with

  7. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Steindler, M J; Ader, M; Barletta, R E

    1980-01-01

    In the program on pyrochemical and dry processing methods (PDPM) for nuclear fuel, tungsten crucibles were successfully spun for use in laboratory-scale experiments. Corrosion testing of refractory metals and alloys in PDPM environments was done. Ceramic substrates were successfully coated with tungsten. Solubility measurements were made to determine Cd/Mg alloy composition and temperature at which dissolved Th will precipitate. Experiments were started to study the reduction of high-fired ThO/sub 2/ with Ca in a molten metal-molten salt system. Work on the fused salt electrolysis of CaO was started. Equipment for determining phase diagrams for U-Cu-Mg system was set up. The reaction of UO/sub 2/ with molten equimolar NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ was studied as part of a project to identify chemically feasible nonaqueous fuel reprocessing methods. Work was continued on development of a flowsheet for reprocessing actinide oxides by extracting actinides into ammonium chloro-aluminate (and alternative salts) from a bismuth solution. Preparation of Th, U, and Pu nitrides after dissolution of spent fuel elements in molten tin is being studied. Leach rates of glass beads, pulverized beads, and beads encapsulated in a lead matrix with no protective envelope were studied. A method (employing no pressure or vacuum systems) of encapsulating various solid wastes in a lead metal matrix was developed and tested. A preliminary integration was made of earlier data on effects of impacts on metal-matrix waste forms.Leach migration experiments were compared with conventional infiltration experiments as methods of evaluating geologic formations as barriers to nuclide migration. The effect of the streaming potential on the rates of transport of radioactive I/sup -/ and Na/sup +/ through kaolinite columns was measured, as well as adsorption of iodide and iodate by several compounds; implications of the results upon the disposal of radioactive iodine are discussed.

  8. The 23(rd) National Meeting of the Medicinal Chemistry Division of the Italian Chemical Society (DCF-SCI) in Salerno (NMMC 2015).

    PubMed

    Campiglia, Pietro; Sbardella, Gianluca

    2016-08-19

    Top-notch Italian medicinal chemistry: Guest editors Pietro Campiglia and Gianluca Sbardella look back at the 2015 National Meeting of the Medicinal Chemistry Division of the Italian Chemical Society. They recall the history of the society and this annual conference and provide highlights of last year's events, as well as key papers and posters presented, which are now collected in this Special Issue. PMID:27546021

  9. A biodynamic understanding of dietborne metal uptake by a freshwater invertebrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.

    2008-01-01

    Aquatic organisms accumulate metals from dissolved and particulate phases. Dietborne metal uptake likely prevails in nature, but the physiological processes governing metal bioaccumulation from diet are not fully understood. We characterize dietborne copper, cadmium, and nickel uptake by a freshwater gastropod (Lymnaea stagnalis) both in terms of biodynamics and membrane transport characteristics. We use enriched stable isotopes to trace newly accumulated metals from diet, determine food ingestion rate (IR) and estimate metal assimilation efficiency (AE). Upon 18-h exposure, dietborne metal influx was linear over a range encompassing most environmental concentrations. Dietary metal uptake rate constants (kuf) ranged from 0.104 to 0.162 g g -1 day-1, and appeared to be an expression of transmembrane transport characteristics. Although kuf values were 1000-times lower than uptake rate constants from solution, biodynamic modeling showed that diet is the major Cd, Cu, and Ni source in nature. AE varied slightly among metals and exposure concentrations (84-95%). Suppression of Cd and Cu influxes upon exposure to extreme concentrations coincided with a 10-fold decrease in food IR, suggesting that feeding inhibition could act as an end point for dietary metal toxicity in L. stagnalis.

  10. Biodynamic modeling of PCB uptake by Macoma balthica and Corbicula fluminea from sediment amended with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLeod, Pamela B.; Luoma, S.N.; Luthy, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Activated carbon amendment was assessed in the laboratory as a remediation strategy for freshwater sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the Grasse River (near Massena, NY). Three end points were evaluated: aqueous equilibrium PCB concentration, uptake into semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), and 28-day bioaccumulation in the clam Corbicula fluminea. PCB uptake by water, SPMDs, and clams followed similar trends, with reductions increasing as a function of carbon dose. Average percent reductions in clam tissue PCBs were 67, 86, and 95% for activated carbon doses of 0.7, 1.3, and 2.5% dry wt, respectively. A biodynamic model that incorporates sediment geochemistry and dietary and aqueous uptake routes was found to agree well with observed uptake by C. fluminea in our laboratory test systems. Results from this study were compared to 28-day bioaccumulation experiments involving PCB-contaminated sediment from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (San Francisco Bay, CA) and the clam Macoma balthica. Due to differences in feeding strategy, M. balthica deposit-feeds whereas C. fluminea filter-feeds, the relative importance of the aqueous uptake route is predicted to be much higher for C. fluminea than for M. balthica. Whereas M. balthica takes up approximately 90% of its body burden through sediment ingestion, C. fluminea only accumulates approximately 45% via this route. In both cases, results strongly suggest that it is the mass transfer of PCBs from native sediment to added carbon particles, not merely reductions in aqueous PCB concentrations, that effectively reduces PCB bioavailability and uptake by sediment-dwelling organisms. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  11. HIGH RESOLUTION DEFINITION OF SUBSURFACE HETEROGENEITY FOR UNDERSTANDING THE BIODYNAMICS OF NATURAL FIELD SYSTEMS: ADVANCING THE ABILITY FOR SCALING TO FIELD CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is an integrated physical (geophysical and hydrologic) and microbial study using innovative geophysical imaging and microbial characterization methods to identify key scales of physical heterogeneities that affect the biodynamics of natural subsurface environments. ...

  12. Comparative Biodynamics; The Form and Function of Two Living Stromatolite Assemblages.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, D. M.; Gleeson, D.; Burns, B.; Collins, L.

    2014-12-01

    Life arose very rapidly on the surface of the Earth after the conditions on the early planet stabilized. The first visible record of life is now represented by the fossilized signature of microbial communities on the surface of ancient sediments. Even at this early stage, at the onset of ecology, it is clear that the development of biofilms at the sediment-water interface would have affected the response of the surface to erosive force. The close interaction between biology and physical dynamics started early. The stabilization of the sediment will have been important in promoting the development of biogeochemical gradients, and promoting the niche segregation that drives evolution. As these microbial mat systems evolved is likely that their binding capacity changed as form and function developed. The onset of photosynthesis was a step change in this process. Studies on the biodynamics of modern Bahamian stromatolites demonstrated the importance of photosynthesis in promoting the biogenic stabilization of the carbonate (ooid) sediments by microbial assemblages derived from living stromatolites. The present study presents a comparative assessment of this work using new material from living stromatolitic assemblages from Shark Bay, Australia. Samples of stromatolites were taken and the natural microbial assemblages extracted and characterized. Microbial assemblages were incubated on the surface of clean sediment and the relative stabilization of the surface measured using the cohesive strength meter system to determine surface stability against time. Magnetic particle induction was also used to determine the relative adhesive capacity of the surfaces as assemblages developed. The results are presented and examined in contrast to the previous work on the biodynamics of modern Bahamian stromatolitic systems showing significant variation in form and function between the two different stromatolitic assemblages. The reasons for this variation are discussed.

  13. Experimentally fitted biodynamic models for pedestrian-structure interaction in walking situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toso, Marcelo André; Gomes, Herbert Martins; da Silva, Felipe Tavares; Pimentel, Roberto Leal

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between moving humans and structures usually occurs in slender structures in which the level of vibration is potentially high. Furthermore, there is the addition of mass to the structural system due to the presence of people and an increase in damping due to the human body´s ability to absorb vibrational energy. In this paper, a test campaign is presented to obtain parameters for a single degree of freedom (SDOF) biodynamic model that represents the action of a walking pedestrian in the vertical direction. The parameters of this model are the mass (m), damping (c) and stiffness (k). The measurements were performed on a force platform, and the inputs were the spectral acceleration amplitudes of the first three harmonics at the waist level of the test subjects and the corresponding amplitudes of the first three harmonics of the vertical ground reaction force. This leads to a system of nonlinear equations that is solved using a gradient-based optimization algorithm. A set of individuals took part in the tests to ensure inter-subject variability, and, regression expressions and an artificial neural network (ANN) were used to relate the biodynamic parameters to the pacing rate and the body mass of the pedestrians. The results showed some scatter in damping and stiffness that could not be precisely correlated with the masses and pacing rates of the subjects. The use of the ANN resulted in significant improvements in the parameter expressions with a low uncertainty. Finally, the measured vertical accelerations on a prototype footbridge show the adequacy of the numerical model for the representation of the effects of walking pedestrians on a structure. The results are consistent for many crowd densities.

  14. Review and Evaluation of Hand-Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Sinsel, Erik W; Welcome, Daniel E; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2015-09-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study. PMID:26929824

  15. Review and Evaluation of Hand–Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Sinsel, Erik W.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study. PMID:26929824

  16. Environmental assessment, aircraft chemical warfare survivability test program, Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-01

    The proposed project, the Aircraft Chemical Warfare Survivability Test Program at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, involves the testing and development of aircraft systems and operating procedures for use in an environment contaminated with chemical/biological warfare agents. The tests will be performed in accordance with a directive from the chief of Naval Operations to obtain and maintain the capability to operate in a chemically-contaminated environment. These tests will be performed under outdoor, warm-weather conditions on a dredge disposal area and adjacent runways to simulate the conditions under which a real-life threat would be encountered.

  17. COMPUTER AIDED CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN METHODOLOGIES FOR POLLUTION REDUCTION(SYSTEMS ANALYSIS BRANCH, SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the project is to develop computer optimization and simulation methodologies for the design of economical chemical manufacturing processes with a minimum of impact on the environment. The computer simulation and optimization tools developed in this project can be...

  18. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts. PMID:26732545

  19. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts. PMID:26732545

  20. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts.

  1. Biodynamic characteristics of upper limb reaching movements of the seated human under whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heon-Jeong; Martin, Bernard J

    2013-02-01

    Simulation of human movements is an essential component for proactive ergonomic analysis and biomechanical model development (Chaffin, 2001). Most studies on reach kinematics have described human movements in a static environment, however the models derived from these studies cannot be applied to the analysis of human reach movements in vibratory environments such as in-vehicle operations. This study analyzes three-dimensional joint kinematics of the upper extremity in reach movements performed in static and specific vibratory conditions and investigates vibration transmission to shoulder, elbow, and hand along the body path during pointing tasks. Thirteen seated subjects performed reach movements to five target directions distributed in their right hemisphere. The results show similarities in the characteristics of movement patterns and reach trajectories of upper body segments for static and dynamic environments. In addition, vibration transmission through upper body segments is affected by vibration frequency, direction, and location of the target to be reached. Similarities in the pattern of movement trajectories revealed by filtering vibration-induced oscillations indicate that coordination strategy may not be drastically different in static and vibratory environments. This finding may facilitate the development of active biodynamic models to predict human performance and behavior under whole body vibration exposure. PMID:22814094

  2. The chemical characterization and possible reuses of hazardous wastes generated by the General Electric Silicone Products Division in Waterford, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    This research describes procedures used to characterize a listed solid hazardous waste from a silicone manufacturer and the investigation of possible industrial applications for the 25,000 tons of waste which is landfilled each year. This research illustrates procedures which could be used to characterize other solid wastes and approaches to studying possible applications for the waste rather than the typical modes of disposal. Samples taken at various stages in the waste water treatment process were characterized by loss on ignition at varying temperatures, chemical analyses including atomic absorption and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies. Successful wet chemical methods were developed to analyze all types of wastes collected. The major component, amorphous silica, was present in all samples. Calcium carbonate and copper were also present in significant amounts. The characterization led to the investigation of reuse alternatives for some samples and the dismissal of others. Possible industrial applications investigated were copper recovery by bioleaching, using the material as a raw material for manufacturing glass, or in the cement and concrete industry. This research focused on the latter reuse possibility. Solids that contain over 70% amorphous silica and constituting 85% of the waste stream were tested as a partial replacement for or as an additive to cement in mortar and concrete. Appreciable improvements in compressive strength over the control after 28 days were achieved. Results of EPA leaching procedures showed the solids, mortar and concrete specimens to be well below the established limits for the regulated metals. The materials did not pose a hazard to the environment when used in this application. Several companies have submitted proposals to the silicone manufacturer for use of this material in their processes. The ability to utilize the bulk of the hazardous waste generated appears economically and environmentally feasible.

  3. Validation of Intra-Subject Variation in Biodynamic Responses of Seated Human Exposed to Whole-Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Soo; Yoshimura, Takuya; Tamaoki, Gen

    Many studies have been conducted to investigate the change in human response under various experimental conditions. Usually, these experiments were conducted using many subjects and the inter-subject variation was evaluated. However, the intra-subject variation in human response is also necessary for understanding the change in an individual's physical response to whole-body vibration (WBV). The aim of this study is to investigate the intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses (both apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility) of a seated human exposed to vertical whole-body vibration over time. In the experiments, nine male subjects were exposed to vertical random vibration (0.2-0.3 m/s2 in r.m.s.) in the 0-30Hz frequency range. The measurement variation was also evaluated, wherein the measurements were repeated five times without any change to form the “baseline” for each subject, and the intra-subject variations were evaluated by comparing their responses with these “baseline.” The intra-subject variation was examined from two different viewpoints: variation “within a day” and that “over several days.” To determine the intra-subject variation “within a day”, the five measurements were obtained at two-hour intervals on the same day. In the intra-subject variation “over several days”, the five measurements were obtained again, but at the same time of the day on five consecutive days. The results show that the intra-subject variations (both “within a day” and “over several days”) in biodynamic responses are larger than the “baseline.” However, when the variation “within a day” in biodynamic responses is compared to that “over several days,” no common trend is observed among subjects. Although the magnitude of intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses depends on each subject, both variations “within a day” and that “over several days” have a similar range of variation.

  4. Physico-chemical characteristics of ground and surface water in Gohpur sub-division of Sonitpur district, Assam (India).

    PubMed

    Sabhapandit, Pranab; Mishra, Abani K

    2011-01-01

    According to WHO, about 80% of all the diseases of human beings are caused by water. Since these diseases are directly related with human health, it is necessary to bring awareness among the present and future generation about the consequences of water pollution. Therefore, in this study 34 samples from different sources such as dug wells, bore wells, hand pumps and ponds, where no information is available, were collected during 2008.The samples were analyzed for different physico-chemical parameters like chloride, sulphate, nitrate, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, cadmium, chromium, lead and zinc using standard methods. The result indicated that chloride and nitrate concentrations in all the sources were within the permissible limit, but ponds contained high amount. The concentrations of sulphate, sodium and zinc in dug wells and bore wells were very high and the concentrations of calcium and chromium were within the permissible limit. In case of lead and calcium their concentrations in ponds were higher than the other sources but chromium was not detected in ponds and hand pumps. The iron and copper concentrations in all the sources exceeded the WHO value, particularly dug wells and bore wells contained high concentrations. Magnesium content was greater than potassium and less than sodium in dug wells and bore wells, but in ponds its concentration was greater than the other sources. In our investigation the results indicate that TDS, EC, pH, BOD, DO, COD, TSS were found very high. In 76% samples turbidity exceeded WHO guideline value 5NTU. It was found that 97% and 76% of the sources were positive for TC and FC. Overall analysis revealed that 11 samples were fit for drinking purpose with respect to the parameters studied. PMID:22324152

  5. Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

    2003-11-01

    Seated human subjects have been exposed to vertical whole-body vibration so as to investigate the non-linearity in their biodynamic responses and quantify the response in directions other than the direction of excitation. Twelve males were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25-25 Hz at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s -2 r.m.s.). The subjects sat in four sitting postures having varying foot heights so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat (feet hanging, feet supported with maximum thigh contact, feet supported with average thigh contact, and feet supported with minimum thigh contact). Forces were measured in the vertical, fore-and-aft, and lateral directions on the seat and in the vertical direction at the footrest. The characteristic non-linear response of the human body with reducing resonance frequency at increasing vibration magnitudes was seen in all postures, but to a lesser extent with minimum thigh contact. Appreciable forces in the fore-and-aft direction also showed non-linearity, while forces in the lateral direction were low and showed no consistent trend. Forces at the feet were non-linear with a multi-resonant behaviour and were affected by the position of the legs. The decreased non-linearity with the minimum thigh contact posture suggests the tissues of the buttocks affect the non-linearity of the body more than the tissues of the thighs. The forces in the fore-and-aft direction are consistent with the body moving in two directions when exposed to vertical vibration. The non-linear behaviour of the body, and the considerable forces in the fore-aft direction should be taken into account when optimizing vibration isolation devices.

  6. DIVISIBILITY TESTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOLEY, JACK L.

    THIS BOOKLET, ONE OF A SERIES, HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THE PROJECT, A PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICALLY UNDERDEVELOPED PUPILS. A PROJECT TEAM, INCLUDING INSERVICE TEACHERS, IS BEING USED TO WRITE AND DEVELOP THE MATERIALS FOR THIS PROGRAM. THE MATERIALS DEVELOPED IN THIS BOOKLET INCLUDE SUCH CONCEPTS AS (1) DIVISIBILITY TESTS, (2) CHECKING THE FUNDAMENTAL…

  7. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: biodynamic responses to sinusoidal and random vibration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The dependence of biodynamic responses of the seated human body on the frequency, magnitude and waveform of vertical vibration has been studied in 20 males and 20 females. With sinusoidal vibration (13 frequencies from 1 to 16 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.1-1.6 ms(-2) r.m.s.) and with random vibration (1-16 Hz) at the same magnitudes, the apparent mass of the body was similar with random and sinusoidal vibration of the same overall magnitude. With increasing magnitude of vibration, the stiffness and damping of a model fitted to the apparent mass reduced and the resonance frequency decreased (from 6.5 to 4.5 Hz). Male and female subjects had similar apparent mass (after adjusting for subject weight) and a similar principal resonance frequency with both random and sinusoidal vibration. The change in biodynamic response with increasing vibration magnitude depends on the frequency of the vibration excitation, but is similar with sinusoidal and random excitation. PMID:24730687

  8. Characterizing dissolved Cu and Cd uptake in terms of the biotic ligand and biodynamics using enriched stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    The biotic ligand model considers the biological and geochemical complexities that affect metal exposure. It relates toxicity to the fraction of physiological active sites impacted by reactive metal species. The biodynamic model is a complementary construct that predicts bioaccumulation and assumes that toxicity occurs when influx rates exceed rates of loss and detoxification. In this paper we presume that metal influx rates are mechanistically the resulting processes that characterize transmembrane transport. We use enriched stable isotopes to characterize, both in terms of the biotic ligand and biodynamics, dissolved metal uptake by a freshwater snail at water hardness varying up to 180-fold. Upon 24 h exposure, metal uptake was linear over a range encompassing most environmental concentrations; although saturation kinetics were observed at higher concentrations. Cadmium influx rates correlate with changes in the affinity of the biotic ligand, whereas those of Cu correlate with changes in both site affinity and capacity. A relationship between metal influx rate and ligand character asks whether toxicity is the result of accumulation at the biotic ligand or the rate at which metal is transported by that ligand.

  9. Structures Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center Structures Division is an international leader and pioneer in developing new structural analysis, life prediction, and failure analysis related to rotating machinery and more specifically to hot section components in air-breathing aircraft engines and spacecraft propulsion systems. The research consists of both deterministic and probabilistic methodology. Studies include, but are not limited to, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue as well as material creep. Studies of structural failure are at both the micro- and macrolevels. Nondestructive evaluation methods related to structural reliability are developed, applied, and evaluated. Materials from which structural components are made, studied, and tested are monolithics and metal-matrix, polymer-matrix, and ceramic-matrix composites. Aeroelastic models are developed and used to determine the cyclic loading and life of fan and turbine blades. Life models are developed and tested for bearings, seals, and other mechanical components, such as magnetic suspensions. Results of these studies are published in NASA technical papers and reference publication as well as in technical society journal articles. The results of the work of the Structures Division and the bibliography of its publications for calendar year 1995 are presented.

  10. Earth Sciences Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division's research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth's crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989, a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will, in the coming years, be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

  11. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  12. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during longitudinal horizontal whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    The resonance frequencies in frequency response functions of the human body (e.g. apparent mass and transmissibility) decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear biodynamic response is found with various sitting and standing postures requiring postural control. The present study measured the apparent mass of the body in a relaxed semi-supine posture with two types of longitudinal horizontal vibration (in the z-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 ms -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 ms -2 rms. A nonlinear response was apparent in both the horizontal ( z-axis) apparent mass and the vertical ( x-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. With intermittent random vibration, as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 ms -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass decreased from 3.2 to 2.5 Hz whereas, with continuous random vibration over the same range of magnitudes, the resonance frequency decreased from 3.4 to 2.4 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms) was 0.6 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 0.9 Hz with the continuous random vibration. With intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration at the same magnitudes. The responses were consistent with passive thixotropy being a primary cause of nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration, although reflex activity of the muscles may also have an influence.

  13. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    Nonlinear biodynamic responses are evident in many studies of the apparent masses of sitting and standing subjects in static postures that require muscle activity for postural control. In the present study, 12 male subjects adopted a relaxed semi-supine posture assumed to involve less muscle activity than during static sitting and standing. The supine subjects were exposed to two types of vertical vibration (in the x-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 m s -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 10.35 to 7.32 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 m s -2 rms. This nonlinear response was apparent in both the vertical ( x-axis) apparent mass and in the horizontal ( z-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. As the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 m s -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass with intermittent random vibration decreased from 9.28 to 8.06 Hz whereas, over the same range of magnitudes with continuous random vibration, the resonance frequency decreased from 9.62 to 7.81 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms) was 1.37 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 1.71 with the continuous random vibration. With the intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration of the same magnitudes. The response was typical of thixotropy that may be a primary cause of the nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration.

  14. Life sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Day, L.

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  15. Are Epiphytic Microbial Communities in the Carposphere of Ripening Grape Clusters (Vitis vinifera L.) Different between Conventional, Organic, and Biodynamic Grapes?

    PubMed Central

    Kecskeméti, Elizabeth; Berkelmann-Löhnertz, Beate; Reineke, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Using barcoded pyrosequencing fungal and bacterial communities associated with grape berry clusters (Vitis vinifera L.) obtained from conventional, organic and biodynamic vineyard plots were investigated in two subsequent years at different stages during berry ripening. The four most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on fungal ITS data were Botrytis cinerea, Cladosporium spp., Aureobasidium pullulans and Alternaria alternata which represented 57% and 47% of the total reads in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Members of the genera Sphingomonas, Gluconobacter, Pseudomonas, Erwinia, and Massilia constituted 67% of the total number of bacterial 16S DNA reads in 2010 samples and 78% in 2011 samples. Viticultural management system had no significant effect on abundance of fungi or bacteria in both years and at all three sampling dates. Exceptions were A. alternata and Pseudomonas spp. which were more abundant in the carposphere of conventional compared to biodynamic berries, as well as Sphingomonas spp. which was significantly less abundant on conventional compared to organic berries at an early ripening stage in 2011. In general, there were no significant differences in fungal and bacterial diversity indices or richness evident between management systems. No distinct fungal or bacterial communities were associated with the different maturation stages or management systems, respectively. An exception was the last stage of berry maturation in 2011, where the Simpson diversity index was significantly higher for fungal communities on biodynamic compared to conventional grapes. Our study highlights the existence of complex and dynamic microbial communities in the grape cluster carposphere including both phytopathogenic and potentially antagonistic microorganisms that can have a significant impact on grape production. Such knowledge is particularly relevant for development, selection and application of effective control measures against economically important

  16. Biodynamic response of the seated human body to single-axis and dual-axis vibration: effect of backrest and non-linearity.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi; Griffin, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The biodynamic responses to the human body give an understanding of why human responses to vibration (changes in health, comfort, and performance) vary with the frequency and direction of vibration. Studies have shown that biodynamic responses also vary with the magnitude of vibration and that the backrests of seats influence the transmission of vibration to the seated human body. There has been little study of the nonlinearity in the biodynamic responses of the body to dual-axis excitation and no study of the influence of backrests during dual-axis excitation. This study investigated the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of the human body exposed to random vibration (0.2 to 20 Hz) in all 15 possible combinations of four magnitudes (0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 ms(-2) r.m.s.) of fore-and-aft vibration and the same four magnitudes of vertical vibration. Nonlinearity was evident, with the body softening with increasing magnitude of vibration when using a fixed magnitude of vibration in one direction and varying the magnitude of vibration in the other direction. The fore-and-aft apparent mass on the seat was greater without a backrest at the lower frequencies but greater with a backrest at the higher frequencies. The vertical apparent mass on the seat was decreased by the backrest at low frequencies. Cross-axis coupling was evident, with excitation in one axis producing a response in the other axis. It is concluded that the nonlinearity of the body evident during single-axis and multi-axis vibration, and the influence of backrests, should be taken into account when determining frequency weightings for predicting human responses to vibration and when optimising the dynamics of seating to minimise exposure to vibration. PMID:22146145

  17. Biodynamic modelling of the bioaccumulation of trace metals (Ag, As and Zn) by an infaunal estuarine invertebrate, the clam Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Kalman, J; Smith, B D; Bury, N R; Rainbow, P S

    2014-09-01

    Biodynamic modelling was used to investigate the uptake and accumulation of three trace metals (Ag, As, Zn) by the deposit feeding estuarine bivalve mollusc Scrobicularia plana. Radioactive labelling techniques were used to quantify the rates of trace metal uptake (and subsequent elimination) from water and sediment diet. The uptake rate constant from solution (±SE) was greatest for Ag (3.954±0.375 l g(-1) d(-1)) followed by As (0.807±0.129 l g(-1) d(-1)) and Zn (0.103±0.016 l g(-1) d(-1)). Assimilation efficiencies from ingested sediment were 40.2±1.3% (Ag), 31.7±1.0% (Zn) and 25.3±0.9% (As). Efflux rate constants after exposure to metals in the solution or sediment fell in the range of 0.014-0.060 d(-1). By incorporating these physiological parameters into biodynamic models, our results showed that dissolved metal is the predominant source of accumulated Ag, As and Zn in S. plana, accounting for 66-99%, 50-97% and 52-98% of total accumulation of Ag, As and Zn, respectively, under different field exposure conditions. In general, model-predicted steady state concentrations of Ag, As and Zn matched well with those observed in clams collected in SW England estuaries. Our findings highlight the potential of biodynamic modelling to predict Ag, As and Zn accumulation in S. plana, taking into account specific dissolved and sediment concentrations of the metals at a particular field site, together with local water and sediment geochemistries. PMID:24880784

  18. Effect of different production systems on chemical profiles of dwarf French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Top Crop) pods.

    PubMed

    Jakopic, Jerneja; Slatnar, Ana; Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja; Veberic, Robert; Stampar, Franci; Bavec, Franci; Bavec, Martina

    2013-03-13

    The chemical composition of dwarf French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cv. Top Crop was compared among five production systems: conventional, integrated, organic, and biodynamic production systems and the control. Determination of sugars and organic acids was performed with a HPLC system, and identification of individual phenolic compounds using HPLC-MS. The chemical composition of the beans was unaffected by the production systems; however, the content levels of individual compounds were changed. The pods from integrated production contained the lowest levels of glucose and sucrose and the highest levels of catechin, procyanidin dimers, and a vanillic acid derivative. The control treatment, as well as organic and biodynamic productions, positively affected the levels of sugar content and caused a lower content of catechin and trans-p-coumaroylaldaric acids. Beans from the conventional production system contained the lowest levels of fructose, glucose, ascorbic acid, and many phenolics from various groups. PMID:23398279

  19. Divisibility--Another Route.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardella, Francis J.

    1984-01-01

    Given is an alternative to individual divisibility rules by generating a general process that can be applied to establish divisibility by any number. The process relies on modular arithmetic and the concept of congruence. (MNS)

  20. Biodynamic modeling of PCB uptake by Macoma balthica and Corbicula fluminea from sediment amended with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Pamela B; Luoma, Samuel N; Luthy, Richard G

    2008-01-15

    Activated carbon amendment was assessed in the laboratory as a remediation strategy for freshwater sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the Grasse River (near Massena, NY). Three end points were evaluated: aqueous equilibrium PCB concentration, uptake into semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), and 28-day bioaccumulation in the clam Corbicula fluminea. PCB uptake by water, SPMDs, and clams followed similar trends, with reductions increasing as a function of carbon dose. Average percent reductions in clam tissue PCBs were 67, 86, and 95% for activated carbon doses of 0.7, 1.3, and 2.5% dry wt, respectively. A biodynamic model that incorporates sediment geochemistry and dietary and aqueous uptake routes was found to agree well with observed uptake by C. fluminea in our laboratory test systems. Results from this study were compared to 28-day bioaccumulation experiments involving PCB-contaminated sediment from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (San Francisco Bay, CA) and the clam Macoma balthica. Due to differences in feeding strategy, M. balthica deposit-feeds whereas C. fluminea filter-feeds, the relative importance of the aqueous uptake route is predicted to be much higher for C. fluminea than for M. balthica. Whereas M. balthica takes up approximately 90% of its body burden through sediment ingestion, C. fluminea only accumulates approximately 45% via this route. In both cases, results strongly suggest that it is the mass transfer of PCBs from native sediment to added carbon particles, not merely reductions in aqueous PCB concentrations, that effectively reduces PCB bioavailability and uptake by sediment-dwelling organisms. PMID:18284151

  1. Ground-water resources of the Middle Loup division of the lower Platte River basin, Nebraska, with a section on Chemical quality of the ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Delbert Wayne; Rainwater, Frank Hays

    1955-01-01

    The Middle Loup division of the lower Platte River basin is an area of 650 square miles which includes the Middle Loup River valley from the confluence of the Middle and North Loup Rivers in Howard County, Nebr., to the site of the diversion dam that the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation proposes to construct in Blaine County near Milburn, Nebr. It also includes land in Howard and Sherman Counties designated by the Bureau of Reclamation as the Farwell unit. Irrigable land in this division is present on both sides of the Middle Loup River and along its tributaries. Most of the Middle Loup River valley is already irrigated by the Middle Loup Public Power and Irrigation District, which is strictly an irrigation enterprise. The uplands are not irrigated. Loess, dune sand, gravel, silt, and clay of Pleistocene or Recent age are exposed in the report area. These unconsolidated sediments rest on bedrock consisting of alternating layers of shale, mudstone, sandstone, and limestone, which are essentially fiat lying or slightly warped. The Ogallala formation, of Tertiary (Pliocene) age, immediately underlies the Pleistocene sediments and rests on the Pierre shale of Cretaceous age. Belts of alluvium occupy the Middle Loup River valley and the valleys of the principal streams in the area. The soils, dune sand, and terrace deposits are the most recent deposits. The Ogallala formation is water bearing and is the source of supply for some domestic and livestock wells. The saturated part of the sand and gravel formations of Pleistocene age, which yields water freely to wells, is the most important aquifer in the Middle Loup division. The water generally is under water-table conditions. The yields of properly constructed wells range from a few gallons per minute (gpm) to as much as 1,800 gpm. Some wells tap water in both the sand and gravel of Pleistocene age and in the underlying Ogallala formation. No wells are known to penetrate into formations older than the Ogallala. Fluctuations

  2. Nonlinear subjective and biodynamic responses to continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J.

    2005-11-01

    The effect of the magnitude of continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction on both subjective and biodynamic responses of human subjects has been investigated experimentally. Additionally, the relation between the subjective responses and the dynamic responses has also been studied. Twelve subjects were exposed to sinusoidal continuous vibrations at five frequencies (3.15-8.0 Hz) and at three magnitudes (0.5-2.0 m s -2 rms). They were also exposed to transient vibrations that were modulated one-and-half cycle sinusoidal waveforms at the same frequencies as the continuous vibrations and at three magnitudes corresponding to the magnitudes used for the continuous vibrations. Discomfort was measured by the method of magnitude estimation with reference stimuli having frequency components in the middle of the frequency range used in this study. The driving-point dynamic responses (the ratio between the force and the motion, i.e., acceleration and velocity, at the driving point) were also measured and divided by the responses to the reference stimuli used in the measurement of discomfort so as to allow the comparison of the dynamic responses with the discomfort responses. Both the discomfort estimates and the normalised driving-point dynamic responses were influenced by the stimuli magnitudes, especially with the continuous vibration. At 3.15 and 4.0 Hz, the discomfort estimates and the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass increased significantly with increases in vibration magnitude from 0.5-2.0 m s -2 rms. Magnitude estimates for discomfort were correlated with the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass in the frequency range investigated. For the transient vibrations, the discomfort estimates and the driving-point dynamic responses were interpreted as responses in frequency bands around the fundamental frequency of the input motion. The results indicate similar nonlinearities in discomfort and driving-point dynamic

  3. Analyses of biodynamic responses of seated occupants to uncorrelated fore-aft and vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandapuram, Santosh; Rakheja, Subhash; Marcotte, Pierre; Boileau, Paul-Émile

    2011-08-01

    The apparent mass and seat-to-head-transmissibility response functions of the seated human body were investigated under exposures to fore-aft ( x), vertical ( z), and combined fore-aft and vertical ( x and z) axis whole-body vibration. The coupling effects of dual-axis vibration were investigated using two different frequency response function estimators based upon the cross- and auto-spectral densities of the response and excitation signals, denoted as H1 and Hv estimators, respectively. The experiments were performed to measure the biodynamic responses to single and uncorrelated dual-axis vibration, and to study the effects of hands support, back support and vibration magnitude on the body interactions with the seatpan and the backrest, characterized in terms of apparent masses and the vibration transmitted to the head. The data were acquired with 9 subjects exposed to two different magnitudes of vibration applied along the individual x- and z-axis (0.25 and 0.4 m/s 2 rms), and along both the axis (0.28 and 0.4 m/s 2 rms along each axis) in the 0.5-20 Hz frequency range. The two methods resulted in identical single-axis responses but considerably different dual-axis responses. The dual-axis responses derived from the Hv estimator revealed notable effects of dual-axis vibration, as they comprised both the direct and cross-axis responses observed under single axis vibration. Such effect, termed as the coupling effect, was not evident in the dual-axis responses derived using the commonly used H1 estimator. The results also revealed significant effects of hands and back support conditions on the coupling effects and the measured responses. The back support constrained the upper body movements and thus showed relatively weaker coupling compared to that observed in the responses without the back support. The effect of hand support was also pronounced under the fore-aft vibration. The results suggest that a better understanding of the seated human body responses to

  4. Animating the biodynamics of soil thickness using process vector analysis: A dynamic denudation approach to soil formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.L.; Domier, J.E.J.; Johnson, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper expands the dynamic denudation framework of landscape evolution by providing new process insights and details on how soil and its signature morphological feature, the biomantle, form and function in the environment. We examine soils and their biomantles from disparate parts of the world, from the tropics through midlatitudes and hyperarid through perhumid, a range that exhibits varying environments for, and of, life. We then explicate the process pathways that cause soils to thicken and thin, and to even disappear, then reform. We do this by examining thickness relationships, where soil thickness stand biomantle thickness bt are functions of upbuilding u and deepening d minus removal r processes, hence st/bt=f(u+d-r). Upbuilding has two subsets, u1, which includes all exogenous (allochthonous-outside) mineral and/or organic inputs to the soil system, and u2, which includes all endogenous (autochthonous-in situ) processes and productions, including weathering. Exogenous u1 inputs include eolian and slopewash inputs (sedimentations) of mineral and organic materials, mass wasting accumulations and the like. Endogenous u2 processes and productions include the sum of in situ bioturbations, biosynthetic productions, organic accumulations, biovoid productions, weathering and volume increases caused by their sum. Endogenous upbuildings, which dominantly occur in the biomantle, are basically biodynamic bd processes and productions, hence u2=bd. Therefore, if exogenous upbuildings u1 are minimal or zero, then biomantle thickness bt is expressed by bt=f(u2-r) or bt=f(bd-r). Drawing on these relationships, we employ a graphic-conceptual device called process vector analysis in a digital animation (see supplementary materials or cf. https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/jdomier/www/temp/ biomantle.html) that illustrates the main pathways that form both Earth's soil and its unique epidermis, the biomantle. We then discuss the main elements of the animation using still frames that

  5. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  6. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1979. [Pyrochemical/dry processing; waste encapsulation in metal; transport in geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    For pyrochemical and dry processing materials development included exposure to molten metal and salt of Mo-0.5% Ti-0.07% Ti-0.01% C, Mo-30% W, SiC, Si/sub 2/ON/sub 2/, ZrB/sub 2/-SiC, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, AlN, HfB/sub 2/, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, nickel nitrate-infiltrated W, W-coated Mo, and W-metallized alumina-yttria. Work on Th-U salt transport processing included solubility of Th in liquid Cd, defining the Cd-Th and Cd-Mg-Th phase diagrams, ThO/sub 2/ reduction experiments, and electrolysis of CaO in molten salt. Work on pyrochemical processes and associated hardware for coprocessing U and Pu in spent FBR fuels included a second-generation computer model of the transport process, turntable transport process design, work on the U-Cu-Mg system, and U and Pu distribution coefficients between molten salt and metal. Refractory metal vessels are being service-life tested. The chloride volatility processing of Th-based fuel was evaluated for its proliferation resistance, and a preliminary ternary phase diagram for the Zn-U-Pu system was computed. Material characterization and process analysis were conducted on the Exportable Pyrochemical process (Pyro-Civex process). Literature data on oxidation of fissile metals to oxides were reviewed. Work was done on chemical bases for the reprocessing of actinide oxides in molten salts. Flowsheets are being developed for the processing of fuel in molten tin. Work on encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in metal matrix included studies of leach rate of crystalline waste materials and of the impact resistance of metal-matrix waste forms. In work on the transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media, adsorption of Sr on oolitic limestone was studied, as well as the migration of Cs in basalt. Fitting of data on the adsorption of iodate by hematite to a mathematical model was attempted.

  7. Comparison of biogenic amine and polyphenol profiles of grape berries and wines obtained following conventional, organic and biodynamic agricultural and oenological practices.

    PubMed

    Tassoni, Annalisa; Tango, Nunzio; Ferri, Maura

    2013-08-15

    The bio-active compounds present in food and beverages have a high potential influence on the future health of humans. The levels of biogenic amines, anthocyanins, polyphenols and antioxidant activity were measured in white (Pignoletto) and red (Sangiovese) grape berries and wines from the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy) obtained following conventional, organic and biodynamic agricultural and oenological practices. No significant difference was shown among the samples coming from different agricultural and winemaking practices. Principal Component Analysis was also performed. Biogenic amine amounts were higher in red than in white berries, while in the wines an opposite trend was observed, with histamine, tyramine and putrescine being the most abundant in Pignoletto wines. Red grapes and wines were richer in anthocyanins and showed higher antioxidant activity than white ones. The total level of polyphenols was similar in red and white berries, but with different metabolite profiles depending on the grape variety. PMID:23561124

  8. Bring Back Short Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Chich

    1985-01-01

    Some benefits of helping learners think in prime numbers are detailed. Reasons for the decay of this ability are described, with short division presented as one activity which should be reintroduced in schools. (MNS)

  9. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  10. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  11. Website for the Space Science Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, James

    2002-01-01

    The Space Science Division at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to research in astrophysics, exobiology, advanced life support technologies, and planetary science. These research programs are structured around Astrobiology (the study of life in the universe and the chemical and physical forces and adaptions that influence life's origin, evolution, and destiny), and address some of the most fundamental questions pursued by science. These questions examine the origin of life and our place in the universe. Ames is recognized as a world leader in Astrobiology. In pursuing our mission in Astrobiology, Space Science Division scientists perform pioneering basic research and technology development.

  12. PROJECT LISTING - CLEAN PROCESSES BRANCH (SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This list of projects for the Clean Processes Branch (CPB)of NRMRL's Sustainable Technology Division covers CPB projects in the areas of metal finishing and electronics pollution prevention; green engineering for chemical synthesis; solvent and coatings alternatives; separations ...

  13. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  15. The Problem with Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Of the "big four", division is likely to regarded by many learners as "the odd one out", "the difficult one", "the one that is complicated", or "the scary one". It seems to have been that way "for ever", in the perception of many who have trodden the learning pathways through the world of number. But, does it have to be like this? Clearly the…

  16. Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Anticrossproducts and cross divisions.

    PubMed

    de Leva, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    This paper defines, in the context of conventional vector algebra, the concept of anticrossproduct and a family of simple operations called cross or vector divisions. It is impossible to solve for a or b the equation axb=c, where a and b are three-dimensional space vectors, and axb is their cross product. However, the problem becomes solvable if some "knowledge about the unknown" (a or b) is available, consisting of one of its components, or the angle it forms with the other operand of the cross product. Independently of the selected reference frame orientation, the known component of a may be parallel to b, or vice versa. The cross divisions provide a compact and insightful symbolic representation of a family of algorithms specifically designed to solve problems of such kind. A generalized algorithm was also defined, incorporating the rules for selecting the appropriate kind of cross division, based on the type of input data. Four examples of practical application were provided, including the computation of the point of application of a force and the angular velocity of a rigid body. The definition and geometrical interpretation of the cross divisions stemmed from the concept of anticrossproduct. The "anticrossproducts of axb" were defined as the infinitely many vectors x(i) such that x(i)xb=axb. PMID:18423647

  18. Division XII Business Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Malcolm G.; Genova, Francoise; Anderson, Johannes; Federman, Steven R.; Gilmore, Alan C.; Nha, Il-Seong; Norris, Raymond P.; Robson, Ian E.; Stavinschi, Magda G.; Trimble, Virginia L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2010-05-01

    Brief meetings were held to confirm the elections of the incoming Division President, Francoise Genova and Vice President, Ray Norris along with the Organizing Committee which will consist of the incoming Presidents of the 7 Commissions (5,6,14,41,46,50 and 55) plus additional nominated members. The incoming Organizing Committee will thus consist of:

  19. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division`s research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth`s crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

  20. 28. Photocopy of drawing L1100 in Utilities Engineering Division, Cleveland ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of drawing L-1100 in Utilities Engineering Division, Cleveland Public Works showing plan and section of chemical house and mixing chambers at BAldwin Filtration Plant. Drawing dated 1924. - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  1. Biodynamic simulations of the effect of a neck-mounted air bag on the head/neck response during high G acceleration.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Freivalds, A; Lee, S Y

    1991-08-01

    New helmet-mounted devices (such as night-vision goggles, laser eye protection, etc.) have created new safety hazards for pilots during ejection or high G maneuvering. In order to prevent the resulting head/neck injuries, this study extends the air-bag protection system developed for ground vehicles to a neck mounted system for aircrew personnel. Results, carried out by computer biodynamic simulations using the Articulated Total Body Model (ATB), showed that: 1) helmet weight had little effect on head/neck torque, contact force and flexion angle; 2) initial head/neck position and center of gravity offsets of the helmet-mounted devices had significant effects on head-neck torques, contact forces, and neck flexion angles; and 3) the neck mounted air bag significantly reduced neck torques, contact forces, and neck flexion angles. We conclude that the neck-mounted air bag system could significantly reduce the severity of head/neck injuries to pilots during ejection or high G maneuvering. PMID:1930056

  2. Predictive value of ex vivo biodynamic imaging in determining response to chemotherapy in dogs with spontaneous non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Custead, M R; An, R; Turek, J J; Moore, G E

    2016-01-01

    Biodynamic imaging (BDI) is a novel phenotypic cancer profiling technology which optically characterizes changes in subcellular motion within living tumor tissue samples in response to ex vivo treatment with cancer chemotherapy drugs. The purpose of this preliminary study was to assess the ability of ex vivo BDI to predict in vivo clinical response to chemotherapy in ten dogs with naturally-occurring non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Pre-treatment tumor biopsy samples were obtained from all dogs and treated ex vivo with doxorubicin (10 μM). BDI measured six dynamic biomarkers of subcellular motion from all biopsy samples at baseline and at regular intervals for 9 h following drug application. All dogs subsequently received doxorubicin to treat their lymphomas. Best overall response to and progression-free survival time following chemotherapy were recorded for all dogs. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine accuracy and identify possible cut-off values for the BDI-measured biomarkers which could accurately predict those dogs’ cancers that would and would not respond to doxorubicin chemotherapy. One biomarker (designated ‘MEM’) showed 100% discriminative capability for predicting clinical response to doxorubicin (area under the ROC curve = 1.00, 95% CI 0.692–1.000), while other biomarkers also showed promising predictive capability. These preliminary findings suggest that ex vivo BDI can accurately predict treatment outcome following doxorubicin chemotherapy in a spontaneous animal cancer model, and is worthy of further investigation as a technology for personalized cancer medicine.

  3. Schizosaccharomyces pombe and its Ni(II)-insensitive mutant GA1 in Ni(II) uptake from aqueous solutions: a biodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Sayar, Nihat Alpagu; Durmaz-Sam, Selcen; Kazan, Dilek; Sayar, Ahmet Alp

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, Ni(II) uptake from aqueous solution by living cells of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe haploid 972 with h (-) mating type and a Ni(II)-insensitive mutant GA1 derived from 972 was investigated at various initial glucose and Ni(II) concentrations. A biodynamic model was developed to predict the unsteady and steady-state phases of the uptake process. Gompertz growth and uptake process parameters were optimized to predict the maximum growth rate μ m and the process metric C r, the remaining Ni(II) content in the aqueous solution. The simulated overall metal uptake values were found to be in acceptable agreement with experimental results. The model validation was done through regression statistics and uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. To gain insight into the phenomenon of Ni(II) uptake by wild-type and mutant S. pombe, probable active and passive metal transport mechanisms in yeast cells were discussed in view of the simulation results. The present work revealed the potential of mutant GA1 to remove Ni(II) cations from aqueous media. The results obtained provided new insights for understanding the combined effect of biosorption and bioaccumulation processes for metal removal and offered a possibility for the use of growing mutant S. pombe cell in bioremediation. PMID:24752843

  4. SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION - HOME PAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the Sustainable Technology Division is to advance the scientific understanding, development and application of technologies and methods for prevention, removal and control of environmental risks to human health and ecology. The Division is organized into four bra...

  5. Division X: Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ren-Dong; Taylor, Russ; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Chapman, Jessica; Dubner, Gloria; Garrett, Michael; Goss, W. Miller; Torrelles, Jose M.; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Carilli, Chris; Hills, Richard; Shastri, Prajval

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of Division X in the IAU 2009GA took place in three sessions during the day of August 6, 2009. The meeting, being well attended, started with the approval for the meeting agenda. Then the triennium reports were made in the first session by the president of Division X, Ren-Dong Nan, and by the chairs of three working groups: “Historic Radio Astronomy WG” by Wayne Orchiston, “Astrophysically Important Lines WG” by Masatoshi Ohishi, and “Global VLBI WG” by Tasso Tzioumis (proxy chair appointed by Steven Tingay). Afterwards, a dozen reports from observatories and worldwide significant projects have been presented in the second session. Business meeting of “Interference Mitigation WG” was located in the third session.

  6. Energy Systems Divisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applewhite, John

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the JSC Energy Systems Divisions work in propulsion. Specific work in LO2/CH4 propulsion, cryogenic propulsion, low thrust propulsion for Free Flyer, robotic and Extra Vehicular Activities, and work on the Morpheus terrestrial free flyer test bed is reviewed. The back-up slides contain a chart with comparisons of LO2/LCH4 with other propellants, and reviewing the advantages especially for spacecraft propulsion.

  7. Biorepositories | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Carefully collected and controlled high-quality human biospecimens, annotated with clinical data and properly consented for investigational use, are available through the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories listed in the charts below. Biorepositories Managed by the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories Supported by the Division of Cancer Prevention Related Biorepositories | Information about accessing biospecimens collected from DCP-supported clinical trials and projects.

  8. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  9. USACE DIVISION AND DISTRICT BOUNDARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USACE Division and District Boundary data contains the delination of Corps Division and District boundaries. District and Division Boundaries are based on the US political and watershed boundaries. In the mid 1990's, WES created the file by digitizing the 1984 Civil Wor...

  10. A physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model for estragole DNA binding in rat liver based on in vitro kinetic data and estragole DNA adduct formation in primary hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paini, Alicia; Punt, Ans; Viton, Florian; Scholz, Gabriele; Delatour, Thierry; Marin-Kuan, Maricel; Schilter, Benoit; Bladeren, Peter J. van; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2010-05-15

    Estragole has been shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in rodent species at high-dose levels. Translation of these results into the likelihood of formation of DNA adducts, mutation, and ultimately cancer upon more realistic low-dose exposures remains a challenge. Recently we have developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) models for rat and human predicting bioactivation of estragole. These PBBK models, however, predict only kinetic characteristics. The present study describes the extension of the PBBK model to a so-called physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model predicting in vivo DNA adduct formation of estragole in rat liver. This PBBD model was developed using in vitro data on DNA adduct formation in rat primary hepatocytes exposed to 1'-hydroxyestragole. The model was extended by linking the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole formation predicted by the PBBK model to the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole in the in vitro experiments. The outcome of the PBBD model revealed a linear increase in DNA adduct formation with increasing estragole doses up to 100 mg/kg bw. Although DNA adduct formation of genotoxic carcinogens is generally seen as a biomarker of exposure rather than a biomarker of response, the PBBD model now developed is one step closer to the ultimate toxic effect of estragole than the PBBK model described previously. Comparison of the PBBD model outcome to available data showed that the model adequately predicts the dose-dependent level of DNA adduct formation. The PBBD model predicts DNA adduct formation at low levels of exposure up to a dose level showing to cause cancer in rodent bioassays, providing a proof of principle for modeling a toxicodynamic in vivo endpoint on the basis of solely in vitro experimental data.

  11. 41. JL photographer, summer 1978, view of chemical mixer from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. JL photographer, summer 1978, view of chemical mixer from atop chemical spray nozzels. - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  12. Coracoacromial ligament division.

    PubMed

    Johansson, J E; Barrington, T W

    1984-01-01

    The object of this paper is to report on the findings of a retrospective study of 40 patients with 41 shoulders with persistent painful arc syndrome secondary to a chronic coracoacromial ligament inflammation who underwent simple coracoacromial ligament division at the Toronto East General and Orthopaedic Hospital between January 1973 and June 1979. Initial therapy was always nonoperative. Surgical intervention was reserved for patients who did not respond to conservative management and who had a painful arc with tenderness of the coracoacromial ligament. The aim of the coracoacromial ligament division was to relieve impingement by releasing the coracoacromial arch. Patients were carefully examined to rule out associated neck pathology, rotator cuff problems, and lesions of the acromioclavicular joint. Any patients with significantly large osteophytes under the anterior acromion were excluded. Forty patients (41 shoulders) were questioned and examined in followup. There were 29 males and 11 females. The ages ranged from 21 to 72 years (average 43.5 years). In 21 shoulders (51%), there was a history of trauma as the initiating factor. The follow-up ranged from 8 to 76 months (average 36.3 months). According to a described rating system, the results were satisfactory to excellent in 39 of 41 shoulders (95%) and unsatisfactory in two of 41 shoulders (5%). The back to work time ranged from 1 to 16 weeks (average 5.7 weeks).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6742288

  13. Activities: Understanding Division of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezuk, Nadine S.; Armstrong, Barbara E.

    1993-01-01

    Presents a series of five activities that introduce division of fractions through real-world situations. Discusses problems related to resurfacing a highway, painting dividing stripes on a highway, covering one area A with another area B, looking for patterns, and maximizing the result of a division problem. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  14. Lightning Talks 2015: Theoretical Division

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, Jack S.

    2015-11-25

    This document is a compilation of slides from a number of student presentations given to LANL Theoretical Division members. The subjects cover the range of activities of the Division, including plasma physics, environmental issues, materials research, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and computational methods.

  15. The Division of Family Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericksen, Julia A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes the marital role division between couples, in the Philadelphia area, concentrating on the division of household tasks, child care, and paid employment. Data support a marital power model with husband's income negatively related and wife's education positively related to shared roles. Blacks are more likely to share roles. (Author)

  16. Streptomyces: A Screening Tool for Bacterial Cell Division Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Charul; Tocheva, Elitza I.; McAuley, Scott; Craney, Arryn; Jensen, Grant J.; Nodwell, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Cell division is essential for spore formation but not for viability in the filamentous streptomycetes bacteria. Failure to complete cell division instead blocks spore formation, a phenotype that can be visualized by the absence of gray (in Streptomyces coelicolor) and green (in Streptomyces venezuelae) spore-associated pigmentation. Despite the lack of essentiality, the streptomycetes divisome is similar to that of other prokaryotes. Therefore, the chemical inhibitors of sporulation in model streptomycetes may interfere with the cell division in rod-shaped bacteria as well. To test this, we investigated 196 compounds that inhibit sporulation in S. coelicolor. We show that 19 of these compounds cause filamentous growth in Bacillus subtilis, consistent with impaired cell division. One of the compounds is a DNA-damaging agent and inhibits cell division by activating the SOS response. The remaining 18 act independently of known stress responses and may therefore act on the divisome or on divisome positioning and stability. Three of the compounds (Fil-1, Fil-2, and Fil-3) confer distinct cell division defects on B. subtilis. They also block B. subtilis sporulation, which is mechanistically unrelated to the sporulation pathway of streptomycetes but is also dependent on the divisome. We discuss ways in which these differing phenotypes can be used in screens for cell division inhibitors. PMID:25256667

  17. Physics Division computer facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cyborski, D.R.; Teh, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division maintains several computer systems for data analysis, general-purpose computing, and word processing. While the VMS VAX clusters are still used, this past year saw a greater shift to the Unix Cluster with the addition of more RISC-based Unix workstations. The main Divisional VAX cluster which consists of two VAX 3300s configured as a dual-host system serves as boot nodes and disk servers to seven other satellite nodes consisting of two VAXstation 3200s, three VAXstation 3100 machines, a VAX-11/750, and a MicroVAX II. There are three 6250/1600 bpi 9-track tape drives, six 8-mm tapes and about 9.1 GB of disk storage served to the cluster by the various satellites. Also, two of the satellites (the MicroVAX and VAX-11/750) have DAPHNE front-end interfaces for data acquisition. Since the tape drives are accessible cluster-wide via a software package, they are, in addition to replay, used for tape-to-tape copies. There is however, a satellite node outfitted with two 8 mm drives available for this purpose. Although not part of the main cluster, a DEC 3000 Alpha machine obtained for data acquisition is also available for data replay. In one case, users reported a performance increase by a factor of 10 when using this machine.

  18. Time-division SQUID multiplexers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, K. D.; Vale, L. R.; Bergren, N. E.; Deiker, S.; Grossman, E. N.; Hilton, G. C.; Nam, S. W.; Reintsema, C. D.; Rudman, D. A.; Huber, M. E.

    2002-02-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of low-temperature bolometers and microcalorimeters based on superconducting transition-edge sensors with a manageable number of readout channels. We discuss the technical tradeoffs between proposed time-division multiplexer and frequency-division multiplexer schemes and motivate our choice of time division. Our first-generation SQUID multiplexer is now in use in an astronomical instrument. We describe our second-generation SQUID multiplexer, which is based on a new architecture that significantly reduces the dissipation of power at the first stage, allowing thousands of SQUIDs to be operated at the base temperature of a cryostat. .

  19. Physics division annual report 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2008-02-28

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission.

  20. Division II: Sun and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, Donald B.; Martinez Pillet, Valentin; Webb, David F.; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Klimchuk, James A.; Kosovichev, Alexander; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; von Steiger, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    This report is on activities of the Division at the General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro. Summaries of scientific activities over the past triennium have been published in Transactions A, see Melrose et al. (2008), Klimchuk et al. (2008), Martinez Pillet et al. (2008) and Bougeret et al. (2008). The business meeting of the three Commissions were incorporated into the business meeting of the Division. This report is based in part on minutes of the business meeting, provided by the Secretary of the Division, Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, and it also includes reports provided by the Presidents of the Commissions (C10, C12, C49) and of the Working Groups (WGs) in the Division.

  1. Division 1137 property control system

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    An automated data processing property control system was developed by Mobile and Remote Range Division 1137. This report describes the operation of the system and examines ways of using it in operational planning and control.

  2. E-Division activities report

    SciTech Connect

    Barschall, H.H.

    1984-07-01

    E (Experimental Physics) Division carries out basic and applied research in atomic and nuclear physics, in materials science, and in other areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Some of the activities are cooperative efforts with other divisions of the Laboratory, and, in a few cases, with other laboratories. Many of the experiments are directly applicable to problems in weapons and energy, some have only potential applied uses, and others are in pure physics. This report presents abstracts of papers published by E (Experimental Physics) Division staff members between July 1983 and June 1984. In addition, it lists the members of the scientific staff of the division, including visitors and students, and some of the assignments of staff members on scientific committees. A brief summary of the budget is included.

  3. Mitochondrial division in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Gandre, Shilpa; van der Bliek, Alexander M

    2007-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial division proteins has largely focused on yeast and mammalian cells. We describe methods to use Caenorhabditis elegans as an alternative model for studying mitochondrial division, taking advantage of the many wonderful resources provided by the C. elegans community. Our methods are largely based on manipulation of gene expression using classic and molecular genetic techniques combined with fluorescence microscopy. Some biochemical methods are also included. As antibodies become available, these biochemical methods are likely to become more sophisticated. PMID:18314747

  4. E-Division activities report

    SciTech Connect

    Barschall, H.H.

    1981-07-01

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-Division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics and in material science. In addition this report describes work on accelerators, microwaves, plasma diagnostics, determination of atmospheric oxygen and of nitrogen in tissue.

  5. E-Division activities report

    SciTech Connect

    Barschall, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics and in materials science. In addition, this report describes development work on accelerators and on instrumentation for plasma diagnostics, nitrogen exchange rates in tissue, and breakdown in gases by microwave pulses.

  6. Harold Seifried, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Harold Seifried is a member of the American Chemical Society Biological Chemistry Division; American College of Toxicology Industrial Toxicology Subcommittee; American Industrial Hygiene Association; Society of Toxicology; International Society for the Study of Xenobiotics; Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology since 1980; American Board of Industrial Hygiene, 1986-2004; and is certified in the Microscopic Examination of Asbestos. |

  7. Chemical sciences, annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of eleven research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a DOE National Laboratory. In FY 1993, the Division made considerable progress on developing two end-stations and a beamline to advance combustion dynamics at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). In support of DOE`s national role in combustion research and chemical science, the beamline effort will enable researchers from around the world to make fundamental advances in understanding the structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates and transients, and in understanding the dynamics of elementary chemical reactions. The Division has continued to place a strong emphasis on full compliance with environmental health and safety guidelines and regulations and has made progress in technology transfer to industry. Finally, the Division has begun a new program in advanced battery research and development that should help strengthen industrial competitiveness both at home and abroad.

  8. Beyond Cookies: Understanding Various Division Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jong, Cindy; Magruder, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Having a deeper understanding of division derived from multiple models is of great importance for teachers and students. For example, students will benefit from a greater understanding of division contexts as they study long division, fractions, and division of fractions. The purpose of this article is to build on teachers' and students'…

  9. 1996 JOURNAL ARTICLES FROM LRPCD (TREATMENT AND DESTRUCTION BRANCH, LAND REMEDIATION AND POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Treatment and Destruction Branch (TDB) of NRMRL's Land Remediation and Pollution Control Division (LRPCD) produces and publishes highly technical and scientific articles relating to TDB's research. TDB conducts bioremediation and physical/chemical treatment research. The rese...

  10. 1997 JOURNAL ARTICLES FROM LRPCD (TREATMENT AND DESTRUCTION BRANCH, LAND REMEDIATION AND POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Treatment and Destruction Branch (TDB) of NRMRL's Land Remediation and Pollution Control Division (LRPCD) produces and publishes highly technical and scientific documents relating to TDB's research. TDB conducts bioremediation and physical/chemical treatment research. The res...

  11. 2000 JOURNAL ARTICLES FROM LRPCD (TREATMENT AND DESTRUCTION BRANCH, LAND REMEDIATION AND POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Treatment and Destruction Branch (TDB) of NRMRL's Land Remediation and Pollution Control Division (LRPCD)produces and publishes highly specialized technical and scientific documents relating to TDB's research. TDB conducts bioremediation and physical/chemical treatment resear...

  12. 1999 JOURNAL ARTICLES FROM LRPCD (TREATMENT AND DESTRUCTION BRANCH, LAND REMEDIATION AND POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Treatment and Destruction Branch (TDB) of NRMRL's Land Remediation and Pollution Control Division (LRPCD) produces and publishes highly technical and scientific documents relating to TDB's research. TDB conducts bioremediation and physical/chemical treatment research. The res...

  13. 1998 JOURNAL ARTICLES FROM LRPCD (TREATMENT AND DESTRUCTION BRANCH, LAND REMEDIATION AND POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Treatment and Destruction Branch (TDB) of NRMRL's Land Remediation and Pollution Control Division (LRPCD) produces and publishes highly technical and scientific documents relating to TDB's research. TDB conducts bioremediation and physical/chemical treatment research. The res...

  14. EDC RESEARCH AT EPA ATLANTIC ECOLOGY DIVISION: DO ENVIRONMENTAL EDCS IMPACT FISH POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlantic Ecology Division, Office of Research and Development, EP A is a marine laboratory situated on Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Researchers at AED are investigating the effects endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the aquatic environment might have on reproductive ...

  15. Building an academic colorectal division.

    PubMed

    Koltun, Walter A

    2014-06-01

    Colon and rectal surgery is fully justified as a valid subspecialty within academic university health centers, but such formal recognition at the organizational level is not the norm. Creating a colon and rectal division within a greater department of surgery requires an unfailing commitment to academic concepts while promulgating the improvements that come in patient care, research, and teaching from a specialty service perspective. The creation of divisional identity then opens the door for a strategic process that will grow the division even more as well as provide benefits to the institution within which it resides. The fundamentals of core values, academic commitment, and shared success reinforced by receptive leadership are critical. Attention to culture, commitment, collaboration, control, cost, and compensation leads to a successful academic division of colon and rectal surgery. PMID:25067922

  16. Building an Academic Colorectal Division

    PubMed Central

    Koltun, Walter A.

    2014-01-01

    Colon and rectal surgery is fully justified as a valid subspecialty within academic university health centers, but such formal recognition at the organizational level is not the norm. Creating a colon and rectal division within a greater department of surgery requires an unfailing commitment to academic concepts while promulgating the improvements that come in patient care, research, and teaching from a specialty service perspective. The creation of divisional identity then opens the door for a strategic process that will grow the division even more as well as provide benefits to the institution within which it resides. The fundamentals of core values, academic commitment, and shared success reinforced by receptive leadership are critical. Attention to culture, commitment, collaboration, control, cost, and compensation leads to a successful academic division of colon and rectal surgery. PMID:25067922

  17. 35. JL photographer, summer 1978, general view of chemical mixer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. JL photographer, summer 1978, general view of chemical mixer Baldwin Filtration plant - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  18. 49 CFR 177.841 - Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials. 177.841... PUBLIC HIGHWAY Loading and Unloading § 177.841 Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials. (See also § 177... by other appropriate method, and the marking removed. (b) (c) Division 2.3 (poisonous gas)...

  19. Home | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Our Research The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into cancer. |

  20. Environmental Transport Division: 1979 report

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Schubert, J.F.; Bowman, W.W.; Adams, S.E.

    1980-03-01

    During 1979, the Environmental Transport Division (ETD) of the Savannah River Laboratory conducted atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic, and marine studies, which are described in a series of articles. Separate abstracts were prepared for each. Publications written about the 1979 research are listed at the end of the report.

  1. Synthetic Division and Matrix Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barabe, Samuel; Dubeau, Franc

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic division is viewed as a change of basis for polynomials written under the Newton form. Then, the transition matrices obtained from a sequence of changes of basis are used to factorize the inverse of a bidiagonal matrix or a block bidiagonal matrix.

  2. Psychological Sciences Division: 1985 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Naval Research, Washington, DC. Psychological Sciences Div.

    This booklet describes research carried out under sponsorship of the Psychological Sciences Division of the U.S. Office of Naval Research during Fiscal Year 1985. The booklet is divided into three programmatic research areas: (1) Engineering Psychology; (2) Personnel and Training; and (3) Group Psychology. Each program is described by an overview…

  3. Manpower Division Looks at CETA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Journal, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The Manpower Division at the American Vocational Association (AVA) convention in Houston was concerned about youth unemployment and about the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA)--its problems and possibilities. The panel discussion reported here reveals some differing perspectives and a general consensus--that to improve their role in…

  4. 78 FR 17431 - Antitrust Division

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ...) of the Act on July 30, 2001 (66 FR 39336). The last notification was filed with the Department on... January 2, 2013 (78 FR 117). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division. BILLING...--Interchangeable Virtual Instruments Foundation, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on February 22, 2013,...

  5. Preschool Children's Informal Division Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blevins-Knabe, Belinda

    The purpose of this study was to examine the division procedures of preschool children to determine whether such procedures involved one-to-one correspondence. Large and small numerosity trials were included so that the amount of effort and ease of using other procedures would vary. Odd and even number trials were included to determine whether…

  6. 77 FR 54611 - Antitrust Division

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... Section 6(b) of the Act on June 30, 2000 (65 FR 40693). The last notification was filed with the... on June 8, 2012 (77 FR 34067). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division...; Tiburon Associates, Inc., Alexandria, VA; Streamline Automation, LLC (dba C3 Propulsion), Huntsville,...

  7. International Division Regional Advisers' Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jenny

    2006-01-01

    An Advisers primary job is to nominate candidates for the five annual ID awards; this involves working with the five International Division award coordinators. Advisers also submit an annual report on activities in their country/ region to their Area Coordinators who, in turn, report on educational technology activities in their Areas. In the…

  8. 75 FR 70031 - Antitrust Division

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Open... National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Open Axis... branding program based upon distinctive trademarks to create high customer awareness of, demand for,...

  9. Physics division annual report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K., ed.

    2001-10-04

    This report summarizes the research performed in 2000 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory and medium energy physics research, and accelerator research and development. As the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee and the nuclear science community create a new long range plan for the field in 2001, it is clear that the research of the Division is closely aligned with and continues to help define the national goals of our field. The NSAC 2001 Long Range Plan recommends as the highest priority for major new construction the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), a bold step forward for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The accelerator R&D in the Physics Division has made major contributions to almost all aspects of the RIA design concept and the community was convinced that this project is ready to move forward. 2000 saw the end of the first Gammasphere epoch at ATLAS, One hundred Gammasphere experiments were completed between January 1998 and March 2000, 60% of which used the Fragment Mass Analyzer to provide mass identification in the reaction. The experimental program at ATLAS then shifted to other important research avenues including proton radioactivity, mass measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap and measurements of high energy gamma-rays in nuclear reactions with the MSU/ORNL/Texas A&M BaF{sub 2} array. ATLAS provided 5460 beam-research hours for user experiments and maintained an operational reliability of 95%. Radioactive beams accounted for 7% of the beam time. ATLAS also provided a crucial test of a key RIA concept, the ability to accelerate multiple charge states in a superconducting heavy-ion linac. This new capability was immediately used to increase the performance for a scheduled experiment. The medium energy program continued to make strides in examining how the quark-gluon structure of matter

  10. Division G Commission 35: Stellar Constitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limongi, Marco; Lattanzio, John C.; Charbonnel, Corinne; Dominguez, Inma; Isern, Jordi; Karakas, Amanda; Leitherer, Claus; Marconi, Marcella; Shaviv, Giora; van Loon, Jacco

    2016-04-01

    Commission 35 (C35), ``Stellar Constitution'', consists of members of the International Astronomical Union whose research spans many aspects of theoretical and observational stellar physics and it is mainly focused on the comprehension of the properties of stars, stellar populations and galaxies. The number of members of C35 increased progressively over the last ten years and currently C35 comprises about 400 members. C35 was part of Division IV (Stars) until 2014 and then became part of Division G (Stars and Stellar Physics), after the main IAU reorganisation in 2015. Four Working Groups have been created over the years under Division IV, initially, and Division G later: WG on Active B Stars, WG on Massive Stars, WG on Abundances in Red Giant and WG on Chemically Peculiar and Related Stars. In the last decade the Commission had 4 presidents, Wojciech Dziembowski (2003-2006), Francesca D'Antona (2006-2009), Corinne Charbonnel (2009-2012) and Marco Limongi (2012-2015), who were assisted by an Organizing Committee (OC), usually composed of about 10 members, all of them elected by the C35 members and holding their positions for three years. The C35 webpage (http://iau-c35.stsci.edu) has been designed and continuously maintained by Claus Leitherer from the Space Telescope Institute, who deserves our special thanks. In addition to the various general information on the Commission structure and activities, it contains links to various resources, of interest for the members, such as stellar models, evolutionary tracks and isochrones, synthetic stellar populations, stellar yields and input physics (equation of state, nuclear cross sections, opacity tables), provided by various groups. The main activity of the C35 OC is that of evaluating, ranking and eventually supporting the proposals for IAU sponsored meetings. In the last decade the Commission has supported several meetings focused on topics more or less relevant to C35. Since the primary aim of this document is to

  11. Cell division, differentiation and dynamic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    1994-08-01

    A novel mechanism for cell differentiation is proposed, based on the dynamic clustering in a globally coupled nonlinear system. A simple model with metabolic reaction, active transport of chemicals from media, and cell division is found to show three successive stages with the growth of the number of cells; coherent growth, dynamic clustering, and fixed cell differentiation. At the last stage, disparity in activities, germ line segregation, somatic cell differentiation, and homeochaotic stability against external perturbation are found. Our results, providing a simple interpretation of the experiments of the preceding paper, imply that cell differentiation can occur without a spatial pattern. From dynamical systems viewpoint, the new concept of “open chaos” is proposed, as a novel and general scenario for systems with growing numbers of elements, also seen in economics and sociology.

  12. Coupled Growth and Division of Model Protocell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The generation of synthetic forms of cellular life requires solutions to the problem of how biological processes such as cyclic growth and division could emerge from purely physical and chemical systems. Small unilamellar fatty acid vesicles grow when fed with fatty acid micelles and can be forced to divide by extrusion, but this artificial division process results in significant loss of protocell contents during each division cycle. Here we describe a simple and efficient pathway for model protocell membrane growth and division. The growth of large multilamellar fatty acid vesicles fed with fatty acid micelles, in a solution where solute permeation across the membranes is slow, results in the transformation of initially spherical vesicles into long thread-like vesicles, a process driven by the transient imbalance between surface area and volume growth. Modest shear forces are then sufficient to cause the thread-like vesicles to divide into multiple daughter vesicles without loss of internal contents. In an environment of gentle shear, protocell growth and division are thus coupled processes. We show that model protocells can proceed through multiple cycles of reproduction. Encapsulated RNA molecules, representing a primitive genome, are distributed to the daughter vesicles. Our observations bring us closer to the laboratory synthesis of a complete protocell consisting of a self-replicating genome and a self-replicating membrane compartment. In addition, the robustness and simplicity of this pathway suggests that similar processes might have occurred under the prebiotic conditions of the early Earth. PMID:19323552

  13. Regulators of cell division in plant tissues : XXVIII. Metabolites of zeatin in sweet-corn kernels: Purifications and identifications using high-performance liquid chromatography and chemical-ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Summons, R E; Entsch, B; Letham, D S; Gollnow, B I; Macleod, J K

    1980-02-01

    The cytokinins in certain fractions prepared from extracts of immature sweet-corn (Zea mays L.) kernels using polystyrene ion-exchange resins have been further investigated. Cytokinins active in the radish cotyledon bioassay were purified from these fractions and identified as 9-β-D-glucopyranosylzeatin, 9-β-D-glucopyranosyldihydrozeatin, O-β-D-glucopyranosylzeatin. and O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-9-β-D-ribofuranosylzeatin. In addition, compounds which resemble zeatin and its glycosides in chromatographic behaviour and in ultraviolet absorption characteristics were purified from extracts of the same material by high-performance liquid chromatography. In addition to zeatin and zeatin riboside, the following compounds were identified unambiguously: O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-9-β-D-ribofuranosyldihydrozeatin, O-β-D-glucopyranosyldihydrozeatin, and hihydrozeatin riboside. A further compound was tentatively identified as O-β-D-glucopyranosylzeatin, and at least two unidentified compounds appeared to be new derivatives of zeatin. In identifying the above compounds, chemical-ionization mass spectrometry proved to be an invaluable complementary technique, yielding spectra showing intense protonated-molecular-ion peaks and also prominent structure-related fragmentation that was either not evident or very minor in the electron-impact spectra. An assessment of the relative importance of the various possible mechanisms for cytokinin modification and inactivation in mature sweet-corn kernels was made by supplying [(3)H]zeatin and [(3)H]zeatin riboside to such kernels after excision. The principal metabolites of zeatin were adenine nucleotides, adenosine and adenine, while little of the metabolite radioactivity was attributable to known O-glucosides. Adenine nucleotides and adenine were the principal metabolites of zeatin riboside, while lesser metabolites were identified as adenosine, dihydrozeatin, and the O-glucosides of dihydrozeatin and dihydrozeatin riboside. Side

  14. Circadian clocks and cell division

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Evolution has selected a system of two intertwined cell cycles: the cell division cycle (CDC) and the daily (circadian) biological clock. The circadian clock keeps track of solar time and programs biological processes to occur at environmentally appropriate times. One of these processes is the CDC, which is often gated by the circadian clock. The intermeshing of these two cell cycles is probably responsible for the observation that disruption of the circadian system enhances susceptibility to some kinds of cancer. The core mechanism underlying the circadian clockwork has been thought to be a transcription and translation feedback loop (TTFL), but recent evidence from studies with cyanobacteria, synthetic oscillators and immortalized cell lines suggests that the core circadian pacemaking mechanism that gates cell division in mammalian cells could be a post-translational oscillator (PTO). PMID:20890114

  15. Health, Safety, and Environment Division

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, C

    1992-01-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting these responsibilities requires expertise in many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The results of these programs help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental science.

  16. Water Resources Division training catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotchkiss, W.R.; Foxhoven, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The National Training Center provides technical and management sessions nesessary for the conductance of the U.S. Geological Survey 's training programs. This catalog describes the facilities and staff at the Lakewood Training Center and describes Water Resources Division training courses available through the center. In addition, the catalog describes the procedures for gaining admission, formulas for calculating fees, and discussion of course evaluations. (USGS)

  17. The Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2009-01-01

    Plant cells have evolved a complex circuitry to regulate cell division. In many aspects, the plant cell cycle follows a basic strategy similar to other eukaryotes. However, several key issues are unique to plant cells. In this chapter, both the conserved and unique cellular and molecular properties of the plant cell cycle are reviewed. In addition to division of individual cells, the specific characteristic of plant organogenesis and development make that cell proliferation control is of primary importance during development. Therefore, special attention should be given to consider plant cell division control in a developmental context. Proper organogenesis depends on the formation of different cell types. In plants, many of the processes leading to cell differentiation rely on the occurrence of a different cycle, termed the endoreplication cycle, whereby cells undergo repeated full genome duplication events in the absence of mitosis and increase their ploidy. Recent findings are focusing on the relevance of changes in chromatin organization for a correct cell cycle progression and, conversely, in the relevance of a correct functioning of chromatin remodelling complexes to prevent alterations in both the cell cycle and the endocycle. PMID:22303246

  18. Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, J.S.; Tilson, P.A.

    1980-10-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing.

  19. Jo Ann Rinaudo, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Jo Ann Rinaudo is a Program Director in the Cancer Biomarkers Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute. She received a doctoral degree from the University of Toronto, where she studied chemical carcinogenesis in the liver. She was in the pathology department and has a broad background in human disease. Post-graduate training included further studies on the cell cycle during liver regeneration and cancer. |

  20. Signaling to stomatal initiation and cell division

    PubMed Central

    Le, Jie; Zou, Junjie; Yang, Kezhen; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Stomata are two-celled valves that control epidermal pores whose opening and spacing optimizes shoot-atmosphere gas exchange. Arabidopsis stomatal formation involves at least one asymmetric division and one symmetric division. Stomatal formation and patterning are regulated by the frequency and placement of asymmetric divisions. This model system has already led to significant advances in developmental biology, such as the regulation of cell fate, division, differentiation, and patterning. Over the last 30 years, stomatal development has been found to be controlled by numerous intrinsic genetic and environmental factors. This mini review focuses on the signaling involved in stomatal initiation and in divisions in the cell lineage. PMID:25002867

  1. Signaling to stomatal initiation and cell division.

    PubMed

    Le, Jie; Zou, Junjie; Yang, Kezhen; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Stomata are two-celled valves that control epidermal pores whose opening and spacing optimizes shoot-atmosphere gas exchange. Arabidopsis stomatal formation involves at least one asymmetric division and one symmetric division. Stomatal formation and patterning are regulated by the frequency and placement of asymmetric divisions. This model system has already led to significant advances in developmental biology, such as the regulation of cell fate, division, differentiation, and patterning. Over the last 30 years, stomatal development has been found to be controlled by numerous intrinsic genetic and environmental factors. This mini review focuses on the signaling involved in stomatal initiation and in divisions in the cell lineage. PMID:25002867

  2. Emerging facets of plastid division regulation.

    PubMed

    Basak, Indranil; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-02-01

    Plastids are complex organelles that are integrated into the plant host cell where they differentiate and divide in tune with plant differentiation and development. In line with their prokaryotic origin, plastid division involves both evolutionary conserved proteins and proteins of eukaryotic origin where the host has acquired control over the process. The plastid division apparatus is spatially separated between the stromal and the cytosolic space but where clear coordination mechanisms exist between the two machineries. Our knowledge of the plastid division process has increased dramatically during the past decade and recent findings have not only shed light on plastid division enzymology and the formation of plastid division complexes but also on the integration of the division process into a multicellular context. This review summarises our current knowledge of plastid division with an emphasis on biochemical features, the functional assembly of protein complexes and regulatory features of the overall process. PMID:22965912

  3. 1. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southwest, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southwest, showing front (east) facade and north side, 213 Division Street is visible at left and 217 Division Street appears at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  4. NEN Division Funding Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, Ernst I.; Goettee, Jeffrey D.; Desimone, David J.; Lakis, Rollin E.; Miko, David K.

    2012-09-05

    The work in NEN Division revolves around proliferation detection. The sponsor funding model seems to have shifted over the last decades. For the past three lustra, sponsors are mainly interested in funding ideas and detection systems that are already at a technical readiness level 6 (TRL 6 -- one step below an industrial prototype) or higher. Once this level is reached, the sponsoring agency is willing to fund the commercialization, implementation, and training for the systems (TRL 8, 9). These sponsors are looking for a fast turnaround (1-2 years) technology development efforts to implement technology. To support the critical national and international needs for nonprolifertion solutions, we have to maintain a fluent stream of subject matter expertise from the fundamental principals of radiation detection through prototype development all the way to the implementation and training of others. NEN Division has large funding gaps in the Valley of Death region. In the current competitive climate for nuclear nonproliferation projects, it is imminent to increase our lead in this field.

  5. Stochastic models for cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukalin, Evgeny; Sun, Sean

    2013-03-01

    The probability of cell division per unit time strongly depends of age of cells, i.e., time elapsed since their birth. The theory of cell populations in the age-time representation is systematically applied for modeling cell division for different spreads in generation times. We use stochastic simulations to address the same issue at the level of individual cells. Our approach unlike deterministic theory enables to analyze the size fluctuations of cell colonies at different growth conditions (in the absence and in the presence of cell death, for initially synchronized and asynchronous cell populations, for conditions of restricted growth). We find the simple quantitative relation between the asymptotic values of relative size fluctuations around mean values for initially synchronized cell populations under growth and the coefficients of variation of generation times. Effect of initial age distribution for asynchronous growth of cell cultures is also studied by simulations. The influence of constant cell death on fluctuations of sizes of cell populations is found to be essential even for small cell death rates, i.e., for realistic growth conditions. The stochastic model is generalized for biologically relevant case that involves both cell reproduction and cell differentiation.

  6. Structures Division 1994 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center Structures Division is an international leader and pioneer in developing new structural analysis, life prediction, and failure analysis related to rotating machinery and more specifically to hot section components in air-breathing aircraft engines and spacecraft propulsion systems. The research consists of both deterministic and probabilistic methodology. Studies include, but are not limited to, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue as well as material creep. Studies of structural failure are at both the micro- and macrolevels. Nondestructive evaluation methods related to structural reliability are developed, applied, and evaluated. Materials from which structural components are made, studied, and tested are monolithics and metal-matrix, polymer-matrix, and ceramic-matrix composites. Aeroelastic models are developed and used to determine the cyclic loading and life of fan and turbine blades. Life models are developed and tested for bearings, seals, and other mechanical components, such as magnetic suspensions. Results of these studies are published in NASA technical papers and reference publication as well as in technical society journal articles. The results of the work of the Structures Division and the bibliography of its publications for calendar year 1994 are presented.

  7. PREPRINTS, DIVISION OF PETROLEUM CHEMISTRY, AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY. (R824729)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

  9. Operational Characterization of Divisibility of Dynamical Maps.

    PubMed

    Bae, Joonwoo; Chruściński, Dariusz

    2016-07-29

    In this work, we show the operational characterization to the divisibility of dynamical maps in terms of the distinguishability of quantum channels. It is proven that the distinguishability of any pair of quantum channels does not increase under divisible maps, in which the full hierarchy of divisibility is isomorphic to the structure of entanglement between system and environment. This shows that (i) channel distinguishability is the operational quantity signifying (detecting) divisibility (indivisibility) of dynamical maps and (ii) the decision problem for the divisibility of maps is as hard as the separability problem in entanglement theory. We also provide the information-theoretic characterization to the divisibility of maps with conditional min-entropy. PMID:27517760

  10. Asymmetrical division of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Lord, P G; Wheals, A E

    1980-01-01

    The unequal division model proposed for budding yeast (L. H. Hartwell and M. W. Unger, J. Cell Biol. 75:422-435, 1977) was tested by bud scar analyses of steady-state exponential batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing at 30 degrees C at 19 different rates, which were obtained by altering the carbon source. The analyses involved counting the number of bud scars, determining the presence or absence of buds on at least 1,000 cells, and independently measuring the doubling times (gamma) by cell number increase. A number of assumptions in the model were tested and found to be in good agreement with the model. Maximum likelihood estimates of daughter cycle time (D), parent cycle time (P), and the budded phase (B) were obtained, and we concluded that asymmetrical division occurred at all growth rates tested (gamma, 75 to 250 min). D, P, and B are all linearly related to gamma, and D, P, and gamma converge to equality (symmetrical division) at gamma = 65 min. Expressions for the genealogical age distribution for asymmetrically dividing yeast cells were derived. The fraction of daughter cells in steady-state populations is e-alpha P, and the fraction of parent cells of age n (where n is the number of buds that a cell has produced) is (e-alpha P)n-1(1-e-alpha P)2, where alpha = IN2/gamma; thus, the distribution changes with growth rate. The frequency of cells with different numbers of bud scars (i.e., different genealogical ages) was determined for all growth rates, and the observed distribution changed with the growth rate in the manner predicted. In this haploid strain new buds formed adjacent to the previous buds in a regular pattern, but at slower growth rates the pattern was more irregular. The median volume of the cells and the volume at start in the cell cycle both increased at faster growth rates. The implications of these findings for the control of the cell cycle are discussed. PMID:6991494

  11. The Materials Division: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Lowell, Carl E.

    1989-01-01

    The Materials Division at NASA's Lewis Research Center has been engaged in a program to improve the quality of its output. The division, its work, and its customers are described as well as the methodologies developed to assess and improve the quality of the Division's staff and output. Examples of these methodologies are presented and evaluated. An assessment of current progress is also presented along with a summary of future plans.

  12. Physics division annual report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in {sup 252}No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of {sup 16}N beta-decay to determine the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium isotopes were

  13. Major Programs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations, research networks, investigator-initiated grants, postdoctoral training, and specialized resources across the United States. |

  14. Children's Inventions for Multidigit Multiplication and Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliandro, Christine Koller

    2000-01-01

    Describes an informal research activity in which third grade students invent their own algorithms for multidigit multiplication and division. Discusses teaching implications and action research ideas. (ASK)

  15. Photobase generator assisted pitch division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinyu; Bates, Christopher M.; Cho, Younjin; Kawakami, Takanori; Nagai, Tomoki; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Sundaresan, Arunkumar K.; Turro, Nicholas J.; Bristol, Robert; Zimmerman, Paul; Willson, C. Grant

    2010-04-01

    The drive to sustain the improvements in productivity that derive from following Moore's law has led the semiconductor industry to explore new technologies that enable production of smaller and smaller features on semiconductor device. Pitch division techniques and double exposure lithography are approaches that print features beyond the fundamental resolution limit of state-of-art lenses by modifying the lithographic process. This paper presents a new technique that enables pitch division in the printing of gratings using only a single exposure that is fully compatible with the current manufacturing tools. This technique employs a classical photoresist polymer together with a photoactive system that incorporates both a photoacid generator (PAG) and a photobase generator (PBG). The PBG is added to the resist formulation in higher molar concentration than the PAG, but has a base production rate that is slower than the acid production rate of the PAG. The PBG functions as a dose-dependent base quencher, which neutralizes the acid in high dose exposure regions but not in the low dose regions. This photoactive system can be exploited in the design of both positive tone and negative tone resist formulations that provide a developed image of a grating that is twice the frequency of the grating on the mask. A simulation of this process was performed for a 52 nm line and space pattern using PROLITH and customized codes. The results showed generation of a 26 nm half pitch relief image after development. Through this new technique, a 45 nm half pitch line and space pattern was experimentally achieved with a mask that produces a 90 nm half pitch aerial image. This corresponds to a k1 factor of 0.13. The principles, the materials design and the first lithographic evaluations of this system are reported.

  16. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    ... Directing mesenchymal stem cells to bone to ... Accounts of Chemical Research 44, 666 (2011). ... and C. R. Bertozzi. Cell surface glycoproteomic analysis of prostate cancer-derived PC-3 cells. ...

  17. Deepening Students' Understanding of Multiplication and Division by Exploring Divisibility by Nine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young-Loveridge, Jenny; Mills, Judith

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how a focus on understanding divisibility rules can be used to help deepen students' understanding of multiplication and division with whole numbers. It is based on research with seven Year 7-8 teachers who were observed teaching a group of students a rule for divisibility by nine. As part of the lesson, students were shown a…

  18. Moral Reasoning of Division III and Division I Athletes: Is There a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Sharon Kay; And Others

    This study sought to examine the potentially corrupting influences of media attention, money, and the accompanying stress on the moral reasoning of student athletes at both Division I and Division III National College Athletics Association (NCAA) schools. Subjects were 718 nonathletes and 277 randomly selected athletes at a Division I school and…

  19. 76 FR 4724 - Emerson Transportation Division, a Division of Emerson Electric, Including Workers Located...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Transportation Division, a division of Emerson Electric, Bridgeton, Missouri. The notice was published in the Federal Register on December 16, 2010 (75 FR 75701). At the request of a State of Arkansas agent, the... Division lived throughout the United States, including Arkansas, but report to the Bridgeton,...

  20. Physics Division annual report 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.

    2006-04-06

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne continues to

  1. 25 CFR 213.29 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Division orders. 213.29 Section 213.29 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Rents and Royalties § 213.29 Division orders. (a)...

  2. Teaching Cell Division: Basics and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mike U.; Kindfield, Ann C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a concise overview of cell division that includes only the essential concepts necessary for understanding genetics and evolution. Makes recommendations based on published research and teaching experiences that can be used to judge the merits of potential activities and materials for teaching cell division. Makes suggestions regarding the…

  3. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P; Belland, Robert J; Cox, John V

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments. PMID:27505160

  4. "American Gothic" and the Division of Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Provides historical review of gender-based division of labor. Argues that gender-based division of labor served a purpose in survival of tribal communities but has lost meaning today and may be a handicap to full use of human talent and ability in the arts. There is nothing in various art forms which make them more appropriate for males or…

  5. Friday's Agenda | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    TimeAgenda8:00 am - 8:10 amWelcome and Opening RemarksLeslie Ford, MDAssociate Director for Clinical ResearchDivision of Cancer Prevention, NCIEva Szabo, MD Chief, Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research GroupDivision of Cancer Prevention, NCI8:10 am - 8:40 amClinical Trials Statistical Concepts for Non-Statisticians |

  6. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  7. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P.; Belland, Robert J.; Cox, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments. PMID:27505160

  8. Research Networks Map | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations and research networks at more than 100 sites across the United States.  Five Major Programs' sites are shown on this map. | The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations and research networks at more than 100 sites across the United States.

  9. New Study Designs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention is expanding clinical research beyond standard trial designs to find interventions that may play a role in more than one prevalent disease. | The Division of Cancer Prevention is expanding clinical research beyond standard trial designs to find interventions that may play a role in more than one prevalent disease.

  10. Guide to the Division of Research Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    This brief guide to the Research Programs Division of the National Endowment for the Humanities covers basic information, describes programs, and summarizes policies and procedures. An introductory section describes the division and its mission to encourage the development and dissemination of significant knowledge and scholarship in the…

  11. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division, 1991 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Willard S., Ed.

    This report documents research and development performed under the sponsorship of the Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division of the Office of Naval Research in fiscal year 1991. It provides abstracts (title, principal investigator, project code, objective, approach, progress, and related reports) of projects of three program divisions (cognitive…

  12. The Changing Nature of Division III Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    2014-01-01

    Non-selective Division III institutions often face challenges in meeting their enrollment goals. To ensure their continued viability, these schools recruit large numbers of student athletes. As a result, when compared to FBS (Football Bowl Division) institutions these schools have a much higher percentage of student athletes on campus and a…

  13. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division 1990 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Willard S., Jr., Ed.

    Research and development efforts carried out under sponsorship of the Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division of the Office of Naval Research during fiscal year 1990 are described in this compilation of project description summaries. The Division's research is organized in three types of programs: (1) Cognitive Science (the human learner--cognitive…

  14. Gravity and the orientation of cell division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    A novel culture system for mammalian cells was used to investigate division orientations in populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells and the influence of gravity on the positioning of division axes. The cells were tethered to adhesive sites, smaller in diameter than a newborn cell, distributed over a nonadhesive substrate positioned vertically. The cells grew and divided while attached to the sites, and the angles and directions of elongation during anaphase, projected in the vertical plane, were found to be random with respect to gravity. However, consecutive divisions of individual cells were generally along the same axis or at 90 degrees to the previous division, with equal probability. Thus, successive divisions were restricted to orthogonal planes, but the choice of plane appeared to be random, unlike the ordered sequence of cleavage orientations seen during early embryo development.

  15. Film processing investigation. [improved chemical mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The present operational chemical mixing system for the Photographic Technology Division is evaluated, and the limitations are defined in terms of meeting the present and programmed chemical supply and delivery requirements. A major redesign of the entire chemical mixing, storage, analysis, and supply system is recommended. Other requirements for immediate and future implementations are presented.

  16. Physics division annual report 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example of the

  17. 49 CFR 1242.03 - Made by accounting divisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Made by accounting divisions. 1242.03 Section 1242... accounting divisions. The separation shall be made by accounting divisions, where such divisions are maintained, and the aggregate of the accounting divisions reported for the quarter and for the year....

  18. 49 CFR 1242.03 - Made by accounting divisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Made by accounting divisions. 1242.03 Section 1242... accounting divisions. The separation shall be made by accounting divisions, where such divisions are maintained, and the aggregate of the accounting divisions reported for the quarter and for the year....

  19. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L.

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as “The Central Dogma in Bacteriology,” is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called “nucleoid complexity,” is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell’s center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  20. Arabidopsis plants perform arithmetic division to prevent starvation at night

    PubMed Central

    Scialdone, Antonio; Mugford, Sam T; Feike, Doreen; Skeffington, Alastair; Borrill, Philippa; Graf, Alexander; Smith, Alison M; Howard, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic starch reserves that accumulate in Arabidopsis leaves during the day decrease approximately linearly with time at night to support metabolism and growth. We find that the rate of decrease is adjusted to accommodate variation in the time of onset of darkness and starch content, such that reserves last almost precisely until dawn. Generation of these dynamics therefore requires an arithmetic division computation between the starch content and expected time to dawn. We introduce two novel chemical kinetic models capable of implementing analog arithmetic division. Predictions from the models are successfully tested in plants perturbed by a night-time light period or by mutations in starch degradation pathways. Our experiments indicate which components of the starch degradation apparatus may be important for appropriate arithmetic division. Our results are potentially relevant for any biological system dependent on a food reserve for survival over a predictable time period. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00669.001 PMID:23805380

  1. Arabidopsis plants perform arithmetic division to prevent starvation at night.

    PubMed

    Scialdone, Antonio; Mugford, Sam T; Feike, Doreen; Skeffington, Alastair; Borrill, Philippa; Graf, Alexander; Smith, Alison M; Howard, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic starch reserves that accumulate in Arabidopsis leaves during the day decrease approximately linearly with time at night to support metabolism and growth. We find that the rate of decrease is adjusted to accommodate variation in the time of onset of darkness and starch content, such that reserves last almost precisely until dawn. Generation of these dynamics therefore requires an arithmetic division computation between the starch content and expected time to dawn. We introduce two novel chemical kinetic models capable of implementing analog arithmetic division. Predictions from the models are successfully tested in plants perturbed by a night-time light period or by mutations in starch degradation pathways. Our experiments indicate which components of the starch degradation apparatus may be important for appropriate arithmetic division. Our results are potentially relevant for any biological system dependent on a food reserve for survival over a predictable time period. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00669.001. PMID:23805380

  2. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as "The Central Dogma in Bacteriology," is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called "nucleoid complexity," is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  3. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, A.L.; Schwartz, L.L.

    1980-04-30

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1979 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract iself is given only under the name of the first author or the first Earth Sciences Division author. A topical index at the end of the report provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division.

  4. Overview of the Applied Aerodynamics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A major reorganization of the Aeronautics Directorate of the Langley Research Center occurred in early 1989. As a result of this reorganization, the scope of research in the Applied Aeronautics Division is now quite different than that in the past. An overview of the current organization, mission, and facilities of this division is presented. A summary of current research programs and sample highlights of recent research are also presented. This is intended to provide a general view of the scope and capabilities of the division.

  5. Asymmetric cell division in plant development.

    PubMed

    Heidstra, Renze

    2007-01-01

    Plant embryogenesis creates a seedling with a basic body plan. Post-embryonically the seedling elaborates with a lifelong ability to develop new tissues and organs. As a result asymmetric cell divisions serve essential roles during embryonic and postembryonic development to generate cell diversity. This review highlights selective cases of asymmetric division in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and describes the current knowledge on fate determinants and mechanisms involved. Common themes that emerge are: 1. role of the plant hormone auxin and its polar transport machinery; 2. a MAP kinase signaling cascade and; 3. asymmetric segregating transcription factors that are involved in several asymmetric cell divisions. PMID:17585494

  6. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

  7. 2. JL photographer, summer 1978. View from south of Division ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. JL photographer, summer 1978. View from south of Division Avenue Punting and Filtration plant. - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  8. 3. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southeast, showing rear (west) facade and north side, Fairbanks Company appears at left and 215 Division Street is visible at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  9. 2. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking northeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking northeast, showing rear (west) facade and south side, 217 Division Street is visible at left and Fairbanks Company appears at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  10. 3. Oblique view of 213 Division Street, looking northeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of 213 Division Street, looking northeast, showing rear (west) facade and south side, 215 Division Street is visible at left and Fairbanks Company appears at right - 213 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  11. 6. Contextual view of Fairbanks Company, looking south along Division ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Contextual view of Fairbanks Company, looking south along Division Street, showing relationship of factory to surrounding area, 213, 215, & 217 Division Street appear on right side of street - Fairbanks Company, 202 Division Street, Rome, Floyd County, GA

  12. About DCP | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) is the primary unit of the National Cancer Institute devoted to cancer prevention research. DCP provides funding and administrative support to clinical and laboratory researchers, community and multidisciplinary teams, and collaborative scientific networks. |

  13. Nanoengineering: Super symmetry in cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial cells can be sculpted into different shapes using nanofabricated chambers and then used to explore the spatial adaptation of protein oscillations that play an important role in cell division.

  14. Division Xii: Union-Wide Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia L.; Andersen, Johannes; Aksnes, Kaare; Genova, Françoise; Gurshtein, Alexander A.; Johansson, Sveneric; Pasachoff, Jay M.; Smith, Malcolm G.

    2007-12-01

    Division XII consists of Commissions that formerly were organized under the Executive Committee, that concern astronomers across a wide range of scientific sub-disciplines and provide interactions with scientists in a wider community, including governmental organizations, outside the IAU.

  15. Division XII: Union-Wide Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Malcolm G.; Genova, Françoise; Andersen, Johannes; Federman, Steven R.; Gilmore, Alan C.; Nha, Il-Seong; Norris, Raymond P.; Robson, Ian E.; Stavinschi, Magda G.; Trimble, Virginia L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Christensen, Lars Lindberg

    Division XII consists of Commissions that formerly were organized under the Executive Committee, that concern astronomers across a wide range of scientific sub-disciplines and provide interactions with scientists in a wider community, including governmental organizations, outside the IAU.

  16. 15 CFR 950.8 - Satellite Data Services Division (SDSD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...., weather forecasting) have been satisfied. The division also provides photographs collected during NASA's... to: Satellite Data Services Division, World Weather Building, Room 606, Washington, DC 20233,...

  17. 15 CFR 950.8 - Satellite Data Services Division (SDSD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...., weather forecasting) have been satisfied. The division also provides photographs collected during NASA's... to: Satellite Data Services Division, World Weather Building, Room 606, Washington, DC 20233,...

  18. 15 CFR 950.8 - Satellite Data Services Division (SDSD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...., weather forecasting) have been satisfied. The division also provides photographs collected during NASA's... to: Satellite Data Services Division, World Weather Building, Room 606, Washington, DC 20233,...

  19. 15 CFR 950.8 - Satellite Data Services Division (SDSD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...., weather forecasting) have been satisfied. The division also provides photographs collected during NASA's... to: Satellite Data Services Division, World Weather Building, Room 606, Washington, DC 20233,...

  20. 15 CFR 950.8 - Satellite Data Services Division (SDSD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...., weather forecasting) have been satisfied. The division also provides photographs collected during NASA's... to: Satellite Data Services Division, World Weather Building, Room 606, Washington, DC 20233,...

  1. 3. Perspective view of Express Building looking northeast, with Division ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Perspective view of Express Building looking northeast, with Division Street in foreground - American Railway Express Company Freight Building, 1060 Northeast Division Street, Bend, Deschutes County, OR

  2. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  3. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

  4. Multivariate linear recurrences and power series division

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Herwig; Koutschan, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Bousquet-Mélou and Petkovšek investigated the generating functions of multivariate linear recurrences with constant coefficients. We will give a reinterpretation of their results by means of division theorems for formal power series, which clarifies the structural background and provides short, conceptual proofs. In addition, extending the division to the context of differential operators, the case of recurrences with polynomial coefficients can be treated in an analogous way. PMID:23482936

  5. Division II: Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Scrijver, Karel J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2015-08-01

    The Business Meeting of Commission 10 was held as part of the Business Meeting of Division II (Sun and Heliosphere), chaired by Valentin Martínez-Pillet, the President of the Division. The President of Commission 10 (C10; Solar activity), Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, took the chair for the business meeting of C10. She summarised the activities of C10 over the triennium and the election of the incoming OC.

  6. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, A.L.; Hornady, B.F.

    1981-10-15

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, reports, and talks presented during 1980 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract itself is given only under the name of the first author (indicated in capital letters) or the first Earth Sciences Division author.

  7. Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Laintz, Kenneth E.

    2012-06-19

    Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

  8. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This year`s Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE`s core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  9. Spontaneous growth and division in self-reproducing inorganic colloidosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Huang, Xin; Mann, Stephen

    2014-08-27

    Self-reproduction in compartmentalized chemical ensembles is a central issue for the development of new materials and processes capable of autonomous behavior, self-amplification and artificial evolution. Current approaches to synthetic cellularity focus primarily on self-assembled soft matter systems such as membrane-bounded lipid vesicles, which have sufficient structural plasticity to undergo growth and division. Steps towards inorganic protocells are being advanced, but self-reproduction in these more structurally robust micro-compartments has not been demonstrated. Here, a primitive form of growth and division involving inorganic colloidosomes (Pickering emulsions), comprising aqueous micro-droplets enclosed by an ultrathin membrane of silica nanoparticles, is shown. Growth of the colloidosomes is induced by organosilane-mediated methanol formation, and results in a localized rupture of the inorganic membrane followed by outgrowth and separation of a second-generation protocell, which is stabilized by de novo nanoparticle assembly. These observations provide a first step towards synthetic cell-like inorganic materials capable of chemically induced self-reproduction. PMID:24861579

  10. One hundred years of the Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (AGFD)of the American Chemical Society was 100 years old in 2008. ACS grouped papers into sections at its national meetings starting in 1904, including one dealing with agricultural, biological, and sanitary chemistry. This section became AGFD on Dec...

  11. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period October 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berven, B.A.

    1993-09-01

    This is a progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology, Biological and Radiation Physics, Chemical Physics, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis, Risk Analysis, Center for Risk Management, Associate Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT), and Contributions to National and Lead Laboratory Programs and Assignments--Environmental Restoration.

  12. Novel division level bacterial diversity in a Yellowstone hot spring.

    PubMed

    Hugenholtz, P; Pitulle, C; Hershberger, K L; Pace, N R

    1998-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic survey was carried out for the bacterial community in Obsidian Pool (OP), a Yellowstone National Park hot spring previously shown to contain remarkable archaeal diversity (S. M. Barns, R. E. Fundyga, M. W. Jeffries, and N. R. Page, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:1609-1613, 1994). Small-subunit rRNA genes (rDNA) were amplified directly from OP sediment DNA by PCR with universally conserved or Bacteria-specific rDNA primers and cloned. Unique rDNA types among > 300 clones were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism, and 122 representative rDNA sequences were determined. These were found to represent 54 distinct bacterial sequence types or clusters (> or = 98% identity) of sequences. A majority (70%) of the sequence types were affiliated with 14 previously recognized bacterial divisions (main phyla; kingdoms); 30% were unaffiliated with recognized bacterial divisions. The unaffiliated sequence types (represented by 38 sequences) nominally comprise 12 novel, division level lineages termed candidate divisions. Several OP sequences were nearly identical to those of cultivated chemolithotrophic thermophiles, including the hydrogen-oxidizing Calderobacterium and the sulfate reducers Thermodesulfovibrio and Thermodesulfobacterium, or belonged to monophyletic assemblages recognized for a particular type of metabolism, such as the hydrogen-oxidizing Aquificales and the sulfate-reducing delta-Proteobacteria. The occurrence of such organisms is consistent with the chemical composition of OP (high in reduced iron and sulfur) and suggests a lithotrophic base for primary productivity in this hot spring, through hydrogen oxidation and sulfate reduction. Unexpectedly, no archaeal sequences were encountered in OP clone libraries made with universal primers. Hybridization analysis of amplified OP DNA with domain-specific probes confirmed that the analyzed community rDNA from OP sediment was predominantly bacterial. These

  13. Novel Division Level Bacterial Diversity in a Yellowstone Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Hugenholtz, Philip; Pitulle, Christian; Hershberger, Karen L.; Pace, Norman R.

    1998-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic survey was carried out for the bacterial community in Obsidian Pool (OP), a Yellowstone National Park hot spring previously shown to contain remarkable archaeal diversity (S. M. Barns, R. E. Fundyga, M. W. Jeffries, and N. R. Page, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:1609–1613, 1994). Small-subunit rRNA genes (rDNA) were amplified directly from OP sediment DNA by PCR with universally conserved or Bacteria-specific rDNA primers and cloned. Unique rDNA types among >300 clones were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism, and 122 representative rDNA sequences were determined. These were found to represent 54 distinct bacterial sequence types or clusters (≥98% identity) of sequences. A majority (70%) of the sequence types were affiliated with 14 previously recognized bacterial divisions (main phyla; kingdoms); 30% were unaffiliated with recognized bacterial divisions. The unaffiliated sequence types (represented by 38 sequences) nominally comprise 12 novel, division level lineages termed candidate divisions. Several OP sequences were nearly identical to those of cultivated chemolithotrophic thermophiles, including the hydrogen-oxidizing Calderobacterium and the sulfate reducers Thermodesulfovibrio and Thermodesulfobacterium, or belonged to monophyletic assemblages recognized for a particular type of metabolism, such as the hydrogen-oxidizing Aquificales and the sulfate-reducing δ-Proteobacteria. The occurrence of such organisms is consistent with the chemical composition of OP (high in reduced iron and sulfur) and suggests a lithotrophic base for primary productivity in this hot spring, through hydrogen oxidation and sulfate reduction. Unexpectedly, no archaeal sequences were encountered in OP clone libraries made with universal primers. Hybridization analysis of amplified OP DNA with domain-specific probes confirmed that the analyzed community rDNA from OP sediment was predominantly bacterial. These results

  14. American Chemical Society, Preprints symposia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Division of Petroleum Chemistry of the American Chemical Society met August 30-September 4, 1987, in New Orleans and presented symposia on advances in fluid cracking catalysts, advances in naphtha reforming, refinery waste cleanup, hydrocarbon oxidation, and methane conversion. Forty-two abstracts were prepared.

  15. Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-31

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

  16. The History of Metals and Ceramics Division

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    The division was formed in 1946 at the suggestion of Dr. Eugene P. Wigner to attack the problem of the distortion of graphite in the early reactors due to exposure to reactor neutrons, and the consequent radiation damage. It was called the Metallurgy Division and assembled the metallurgical and solid state physics activities of the time which were not directly related to nuclear weapons production. William A. Johnson, a Westinghouse employee, was named Division Director in 1946. In 1949 he was replaced by John H Frye Jr. when the Division consisted of 45 people. He was director during most of what is called the Reactor Project Years until 1973 and his retirement. During this period the Division evolved into three organizational areas: basic research, applied research in nuclear reactor materials, and reactor programs directly related to a specific reactor(s) being designed or built. The Division (Metals and Ceramics) consisted of 204 staff members in 1973 when James R. Weir, Jr., became Director. This was the period of the oil embargo, the formation of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) by combining the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) with the Office of Coal Research, and subsequent formation of the Department of Energy (DOE). The diversification process continued when James O. Stiegler became Director in 1984, partially as a result of the pressure of legislation encouraging the national laboratories to work with U.S. industries on their problems. During that time the Division staff grew from 265 to 330. Douglas F. Craig became Director in 1992.

  17. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. PMID:27181353

  18. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

  19. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Hatzold, Julia; Conradt, Barbara

    2008-04-01

    Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death) are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well. PMID:18399720

  20. Energy Technology Division research summary -- 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Research funded primarily by the NRC is directed toward assessing the roles of cyclic fatigue, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking on failures in light water reactor (LWR) piping systems, pressure vessels, and various core components. In support of the fast reactor program, the Division has responsibility for fuel-performance modeling and irradiation testing. The Division has major responsibilities in several design areas of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The Division supports the DOE in ensuring safe shipment of nuclear materials by providing extensive review of the Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs). Finally, in the nuclear area they are investigating the safe disposal of spent fuel and waste. In work funded by DOE`s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the high-temperature superconductivity program continues to be a major focal point for industrial interactions. Coatings and lubricants developed in the division`s Tribology Section are intended for use in transportation systems of the future. Continuous fiber ceramic composites are being developed for high-performance heat engines. Nondestructive testing techniques are being developed to evaluate fiber distribution and to detect flaws. A wide variety of coatings for corrosion protection of metal alloys are being studied. These can increase lifetimes significant in a wide variety of coal combustion and gasification environments.

  1. 75 FR 16843 - Core Manufacturing, Multi-Plastics, Inc., Division, Sipco, Inc., Division, Including Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Notice was published in the Federal Register on January 25, 2010 (75 FR 3935). After the certification... Employment and Training Administration Core Manufacturing, Multi-Plastics, Inc., Division, Sipco, Inc..., 2009, applicable to workers of Core Manufacturing, Multi-Plastics, Inc., Division and Sipco,...

  2. Section III, Division 5 - Development And Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Dana K.; Jetter, Robert I; Nestell, James E.; Burchell, Timothy D; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development.

  3. Synthetic cell division system: Controlling equal vs. unequal divisions by design

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yoichi; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Kikuchi, Jun-ichi; Sato, Thomas N.

    2013-01-01

    Cell division is one of the most fundamental and evolutionarily conserved biological processes. Here, we report a synthetic system where we can control by design equal vs. unequal divisions. We synthesized a micro-scale inverse amphipathic droplet of which division is triggered by the increase of surface to volume ratio. Using this system, we succeeded in selectively inducing equal vs. unequal divisions of the droplet cells by adjusting the temperature or the viscosity of the solvent outside the droplet cell accordingly. Our synthetic division system may provide a platform for further development to a system where intracellular contents of the parent droplet cell could be divided into various ratios between the two daughter droplet cells to control their functions and fates. PMID:24327069

  4. On-chip multiplexing conversion between wavelength division multiplexing-polarization division multiplexing and wavelength division multiplexing-mode division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mengyuan; Yu, Yu; Zou, Jinghui; Yang, Weili; Zhang, Xinliang

    2014-02-15

    A compact silicon-on-insulator device used for conversions between polarization division multiplexing (PDM) and mode division multiplexing (MDM) signals is proposed and experimentally demonstrated by utilizing a structure combining the improved two-dimensional grating coupler and two-mode multiplexer. The detailed design of the proposed device is presented and the results show the extinction ratio of 16 and 20 dB for X- and Y-pol input, respectively. The processing of 40  Gb/s signal is achieved within the C-band with good performance. The proposed converter is capable of handling multiple wavelengths in wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks, enabling the conversions between WDM-PDM and WDM-MDM, which is promising to further increase the throughput at the network interface. PMID:24562199

  5. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. This report includes the Division's activities during 2008.

  6. Division V: Commission 42: Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, Ignasi; Richards, Mercedes T.; Rucinski, Slavek; Bradstreet, David H.; Harmanec, Petr; Kaluzny, Janusz; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Munari, Ulisse; Niarchos, Panagiotis; Olah, Katalin; Pribulla, Theodor; Scarfe, Colin D.; Torres, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    Commission 42 (C42) co-organized, together with Commission 27 (C27) and Division V (Div V) as a whole, a full day of science and business sessions that were held on 24 August 2012. The program included time slots for discussion of business matters related to Div V, C27 and C42, and two sessions of 2 hours each devoted to science talks of interest to both C42 and C27. In addition, we had a joint session between Div IV and Div V motivated by the proposal to reformulate the division structure of the IAU and the possible merger of the two divisions into a new Div G. The current report gives an account of the matters discussed during the business session of C42.

  7. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Cook, J.S.

    1993-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report.

  8. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides...

  9. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides...

  10. Laboratory Planning for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Harry F., Ed.

    This study is the result of a project of the Committee on Design, Construction and Equipment of Laboratories, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, of the National Academy of Sciences. The problems and methods of planning, designing and constructing varying types of chemical laboratories for research and developmental buildings are…

  11. Hyperspectral imaging camera using wavefront division interference.

    PubMed

    Bahalul, Eran; Bronfeld, Asaf; Epshtein, Shlomi; Saban, Yoram; Karsenty, Avi; Arieli, Yoel

    2016-03-01

    An approach for performing hyperspectral imaging is introduced. The hyperspectral imaging is based on Fourier transform spectroscopy, where the interference is performed by wavefront division interference rather than amplitude division interference. A variable phase delay between two parts of the wavefront emanating from each point of an object is created by a spatial light modulator (SLM) to obtain variable interference patterns. The SLM is placed in the exit pupil of an imaging system, thus enabling conversion of a general imaging optical system into an imaging hyperspectral optical system. The physical basis of the new approach is introduced, and an optical apparatus is built. PMID:26974085

  12. Division XII: Commission 6: Astronomical Telegrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, N. N.; Yamaoka, H.; Gilmore, A. C.; Aksnes, K.; Green, D. W. E.; Marsden, B. G.; Nakano, S.; Lara, Martin; Pitjeva, Elena V.; Sphar, T.; Ticha, J.; Williams, G.

    2015-08-01

    IAU Commission 6 ``Astronomical Telegrams'' had a single business meeting during the Beijing General Assembly of the IAU. It took place on Friday, August 24, 2012. The meeting was attended by five C6 members (N. N. Samus; D. W. E. Green; S. Nakano; J. Ticha; and H. Yamaoka). Also present was Prof. F. Genova as a representative of the IAU Division B. She told the audience about the current restructuring of IAU Commissions and Divisions and consequences for the future of C6.

  13. Mitochondrial Division and Fusion in Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Madhuparna; Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria govern many metabolic processes. In addition, mitochondria sense the status of metabolism and change their functions to regulate energy production, cell death, and thermogenesis. Recent studies have revealed that mitochondrial structural remodeling through division and fusion is critical to the organelle’s function. It has also become clear that abnormalities in mitochondrial division and fusion are linked to the pathophysiology of metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. Here, we discuss the current understanding of the mechanisms of mitochondrial dynamics and their role in cellular and organismal metabolism. PMID:25703628

  14. Life Sciences Division annual report, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Cram, L.S.

    1989-04-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Life Sciences Division for the calendar year 1988. Technical reports related to the current status of projects are presented in sufficient detail to permit the informed reader to assess their scope and significance. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the Group Leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  15. Quantum internet using code division multiple access.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu-xi; Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya; Wu, Re-Bing; Gao, Feifei; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels. PMID:23860488

  16. Quantum internet using code division multiple access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu-Xi; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Wu, Re-Bing; Gao, Feifei; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2013-07-01

    A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels.

  17. Focus issue introduction: space-division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Li, Guifang; Karlsson, Magnus; Liu, Xiang; Quiquempois, Yves

    2014-12-29

    Since the publication of the first focus issue [Opt. Express 19(11), 2011], single-fiber transmission capacity has eclipsed the 1 Pb/s mark. All aspects related to space-division multiplexing including fiber, passive components [(de)multiplexer, couplers], active components (EDFA and Raman amplifiers), switching and routing elements (ROADM and WSS), as well as transmission and networking have progressed rapidly. This focus issue is intended to bring together the most up-to-date research in space-division multiplexing, including fibers, passive and active components, transmission systems and networking. PMID:25607215

  18. Medical and Health Sciences Division research report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The Medical and Health Sciences Division conducts research programs relevant to neoplastic, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular diseases. Basic biological science, nuclear medicine, and epidemiology provide an integrated approach to solving biomedical problems directly related to occupational medicine and environmental health effects. The central theme of this research is focused on both the mechanisms and risk assessments of diseases caused by accidental exposure to chemical toxicants derived from fossil and synthetic fuels or to radiation. A major reorganizational change made this past year restructured the division into two branches. The environmental and health sciences branch contains a cancer and pulmonary research section, an interdisciplinary task group section, a cardiovascular research section, and a research support section. The radiation and nuclear medicine branch consists of a radiation and nuclear medicine section and an occupational epidemiology section. In addition, special task groups have been created to provide an interdisciplinary team approach in certain research efforts. Information included in this booklet summarizes research results and related activities for the period from October 1, 1979, to September 30, 1980.

  19. General view of site. Chemical House is in the distance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of site. Chemical House is in the distance at left, Administration/Filter Building at right. Looking northwest. Baldwin Reservoir lies beneath the greensward - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Meetings and Events | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Trial NCT01382082 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Trial NCT02237183 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Trial NCT01950403 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Trial NCT01849250 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Trial NCT01968798 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Trial NCT02116530 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Trial NCT01824836 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Trial NCT01141231 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Trial NCT02273362 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... operating regulations of the Geological Survey, see 30 CFR part 221. Operations ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Division orders. 227.19 Section 227.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND...

  11. Cancer Biomarkers Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Problems on Divisibility of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.; Smoak, James

    2004-01-01

    Twelve unusual problems involving divisibility of the binomial coefficients are represented in this article. The problems are listed in "The Problems" section. All twelve problems have short solutions which are listed in "The Solutions" section. These problems could be assigned to students in any course in which the binomial theorem and Pascal's…

  13. Mark Sherman, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Academic Achievement of NCAA Division III Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Kathy A.; Hickey, Ann

    2014-01-01

    A study of 215 athletes at a small private liberal arts Division III college revealed that athletes (a) begin their college experience with SATs no different from non-athletes; (b) attain GPAs that do not significantly differ from those of nonathletes; (c) achieve GPAs that do not significantly differ between their "in-season" semester…

  15. Trial NCT01169259 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Trial NCT01661764 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Thursday's Agenda | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    TimeAgenda8:30 am - 8:50 amRegistration - Networking8:50 am - 8:55 amWelcome and Opening RemarksLeslie Ford, MDAssociate Director for Clinical ResearchDivision of Cancer Prevention, NCIEva Szabo, MD Chief, Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group |

  18. Trial NCT01238172 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Trial NCT02314156 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Trial NCT01935960 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Trial NCT02155777 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  3. Trial NCT01728571 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Trial NCT02112188 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  6. Administrative Resource Center | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Nutritional Science Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Funded Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Physics Division activities report, 1986--1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the research activities of the Physics Division for the years 1986 and 1987. Areas of research discussed in this paper are: research on e/sup +/e/sup /minus// interactions; research on p/bar p/ interactions; experiment at TRIUMF; double beta decay; high energy astrophysics; interdisciplinary research; and advanced technology development and the SSC.

  10. Trial NCT02095145 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Active Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Verification of IEEE Compliant Subtractive Division Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Paul S.; Leathrum, James F., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A parameterized definition of subtractive floating point division algorithms is presented and verified using PVS. The general algorithm is proven to satisfy a formal definition of an IEEE standard for floating point arithmetic. The utility of the general specification is illustrated using a number of different instances of the general algorithm.

  13. Eva Szabo, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Sarah Temkin, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Origins of the Sexual Division of Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibowitz, Lila

    An interactive, biosocial model of early hominids presents evidence that physical sex differences are not the basis for the sexual division of labor as is commonly believed. Production (the deliberate collection and distribution of food) developed among early hominids as a prerequisite for survival. Although the population appears to have had…

  16. Trial NCT01550783 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. OVERVIEW -- SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division located in Ada, Oklahoma, conducts EPA-investigator led laboratory and field research to provide the scientific basis to support the development of strategies and technologies to protect and restore ground and surface water q...

  18. Kara Smigel Croker | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Kara Smigel Croker is the Communications Manager for the National Cancer Institute Division of Cancer Prevention. She coordinates and supports all aspects of communication, including media contacts, writing and editing of reports and responses, divisional websites, and social media. |

  19. Leslie Ford, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Division orders. 227.19 Section 227.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER... operating regulations of the Geological Survey, see 30 CFR part 221. Operations...

  1. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Division orders. 227.19 Section 227.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER... operating regulations of the Geological Survey, see 30 CFR part 221. Operations...

  2. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Division orders. 227.19 Section 227.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER... operating regulations of the Geological Survey, see 30 CFR part 221. Operations...

  3. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Division orders. 227.19 Section 227.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER... operating regulations of the Geological Survey, see 30 CFR part 221. Operations...

  4. Trial NCT02123849 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Trial NCT02169271 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Trial NCT00983580 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Trial NCT02348203 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Trial NCT02002533 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Acoustics Division recent accomplishments and research plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. R.; Morgan, H. G.

    1986-01-01

    The research program currently being implemented by the Acoustics Division of NASA Langley Research Center is described. The scope, focus, and thrusts of the research are discussed and illustrated for each technical area by examples of recent technical accomplishments. Included is a list of publications for the last two calendar years. The organization, staff, and facilities are also briefly described.

  10. 2014 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Trial NCT01594502 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Ultrasociality and the sexual divisions of labor.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Pamela; Caporael, Linnda R

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasociality thesis proposes that the same "mechanistic evolutionary forces" may be at work in the evolution of insect eusociality and human ultrasociality in relation to agriculture. Wide variation in the reproductive division of labor among differing highly social phyla points to a resemblance of outcomes arising from very different selective environments and possibly different forces. PMID:27561830

  13. Trial NCT02052908 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Clinical Trials Node | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Trial NCT02169284 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Trial NCT02134925 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Staff Directory | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Trial NCT02326805 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Trial NCT01391689 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Raising Literacy Standards in the Primary Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waiser, Marlene

    A research project undertaken in York, Ontario, Canada aimed to raise literacy standards in the primary division and to ensure that all children in Grade 1 read to the Grade 1 standard (as determined by Reading Recovery levels, the school board, and the Ontario Ministry of Education). Focus was placed on acquiring high quality leveled literature…

  2. Trial NCT02028221 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Trial NCT00641147 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Trial NCT00917735 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Howard Parnes, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. News Archives | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Trial NCT00392561 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Early Detection Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Understanding the Concept of "Division": Assessment Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmar, Rene S.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents a summary of considerations for teachers when assessing a student's understanding of division concepts. It discusses student products, student procedures and strategies, and student concepts and explanations at the preschool, elementary, and middle school levels. Examples of assessment activities and possible misconceptions…

  10. Biometry Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Trial NCT02063698 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Trial NCT01503632 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. 2015 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. 2016 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. 2013 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Trial NCT00690924 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Division Reports from the 2005 AECT Convention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TechTrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Association for Educational Communication & Technology held its International Convention in Orlando, Florida, October 18-22, 2005. The convention theme was "Exploring the Vision". Division report highlights include: (1) Reflections on a Convention: A Vision Explored (Wes Miller); (2) Definition and Terminology Committee (Al Januszewski); (3)…

  18. Trial NCT02382419 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Trial NCT01606124 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Easy come-easy go divisible cash

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, A.; Tsiounis, Y.; Frankel, Y.

    1996-10-16

    Recently, there has been an interest in making electronic cash protocols more practical for electronic commerce by developing e-cash which is divisible (e.g., a coin which can be spent incrementally but total purchases are limited to the monetary value of the coin). In Crypto`95, T. Okamoto presented the first practical divisible, untraceable, off-line e-cash scheme, which requires only O(log N) computations for each of the withdrawal, payment and deposit procedures, where N = (total coin value)/(smallest divisible unit). However, Okamoto`s set-up procedure is quite inefficient (on the order of 4,000 multi-exponentiations and depending on the size of the RSA modulus). The authors formalize the notion of range-bounded commitment, originally used in Okamoto`s account establishment protocol, and present a very efficient instantiation which allows one to construct the first truly efficient divisible e-cash system. The scheme only requires the equivalent of one (1) exponentiation for set-up, less than 2 exponentiations for withdrawal and around 20 for payment, while the size of the coin remains about 300 Bytes. Hence, the withdrawal protocol is 3 orders of magnitude faster than Okamoto`s, while the rest of the system remains equally efficient, allowing for implementation in smart-cards. Similar to Okamoto`s, the scheme is based on proofs whose cryptographic security assumptions are theoretically clarified.

  1. Trial NCT01346267 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Trial NCT01781468 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Trial NCT01556243 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Trial NCT01793233 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Protocol Information Office | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    PIO Instructions and ToolsFind instructions, forms, and templates for the management of all types of Division of Cancer Prevention clinical trials.Clinical Trials Reference MaterialsModel clinical agreements, human subject protection and informed consent models, gender and minority inclusion information, and monitoring policy and guidelines. |

  6. 2008 Research Portfolio: Research & Development Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This document describes the breadth of the research being conducted in 2008 by the Research and Development Division at Educational Testing Service (ETS). The research described falls into three large categories: (1) Research supported by the ETS research allocation; (2) Research funded by testing programs at ETS; and (3) Research funded by…

  7. Trial NCT00153816 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division, 1988 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Willard S., Ed.

    The research and development efforts performed by principal investigators under sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division during 1988 are documented. The title, name and affiliation of the principal investigator, project code, contract number, current end date, technical objective, approach, and progress of…

  9. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division, 1989 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Willard S., Ed.

    This report documents research and development performed by principal investigators under the sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division during fiscal year 1989. Programs are conducted under contracts and grants awarded on the basis of proposals received in response to a Broad Agency Announcement in the…

  10. Background Information | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial is a large population-based randomized trial evaluating screening programs for these cancers. The primary goal of this long-term trial of the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) is to determine the effects of screening on cancer-related mortality and on secondary endpoints. |

  11. Annalisa Gnoleba, MSA | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Mrs. Annalisa Gnoleba is the Public Health Analyst for the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute. In this position, Mrs. Gnoleba serves as the analyst for developing and formulating short and long range public health program goals, objectives and policies. |

  12. Trial NCT02636582 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Keypad Geometry and Divisibility of Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dyke, Frances; Keynes, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors show how students can form familiar geometric figures on the calculator keypad and generate numbers that are all divisible by a common number. Students are intrigued by the results and want to know "why it works". The activities can be presented and students given an extended amount of time to think about them. As…

  14. Selected Publications of the Division of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA. Div. of Nursing.

    Publications are organized under the following topics: (1) Division of Nursing Program, (2) Nurse Training Act of 1964, (3) Nursing (general interest), (4) Nursing Manpower, (5) Nursing Services in Hospitals, (6) Public Health Nursing, (7) Nursing Education, (8) Nursing Research and Research Training, and (9) Nurse Training Manuals. Single copies…

  15. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-21

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear

  16. Exponential growth of bacteria: Constant multiplication through division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Stephen J.

    2010-12-01

    The growth of a bacterial culture is one of the most familiar examples of exponential growth, with important consequences in biology and medicine. Bacterial growth involves more than just a rate constant. To sustain exponential growth, the cell must carefully coordinate the accumulation of mass, constant replication of the chromosome, and physical division. Hence, the growth rate is centrally important in any physical and chemical description of a bacterial cell. These aspects of bacterial growth can be described by empirical laws that suggest simple and intuitive models. Therefore, a quantitative discussion of bacterial growth could be a part of any undergraduate biophysics course. We present a general overview of some classic experimental studies and mathematical models of bacterial growth from a mostly physical perspective.

  17. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, R.H.

    1991-06-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division are described in this annual progress report for FY 1990. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of how societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy efficient technologies; and (4) developing improved transportation planning and policy. Disciplines of the 129 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, chemical heat pumps, refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building enveloped (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), retrofits for existing buildings, and electric power systems. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. 48 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.W.

    1982-06-01

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  19. 76 FR 14976 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From Mathieson Chemical Co...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... as follows: Facility: Mathieson Chemical Co. Location: Pasadena, Texas. Job Titles and/or Job Duties...: Stuart L. Hinnefeld, Director, Division of Compensation Analysis and Support, National Institute...

  20. Chemical mixing study for the Hanford TWRS Supporting facilities (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Heal, D.W.; Brantley, W.M.

    1996-09-03

    This Engineering Calculation addresses consequences of mixing any two hazardous chemicals contained in the same section of TWRS supporting facilities, as screened in accordance with `Westinghouse Savannah River Company Engineering and Construction Services Division Guidelines and Methods.`

  1. Microcomputer based software for biodynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rangarajan, N.; Shams, T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a description of a microcomputer based software package, called DYNAMAN, which has been developed to allow an analyst to simulate the dynamics of a system consisting of a number of mass segments linked by joints. One primary application is in predicting the motion of a human occupant in a vehicle under the influence of a variety of external forces, specially those generated during a crash event. Extensive use of a graphical user interface has been made to aid the user in setting up the input data for the simulation and in viewing the results from the simulation. Among its many applications, it has been successfully used in the prototype design of a moving seat that aids in occupant protection during a crash, by aircraft designers in evaluating occupant injury in airplane crashes, and by users in accident reconstruction for reconstructing the motion of the occupant and correlating the impacts with observed injuries.

  2. Perception and biodynamics in unalerted precrash response.

    PubMed

    McGehee, Daniel V; Carsten, Oliver M J

    2010-01-01

    This research seeks to better understand unalerted driver response just prior to a serious vehicle crash. Few studies have been able to view a crash from the inside-with a camera focused on the driver and occupants. Four studies are examined: 1) a high-fidelity simulator study with an unalerted intersection incursion crash among 107 drivers; 2) four crashes from the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI) 100 car study; 3) 58 crashes from vehicles equipped with an event triggered video recorder; and 4) a custom-designed high-fidelity simulator experiment that examined unalerted driver response to a head-on crash with a heavy truck. Analyses concentrate on decomposing driver perception, action, facial and postural changes with a focus on describing the neurophysiologic mechanisms designed to respond to danger. Results indicate that drivers involved in severe crashes generally have preview that an impact is about to occur. They respond first with vehicle control inputs (accelerator pedal release) along with facial state changes and withdrawal of the head back towards the head restraint. These responses frequently occur almost simultaneously, providing safety system designers with a number of reliable driver performance measures to monitor. Understanding such mechanisms may assist future advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), advanced restraints, model development of advanced anthropomorphic test dummies (ATDs), injury prediction and the integration of active and passive safety systems. PMID:21050614

  3. Developmental Biodynamics: Brain, Body, Behavior Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockman, Jeffrey J.; Thelen, Esther

    1993-01-01

    Advances in the neurosciences, biomechanics, and behavior sciences, along with attempts to integrate theories and findings across these disciplines, have led to a renewed interest in the study of motor development. Considers the contributions that have led to the reinvigoration of this field of study and its new interdisciplinary outlook. (MDM)

  4. Perception and Biodynamics in Unalerted Precrash Response

    PubMed Central

    McGehee, Daniel V.; Carsten, Oliver M.J.

    2010-01-01

    This research seeks to better understand unalerted driver response just prior to a serious vehicle crash. Few studies have been able to view a crash from the inside—with a camera focused on the driver and occupants. Four studies are examined: 1) a high-fidelity simulator study with an unalerted intersection incursion crash among 107 drivers; 2) four crashes from the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI) 100 car study; 3) 58 crashes from vehicles equipped with an event triggered video recorder; and 4) a custom-designed high-fidelity simulator experiment that examined unalerted driver response to a head-on crash with a heavy truck. Analyses concentrate on decomposing driver perception, action, facial and postural changes with a focus on describing the neurophysiologic mechanisms designed to respond to danger. Results indicate that drivers involved in severe crashes generally have preview that an impact is about to occur. They respond first with vehicle control inputs (accelerator pedal release) along with facial state changes and withdrawal of the head back towards the head restraint. These responses frequently occur almost simultaneously, providing safety system designers with a number of reliable driver performance measures to monitor. Understanding such mechanisms may assist future advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), advanced restraints, model development of advanced anthropomorphic test dummies (ATDs), injury prediction and the integration of active and passive safety systems. PMID:21050614

  5. Engineering Research Division publication report, calendar year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.K.; Livingston, P.L.; Rae, D.C.

    1980-06-01

    Each year the Engineering Research Division of the Electronics Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has issued an internal report listing all formal publications produced by the Division during the calendar year. Abstracts of 1980 reports are presented.

  6. 7. Contextual view of Fairbanks Company, looking north along Division ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Contextual view of Fairbanks Company, looking north along Division Street, showing relationship of factory to surrounding buildings and railroad - Fairbanks Company, 202 Division Street, Rome, Floyd County, GA

  7. Integrated mode converter for mode division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Galacho, Diego; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos Alberto; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Le Roux, Xavier; Ortega-Moñux, Alejandro; Wangüemert-Perez, Juan Gonzalo; Vivien, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The ever growing demands of bandwidth in optical communication systems are making traditional Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) based systems to reach its limit. In order to cope with future bandwidth demand is necessary to use new levels of orthogonality, such as the waveguide mode or the polarization state. Mode Division Multiplexing (MDM) has recently attracted attention as a possible solution to increase aggregate bandwidth. In this work we discuss the proposition a of mode converter that can cover the whole C-Band of optical communications. The Mode Converter is based on two Multimode Interference (MMI) couplers and a phase shifter. Insertion loss (IL) below 0.2 dB and Extinction ratio (ER) higher than 20 dB in a broad bandwidth range of 1.5 μm to 1.6 μm have been estimated. The total length of the device is less than 30 μm.

  8. Small GTPases as regulators of cell division

    PubMed Central

    Militello, Rodrigo; Colombo, María I.

    2013-01-01

    The superfamily of small GTPases serves as a signal transducer to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions. The members of this superfamily are structurally and functionally classified into at least 5 groups (Ras, Rho/Rac, Rab, Arf, and Ran) and they are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and nuclear transport. It is widely reported that members of the Rab family participate in the control of intracellular membrane trafficking through the interaction with specific effector molecules. However, many Rabs and other small GTPases have also been shown to function in cell division. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about Rab proteins regulating different stages of the cell cycle, such as the congregation and segregation of chromosomes (during metaphase) and the final stage of cell division known as cytokinesis, in which a cell is cleaved originating 2 daughter cells. PMID:24265858

  9. The PLASTID DIVISION1 and 2 Components of the Chloroplast Division Machinery Determine the Rate of Chloroplast Division in Land Plant Cell Differentiation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kumiko; Kabeya, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ichikawa, Takanari; Matsui, Minami; Nakanishi, Hiromitsu; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2009-01-01

    In most algae, the chloroplast division rate is held constant to maintain the proper number of chloroplasts per cell. By contrast, land plants evolved cell and chloroplast differentiation systems in which the size and number of chloroplasts change along with their respective cellular function by regulation of the division rate. Here, we show that PLASTID DIVISION (PDV) proteins, land plant–specific components of the division apparatus, determine the rate of chloroplast division. Overexpression of PDV proteins in the angiosperm Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens increased the number but decreased the size of chloroplasts; reduction of PDV levels resulted in the opposite effect. The level of PDV proteins, but not other division components, decreased during leaf development, during which the chloroplast division rate also decreased. Exogenous cytokinins or overexpression of the cytokinin-responsive transcription factor CYTOKININ RESPONSE FACTOR2 increased the chloroplast division rate, where PDV proteins, but not other components of the division apparatus, were upregulated. These results suggest that the integration of PDV proteins into the division machinery enabled land plant cells to change chloroplast size and number in accord with the fate of cell differentiation. PMID:19567705

  10. Sarah Temkin, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Sarah Temkin is a program director in the Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group of NCI's Division of Cancer Prevention. She works with the NCI Community Oncology Research Program, which conducts multi-site cancer clinical trials and cancer care delivery research studies in communities across the U.S. Dr. Temkin also serves as an adjunct associate professor in the Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics. |

  11. Space division multiplexing in access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effenberger, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Space division multiplexing (SDM) has received a lot of attention in the past years, as it is seen as the final frontier of fiber optic capacity improvement for long haul transmission. Its use in access networks is even more interesting, due to the different design optimization goals in access versus transport. This paper explores some of the applications of SDM in access that have the potential for early adoption.

  12. Unpacking the Division Interpretation of a Fraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Rebecca C.; Lewis, Priscilla Eide

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges in learning fractions is understanding how and why a fraction can have multiple interpretations. As presented in one textbook, a fraction is "a symbol, such as 2/3, 5/1, or 8/5, used to name a part of a whole, a part of a set, a location on a number line, or a division of whole numbers" (Charles et al. 2012, p.…

  13. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    Summaries of the highlights of programs in the Earth Sciences Division are presented under four headings; Geosciences, Geothermal Energy Development, Nuclear Waste Isolation, and Marine Sciences. Utilizing both basic and applied research in a wide spectrum of topics, these programs are providing results that will be of value in helping to secure the nation's energy future. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each project for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  14. Eva Szabo, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Eva Szabo is Chief of the Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group at the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention. She graduated from Yale University with a BS in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, received her MD from Duke University, and completed her internal medicine residency at Bellevue-NYU Medical Center. After completing her medical oncology fellowship at the National Cancer Institute, Dr. Szabo led a laboratory effort studying lung cancer biology. |

  15. DOE'S geothermal division: A period of transition

    SciTech Connect

    Jelacic, Allan J.; Reed, Marshall

    1996-01-24

    The transition that the Department of Energy's geothemal research program is undergoing is discussed. This transitional period began last year and will continue at least through final implementation of the Department's reorganization and downsizing. Current and recently completed R&D programs are reviewed. New initiatives are outlined. The foci and direction of the Division's activities of particular interest to the geothermal research community are addressed.

  16. The Arzt Algorithm and other Divisibility Tests for 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arzt, Joshua; Gaze, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Divisibility tests for digits other than 7 are well known and rely on the base 10 representation of numbers. For example, a natural number is divisible by 4 if the last 2 digits are divisible by 4 because 4 divides 10[sup k] for all k equal to or greater than 2. Divisibility tests for 7, while not nearly as well known, do exist and are also…

  17. Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  18. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J

    2015-10-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression. PMID:26517321

  19. Regulation of cell division in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant's essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  20. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J.

    2015-01-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression. PMID:26517321

  1. Divisibility and Multiplicative Structure of Natural Numbers: Preservice Teachers' Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zazkis, Rina; Campbell, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    Elementary number theory is investigated with the main focus on the concept of divisibility and its relation to division, multiplication, prime and composite numbers, factorization, divisibility rules, and prime decomposition. Preservice teachers' responses indicated dispositions toward procedural attachments even when conceptual understanding was…

  2. 7 CFR 2.34 - Director, National Appeals Division.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Director, National Appeals Division. 2.34 Section 2.34 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE... Heads § 2.34 Director, National Appeals Division. The Director, National Appeals Division, under...

  3. 7 CFR 2.34 - Director, National Appeals Division.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Director, National Appeals Division. 2.34 Section 2.34 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE... Heads § 2.34 Director, National Appeals Division. The Director, National Appeals Division, under...

  4. Couples' Attitudes, Childbirth, and the Division of Labor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Miranda; Liefbroer, Aart C.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine effects of partners' attitudes on the timing of the birth of a first child, the division of domestic labor, the division of child care, and the division of paid labor of couples. They use data from the Panel Study of Social Integration in the Netherlands, which includes independent measures of both partners'…

  5. Actor Networks and the Division of Knowledge in the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Lawrence

    This paper discusses the current division of knowledge at the college and university level, its historical roots, and the application of Actor Network Theory (ANT) to arrive at an explanation of the permanence of the current division of knowledge as well as what form a new division of knowledge might take. It finds fragmentation and disintegration…

  6. 28 CFR 0.72 - National Security Division.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National Security Division. 0.72 Section 0.72 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE National Security Division § 0.72 National Security Division. The following functions are assigned to and shall be conducted, handled, or supervised by...

  7. Reconciling Divisions in the Field of Authentic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarid, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold: first, to identify and address three central divisions in the field of authentic education that introduce ambiguity and at times inconsistencies within the field of authentic education. These divisions concern a) the relationship between autonomy and authenticity; b) the division between the two basic attitudes…

  8. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.W.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  9. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1995. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report. Attention is focused on the following research activities: molecular, cellular, and cancer biology; mammalian genetics and development; genome mapping program; and educational activities.

  10. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division Program Report, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    In 1990, the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division begins its 17th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to decades and from local to global. Our modeling is now reaching out from its atmospheric focus to treat linkages with the oceans and the land. In this report, we describe the Division's goal and organizational structure. We also provide tables and appendices describing the Division's budget, personnel, models, and publications. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.V.

    1992-03-01

    This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

  12. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.V.

    1989-03-01

    The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens.

  13. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, M.L.; Ferris, L.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    The Chemistry Division conducts basic and applied chemical research on projects important to DOE`s missions in sciences, energy technologies, advanced materials, and waste management/environmental restoration; it also conducts complementary research for other sponsors. The research are arranged according to: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, chemistry of advanced inorganic materials, structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, chemical and structural principles in solvent extraction, surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis, photolytic transformations of hazardous organics, DNA sequencing and mapping, and special topics.

  14. Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L Sham

    2012-07-01

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, © ASME, 2012, Reference.

  15. Physics division. Progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, M.; Bacon, D.S.; Aine, C.J.; Bartsch, R.R.

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Physics Division Progress Report describes progress and achievements in Physics Division research during the period January 1, 1995-December 31, 1996. The report covers the five main areas of experimental research and development in which Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in applied and basic sciences: (1) biophysics, (2) hydrodynamic physics, (3) neutron science and technology, (4) plasma physics, and (5) subatomic physics. Included in this report are a message from the Division Director, the Physics Division mission statement, an organizational chart, descriptions of the research areas of the five groups in the Division, selected research highlights, project descriptions, the Division staffing and funding levels for FY95-FY97, and a list of publications and presentations.

  16. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of The AAS (LAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  17. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The {open_quotes}early implementation{close_quotes} phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large {gamma}-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive {sup 21}Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium.

  18. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  19. Physics division annual report - October 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K.

    2000-10-16

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part, defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design.

  20. Environmental Chemistry Division annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, L.

    1990-01-01

    The research activities making up the programs in the Environmental Chemistry Division of the Department of Applied Science are presented. Some of the more significant accomplishments during 1989 are described and plans for 1990 are discussed briefly. Publications for the period are listed and abstracts are provided. Research objectives and principal investigators are given for each of the active programs. A list of personnel and collaborators during the past year is presented. The support distribution of FY 1989 is approximately 85% from the Department of Energy (65% Office of Health and Environmental Research), and 15% other agencies (principally from the Electric Power Research Institute).

  1. Ecological Research Division, Marine Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This report presents program summaries of the various projects sponsored during 1979 by the Marine Research Program of the Ecological Research Division. Program areas include the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the marine environment; a study of the baseline ecology of a proposed OTEC site near Puerto Rico; the environmental impact of offshore geothermal energy development; the movement of radionuclides through the marine environment; the environmental aspects of power plant cooling systems; and studies of the physical and biological oceangraphy of the continental shelves bordering the United States.

  2. Two wavelength division multiplexing WAN trials

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, W.J.; Thombley, R.L.

    1995-01-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a super-user, supercomputer, and super-application site, is anticipating the future bandwidth and protocol requirements necessary to connect to other such sites as well as to connect to remote-sited control centers and experiments. In this paper the authors discuss their vision of the future of Wide Area Networking, describe the plans for a wavelength division multiplexed link connecting Livermore with the University of California at Berkeley and describe plans for a transparent, {approx} 10 Gb/s ring around San Francisco Bay.

  3. Performance of code division multiple access systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, C. L.; Huth, G. K.; Batson, B. H.

    1980-01-01

    The performance of code division multiple-access (CDMA) systems is determined using direct sequence spectral spreading. Under relatively ideal conditions, the degradation in system performance as a function of the number of users is shown to have a threshold effect. This basic limitation in the number of users of the system is further limited if the powers are unequal. For two users, system performance as a function of their power ratio also has a threshold effect. System performance as a function of the amount of spectral spreading is determined. The performance of both coded and uncoded systems is predicted.

  4. Multimode fiber optic wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, with signals transmitted on different wavelengths through a single optical fiber, can have increased bandwidth and fault isolation properties over single wavelength optical systems. Two WDM system designs that might be used with multimode fibers are considered and a general description of the components which could be used to implement the system are given. The components described are sources, multiplexers, demultiplexers, and detectors. Emphasis is given to the demultiplexer technique which is the major developmental component in the WDM system.

  5. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. This research effort was enhanced by new capabilities in atomic-scale materials characterization, new emphasis on the synthesis and processing of materials, and increased partnering with industry and universities. The theoretical effort included a broad range of analytical studies, as well as a new emphasis on numerical simulation stimulated by advances in high-performance computing and by strong interest in related division experimental programs. Superconductivity research continued to advance on a broad front from fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity to the development of new materials and processing techniques. The Neutron Scattering Program was characterized by a strong scientific user program and growing diversity represented by new initiatives in complex fluids and residual stress. The national emphasis on materials synthesis and processing was mirrored in division research programs in thin-film processing, surface modification, and crystal growth. Research on advanced processing techniques such as laser ablation, ion implantation, and plasma processing was complemented by strong programs in the characterization of materials and surfaces including ultrahigh resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic-resolution chemical analysis, synchrotron x-ray research, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  6. Interface control document between Analytical Services and Solid Waste Disposal Division

    SciTech Connect

    Venetz, T.J.

    1995-01-30

    This interface control document (ICD) between Analytical Services and Solid Waste Disposal (SWD) establishes a baseline description of the support needed and the wastes that will require management as part of the interface between the two divisions. It is important that each division has a clear understanding of the other division`s expectations regarding levels and type of support needed. This ICD deals with the waste sampling support needed by SWD and the waste generated by the specified analytical laboratories. The baseline description of wastes includes waste volumes, characteristics and shipping schedules, which will be used to plan the proper support requirements. The laboratories included in this document are 222-S Laboratory Facility, the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) and the Chemical Engineering Laboratory. These three facilities provide support to the entire site and are not associated with one major program/facility. The laboratories associated with major facilities or programs such as Engineering/Environmental Development Laboratory at K Basins Operation are not within the scope of this document.

  7. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kimberly A. (Editor); Reddy, Francis J. (Editor); Tyler, Patricia A. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for two orbiting astrophysics missions Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and Swift as well as the Science Support Center for Fermi. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  8. Frequency division using a micromechanical resonance cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Qalandar, K. R. Gibson, B.; Sharma, M.; Ma, A.; Turner, K. L.; Strachan, B. S.; Shaw, S. W.

    2014-12-15

    A coupled micromechanical resonator array demonstrates a mechanical realization of multi-stage frequency division. The mechanical structure consists of a set of N sequentially perpendicular microbeams that are connected by relatively weak elastic elements such that the system vibration modes are localized to individual microbeams and have natural frequencies with ratios close to 1:2:⋯:2{sup N}. Conservative (passive) nonlinear inter-modal coupling provides the required energy transfer between modes and is achieved by finite deformation kinematics. When the highest frequency beam is excited, this arrangement promotes a cascade of subharmonic resonances that achieve frequency division of 2{sup j} at microbeam j for j = 1, …, N. Results are shown for a capacitively driven three-stage divider in which an input signal of 824 kHz is passively divided through three modal stages, producing signals at 412 kHz, 206 kHz, and 103 kHz. The system modes are characterized and used to delineate the range of AC input voltages and frequencies over which the cascade occurs. This narrow band frequency divider has simple design rules that are scalable to higher frequencies and can be extended to a larger number of modal stages.

  9. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division(ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center(GSFC)is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radiowavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contract imaging techniques to serch for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, and provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and suppport the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new conepts and inventing new technologies.

  10. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William (Editor); Reddy, Francis (Editor); Tyler, Pat (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum - from gamma rays to radio wavelengths - as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions - WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  11. The Commingled Division of Visual Attention

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuechuan; Wu, Sijing; Spence, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Many critical activities require visual attention to be distributed simultaneously among distinct tasks where the attended foci are not spatially separated. In our two experiments, participants performed a large number of trials where both a primary task (enumeration of spots) and a secondary task (reporting the presence/absence or identity of a distinctive shape) required the division of visual attention. The spots and the shape were commingled spatially and the shape appeared unpredictably on a relatively small fraction of the trials. The secondary task stimulus (the shape) was reported in inverse proportion to the attentional load imposed by the primary task (enumeration of spots). When the shape did appear, performance on the primary task (enumeration) suffered relative to when the shape was absent; both speed and accuracy were compromised. When the secondary task required identification in addition to detection, reaction times increased by about 200 percent. These results are broadly compatible with biased competition models of perceptual processing. An important area of application, where the commingled division of visual attention is required, is the augmented reality head-up display (AR-HUD). This innovation has the potential to make operating vehicles safer but our data suggest that there are significant concerns regarding driver distraction. PMID:26076144

  12. Premature centromere division and other centromeric misbehavior

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, P.H.

    1993-12-31

    Premature centromere division was initially described for the X chromosome. In an otherwise typical metaphase cell, one chromosome showed no primary constriction and appeared to have no centromere. G-banding analysis indicated that this apparent acentric fragment was an entire X chromosome. Because its centromere was divided when the centromeres of all other chromosomes of the metaphase cell were entire, the condition was described as premature centromere division (PCD). The importance of PCD lies in its being a mechanism on non-disjunction, as was indicated by the strong association of X chromosome aneuploidy with PCD,X. We can infer that the affected chromosome failed to take part in the normal distribution of chromosomes at mitoses. The centromere, it its widest sense, is generally believed to have a role in the correct orientation of chromosomes at the metaphase plate and the distribution of chromatids to the spindle poles. The failure of these functions implies a major centromeric dysfunction. What do we know of this complex region of the chromosome that might help us understand its dysfunction?

  13. Mechanics of cell division in fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fred

    2012-02-01

    Cytokinesis is the stage of cell division in which a cell divides into two. A paradigm of cytokinesis in animal cells is that the actomyosin contractile ring provides the primary force to squeeze the cell into two. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytokinesis also requires a actomyosin ring, which has been generally assumed to provide the force for cleavage. However, in contrast to animal cells, yeast cells assemble a cell wall septum concomitant with ring contraction and possess large (MPa) internal turgor pressure. Here, we show that the inward force generated by the division apparatus opposes turgor pressure; a decrease in effective turgor pressure leads to an increase in cleavage rate. We show that the ring cannot be the primary force generator. Scaling arguments indicate that the contractile ring can only provide a tiny fraction of the mechanical stress required to overcome turgor. Further, we show that cleavage can occur even in the absence of the contractile ring. Instead of the contractile ring, scaling arguments and modeling suggest that the large forces for cytokinesis are produced by the assembly of cell wall polymers in the growing septum.

  14. Effects of Polyhydroxybutyrate Production on Cell Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kathleen; Rahman, Asif; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biological engineering can be utilized to aide the advancement of improved long-term space flight. The potential to use synthetic biology as a platform to biomanufacture desired equipment on demand using the three dimensional (3D) printer on the International Space Station (ISS) gives long-term NASA missions the flexibility to produce materials as needed on site. Polyhydroxybutyrates (PHBs) are biodegradable, have properties similar to plastics, and can be produced in Escherichia coli using genetic engineering. Using PHBs during space flight could assist mission success by providing a valuable source of biomaterials that can have many potential applications, particularly through 3D printing. It is well documented that during PHB production E. coli cells can become significantly elongated. The elongation of cells reduces the ability of the cells to divide and thus to produce PHB. I aim to better understand cell division during PHB production, through the design, building, and testing of synthetic biological circuits, and identify how to potentially increase yields of PHB with FtsZ overexpression, the gene responsible for cell division. Ultimately, an increase in the yield will allow more products to be created using the 3D printer on the ISS and beyond, thus aiding astronauts in their missions.

  15. Marginalization in neural circuits with divisive normalization

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J.M.; Latham, P.E.; Pouget, A.

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of computations performed by the nervous system involves a type of probabilistic inference known as marginalization. This computation comes up in seemingly unrelated tasks, including causal reasoning, odor recognition, motor control, visual tracking, coordinate transformations, visual search, decision making, and object recognition, to name just a few. The question we address here is: how could neural circuits implement such marginalizations? We show that when spike trains exhibit a particular type of statistics – associated with constant Fano factors and gain-invariant tuning curves, as is often reported in vivo – some of the more common marginalizations can be achieved with networks that implement a quadratic nonlinearity and divisive normalization, the latter being a type of nonlinear lateral inhibition that has been widely reported in neural circuits. Previous studies have implicated divisive normalization in contrast gain control and attentional modulation. Our results raise the possibility that it is involved in yet another, highly critical, computation: near optimal marginalization in a remarkably wide range of tasks. PMID:22031877

  16. Fourteenth National Congress of the Environmental and Cultural Heritage Chemistry Division, "Chemistry in a Sustainable Society," held in Rimini (Italy) in June 2013.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Elena; Passarini, Fabrizio; Morselli, Luciano

    2014-12-01

    This report briefly presents the aims and the fields of interest of the Environmental and Cultural Heritage Division (Italian Chemical Society) and the issues addressed during its national congress, held in Rimini in June 2013. The broad range of topics raised by different speakers, the variety of affiliations and institutions participating at the conference, the scientific organisations and private companies co-sponsoring the different sessions give a clear picture of the interdisciplinarity which is a hallmark of this division. PMID:24573464

  17. Adding Football and the "Uses" of Athletics at NCAA Division II and Division III Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feezell, Travis

    2009-01-01

    In announcing establishment of a football program within its National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) Division I athletic program in 2012 or 2013, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC) offered a rationale different from what many would expect (Perimutt, 2008). The UNCC chancellor noted that neither generating revenue nor…

  18. THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE CASSINI DIVISION

    SciTech Connect

    Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Brown, R. H.; French, R. G.; Marouf, E. A.

    2010-01-15

    The Cassini Division in Saturn's rings contains a series of eight named gaps, three of which contain dense ringlets. Observations of stellar occultations by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft have yielded {approx}40 accurate and precise measurements of the radial position of the edges of all of these gaps and ringlets. These data reveal suggestive patterns in the shapes of many of the gap edges: the outer edges of the five gaps without ringlets are circular to within 1 km, while the inner edges of six of the gaps are eccentric, with apsidal precession rates consistent with those expected for eccentric orbits near each edge. Intriguingly, the pattern speeds of these eccentric inner gap edges, together with that of the eccentric Huygens Ringlet, form a series with a characteristic spacing of 0.{sup 0}06 day{sup -1}. The two gaps with non-eccentric inner edges lie near first-order inner Lindblad resonances (ILRs) with moons. One such edge is close to the 5:4 ILR with Prometheus, and the radial excursions of this edge do appear to have an m = 5 component aligned with that moon. The other resonantly confined edge is the outer edge of the B ring, which lies near the 2:1 Mimas ILR. Detailed investigation of the B-ring-edge data confirm the presence of an m = 2 perturbation on the B-ring edge, but also show that during the course of the Cassini Mission, this pattern has drifted backward relative to Mimas. Comparisons with earlier occultation measurements going back to Voyager suggest the possibility that the m = 2 pattern is actually librating relative to Mimas with a libration frequency L {approx} 0.{sup 0}06 day{sup -1} (or possibly 0.{sup 0}12 day{sup -1}). In addition to the m = 2 pattern, the B-ring edge also has an m = 1 component that rotates around the planet at a rate close to the expected apsidal precession rate. Thus, the pattern speeds of the eccentric edges in the Cassini Division can be generated from various

  19. The architecture of the Cassini division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R.N.; Brown, R.H.; French, R.G.; Marouf, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Division in Saturn's rings contains a series of eight named gaps, three of which contain dense ringlets. Observations of stellar occultations by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft have yielded 40 accurate and precise measurements of the radial position of the edges of all of these gaps and ringlets. These data reveal suggestive patterns in the shapes of many of the gap edges: the outer edges of the five gaps without ringlets are circular to within 1 km, while the inner edges of six of the gaps are eccentric, with apsidal precession rates consistent with those expected for eccentric orbits near each edge. Intriguingly, the pattern speeds of these eccentric inner gap edges, together with that of the eccentric Huygens Ringlet, form a series with a characteristic spacing of 006 day-1. The two gaps with non-eccentric inner edges lie near first-order inner Lindblad resonances (ILRs) with moons. One such edge is close to the 5:4 ILR with Prometheus, and the radial excursions of this edge do appear to have an m = 5 component aligned with that moon. The other resonantly confined edge is the outer edge of the B ring, which lies near the 2:1 Mimas ILR. Detailed investigation of the B-ring-edge data confirm the presence of an m = 2 perturbation on the B-ring edge, but also show that during the course of the Cassini Mission, this pattern has drifted backward relative to Mimas. Comparisons with earlier occultation measurements going back to Voyager suggest the possibility that the m = 2 pattern is actually librating relative to Mimas with a libration frequency L 006 day-1 (or possibly 012 day -1). In addition to the m = 2 pattern, the B-ring edge also has an m = 1 component that rotates around the planet at a rate close to the expected apsidal precession rate (?? ?? ?? B ??? 5.??06 day -1). Thus, the pattern speeds of the eccentric edges in the Cassini Division can be generated from various combinations of the pattern speeds

  20. 49 CFR 174.112 - Loading Division 1.3 materials and Division 1.2 (explosive) materials (Also see § 174.101).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (explosive) materials (Also see § 174.101). 174.112 Section 174.112 Transportation Other Regulations... Division 1.3 materials and Division 1.2 (explosive) materials (Also see § 174.101). (a) Division 1.3... with spark shields (see § 174.104). Packages of Division 1.3 materials and Division 1.2...

  1. HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS.

    Robert J. Kavlock, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.

    Over the past several decades a hypothesis has been put forth that a numb...

  2. From the Beginning: The "Journal of Chemical Education" and Secondary School Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagowski, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The people, events, and issues that were involved in the beginning and the evolution of the "Journal of Chemical Education" and the Division of Chemical Education (DivCHED) are traced and discussed. The constitution of the American Chemical Society incorporates the roots of chemical education as an area of interest to the Society. Both…

  3. Summaries of FY 1993 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The summaries in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced battery technology are arranged according to national laboratories and offsite institutions. Small business innovation research projects are also listed. Special facilities supported wholly or partly by the Division of Chemical Sciences are described. Indexes are provided for selected topics of general interest, institutions, and investigators.

  4. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division: Program report, FY 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    In 1988 the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division began its 15th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to years, and from kilometers to global, respectively. For this report, we have chosen to show a subset of results from several projects to illustrate the breadth, depth, and diversity of the modeling activities that are a major part of the Division's research, development, and application efforts. In addition, the recent reorganization of the Division, including the merger of another group with the Division, is described, and the budget, personnel, models, and publications are reviewed. 95 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Joy Osborne, MS, MPA | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Joy Osborne is the ARC Director for the Division of Cancer Prevention and the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences. The ARC (Administrative Resource Center) provides services to DCP in the areas of budget, contracts, grants, human resources, travel, space and facilities, and other administrative areas. Joy came to NCI in 1992 as a Presidential Management Intern and has worked with many of the NCI Divisions in both intramural and extramural. |

  6. Compartmentalization and Cell Division through Molecular Discreteness and Crowding in a Catalytic Reaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Explanation of the emergence of primitive cellular structures from a set of chemical reactions is necessary to unveil the origin of life and to experimentally synthesize protocells. By simulating a cellular automaton model with a two-species hypercycle, we demonstrate the reproduction of a localized cluster; that is, a protocell with a growth-division process emerges when the replication and degradation speeds of one species are respectively slower than those of the other species, because of overcrowding of molecules as a natural outcome of the replication. The protocell exhibits synchrony between its division process and replication of the minority molecule. We discuss the effects of the crowding molecule on the formation of primitive structures. The generality of this result is demonstrated through the extension of our model to a hypercycle with three molecular species, where a localized layered structure of molecules continues to divide, triggered by the replication of a minority molecule at the center. PMID:25370530

  7. Compartmentalization and Cell Division through Molecular Discreteness and Crowding in a Catalytic Reaction Network.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Explanation of the emergence of primitive cellular structures from a set of chemical reactions is necessary to unveil the origin of life and to experimentally synthesize protocells. By simulating a cellular automaton model with a two-species hypercycle, we demonstrate the reproduction of a localized cluster; that is, a protocell with a growth-division process emerges when the replication and degradation speeds of one species are respectively slower than those of the other species, because of overcrowding of molecules as a natural outcome of the replication. The protocell exhibits synchrony between its division process and replication of the minority molecule. We discuss the effects of the crowding molecule on the formation of primitive structures. The generality of this result is demonstrated through the extension of our model to a hypercycle with three molecular species, where a localized layered structure of molecules continues to divide, triggered by the replication of a minority molecule at the center. PMID:25370530

  8. Division of energy biosciences: Annual report and summaries of FY 1995 activities

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The mission of the Division of Energy Biosciences is to support research that advances the fundamental knowledge necessary for the future development of biotechnologies related to the Department of Energy`s mission. The departmental civilian objectives include effective and efficient energy production, energy conservation, environmental restoration, and waste management. The Energy Biosciences program emphasizes research in the microbiological and plant sciences, as these understudied areas offer numerous scientific opportunities to dramatically influence environmentally sensible energy production and conservation. The research supported is focused on the basic mechanisms affecting plant productivity, conversion of biomass and other organic materials into fuels and chemicals by microbial systems, and the ability of biological systems to replace energy-intensive or pollutant-producing processes. The Division also addresses the increasing number of new opportunities arising at the interface of biology with other basic energy-related sciences such as biosynthesis of novel materials and the influence of soil organisms on geological processes.

  9. Emergency medical training in the 82d Airborne Division. The Gulf War experience.

    PubMed

    Cancio, L C; Goforth, G A

    1993-01-01

    The 82d Airborne Division, as the Army's worldwide contingency division, places unique demands on its medical personnel. This was true particularly during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm in 1990-1991. An unprecedented emergency medical training program was carried out in preparation for the Gulf War. All levels of expertise were involved: non-medical Combat Lifesavers, medics, physician assistants, and physicians. Courses provided included Combat Lifesaver provider and refresher training, Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) provider and instructor training, Chemical Casualty courses, and a Combat Surgical Skills course. Approximately 736 personnel, including 80 Saudi and allied physicians and medics, participated in these courses. Confidence and competence in handling war casualties at all levels was enhanced greatly. Prepackaged courses such as BTLS enabled the rapid training of large numbers of medical personnel under challenging conditions. PMID:10155478

  10. Scientific Scope | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of developing cancer and to find ways to reduce that risk. Through laboratory, clinical, and epidemiologic research, scientists have shown that the diseases of cancer occur not as single, catastrophic events, but rather as the result of a complex and long-evolving molecular process that can take decades. This long-term process of carcinogenesis provides time and opportunities to slow down, stop, or reverse the cellular changes that can become cancer. | DCP research spans the initiation of cancer and the occurrence of invasive disease in major organ sites. The overall goal is to detect changes and intervene early to prevent symptomatic disease and death.

  11. GSFC Heliophysics Science Division 2009 Science Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.; Saba, Julia L. R.; Strong, Yvonne M.

    2009-01-01

    This report is intended to record and communicate to our colleagues, stakeholders, and the public at large about heliophysics scientific and flight program achievements and milestones for 2009, for which NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Heliophysics Science Division (HSD) made important contributions. HSD comprises approximately 299 scientists, technologists, and administrative personnel dedicated to the goal of advancing our knowledge and understanding of the Sun and the wide variety of domains that its variability influences. Our activities include: Leading science investigations involving flight hardware, theory, and data analysis and modeling that will answer the strategic questions posed in the Heliophysics Roadmap; Leading the development of new solar and space physics mission concepts and support their implementation as Project Scientists; Providing access to measurements from the Heliophysics Great Observatory through our Science Information Systems; and Communicating science results to the public and inspiring the next generation of scientists and explorers.

  12. Reducing Peak Demand by Time Zone Divisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, A.

    2014-09-01

    For a large country like India, the electrical power demand is also large and the infrastructure cost for power is the largest among all the core sectors of economy. India has an emerging economy which requires high rate of growth of infrastructure in the power generation, transmission and distribution. The current peak demand in the country is approximately 1,50,000 MW which shall have a planned growth of at least 50 % over the next five years (Seventeenth Electric Power Survey of India, Central Electricity Authority, Government of India, March 2007). By implementing the time zone divisions each comprising of an integral number of contiguous states based on their total peak demand and geographical location, the total peak demand of the nation can be significantly cut down by spreading the peak demand of various states over time. The projected reduction in capital expenditure over a plan period of 5 years is substantial. Also, the estimated reduction in operations expenditure cannot be ignored.

  13. Grid scheduling divisible loads from two sources

    SciTech Connect

    Moges, M.A.; Yu, D.; Robertazzi, T.

    2009-07-10

    To date closed form solutions for optimal finish time and job allocation are largely obtained only for network topologies with a single load originating (root) processor. However in large-scale data intensive problems with geographically distributed resources, load is generated from multiple sources. This paper introduces a new divisible load scheduling strategy for single level tree networks with two load originating processors. Solutions for an optimal allocation of fractions of load to nodes in single level tree networks are obtained via linear programming. A unique scheduling strategy that allows one to obtain closed form solutions for the optimal finish time and load allocation for each processor in the network is also presented. The tradeoff between linear programming and closed form solutions in terms of underlying assumptions is examined. Finally, a performance evaluation of a two source homogeneous single level tree network with concurrent communication strategy is presented.

  14. Division F Commission 53: Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecavelier Des Etangs, Alain; Minniti, Dante; Boss, Alan; Mayor, Michel; Bodenheimer, Peter; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Jayawardhana, Ray; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Mardling, Rosemary; Queloz, Didier; Rauer, Heike; Zhao, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The IAU Working Group on Extrasolar Planets (WGESP) was created by the Executive Council as a Working Group of Division III. This decision took place in June 1999, that is only 7 years after the discovery of planets around the pulsar PSR B1257+12 and 4 years after the discovery of 51 Peg b. This working group was renewed for 3 years at the General Assembly in 2003 in Sydney, Australia. It was chaired by Alan Boss from Carnegie Institution of Washington. The WGESP members were Paul Butler, William Hubbard, Philip Ianna, Martin Kürster, Jack Lissauer, Michel Mayor, Karen Meech, Francois Mignard, Alan Penny, Andreas Quirrenbach, Jill Tarter, and Alfred Vidal-Madjar.

  15. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    This book briefly describes the activities of the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. During the past year the Donner Pavilion program on the treatment of arteriovenous malformations in the brain has chalked up very significant successes. The disease control rate has been high and objective measures of success using cerebral angiography have been established. The new high resolution positron emitting tomographic imager has been demonstrated to operate successfully. In the Radiation Biophysics program, the availability of higher mass ions up to uranium has allowed us cell and tissue studies in a radiation domain that is entirely new. Using uranium beams, investigators have already made new and exciting findings that are described in the body of the report.

  16. GSFC Heliophysics Science Division 2008 Science Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly R.; Strong, Keith T.; Saba, Julia L. R.; Firestone, Elaine R.

    2009-01-01

    This report is intended to record and communicate to our colleagues, stakeholders, and the public at large about heliophysics scientific and flight program achievements and milestones for 2008, for which NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Heliophysics Science Division (HSD) made important contributions. HSD comprises approximately 261 scientists, technologists, and administrative personnel dedicated to the goal of advancing our knowledge and understanding of the Sun and the wide variety of domains that its variability influences. Our activities include Lead science investigations involving flight hardware, theory, and data analysis and modeling that will answer the strategic questions posed in the Heliophysics Roadmap; Lead the development of new solar and space physics mission concepts and support their implementation as Project Scientists; Provide access to measurements from the Heliophysics Great Observatory through our Science Information Systems, and Communicate science results to the public and inspire the next generation of scientists and explorers.

  17. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Cal State Division Beaches and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Cal State Division Beaches and Parks Collection Photo 1958 Rephoto 1960 EAST ELEVATION - Adams & Company Building, 1014 Second Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  18. 8. STATION 'L' FROM SOUTHEAST DIVISION STREET LOOKING NORTHWEST, LINCOLN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. STATION 'L' FROM SOUTHEAST DIVISION STREET LOOKING NORTHWEST, LINCOLN SUBSTATION IN FOREGROUND - Portland General Electric Company, Station "L", 1841 Southeast Water Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  19. 9. STATION 'L', LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM SOUTHEAST DIVISION, LINCOLN SUBSTATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. STATION 'L', LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM SOUTHEAST DIVISION, LINCOLN SUBSTATION IN FOREGROUND - Portland General Electric Company, Station "L", 1841 Southeast Water Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  20. ADP Analysis project for the Human Resources Management Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tureman, Robert L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The ADP (Automated Data Processing) Analysis Project was conducted for the Human Resources Management Division (HRMD) of NASA's Langley Research Center. The three major areas of work in the project were computer support, automated inventory analysis, and an ADP study for the Division. The goal of the computer support work was to determine automation needs of Division personnel and help them solve computing problems. The goal of automated inventory analysis was to find a way to analyze installed software and usage on a Macintosh. Finally, the ADP functional systems study for the Division was designed to assess future HRMD needs concerning ADP organization and activities.

  1. The Architecture of the Cassini Division. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedman, Matthew M.; Nicholson, P. D.; VIMS Team

    2009-05-01

    Between Day 144 of 2005 and Day 351 of 2008, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft obtained 41 high-quality occultation cuts through the Cassini Division in Saturn's rings. The position of the edges of all the gaps (and detached ringlets) were measured for all of these occultations. We find that all the gaps that do not contain dense ringlets have nearly circular outer edges, while all the other edges exhibit significant variations in their radial locations. As expected based on earlier Voyager and Cassini observations (Porco et al. 1984, Spitale et al. 2006), we find that the outer edge of the B ring has a large m=2 component due to the nearby 2:1 resonance with Mimas. However, detailed studies of this pattern suggest that the orientation of the B-ring edge slowly drifts or librates relative to Mimas. There is also some evidence for other perturbations on this edge (cf. Spitale et al. 2006). Meanwhile, the inner edge of the outermost gap in the Cassini division has an m=5 component that may be associated with the nearby 5:4 inner Lindblad resonance with Prometheus. Intriguingly, the inner edges of all the remaining named gaps (which do not fall near known first-order resonances with any moon) can be well-fit with simple ellipses that precess around Saturn at approximately the expected rates given their distances from Saturn center (one of these edges was already modeled in this way in Flynn and Cuzzi 1989). The pattern speeds of the observed eccentric edges form a quasi-regular series with a characteristic spacing of approximately 0.05-0.07 degrees/day. A possible explanation for this regularity is presented in an accompanying abstract by Nicholson et al.

  2. Environmental Sciences Division Toxicology Laboratory standard operating procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; Wicker, L.F.; Logsdon, G.M.

    1989-09-01

    This document was developed to provide the personnel working in the Environmental Sciences Division's Toxicology Laboratory with documented methods for conducting toxicity tests. The document consists of two parts. The first part includes the standard operating procedures (SOPs) that are used by the laboratory in conducting toxicity tests. The second part includes reference procedures from the US Environmental Protection Agency document entitled Short-Term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater Organisms, upon which the Toxicology Laboratory's SOPs are based. Five of the SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction test. These SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia food (SOP-3), maintaining Ceriodaphnia cultures (SOP-4), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-13), analyzing the test data (SOP-13), and conducting a Ceriodaphnia reference test (SOP-15). Five additional SOPs relate specifically to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test: methods for preparing fathead minnow larvae food (SOP-5), maintaining fathead minnow cultures (SOP-6), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-9), analyzing the test data (SOP-12), and conducting a fathead minnow reference test (DOP-14). The six remaining SOPs describe methods that are used with either or both tests: preparation of control/dilution water (SOP-1), washing of glassware (SOP-2), collection and handling of samples (SOP-7), preparation of samples (SOP-8), performance of chemical analyses (SOP-11), and data logging and care of technical notebooks (SOP-16).

  3. Chemical Information Instruction in Academe: Who Is Leading the Charge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garritano, Jeremy R.; Culp, F. Bartow; Twiss-Brooks, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Chemical information instruction (CII) has been recommended by the ACS Committee on Professional Training as a necessary component of the chemistry curriculum for both undergraduate and graduate students. Surveys conducted by the ACS Chemical Information Division (CINF) Education Committee in 1984 and 1993 showed the extent that CII had become…

  4. Two Outstanding Investigator Awards Go to Division of Cancer Prevention Grantees | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's Outstanding Investigator Award supports accomplished leaders in cancer research, who are providing significant contributions toward understanding cancer and developing applications that may lead to a breakthrough in biomedical, behavioral, or clinical cancer research. The Award provides up to $600,000 in direct costs per year for 7 years, allowing substantial time for funded investigators to take greater risks and be more adventurous in their research. Two of these awards have been made to Division of Cancer Prevention investigators: |

  5. Chemicals from coal - The Eastman experience. [Anhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Larkins, T.H.

    1986-03-01

    Tennessee Eastman Company is a major producer of chemicals, fibers and plastics. It is located in Kingsport, Tennessee, headquarters for the Eastman Chemicals Division of Eastman Kodak Company. Eastman Companies employ a total of 12,250 people in Kingsport. Other domestic Eastman Chemicals Division plants are located in Texas, South Carolina, Arkansas and New York. The authors began to witness a flow of products from one of the most highly technical and sophisticated chemical processes in operation in the world. The Eastman ''Chemicals-from-Coal'' facility is not a sunfuel plant. To be sure, we are producing syngas from coal, but the syngas is used to produce acetic anhydride. Acetic anhydride is very important to Eastman. This chemical intermediate eventually finds its way into such diverse products as aspirin, cigarette filters, tool handles, and photographic film. It also is used to make other chemical intermediates such as cellulose esters, anhydrides, triacetin, and acetate ester solvents, all of which have a variety of end uses. The chemicals-from-coal project had its inception in the late 1960's when Eastman stepped up its program of energy conservation and began a search for lower cost chemical feedstocks. Our concern started before the national concern caused by a ten-fold increase in petroleum prices during the past decade.

  6. Language and Literature Division, Faculty of Education, Hong Kong University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qin, Xie; Andrews, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The Language and Literature Division (LLD) is the largest of the six divisions of the Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong (HKU). It is currently home to 34 academic staff, who specialize either in the fields of Chinese Language, English Language and/or Literature Education, and to 60 full-time and 28 part-time doctoral students, who are…

  7. THE WESTERN ECOLOGY DIVISION STUDENT INTERN PROGRAM VIDEO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Western Ecology Division of the National Health & Environmental Effects Research Laboratory has produced a 15 minute video documenting the internship program at the Division. The video highlights various CWEST student interns reporting on their experiences at an end-of-the-s...

  8. 1986 Division 17 Presidential Address: Crossroads for Counseling Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazda, George M.

    1987-01-01

    Addresses the American Psychological Association (APA) reorganization plans developed by the Task Force on the Structure of APA, and their impact on Division 17, the Division of Counseling Psychology. Discusses accreditation, specialization, model guidelines for state licensure and graduate education. Expresses concern regarding the Assemblies'…

  9. An Exploration of Challenges Facing Division III Athletic Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engbers, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a basic understanding of the challenges associated with directing athletic programs at NCAA Division III Institutions. Specifically, this study identified the frequency, intensity, and time allocated to common challenges facing the position of the NCAA Division III AD. The challenges were examined using…

  10. An Early History of Difficult Multiplication and Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Jack

    2005-01-01

    Multiplication and division have in general been much more difficult to perform than addition and subtraction. Perhaps, if we could find some device for reducing multiplication and division to addition and subtraction, computational loads could be lightened. One such device is that of logarithms of course. This note outlines another such device…

  11. High energy physics division semiannual report of research activities

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. )

    1991-08-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  12. 75 FR 45154 - National Security Division; Agency Information Collection Activities:

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... National Security Division; Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments... (Foreign Agents). The Department of Justice (DOJ), National Security Division (NSD), will be submitting the... information, please write to U.S. Department of Justice, 10th & Constitution Avenue, NW., National...

  13. ATL Products Division's entries into the computer mass storage marketplace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Fred

    1991-01-01

    The viewgraphs of a discussion on ATL Products Division's entries into the computer mass storage marketplace presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Mass Storage Workshop is included. Topics covered are product evolution including robotics; aperture storage module library; Broadcast Division's TCS2000 Video Cart and TCS90 Videocart System; high density systems business product lines; and storage and library management.

  14. A Division of Research in an Academic Clinical Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traystman, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses in general the importance of a research division, whether basic or clinical, in an academic setting and factors to consider in establishing one. Uses John Hopkins' newly created research division for Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine to specifically address funding and intra- and interdepartmental clinical research programs. (DC)

  15. Photochemically driven redox chemistry induces protocell membrane pearling and division.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ting F; Adamala, Katarzyna; Zhang, Na; Szostak, Jack W

    2012-06-19

    Prior to the evolution of complex biochemical machinery, the growth and division of simple primitive cells (protocells) must have been driven by environmental factors. We have previously demonstrated two pathways for fatty acid vesicle growth in which initially spherical vesicles grow into long filamentous vesicles; division is then mediated by fluid shear forces. Here we describe a different pathway for division that is independent of external mechanical forces. We show that the illumination of filamentous fatty acid vesicles containing either a fluorescent dye in the encapsulated aqueous phase, or hydroxypyrene in the membrane, rapidly induces pearling and subsequent division in the presence of thiols. The mechanism of this photochemically driven pathway most likely involves the generation of reactive oxygen species, which oxidize thiols to disulfide-containing compounds that associate with fatty acid membranes, inducing a change in surface tension and causing pearling and subsequent division. This vesicle division pathway provides an alternative route for the emergence of early self-replicating cell-like structures, particularly in thiol-rich surface environments where UV-absorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could have facilitated protocell division. The subsequent evolution of cellular metabolic processes controlling the thiol:disulfide redox state would have enabled autonomous cellular control of the timing of cell division, a major step in the origin of cellular life. PMID:22665773

  16. 28 CFR 50.6 - Antitrust Division business review procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., which may involve either domestic or foreign commerce. 3. The Division may, in its discretion, refuse to... U.S.C. 18A, and the regulations promulgated thereunder, 16 CFR, part 801. 8. After review of a... nature of action taken by the Division upon the request. (e) This paragraph reflects a...

  17. The Gendered Division of Labor and Family Outcomes in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Lynn Prince

    2004-01-01

    The literature on the predictors of the division of household labor continues to expand, but the effect of this division on family outcomes has not been explored. Using the German SocioEconomic Panel (N= 628), I analyze the effect of men's participation in housework and child care on the likelihood of second birth and divorce. Fathers' greater…

  18. Ploidy-Dependent Unreductional Meiotic Cell Division in Polyploid Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meiosis includes one round of DNA replication and two successive nuclear divisions, i.e. meiosis I (reductional) and meiosis II (equational). This specialized cell division reduces chromosomes in half and generates haploid gametes in sexual reproduction of eukaryotes. It ensures faithful transmiss...

  19. Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Poskanzer, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document.

  20. Importance of data management with statistical analysis set division.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Li, Chan-juan; Jiang, Zhi-wei; Xia, Jie-lai

    2015-11-01

    Testing of hypothesis was affected by statistical analysis set division which was an important data management work before data base lock-in. Objective division of statistical analysis set under blinding was the guarantee of scientific trial conclusion. All the subjects having accepted at least once trial treatment after randomization should be concluded in safety set. Full analysis set should be close to the intention-to-treat as far as possible. Per protocol set division was the most difficult to control in blinded examination because of more subjectivity than the other two. The objectivity of statistical analysis set division must be guaranteed by the accurate raw data, the comprehensive data check and the scientific discussion, all of which were the strict requirement of data management. Proper division of statistical analysis set objectively and scientifically is an important approach to improve the data management quality. PMID:26911044