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Sample records for chemical composition by material content

  1. Nondestructive activation analysis of sample of lunar surface material returned by Luna 16 automatic station. [chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chayko, M.; Sabo, E.

    1974-01-01

    The composition of a sample of lunar surface material returned by the Luna 16 automatic station from the Sea of Fertility was studied, using nondestructive activation analysis. The structure of the returned surface material is inhomogeneous; the surficial material is thin, quite homogeneous, and the granularity increases with depth. Based on grain size, the sample was separated into five zones. The activation analysis was conducted on a sample taken from the friable surficial layer, zone A. The content of Al, Mn, Na, Cr, Co, Fe, and Sc was determined by nondestructive activation analysis of the sample. In determining Cr, Co, Fe, and Sc, the sample was irradiated for 24 hours and cooled for 10 days. Gamma spectra of the samples were recorded with a semiconductor Ge(Li)-detector and a multichannel analyzer, and measurement data were processed with an electronic computer.

  2. Use of radiation effects for a controlled change in the chemical composition and properties of materials by intentional addition or substitution of atoms of a certain kind

    SciTech Connect

    Gurovich, B. A.; Prikhod'ko, K. E. Kuleshova, E. A.; Maslakov, K. I.; Komarov, D. A.

    2013-06-15

    This study is a continuation of works [1-12] dealing with the field developed by the authors, namely, to widen the possibilities of radiation methods for a controlled change in the atomic composition and properties of thin-film materials. The effects under study serve as the basis for the following two methods: selective atom binding and selective atom substitution. Such changes in the atomic composition are induced by irradiation by mixed beams consisting of protons and other ions, the energy of which is sufficient for target atom displacements. The obtained experimental data demonstrate that the changes in the chemical composition of thin-film materials during irradiation by an ion beam of a complex composition take place according to mechanisms that differ radically from the well-known mechanisms controlling the corresponding chemical reactions in these materials. These radical changes are shown to be mainly caused by the accelerated ioninduced atomic displacements in an irradiated material during irradiation; that is, they have a purely radiation nature. The possibilities of the new methods for creating composite structures consisting of regions with a locally changed chemical composition and properties are demonstrated for a wide class of materials.

  3. Estimation of Macronutrient Content in Kindergartens Meals: Food Composition Tables or Chemical Analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Konstansa, Lazarevic; Dusica, Stojanovic; Dragan, Bogdanovic

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The nutrition of children in kindergartens has a great significance for proper growth and development of children. In order to save time and money, the control of macronutrients content is performed by calculations using food composition tables instead of performing a chemical analysis. Methods: We examined the macronutrients content of 240 whole day meals using food composition tables and performed chemical analysis of meals to determine adequacy and validity of food composition tables in calculation of macronutrient contents in kindergarten meals. Findings: We established no correlation (P>0.05) between the value of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Significant difference was established between the average content of proteins (t=2.57; P<0.05), and carbohydrates (t=3.20; P<0.01), but not with the content of fats in the meals (t=1.26; P>0.05) (food composition tables vs chemical analysis). Conclusion: Until we establish new food composition tables, chemical analysis remains the only valid method for assessment of macronutrients content and energy value of a meal in kindergarten. PMID:25793075

  4. Composite-Material Tanks with Chemically Resistant Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    Lightweight composite-material tanks with chemically resistant liners have been developed for storage of chemically reactive and/or unstable fluids . especially hydrogen peroxide. These tanks are similar, in some respects, to the ones described in gLightweight Composite-Material Tanks for Cryogenic Liquids h (MFS-31379), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 58; however, the present tanks are fabricated by a different procedure and they do not incorporate insulation that would be needed to prevent boil-off of cryogenic fluids. The manufacture of a tank of this type begins with the fabrication of a reusable multisegmented aluminum mandrel in the shape and size of the desired interior volume. One or more segments of the mandrel can be aluminum bosses that will be incorporated into the tank as end fittings. The mandrel is coated with a mold-release material. The mandrel is then heated to a temperature of about 400 F (approximately equal to 200 C) and coated with a thermoplastic liner material to the desired thickness [typically approxiamtely equal to 15 mils (approximately equal to 0.38 mm)] by thermal spraying. In the thermal-spraying process, the liner material in powder form is sprayed and heated to the melting temperature by a propane torch and the molten particles land on the mandrel. The sprayed liner and mandrel are allowed to cool, then the outer surface of the liner is chemically and/or mechanically etched to enhance bonding of a composite overwrap. The etched liner is wrapped with multiple layers of an epoxy resin reinforced with graphite fibers; the wrapping can be done either by manual application of epoxy-impregnated graphite cloth or by winding of epoxy-impregnated filaments. The entire assembly is heated in an autoclave to cure the epoxy. After the curing process, the multisegmented mandrel is disassembled and removed from inside, leaving the finished tank. If the tank is to be used for storing hydrogen peroxide, then the liner material should be fluorinated ethylene/propylene (FEP), and one or more FEP O ring(s) should be used in the aluminum end fitting(s). This choice of materials is dictated by experimental observations that pure aluminum and FEP are the only materials suitable for long-term storage of hydrogen peroxide and that other materials tend to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. Other thermoplastic liner materials that are suitable for some applications include nylon 6 and polyethylene. The processing temperatures for nylon 6 are lower than those for FEP. Nylon 6 is compatible with propane, natural gas, and other petroleum-based fuels. Polyethylene is compatible with petroleum- based products and can be used for short-term storage of hydrogen peroxide.

  5. Chemical composition and enzymatic digestibility of sugarcane clones selected for varied lignin content

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The recalcitrance of lignocellulosic materials is a major limitation for their conversion into fermentable sugars. Lignin depletion in new cultivars or transgenic plants has been identified as a way to diminish this recalcitrance. In this study, we assessed the success of a sugarcane breeding program in selecting sugarcane plants with low lignin content, and report the chemical composition and agronomic characteristics of eleven experimental hybrids and two reference samples. The enzymatic digestion of untreated and chemically delignified samples was evaluated to advance the performance of the sugarcane residue (bagasse) in cellulosic-ethanol production processes. Results The ranges for the percentages of glucan, hemicellulose, lignin, and extractive (based on oven-dry biomass) of the experimental hybrids and reference samples were 38% to 43%, 25% to 32%, 17% to 24%, and 1.6% to 7.5%, respectively. The samples with the smallest amounts of lignin did not produce the largest amounts of total polysaccharides. Instead, a variable increase in the mass of a number of components, including extractives, seemed to compensate for the reduction in lignin content. Hydroxycinnamic acids accounted for a significant part of the aromatic compounds in the samples, with p-coumaric acid predominating, whereas ferulic acid was present only in low amounts. Hydroxycinnamic acids with ester linkage to the hemicelluloses varied from 2.3% to 3.6%. The percentage of total hydroxycinnamic acids (including the fraction linked to lignin through ether linkages) varied from 5.0% to 9.2%, and correlated to some extent with the lignin content. These clones released up to 31% of glucose after 72 hours of digestion with commercial cellulases, whereas chemically delignified samples led to cellulose conversion values of more than 80%. However, plants with lower lignin content required less delignification to reach higher efficiencies of cellulose conversion during the enzymatic treatment. Conclusion Some of the experimental sugarcane hybrids did have the combined characteristics of high biomass and high sucrose production with low lignin content. Conversion of glucan to glucose by commercial cellulases was increased in the samples with low lignin content. Chemical delignification further increased the cellulose conversion to values of more than 80%. Thus, plants with lower lignin content required less delignification to reach higher efficiencies of cellulose conversion during the enzymatic treatment. PMID:22145819

  6. Determination of Porosity Content in Composites by Micrograph Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kite, A. H.; Hsu, D. K.; Barnard, D. J.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes a method to determine the porosity content of a composite lay-up by processing micrograph images of the laminate. The porosity content of a composite structure is critical to the overall strength and performance of the structure. The determination of the porosity content is often done by the acid digestion method. The acid digestion method requires the use of chemicals and costly equipment that may not be available. The image processing method developed utilizes a free software package to process micrograph images of the test sample. The process can be automated with simple scripts within the free software. The results from the image processing method are shown to correlate well with the acid digestion results.

  7. Materials analysis by ultrasonics: Metals, ceramics, composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex (editor)

    1987-01-01

    Research results in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing structural materials from metals and ceramics to composites are presented. General topics covered by the conference included: status and advances in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing material microstructures and mechanical properties; status and prospects for ultrasonic measurements of microdamage, degradation, and underlying morphological factors; status and problems in precision measurements of frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation for materials analysis; procedures and requirements for automated, digital signal acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation; incentives for analytical ultrasonics in materials research and materials processing, testing, and inspection; and examples of progress in ultrasonics for interrelating microstructure, mechanical properties, and dynamic response.

  8. Aqueous fluid composition in CI chondritic materials: Chemical equilibrium assessments in closed systems

    E-print Network

    Rhoads, James

    Aqueous fluid composition in CI chondritic materials: Chemical equilibrium assessments in closed, Composition Satellites, Composition Meteorites a b s t r a c t Solids of nearly solar composition have interacted with aqueous fluids on carbonaceous asteroids, icy moons, and trans-neptunian objects

  9. Chemical composition of cottonseed affected by cropping management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed is a valuable raw material for a range of food, animal feed, and industrial (such as adhesives) products. Chemical composition is one of the critical parameters to evaluate cottonseed's quality and potential end use. However, the information on the impacts of cropping management practices...

  10. Transient assembly of active materials fueled by a chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekhoven, Job; Hendriksen, Wouter E.; Koper, Ger J. M.; Eelkema, Rienk; van Esch, Jan H.

    2015-09-01

    Fuel-driven self-assembly of actin filaments and microtubules is a key component of cellular organization. Continuous energy supply maintains these transient biomolecular assemblies far from thermodynamic equilibrium, unlike typical synthetic systems that spontaneously assemble at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we report the transient self-assembly of synthetic molecules into active materials, driven by the consumption of a chemical fuel. In these materials, reaction rates and fuel levels, instead of equilibrium composition, determine properties such as lifetime, stiffness, and self-regeneration capability. Fibers exhibit strongly nonlinear behavior including stochastic collapse and simultaneous growth and shrinkage, reminiscent of microtubule dynamics.

  11. The effect of Zn contents on phase composition, chemical stability and cellular bioactivity in Zn-Ca-Si system ceramics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengtie; Ramaswamy, Yogambha; Chang, Jiang; Woods, Joy; Chen, Yiqing; Zreiqat, Hala

    2008-11-01

    Ca-Si system ceramics, in particular CaSiO(3) ceramics, are regarded as potential bioactive bone repair/regeneration material. However, their high dissolution rate limits their biological applications. The aim of this study was to incorporate Zinc (Zn) into the Ca-Si system ceramics to produce part (at 10 and 20% Zn) or complete (at 50% Zn) new crystal phase (hardystonite: Ca(2)ZnSi(2)O(7)) with improved chemical stability and cellular activity. Zn-Ca-Si ceramics with four Zn contents (0, 10, 20, and 50%) were successfully prepared by sintering sol-gel-derived Zn-Ca-Si powder compacts. A new pure crystal phase Ca(2)ZnSi(2)O(7) was formed only when 50% Zn was added. The chemical stability of Zn-Ca-Si ceramics was evaluated by soaking in simulating body fluid (SBF), and the ion release from ceramics and the change in pH values of the SBF were measured. Their ability to form apatite in SBF was determined by analyzing the surface phase composition and morphology of the ceramics using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicated that, with the increase of Zn contents, the chemical stability of ceramics increased while the apatite-formation ability decreased. The ability of Zn-Ca-Si ceramics to support attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of the human bone osteoblastic-like cells (HOB) was assessed using SEM, MTS, and alkaline phosphate activity assays, respectively. Zn-Ca-Si ceramics supported HOB attachment and their proliferation increased with the increase of Zn content. ALP activity of HOB on Zn-Ca-Si ceramics with 50% Zn (Ca(2)ZnSi(2)O(7)) was the highest among the levels obtained for the four ceramics tested. Taken together, Ca(2)ZnSi(2)O(7) ceramics possessed the best chemical stability and cellular bioactivity in Zn containing Ca-Si ceramics, indicating their potential application in skeletal tissue regeneration. PMID:18464251

  12. Chemical characteristics, fatty acid composition and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of traditional Greek yogurts.

    PubMed

    Serafeimidou, Amalia; Zlatanos, Spiros; Laskaridis, Kostas; Sagredos, Angelos

    2012-10-15

    Many studies with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) indicate that it has a protective effect against mammary cancer. Because dairy products are the most important dietary sources of CLA, we have investigated the CLA concentrations and additionally the fatty acid profiles and chemical composition of several commercial, traditional, Greek yogurts from different geographical origin. The fat content of yogurts was in the order of goatcontent on lipid basis compared to full-fat yogurts. Samples from mountain areas showed average c-9, t-11 CLA content higher than those from prairie districts. The highest amounts of saturated fatty acids (SFA) were found in low-fat yogurts, of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in sheep milk yogurts and of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in low-fat cow milk yogurts. PMID:23442628

  13. The effects of space radiation on a chemically modified graphite-epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, S. M.; Herakovich, C. T.; Sykes, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the space environment on the engineering properties and chemistry of a chemically modified T300/934 graphite-epoxy composite system are characterized. The material was subjected to 1.0 x 10 to the 10th power rads of 1.0 MeV electron irradiation under vacuum to simulate 30 years in geosynchronous earth orbit. Monotonic tension tests were performed at room temperature (75 F/24 C) and elevated temperature (250 F/121 C) on 4-ply unidirectional laminates. From these tests, inplane engineering and strength properties (E sub 1, E sub 2, Nu sub 12, G sub 12, X sub T, Y sub T) were determined. Cyclic tests were also performed to characterize energy dissipation changes due to irradiation and elevated temperature. Large diameter graphite fibers were tested to determine the effects of radiation on their stiffness and strength. No significant changes were observed. Dynamic-mechanical analysis demonstrated that the glass transition temperature was reduced by 50 F(28 C) after irradiation. Thermomechanical analysis showed the occurrence of volatile products generated upon heating of the irradiated material. The chemical modification of the epoxy did not aid in producing a material which was more radiation resistant than the standard T300/934 graphite-epoxy system. Irradiation was found to cause crosslinking and chain scission in the polymer. The latter produced low molecular weight products which plasticize the material at elevated temperatures and cause apparent material stiffening at low stresses at room temperature.

  14. Refinery piping fires resulting from variations in chemical composition of piping materials

    SciTech Connect

    Setterlund, R.B.

    1996-07-01

    A number of refinery fires in recent years are traceable to variations in the chemical composition of piping materials. These fires are typically more destructive than those due to other causes and can take place without warning. Some, but not all, were the result of the inadvertent use of carbon steel in alloy steel piping systems. Others were the result of alloy welds in carbon steel systems while still others were due to variations in residual elements leading to anomalous corrosion behavior. Recommendations are given on areas of refinery units where the greatest need for close control of material composition exists.

  15. Effects of intra- and inter-laminar resin content on the mechanical properties of toughened composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grande, Dodd H.; Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Avery, William B.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1991-01-01

    Composite materials having multiphase toughened matrix systems and laminate architectures characterized by resin-rich interlaminar layers (RIL) have been the subject of much recent attention. Such materials are likely to find applications in thick compressively loaded structures such as the keel area of commercial aircraft fuselages. The effects of resin content and its interlaminar and intralaminar distribution on mechanical properties were investigated with test and analysis of two carbon-epoxy systems. The RIL was found to reduce the in situ strengthening effect for matrix cracking in laminates. Mode 2 fracture toughness was found to increase with increasing RIL thickness over the range investigated, and Mode 1 interlaminar toughness was negligibly affected. Compressive failure strains were found to increase with increasing resin content for specimens having no damage, holes, and impact damage. Analytical tools for predicting matrix cracking of off-axis plies and damage tolerance in compression after impact (CAI) were successfully applied to materials with RIL.

  16. Structure and chemical composition of the dentin-enamel junction analyzed by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desoutter, A.; Salehi, H.; Slimani, A.; Marquet, P.; Jacquot, B.; Tassery, H.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-02-01

    The structure and chemical composition of the human dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) was studied using confocal Raman microscopy - a chemical imaging technique. Slices of non-fixed, sound teeth were prepared with an Isomet diamond saw and scanned with Witec Alpha300R system. The combination of different characteristics peaks of phosphate, carbonate and organic matrix (respectively 960, 1072 and 1545 cm-1), generates images representing the chemical composition of the DEJ area. Images are also calculated using peak ratios enabling precise determination of the chemical composition across the DEJ. Then, with two characterized peaks, different pictures are calculated to show the ratio of two components. The images of the spatial distribution of mineral phosphate (960cm-1) to organic matrix (1545 cm-1) ratios, mineral carbonates (1072cm-1) to mineral phosphate ratios; and mineral carbonates to organic matrix ratios were reconstructed. Cross sectional and calculated graphic profile show the variations of the different chemical component ratios through the enamel and the dentin. Phosphate to organic ratio shows an accumulation of organic material under the enamel surface. The cross sectional profile of these pictures shows a high phosphate content compared to enamel in the vicinity of the DEJ. The Confocal Raman imaging technique can be used to further provide full chemical imaging of tooth, particularly of the whole DEJ and to study enamel and dentin decay.

  17. Composite material

    DOEpatents

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  18. Grained composite materials prepared by combustion synthesis under mechanical pressure

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D. (Davis, CA); Holt, Joseph B. (San Jose, CA); Kingman, Donald D. (Danville, CA); Munir, Zuhair A. (Davis, CA)

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  19. TGA-DTA and chemical composition study of raw material of Bikaner region for electrical porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tak, S. K.; Shekhawat, M. S.; Mangal, R.

    2013-06-01

    Porcelains are vitrified and a fine grained ceramic product, used either glazed or unglazed and is often manufactured from a tri-axial body mix of clays, quartz and alkaline feldspar. Physical properties associated with porcelain include those of permeability, high strength, hardness, glassiness, durability, whiteness, translucence, resonance, brittleness, high resistance to the passage of electricity, high resistance to thermal shock and high elasticity[1,2]. Porcelain insulators are made from three raw materials; clay; feldspar and quartz. For porcelain manufacture the clay is categorized in two groups; ball clay and kaolin, each of which plays an important role, either in the preparation of the product or in the properties of the finished products. The following research highlights the importance that suits these materials for their contributions to the final properties of the product. Keeping this view a TGA-DTA and chemical composition of these raw materials were observed and these materials are found suitable for production of Electrical Porcelain.

  20. Aqueous fluid composition in CI chondritic materials: Chemical equilibrium assessments in closed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.

    2012-08-01

    Solids of nearly solar composition have interacted with aqueous fluids on carbonaceous asteroids, icy moons, and trans-neptunian objects. These processes altered mineralogy of accreted materials together with compositions of aqueous and gaseous phases. We evaluated chemistry of aqueous solutions coexisted with CI-type chondritic solids through calculations of chemical equilibria in closed water-rock-gas systems at different compositions of initial fluids, water/rock mass ratios (0.1-1000), temperatures (<350 °C), and pressures (<2 kbars). The calculations show that fluid compositions are mainly affected by solubilities of solids, the speciation of chlorine in initial water-rock mixtures, and the occurrence of Na-bearing secondary minerals such as saponite. The major species in modeled alkaline solutions are Na+, Cl-, CO32-,HCO3-, K+, OH-, H2, and CO2. Aqueous species of Mg, Fe, Ca, Mn, Al, Ni, Cr, S, and P are not abundant in these fluids owing to low solubility of corresponding solids. Typical NaCl type alkaline fluids coexist with saponite-bearing mineralogy that usually present in aqueously altered chondrites. A common occurrence of these fluids is consistent with the composition of grains emitted from Enceladus. Na-rich fluids with abundant CO32-,HCO3-, and OH- anions coexist with secondary mineralogy depleted in Na. The Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 type fluids could form via accretion of cometary ices. NaOH type fluids form in reduced environments and may locally occur on parent bodies of CR carbonaceous chondrites. Supposed melting of accreted HCl-bearing ices leads to early acidic fluids enriched in Mg, Fe and other metals, consistent with signs of low-pH alteration in chondrites. Neutralization of these solutions leads to alkaline Na-rich fluids. Sulfate species have negligible concentrations in closed systems, which remain reduced, especially at elevated pressures created by forming H2 gas. Hydrogen, CO2, and H2O dominate in the gaseous phase, though the abundance of methane cannot be fairly estimated.

  1. Enantiomeric Selective Adsorption of Amino Acid by Polysaccharide Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Reid, Scott A.

    Enantiomeric Selective Adsorption of Amino Acid by Polysaccharide Composite Materials Simon Duri, was found to exhibit remarkable enantiomeric selectivity toward the adsorption of amino acids. The highest adsorption capacity and enantiomeric selectivity are exhibited by 100% CS. A racemic amino acid can

  2. Effect of chemical degradation followed by toothbrushing on the surface roughness of restorative composites

    PubMed Central

    VOLTARELLI, Fernanda Regina; dos SANTOS-DAROZ, Claudia Batitucci; ALVES, Marcelo Corrêa; CAVALCANTI, Andrea Nóbrega; MARCHI, Giselle Maria

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of the exposure to food-simulating liquids prior to brushing simulation on the surface roughness of five composite materials (Quixfil, Filtek Supreme, Esthet-X, Filtek Z250, Tetric Ceram). Material and methods Twenty cylinders (5 mm diameter and 4 mm height) of each composite were randomly allocated to 4 groups (n=5), according to the food-simulating liquid in which they were immersed for 7 days at 37ºC: artificial saliva, heptane, citric acid, and ethanol. After this period, the top surface of composite cylinders was submitted to 7,500 brushing cycles (200 g load). Measurements of the surface roughness (Ra, µm) were carried out before and after the exposure to the chemicals/brushing simulation. Changes on the morphology of composite surfaces were observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The statistical analysis (ANOVA with cofactor / Tukey's test, ?=5%) detected a significant interaction between solutions and composite resins. Esthet-X, Filtek Z250 and Tetric Ceram were not affected by the food-simulating liquids/toothbrushing. Citric acid and ethanol increased the surface roughness of Quixfil and Filtek Supreme, respectively. SEM images corroborate the surface roughness findings, demonstrating the negative effect from chemical solutions and mechanical abrasion. Conclusions The surface roughness of composite resin materials are differently affected by the food-simulating solutions, depending on the immersion media. PMID:21308289

  3. Optimum conditions for composites fiber coating by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, S.K.; Nilson, R.H.

    1997-04-01

    A combined analytical and numerical method is employed to optimize process conditions for composites fiber coating by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). For a first-order deposition reaction, the optimum pressure yielding the maximum deposition rate at a preform center is obtained in closed form and is found to depend only on the activation energy of the deposition reaction, the characteristic pore size, and properties of the reactant and product gases. It does not depend on the preform specific surface area, effective diffusivity or preform thickness, nor on the gas-phase yield of the deposition reaction. Further, this optimum pressure is unaltered by the additional constraint of a prescribed deposition uniformity. Optimum temperatures are obtained using an analytical expression for the optimum value along with numerical solutions to the governing transport equations. These solutions account for both diffusive and advective transport, as well as both ordinary and Knudsen diffusion. Sample calculations are presented for coating preform fibers with boron nitride.

  4. (210)Pb content in natural gas pipeline residues ("black-powder") and its correlation with the chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Godoy, José Marcus; Carvalho, Franciane; Cordilha, Aloisio; Matta, Luiz Ernesto; Godoy, Maria Luiza

    2005-01-01

    The present work was carried out to assess the (210)Pb content in "black-powder" found in pigging operations on gas pipelines in Brazil, in particular, on the Campos Basin gas pipeline. Additionally, the chemical composition of such deposits was determined and an eventual correlation with (210)Pb concentration evaluated. Typical "black-powder" generated in the natural gas pipeline from Campos Basin oilfield contains mainly iron oxide ( approximately 81%) and residual organic matter ( approximately 9%). The (210)Pb content ranges from 4.9 to 0.04k Bqkg(-1) and seems to be inversely correlated with the distance to the platforms. On the other hand, (226)Ra concentration is higher on the pipeline branch between the platform and the onshore installations. (228)Ra was only observed in few samples, in particular, in the samples with the highest (226)Ra content. PMID:15885858

  5. The Chemical Nature of the Fiber/resin Interface in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diefendorf, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites are considered. The nature of the fiber structure and the interaction that occurs at the interface between fiber and matrix are emphasized. Composite toughness can be improved by increased axial tensile and compressive strengths in the fibers. The structure of carbon fibers indicates that the fiber itself can fail transversely, and different transverse microstructures could provide better transverse strengths. The higher surface roughness of lower modulus and surface-treated carbon fibers provides better mechanical interlocking between the fiber and matrix. The chemical nature of the fiber surface was determined, and adsorption of species on this surface can be used to promote wetting and adhesion. Finally, the magnitude of the interfacial bond strength should be controlled such that a range of composites can be made with properties varying from relatively brittle and high interlaminar shear strength to tougher but lower interlaminar shear strength.

  6. Chemical Compositions of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckrone, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In 1835, in a famously inaccurate forecast, the French philosopher Auguste Comte wrote of stars that, `We understand the possibility of determining their shapes, their distances, their sizes and their movements; whereas we would never know how to study by any means their chemical composition…'. At the close of the 20th century the accurate measurement of the abundances of the chemical elements in...

  7. Chemical composition and energy content of deep-sea calanoid copepods in the Western North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Matsuishi, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    Condition factor index [CFI=1000×DW/(PL) 3; DW: dry weight, PL: prosome length], water content, carbon (C), nitrogen (N), ash and energy content were determined on a total of 69 copepod species caught from the mesopelagic (500-1000 m), upper-bathypelagic (1000-2000 m), lower-bathypelagic (2000-3000 m) and abyssopelagic (3000-5000 m) zones of the western subarctic Pacific. Resultant data were grouped into these four sampling zones, four developmental stage/sex categories (C4, C5 and C6 females and males), three feeding types (carnivore, detritivore and suspension feeder), or two reaction speed groups by the presence/absence of myelinated sheath enveloping axons (fast and slow reacting species). Zone-structured data showed the overall ranges were 3.8-4.6 mm for PL, 1.6-2.6 mg for DW, 21.4-25.0 for CFI, 75.0-78.6% of wet weight (WW) for water, 51.3-53.7% of DW for C, 7.7-8.8% of DW for N, 6.2-7.0 (by weight) for C/N, 6.9-9.6% of DW for ash and 25.3-27.4 J mg -1 DW for energy. Among these components, N and ash exhibited significant between-zone differences characterized by gradual decrease downward for the former, and only the upper-bathypelagic zone>abyssopelagic zone for the latter. Stage/sex-structured data showed no significant differences among them, but energy content of C5 was higher than that of C6 females. From the analyses of feeding type-structured data, carnivores were shown to have lower water, N, ash, but higher C, C/N and energy contents than suspension feeders do. Reaction speed-structured data indicated that slow-reacting species have significantly higher water but lower CFI, C, N and energy contents than fast-reacting species. Designating these grouping criteria, PL and DW as independent variables, the attributes of these variables to the CFI, chemical composition or energy contents were evaluated by stepwise-multiple regression analysis, showing the most pronounced effect of suspension-feeder, followed by the presence of myelinated sheath, DW, C6 females and the abyssopelagic zone. Further analysis of zone-structured data, by adding epipelagic copepod data from identical thermal habitats (Arctic/Antarctic waters), revealed a more marked decline in N content from the epipelagic zone to the abyssopelagic zone, accompanied by an increase in C/N ratios downward. The decline in N (=protein or muscle) contents with depth cannot be explained by the "visual interactions" hypotheses being proposed for the metabolism of pelagic visual predators, but is consistent with the "predation-mediated selection" hypothesis for the metabolism of pelagic copepods.

  8. Composite material dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  9. Characterisation of chemical composition and energy content of green waste and municipal solid waste from Greater Brisbane, Australia.

    PubMed

    Hla, San Shwe; Roberts, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The development and deployment of thermochemical waste-to-energy systems requires an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of waste streams. Despite Australia's growing interest in gasification of waste streams, no data are available on their thermochemical properties. This work presents, for the first time, a characterisation of green waste and municipal solid waste in terms of chemistry and energy content. The study took place in Brisbane, the capital city of Queensland. The municipal solid waste was hand-sorted and classified into ten groups, including non-combustibles. The chemical properties of the combustible portion of municipal solid waste were measured directly and compared with calculations made based on their weight ratios in the overall municipal solid waste. The results obtained from both methods were in good agreement. The moisture content of green waste ranged from 29% to 46%. This variability - and the tendency for soil material to contaminate the samples - was the main contributor to the variation of samples' energy content, which ranged between 7.8 and 10.7MJ/kg. The total moisture content of food wastes and garden wastes was as high as 70% and 60%, respectively, while the total moisture content of non-packaging plastics was as low as 2.2%. The overall energy content (lower heating value on a wet basis, LHVwb) of the municipal solid waste was 7.9MJ/kg, which is well above the World Bank-recommended value for utilisation in thermochemical conversion processes. PMID:25882791

  10. Fatigue Crack Measurement in Composite Materials by Ultrasonic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Russell, Samuel S.; Suits, Michael W.; Workman, Gary L.; Watson, Jason M.; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The nondestructive detection of intra-ply microcracking in unlined pressure vessels fabricated from composite materials is critical to ensuring mission success. Microcracking in composite structures due to combined fatigue and cryogenic thermal loading can be very troublesome to detect in-service and when it begins to link through the thickness can cause leakage and failure of the structure. These leaks may lead to loss of pressure/propellant, increased risk of explosion and possible cryo-pumping. The work presented herein develops a method and an instrument to locate and measure intraply fatigue cracking through the thickness of laminated composite material by means of correlation with ultrasonic resonance. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy provides measurements which are, sensitive to both the microscopic and macroscopic properties of an object. Elastic moduli, acoustic attenuation, and geometry can all be probed. The approach is based on the premise of half-wavelength resonance. The method injects a broadband ultrasonic wave into the test structure using a swept frequency technique. This method provides dramatically increased energy input into the test article, as compared to conventional spike pulsed ultrasonics. This relative energy increase improves the ability to measure finer details in the materials character, such as micro-cracking and porosity. As the micro-crack density increases, more interactions occur with the higher frequency (small wavelength) components of the signal train causing the spectrum to shift toward lower frequencies. Preliminary experiments have verified a measurable effect on the resonance spectrum of the ultrasonic data to detect microcracking. Methods involving self organizing neural networks and other clustering algorithms show that the resonance ultrasound signatures from composites vary with the degree of microcracking and can be separated and identified.

  11. Chemical Fingerprinting of Materials Developed Due to Environmental Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Doris A.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Instrumental chemical analysis methods are developed and used to chemically fingerprint new and modified External Tank materials made necessary by changing environmental requirements. Chemical fingerprinting can detect and diagnose variations in material composition. To chemically characterize each material, fingerprint methods are selected from an extensive toolbox based on the material's chemistry and the ability of the specific methods to detect the material's critical ingredients. Fingerprint methods have been developed for a variety of materials including Thermal Protection System foams, adhesives, primers, and composites.

  12. Recycling By Solvolysis Thermosetting Composite Materials Of Sustainable Surface Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveux, Géraldine; Le Gal La Salle, Eric; Bailleul, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    A solvolysis process is studied to degrade an unsaturated polyester resin based on DCPD (dicyclopentadiene) and crosslinked with styrene, as the matrix of a composite material reinforced with long glass fibers. The study presented here investigates in particular the hydrolysis in conditions below the critical point of water (T<374° C and P<221bar) in a batch reactor. Process window and parameter influences were studied by a Design of Experiments (DOE) approach (1). A tar-like substance issued from thermal degradations is formed in greater or lesser quantities depending on the operating conditions, and coats the fibers. The appearance of the composite samples and the degree of conversion for the degradation at 250° C lead us to make a parallel with osmosis phenomena to explain the initiation mechanism of the degradation.

  13. Recycling By Solvolysis Thermosetting Composite Materials Of Sustainable Surface Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveux, Geraldine; Le Gal La Salle, Eric; Bailleul, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-17

    A solvolysis process is studied to degrade an unsaturated polyester resin based on DCPD (dicyclopentadiene) and crosslinked with styrene, as the matrix of a composite material reinforced with long glass fibers. The study presented here investigates in particular the hydrolysis in conditions below the critical point of water (T<374 deg. C and P<221bar) in a batch reactor. Process window and parameter influences were studied by a Design of Experiments (DOE) approach (1). A tar-like substance issued from thermal degradations is formed in greater or lesser quantities depending on the operating conditions, and coats the fibers. The appearance of the composite samples and the degree of conversion for the degradation at 250 deg. C lead us to make a parallel with osmosis phenomena to explain the initiation mechanism of the degradation.

  14. Variation in Content Coverage by Classroom Composition: An Analysis of Advanced Math Course Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covay, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Everyone knows that there is racial inequality in achievement returns from advanced math; however, they do not know why black students and white students taking the same level of math courses are not leaving with the same or comparable skill levels. To find out, the author examines variation in course coverage by the racial composition of the…

  15. Microstructure and properties of multiphase and functionally graded materials prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.Y.

    1996-05-01

    The synthesis of multiphase and functionally graded materials by chemical vapor deposition is discussed from a perspective of controlling their composition and microstructure at a nano-scale level, and ultimately, tailoring their material properties. Prior research is briefly reviewed to address the current state of this novel material concept. Recent experimental results relating to controlling the selected properties of two multiphase systems, TiN + MoS{sub 2} and NiAl + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, are described to illustrate this concept`s potential merits and challenges for use in realistic applications.

  16. A review of laser machining of composites and the chemical by-product formed by such processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Daryl J.

    The laser-cutting of polymers and polymer-based composites is reviewed with emphasis placed on the chemical by-products formed by such processes. It has been reported that toxic and potentially carcinogenic materials are formed; therefore, appropriate control measures need to be incorporated into the engineering design of laser-cutting facilities to maintain air quality of the workplace within the guidelines established by governmental regulatory agencies.

  17. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  18. Chemical Composition and Fatty Acid Content of Some Spices and Herbs under Saudi Arabia Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jasass, Fahad Mohammed; Al-Jasser, Mohammed Saud

    2012-01-01

    Some Saudi herbs and spices were analyzed. The results indicated that mustard, black cumin, and cress seeds contain high amount of fat 38.45%, 31.95% and 23.19%, respectively, as compared to clove (16.63%), black pepper (5.34%) and fenugreek (4.51%) seeds. Cress, mustard, black cumin and black pepper contain higher protein contents ranging from 26.61 to 25.45%, as compared to fenugreek (12.91%) and clove (6.9%). Crude fiber and ash content ranged from 6.36 to 23.6% and from 3.57 to 7.1%, respectively. All seeds contain high levels of potassium (ranging from 383 to 823?mg/100g), followed by calcium (ranging from 75 to 270?mg/100g), Magnesium (ranged from 42 to 102?mg/100g) and iron (ranged from 20.5 to 65?mg/100g). However, zinc, manganese and copper were found at low levels. The major fatty acids in cress and mustard were linolenic acid (48.43%) and erucic acid (29.81%), respectively. The lenoleic acid was the major fatty acid in black cumin, fenugreek, black pepper and clove oils being 68.07%, 34.85%, 33.03% and 44.73%, respectively. Total unsaturated fatty acids were 83.24, 95.62, 86.46, 92.99, 81.34 and 87.82% for cress, mustard, black cumin, fenugreek, black pepper and clove, respectively. The differences in the results obtained are due to environmental factors, production areas, cultivars used to produce seeds and also due to the different methods used to prepare these local spices. PMID:23319888

  19. Chemical composition and fatty acid content of some spices and herbs under Saudi Arabia conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Jasass, Fahad Mohammed; Al-Jasser, Mohammed Saud

    2012-01-01

    Some Saudi herbs and spices were analyzed. The results indicated that mustard, black cumin, and cress seeds contain high amount of fat 38.45%, 31.95% and 23.19%, respectively, as compared to clove (16.63%), black pepper (5.34%) and fenugreek (4.51%) seeds. Cress, mustard, black cumin and black pepper contain higher protein contents ranging from 26.61 to 25.45%, as compared to fenugreek (12.91%) and clove (6.9%). Crude fiber and ash content ranged from 6.36 to 23.6% and from 3.57 to 7.1%, respectively. All seeds contain high levels of potassium (ranging from 383 to 823 ?mg/100 g), followed by calcium (ranging from 75 to 270 ?mg/100 g), Magnesium (ranged from 42 to 102 ?mg/100 g) and iron (ranged from 20.5 to 65 ?mg/100 g). However, zinc, manganese and copper were found at low levels. The major fatty acids in cress and mustard were linolenic acid (48.43%) and erucic acid (29.81%), respectively. The lenoleic acid was the major fatty acid in black cumin, fenugreek, black pepper and clove oils being 68.07%, 34.85%, 33.03% and 44.73%, respectively. Total unsaturated fatty acids were 83.24, 95.62, 86.46, 92.99, 81.34 and 87.82% for cress, mustard, black cumin, fenugreek, black pepper and clove, respectively. The differences in the results obtained are due to environmental factors, production areas, cultivars used to produce seeds and also due to the different methods used to prepare these local spices. PMID:23319888

  20. Interplanetary dust particles, quantitative material properties and bulk chemical composition of meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J.

    Meteors fill the gap between interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteorites that are collected for laboratory analyses. When interacting with the atmosphere meteors leave potentially extractable information on mass (size), density, internal texture (massive or aggregates), sizes of building blocks (meteor fragmentation behavior), and bulk composition of "coherent entities" (light curves). Most comet nuclei and many undifferentiated asteroids are rubble piles that could potentially produce meteors ranging from several hundreds of meter-sized pre-protoplanets, boulders (several meters to sub-meter-size), cm/mm-size pebbles and dust. The hypothesis of hierarchical dust accretion describes the mineralogical variations and chemical changes of heterogeneous, micron to mm-sized meteors and constituent grain size. The initially accreting dusts had a non-chondritic composition. Dust in "dirty-ice" or "icy-dirt" was latest-accreted nebular dust once most of the evolved dust had accreted into pre-protoplanets where it was subjected to aqueous, thermal, or both, modification. The hypothesis can no longer be traced when dust +/- ice aggregates composition but will be texturally and mineralogically heterogeneous unless parent body processes had modified or erased initial heterogeneity when forming new, secondary, minerals that would decrease bulk porosity while increasing material strength. It is generally assumed that such modifications will require a sustained thermal regime but the metastable nature of sub-millimeter grains would allow modification well below equilibrium temperatures. After modification or lithification of accretionary-evolved pre-proto-planets, the resulting rubble pile will preserve a fractal nature from the largest down to the smallest dust aggregates. Its mm-sized and larger meteors would range from Si-rich proto-CI aggregates to fully-hydrated CI, possible also CM, boulders. Mapping the properties listed at the top for individual "dust and small boulder" meteors from comet nuclei in different meteor streams might produce a picture of accretion and (pre)protoplanetary dust modification from these near-surface source sample to asses differences between and among active, dormant and extinct rubble piles from the Oort cloud, KBOs and NEAs, even on-orbit meteoroid modification. Ironically the smallest, thus faintest, meteors would be of greatest interest. Yet, larger meteoroids will remain the only option to learn the nature of the pebbles and boulders that could be CI/CM like, or much-less modified precursor materials.

  1. Synthesis of steel slag ceramics: chemical composition and crystalline phases of raw materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-hua; Wei, Wei; Bai, Hao; Zhang, Xu; Cang, Da-qiang

    2015-03-01

    Two types of porcelain tiles with steel slag as the main raw material (steel slag ceramics) were synthesized based on the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 and CaO-MgO-SiO2 systems, and their bending strengths up to 53.47 MPa and 99.84 MPa, respectively, were obtained. The presence of anorthite, ?-quartz, magnetite, and pyroxene crystals (augite and diopside) in the steel slag ceramics were very different from the composition of traditional ceramics. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) results illustrated that the addition of steel slag reduced the temperature of extensive liquid generation and further decreased the firing temperature. The considerable contents of glass-modifying oxide liquids with rather low viscosities at high temperature in the steel slag ceramic adobes promoted element diffusion and crystallization. The results of this study demonstrated a new approach for extensive and effective recycling of steel slag.

  2. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, C.-T.A.; Morton, D.M.; Little, M.G.; Kistler, R.; Horodyskyj, U.N.; Leeman, W.P.; Agranier, A.

    2008-01-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  3. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus; Morton, Douglas M.; Little, Mark G.; Kistler, Ronald; Horodyskyj, Ulyana N.; Leeman, William P.; Agranier, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms. PMID:18362343

  4. [Effect of processing on the chemical contents and hepatic and renal toxicity of rhubarb studied by canonical correlation analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Bo; Ma, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Ping; Jin, Cheng; Sun, Yu-Qi; Xiao, Xiao-He; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Zhou, Can-Ping

    2009-08-01

    In this article, canonical correlation analysis was used to explore the relationship between the toxicity-attenuating effect and the variation of chemical contents in rhubarb caused by processing. With quasi-acute toxicity test, the difference of hepatic and renal toxicity to mice with the processed materials of rhubarb was researched. The chemical contents of anthraquinones and tannins in rhubarb were measured by UV-vis spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that there were toxic effects to liver and kidney in mice after repeated intragastric administration of rhubarb and its processed materials for 14 days at a dosage of 76 g x kg(-1). The toxic effect of processed materials was much lower than crude drug. With canonical correlation analysis, the sequence of the hepatic and renal toxicity of chemical contents in rhubarb were found as follows: total anthraquinone glycosides (AQGs) > tannins (Tns) > total anthraquinones (AQs); aloe-emodin (AE) > physcione (Ph) > rhein (Rn) > emodin (Ed) > chrysophanol (Ch) and AEG > PhG > ChG > EdG > RnG of glycosyl-anthraquinone. It could be concluded that processing would attenuate the toxicity of crude drug of rhubarb. The toxicity-attenuating effect might be correlated to the decline of the contents of both anthraquinone glycosides and tannins, especially the aloe-emodin glycoside and physcione glycoside. The results also suggested that the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine (CREA) would be useful to monitor the hepatic and renal toxicity of rhubarb. PMID:20055157

  5. Silica-titania composite aerogel photocatalysts by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zu, Guoqing; Shen, Jun; Wang, Wenqin; Zou, Liping; Lian, Ya; Zhang, Zhihua

    2015-03-11

    Silica-titania composite aerogels were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds. This novel deposition process was based on chemisorption of partially hydrolyzed titanium alkoxides from solution onto silica nanoparticle surfaces and subsequent hydrolysis and condensation to afford titania nanoparticles on the silica surface. The titania is homogeneously distributed in the silica-titania composite aerogels, and the titania content can be effectively controlled by regulating the deposition cycles. The resultant composite aerogel with 15 deposition cycles possessed a high specific surface area (SSA) of 425 m(2)/g, a small particle size of 5-14 nm, and a large pore volume and pore size of 2.41 cm(3)/g and 18.1 nm, respectively, after heat treatment at 600 °C and showed high photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation of methylene blue under UV-light irradiation. Its photocatalytic activity highly depends on the deposition cycles and heat treatment. The combination of small particle size, high SSA, and enhanced crystallinity after heat treatment at 600 °C contributes to the excellent photocatalytic property of the silica-titania composite aerogel. The higher SSAs compared to those of the reported titania aerogels (<200 m(2)/g at 600 °C) at high temperatures combined with the simple method makes the silica-titania aerogels promising candidates as photocatalysts. PMID:25664480

  6. The wettability of carbon/TiB2 composite materials by aluminum in cryolite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, K. D.; Toguri, J. M.

    1991-10-01

    Both pure TiB2 and carbon/TiB2 composites are potential cathode materials for aluminum reduction cells. An important requirement for this application is that the material be wetted by aluminum in cryolite melts. A sessile drop technique combined with X-ray radiography was used to measure the contact angle formed between aluminum and pure hot-pressed TiB2, carbon/TiB2 composite, graphite, and a carbonaceous cement in cryolite melts. Pure hot-pressed TiB2 was found to be completely wetted by aluminum in cryolite melts. Graphite and the carbonaceous cement were nonwetted by aluminum in cryolite melts, the contact angles being in the range of 144 to 158 deg. The contact angle formed by aluminum on the carbon/TiB2 composite in cryolite melts exhibited time dependency. It was proposed the time dependency was due to (1) removal of contamination from the composite surface and (2) removal of aluminum from the drop. The wettability of the composite material increased as the TiB2 content increased.

  7. Development of ammonia sensors by using conductive polymer/hydroxyapatite composite materials.

    PubMed

    Huixia, Li; Yong, Liu; Lanlan, Luo; Yanni, Tan; Qing, Zhang; Kun, Li

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the gas sensing properties, hydroxyapatite (HAp)-based composites were prepared by mixing with different contents of conductive polymers: polypyrrole (PPy) and polyaniline (PAni). The compositions, microstructures and phase constitutions of polymer/HAp composites were characterized, and the sensing properties were studied using a chemical gas sensing (CGS-8) system. The results showed that, compared to pure HAp, the sensitivities of the composites to ammonia were improved significantly. 5%PPy/HAp and 20%PAni/HAp composites exhibited the best sensitivities to ammonia, and the sensitivities at 500ppm were 86.72% and 86.18%, respectively. Besides, the sensitivity of 5%PPy/HAp at 1000ppm was up to 90.7%. Compared to pure PPy and PAni, the response and the recovery time of 5%PPy/HAp and 20%PAni/HAp at 200ppm were shortened several times, and they were 24s/245s and 15s/54s, respectively. In addition, the composites showed a very high selectivity to ammonia. The mechanism for the enhancement of the sensitivity to ammonia was also discussed. The polymer/HAp composites are very promising in applications of ammonia sensors. PMID:26652394

  8. Chemical Composition by the APXS along the Downhill Traverse of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit at Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, J.; Dreibus, G.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B.C.; Cohen, B.; McCoy, T.; Ming, D.W.; Mittlefehldt, D.W.; Yen, A.; Athena Science Team

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit continues to determine the elemental composition of samples at Gusev Crater. Starting around sol 600 the rover descended Husband Hill, which is part of the Columbia Hills, visited the inner basin with a large dune field, called 'El Dorado', and parked at Low Ridge to conserve energy during the martian winter. Many unique samples were discovered by the instruments onboard Spirit during her downhill traverse. Here, we report only on the chemical data obtained by the APXS. The compositions of some of the soil samples are comparable to the mean soil determined along the earlier traverse. However, a light-toned subsurface sample (disturbed by the rover wheels), called Dead Sea Samra , showed the highest sulfur content of all soil samples, the lowest Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Zn, among the lowest Si and P, and among the highest Cr, Fe and Ni. Assuming ferric sulfate as a major mineral, large amounts of a pure silica phase must be present. Color and quantity of Dead Sea Samra resemble somewhat an earlier soil called Paso Robles , though the latter is a mixture of sulfates with phosphate-rich soil. Manganese in Dead Sea Samra is so low that the Fe/Mn ratio exceeds 300, a value that has never been found previously on Mars (Fe/Mn ratio of 46 for Gusev basalts), indicating that only Fe(3+) occurs. The dune field El Dorado contained granulated material that exhibited the highest Mg and Ni concentrations and the lowest S and Cl compared to all other soils implying an enrichment of olivine-rich sands. Two outcrops, called Algonquin and Comanche , revealed compositions that differ significantly from those of earlier outcrops as they have the highest concentrations of Mg, Fe, and Ni (except for Ni in Independence) and the lowest of Al, K (detection limit), Ca, and Ti of all brushed and almost all abraded rocks. Normative estimates assign them the highest olivine contents ever found for martian rocks and a very mafic nature based on their high Mg/(Mg+Fe) and low Al, Ca and Na. Their significantly high Ni contents point to a different source than the Gusev plains basalts. The elemental compositions of samples encountered during the downhill traverse revealed a larger chemical diversity of the Columbia Hills than the uphill trek already published.

  9. Compositions for enhancing hydroysis of cellulosic material by cellulolytic enzyme compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2014-09-30

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising a GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and an organic compound comprising a carboxylic acid moiety, a lactone moiety, a phenolic moiety, a flavonoid moiety, or a combination thereof, wherein the combination of the GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and the organic compound enhances hydrolysis of a cellulosic material by a cellulolytic enzyme compared to the GH61 polypeptide alone or the organic compound alone. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  10. Comparison of Chemical Composition of Complex Disinfection Byproduct (DBP) Mixtures Produced by Different Treatment Methods - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of the chemical composition of complex DBP mixtures, produced by different drinking water treatment processes, are essential to generate toxicity data required for assessing their risks to humans. For mixture risk assessments, whole mixture toxicology studies generally a...

  11. Comparison of Chemical Composition of Complex Disinfection Byproduct (DBP) Mixtures Produced by Different Treatment Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of the chemical composition of complex DBP mixtures, produced by different drinking water treatment processes, are essential to generate toxicity data required for assessing their risks to humans. For mixture risk assessments, whole mixture toxicology studies generally a...

  12. Optimization model coupling both chemical compositions and high-temperature characteristics of sintering materials for sintering burden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke-jiang; Zhang, Jian-liang; Liu, Zheng-jian; Su, Bu-xin; Kong, Ling-tan; Yang, Tian-jun

    2014-03-01

    We developed a mathematical optimization model coupling chemical compositions and high-temperature characteristics of sintering materials, targeting the best quality and lowest cost. The simplex algorithm was adopted to solve this model. Four kinds of imported iron ores, two kinds of Chinese iron ore concentrates, and two kinds of fluxes were selected to verify both the model and the algorithm. The results confirmed the possibility of considering both chemical compositions and high-temperature characteristics of iron ores in the optimization model. This model provides a technical roadmap to obtain a precise mathematical correlation between the lowest cost and the grade of iron in sinters based on the condition of given raw materials, which can provide a reference to adjust the grade of iron in the sintering process for enterprise.

  13. Inspection of composite materials by laser-ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Monchalin, J.P.; Neron, C.; Vaudreuil, G.

    1995-10-01

    Laser-ultrasonics, a technique that uses lasers for the generation and detection of ultrasound circumvents a number of limitations associated with conventional ultrasonics and offers a unique method for inspecting polymer-matrix composite materials. The technique operates at a distance of several feet or meters from the inspected part. The normalcy requirement of classical ultrasonics is eliminated, since generation occurs at the surface of the material and detection is performed directly off its surface, so parts with complex geometries can be more easily inspected. In this paper, the authors describe the system that has been developed, which comprises a high power short pulse laser for ultrasound generation, a long pulse receiving laser for ultrasound detection, a demodulating interferometer, an optical scanner and a data analysis system for data acquisition and processing. Following many tests performed on composite parts in the laboratory, the authors present demonstration tests performed with this system on a CF-18 aircraft in a maintenance hangar. These tests show that the technology is now sufficiently advanced to be readily applicable to the inspection of detached components following manufacturing and for the in-service inspection of aircrafts. Recent developments of quantitative models which describe the generation of ultrasound in composite materials are outlined, as well as on-going improvements to the detection sensor.

  14. Optical composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Beecroft, L.L.; Ober, C.K.; Barber, D.B.

    1995-12-31

    Optical quality composite materials can be useful for many applications. This work concerns optical quality composite films constructed from very small (<100 nm) particles of optically functional material embedded in a matrix of the same refractive index (RI). The particles impart their optical properties, while the matrix allows for processing of films. The initial optical composite studied contained Cr-forsterite (Cr-Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), a tunable solid state laser material in the attractive near-IR regime (1167-1345 nm). Small Cr-forsterite particles were synthesized by firing preceramic dispersion polymerization beads, and were embedded in unusually high RI polymeric matrix materials. Work to make optical amplification measurements is underway. This composite concept can be extended to other optically interesting materials.

  15. Study on the chemical composition features of Longquan celadon excavated from the Chuzhou site of Huai'an City in Jiangsu Province by EDXRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Feng, Song-Lin; Feng, Xiang-Qian; Xu, Qing; Yan, Ling-Tong; Ma, Bo; Huo, Hua

    2011-07-01

    A mass of Longquan celadon shards were excavated from the Chuzhou site of Huai'an City in Jiangsu Province, China. These celadon shards were fired during the period of the Late Yuan Dynasty to the Tianshun era of the Ming Dynasty, as identified by archaeologists at Nanjing Museum. In order to research the chemical composition features of this ancient celadon porcelain, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) for non-destructive analysis was used to determine the chemical composition of the porcelain body and glaze in these shards. The results indicate that Ti and Fe in the body of Longquan celadon are characteristic elements which can distinguish porcelain produced during the Late Yuan Dynasty from those produced in the Ming Dynasties. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) show that different body and glaze raw materials were used for the production of porcelain in different periods and the raw materials of the body and glaze are also different for various vessel shapes. The chemical compositions in the porcelain body of civilian ware are slightly different. The imperial and civilian Longquan celadon porcelains produced during the Hongwu era to the Tianshun era of the Ming Dynasty are distinguishable by the MnO, Fe2O3, Rb2O and SrO content in their porcelain glaze.

  16. Chemical composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. W.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical composition of Mars is estimated from the cosmochemical model of Ganapathy and Anders (1974) with additional petrological and geophysical constraints. The model assumes that planets and chondrites underwent the same fractionation processes in the solar nebula, and constraints are imposed by the abundance of the heat-producing elements, U, Th and K, the volatile-rich component and the high density of the mantle. Global abundances of 83 elements are presented, and it is noted that the mantle is an iron-rich garnet wehrlite, nearly identical to the bulk moon composition of Morgan at al. (1978) and that the core is sulfur poor (3.5% S). The comparison of model compositions for the earth, Venus, Mars, the moon and a eucrite parent body suggests that volatile depletion correlates mainly with size rather than with radial distance from the sun.

  17. Defects, strain relaxation, and compositional grading in high indium content InGaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazioti, C.; Papadomanolaki, E.; Kehagias, Th.; Walther, T.; Smalc-Koziorowska, J.; Pavlidou, E.; Komninou, Ph.; Karakostas, Th.; Iliopoulos, E.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the structural properties of a series of high alloy content InGaN epilayers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, employing the deposition temperature as variable under invariant element fluxes. Using transmission electron microscopy methods, distinct strain relaxation modes were observed, depending on the indium content attained through temperature adjustment. At lower indium contents, strain relaxation by V-pit formation dominated, with concurrent formation of an indium-rich interfacial zone. With increasing indium content, this mechanism was gradually substituted by the introduction of a self-formed strained interfacial InGaN layer of lower indium content, as well as multiple intrinsic basal stacking faults and threading dislocations in the rest of the film. We show that this interfacial layer is not chemically abrupt and that major plastic strain relaxation through defect introduction commences upon reaching a critical indium concentration as a result of compositional pulling. Upon further increase of the indium content, this relaxation mode was again gradually succeeded by the increase in the density of misfit dislocations at the InGaN/GaN interface, leading eventually to the suppression of the strained InGaN layer and basal stacking faults.

  18. Chemical composition and mineralogy of borate from Rio Grande deposit, Uyuni (Bolivia) as raw materials for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen Vargas, Julio; Arancibia, Jony Roger Hans; Alfonso, Pura; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Parcerisa, David; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-05-01

    Bolivia has large tailings as a result of the historic and present-day Sn mining activity developed extensively in that country. Tailings produced in these mining activities have an appropriate composition to reprocess them and make silicate glass and glass-ceramics, obtaining the valorization of wastes and reducing the visual and chemical impact. Reprocessing the wastes to make glass and glass-ceramics prevents the leaching of heavy metals from those wastes because they are retained in the structure of the glass. Furthermore, an option to increase the economic value of these glasses is the introduction of boron and other additives to produce borosilicate glass. In this study a characterization of the Rio Grande borate deposit for its use in the manufacture of borosilicate glass is presented. Mineralogy was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR); textures were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The Rio Grande borate deposit is located in an area of about 50 km2 close to the south of the Salar of Uyuni, in the Río Grande de Lípez Delta. Borates occur in the contact between fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine sediments from water raising the surface by capillarity. The borates crop out in an extent area but towards the west they are covered by fluvio-deltaic sediments, which can be up to 2 m thick. These borates occur as lenses 50-100 m in diameter and layers up to 1 m thick. They usually form brittle nodules with a cotton-ball texture. Chemical composition of the Rio Grande borates is CaO, 11.82-13.83 wt%; Na2O, 13.50-19.35 wt%; K2O, 0.05- 1.04 wt%; MgO, 0.42-1.46 wt%; B2O3, 36.21-42.60 wt%; SiO2, up to 0.53 wt% and SO2, up to 0.60 wt%. Trace elements are low: Sr content is between 151-786 ppm, Al 12-676 ppm, Mn between 1-17 ppm, As 2-10 ppm and Fe between 9-376 ppm. The most abundant borate mineral in this deposit is ulexite (NaCaB5.5H20), halite can reach up to 17 wt% and gypsum up to 1.2 wt.%. Calcite occurs in minor contents. Ulexite exhibits a fibrous morphology with fibers oriented parallel each other. Purity of borates from the Rio Grande deposits makes them suitable for the most restrictive applications. Chemistry of these borates is in accordance with the necessary composition for obtaining borosilicate glasses. Acknowledgements: This work was partly financed by the project AECID: A3/042750/11, and the SGR 2009SGR-00444.

  19. Chemical composition and physical quality characteristics of Ghanaian cocoa beans as affected by pulp pre-conditioning and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Afoakwa, Emmanuel Ohene; Quao, Jennifer; Takrama, Jemmy; Budu, Agnes Simpson; Saalia, Firibu Kwesi

    2013-12-01

    Investigations were conducted to evaluate the effects of pod storage (as a means of pulp preconditioning) and fermentation on the chemical composition and physical characteristics of Ghanaian cocoa beans. A 4?×?2 full factorial design with factors as pod storage (0, 7, 14, 21 days) and cocoa treatment (fermented and unfermented) were conducted. Samples were analyzed for their chemical composition (moisture, crude fat, crude protein, ash and carbohydrate content) and mineral content using standard analytical methods. The physical qualities of the beans were analyzed for their proportions of cocoa nibs, shells and germ. Fermentation and increasing pod storage resulted in significant (P?content of the beans while carbohydrate content increased from 15.47% to 24.93% with both treatments. As well, increasing pod storage and fermentation significantly (P?content of the beans from while reductions in Mg and K occurred. Amongst the minerals studied, potassium was the most abundant mineral followed by magnesium, phosphorus and calcium in the fermented cocoa beans. Proportion of cocoa nibs also increased from with increasing pod storage and fermentation whiles reductions in shell content and no appreciable changes in germ proportions were noted. PMID:24426021

  20. Semiconductor nanocrystal composite materials and devices

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jinwook, 1966-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis and characterization of semiconductor nanocrystal (quantum dot, QD) embedded composite materials and possible device applications of the resulting luminescent materials. Chemically ...

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  2. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  3. Making ceramic- metal composite material by friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, M.; Balasubramanian, K.; Chakkingal, Uday; Prasad Rao, K.

    2015-02-01

    An innovative method to add ceramic particles in the metal matrix to make ceramic metal matrix composite was experimented and proved with alumina powder as particles and AE42 magnesium alloy as matrix. The alloy was subjected to friction stir processing and alumina particles were added through the processing tool. AE42 magnesium alloy has primary ?-Mg phase of 100-150 micron grain size and secondary phase of 10-50 micron size as precipitates. Al2RE, Al11RE3 and Al17Mg12 are main secondary phases in the form of precipitates. Alumina powder was selected with average particles size of 5 micron. For processing parameters of 300-400 rpm tool speed, 15-20 mm/minute traverse speed and a threaded pin geometry; composites with fine distribution of second phase precipitates and alumina particles in the matrix were observed. Mechanical and microstructural characterization revealed uniform properties in longitudinal and transverse directions. Composite material has superior mechanical properties than the magnesium alloy. Distribution of particles was up to the length of tool pin. Tool pin geometry, feed rate and volume percentage of alumina particles, processing speed and tool rpm on the effect of mechanical and micro-structural properties were analyzed in detail.

  4. Effects of coal rank on the chemical composition and toxicological activity of coal liquefaction materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Dauble, D.D.

    1986-05-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and toxicological testing of coal liquefaction materials from the EDS and H-Coal processes operated using different ranks of coal. Samples of recycle solvent from the bottoms recycle mode of the EDS direct coal liquefaction process derived from bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite coals were analyzed. In addition, the H-Coal heavy fuel oils derived from bituminous and sub-bituminous coals were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsoprtion column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry. The toxicological activity of selected samples was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay, an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity, and a static bioassy with Daphnia magna for aquatic toxicity of the water-soluble fractions. 22 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. Light energy transmission through composite influenced by material shades.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Mendes, Wilson Batista; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of different composite resin shades on light energy transmission through the composite, hardness and cross-link density (CLD). The composite Filtek Z250 was used in shades A1, A2, A3, A3.5 and A4. A quartz tungsten halogen light curing unit was used at an irradiance of 900 mW/cm(2). Thirty specimens were made for each shade. Light energy transmission that passed through the composite was calculated (n=10). Differences in Knoop hardness between the top and bottom (DKH) of the same specimen were calculated (n=10). The Knoop hardness value for each surface was recorded as the average of three indentations (KHN(1)). Thereafter, the specimens were soaked in absolute ethanol for 24hr at room temperature, and hardness was again determined (KHN(2)). The CLD was estimated by the softening effect produced by ethanol, i.e., by decrease in hardness. The percentage of decrease in KHN(2) compared with KHN(1) (PD) in the same specimen was then calculated for both surfaces (n=10). The data were submitted to an ANOVA in different tests (Light energy transmission, Knoop hardness and CLD). The irradiance of light that passed through composite shade A1 (408 mW/cm(2)) was statistically greater than that through shade A2 (376 mW/cm(2)), and was greater through A2 than A3 (359 mW/cm(2)) and through A3 than A3.5 (327 mW/cm(2)); A3.5 showed no statistical difference when compared to A4 (324 mW/cm(2)). The DKH of A4 (20.56%) was not statistically higher than that of A3.5 (20.14%), which was greater than that of A3 (14.08%), A2 (11.65%) and A1 (9.06%). There was no statistical difference in CLD. Darker shades had a significant influence on light energy transmission through dental resin composite and its hardness. However, CLD was not affected by darker dental composite shades. PMID:20179393

  6. DPPH free-radical scavenging ability, total phenolic content, and chemical composition analysis of forty-five kinds of essential oils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiao-Fen; Wang, Yu-Kang; Yih, Kuang-Hway

    2008-01-01

    Forty-five kinds of commonly used essential oils were employed to investigate the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging ability and total phenolic content of major chemical compositions. The free-radical scavenging ability and total phenolic content of cinnamon leaf and clove bud essential oils are the best among these essential oils. One-half milliliter of cinnamon leaf and clove bud essential oils (10 mg/ml EtOH) are shown to be 96.74% and 96.12% of the DPPH (2.5 ml, 1.52x10(-4) M) free-radical scavenging ability, respectively. Their EC50 (effective concentrations) are 53 and 36 (microg/ml). One milligram per milliliter of cinnamon leaf, clove bud, and thyme red essential oils were shown to be 420, 480, and 270 (mg/g of GAE) of total phenolic content, respectively. Eugenol in cinnamon leaf and clove bud essential oils (82.87% and 82.32%, respectively) were analyzed by GC-MS. It is clear that the amounts of the phenol compounds in essential oils and the DPPH free-radical scavenging ability are in direct proportion. PMID:19156333

  7. Chemical recycling of scrap composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald E.; Salas, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    There are no well-developed technologies for recycling composite materials other than grinding to produce fillers. New approaches are needed to reclaim these valuable resources. Chemical or tertiary recycling, conversion of polymers into low molecular weight hydrocarbons for reuse as chemicals or fuels, is emerging as the most practical means for obtaining value from waste plastics and composites. Adherent Technologies is exploring a low-temperature catalytic process for recycling plastics and composites. Laboratory results show that all types of plastics, thermosets as well as thermoplastics, can be converted in high yields to valuable hydrocarbon products. This novel catalytic process runs at 200 C, conversion times are rapid, the process is closed and, thus, nonpolluting, and no highly toxic gas or liquid products have been observed so no negative environmental impact will result from its implementation. Tests on reclamation of composite materials show that epoxy, imide, and engineering thermoplastic matrices can be converted to low molecular weight hydrocarbons leaving behind the reinforcing fibers for reuse as composite reinforcements in secondary, lower-performance applications. Chemical recycling is also a means to dispose of sensitive or classified organic materials without incineration and provides a means to eliminate or reduce mixed hazardous wastes containing organic materials.

  8. Chemical Composition of Different Botanical Origin Honeys Produced by Sicilian Black Honeybees (Apis mellifera ssp. sicula).

    PubMed

    Mannina, Luisa; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Vista, Silvia; Tenore, Gian Carlo; Daglia, Maria

    2015-07-01

    In 2008 a Slow Food Presidium was launched in Sicily (Italy) for an early warning of the risk of extinction of the Sicilian native breed of black honeybee (Apis mellifera L. ssp sicula). Today, the honey produced by these honeybees is the only Sicilian honey produced entirely by the black honeybees. In view of few available data regarding the chemical composition of A. mellifera ssp. sicula honeys, in the present investigation the chemical compositions of sulla honey (Hedysarum coronarium L.) and dill honey (Anethum graveolens L.) were studied with a multimethodological approach, which consists of HPLC-PDA-ESI-MSn and NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, three unifloral honeys (lemon honey (obtained from Citrus limon (L.) Osbeck), orange honey (Citrus arantium L.), and medlar honey (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl)), with known phenol and polyphenol compositions, were studied with NMR spectroscopy to deepen the knowledge about sugar and amino acid compositions. PMID:25730368

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Various topics relating to composite structural materials for use in aircraft structures are discussed. The mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers, carbon fiber-epoxy interface bonds, composite fractures, residual stress in high modulus and high strength carbon fibers, fatigue in composite materials, and the mechanical properties of polymeric matrix composite laminates are among the topics discussed.

  10. Effect of cooking on the chemical composition of low-salt, low-fat Wakame/olive oil added beef patties with special reference to fatty acid content.

    PubMed

    López-López, I; Cofrades, S; Cañeque, V; Díaz, M T; López, O; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2011-09-01

    Changes in chemical composition, with special reference to fatty acids, as affected by cooking, were studied in low-salt (0.5%)/low-fat patties (10%) with added Wakame (3%) and partial or total replacement of pork backfat with olive oil-in-water emulsion. The addition of Wakame and olive oil-in-water emulsion improved (P < 0.05) the binding properties and the cooking retention values of moisture, fat, fatty acids and ash, which were close to 100%. Partial and total replacement of animal fat with olive oil-in-water emulsion reduced (P < 0.05) saturated fatty acids (SFAs), while total replacement also reduced (P < 0.05) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFAs) contents. The fatty acid concentration in cooked patties was affected by product formulation. Unlike the case of all animal fat patties, when olive oil was added the cooking process increased (P < 0.05) SFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and PUFA n-3 (linolenic acid) and n-6 (linoleic acid) contents. Cooked formulated patties with seaweed and partial or total replacement of pork backfat by oil-in-water emulsion and with seaweed added were less calorie-dense and had lower SFAs levels, while samples with olive oil had higher MUFAs levels. PMID:21497025

  11. Chemical composition of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, J.W.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The composition of Mars has been calculated from the cosmochemical model of Ganapathy and Anders (1974) which assumes that planets and chondrites underwent the same 4 fractionation processes in the solar nebula. Because elements of similar volatility stay together in these processes, only 4 index elements (U, Fe, K and Tl or Ar36) are needed to calculate the abundances of all 83 elements in the planet. The values chosen are U = 28 ppb, K = 62 ppm (based on K U = 2200 from orbital ??-spectrometry and on thermal history calculations by Tokso??z and Hsui (1978) Fe = 26.72% (from geophysical data), and Tl = 0.14 ppb (from the Ar36 and Ar40 abundances measured by Viking). The mantle of Mars is an iron-rich [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.77] garnet wehrlite (?? = 3.52-3.54 g/cm3), similar to McGetchin and Smyth's (1978) estimate but containing more Ca and Al. It is nearly identical to the bulk Moon composition of Morgan et al. (1978b). The core makes up 0.19 of the planet and contains 3.5% S-much less than estimated by other models. Volatiles have nearly Moon-like abundances, being depleted relative to the Earth by factors of 0.36 (K-group, Tcond = 600-1300 K) or 0.029 (Tl group, Tcond < 600 K). The water abundance corresponds to a 9 m layer, but could be higher by as much as a factor of 11. Comparison of model compositions for 5 differentiated planets (Earth, Venus, Mars, Moon, and eucrite parent body) suggests that volatile depletion correlates mainly with size rather than with radial distance from the Sun. However, the relatively high volatile content of shergottites and some chondrites shows that the correlation is not simple; other factors must also be involved. ?? 1979.

  12. Prediction of chemical contaminants and food compositions by near infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prediction of Food Adulteration by Infrared Spectroscopy H. Zhuang Quality and Safety Assessment Research Unit, ARS-USDA, 950 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605 Food adulteration, including both chemical contamination and composition alternation, has been one of major quality and/or safety c...

  13. Visualizing Chemical Compositions and Kinetics of Sol-Gel by Near-Infrared Multispectral Imaging

    E-print Network

    Reid, Scott A.

    Visualizing Chemical Compositions and Kinetics of Sol-Gel by Near-Infrared Multispectral Imaging, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 Kinetics of sol-gel formation were studied using the recently developed near-infrared (NIR) multispectral im- aging instrument. This imaging spectrometer possesses all the advantages

  14. Influence of Bulk Chemical Composition on Relative Sensitivity Factors for 55Mn/52Cr by SIMS: Implications for the 53Mn-53Cr Chronometer

    SciTech Connect

    Matzel, J; Jacobsen, B; Hutcheon, I D; Kita, N; Ryerson, F J

    2009-09-09

    The {sup 53}Mn-{sup 53}Cr systematics of meteorite samples provide an important high resolution chronometer for early solar system events. Accurate determination of the initial abundance of {sup 53}Mn ({tau}{sub 1/2} = 3.7 Ma) by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is dependent on properly correcting for differing ion yields between Mn and Cr by use of a relative sensitivity factor (RSF). Ideal standards for SIMS analysis should be compositionally and structurally similar to the sample of interest. However, previously published Mn-Cr studies rely on few standards (e.g., San Carlos olivine, NIST 610 glass) despite significant variations in chemical composition. We investigate a potential correlation between RSF and bulk chemical composition by determining RSFs for {sup 55}Mn/{sup 52}Cr in 11 silicate glass and mineral standards (San Carlos olivine, Mainz glasses KL2-G, ML3B-G, StHs6/80-G, GOR128-G, BM90/21-G, and T1-G, NIST 610 glass, and three LLNL pyroxene-composition glasses). All standards were measured on the Cameca ims-3f ion microprobe at LLNL, and a subset were also measured on the Cameca ims-1270 ion microprobe at the Geological Survey of Japan. The standards cover a range of bulk chemical compositions with SiO{sub 2} contents of 40-71 wt.%, FeO contents of 0.05-20 wt.% and Mn/Cr ratios between 0.4 and 58. We obtained RSF values ranging from 0.83 to 1.15. The data obtained on the ims-1270 ion microprobe are within {approx}10% of the RSF values obtained on the ims-3f ion microprobe, and the RSF determined for San Carlos olivine (0.86) is in good agreement with previously published data. The typical approach to calculating an RSF from multiple standard measurements involves making a linear fit to measured {sup 55}Mn/{sup 52}Cr versus true {sup 55}Mn/{sup 52}Cr. This approach may be satisfactory for materials of similar composition, but fails when compositions vary significantly. This is best illustrated by the {approx}30% change in RSF we see between glasses with similar Mn/Cr ratios but variable Fe and Na content. We are developing an approach that uses multivariate analysis to evaluate the importance of different chemical components in controlling the RSF and predict the RSF of unknowns when standards of appropriate composition are not available. Our analysis suggests that Fe, Si, and Na are key compositional factors in these silicate standards. The RSF is positively correlated with Fe and Si and negatively correlated with Na. Work is currently underway to extend this analysis to a wider range of chemical compositions and to evaluate the variability of RSF on measurements obtained by NanoSIMS.

  15. Metal removal of cyanobacterial exopolysaccharides by uronic acid content and monosaccharide composition.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Sahlan; Aslim, Belma; Suludere, Zekiye; Tan, Sema

    2014-01-30

    In the present study, chromium, cadmium and metal mixed (chromium+cadmium) removal and its association with exopolysaccharides and uronic acids production in Synechocystis sp. BASO671 were investigated. It was investigated that BASO671 showed different removal ability when exposed to each metal solely and mixed metal. EPS production by BASO671 was increased following exposure to 15 and 35 ppm Cr(VI), Cd(II) and Cr(VI)+Cd(II). Monomer composition of EPS was changed after metal treatment. Uronic acid contents of metal treated cells were higher than control cells of each isolate. Also, glucuronic acid content and galactronic acid content of EPS correlated with uronic acid contents of cells. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis confirmed that a considerable amount of metals had precipitated on the cell surface. Fourier transform infrared spectrum analysis of EPSs indicated the presence of CH and CO group, which may serve as binding sites for divalent cations. PMID:24299773

  16. Iatrogenic Damage to the Periodontium by Chemicals and Dental Materials.

    PubMed

    Justus, Biju; Sirajuddin, Syed; Gundapaneni, Veenadharini; Biswas, Shriparna; Mn, Kumuda; Mp, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity and tissue reactions to dental materials are receiving more attention as a wide variety of materials are used and as federal agencies demonstrate more concern in this area. A further indication of the importance of the interaction of materials and tissues is the development of recommended standard practices and tests for the biological interaction of materials. PMID:26312092

  17. Iatrogenic Damage to the Periodontium by Chemicals and Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Biju; Sirajuddin, Syed; Gundapaneni, Veenadharini; Biswas, Shriparna; MN, Kumuda; MP, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity and tissue reactions to dental materials are receiving more attention as a wide variety of materials are used and as federal agencies demonstrate more concern in this area. A further indication of the importance of the interaction of materials and tissues is the development of recommended standard practices and tests for the biological interaction of materials. PMID:26312092

  18. Lipid content and composition of coffee brews prepared by different methods.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, W M; Hollywood, R; O'Grady, E; Stavric, B

    1993-04-01

    The lipid content and composition of boiled, filtered, dripped, Turkish and espresso coffees prepared from roasted beans of Coffea arabica and Coffea robusta, and of coffees prepared from different brands of instant coffee were examined. The lipid content varied with the method of preparation. While coffee brews filtered through filter paper contained less than 7 mg lipids, those prepared by boiling without filtering and espresso coffee reached 60-160 mg lipids/150-ml cup. Coffee brew filtered through a metal screener contained 50 mg lipids/150-ml cup. Although the lipid content varied, the method of preparation of the brew and filtration had no important influence on the lipid composition. During paper filtration lipids remained mainly in spent coffee grounds, and the brew and filter paper retained only 0.4 and 9.4%, respectively, of the total lipids recovered. However, the lipids in the brew, filter paper and spent coffee grounds had the same profile, indicating that there was no preferential retention of a particular lipid component in filter paper. Triglycerides and diterpene alcohol esters were the major lipid classes in coffee brewed from ground coffee beans, and ranged from 86.6 to 92.9 and 6.5 to 12.5% of total lipids, respectively. For coffee brews made from instant coffee, the levels of these two lipid classes were 96.4-98.5 and 1.6-3.6%, respectively. The lipid contents of both regular and decaffeinated instant coffees varied slightly from one brand to the other, and ranged from 1.8 to 6.6 mg/150-ml cup. PMID:8477916

  19. 27 CFR 19.326 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Spirits content of chemicals produced. 19.326 Section 19.326...DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production Chemical By-Products § 19.326 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals...

  20. Active metal-matrix composites with embedded smart materials by ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnlen, Ryan; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the development of active aluminum-matrix composites manufactured by Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM), an emerging rapid prototyping process based on ultrasonic metal welding. Composites created through this process experience temperatures as low as 25 °C during fabrication, in contrast to current metal-matrix fabrication processes which require temperatures of 500 °C and above. UAM thus provides unprecedented opportunities to develop adaptive structures with seamlessly embedded smart materials and electronic components without degrading the properties that make these materials and components attractive. This research focuses on developing UAM composites with aluminum matrices and embedded shape memory NiTi, magnetostrictive Galfenol, and electroactive PVDF phases. The research on these composites will focus on: (i) electrical insulation between NiTi and Al phases for strain sensors, investigation and modeling of NiTi-Al composites as tunable stiffness materials and thermally invariant structures based on the shape memory effect; (ii) process development and composite testing for Galfenol-Al composites; and (iii) development of PVDF-Al composites for embedded sensing applications. We demonstrate a method to electrically insulate embedded materials from the UAM matrix, the ability create composites containing up to 22.3% NiTi, and their resulting dimensional stability and thermal actuation characteristics. Also demonstrated is Galfenol-Al composite magnetic actuation of up to 54 ?(see manuscript), and creation of a PVDF-Al composite sensor.

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse properties of fiber constituents in composites, fatigue in composite materials, matrix dominated properties of high performance composites, numerical investigation of moisture effects, numerical investigation of the micromechanics of composite fracture, advanced analysis methods, compact lug design, and the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes projects are discussed.

  2. Effect of packaging materials on the chemical composition and microbiological quality of edible mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) grown on cassava peels.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Oluwakemi; Obadina, Adewale; Idowu, Micheal; Adegunwa, Mojisola; Kajihausa, Olatundun; Sanni, Lateef; Asagbra, Yemisi; Ashiru, Bolanle; Tomlins, Keith

    2015-07-01

    Edible fungi such as mushrooms are highly perishable and deteriorate few days after harvest due to its high moisture content and inability to maintain their physiological status. In this study, the effect of packaging materials on the nutritional composition of mushroom cultivated from cassava peels was investigated. Mushroom samples were dried at 50°C in a cabinet dryer for 8 h. The dried mushroom samples packaged in four different packaging materials; high density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene (PP), laminated aluminum foil (LAF), high density polyethylene under vacuum (HDPEV) were stored at freezing (0°C) temperatures for 12 weeks. Samples were collected at 2-week intervals and analyzed for proximate composition (carbohydrate, protein, fat, fiber, ash, moisture), mineral content (calcium, potassium), vitamin C content, and microbiological qualities (total aerobic count, Pseudomonal count, Coliform count, Staphylococcal count, Salmonella count) using the standard laboratory procedures. Carbohydrate, protein, fat content of dried mushrooms packaged in HDPE at freezing temperature ranged from 45.2% to 53.5%, 18.0% to 20.3%, and 3.2% to 4.3%, while mushrooms in polypropylene ranged from 45.2% to 53.5%, 18.5% to 20.3%, 2.6% to 4.3%. Carbohydrate, protein, fat of mushroom in LAF ranged from 47.8% to 53.5%, 17.3% to 20.3%, and 3.3% to 4.3%, respectively, while carbohydrate, protein, fat of mushroom in HDPEV ranged from 51.1% to 53.5%, 19.5% to 20.3%, and 3.5% to 4.3%. Microbiological analysis showed that total aerobic count, Pseudomonal count, and Staphyloccocal count of dried mushroom ranged from 2.3 to 3.8 log cfu/g, 0.6 to 1.1 log cfu/g, and 0.4 to 0.5 log cfu/g, respectively. In conclusion, dried mushroom in HDPE packaged under vacuum at freezing temperature retained the nutritional constituents than those packaged with other packaging materials. PMID:26288720

  3. Effect of packaging materials on the chemical composition and microbiological quality of edible mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) grown on cassava peels

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, Oluwakemi; Obadina, Adewale; Idowu, Micheal; Adegunwa, Mojisola; Kajihausa, Olatundun; Sanni, Lateef; Asagbra, Yemisi; Ashiru, Bolanle; Tomlins, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Edible fungi such as mushrooms are highly perishable and deteriorate few days after harvest due to its high moisture content and inability to maintain their physiological status. In this study, the effect of packaging materials on the nutritional composition of mushroom cultivated from cassava peels was investigated. Mushroom samples were dried at 50°C in a cabinet dryer for 8 h. The dried mushroom samples packaged in four different packaging materials; high density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene (PP), laminated aluminum foil (LAF), high density polyethylene under vacuum (HDPEV) were stored at freezing (0°C) temperatures for 12 weeks. Samples were collected at 2-week intervals and analyzed for proximate composition (carbohydrate, protein, fat, fiber, ash, moisture), mineral content (calcium, potassium), vitamin C content, and microbiological qualities (total aerobic count, Pseudomonal count, Coliform count, Staphylococcal count, Salmonella count) using the standard laboratory procedures. Carbohydrate, protein, fat content of dried mushrooms packaged in HDPE at freezing temperature ranged from 45.2% to 53.5%, 18.0% to 20.3%, and 3.2% to 4.3%, while mushrooms in polypropylene ranged from 45.2% to 53.5%, 18.5% to 20.3%, 2.6% to 4.3%. Carbohydrate, protein, fat of mushroom in LAF ranged from 47.8% to 53.5%, 17.3% to 20.3%, and 3.3% to 4.3%, respectively, while carbohydrate, protein, fat of mushroom in HDPEV ranged from 51.1% to 53.5%, 19.5% to 20.3%, and 3.5% to 4.3%. Microbiological analysis showed that total aerobic count, Pseudomonal count, and Staphyloccocal count of dried mushroom ranged from 2.3 to 3.8 log cfu/g, 0.6 to 1.1 log cfu/g, and 0.4 to 0.5 log cfu/g, respectively. In conclusion, dried mushroom in HDPE packaged under vacuum at freezing temperature retained the nutritional constituents than those packaged with other packaging materials. PMID:26288720

  4. Tough Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vosteen, L. F. (compiler); Johnson, N. J. (compiler); Teichman, L. A. (compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries are presented which address composite material behavior and performance improvement. Topic areas include composite fracture toughness and impact characterization, constituent properties and interrelationships, and matrix synthesis and characterization.

  5. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology utilization of fiber reinforced composite materials is discussed in the areas of physical properties, and life prediction. Programs related to the Composite Aircraft Program are described in detail.

  6. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection...Subpart Z of Part 98—Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight)...

  7. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection...Subpart Z of Part 98—Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight)...

  8. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection...Subpart Z of Part 98—Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight)...

  9. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection...Subpart Z of Part 98—Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight)...

  10. Nano-composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  11. 3-D Braided, continuous fiber ceramic composites produced by chemical vapor infiltration. Final report, 18 January 1991-2 January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, M.D.; Florentine, R.A.

    1993-12-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites have been successfully fabricated by chemical vapor infiltration of silicon carbide and silicon nitride matrix materials. Fiber preforms were three dimensionally braided with Nicalon(TM) and Nextel(TM) fiber materials forming a network of through thickness fiber architectures. Three unique material compositions were produced with the objective of demonstrating the capability of braiding brittle ceramic fibers and producing quality composites structurally capable of performing in a ballistic environment. It is anticipated that the continuous fiber architecture will be a significant technical advantage towards improvements in ceramic armor applications where non-catastrophic failure and increased toughness are a concern.

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  13. [EDXRF study on the chemical composition and raw material recipe of Jindezhen porcelains in the five dynasties].

    PubMed

    zhang, Mao-lin; Zhou, Jian; Li, Qi-jiang; Wu, Jun-ming; Gan, Ke

    2012-05-01

    Early crafts of porcelain making in Jindezhen were an important issue in ceramic history of China. The chemical composition of white porcelain and celadon samples excavated from Xianghu Kiln in the five dynasties was analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). Raw material recipes of the samples were discussed. The results showed that white porcelain bodies of Xianghu Kiln in the Five Dynasties were made from porcelain stone, while celadon bodies were made from porcelain stone and Zijin clay. Glaze ash and glaze stone were both used in the formula of white porcelain and celadon glaze, and the amount of glaze ash in the celadon was higher than that in the white porcelain samples. PMID:22827103

  14. Process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Caputo, Anthony J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1986-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for preparing fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of a fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  15. COMPOSITE MATERIALS PRODUCED BY PARTICLE-BONDING WITH GLIADIN AS A GLUE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our previous report, we introduced a new methodology for the production of biodegradable polymer composites that will potentially replace existing petroleum-based polymers. Unlike conventional techniques that produce polymer composites by mixing the component materials in the extruder at high te...

  16. In-situ DLC/TiC composite coating by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsiao Lei; Hon, Min Hsiung

    1995-12-31

    In-situ diamond like carbon (DLC)/TiC composite film was coated on silicon wafer, steel and glass substrates with titanium chloride, methane, hydrogen and argon gas mixtures by R.F. plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectra showed the coexistance of DLC and TiC in the films. The growth rate and DLC/TiC ratio of these films were investigated as a function of the inert gas flow rate.

  17. Composite material and method for production of improved composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A laminated composite material with improved interlaminar strength and damage tolerance having short rods distributed evenly throughout the composite material perpendicular to the laminae. Each rod is shorter than the thickness of the finished laminate, but several times as long as the thickness of each lamina. The laminate is made by inserting short rods in layers of prepreg material, and then stacking and curing prepreg material with rods inserted therethrough.

  18. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the RPI composites program is to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability and life prediction. Concommitant goals are to educate engineers to design and use composite materials as normal or conventional materials. A multifaceted program was instituted to achieve these objectives.

  19. The Chemical Composition of Honey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Honey is a supersaturated sugar solution, created by bees, and used by human beings as a sweetener. However, honey is more than just a supersaturated sugar solution; it also contains acids, minerals, vitamins, and amino acids in varying quantities. In this article, we will briefly explore the chemical composition of honey. (Contains 2 figures and…

  20. Composite Materials: An Educational Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saliba, Tony E.; Snide, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the need to incorporate the concepts and applications of advanced composite materials into existing chemical engineering programs. Discussed are the justification for, and implementation of topics including transport phenomena, kinetics and reactor design, unit operations, and product and process design. (CW)

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  2. Combinatorial synthesis of inorganic or composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Ross, Debra A. (Mountain Ranch, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Danville, CA); Briceno, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xian-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

    2010-08-03

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials or, alternatively, allowing the components to interact to form at least two different materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, nonbiological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  3. Chemical composition of Luna 16 lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Chupakhin, M. S.; Belyayev, Y. I.

    1974-01-01

    Data on the chemical composition of regolith returned by the Luna 16 automatic station and two fragments of basalts from the lower layer of the core are presented. Spark mass spectrometric, primary X-ray spectral, emission spectral, and atomic absorption methods were used in the analysis. The regolith of mare provinces were shown to be a mixture of material of various origins. The source of the material of the mare regolith was principally basalts of the corresponding lunar lava maria. The regolith is genetically related to it. This follows from a comparison of the chemical composition, mineralogical, and petrochemical features of the basesalts and the regolith from the Sea of Fertility, Sea of Tranquillity, and Ocean of Storms, respectively.

  4. Energetic composites and method of providing chemical energy

    DOEpatents

    Danen, Wayne C. (Los Alamos, NM); Martin, Joe A. (Espanola, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application.

  5. Energetic composites and method of providing chemical energy

    DOEpatents

    Danen, W.C.; Martin, J.A.

    1997-02-25

    A method is described for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application. 3 figs.

  6. Frying stability of high oleic sunflower oils as affected by composition of tocopherol isomers and linoleic acid content.

    PubMed

    Aladedunye, Felix; Przybylski, Roman

    2013-12-01

    The influence of linoleic acid content and tocopherol isomeric composition on the frying performance of high oleic sunflower oil was evaluated during a 14-day restaurant style frying operation. At equal linoleic acid content, no significant difference was observed between high oleic sunflower oil containing only ?-tocopherol and the sample containing a mixture of ?-, ?-, and ?-isomers as measured by the amount of total polar components, oligomers, anisidine value, and free fatty acids. On the contrary, at similar tocopherol isomeric composition, high oleic sunflower oil containing lower amount of linoleic acid showed superior frying stability compared to the sample with a higher content of linoleic acid, suggesting that the frying performance of high oleic sunflower oil is dictated primarily by the level of linoleic acid, with the tocopherol isomeric composition of the oil having no significant influence. In all oil samples, the loss of ?-tocopherol was higher than the corresponding loss of ?-tocopherol. PMID:23870970

  7. Growth of crystals of several boron-carbon compositions by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kevill, D. N.; Rissmann, T. J.; Brewe, D.; Wood, C.

    1986-01-01

    Boron-carbon compounds have been deposited by the flow of carbon tetrachloride and boron trichloride, in the presence of a large excess of hydrogen, over a graphite surface maintained at 1000-1300 C. Deposits were formed on either an RF-heated disc or a tube or insert heated by a resistance furnace. Crystalline materials ranging in composition from B2C to B17C have been obtained.

  8. Supplementary Materials for Flower Discrimination by Pollinators in a Dynamic Chemical Environment

    E-print Network

    Shlizerman, Eli

    Supplementary Materials for Flower Discrimination by Pollinators in a Dynamic Chemical Environment includes the following: Database S1 #12;2 MATERIALS AND METHODS Flower volatile sampling Field site: Datura wrightii (hereafter: Datura) flower volatiles were sampled at the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  10. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  11. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  12. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  13. Composite Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development and application of filamentary composite materials, is considered. Such interest is based on the possibility of using relatively brittle materials with high modulus, high strength, but low density in composites with good durability and high tolerance to damage. Fiber reinforced composite materials of this kind offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been made since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. There were only limited applied to the primary structure of operational vehicles, mainly as aircrafts.

  14. Aqueous chemical wash compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, C.E.

    1987-07-21

    This patent describes an aqueous, substantially unfoamed chemical wash composition having properties making it suitable for use as a pre-flush in well cementing operations and/or for removal of drilling mud from a borehole at a temperature of from about 150/sup 0/F to about 270/sup 0/F, the wash a. being predominantly composed of water, b. containing an active surfactant component comprising a combination of (1) from about 0.1 to about 1.5 weight percent (total weight basis) of a water soluble anionic surfactant; (2) from about 0.1 to about 1.5 weight percent (total weight basis) of a nonionic surfactant; and (3) from about 0.05 to about 0.54 weight percent (total weight basis) of at least one water soluble amphoteric surfactant, and c. having dispersed therein a heterogeneous mixture of distinct particles comprising both a first particulate oil soluble resin which is friable and a second particulate oil soluble resin which is pliable and where the size of the friable resin particles ranges from about 0.5 to about 300 microns and the size of the pliable resin particles ranges from about 0.05 to about 30 microns. The amount of the friable-pliable resin mixture is sufficient to impart effective fluid loss control to the chemical wash composition.

  15. Origin and Bulk Chemical Composition of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Andrew J. R.; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The planet Mercury is remarkable because its mean uncompressed density ˜5.3 g/cc implies a Fe-Ni mass content of ˜67%. This is more than twice the ˜32% metal fractions of Venus and Earth. This factor coupled with other marked chemical and isotopic differences between the four terrestrial planets points to the conclusion that each planet ?received the overwhelming majority of its mass from a narrow compositionally-distinct annulus of material around the Sun? (Drake & Righter 2002 Nature 416 39; Taylor & Scott 2001 in URL below). This situation finds an explanation within the Modern Laplacian theory of Solar system origin (Prentice 2001 Earth Moon & Planets 87 11; URL: www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/mercury01). Here the planets condensed from a concentric family of circular gas rings shed by the proto-Solar cloud. The temperatures and mean orbit pressures of the gas rings scale with heliocentric distance r as T ~ 1/r0.9 and p ˜1/r4.0 respectively. At Mercury?s orbit T = 1640 K p= 0.16 bar and the three primary equilibrium condensates are Fe-Ni (67 %) gehlenite (26.1%) and spinel (4.1%). A simple 2-zone structural model of Mercury based on this mix has mean density 5.43 g/cc and axial moment-of-inertia coefficent C/MR2 = 0.325.

  16. Production and application of chemical fibers with special properties for manufacturing composite materials and goods of different usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levit, R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of modern technologies demands the creation of new nonmetallic, fibrous materials with specific properties. The fibers and materials developed by NII 'Chimvolokno', St. Petersburg, can be divided into two groups. The first group includes heat-resistant fibers, fire-resistant fibers, thermotropic fibers, fibers for medical application, and textile structures. The second group contains refractory fibers, chemoresistant and antifriction fibers, fibers on the basis of polyvinyl alcohol, microfiltering films, and paperlike and nonwoven materials. In cooperation with NPO 'Chimvolokno' MYTITSHI, we developed and started producing heat-resistant high-strength fibers on the base of polyhetarearilin and aromatic polyimides (SVM and terlon); heat-resistant fibers on the base of polyemede (aramid); fire-retardant fibers (togilen); chemoresistant and antifriction fibers on the basis of homo and copolymers of polytetrafluoroethylene (polyfen and ftorin); and water soluble, acetylated, and high-modulus fibers from polyvinyl alcohol (vylen). Separate reports will deal with textile structures and thermotropic fibers, as well as with medical fibers. One of the groups of refractory fibers carbon fibers (CF) and the corresponding paperlike nonwoven materials are discussed in detail. Also, composite materials (CM) and their base, which is the subject of the author's research since 1968, is discussed.

  17. Composite Material Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A device to protect electronic circuitry from high voltage transients is constructed from a relatively thin piece of conductive composite sandwiched between two conductors so that conduction is through the thickness of the composite piece. The device is based on the discovery that conduction through conductive composite materials in this configuration switches to a high resistance mode when exposed to voltages above a threshold voltage.

  18. Composite Material Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device to protect electronic circuitry from high voltage transients is constructed from a relatively thin piece of conductive composite sandwiched between two conductors so that conduction is through the thickness of the composite piece. The device is based on the discovery that conduction through conductive composite materials in this configuration switches to a high resistance mode when exposed to voltages above a threshold voltage.

  19. Composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Samuels, William D.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2004-04-20

    The composite material and methods of making the present invention rely upon a fully dense monolayer of molecules attached to an oxygenated surface at one end, and an organic terminal group at the other end, which is in turn bonded to a polymer. Thus, the composite material is a second material chemically bonded to a polymer with fully dense monolayer there between.

  20. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  1. Chemical compositions of large cluster IDPs

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S.R.

    2006-12-06

    We performed X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy on two large cluster IDPs, which sample the IDP parent body at a mass scale two orders-of-magnitude larger than {approx}10 {micro}m IDPs, allowing proper incorporation of larger mineral grains into the bulk composition of the parent body. We previously determined that {approx}10 {micro}m interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere are enriched in many moderately volatile elements by a factor of {approx}3 over the CI meteorites. However, these IDP measurements provide no direct constraint on the bulk chemical composition of the parent body (or parent bodies) of the IDPs. Collisions are believed to be the major mechanism for dust production by the asteroids, producing dust by surface erosion, cratering and catastrophic disruption. Hypervelocity impact experiments at {approx}5 km/sec, which is the mean collision velocity in the main belt, performed by Flynn and Durda on ordinary chondrite meteorites and the carbonaceous chondrite meteorite Allende show that the 10 {micro}m debris is dominated by matrix material while the debris larger than {approx}25 {micro}m is dominated by chondrule fragments. Thus, if the IDP parent body is similar in structure to the chondritic meteorites, it is likely that the {approx}10 {micro}m IDPs oversample the fine-grained component of the parent body. We have examined the matrix material from the few meteorites that are sufficiently fine-grained to be samples of potential IDP parent bodies. This search has, thus far, not produced a compositional and mineralogical match to either the hydrous or anhydrous IDPs. This result, coupled with our recent mapping of the element distributions, which indicates the enrichment of moderately volatile elements is not due to contamination on their surfaces, suggests the IDPs represent a new type of extraterrestrial material. Nonetheless, the meteorite fragmentation results suggest that compositional measurements on 10 {micro}m IDPs only provide a direct constraint on the bulk chemical composition of the IDP parent body if the size-scale of the grains in the parent body is <<10 {micro}m. The stratospheric collections include many nonchondritic, mono-mineralic grains, collected along with the fine-grained chondritic IDPs. Some of these grains, which include volatile-poor olivine and pyroxene as well as calcophile-rich sulfides, have fine-grained, chondritic material (i.e., small bits of typical IDPs) adhering to their surfaces. This indicates that at least some of the non-chondritic grains found on the stratospheric collectors are fragments from the same parent as the fine-grained IDPs. Thus, the bulk composition of the IDP parent body can only be reconstructed by adding to the fine-grained, chondritic IDPs the correct amount of this non-chondritic material. Qualitatively, the addition of olivines and pyroxenes will reduce the mean content of many moderately volatile elements while the addition of sulfides will increase the content of some of these elements. However, the quantitative task of adding these monomineralic grains to the fine-grained IDPs cannot be accomplished by simply adding the non-chondritic material in proportion to its occurrence on the stratospheric collectors because: (1) it is not clear that all of the olivines, pyroxenes, sulfides or other mineral grains found on the stratospheric collectors are extraterrestrial; (2) the settling rate of a particle depends on its density and shape, thus the concentration factor for these high-density, mono-mineralic grains is lower at the collection altitude than it is for the lower-density, fine-grained aggregate IDPs; and (3) the atmospheric entry survival of a particle is a function of density, so higher density grains (e.g., sulfides) are more likely to vaporize on entry, even if they enter with the same velocity as fine-grained, lower-density aggregates. The collection of 'cluster IDPs,' which enter the atmosphere as large particles, some larger than 50 {micro}m in diameter, containing both fine-grained aggregate material

  2. Thermoelastic constitutive equations for chemically hardening materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, B. W.; Levitsky, M.

    1974-01-01

    Thermoelastic constitutive equations are derived for a material undergoing solidification or hardening as the result of a chemical reaction. The derivation is based upon a two component model whose composition is determined by the degree of hardening, and makes use of strain-energy considerations. Constitutive equations take the form of stress rate-strain rate relations, in which the coefficients are time-dependent functions of the composition. Specific results are developed for the case of a material of constant bulk modulus which undergoes a transition from an initial liquidlike state into an isotropic elastic solid. Potential applications are discussed.

  3. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF THE LIPID CONTENT IN STARCH-LIPID COMPOSITES BY TIME-DOMAIN NMR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch-lipid composites, prepared by excess steam jet-cooking aqueous mixtures of starch and lipid, are used in various applications for which their performance can depend upon accurate quantitation of lipid contained within these composites. A rapid and non-destructive method based on time-domain ...

  4. Chemical vapor deposition prepared bi-morphological carbon-coated Fe3O4 composites as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junhua; Gao, Mingxia; Wang, Dingsheng; Li, Xiang; Dou, Yibo; Liu, Yongfeng; Pan, Hongge

    2015-05-01

    Carbon coated Fe3O4 composite (Fe3O4@C) with bi-morphological architecture has been prepared via a chemical vapor deposition at 450 °C from Fe2O3 nanoparticles by using acetylene as the deposition vapor and carbon source. The Fe2O3 are fully reduced to Fe3O4 in a 10 min of deposition, showing submicron-sized octahedral Fe3O4 particles coated partially with a thin carbon layer mainly, and a few nano-sized Fe3O4 particles coated with carbon also. The deposition period of 20 min results in a further growth of the octahedral Fe3O4 particles and a reduction of the number of the nano-sized ones, correlating to a thick and fully coated carbon layer. Impurities of iron carbides generate in the composite with further prolonging the deposition to 30 min. The Fe3O4@C composite from 20 min of deposition shows superior electrochemical property to others. An initial reversible capacity of 570 mAh g-1 is obtained and the capacity fading is less than 5% after 60 cycles. The fabrication method is facile and time-saving. Such submicron size-predominated Fe3O4@C composite is hopefully not only favorable in alleviating the agglomeration of the iron oxide during cycling, but also helpful in getting high packing density of the anode material.

  5. Resin composite restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Ilie, N; Hickel, R

    2011-06-01

    This paper surveys the most important developments in resin-based dental composites and focuses on the deficits (e.g. polymerization shrinkage) and strengths of the materials and their clinical implications. Moreover, differences between composite categories, such as hybrid, nanohybrid, microfilled, packable, ormocer-based, silorane-based, polyacid-modified composites (compomers) and flowable composites are highlighted, especially in view of their mechanical behaviour. In addition to the classical dimethacrylate-based composites, special attention is given to alternative monomers, such as siloranes, ormocers or high-molecular-weight dimethacrylate monomers (e.g. dimer acid-based dimethacrylates and tricyclodecane (TCD)-urethane), analysing their advantages, behaviour and abilities. Finally, the paper attempts to establish the needs and wishes of clinicians for further development of resin-based composites. PMID:21564116

  6. Engineering of fluorescent emission of silk fibroin composite materials by material assembly.

    PubMed

    Lin, Naibo; Meng, Zhaohui; Toh, Guoyang William; Zhen, Yang; Diao, Yingying; Xu, Hongyao; Liu, Xiang Yang

    2015-03-01

    This novel materials assembly technology endows the designated materials with additional/enhanced performance by fixing "functional components" into the materials. Such functional components are molecularly recognized and accommodated by the designated materials. In this regard, two-photon fluorescence (TPF) organic molecules and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) are adopted as functional components to functionalize silk fibers and films. TPF organic molecules, such as, 2,7-bis[2-(4-nitrophenyl) ethenyl]-9,9-dibutylfluorene (NM), exhibit TPF emission quenching because of the molecular stacking that leads to aggregation in the solid form. The specific recognition between -NO2 in the annealed fluorescent molecules and the -NH groups in the silk fibroin molecules decouples the aggregated molecules. This gives rise to a significant increase in the TPF quantum yields of the silk fibers. Similarly, as another type of functional components, CdTe quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were also adopted in the silk functionalization method. Compared to QDs in solution the fluorescence properties of functionalized silk materials display a long stability at room temperature. As the functional materials are well dispersed at high quantum yields in the biocompatible silk a TPF microscope can be used to pursue 3D high-resolution imaging in real time of the TPF-silk scaffold. PMID:25270616

  7. Mechanics of Interfacial Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Anand Bala Subramaniam; Manouk Abkarian; L. Mahadevan; Howard A. Stone

    2006-05-25

    Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated that particle-covered interfaces can exist in stable non-spherical shapes as a result of the steric jamming of the interfacially trapped particles, which confers the interface with solid-like properties. We provide an experimental and theoretical characterization of the mechanical properties of these armored objects, with attention given to the two-dimensional granular state of the interface. Small inhomogeneous stresses produce a plastic response while homogeneous stresses produce a weak elastic response. Shear-driven particle-scale rearrangements explain the basic threshold needed to obtain the near-perfect plastic deformation that is observed. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous stress state of the interface is exhibited experimentally by using surfactants to destabilize the particles on the surface. Since the interfacially trapped particles retain their individual characteristics, armored interfaces can be recognized as a kind of composite material with distinct chemical, structural and mechanical properties.

  8. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  9. Modified Composite Materials Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L. (compiler)

    1978-01-01

    The reduction or elimination of the hazard which results from accidental release of graphite fibers from composite materials was studied at a workshop. At the workshop, groups were organized to consider six topics: epoxy modifications, epoxy replacement, fiber modifications, fiber coatings and new fibers, hybrids, and fiber release testing. Because of the time required to develop a new material and acquire a design data base, most of the workers concluded that a modified composite material would require about four to five years of development and testing before it could be applied to aircraft structures. The hybrid working group considered that some hybrid composites which reduce the risk of accidental fiber release might be put into service over the near term. The fiber release testing working group recommended a coordinated effort to define a suitable laboratory test.

  10. Nanostructured polyaniline rice husk composite as adsorption materials synthesized by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tot Pham, Thi; Thanh Thuy Mai, Thi; Quy Bui, Minh; Mai, Thi Xuan; Yen Tran, Hai; Binh Phan, Thi

    2014-03-01

    Composites based on polyaniline (PANi) and rice husk (RH) were prepared by two methods: the first one was chemical method by combining RH contained in acid medium and aniline using ammonium persulfate as an oxidation agent and the second one was that of soaking RH into PANi solution. The presence of PANi combined with RH to form nanocomposite was clearly demonstrated by infrared (IR) spectra as well as by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Lead(II) and cadmium(II) ion concentrations in solution before and after adsorption process on those composites were analysed by atomic adsorption spectroscopy. Of the above preparation methods, the soaking one provided a composite onto which the maximum adsorption capacity was higher for lead(II) ion (200 mg g-1), but lower for cadmium(II) ion (106.383 mg g-1) in comparison with the chemical one. However, their adsorption process occurring on both composites also fitted well into the Langmuir isotherm model.

  11. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress and plans are reported for investigations of: (1) the mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; (2) fatigue in composite materials; (3) moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates; (4) the theory of inhomogeneous swelling in epoxy resin; (5) numerical studies of the micromechanics of composite fracture; (6) free edge failures of composite laminates; (7) analysis of unbalanced laminates; (8) compact lug design; (9) quantification of Saint-Venant's principles for a general prismatic member; (10) variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; and (11) the wing fuselage ensemble of the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes.

  12. Changes in chemical composition of bone matrix in ovariectomized (OVX) rats detected by Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Iimura, Tadahiro; Saitou, Takashi; Imamura, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a major bone disease that connotes the risk of fragility fractures resulting from alterations to bone quantity and/or quality to mechanical competence. Bone strength arises from both bone quantity and quality. Assessment of bone quality and bone quantity is important for prediction of fracture risk. In spite of the two factors contribute to maintain the bone strength, only one factor, bone mineral density is used to determine the bone strength in the current diagnosis of osteoporosis. On the other hand, there is no practical method to measure chemical composition of bone tissue including hydroxyapatite and collagen non-invasively. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique to analyze chemical composition and material properties of bone matrix non-invasively. Here we demonstrated Raman spectroscopic analysis of the bone matrix in osteoporosis model rat. Ovariectomized (OVX) rat was made and the decalcified sections of tibias were analyzed by a Raman microscope. In the results, Raman bands of typical collagen appeared in the obtained spectra. Although the typical mineral bands at 960 cm-1 (Phosphate) was absent due to decalcified processing, we found that Raman peak intensities of amide I and C-C stretching bands were significantly different between OVX and sham-operated specimens. These differences on the Raman spectra were statistically compared by multivariate analyses, principal component analysis (PCA) and liner discrimination analysis (LDA). Our analyses suggest that amide I and C-C stretching bands can be related to stability of bone matrix which reflects bone quality.

  13. Structure and dielectric properties of composite material based on surface-modified BaTiO3 nanoparticles in polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelianov, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on studies of the structure and dielectric properties of composites materials based on BaTiO3 nanoparticles in the polymer matrix. It is shown that nanoparticles of barium titanate obtained by peroxide method, have surface enriched hydroxyl (-OH) groups, which allow the formation of strong chemical bonds with the molecules of surfactant. This surface modification prevents agglomeration of nanoparticles, which leads to heterogeneity of mechanical and dielectric properties of the composites. It is shown that the effective dielectric constant for the studied composite material agrees well with the modified Kerner equation for the volume content of nanoparticles within the range from 5 to 35%.

  14. Oxygen isotopic compositions of asteroidal materials returned from Itokawa by the Hayabusa mission.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Abe, Ken-ichi; Abe, Masanao; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Fujimura, Akio; Hashiguchi, Minako; Hashizume, Ko; Ireland, Trevor R; Itoh, Shoichi; Katayama, Juri; Kato, Chizu; Kawaguchi, Junichiro; Kawasaki, Noriyuki; Kitajima, Fumio; Kobayashi, Sachio; Meike, Tatsuji; Mukai, Toshifumi; Nagao, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tomoki; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Takaaki; Okazaki, Ryuji; Park, Changkun; Sakamoto, Naoya; Seto, Yusuke; Takei, Masashi; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Uesugi, Masayuki; Wakaki, Shigeyuki; Yada, Toru; Yamamoto, Kosuke; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Zolensky, Michael E

    2011-08-26

    Meteorite studies suggest that each solar system object has a unique oxygen isotopic composition. Chondrites, the most primitive of meteorites, have been believed to be derived from asteroids, but oxygen isotopic compositions of asteroids themselves have not been established. We measured, using secondary ion mass spectrometry, oxygen isotopic compositions of rock particles from asteroid 25143 Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft. Compositions of the particles are depleted in (16)O relative to terrestrial materials and indicate that Itokawa, an S-type asteroid, is one of the sources of the LL or L group of equilibrated ordinary chondrites. This is a direct oxygen-isotope link between chondrites and their parent asteroid. PMID:21868668

  15. Aerogel/polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Clayton, LaNetra M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention provides new composite materials containing aerogels blended with thermoplastic polymer materials at a weight ratio of aerogel to thermoplastic polymer of less than 20:100. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability. The composite materials also have better flexibility and less brittleness at low temperatures than the parent thermoplastic polymer materials.

  16. Composite Materials for Thermal Energy Storage: Enhancing Performance through Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zhiwei; Ye, Feng; Ding, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    Chemical incompatibility and low thermal conductivity issues of molten-salt-based thermal energy storage materials can be addressed by using microstructured composites. Using a eutectic mixture of lithium and sodium carbonates as molten salt, magnesium oxide as supporting material, and graphite as thermal conductivity enhancer, the microstructural development, chemical compatibility, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of composite materials are investigated. The ceramic supporting material is essential for preventing salt leakage and hence provides a solution to the chemical incompatibility issue. The use of graphite gives a significant enhancement on the thermal conductivity of the composite. Analyses suggest that the experimentally observed microstructural development of the composite is associated with the wettability of the salt on the ceramic substrate and that on the thermal conduction enhancer. PMID:24591286

  17. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  18. Comparison of the structural and chemical composition of two unique micro/nanostructures produced by femtosecond laser interactions on nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Zuhlke, Craig A.; Anderson, Troy P.; Alexander, Dennis R.

    2013-09-16

    The structural and chemical composition of two unique microstructures formed on nickel, with nanoscale features, produced using femtosecond laser surface processing (FLSP) techniques is reported in this paper. These two surface morphologies, termed mounds and nanoparticle-covered pyramids, are part of a larger class of self-organized micro/nanostructured surfaces formed using FLSP. Cross-sections of the structures produced using focused ion beam milling techniques were analyzed with a transmission electron microscope. Both morphologies have a solid core with a layer of nanoparticles on the surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy by scanning transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the nanoparticles are a nickel oxide, while the core material is pure nickel.

  19. Composite materials obtained by the ion-plasma sputtering of metal compound coatings on polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikov, Nikolai; Polyakov, Evgenii; Borisov, Sergei; Barashev, Nikolai; Biramov, Emir; Maltceva, Anastasia; Vereshchagin, Artem; Khartov, Stas; Voronin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the principle and examples composite materials obtained by deposition of metal compound coatings on polymer film substrates by the ion-plasma sputtering method are presented. A synergistic effect is to obtain the materials with structural properties of the polymer substrate and the surface properties of the metal deposited coatings. The technology of sputtering of TiN coatings of various thicknesses on polyethylene terephthalate films is discussed. The obtained composites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is shown. The examples of application of this method, such as receiving nanocomposite track membranes and flexible transparent electrodes, are considered.

  20. Spatial-Time Variability of Particulate Material Content and its Composition on the East Siberian Shelf: from Mesoscale to Interannual Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, O.; Charkin, A.; Shakhova, N. E.; Semiletov, I. P.; Gustafsson, O. M.; Vonk, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, L.

    2013-12-01

    Here we present the data obtained in the Russia-US cruises (FEBRAS, NOAA, NSF, and Russian Foundation for Basic Research, RFBR, funded) in 2000, 2003-2005, and in the International Siberian Shelf Study-2008 (ISSS-2008, supported by the Wallenberg Foundation, FEBRAS, NOAA, and RFBR) which characterized a spatial and inter-annual variability in distribution of particulate material (PM), and its organic carbon and stable isotopes content. The role of the coastal zone in lateral transport and fate of terrestrial organic carbon in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) is still not studied well because most recent activities were focused on onshore geomorphologic and geochemical features, while biogeochemical and sedimentation consequences of coastal erosion and riverine runoff in the sea were not studied sufficiently. Dynamics of PM and its composition was studied twice along the Lena river in summer-fall of 2003. Spatial-time dynamics of PM composition (POC and isotopes) along with its mineralogical composition is considered in connection with changing river runoff and wind patterns. It has been found that not the rivers (Lena, Yana, Indigirka, Kolyma), but the coastal erosion is a dominant source of terrestrial particulate organic carbon (POC) into the ESAS. That supports the hypothesis about the dominant role of coastal erosion in the offshore transport of terrestrial organic carbon and sedimentation in the ESAS proposed by Semiletov (DAN, 1999). The PM concentration sharp gradient was found across the frontal zone between 'freshened/high PM' and 'Pacific/low PM' waters. Position of the frontal zone varies significantly from year to year. It is mainly attributed to the difference in atmospheric circulation patterns driven the Arctic Ocean circulation. During storms and surges the PM concentration in the same area increased up to 10-times and higher (up to 80-242 mg/l) in 2000 and 2005 comparing the 2003 and 2004. Values of total PM and other environmental parameters were integrated vertically and spatially for the 'comparison' area using approach proposed by Shakhova et al. (GRL, 2005) to make the first quantitative PM burden estimation (2003 vs 2004).

  1. Negative thermal expansion in functional materials: controllable thermal expansion by chemical modifications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Hu, Lei; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2015-06-01

    Negative thermal expansion (NTE) is an intriguing physical property of solids, which is a consequence of a complex interplay among the lattice, phonons, and electrons. Interestingly, a large number of NTE materials have been found in various types of functional materials. In the last two decades good progress has been achieved to discover new phenomena and mechanisms of NTE. In the present review article, NTE is reviewed in functional materials of ferroelectrics, magnetics, multiferroics, superconductors, temperature-induced electron configuration change and so on. Zero thermal expansion (ZTE) of functional materials is emphasized due to the importance for practical applications. The NTE functional materials present a general physical picture to reveal a strong coupling role between physical properties and NTE. There is a general nature of NTE for both ferroelectrics and magnetics, in which NTE is determined by either ferroelectric order or magnetic one. In NTE functional materials, a multi-way to control thermal expansion can be established through the coupling roles of ferroelectricity-NTE, magnetism-NTE, change of electron configuration-NTE, open-framework-NTE, and so on. Chemical modification has been proved to be an effective method to control thermal expansion. Finally, challenges and questions are discussed for the development of NTE materials. There remains a challenge to discover a "perfect" NTE material for each specific application for chemists. The future studies on NTE functional materials will definitely promote the development of NTE materials. PMID:25864730

  2. Influence of Chemical Composition and Structure in Silicon Dielectric Materials on Passivation of Thin Crystalline Silicon on Glass.

    PubMed

    Calnan, Sonya; Gabriel, Onno; Rothert, Inga; Werth, Matteo; Ring, Sven; Stannowski, Bernd; Schlatmann, Rutger

    2015-09-01

    In this study, various silicon dielectric films, namely, a-SiOx:H, a-SiNx:H, and a-SiOxNy:H, grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) were evaluated for use as interlayers (ILs) between crystalline silicon and glass. Chemical bonding analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that high values of oxidant gases (CO2 and/or N2), added to SiH4 during PECVD, reduced the Si-H and N-H bond density in the silicon dielectrics. Various three layer stacks combining the silicon dielectric materials were designed to minimize optical losses between silicon and glass in rear side contacted heterojunction pn test cells. The PECVD grown silicon dielectrics retained their functionality despite being subjected to harsh subsequent processing such as crystallization of the silicon at 1414 °C or above. High values of short circuit current density (Jsc; without additional hydrogen passivation) required a high density of Si-H bonds and for the nitrogen containing films, additionally, a high N-H bond density. Concurrently high values of both Jsc and open circuit voltage Voc were only observed when [Si-H] was equal to or exceeded [N-H]. Generally, Voc correlated with a high density of [Si-H] bonds in the silicon dielectric; otherwise, additional hydrogen passivation using an active plasma process was required. The highest Voc ? 560 mV, for a silicon acceptor concentration of about 10(16) cm(-3), was observed for stacks where an a-SiOxNy:H film was adjacent to the silicon. Regardless of the cell absorber thickness, field effect passivation of the buried silicon surface by the silicon dielectric was mandatory for efficient collection of carriers generated from short wavelength light (in the vicinity of the glass-Si interface). However, additional hydrogen passivation was obligatory for an increased diffusion length of the photogenerated carriers and thus Jsc in solar cells with thicker absorbers. PMID:26281016

  3. Characterization and chemical composition of fatty acids content of watermelon and muskmelon cultivars in Saudi Arabia using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Albishri, Hassan M.; Almaghrabi, Omar A.; Moussa, Tarek A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The growth in the production of biodiesel, which is principally fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), has been phenomenal in the last ten years because of the general desire to cut down on the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, and also as a result of the increasing cost of fossil fuels. Objective: Establish whether there is any relationship between two different species (watermelon and muskmelon) within the same family (Cucurbitaceae) on fatty acid compositions and enumerate the different fatty acids in the two species. Materials and Methods: Extraction of fatty acids from the two species and preparation the extract to gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis to determine the fatty acids compositions qualitatively and quantitatively. Results: The analyzed plants (watermelon and muskmelon) contain five saturated fatty acids; tetrdecanoic acid, pentadecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, heptadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid with different concentrations, while muskmelon contains an extra saturated fatty acid named eicosanoic acid. The watermelon plant contains five unsaturated fatty acids while muskmelon contains three only, the two plants share in two unsaturated fatty acids named 9-hexadecenoic acid and 9-octadecenoic acid, the muskmelon plant contains higher amounts of these two acids (2.04% and 10.12%, respectively) over watermelon plant (0.88% and 0.25%, respectively). Conclusion: The chemical analysis of watermelon and muskmelon revealed that they are similar in saturated fatty acids but differ in unsaturated fatty acids which may be a criterion of differentiation between the two plants. PMID:23661995

  4. UPDATED ESTIMATES OF THE SELENOMETHIONINE CONTENTS OF NIST WHEAT REFERENCE MATERIALS BY GC-IDMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Updated estimates of the selenomethionine contents of four NIST wheat reference materials have been obtained using a revised gas chromatography-stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry method. The revised method makes use of digestion with methanesulfonic acid, providing a more complete accounting ...

  5. Chemical composition of the continental crust as revealed by studies in East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Gao; Luo, Ting-Chuan; Zhang, Ben-Ren; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Han, Yin-Wen; Zhao, Zi-Dan; Hu, Yi-Ken

    1998-06-01

    We report abundances of sixty-three major, trace, and rare earth elements in the upper crust in five tectonic units (the interior and southern margin of the North China craton, the North and South Qinling orogenic belts, and the Yangtze craton) of central East China and the study area as a whole. The estimates are based on sampling of 11,451 individual rock samples over an area of 950,000 km 2 , from which 905 large composite samples were prepared and analyzed by thirteen methods. Some of the trace elements (i.e., Ag, As, Ge, Mo, Pd, Pt, Sb, Se, Sn, W) have never been subjected to systematic analysis in previous regional crustal composition studies. The middle, lower, and total crust compositions of the tectonic units are also estimated from studies of exposed crustal cross-sections and granulite xenoliths and by correlation of seismic data from eleven regional seismic refraction profiles with lithologies. The proposed granodioritic total crust composition has the following ratios of element pairs exhibiting similar compatibility, that are identical or close to the primitive mantle values: Zr/Hf = 37, Nb/Ta = 17.5, Ba/Th = 87, K/Pb = 0.12 × 10 4 , Rb/Cs = 25, Ba/Rb = 8.94, Sn/Sm = 0.31, Se/Cd = 1.64, La/As = 10.3, Ce/Sb = 271, Pb/Bi = 57, Rb/Tl = 177, Er/Ag = 52, Cu/Au = 3.2×10 4 , Sm/Mo = 7.5, Nd/W = 40, Cl/Li = 10.8, F/Nd = 21.9, and La/B = 1.8. The ( ) value is calculated at ~5. The upper crust composition is less evolved and higher in TiO 2 , total FeO, Co, Cr, Ni, Sc and V, and lower in Na 2 O, K 2 O and Nb, Ta, Rb, Th, U, and Zr, than previous estimates based on shield samplings. Because usually the uppermost layer of the crust, where mafic volcanics tend to concentrate, has been removed from Precambrian shields, and since our study involves Phanerozoic orogenic belts, the results are suggested to be better representative of the upper crust in a general sense. Trace elements associated with mineralization (e.g., B, Cl, Se, As, Bi, Pd, W, Th, Cs, Ta, Tl, Hg, Au, and Pb) show considerable inter-unit variations by a factor of 2-5 in the upper crust. In addition, the North Qinling paleoactive margin is characterized by anomalous enrichment in Th, U, and Pb in particular and has a marked lower value (3.3) compared to the two cratons and the South Qinling paleopassive margin ( = 4.5-6.2). Each tectonic unit has a relatively homogenous middle crust composition which is broadly similar to the composition of the total crust. The lower crust in East China can be divided into two layers both seismically and chemically. The upper lower crust is characterized by Vp = 6.7 km s -1 and an intermediate composition and the lowermost crust by Vp = 7.1 km s -1 and a mafic composition. The bulk lower crust is still intermediate in composition with 58% SiO 2 due to the dominance of the upper lower crust. P-wave velocities of both the lower and total crusts in East China are slower by 0.2-0.4 km s -1 compared to various global estimates. Correspondingly, the total crust shows an more evolved composition and is characterized by a significant negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu * = 0.80), low (10.4), and high (3.0) ratios. The obtained SiO 2 is 64% on a volatile-free basis. The near arc magma ratio implies that intraplate crustal growth contributes < 10% of the continental crust. The relative deficits in Eu, Sr, and transition metals (Cr, Ni, Co, V, and Ti) in the derived crustal compositions of East China, along with slower crustal velocity and thin crustal thickness for the Paleozoic to Mesozoic Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt, strongly suggest that lower crust delamination of eclogites, as represented by those from the Dabie-Sulu belt, had played an important role in modification of the East China crust during the Phanerozoic era.

  6. Chemical composition of the continental crust as revealed by studies in East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Luo, Ting-Chuan; Zhang, Ben-Ren; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Han, Yin-wen; Zhao, Zi-Dan; Hu, Yi-Ken

    1998-06-01

    We report abundances of sixty-three major, trace, and rare earth elements in the upper crust in five tectonic units (the interior and southern margin of the North China craton, the North and South Qinling orogenic belts, and the Yangtze craton) of central East China and the study area as a whole. The estimates are based on sampling of 11,451 individual rock samples over an area of 950,000 km 2, from which 905 large composite samples were prepared and analyzed by thirteen methods. Some of the trace elements (i.e., Ag, As, Ge, Mo, Pd, Pt, Sb, Se, Sn, W) have never been subjected to systematic analysis in previous regional crustal composition studies. The middle, lower, and total crust compositions of the tectonic units are also estimated from studies of exposed crustal cross-sections and granulite xenoliths and by correlation of seismic data from eleven regional seismic refraction profiles with lithologies. The proposed granodioritic total crust composition has the following ratios of element pairs exhibiting similar compatibility, that are identical or close to the primitive mantle values: Zr/Hf = 37, Nb/Ta = 17.5, Ba/Th = 87, K/Pb = 0.12 × 10 4, Rb/Cs = 25, Ba/Rb = 8.94, Sn/Sm = 0.31, Se/Cd = 1.64, La/As = 10.3, Ce/Sb = 271, Pb/Bi = 57, Rb/Tl = 177, Er/Ag = 52, Cu/Au = 3.2×10 4, Sm/Mo = 7.5, Nd/W = 40, Cl/Li = 10.8, F/Nd = 21.9, and La/B = 1.8. The ? ( 238U/ 204Pb) value is calculated at ˜5. The upper crust composition is less evolved and higher in TiO 2, total FeO, Co, Cr, Ni, Sc and V, and lower in Na 2O, K 2O and Nb, Ta, Rb, Th, U, and Zr, than previous estimates based on shield samplings. Because usually the uppermost layer of the crust, where mafic volcanics tend to concentrate, has been removed from Precambrian shields, and since our study involves Phanerozoic orogenic belts, the results are suggested to be better representative of the upper crust in a general sense. Trace elements associated with mineralization (e.g., B, Cl, Se, As, Bi, Pd, W, Th, Cs, Ta, Tl, Hg, Au, and Pb) show considerable inter-unit variations by a factor of 2-5 in the upper crust. In addition, the North Qinling paleoactive margin is characterized by anomalous enrichment in Th, U, and Pb in particular and has a marked lower ? value (3.3) compared to the two cratons and the South Qinling paleopassive margin (? = 4.5-6.2). Each tectonic unit has a relatively homogenous middle crust composition which is broadly similar to the composition of the total crust. The lower crust in East China can be divided into two layers both seismically and chemically. The upper lower crust is characterized by Vp = 6.7 km s -1 and an intermediate composition and the lowermost crust by Vp = 7.1 km s -1 and a mafic composition. The bulk lower crust is still intermediate in composition with 58% SiO 2 due to the dominance of the upper lower crust. P-wave velocities of both the lower and total crusts in East China are slower by 0.2-0.4 km s -1 compared to various global estimates. Correspondingly, the total crust shows an more evolved composition and is characterized by a significant negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu? = 0.80), low Sr/Nd (10.4), and high La/Nb (3.0) ratios. The obtained SiO 2 is 64% on a volatile-free basis. The near arc magma La/Nb ratio implies that intraplate crustal growth contributes <10% of the continental crust. The relative deficits in Eu, Sr, and transition metals (Cr, Ni, Co, V, and Ti) in the derived crustal compositions of East China, along with slower crustal velocity and thin crustal thickness for the Paleozoic to Mesozoic Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt, strongly suggest that lower crust delamination of eclogites, as represented by those from the Dabie-Sulu belt, had played an important role in modification of the East China crust during the Phanerozoic era.

  7. Improving dry carbon nanotube actuators by chemical modifications, material hybridization, and proper engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biso, Maurizio; Ansaldo, Alberto; Ricci, Davide

    2013-04-01

    Low voltage, dry electrochemical actuators can be prepared by using a gel made of carbon nanotubes and ionic liquid.1 Their performance can be significantly improved by combining physical and chemical modifications with a proper engineering. We demonstrated that multi walled carbon nanotubes can be effectively used for actuators preparation;2 we achieved interesting performance improvements by chemically cross linking carbon nanotubes using both aromatic and aliphatic diamines;3 we introduced a novel hybrid material, made by in-situ chemical polymerization of pyrrole on carbon nanotubes, that further boosts actuation by taking advantage of the peculiar properties of both materials in terms of maximum strain and conductivity;4 we investigated the influence of actuator thickness showing that the generated strain at high frequency is strongly enhanced when thickness is reduced. To overcome limitations set by bimorphs, we designed a novel actuator in which a metal spring, embedded in the solid electrolyte of a bimorph device, is used as a non-actuating counter plate resulting in a three electrode device capable of both linear and bending motion. Finally, we propose a way to model actuators performance in terms of purely material-dependent parameters instead of geometry-dependent ones.5

  8. Method of forming a chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wendt, Kraig M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-09

    A method of forming a chemical composition such as a chemical hydride is described and which includes the steps of selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of hydrogen; and exposing the selected composition to an amount of ionizing radiation to encourage the changing of the chemical bonds of the selected composition, and chemically reacting the selected composition with the source of hydrogen to facilitate the formation of a chemical hydride.

  9. Carbon Fibre Composite Materials Produced by Gamma Radiation Induced Curing of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dispenza, C.; Alessi, S.; Spadaro, G.

    2008-08-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation can initiate polymerization of suitable monomers for many applications. In this work an epoxy difunctional monomer has been used as matrix of a carbon fibre composite in order to produce materials through gamma radiation, for aerospace and advanced automotive applications. Radiation curing has been performed at different absorbed doses and, as comparison, also thermal curing of the same monomer formulations has been done. Furthermore some irradiated samples have been also subjected to a post irradiation thermal curing in order to complete the polymerization reactions. The properties of the cured materials have been studied by moisture absorption isotherms, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis and mechanical flexural tests.

  10. Dense, finely, grained composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D. (Davis, CA); Holt, Joseph B. (San Jose, CA); Kingman, Donald D. (Danville, CA); Munir, Zuhair A. (Davis, CA)

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  11. Advanced composite materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Composites are generally defined as two or more individual materials, which, when combined into a single material system, results in improved physical and/or mechanical properties. The freedom of choice of the starting components for composites allows the generation of materials that can be specifically tailored to meet a variety of applications. Advanced composites are described as a combination of high strength fibers and high performance polymer matrix materials. These advanced materials are required to permit future aircraft and spacecraft to perform in extended environments. Advanced composite precursor materials, processes for conversion of these materials to structures, and selected applications for composites are reviewed.

  12. NASA technology utilization survey on composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leeds, M. A.; Schwartz, S.; Holm, G. J.; Krainess, A. M.; Wykes, D. M.; Delzell, M. T.; Veazie, W. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    NASA and NASA-funded contractor contributions to the field of composite materials are surveyed. Existing and potential non-aerospace applications of the newer composite materials are emphasized. Economic factors for selection of a composite for a particular application are weight savings, performance (high strength, high elastic modulus, low coefficient of expansion, heat resistance, corrosion resistance,), longer service life, and reduced maintenance. Applications for composites in agriculture, chemical and petrochemical industries, construction, consumer goods, machinery, power generation and distribution, transportation, biomedicine, and safety are presented. With the continuing trend toward further cost reductions, composites warrant consideration in a wide range of non-aerospace applications. Composite materials discussed include filamentary reinforced materials, laminates, multiphase alloys, solid multiphase lubricants, and multiphase ceramics. New processes developed to aid in fabrication of composites are given.

  13. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76...

  14. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76...

  15. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76...

  16. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76...

  17. Determination of divalent iron content in igneous rocks of ultrabasic, basic and intermediate compositions by a wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarov, Victor M.; Finkelshtein, Alexandr L.

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes the quantitative wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique of divalent iron content determination in igneous rocks and reports specifics of this technique in terms of classifying rocks into ultrabasic, basic, intermediate and acid ones. Unlike the widely used technique of titration, the proposed XRF technique does not require a labor-consuming procedure for sample preparation. In the fields of FeK?5 line, and FeK?? and FeK?? satellites relative intensities of XRF emission spectrum lines are dependent on the valence state of iron in minerals. The ratio FeK?5/FeK?1,3 is preferred as the analytical parameter. The XRF method allows divalent iron content (expressed as FeO oxide) over 1.5% to be measured in igneous rocks of ultrabasic and basic compositions by the common calibration equation with the error below 10 rel. %, that is comparable with the error of titrimetric analysis. The samples of igneous rocks of intermediate composition and granodiorites should be analyzed using calibration equations obtained with certified reference materials corresponding in composition to the study samples. For the samples of alkaline rocks the errors of FeO content determination might be in excess of 50 rel. %.

  18. Determination of the Mineral Composition and Toxic Element Contents of Propolis by Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    González-Martín, M Inmaculada; Escuredo, Olga; Revilla, Isabel; Vivar-Quintana, Ana M; Coello, M Carmen; Riocerezo, Carlos Palacios; Moncada, Guillermo Wells

    2015-01-01

    The potential of near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) with remote reflectance fiber-optic probes for determining the mineral composition of propolis was evaluated. This technology allows direct measurements without prior sample treatment. Ninety one samples of propolis were collected in Chile (Bio-Bio region) and Spain (Castilla-León and Galicia regions). The minerals measured were aluminum, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, and some potentially toxic trace elements such as zinc, chromium, nickel, copper and lead. The modified partial least squares (MPLS) regression method was used to develop the NIR calibration model. The determination coefficient (R²) and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) obtained for aluminum (0.79, 53), calcium (0.83, 94), iron (0.69, 134) potassium (0.95, 117), magnesium (0.70, 99), phosphorus (0.94, 24) zinc (0.87, 10) chromium (0.48, 0.6) nickel (0.52, 0.7) copper (0.64, 0.9) and lead (0.70, 2) in ppm. The results demonstrated that the capacity for prediction can be considered good for wide ranges of potassium, phosphorus and zinc concentrations, and acceptable for aluminum, calcium, magnesium, iron and lead. This indicated that the NIR method is comparable to chemical methods. The method is of interest in the rapid prediction of potentially toxic elements in propolis before consumption. PMID:26540058

  19. Chemical composition of selected edible nut seeds.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2006-06-28

    Commercially important edible nut seeds were analyzed for chemical composition and moisture sorption. Moisture (1.47-9.51%), protein (7.50-21.56%), lipid (42.88-66.71%), ash (1.16-3.28%), total soluble sugars (0.55-3.96%), tannins (0.01-0.88%), and phytate (0.15-0.35%) contents varied considerably. Regardless of the seed type, lipids were mainly composed of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (>75% of the total lipids). Fatty acid composition analysis indicated that oleic acid (C18:1) was the main constituent of monounsaturated lipids in all seed samples. With the exception of macadamia, linoleic acid (C18:2) was the major polyunsaturated fatty acid. In the case of walnuts, in addition to linoleic acid (59.79%) linolenic acid (C18:3) also significantly contributed toward the total polyunsaturated lipids. Amino acid composition analyses indicated lysine (Brazil nut, cashew nut, hazelnut, pine nut, and walnut), sulfur amino acids methionine and cysteine (almond), tryptophan (macadamia, pecan), and threonine (peanut) to be the first limiting amino acid as compared to human (2-5 year old) amino acid requirements. The amino acid composition of the seeds was characterized by the dominance of hydrophobic (range = 37.16-44.54%) and acidic (27.95-33.17%) amino acids followed by basic (16.16-21.17%) and hydrophilic (8.48-11.74%) amino acids. Trypsin inhibitory activity, hemagglutinating activity, and proteolytic activity were not detected in the nut seed samples analyzed. Sorption isotherms (Aw range = 0.08-0.97) indicated a narrow range for monolayer water content (11-29 mg/g of dry matter). No visible mold growth was evident on any of the samples stored at Aw < 0.53 and 25 degrees C for 6 months. PMID:16787018

  20. Precise Determination of Thicknesses of Multilayer Polyethylene Composite Materials by Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, Norbert; Krimi, Soufiene; Ospald, Frank; Miedzinska, Danuta; Gieleta, Roman; Malek, Marcin; Beigang, Rene

    2015-06-01

    The multilayer structure of an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) composite material was investigated in the terahertz (THz) spectral range by means of time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) technique. Such structures consist of many alternating layers of fibers, each being perpendicular to the other and each having a thickness of about 50 ?m. Refractive indices of two composite samples and of a sample composed of four single layers (plies) having the same fiber orientation were determined for two orthogonal orientations of the electric field in a transmission TDS system. The birefringence of a single layer was measured, and the origin of this phenomenon is discussed. Using the TDS system in reflection, the formation of many pulses shifted in time was observed originating from reflections from interfaces of successive layers caused by the periodic modulation of the refractive index along the propagation of the THz radiation. This phenomenon is theoretically described and simulated by means of a transfer matrix method (TMM). A time-domain fitting procedure was used to determine thicknesses of all layers of the composite material. The reconstructed waveform based on the optimized thicknesses shows very good agreement with the measured waveform, with typical differences between measurements and simulations between 3 and 7 ?m (depending on the sample). As a result, we were able to determine the thicknesses of all layers of two multilayer (~200 plies) structures by means of the reflection TDS technology with high accuracy.

  1. Composites and blends from biobased materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, S.S.

    1995-05-01

    The program is focused on the development of composites and blends from biobased materials to use as membranes, high value plastics, and lightweight composites. Biobased materials include: cellulose derivative microporous materials, cellulose derivative copolymers, and cellulose derivative blends. This year`s research focused on developing an improved understanding of the molecular features that cellulose based materials with improved properties for gas separation applications. Novel cellulose ester membrane composites have been developed and are being evaluated under a collaborative research agreement with Dow Chemicals Company.

  2. Fiber composite materials technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, T.T.

    1980-10-23

    The FY1980 technical accomplishments from the Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the Fiber Composite Materials Technology Development Task fo the MEST project are summarized. The task is divided into three areas: Engineering data base for flywheel design (Washington University will report this part separately), new materials evaluation, and time-dependent behavior of Kevlar composite strands. An epoxy matrix was formulated which can be used in composites for 120/sup 0/C service with good processing and mechanical properties. Preliminary results on the time-dependent properties of the Kevlar 49/epoxy strands indicate: Fatigue loading, as compared to sustained loading, drastically reduces the lifetime of a Kevlar composie; the more the number of on-off load cycles, the less the lifetime; and dynamic fatigue of the Kevlar composite can not be predicted by current damage theories such as Miner's Rule.

  3. Enhanced Removal of Lead by Chemically and Biologically Treated Carbonaceous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E.; Osman, Maher M.; Ahmed, Somia B.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid sorbents and biosorbents were synthesized via chemical and biological treatment of active carbon by simple and direct redox reaction followed by surface loading of baker's yeast. Surface functionality and morphology of chemically and biologically modified sorbents and biosorbents were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared analysis and scanning electron microscope imaging. Hybrid carbonaceous sorbents and biosorbents were characterized by excellent efficiency and superiority toward lead(II) sorption compared to blank active carbon providing a maximum sorption capacity of lead(II) ion as 500??mol?g?1. Sorption processes of lead(II) by these hybrid materials were investigated under the influence of several controlling parameters such as pH, contact time, mass of sorbent and biosorbent, lead(II) concentration, and foreign ions. Lead(II) sorption mechanisms were found to obey the Langmuir and BET isotherm models. The potential applications of chemically and biologically modified-active carbonaceous materials for removal and extraction of lead from real water matrices were also studied via a double-stage microcolumn technique. The results of this study were found to denote to superior recovery values of lead (95.0–99.0 ± 3.0–5.0%) by various carbonaceous-modified-bakers yeast biosorbents. PMID:22629157

  4. Non-destructive testing of composite materials by means of active thermography-based tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizaranzu, Miguel; Lario, Alberto; Chiminelli, Agustín; Amenabar, Ibán

    2015-07-01

    Infrared analysis tools are nowadays widely used for the non-destructive testing of components made up in composite materials, belonging to many different industrial sectors. Being a non-contact method, its capability for the inspection of large areas in short periods of time justifies the great number of works and technical studies that can be found in this field. The growing interest in the technique is also supported by the development, during recent years, of increasingly powerful equipment and data analysis tools. In order to establish a base of knowledge to assist defect identification in real components inspections, the design and manufacturing of inspection samples including controlled defects, is a frequently used strategy. This paper deals with the analysis, by means of transient active thermography, of a set of inspection patterns made out of different composite materials and configurations that can be found in the wind turbine blade manufacturing industry. The design and manufacturing of these patterns are described, including different types of representative defects, stack configurations and composite manufacturing techniques. Reference samples are then inspected by means of active thermography analysis tools and the results obtained are discussed.

  5. Chemical vapor infiltration of non-oxide ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites are enabling new, high temperature structural applications. Chemical vapor infiltration methods for producing these composites are being investigated, with the complexity of filament weaves and deposition chemistry merged with standard heat and mass transport relationships. Silicon carbide- based materials are, by far, the most mature, and are already being used in aerospace applications. This paper addresses the state-of-the-art of the technology and outlines current issues.

  6. The energetics of adhesion in composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Philip Hiram

    Composite materials are used throughout modern society, and often the most important parameter in determining their properties is the adhesion at material interfaces within the composite. A broad investigation is completed, the global objective of which is to develop understanding of the role of adhesion in composite materials. The scope of this study ranges from macroscopic effects of adhesion on filled polymer composites to microscopic adhesion measurements with engineered interfaces. The surface of a filler material is systematically modified and surface characterization techniques are used to quantify the influence of the surface treatments on surface energetics and wetting properties. Filled polymer composites are prepared and composite mechanical properties determined with beam deflection tests. Filler surface treatments significantly alter the composite yield stress for composites which fail interfacially and are observed to increase or decrease mechanical strength, depending on the chemical nature of the modification. Thermodynamic adhesion mechanisms active at the filler-matrix interfaces are then explored by making direct interfacial strength measurements whereby a single spherical particle is introduced into the polymeric matrix. Interfacial strength is determined by submitting the single-particle composite (SPC) to uni-axial tension and relating the macroscopic stress at interfacial failure to that experienced at the interface. The technique provides a measurement of interfacial strength between two elastic materials, one unaffected by frictional forces, viscoelasticity, and thermal stresses. The SPC measurements are used to verify proposed adhesion mechanisms at the various filler-polymer interfaces and establish the role of adhesion in the filled polymer composites. The SPC technique is then used to investigate the adhesion promotion mechanism of organofunctional silanes, which are shown to be controlled by the compatibility and penetration of the silane organofunctional group. The effects of thermal residual stresses on interfacial strength are also investigated using the SPC technique. Processing conditions, i.e., time-temperature profiles, are used to systematically vary the thermal residual stresses within the polymeric matrix. The interfaces studied are deleteriously affected by increases in thermal residual stresses.

  7. Investigation of the chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide from tetramethylsilane by in situ temperature and gas composition measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Herlin, N.; Lefebvre, M.; Pealat, M.; Perrin, J.

    1992-08-20

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon carbide (SiC) from tetramethylsilane Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 4} (TMS) on a graphite susceptor at 1200-1500 K is studied in a low pressure ({approx}100 Pa) cold-wall reactor under laminar flow conditions. In addition to material characterization (electron microscopy and chemical analysis), the gas-phase temperature distribution and composition are investigated by combining several in situ and ex situ diagnostics. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) on TMS and H{sub 2} (produced from TMS decomposition) in the hot zone of the reactor gives the rotational temperature distribution of the molecules and their concentrations. Within a few mean free paths from the surface, the H{sub 2} gas temperature is lower than the surface temperature. This is due to nonunity accommodation coefficient {alpha} of H{sub 2} on SiC. A simple analytical model yields {alpha} = 0.05 for H{sub 2} on SiC. Using gas transport coefficients and the experimental value of {alpha} for H{sub 2}, a two-dimensional numerical code is used to compute the gas flow and temperature profiles in the reactor. The increase of the H{sub 2} concentration and the decrease of TMS concentration close to the surface reveals that gas-phase pyrolysis of TMS occurs within a few millimeters from the hot surface. The gas composition at the outlet of the reactor is analyzed by mass spectrometry and IR absorption spectroscopy. The global gas conversion and material balance between deposited SiC, powders, and exhaust gases is obtained Si atoms of TMS molecules are mostly converted into solid SiC and powders. In the gaseous products a small fraction of trimethylsilane SiH(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} is detected. Other gases in decreasing order of importance are H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. These results are compared with predictions of some thermodynamic models and chemical mechanisms reported in the literature. 42 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Germanium-on-Silicon Strain Engineered Materials for Improved Device Performance Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, Jayesh Moorkoth

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a chemical vapor deposition process for growing epitaxial films of germanium on silicon (001) substrates with two-dimensional (2-D) morphology, and a low density of threading dislocations. Growth was carried out in a reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition (RPCVD) system by a two-step growth technique. An accurate knowledge of elastic constants of thin films is important in understanding the effect of strain on material properties. Residual thermal strain was used to measure the Poisson ratio of Ge films grown on Si(001) substrates, by the sin2Psi method and highresolution x-ray diffraction. The Poisson ratio of the Ge films was measured to be 0.25, compared to the bulk value of 0.27. The result was found to be independent of film thickness and defect density, which confirmed that the strain is associated with the elastic response of the film. The study showed that the use of Poisson ratio instead of bulk compliance values yields a more accurate description of the state of in-plane strain present in the film. The experimentally measured in-plane strain in Ge films was found to be lower than the theoretical calculations based on the differential thermal expansion coefficients of Si and Ge. The mechanism of thermal misfit strain relaxation in epitaxial Ge films grown on Si(001) substrates was investigated by x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Lattice misfit strain associated with Ge/(001)Si mismatched epitaxy is relieved by a network of Lomer edge misfit dislocations during the first step of the growth technique. However, thermal misfit strain energy during growth is relieved by interdiffusion mechanism at the heterointerface. Two SiGe compositions containing 0.5 and 6.0 atomic percent Si were detected that relieve the thermal mismatch strain associated with the two steps of the growth process. This study discusses the importance of interdiffusion mechanism in relieving small misfit strains present during epitaxy. The microstructural characteristics of Ge films were analyzed by x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The principal defects in the epitaxial films were determined to be threading dislocations and stacking faults. A unique defect appearing as a line during defect delineation was established to be a wide stacking fault arising from oxygen contamination during RPCVD epitaxy. A decrease in defect density by almost an order of magnitude was observed with increasing film thickness. Germanium films with a thickness of 3.5 mum exhibited the lowest threading dislocation densities of 5 x 106 cm-2. The mechanisms of interactions between threading dislocations has been discussed with the aid of transmission electron microscopy to explain the reduction in the observed threading dislocation density. A strong correlation was obtained between electrical performance of the devices and defect density. Thicker films with the lowest threading dislocation density of 5 x 106 cm-2 also yielded devices with the lowest dark current density of ˜ 5 mA/cm2 (1 V reverse bias) and bulk resistivity of 30 O cm2. All devices showed spectral response of up to 1.61 mum, confirming a strain-induced shrinkage of the direct band gap by approximately 30 meV, which is in good agreement with theoretical models. In summary, the structural, electrical, and optical properties of 2-D Ge films grown on Si(001) substrates by RPCVD has been investigated.

  9. Zirconia/alumina functionally gradiented composites by electrophoretic deposition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, P.; Huang, Xuening; Nicholson, P.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-04-01

    Continuous variation of composition, and thus of physical property, is characteristic of a functionally gradiented material (FGM). Such composite find applications in extreme thermal shielding, the joining of ceramics to metals, optical/electronic functions, and biomaterial implant development. FGMs have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), plasma spraying, self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, and green forming followed by sintering. An electrophoretic deposition and sintering route was used to prepare YSZ/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] composites with a compositional gradient. The YSZ content was continuously decreased from the YSZ-rich surface to the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]-rich surface. Microstructural and Vickers hardness (16--24 GPa) evidence tracked the compositional development, and the indentation fracture toughness was found to vary across the section (10--3 MPa[center dot]m[sup 1/2]).

  10. The physicochemical properties and chemical composition of trehalose lipids produced by Rhodococcus erythropolis 51T7.

    PubMed

    Marqués, A M; Pinazo, A; Farfan, M; Aranda, F J; Teruel, J A; Ortiz, A; Manresa, A; Espuny, M J

    2009-04-01

    This study analyzed the chemical and physical properties of a biosurfactant synthesized by Rhodococcus sp. 51T7. The biosurfactant was a trehalose tetraester (THL) consisting of six components: one major and five minor. The hydrophobic moieties ranged in size from 9 to 11 carbons. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was 0.037g L(-1) and the interfacial tension against hexadecane was 5mN m(-1). At pH 7.4 the glycolipid CMC/critical aggregation concentration (CAC) was 0.05g L(-1) and at pH 4 it was 0.034g L(-1). A phase diagram revealed effective emulsification with water and paraffin or isopropyl myristate. A composition of 11.3-7.5-81.8 (isopropyl myristate-THL-W) was stable for at least 3 months. The HLB was 11 and the phase behaviour of the glycolipid revealed the formation of lamellar and hexagonal liquid-crystalline textures. PMID:19428355

  11. Biomimetic apatite-based composite materials obtained by spark plasma sintering (SPS): physicochemical and mechanical characterizations.

    PubMed

    Brouillet, Fabien; Laurencin, Danielle; Grossin, David; Drouet, Christophe; Estournes, Claude; Chevallier, Geoffroy; Rey, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Nanocrystalline calcium phosphate apatites are biomimetic compounds analogous to bone mineral and are at the origin of the bioactivity of most biomaterials used as bone substitutes. Their unique surface reactivity originates from the presence of a hydrated layer containing labile ions (mostly divalent ones). So the setup of 3D biocompatible apatite-based bioceramics exhibiting a high reactivity requests the development of «low» temperature consolidation processes such as spark plasma sintering (SPS), in order to preserve the characteristics of the hydrated nanocrystals. However, mechanical performances may still need to be improved for such nanocrystalline apatite bioceramics, especially in view of load-bearing applications. The reinforcement by association with biopolymers represents an appealing approach, while preserving the advantageous biological properties of biomimetic apatites. Herein, we report the preparation of composites based on biomimetic apatite associated with various quantities of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, 1-20 wt%), a natural fibrous polymer. The SPS-consolidated composites were analyzed from both physicochemical (X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, solid state NMR) and mechanical (Brazilian test) viewpoints. The preservation of the physicochemical characteristics of apatite and cellulose in the final material was observed. Mechanical properties of the composite materials were found to be directly related to the polymer/apatite ratios and a maximum crushing strength was reached for 10 wt% of MCC. PMID:26271216

  12. Failure Study of Composite Materials by the Yeh-Stratton Criterion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hsien-Yang; Richards, W. Lance

    1997-01-01

    The newly developed Yeh-Stratton (Y-S) Strength Criterion was used to study the failure of composite materials with central holes and normal cracks. To evaluate the interaction parameters for the Y-S failure theory, it is necessary to perform several biaxial loading tests. However, it is indisputable that the inhomogeneous and anisotropic nature of composite materials have made their own contribution to the complication of the biaxial testing problem. To avoid the difficulties of performing many biaxial tests and still consider the effects of the interaction term in the Y-S Criterion, a simple modification of the Y-S Criterion was developed. The preliminary predictions by the modified Y-S Criterion were relatively conservative compared to the testing data. Thus, the modified Y-S Criterion could be used as a design tool. To further understand the composite failure problem, an investigation of the damage zone in front of the crack tip coupled with the Y-S Criterion is imperative.

  13. Surface structure, composition, and polarity of indium nitride grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    E-print Network

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition have been studied. Atomic hydrogen cleaning produced and heterostructures--which can be accomplished by low- pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition MOCVD --the- rium vapor pressure of nitrogen during growth. This requires different approaches in growing structures

  14. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  15. 27 CFR 19.326 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.326 Section 19.326 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production Chemical By-Products § 19.326 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals produced, including chemical...

  16. Utilization of composite materials by the US Army: A look ahead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chait, Richard

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the use of composite materials in the Army is given. Important efforts to document design information, supporting research, and some national applications for composite materials are given. The use of Kevlar fiber in both vests and helmets for the soldier is outlined. The advantages of using fiberglass in the hull of the Bradley fighting ground vehicle is given. The full potential of composite materials is realized in the recently awarded LH Comanche RAH-66 program. The use of composites for application to rocket motor uses, wings, fins, and casings is under development. Because of the uncertain funding profile, it is more important than ever that technology planning provide the basis for effective prioritization and leveraging of the tech base efforts involving advanced materials.

  17. Fabrication and evaluation of low fiber content alumina fiber/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, J. E.; Strempek, G. C.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical fabrication of low volume percent fiber, polycrystalline alumina fiber reinforced aluminum composites was accomplished. Wire preform material was prepared by liquid-metal infiltration of alumina fiber bundles. The wires were subsequently encapsulated with aluminum foil and fabricated into bulk composite material by hot-drawing. Extensive mechanical, thermal and chemical testing was conducted on preform and bulk material to develop a process and material data base. In addition, a preliminary investigation of mechanical forming of bulk alumina fiber reinforced aluminum composite material was conducted.

  18. Vector diagram of the chemical compositions of tektites and earth lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvasha, L. G.; Gorshkov, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical compositions of tektites and various volcanic glasses, similar in composition to tektites are compared by a petrochemical method. The advantage of the method is that a large number of chemical analyses of igneous rocks can be graphically compared with the help of vectors, plotted in relation to six parameters. These parameters, calculated from ratios of the main oxides given by silicate analysis, reflect the chief characteristics of igneous rock. Material for the study was suppled by data from chemical analysis characterizing tektites of all known locations and data from chemical analyses of obsidians similar in chemical composition to tektites of various petrographical provinces.

  19. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  20. Hydrogen storage in different carbon materials: Influence of the porosity development by chemical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Sánchez, Paula; Valverde, José Luís; Romero, Amaya

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen adsorption capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured as a function of pressure and temperature. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less hydrogen than more amorphous materials. After a chemical activation process, the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbon materials increased markedly in comparison with the non-activated ones. BET surface area of amorphous carbon increased by a factor of 3.5 and the ultramicropore volume doubled, thus increasing the hydrogen adsorption by a factor of 2. However, BET surface area in platelet CNFs increased by a factor of 3 and the ultramicropore volume by a factor of 6, thus increasing the hydrogen storage by a factor of 4.5. The dependency of hydrogen storage capacity of carbon materials on the BET surface area was evaluated using both a condensation model and experimental results. Comparison of data suggests that the hydrogen adsorption capacity clearly depends on the pore structure and so, on the accessibility to the internal surface.

  1. Joining of polymer composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Magness, F.H.

    1990-11-01

    Under ideal conditions load bearing structures would be designed without joints, thus eliminating a source of added weight, complexity and weakness. In reality the need for accessibility, repair, and inspectability, added to the size limitations imposed by the manufacturing process and transportation/assembly requirements mean that some minimum number of joints will be required in most structures. The designer generally has two methods for joining fiber composite materials, adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening. As the use of thermoplastic materials increases, a third joining technique -- welding -- will become more common. It is the purpose of this document to provide a review of the available sources pertinent to the design of joints in fiber composites. The primary emphasis is given to adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening with information coming from documentary sources as old as 1961 and as recent as 1989. A third, shorter section on composite welding is included in order to provide a relatively comprehensive treatment of the subject.

  2. Chemical characterization of torbanites by transmission micro-FTIR spectroscopy: Origin and extent of compositional heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Landais, P.; Rochdi, A. ); Largeau, C.; Derenne, S. )

    1993-06-01

    Four Permian to Carboniferous torbanites of various geographical origins were examined by transmission micro-FTIR spectroscopy on doubly polished thin sections (10--25 [mu]m). Several types of heterogeneities (different types of organic matrix; yellow and orange Botryococcus braunii colonies) were identified and chemically characterized. Important differences were noted between the organic constituents of the matrix and the algal bodies, regarding the intensity of OH, C[double bond]O, and aromatic C[double bond]C absorptions. The previous IR studies of torbanites on bulk samples therefore afforded substantially biased information on the composition of B. braunii fossil colonies, on their oil potential, and on the maturity of such kerogens. Micro-FTIR spectra indicate that the organic matrix corresponds neither to an extensive breaking up of colonies nor to humic substances. This matrix is highly heterogeneous; two types were identified in the Autun sample (chiefly corresponding to degraded algal and bacterial constituents, respectively). A precise characterization of the organic matrix was made difficult, however, in Pumpherston torbanite, due to intimate mixing with minerals. The co-occurrence of yellow and orange colonies, with contrasted micro-FTIR features, in Autun torbanite neither reflects radiolysis processes nor differences in maturation and/or source algae. A specific spatial relation was observed between these two types of algal bodies and the organo-mineral matrix, thus revealing differences in colony microenvironment after deposition. The orange colonies are likely derived, in agreement with their micro-FTIR spectra and their spatial correlation with the matrix, from sedimentological and/or matrix-catalyzed diagenetic transformations of some yellow colonies. This first application of micro-FTIR to kerogens confirmed the utility of this nondestructive, in situ pin-point method. 69 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Fatigue Crack and Porosity Measurement in Composite Materials by Thermographic and Ultrasonic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Russell, Samuel S.; Suits, Michael W.; Workman, Gary L.

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Purpose. Detect thermo-mechanically induced intra-ply fatigue microcracking and manufactured porosity in unlined composite pressure vessels. 2. Defect descriptions. Porosity, microcracking. 3. Thermography. Overview of technique. Strengths and Weaknesses. Examples of its use for porosity detection. 4. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. Overview of technique. Strengths and Weaknesses. Examples of its use for microcracking detection. Conclusions.

  4. Extinction characterization of soot produced by laser ablating carbon fiber composite materials in air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiping; Ma, Zhiliang; Zhang, Zhenrong; Zhou, Menglian; Wei, Chenghua

    2015-05-01

    In order to research the dynamic process of energy coupling between an incident laser and a carbon fiber/epoxy resin composite material, an extinction characterization analysis of soot, which is produced by laser ablating and located in an air flow that is tangential to the surface of the composite material, is carried out. By the theory analyses, a relationship of mass extinction coefficient and extinction cross section of the soot is derived. It is obtained that the mass extinction coefficients of soot aggregates are the same as those of the primary particles when they contain only a few primary particles. This conclusion is significant when the soot is located in an air flow field, where the generations of the big soot aggregates are suppressed. A verification experiment is designed. The experiment employs Laser Induced Incandescence technology and laser extinction method for the soot synchronization diagnosis. It can derive a temporal curve of the mass extinction coefficient from the soot concentration and laser transmittance. The experiment results show that the mass extinction coefficient becomes smaller when the air flow velocity is higher. The reason is due to the decrease of the scatter effects of the soot particles. The experiment results agree with the theory analysis conclusion.

  5. Chemical comparisons of liquid fuel produced by thermochemical liquefaction of various biomass materials

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.A.; Molton, P.M.; Landsman, S.D.

    1980-12-01

    Liquefaction of biomass in aqueous alkali at temperatures up to 350/sup 0/C is an effective way to convert solid wastes into liquid fuels. The liqefaction oils of several forms of biomass differing in proportions of cellulose, hemi-cellulose, lignin, protein, and minerals were studied and their chemical composition compared. It was that the proportions of chemical components varied considerably depending on the type of biomass liquefied. However, all the oils, even those produced from cellulose, had similar chemical characteristics due to the presence of significant quantities of phenols. These phenols are at least partially responsible for the corrosivity and viscosity commonly associated with biomass oils. The differences in chemical component distribution in the various biomass oils might successfully be exploited if the oil is to be used as a chemical feedstock. If the oil is to be used as a fuel, however, then reaction conditions will be a more important consideration than the source of biomass.

  6. APPLICATION OF TIME-DOMAIN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE TO QUANTIFY OIL CONTENT IN STARCH-OIL COMPOSITES PREPARED BY EXCESS STEAM JET-COOKING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable dispersions of starch-oil composites can be obtained by excess steam jet-cooking aqueous slurries of starch and hydrophobic materials such as vegetable oils. These composites consist of uniformly suspended starch-coated oil droplets (1-10 micrometers in diameter). These composites can conta...

  7. Development of rice husks-plastics composites for building materials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nak-Woon; Mori, Ippei; Ohama, Yoshihiko

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new effective recycling method for rice husks and waste expanded polystyrene is developed by using a combination of both wastes. A styrene solution of waste expanded polystyrene is used as a binder for rice husks-plastics composites. The composites are prepared with various mix proportions by a hot press molding method, and tested for apparent density, water absorption, expansion in thickness, and dry and wet flexural strengths. From the test results, the apparent density of the composites is increased with increasing binder content and filler-binder ratio. Their flexural strength and wet flexural strengths reach maximums at a binder content of 30.0% and a filler-binder ratio of 1.0. Their water absorption and expansion in thickness are decreased with increasing binder content and filler-binder ratio. Since the composites have a high flexural strength and water resistance, their uses as building materials are expected. PMID:16256327

  8. Chemical composition, morphology and optical properties of zinc sulfide coatings deposited by low-energy electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragachev, A. V.; Yarmolenko, M. A.; Rogachev, A. A.; Gorbachev, D. L.; Zhou, Bing

    2014-06-01

    The research determines the features of formation, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties of the coatings deposited by the method, proposed for the first time, of the exposure of mechanical mixture of zinc and sulfur powders to low-energy electron beam evaporation. The findings show that the deposited coatings are characterized by high chemical and structural homogeneity in thickness. The study considers the influence of substrate temperature and thickness of the deposited layer on the morphology and the width of the formed ZnS thin layers band gap. Also was shown the possibility to form ZnS coatings with this method using the mixture of zinc and copper sulfide powders.

  9. Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Chemical Engineering and Materials Science COLLEGE of ENGINEERING DepartmentofChemicalEngineering-credit EDGE Engineering Entrepreneur Certificate Program is a great addition to a chemical engineering t engineering.wayne.edu/che #12;What is chemical engineering? Imagine saving the lives of pediatric patients

  10. An Overview of Recent Development in Composite Catalysts from Porous Materials for Various Reactions and Processes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zaiku; Liu, Zhicheng; Wang, Yangdong; Yang, Qihua; Xu, Longya; Ding, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Catalysts are important to the chemical industry and environmental remediation due to their effective conversion of one chemical into another. Among them, composite catalysts have attracted continuous attention during the past decades. Nowadays, composite catalysts are being used more and more to meet the practical catalytic performance requirements in the chemical industry of high activity, high selectivity and good stability. In this paper, we reviewed our recent work on development of composite catalysts, mainly focusing on the composite catalysts obtained from porous materials such as zeolites, mesoporous materials, carbon nanotubes (CNT), etc. Six types of porous composite catalysts are discussed, including amorphous oxide modified zeolite composite catalysts, zeolite composites prepared by co-crystallization or overgrowth, hierarchical porous catalysts, host-guest porous composites, inorganic and organic mesoporous composite catalysts, and polymer/CNT composite catalysts. PMID:20559508

  11. Composition and microstructure of zirconium and hafnium germanates obtained by different chemical routes

    SciTech Connect

    Utkin, A.V. Prokip, V.E.; Baklanova, N.I.

    2014-01-15

    The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. The products were characterized using high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal (TG/DTA) analysis. To investigate the phase composition and stoichiometry of compounds the unit cell parameters were refined by full-profile Rietveld XRD analysis. The morphology of products and its evolution during high-temperature treatment was examined by SEM analysis. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. The ceramic route requires a multi-stage high-temperature treatment to obtain zirconium and hafnium germanates of 95% purity or more. Also, there are strong diffusion limitations to obtain hafnium germanate Hf{sub 3}GeO{sub 8} by ceramic route. On the contrary, the co-precipitation route leads to the formation of nanocrystalline single phase germanates of stoichiometric composition at a relatively low temperatures (less than 1000 °C). The results of quantitative XRD analysis showed the hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds in contrast to zirconium germanates that form a set of solid solutions. This distinction may be related to the difference in the ion radii of Zr and Hf. - Graphical abstract: The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Zr and Hf germanates were synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes. • The morphology of products depends on the synthesis parameters. • Zirconium germanates forms a set of solid solutions. • Hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds.

  12. Asymmetric Dielectric Elastomer Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a dielectric elastomer composite material comprising a plurality of elastomer-coated electrodes arranged in an assembly. Embodiments of the invention provide improved force output over prior DEs by producing thinner spacing between electrode surfaces. This is accomplished by coating electrodes directly with uncured elastomer in liquid form and then assembling a finished component (which may be termed an actuator) from coated electrode components.

  13. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  14. Improved process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Lackey, W.J. Jr.; Caputo, A.J.

    1984-09-07

    A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  15. Prediction of Local Ultimate Strain and Toughness of Trabecular Bone Tissue by Raman Material Composition Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stüssi, Edgar; Müller, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate that bone mineral density correlates with fracture risk at the population level but does not correlate with individual fracture risk well. Current research aims to better understand the failure mechanism of bone and to identify key determinants of bone quality, thus improving fracture risk prediction. To get a better understanding of bone strength, it is important to analyze tissue-level properties not influenced by macro- or microarchitectural factors. The aim of this pilot study was to identify whether and to what extent material properties are correlated with mechanical properties at the tissue level. The influence of macro- or microarchitectural factors was excluded by testing individual trabeculae. Previously reported data of mechanical parameters measured in single trabeculae under tension and bending and its compositional properties measured by Raman spectroscopy was evaluated. Linear and multivariate regressions show that bone matrix quality but not quantity was significantly and independently correlated with the tissue-level ultimate strain and postyield work (r = 0.65–0.94). Principal component analysis extracted three independent components explaining 86% of the total variance, representing elastic, yield, and ultimate components according to the included mechanical parameters. Some matrix parameters were both included in the ultimate component, indicating that the variation in ultimate strain and postyield work could be largely explained by Raman-derived compositional parameters. PMID:25695083

  16. Spectral Analysis by XANES Reveals that GPNMB Influences the Chemical Composition of Intact Melanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    T Haraszti; C Trantow; A Hedberg-Buenz; M Grunze; M Anderson

    2011-12-31

    GPNMB is a unique melanosomal protein. Unlike many melanosomal proteins, GPNMB has not been associated with any forms of albinism, and it is unclear whether GPNMB has any direct influence on melanosomes. Here, melanosomes from congenic strains of C57BL/6J mice mutant for Gpnmb are compared to strain-matched controls using standard transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis (XANES). Whereas electron microscopy did not detect any ultrastructural changes in melanosomes lacking functional GPNMB, XANES uncovered multiple spectral phenotypes. These results directly demonstrate that GPNMB influences the chemical composition of melanosomes and more broadly illustrate the potential for using genetic approaches in combination with nano-imaging technologies to study organelle biology.

  17. Surface doping of composite plasmonic material by functional graphene nanostructures for organic solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-Chu; Yang, Cheng-Du; Kao, Yi-Lun; Chiu, Nan-Fu

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we're binding gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) by cystamine (Cys). The PEDOT:PSS mix GNPs/Cys/rGO as a hole transport layer of the solar cell. From the experimental result shows the PEDOT:PSS/GNPs/Cys/rGO/ITO film than ITO film have the best transmittance. It's transmittance was decreased for 1.01% at 545 nm wavelength. The sheet resistance of PEDOT:PSS/GNPs/Cys/rGO/ITO was reduce than PEDOT:PSS/ITO, when it was doped with Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and rGO on ITO glass. The former is than the latter decreased for 1%. For these reasons due to impact by surface doping of composite plasmonic material.

  18. Correlation of rocket propulsion fuel properties with chemical composition using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry followed by partial least squares regression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kehimkar, Benjamin; Hoggard, Jamin C.; Marney, Luke C.; Billingsley, Matthew; Fraga, Carlos G.; Bruno, Thomas J.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2014-01-31

    There is an increased need to more fully assess and control the composition of kerosene based rocket propulsion fuels, namely RP-1 and RP-2. In particular, it is crucial to be able to make better quantitative connections between the following three attributes: (a) fuel performance, (b) fuel properties (flash point, density, kinematic viscosity, net heat of combustion, hydrogen content, etc) and (c) the chemical composition of a given fuel (i.e., specific chemical compounds and compound classes present as a result of feedstock blending and processing). Indeed, recent efforts in predicting fuel performance through modeling put greater emphasis on detailed and accurate fuel properties and fuel compositional information. In this regard, advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology provides improved data relative to classical boiling point and volatility curve techniques. Using ADC metrology, data obtained from RP-1 and RP-2 fuels provides compositional variation information that is directly relevant to predictive modeling of fuel performance. Often, in such studies, one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is typically employed to provide chemical composition information. Building on approaches using GC-MS, but to glean substantially more chemical composition information from these complex fuels, we have recently studied the use of comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC - TOFMS) to provide chemical composition data that is significantly richer than that provided by GC-MS methods. In this report, by applying multivariate data analysis techniques, referred to as chemometrics, we are able to readily model (correlate) the chemical compositional information from RP-1 and RP-2 fuels provided using GC × GC - TOFMS, to the fuel property information such as that provided by the ADC method and other specification properties. We anticipate that this new chemical analysis strategy will have broad implications for the development of high fidelity composition-property models, leading to an optimized approach to fuel formulation and specification for advanced engine cycles.

  19. Cometary coma chemical composition (C4) mission. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Clark, B. C.; Niemann, H. B.; Alexander, M.; Knocke, P. C.; O'Hara, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary missions are of enormous fundamental importance for many different space science disciplines, including exobiology. Comets are presumed relics of the earliest, most primitive material in the solar nebula and are related to the planetesimals. They undoubtedly provided a general enrichment of volatiles to the inner solar system (contributing to atmospheres and oceans) and may have been key to the origin of life. A Discovery class, comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, was selected for further study by NASA earlier this year. The C4 Mission is a highly focused and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission, concentrating exclusively on measurements which will lead to an understanding of the chemical composition and make-up of the cometary nucleus. The scientific goals of the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission are to rendezvous with a short-period comet and (1) to determine the elemental, chemical, and isotopic composition of the nucleus and (2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. Further, it is a goal to obtain preliminary data on the development of the coma (dust and gas composition) as a function of time and orbital position.

  20. Materials Science and Engineering B54 (1998) 207209 Growth of gallium phosphide layers by chemical beam epitaxy on

    E-print Network

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    1998-01-01

    Materials Science and Engineering B54 (1998) 207­209 Letter Growth of gallium phosphide layers by chemical beam epitaxy on oxide patterned (001)silicon substrates V. Narayanan a, *, N. Sukidi c , Chimin Hu b , N. Dietz c , K.J. Bachmann c , S. Mahajan a , S. Shingubara d a Department of Chemical, Bio

  1. Health, safety and environmental requirements for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazer, Kathleen A.

    1994-01-01

    The health, safety and environmental requirements for the production of composite materials are discussed. The areas covered include: (1) chemical identification for each chemical; (2) toxicology; (3) industrial hygiene; (4) fire and safety; (5) environmental aspects; and (6) medical concerns.

  2. Chemical composition and tissue energy density of the cuttlefish (Sepia apama) and its assimilation efficiency by Diomedea albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Battam, H; Richardson, M; Watson, A W T; Buttemer, W A

    2010-11-01

    The cuttlefish Sepia apama Gray (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) is a seasonally abundant food resource exploited annually by moulting albatrosses throughout winter and early spring in the coastal waters of New South Wales, Australia. To assess its nutritional value as albatross forage, we analysed S. apama for water, lipid protein, ash contents, energy density and amino acid composition. Because albatrosses consistently consume S. apama parts preferentially in the order of head, viscera and mantle, we analysed these sections separately, but did not identify any nutritional basis for this selective feeding behaviour. The gross energy value of S. apama bodies was 20.9 kJ/g dry mass, but their high water content (>83%; cf <70% for fish) results in a relatively low energy density of 3.53 kJ/g. This may contribute to a need to take large meals, which subsequently degrade flight performance. Protein content was typically >75% dry mass, whereas fat content was only about 1%. Albatrosses feed on many species of cephalopods and teleost fish, and we found the amino acid composition of S. apama to be comparable to a range of species within these taxa. We used S. apama exclusively in feeding trials to estimate the energy assimilation efficiency for Diomedea albatrosses. We estimated their nitrogen-corrected apparent energy assimilation efficiency for consuming this prey to be 81.82 ± 0.72% and nitrogen retention as 2.90 ± 0.11 g N kg(-1) d(-1). Although S. apama has a high water content and relatively low energy density, its protein composition is otherwise comparable to other albatross prey species. Consequently, the large size and seasonal abundance of this prey should ensure that albatrosses remain replete and adequately nourished on this forage while undergoing moult. PMID:20640855

  3. Surface chemical composition of human maxillary first premolar as assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Leo; Nelson, Alan E.; Heo, Giseon; Major, Paul W.

    2008-08-01

    The surface chemical composition of dental enamel has been postulated as a contributing factor in the variation of bond strength of brackets bonded to teeth, and hence, the probability of bracket failure during orthodontic treatment. This study systematically investigated the chemical composition of 98 bonding surfaces of human maxillary premolars using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to ascertain compositional differences between right and left first premolars. The major elements detected in all samples were calcium, phosphorus, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. Surface compositions were highly variable between samples and several elements were found to be highly correlated. No statistical significant difference in the chemical composition of the maxillary right and left first premolars was found ( p > 0.05). Knowledge of the chemical composition of enamel surfaces will facilitate future studies that relate this information to the variations in dental enamel bond strength.

  4. Chemical processing of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper highlights recent work on the general problem of processing lunar materials. The discussion covers lunar source materials, refined products, motivations for using lunar materials, and general considerations for a lunar or space processing plant. Attention is given to chemical processing through various techniques, including electrolysis of molten silicates, carbothermic/silicothermic reduction, carbo-chlorination process, NaOH basic-leach process, and HF acid-leach process. Several options for chemical processing of lunar materials are well within the state of the art of applied chemistry and chemical engineering to begin development based on the extensive knowledge of lunar materials.

  5. Cell attachment to hydrogel-electrospun fiber mat composite materials.

    PubMed

    Han, Ning; Johnson, Jed K; Bradley, Patrick A; Parikh, Kunal S; Lannutti, John J; Winter, Jessica O

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels, electrospun fiber mats (EFMs), and their composites have been extensively studied for tissue engineering because of their physical and chemical similarity to native biological systems. However, while chemically similar, hydrogels and electrospun fiber mats display very different topographical features. Here, we examine the influence of surface topography and composition of hydrogels, EFMs, and hydrogel-EFM composites on cell behavior. Materials studied were composed of synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(?-caprolactone) (PEGPCL) hydrogels and electrospun poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and core/shell PCL/PEGPCL constituent materials. The number of adherent cells and cell circularity were most strongly influenced by the fibrous nature of materials (e.g., topography), whereas cell spreading was more strongly influenced by material composition (e.g., chemistry). These results suggest that cell attachment and proliferation to hydrogel-EFM composites can be tuned by varying these properties to provide important insights for the future design of such composite materials. PMID:24955629

  6. Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science University of Southern by incorporating mod- ern concepts such as nanotechnology and biotechnology into a traditional approach that has Projects" » W. Victor Chang (Associate Professor) Polymers-Composites Adhesion Mechanics, Thin Films » John

  7. Wear of hard materials by hard particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2003-10-01

    Hard materials, such as WC-Co, boron carbide, titanium diboride and composite carbide made up of Mo2C and WC, have been tested in abrasion and erosion conditions. These hard materials showed negligible wear in abrasion against SiC particles and erosion using Al2O3 particles. The WC-Co materials have the highest wear rate of these hard materials and a very different material removal mechanism. Wear mechanisms for these materials were different for each material with the overall wear rate controlled by binder composition and content and material grain size.

  8. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The composite aircraft program component (CAPCOMP) is a graduate level project conducted in parallel with a composite structures program. The composite aircraft program glider (CAPGLIDE) is an undergraduate demonstration project which has as its objectives the design, fabrication, and testing of a foot launched ultralight glider using composite structures. The objective of the computer aided design (COMPAD) portion of the composites project is to provide computer tools for the analysis and design of composite structures. The major thrust of COMPAD is in the finite element area with effort directed at implementing finite element analysis capabilities and developing interactive graphics preprocessing and postprocessing capabilities. The criteria for selecting research projects to be conducted under the innovative and supporting research (INSURE) program are described.

  9. Dual bioactivities of essential oil extracted from the leaves of Artemisia argyi as an antimelanogenic versus antioxidant agent and chemical composition analysis by GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huey-Chun; Wang, Hsiao-Fen; Yih, Kuang-Hway; Chang, Long-Zen; Chang, Tsong-Min

    2012-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the antimelanogenic and antioxidant properties of essential oil when extracted from the leaves of Artemisia argyi, then analyzing the chemical composition of the essential oil. The inhibitory effect of the essential oil on melanogenesis was evaluated by a mushroom tyrosinase activity assay and B16F10 melanoma cell model. The antioxidant capacity of the essential oil was assayed by spectrophotometric analysis, and the volatile chemical composition of the essential oil was analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The results revealed that the essential oil significantly inhibits mushroom tyrosinase activity (IC(50) = 19.16 mg/mL), down-regulates B16F10 intracellular tyrosinase activity and decreases the amount of melanin content in a dose-dependent pattern. Furthermore, the essential oil significantly scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) ABTS radicals, showed an apparent reduction power as compared with metal-ion chelating activities. The chemicals constituents in the essential oil are ether (23.66%), alcohols (16.72%), sesquiterpenes (15.21%), esters (11.78%), monoterpenes (11.63%), ketones (6.09%), aromatic compounds (5.01%), and account for a 90.10% analysis of its chemical composition. It is predicted that eucalyptol and the other constituents, except for alcohols, in the essential oil may contribute to its antioxidant activities. The results indicated that essential oil extracted from A. argyi leaves decreased melanin production in B16F10 cells and showed potent antioxidant activity. The essential oil can thereby be applied as an inhibitor of melanogenesis and could also act as a natural antioxidant in skin care products. PMID:23203088

  10. Assessment of The Compatibility of Composite Materials With High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Griffin, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The compatibility of composite materials with high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) was assessed using various chemical and mechanical techniques. Methods included classical schemes combining concentration assay with accelerated aging by means of a heated water bath. Exothermic reactivity was observed using Isothermal Microcalorimetry. Mechanical Properties testing determined degradation of the composite material. Photoacoustic Infrared Spectroscopy was used to monitor chemical alteration of the resin matrix. Other materials were examined including some polymers and metals.

  11. Chemical composition of Hanford Tank SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, E.; Agnew, S.; Jarvinen, G.; Yarbro, S.

    1993-12-01

    The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of the radioactive waste, both current and future, stored in double-shell and single-shell tanks at the Hanford sites. One major program element in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal using the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. In support of this program, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a conceptual process flow sheet which will remediate the entire contents of a selected double-shelled underground waste tank, including supernatant and sludge, into forms that allow storage and final disposal in a safe, cost-effective and environmentally sound manner. The specific tank selected for remediation is 241-SY-102 located in the 200 West Area. As part of the flow sheet development effort, the composition of the tank was defined and documented. This database was built by examining the history of liquid waste transfers to the tank and by performing careful analysis of all of the analytical data that have been gathered during the tank`s lifetime. In order to more completely understand the variances in analytical results, material and charge balances were done to help define the chemistry of the various components in the tank. This methodology of defining the tank composition and the final results are documented in this report.

  12. Environmental effects of oilfield chemicals on composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sorem, R.M.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents a feasibility study of the effects of oilfield chemicals on composite materials. In this initial study only hydrochloric acid is considered. Initial attempts were made to test stressed specimens, but results were very poor. Subsequent testing was performed to determine how the composite material constituents reacted to the hydrochloric acid. The initial testing was performed on tubular specimens with axial and essentially hoop wound fibers of different materials with different resins. The specimens were loaded in bending to induce representative strains in the tubing. All specimens failed. The second tests consisted of only an environmental soak to determine the amount of mass uptake as well as the reduction in strength. The strength reduction results will be presented at a later time. Testing was performed on S-2 glass, carbon and Kevlar 49 as well as three different resins.

  13. p-Type Bismuth Telluride-Based Composite Thermoelectric Materials Produced by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz, M. K.; Vasilevskiy, D.; Masut, R. A.; Turenne, S.

    2013-07-01

    We produced six different composites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride alloys and studied their structure and thermoelectric properties. The components of the composites were obtained in powder form by mechanical alloying. Mixed powders of two different compositions were consolidated by hot extrusion to obtain each bulk composite. The minimum grain size of bulk composites as revealed by scanning electron microscopy shows a 50% reduction compared with the conventional (Bi0.2Sb0.8)2Te3. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis only shows peak broadening with no clear indication of separate phases, and indicates a systematic decrease of crystallite size in the composite materials. Scattering mechanisms of charge carriers were evaluated by Hall-effect measurements. The thermoelectric properties were investigated via the Harman method from 300 K up to 460 K. The composites show no significant degradation of the power factor and high peak ZT values ranging from 0.86 to 1.04. The thermal conductivity of the composites slightly increases with respect to the conventional alloy. This unexpected behavior can be attributed to two factors: (1) the composites do not yet contain a significant number of grains whose sizes are sufficiently small to increase phonon scattering, and (2) each of the combined components of the composites corresponds to a phase with thermal conductivity higher than the minimum value corresponding to the (Bi0.2Sb0.8)2Te3 alloy.

  14. Three-dimensional microstructural design of woven fabric composite material by homogenization method

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Naoki; Zako, Masaru

    1995-11-01

    The strength of woven fabric composite materials depends on the microstructural geometry. However, the conventional methods for mechanical analysis, which have been widely used so far, are insufficient because they cannot take into account for the three-dimensional microstructure. In this study, three-dimensional homogenization method is shown to be effective for the evaluations of the material constants, microscopic stresses and the strength. It has been found that the transverse stresses in the direction of lamination play an important role for the fracture of both fiber bundle and resin. Also, the effect of the mismatched lay-up on the strength has been investigated. It has well been predicted that the mismatched lay-up causes the reduction of the strength and the difference of crack initiation in the resin. These simulations give a new concept of the microstructural design of the composite materials.

  15. Flaw Detection for Composite Materials Improved by Advanced Thermal Image Reconstruction Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Richard E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.

    2003-01-01

    The development of advanced composite materials for use in space and propulsion components has seen considerable growth over the past few years. In addition to improvements that have been made in material properties and processing techniques, similar growth must be seen in the development of methods for the detection of flaws, either generated in service or during manufacturing. Thermal imaging techniques have proven to be successful for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of composite materials, but their detection capabilities decrease as flaw depth increases. The purpose of this research is to investigate advanced thermal imaging methods and thermal image processing technologies to increase the maximum depth below surface that a flaw can be detected and improve the contrast between flawed regions and sound regions.

  16. Composite materials: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design, analysis and fabrication techniques for boron-aluminum composite-structure technology is presented and a new method of joining different laminated composites without mechanical fasteners is proposed. Also discussed is a low-cost procedure for rigidifying expanded honeycomb tubing and piping simulations. A brief note on patent information is added.

  17. Enhanced toughness and stable crack propagation in a novel tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite produced by chemical vapour infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesch, J.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.

    2014-04-01

    Tungsten is a promising candidate for the plasma-facing components of a future fusion reactor, but its use is strongly restricted by its inherent brittleness. An innovative concept to overcome this problem is tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite. In this paper we present the first mechanical test of such a composite material using a sample containing multiple fibres. The in situ fracture experiment was performed in a scanning electron microscope for close observation of the propagating crack. Stable crack propagation accompanied with rising load bearing capacity is observed. The fracture toughness is estimated using the test results and the surface observation.

  18. Degradation of simazine from aqueous solutions by diatomite-supported nanosized zero-valent iron composite materials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiming; Zheng, Shuilin; Ayoko, Godwin A; Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei

    2013-12-15

    A novel composite material based on deposition of nanosized zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles on acid-leached diatomite was synthesised for the removal of a chlorinated contaminant in water. The nZVI/diatomite composites were characterised by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, elemental analysis, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the pure nZVI particles, better dispersion of nZVI particles on the surface or inside the pores of diatom shells was observed. The herbicide simazine was selected as the model chlorinated contaminant and the removal efficiency by nZVI/diatomite composite was compared with that of the pristine nZVI and commercial iron powder. It was found that the diatomite supported nZVI composite material prepared by centrifugation exhibits relatively better efficient activity in decomposition of simazine than commercial Fe, lab synthesised nZVI and composite material prepared via rotary evaporation, and the optimum experimental conditions were obtained based on a series of batch experiments. This study on immobilising nZVI particles onto diatomite opens a new avenue for the practical application of nZVI and the diatomite-supported nanosized zero-valent iron composite materials have potential applications in environmental remediation. PMID:24231330

  19. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  20. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2004-03-23

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  1. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul (Northridge, CA); Hays, Charles C. (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

    2007-07-17

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  2. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, Edward D. (Spring Valley, OH)

    1982-01-01

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

  3. Composite materials and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Kevin L [Kennewick, WA; Wood, Geoffrey M [North Saanich, CA

    2011-05-17

    A method for forming improved composite materials using a thermosetting polyester urethane hybrid resin, a closed cavity mold having an internal heat transfer mechanism used in this method, and the composite materials formed by this method having a hybrid of a carbon fiber layer and a fiberglass layer.

  4. Improved Silica Aerogel Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven

    2008-01-01

    A family of aerogel-matrix composite materials having thermal-stability and mechanical- integrity properties better than those of neat aerogels has been developed. Aerogels are known to be excellent thermal- and acoustic-insulation materials because of their molecular-scale porosity, but heretofore, the use of aerogels has been inhibited by two factors: (1) Their brittleness makes processing and handling difficult. (2) They shrink during production and shrink more when heated to high temperatures during use. The shrinkage and the consequent cracking make it difficult to use them to encapsulate objects in thermal-insulation materials. The underlying concept of aerogel-matrix composites is not new; the novelty of the present family of materials lies in formulations and processes that result in superior properties, which include (1) much less shrinkage during a supercritical-drying process employed in producing a typical aerogel, (2) much less shrinkage during exposure to high temperatures, and (3) as a result of the reduction in shrinkage, much less or even no cracking.

  5. Risks and reliability of manufacturing processes as related to composite materials for spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Han P.

    1995-01-01

    Fabricating primary aircraft and spacecraft structures using advanced composite materials entail both benefits and risks. The benefits come from much improved strength-to-weight ratios and stiffness-to-weight ratios, potential for less part count, ability to tailor properties, chemical and solvent resistance, and superior thermal properties. On the other hand, the risks involved include high material costs, lack of processing experience, expensive labor, poor reproducibility, high toxicity for some composites, and a variety of space induced risks. The purpose of this project is to generate a manufacturing database for a selected number of materials with potential for space applications, and to rely on this database to develop quantitative approaches to screen candidate materials and processes for space applications on the basis of their manufacturing risks including costs. So far, the following materials have been included in the database: epoxies, polycyanates, bismalemides, PMR-15, polyphenylene sulfides, polyetherimides, polyetheretherketone, and aluminum lithium. The first four materials are thermoset composites; the next three are thermoplastic composites, and the last one is is a metal. The emphasis of this database is on factors affecting manufacturing such as cost of raw material, handling aspects which include working life and shelf life of resins, process temperature, chemical/solvent resistance, moisture resistance, damage tolerance, toxicity, outgassing, thermal cycling, and void content, nature or type of process, associate tooling, and in-process quality assurance. Based on industry experience and published literature, a relative ranking was established for each of the factors affecting manufacturing as listed above. Potential applications of this database include the determination of a delta cost factor for specific structures with a given process plan and a general methodology to screen materials and processes for incorporation into the current conceptual design optimization of future spacecrafts as being coordinated by the Vehicle Analysis Branch where this research is being conducted.

  6. Clues for biomimetics from natural composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Lapidot, Shaul; Meirovitch, Sigal; Sharon, Sigal; Heyman, Arnon; Kaplan, David L; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Bio-inspired material systems are derived from different living organisms such as plants, arthropods, mammals and marine organisms. These biomaterial systems from nature are always present in the form of composites, with molecular-scale interactions optimized to direct functional features. With interest in replacing synthetic materials with natural materials due to biocompatibility, sustainability and green chemistry issues, it is important to understand the molecular structure and chemistry of the raw component materials to also learn from their natural engineering, interfaces and interactions leading to durable and highly functional material architectures. This review will focus on applications of biomaterials in single material forms, as well as biomimetic composites inspired by natural organizational features. Examples of different natural composite systems will be described, followed by implementation of the principles underlying their composite organization into artificial bio-inspired systems for materials with new functional features for future medicine. PMID:22994958

  7. Amino acid composition and chemical evaluation of protein quality of cereals as affected by insect infestation.

    PubMed

    Jood, S; Kapoor, A C; Singh, R

    1995-09-01

    A significant decrease in essential amino acids of wheat, maize and sorghum was observed due to grain infestation caused by mixed populations of Trogoderma granarium Everts and Rhizopertha dominica Fabricius (50:50). Non-essential amino acids were also adversely affected. Among the essential amino acids, maximum reduction was found in methionine, isoleucine and lysine in infested wheat, maize and sorghum grains, respectively. Lysine, with lowest chemical score in uninfested and infested grains of three cereals, is the first limiting amino acid. Insect infestation caused significant (p < 0.05) reduction in the chemical score of all the essential amino acids, yet did not change the position of first and second limiting amino acids in wheat and sorghum. However, in case of maize, isoleucine became the second limiting amino acid. Infested grains also showed substantial reduction in essential amino acid index, calculated biological value and requirement index. PMID:8837875

  8. Chemical composition of volatile oils from the pericarps of Indian sandalwood (Santalum album) by different extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin Hua; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Jia, Yong Xia; Zhao, Jie Tang; Ma, Guo Hua

    2012-01-01

    The chemical composition of volatile compounds from pericarp oils of Indian sandalwood, Santalum album L., isolated by hydrodistillation and solvent extraction, were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. The pericarps yielded 2.6 and 5.0% volatile oil by hydrodistillation and n-hexane extraction, and they were colorless and yellow in color, respectively. A total of 66 volatile components were detected. The most prominent compounds were palmitic and oleic acids, representing about 40-70% of the total oil. Many fragrant constituents and biologically active components, such as alpha- and beta-santalol, cedrol, esters, aldehydes, phytosterols, and squalene were present in the pericarp oils. This is the first report of the volatile composition of the pericarps of any Santalum species. PMID:22428257

  9. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

  10. Chemical composition and in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of apple phenolic extracts and of their sub-fractions.

    PubMed

    Lauren, Denis R; Smith, Wendy A; Adaim, Aselle; Cooney, Janine M; Wibisono, Reginald; Jensen, Dwayne J; Zhang, Jingli; Skinner, Margot A

    2009-01-01

    Apple extract powders from three different manufacturers were investigated for their anti-inflammatory activity, their total phenolic content, and their chemical composition. The samples represented two production batches for two products and a single batch of a third. The samples showed similar, but clearly different, anti-inflammatory activities, and had substantially different total phenolic contents, and different chemical compositions. Differences in chemical composition for batches of the same product were significant, although not as great as differences between products. The samples were fractionated into chemical classes. The most active fractions were those that contained epicatechin, catechin with phloridzin and quercetin glycosides, or those that contained procyanidin polymers. It was not possible to link activity to the presence of individual components or combinations of these. If fruit extracts are to be reliably linked to validated health benefits, then the source materials, the extraction processes, and the final composition of such products need to be more clearly defined than at present. PMID:19391030

  11. Cadmium Chemical Form in Mine Waste Materials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diacomanolis, V.; Ng, J. C.; Sadler, R.; Harris, H. H.; Nomura, M.; Noller, B. N.

    2010-06-23

    This study examines the molecular form of cadmium (Cd) present in mine wastes by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS; Cd>20 mg/kg) using the K-edge of Cd at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR), NW10A beam line at KEK-Tsukuba-Japan. Mine waste materials and zinc concentrate were analyzed for Cd by ICPMS prior to undertaking XAS (range 21-452 mg/kg). Model compounds (CdO, Cd(OH){sub 2}, CdCO{sub 3}, Cdacetate, CdS, Cdstearate, CdDEDTC) and samples were examined in solid form at 20 K. The XANES spectra showed similar E max values for both model compounds and samples. The EXAFS showed that Cd-S in CdS, gives a flatter spectrum in the extended region compared to Cd-O found with CdCO{sub 3}, CdO and Cd Stearate. Linear combination fitting with model Cd compounds did not give clear assignments of composition, indicating that more detailed EXAFS spectra is required as mineral forms containing Cd were present rather than simple Cd compounds such as CdCO{sub 3}. The Cd bond for a single shell model in mine waste sample matrices appears to be either Cd-O or Cd-S, or a combination of both. Comparison of molecular data from the XAS studies with bioaccessibility data giving a prediction of bioavailability for mine waste materials provides useful information about the significance of the cadmium form as a contaminant for health risk assessment purposes.

  12. Chemical compositions of subway particles in Seoul, Korea determined by a quantitative single particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sunni; Hwang, HeeJin; Park, YooMyung; Kim, HyeKyoung; Ro, Chul-Un

    2008-12-15

    A novel single particle analytical technique, low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis, was applied to characterize seasonal subway samples collected at a subway station in Seoul, Korea. For all 8 samples collected twice in each season, 4 major types of subway particles, based on their chemical compositions, are significantly encountered: Fe-containing; soil-derived; carbonaceous; and secondary nitrate and/or sulfate particles. Fe-containing particles are generated indoors from wear processes at rail-wheel-brake interfaces while the others may be introduced mostly from the outdoor urban atmosphere. Fe-containing particles are the most frequently encountered with relative abundances in the range of 61-79%. In this study, it is shown that Fe-containing subway particles almost always exist either as partially or fully oxidized forms in underground subway microenvironments. Their relative abundances of Fe-containing particles increase as particle sizes decrease. Relative abundances of Fe-containing particles are higher in morning samples than in afternoon samples because of heavier train traffic in the morning. In the summertime samples, Fe-containing particles are the most abundantly encountered, whereas soil-derived and nitrate/sulfate particles are the least encountered, indicating the air-exchange between indoor and outdoor environments is limited in the summer, owing to the air-conditioning in the subway system. In our work, it was observed that the relative abundances of the particles of outdoor origin vary somewhat among seasonal samples to a lesser degree, reflecting that indoor emission sources predominate. PMID:19174870

  13. Nanocellulose reinforced chitosan composite films as affected by nanofiller loading and plasticizer content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chitosan is a biopolymer obtained by N-deacetylation of chitin, produced from shellfish waste, which may be employed to elaborate edible films or coatings to enhance shelf life of food products. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of nanofiller (cellulose nan...

  14. Variations in the chemical composition of cassava ( Manihot esculenta Crantz) leaves and roots as affected by genotypic and environmental variation.

    PubMed

    Burns, Anna Elizabeth; Gleadow, Roslyn Margaret; Zacarias, Anabela M; Cuambe, Constantino Estevão; Miller, Rebecca Elizabeth; Cavagnaro, Timothy Richard

    2012-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of cassava cultivars, in terms of cyanogenic potential and composition of macro- and micronutrients, sampled from different locations in rural Mozambique. Total cyanide concentrations in fresh cassava tissues were measured using portable cyanide testing kits, and elemental nutrients were later analyzed from dried plant tissue. Variation in cyanogenic potential and nutrient composition occurred both among cultivars and across locations. The majority of cultivars contained >100 ppm total cyanide, fresh weight, and are therefore considered to be dangerously poisonous unless adequately processed before consumption. Leaf cyanogenic and nutrient content varied with plant water status, estimated using carbon isotope discrimination (?(13)C). The colonization of roots of all cultivars by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was also quantified and found to be high, indicating that mycorrhizas could play a key role in plant nutrient acquisition in these low-input farming systems. PMID:22515684

  15. Statistical Analysis of Particle Distributions in Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Wichert, Sofia

    Statistical Analysis of Particle Distributions in Composite Materials by Sofia Mucharreira de Distributions in Composite Materials Sofia Mucharreira de Azeredo Lopes Summary Particulate composite materials distributions is of prime importance for a better control of the production of particulate composite materials

  16. Systems With Variable Composition: The Chemical Potential Chemistry 223

    E-print Network

    Ronis, David M.

    Systems With Variable Composition: The Chemical Potential Chemistry 223 David Ronis Mc or 2) by changing the composition through chemical reaction. Nonetheless, as far as state functions the composition of the system. For example, you may add compounds with different types of bonds

  17. Composite structural materials. [aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of composite materials for aircraft applications is addressed with specific consideration of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life prediction. The design and flight testing of composite ultralight gliders is documented. Advances in computer aided design and methods for nondestructive testing are also discussed.

  18. Nondestructive Characterization of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Increasingly, composite materials are applied to fracture-critical structures of aircraft and spacecraft...Ultrasonics offer the most capable inspection technology and recently developed techniques appear to improve this technology significantly... Recent progress in ultrasonic NDE of composites will be reviewed.

  19. Evaluation of body composition and nitrogen content of renal patients on chronic dialysis as determined by total body neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.; Brennan, B.L.; Yasumura, S.; Vartsky, D.; Vaswani, A.N.; Ellis, K.J.

    1983-07-01

    Total body protein (nitrogen), body cell mass (potassium), fat, and water were measured in 15 renal patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). Total body nitrogen was measured by means of prompt ..gamma.. neutron activation analysis; total body water was determined with tritium labeled water; total body potassium was measured by whole body counting. The extracellular water was determined by a technique utilizing the measurement of total body chloride and plasma chloride. When compared with corresponding values of a control group of the same age, sex, and height, the protein content, body cell mass, and total body fat of the MHD patients were within the normal range. The only significant change was an increase in the extracellular water/body cell mass ratio in the male MHD patients compared to the control. The lack of significant difference of the nitrogen values of the MHD patients compared to matched controls suggests that dialysis minimizes any residual effects of uremic toxicity or protein-calorie malnutrition. These findings further suggest that there is a need to reevaluate the traditional anthropometric and biochemical standards of nutritional status for MHD patients. It was concluded that it is particularly important to measure protein stores of MHD patients with low protein intake to ascertain nutritional status. Finally, in vivo measurement of total body nitrogen and potassium for determination of body composition provides a simple, direct, and accurate assessment of the nutritional status of MHD patients.

  20. Piezoelectric Nanoparticle-Polymer Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, William Ray

    Herein we demonstrate that efficient piezoelectric nanoparticle-polymer composite materials can be synthesized and fabricated into complex microstructures using sugar-templating methods or optical printing techniques. Stretchable foams with excellent tunable piezoelectric properties are created by incorporating sugar grains directly into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixtures containing barium titanate (BaTiO3 -- BTO) nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), followed by removal of the sugar after polymer curing. Porosities and elasticity are tuned by simply adjusting the sugar/polymer mass ratio and the electrical performance of the foams showed a direct relationship between porosity and the piezoelectric outputs. User defined 2D and 3D optically printed piezoelectric microstructures are also fabricated by incorporating BTO nanoparticles into photoliable polymer solutions such as polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) and exposing to digital optical masks that can be dynamically altered. Mechanical-to-electrical conversion efficiency of the optically printed composite is enhanced by chemically altering the surface of the BTO nanoparticles with acrylate groups which form direct covalent linkages with the polymer matrix under light exposure. Both of these novel materials should find exciting uses in a variety of applications including energy scavenging platforms, nano- and microelectromechanical systems (NEMS/MEMS), sensors, and acoustic actuators.

  1. Chemical compositions of primitive solar system particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Steve R.; Bajt, S.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical studies of micrometeorites are of fundamental importance primarily because atmospheric entry selection effects (such as destruction of friable objects) are less significant than those for conventional meteorites. As a result, particles that have experienced very little postaccretional processing have a significant chance of surviving the Earth encounter and subsequent collection. Thus, chemical analyses of these relatively unaltered micrometeorites may lead to a better understanding of the compositions of the most primitive materials in the solar system and thereby constrain the conditions (physical and chemical) that existed in the early solar nebula. Micrometeorites have been collected from the stratosphere, polar ices, and ocean sediments, but the stratospheric collection is the best source for the most unaltered material because they are small and are not heated to their melting points. Despite the fact that the stratospheric micrometeorites have masses in the nanogram range, a variety of microanalytical techniques have been applied to bulk chemical analyses with part-per-million sensitivity. In some cases, multi-disciplinary studies (e.g., chemistry and mineralogy) have been performed on individual particles. The first-order conclusion is that the chondrite-like particles are chemically similar to carbonaceous chondrites but in detail are distinct from members of the conventional meteorite collection. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the results to date and identify important areas for further study.

  2. Oxygen and Magnesium Isotopic Compositions of Asteroidal Materials Returned from Itokawa by the Hayabusa Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yurimoto, H; Abe, M.; Ebihara, M.; Fujimura, A.; Hashizume, K.; Ireland, T. R.; Itoh, S.; Kawaguchi, K.; Kitajima, F.; Mukai, T.; Nagao, K.; Nakamura, T.; Naraoka, H.; Noguchi, T.; Okazaki, R.; Sakamoto, N.; Seto, Y.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Uesugi, M.; Yada, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Zolensky, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Hayabusa spacecraft made two touchdowns on the surface of Asteroid 25143 Itokawa on November 20th and 26th, 2005. The Asteroid 25143 Itokawa is classified as an S-type asteroid and inferred to consist of materials similar to ordinary chondrites or primitive achondrites [1]. Near-infrared spectroscopy by the Hayabusa spacecraft proposed that the surface of this body has an olivine-rich mineral assemblage potentially similar to that of LL5 or LL6 chondrites with different degrees of space weathering [2]. The spacecraft made the reentry into the Earth s atmosphere on June 12th, 2010 and the sample capsule was successfully recovered in Australia on June 13th, 2010. Although the sample collection processes on the Itokawa surface had not been made by the designed operations, more than 1,500 grains were identified as rocky particles in the sample curation facility of JAXA, and most of them were judged to be of extraterrestrial origin, and definitely from Asteroid Itokawa on November 17th, 2010 [3]. Although their sizes are mostly less than 10 microns, some larger grains of about 100 microns or larger were also included. The mineral assembly is olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, iron sulfide and iron metal. The mean mineral compositions are consistent with the results of near-infrared spectroscopy from Hayabusa spacecraft [2], but the variations suggest that the petrologic type may be smaller than the spectroscopic results. Several tens of grains of relatively large sizes among the 1,500 grains will be selected by the Hayabusa sample curation team for preliminary examination [4]. Each grain will be subjected to one set of preliminary examinations, i.e., micro-tomography, XRD, XRF, TEM, SEM, EPMA and SIMS in this sequence. The preliminary examination will start from the last week of January 2011. Therefore, samples for isotope analyses in this study will start from the last week of February 2011. By the time of the LPSC meeting we will have measured the oxygen and magnesium isotopic composition of several grains. We will present the first results from the isotope analyses that will have been performed.

  3. Risk assessment for chemical pickling of metals contaminated by radioactive materials.

    PubMed

    Donzella, A; Formisano, P; Giroletti, E; Zenoni, A

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, many cases of contamination of metal scraps by unwanted radioactive materials have occurred. Moreover, international organisations are evaluating the possibility to re-use or to recycle metals coming from nuclear power plants. The metal recycling industry has started to worry about radiation exposure of workers that could be in contact with contaminated metals during each manufacturing phase. Risks are strongly dependent on the radiation source features. The aim of this study is to perform risk assessment for workers involved in chemical pickling of steel coils. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed, using the MCNP package and considering coils contaminated with (60)Co, (137)Cs, (241)Am and (226)Ra. Under the most conservative conditions (coil contaminated with 1.0 kBq g(-1) of (60)Co), the dose assessment results lower than the European dose limit for the population (1 mSv y(-1)), considering a maximum number of 10 contaminated coils handled per year. The only exception concerns the case of (241)Am, for which internal contamination could be non- negligible and should be verified in the specific cases. In every case, radiation exposure risk for people standing at 50 m from the coil is widely <1 mSv y(-1). PMID:16849378

  4. Distinguishing authentic and counterfeit banknotes by surface chemical composition determined using electrospray laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yi-Ying; Cheng, Chu-Nian; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Ho, Hsiu-O; Shiea, Jentaie

    2013-11-01

    Electrospray laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (ELDI/MS) was used to rapidly distinguish authentic banknotes from counterfeits of the US dollar and the New Taiwan dollar. The banknotes' surfaces were irradiated with a pulsed ultraviolet laser, after which the desorbed ink compounds entered an electrospray plume and formed ions via interactions with charged solvent species. Authentic banknotes were found to differ from their counterfeit equivalents in their surface chemical compositions. The detected chemical compounds included various polymers, plasticizers and inks; these results were comparable with those obtained using solvent extraction followed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis. Because of the high spatial resolution of the laser beam, ELDI/MS analysis resulted in minimal damage to the banknotes. PMID:24259201

  5. Chemical Compatibility of Polymeric Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solen, Kenneth A.; Kuchar, Marvin C.

    1990-01-01

    Presents some principles for specifying general classes of polymers for predicting relative chemical attack from acids, bases, oxidants, and certain common antagonists. Also discusses predicting relative solvent effects. Suggests uses of this information in two or three lectures in a chemical engineering materials course. (YP)

  6. Modeling of composite materials and multilayered structures

    SciTech Connect

    Touratier, M.

    1993-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to present efficient tools for predicting mechanical properties of most of the usual composite materials, and the response to the loading for multilayered structures. The essence of these tools is such that they are especially appropriate to the design of composite constructions. Three types of composite materials have been considered: composite materials with a matrix reinforced by long parallel fibers; composite materials with a matrix reinforced by randomly distributed short fibers; and last, two-dimensional woven fabric composites. For all these composite materials homogenized elastic properties are given and some indications are provided for hygrothermal properties. Experimental techniques in statics and in dynamics by ultrasonic wave propagation have allowed us to validate the above homogenization models. In order to provide a complete set of tools for the composite designer, a multilayered, doubly curved shallow shell model has been designed. This model is based on a new type of kinematics which has a three-dimensional essence and allows us to take into account a proper transverse shear deformation distribution and avoid transverse shear correction factors. Finally, contact conditions at interfaces between layers of the laminate have been taken into account both for displacements and for transverse shear stresses, the latter satisfying the free boundary conditions upon the top and bottom surfaces of the multilayered structures. Thus this model allows for instance, analyzing interface stresses useful to the design of composite structures in order to prevent delamination. The analysis may use analytical and/or finite element computations.

  7. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Spirits content of chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308...Production of Distilled Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and...

  8. Material properties and laser cutting of composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Chieh; Cheng, Wing

    Laser (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) has been used successfully for many material cutting, drilling, metal welding and heat treating applications. However, laser cutting of polymer composites were attempted with varying degrees of success. Because composites are heterogeneous, the energy applied by laser could result in severe resin degradation before fibers were cut. In this study, cutting of glass, Kevlar, and graphite composites were evaluated based on their material properties and laser cutting parameters. A transient heat transfer analysis was used to determine the relative heat affected zones of these composites. Kevlar composites can be cut very well while graphite composites are difficult to cut. Though the cutting process is much more complicated in reality, the analysis provides a semi-quantitative perspective on the characteristics and limitations of laser cutting of different composites.

  9. Silicon carbon nitride films as new materials obtained by plasma chemical vapor deposition from novel precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Tamara P.; Shmakov, Aleksander N.; Badalian, Aram M.; Kaichev, Vasiliy V.; Bukhtiyarov, Valery I.; Rachlin, Vladimer I.; Fomina, Anna N.

    2001-07-01

    Silicon carbonitride films were synthesized by RP CVD process using the novel single-source precursor that is derivative of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, (CH3)2HSiNHN(CH3)2. The films were characterized by X- ray photoelectron (XPS), infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy. The microstructure of the films was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and diffraction of synchrotron radiation (DSR) methods. XPS and FT-IR spectroscopy studies showed that the Si-C and Si-N are the main bonds in the deposited films. Concerning the C-N bonds, the results are less obvious: they are either negligible or not present at all. The films were found to be predominately amorphous with a number of crystallites within the unstructured matrix. The crystals appearance, their dimensions and crystal form did not depend on substrate temperature. We hypothesized that crystallization could happen in the gas phase during deposition or nanocrystals were formed by the strain induced after a certain thickness of the amorphous film. The crystals were assigned to the structure closed to (alpha) -Si3N4 phase. According to FTIR and XPS data it is clear that the chemical bonding and the atomic local order in the amorphous matrix are much more complicated than those of Si3N4-SiC mixtures. We concluded that tetrahedral configurations of silicon carbide and silicon nitride units with mixed C/N environment are hypothetically formed. The films are highly resistant to thermal degradation. It was also demonstrated that this new material has a band gap that was variable from 2.0 eV to 4.7 eV.

  10. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  11. The Effect of Chemical Functionalization on Mechanical Properties of Nanotube/Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Gates, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the chemical functionalization of a carbon nanotube embedded in a nanotube/polyethylene composite on the bulk elastic properties are presented. Constitutive equations are established for both functionalized and non-functionalized nanotube composites systems by using an equivalent-continuum modeling technique. The elastic properties of both composites systems are predicted for various nanotube lengths, volume fractions, and orientations. The results indicate that for the specific composite material considered in this study, most of the elastic stiffness constants of the functionalized composite are either less than or equal to those of the non-functionalized composite.

  12. Correlation of rocket propulsion fuel properties with chemical composition using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry followed by partial least squares regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Kehimkar, Benjamin; Hoggard, Jamin C; Marney, Luke C; Billingsley, Matthew C; Fraga, Carlos G; Bruno, Thomas J; Synovec, Robert E

    2014-01-31

    There is an increased need to more fully assess and control the composition of kerosene-based rocket propulsion fuels such as RP-1. In particular, it is critical to make better quantitative connections among the following three attributes: fuel performance (thermal stability, sooting propensity, engine specific impulse, etc.), fuel properties (such as flash point, density, kinematic viscosity, net heat of combustion, and hydrogen content), and the chemical composition of a given fuel, i.e., amounts of specific chemical compounds and compound classes present in a fuel as a result of feedstock blending and/or processing. Recent efforts in predicting fuel chemical and physical behavior through modeling put greater emphasis on attaining detailed and accurate fuel properties and fuel composition information. Often, one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is employed to provide chemical composition information. Building on approaches that used GC-MS, but to glean substantially more chemical information from these complex fuels, we recently studied the use of comprehensive two dimensional (2D) gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) using a "reversed column" format: RTX-wax column for the first dimension, and a RTX-1 column for the second dimension. In this report, by applying chemometric data analysis, specifically partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis, we are able to readily model (and correlate) the chemical compositional information provided by use of GC×GC-TOFMS to RP-1 fuel property information such as density, kinematic viscosity, net heat of combustion, and so on. Furthermore, we readily identified compounds that contribute significantly to measured differences in fuel properties based on results from the PLS models. We anticipate this new chemical analysis strategy will have broad implications for the development of high fidelity composition-property models, leading to an improved approach to fuel formulation and specification for advanced engine cycles. PMID:24411093

  13. Nanophase and Composite Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This talk will focus on accomplishments, current developments, and future directions of our work on composite optical materials for microgravity science and space exploration. This research spans the order parameter from quasi-fractal structures such as sol-gels and other aggregated or porous media, to statistically random cluster media such as metal colloids, to highly ordered materials such as layered media and photonic bandgap materials. The common focus is on flexible materials that can be used to produce composite or artificial materials with superior optical properties that could not be achieved with homogeneous materials. Applications of this work to NASA exploration goals such as terraforming, biosensors, solar sails, solar cells, and vehicle health monitoring, will be discussed.

  14. Determination of the composition of the organic matter chemically stabilized by agricultural soil clay minerals: Spectroscopy and Density Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oufqir, Sofia; Bloom, Paul; Toner, Brandy; Hatcher, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The interactions between soil organic matter and clay minerals are considered important processes because of their ability to sequester C in soil for long periods of time, and hence control C in the global C cycle when present. However, differing results have been reported regarding the composition of the soil organic matter - aromatic fractions versus aliphatic fractions - associated with clay minerals. To clarify this critical issue and better understand the C sequestration process in soils, we aimed to determine the nature of the chemically bound natural organic matter on clay surfaces, and to probe the speciation and spatial distribution of C in the soil clay nanoparticles using direct spectroscopic measurements namely solid-state CP-MAS and DP-MAS 13C NMR spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). We tested the hypotheses that peptides and polysaccharides are stabilized by the smectite-illite clay while the lipids and black carbon are a separate phase; and that they are evenly distributed on clay surfaces. A soil clay fraction (5.5% organic C) was isolated from the surface of a prairie soil (Mollisol) in southwestern Minnesota, characterized by a pH 6.0, 32.5% clay content, and 3.7% organic carbon, using a sonication-sedimentation-siphoning process in distilled water. Then was subjected to density separation combined with low energy ultrasonic dispersion to separate the free organic and black C (light fraction) from the chemically bound C (heavy fraction). The XRD results indicated a dominance of interstratified smectite-illite clays in soil. The 13C-NMR spectra of the soil clay fraction suggested that polysaccharides and polypeptides are the prevailing components of the organic matter associated with the mineral clay, with only a minor component of aromatic C. The light fraction has strong alkyl C-H bands characteristic of fatty acids plus strong C-O bands characteristic of polysaccharides, including the anomeric C band centered at 105 ppm. The aromatic band at 130 ppm and the phenolic C-O band at 150 pm are strong as well indicating the presence of black carbon and lignin-derived components, contrary to the heavy fraction where they are almost absent. STXM results indicated that the proteins are abundant in the soil clay fraction, separate from lipids, and partially associated with saccharides. The black carbon constitutes a separate phase, but is amply present with lipids and lignin-derived compounds in the light fraction. We conclude that (1) the smectite-illite sheets in our soils preferentially retain peptides, and polysaccharides favoring the protection of these normally readily biodegradable fractions relative to the lignin-derived phenolic components; (2) the black carbon constitutes a major component of the light fraction, and is partially attached to the organic matter bonded with the smectitic clays; and (3) the lipids are associated with soil clay fraction as a separate phase, but are not bound to clay minerals.

  15. Kevlar fiber-epoxy adhesion and its effect on composite mechanical and fracture properties by plasma and chemical treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, S.S.; Wu, S.R.; Sheu, G.S.

    1996-12-31

    Kevlar 49 fibers were surface modified by gas (ammonia, oxygen, and water vapor) plasmas etching and chlorosulfonation and subsequent reaction with some reagents (glycine, deionized water, ethylenediamine, and 1-butanol) to improve the adhesion to epoxy resin. After these treatments, the changes in fiber topography, chemical compositions of the fiber surfaces and the surface functional groups introduced to the surface of fibers were identified by SEM XPS and static SIMS. Interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and T-peel strength between the fiber and epoxy resin were markedly improved by gas plasma and chlorosulfonation (0.1% and 0.25% ClSO{sub 3}H at 30 s). However, it is clear from the similar G{sub IC} values of the treated and untreated fiber composites that the fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength is only a minor contributor to G{sub IC}. SEM was also used to study the surface topography of the fracture surfaces of composites in T-peel test.

  16. IR spectroscopic study of the chemical composition of epiphytic lichens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meysurova, A. F.; Khizhnyak, S. D.; Pakhomov, P. M.

    2011-11-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of lichens exposed to pollutants are investigated by means of FTIR spectroscopy. According to model experiments, alkyl nitrates, ammonium salts, amines, and sulfones develop in the lichen thallus through the action of ammonia and nitric and sulfuric acids. Spectroscopic data of modeling experiments enabled nitrogen- and sulfur-containing substances to be identified as the main air pollutants in the vicinity of a pig-breeding complex and information to be obtained on the content of the pollutants and their impact on the lichens.

  17. Chemical Composition of Aerosol Particles Emitted by a Passenger Car Engine Fueled by Ethanol/Gasoline Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano, J. M.; Gross, D. S.; Dutcher, D. D.; Drayton, M.; Kittelson, D.; McMurry, P.

    2007-12-01

    With concerns of national security, climate change, and human health, many people have called for oil independence for the United States and for the creation of alternative fuels. Ethanol has been widely praised as a viable alternative to petroleum-based fuels, due to the fact that it can be produced locally. A great deal of work has been done to characterize the energy balance of ethanol production versus consumption, but there have been fewer studies of the environmental and health impacts of emissions from combustion of ethanol/gasoline mixtures such as those burned in the modern vehicle fleet. To study the particulate emissions from such fuels, different ethanol/gasoline fuel mixtures with 0, 20, 40, and 85% ethanol were burned in a dynamometer-mounted automobile engine. The engine exhaust was diluted and sampled with two aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers (TSI 3800 ATOFMS), sampling different particle size ranges (50-500 nm and 150-3000 nm, respectively), to measure size and composition of the emitted aerosol particles. A variety of other aerosol characterization techniques were also employed to determine the size distribution of the aerosol particles, the mass emission rate from the engine, and the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and elemental carbon (EC) in the particle emissions. Here we will focus on results from the ATOFMS, which provides us with a particle size and mass spectra - for both negative and positive ions - for each particle that is sampled. Particles being emitted were found to contain primarily PAHs, elemental carbon (EC), nitrates, and sulfates. Particles were analyzed to investigate trends in particle composition as a function of fuel ethanol content, particle size, and for the types of particles emitted. A trend in particle type as a function of fuel ethanol content was evident in smaller particles, and trends in composition as a function of particle size were visible across the entire size range sampled.

  18. Lunar Skylights and Their Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, J.; Torres, J.; FitzHoward, S.; Luu, E.; Hua, J.; Irby, R.

    2013-12-01

    In 2009, the Japanese orbiter, SELenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) discovered a skylight on the near side of the moon. Skylights are collapsed ceilings of rilles, thought to be caused by moonquakes, meteoroids, or incomplete formation of these lava tube ceilings. Since then, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has discovered two more skylights, also located on the near side of the moon. Previous research has shown that the physical characteristics of known rilles, can be used as indicators of the presence of yet undiscovered rille and lava dome locations across the lunar surface. We hypothesize that skylights have a signature chemical composition that is unique, and can be used to predict the location of additional skylights on the surface of the moon. For this study, we compared chemical composition data of the three mare sites containing skylights with the 21 mare sites without skylights. Using the software JMARS for the Moon, we compiled multiple datasets to measure the concentrations of 13 different chemical compounds including calcium, iron oxide, titanium dioxide, and thorium. We then conducted a two-tailed T-test of the data, which generated probability values for the mean differences across all 13 chemical compounds of the maria sites with skylights and the maria sites without skylights. Our results show that there is no statistical difference in chemical composition across all of the maria sites examined. Therefore, we conclude that chemical composition does not predict or indicate potential skylight locations on the moon. Further research on other skylight characteristics, for example depth and surrounding underground lava channels, may shed light on the relationships between mare and skylights locations. Three Skylight Locations Found on Lunar Surface 100m View of Mare Tranquilitatis Skylight

  19. Reaching Europa's Surface: Erosion of the Viscous Lid by Compositional Plumes with Implications for Ocean-Surface Material Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allu Peddinti, D.; McNamara, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    The source of the intriguing surface chemistry of the icy moon, Europa has been widely debated. Of primary interest is the process of surface-ice-shell-ocean exchange of trace chemistry. Of particular astrobiological interest is the possible endogenic origin of the surface chemistry. The viscous lid atop the ice-shell poses a physical barrier for such a material exchange to occur. We have performed a computational study of thermochemical convection models to test the weakening of this viscous lid by warmer plumes of lower compositional density rising in the ice-shell. We modeled a two-phase convecting ice-ocean system with a low viscosity proxy fluid approximation for the liquid ocean. On achieving a stable convecting system, the newly frozen ice at the base of the warm ice plumes at the shell-ocean boundary is tracked and mapped as it is advected upwards by the rising plumes. The newly formed ice is prescribed a lower intrinsic density than the ambient ice to mimic the scenario where compositional contrasts in the ice-shell could exist. We then study how the rising compositional plumes incorporated with the low intrinsic density new ice can erode the stagnant lid at the top of the ice-shell. Several values of density contrast have been modeled to study any variability in their extent of erosion of the lid. The models show that in a convecting ice-ocean system, it is possible for less dense newly formed ice to incorporate into the convecting ice plumes and erode the lid over time. The results suggest that if oceanic trace chemistry were to be incorporated into the newly frozen ice at the ice-ocean interface, it could be possible for it to reach the surface by continual erosion of the viscous ice lid at the top of the shell. This presents a plausible scenario for surface detection of an endogenic chemical signature that could be a potential biosignature of subsurface life in Europa.

  20. Carbon materials for chemical capacitive energy storage.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yunpu; Dou, Yuqian; Zhao, Dongyuan; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Carbon materials have attracted intense interests as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost. Activated carbons produced by different activation processes from various precursors are the most widely used electrodes. Recently, with the rapid growth of nanotechnology, nanostructured electrode materials, such as carbon nanotubes and template-synthesized porous carbons have been developed. Their unique electrical properties and well controlled pore sizes and structures facilitate fast ion and electron transportation. In order to further improve the power and energy densities of the capacitors, carbon-based composites combining electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC)-capacitance and pseudo-capacitance have been explored. They show not only enhanced capacitance, but as well good cyclability. In this review, recent progresses on carbon-based electrode materials are summarized, including activated carbons, carbon nanotubes, and template-synthesized porous carbons, in particular mesoporous carbons. Their advantages and disadvantages as electrochemical capacitors are discussed. At the end of this review, the future trends of electrochemical capacitors with high energy and power are proposed. PMID:21953940

  1. Carbon Materials for Chemical Capacitive Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Yunpu; Dou, Yuqian; Zhao, Dongyuan; Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Mayes, Richard T.; Dai, Sheng

    2011-09-26

    Carbon materials have attracted intense interests as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost. Activated carbons produced by different activation processes from various precursors are the most widely used electrodes. Recently, with the rapid growth of nanotechnology, nanostructured electrode materials, such as carbon nanotubes and template-synthesized porous carbons have been developed. Their unique electrical properties and well controlled pore sizes and structures facilitate fast ion and electron transportation. In order to further improve the power and energy densities of the capacitors, carbon-based composites combining electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC)-capacitance and pseudo-capacitance have been explored. They show not only enhanced capacitance, but as well good cyclability. In this review, recent progresses on carbon-based electrode materials are summarized, including activated carbons, carbon nanotubes, and template-synthesized porous carbons, in particular mesoporous carbons. Their advantages and disadvantages as electrochemical capacitors are discussed. At the end of this review, the future trends of electrochemical capacitors with high energy and power are proposed.

  2. Toward absolute chemical composition distribution measurement of polyolefins by high-temperature liquid chromatography hyphenated with infrared absorbance and light scattering detectors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dean; Shan, Colin Li Pi; Meunier, David M; Lyons, John W; Cong, Rongjuan; deGroot, A Willem

    2014-09-01

    Chemical composition distribution (CCD) is a fundamental metric for representing molecular structures of copolymers in addition to molecular weight distribution (MWD). Solvent gradient interaction chromatography (SGIC) is commonly used to separate copolymers by chemical composition in order to obtain CCD. The separation of polymer in SGIC is, however, not only affected by chemical composition but also by molecular weight and architecture. The ability to measure composition and MW simultaneously after separation would be beneficial for understanding the impact of different factors and deriving true CCD. In this study, comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography (2D) was coupled with infrared absorbance (IR5) and light scattering (LS) detectors for characterization of ethylene-propylene copolymers. Polymers were first separated by SGIC as the first dimension chromatography (D1). The separated fractions were then characterized by the second dimension (D2) size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with IR5 and LS detectors. The concentrations and compositions of the separated fractions were measured online using the IR5 detector. The MWs of the fractions were measured by the ratio of LS to IR5 signals. A metric was derived from online concentration and composition data to represent CCD breadth. The metric was shown to be independent of separation gradients for an "absolute" measurement of CCD breadth. By combining online composition and MW data, the relationship of MW as a function of chemical composition was obtained. This relationship was qualitatively consistent with the results by SEC coupled to IR5, which measures chemical composition as a function of logMW. The simultaneous measurements of composition and MW give the opportunity to study the SGIC separation mechanism and derive chain architectural characteristics of polymer chains. PMID:25117509

  3. Combined studies of chemical composition of urine sediments and kidney stones by means of infrared microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamošaityt?, Sandra; Hendrixson, Vaiva; Želvys, Ar?nas; Tyla, Ram?nas; Ku?inskien?, Zita A.; Jankevi?ius, Feliksas; Pu?etait?, Milda; Jablonskien?, Valerija; Šablinskas, Valdas

    2013-02-01

    Results of the structural analysis of urinary sediments by means of infrared spectral microscopy are presented. The results are in good agreement with the results of standard optical microscopy in the case of single-component and crystalline urinary sediments. It is found that for noncrystalline or multicomponent sediments, the suggested spectroscopic method is superior to optical microscopy. The chemical structure of sediments of any molecular origin can be elucidated by this spectroscopic method. The method is sensitive enough to identify solid particles of drugs present in urine. Sulfamethoxazole and traces of other medicines are revealed in this study among the other sediments. We also show that a rather good correlation exists between the type of urinary sediments and the renal stones removed from the same patient. Spectroscopic studies of urinary stones and corresponding sediments from 76 patients suffering from renal stone disease reveal that in 73% of cases such correlation exists. This finding is a strong argument for the use of infrared spectral microscopy to prevent kidney stone disease because stones can be found in an early stage of formation by using the nonintrusive spectroscopic investigation of urinary sediments. Some medical recommendations concerning the overdosing of certain pharmaceuticals can also be derived from the spectroscopic studies of urinary sediments.

  4. Composite materials for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawal, Suraj P.; Misra, Mohan S.; Wendt, Robert G.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the program were to: generate mechanical, thermal, and physical property test data for as-fabricated advanced materials; design and fabricate an accelerated thermal cycling chamber; and determine the effect of thermal cycling on thermomechanical properties and dimensional stability of composites. In the current program, extensive mechanical and thermophysical property tests of various organic matrix, metal matrix, glass matrix, and carbon-carbon composites were conducted, and a reliable database was constructed for spacecraft material selection. Material property results for the majority of the as-fabricated composites were consistent with the predicted values, providing a measure of consolidation integrity attained during fabrication. To determine the effect of thermal cycling on mechanical properties, microcracking, and thermal expansion behavior, approximately 500 composite specimens were exposed to 10,000 cycles between -150 and +150 F. These specimens were placed in a large (18 cu ft work space) thermal cycling chamber that was specially designed and fabricated to simulate one year low earth orbital (LEO) thermal cycling in 20 days. With this rate of thermal cycling, this is the largest thermal cycling unit in the country. Material property measurements of the thermal cycled organic matrix composite laminate specimens exhibited less than 24 percent decrease in strength, whereas, the remaining materials exhibited less than 8 percent decrease in strength. The thermal expansion response of each of the thermal cycled specimens revealed significant reduction in hysteresis and residual strain, and the average CTE values were close to the predicted values.

  5. The effect of metal content on the erosion resistance of metal/ceramic co-sprayed composite coatings produced by VPS

    SciTech Connect

    Ramm, D.A.J.; Clyne, T.W.; Sturgeon, A.J.; Dunkerton, S.

    1994-12-31

    Coatings with a range of metal/ceramic contents have been produced by co-spraying of alumina and aluminum, using the Vacuum Plasma Spraying Technique. Attention has been concentrated on ceramic-rich composites containing up to 40% of metal. The resistance of these coatings to erosive wear has been studied, using large silica particles as the erodent, at high and low impingement angles. It is shown that there is scope for the development of composite formulations with good erosion performance over a range of erodent incident angles. These results have been correlated with microstructural characterization and Young modulus measurements, made before and after Hot isostatic Pressing. The composites have higher porosity contents, but also higher stiffness, when compared with the monolithic coatings. This is tentatively explained in terms of an improvement in intersplat bonding being effected by the presence of the metal.

  6. Compositional and functional dynamics of dried papaya as affected by storage time and packaging material.

    PubMed

    Udomkun, Patchimaporn; Nagle, Marcus; Argyropoulos, Dimitrios; Mahayothee, Busarakorn; Latif, Sajid; Müller, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Papaya has been identified as a valuable source of nutrients and antioxidants, which are beneficial for human health. To preserve the nutritional properties after drying, appropriate storage specifications should be considered. This study aimed to investigate the quality and stability of air-dried papaya in terms of quality dynamics and behavior of bio-active compounds during storage for up to 9months in two packaging materials: aluminum laminated polyethylene and polyamide/polyethylene. Samples with moisture content (MC) of 0.1328gg(-1) and water activity (aw) of 0.5 were stored at 30°C and relative humidity (RH) of 40-50%. The MC, aw, degree of browning (DB) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) content were found to notably increase as storage progressed. On the contrary, there was a significant decrease in antioxidant capacity (DPPH, FRAP and ABTS), total phenolic (TP) and ascorbic acid (AA) contents. Packaging in aluminum laminated polyethylene under ambient conditions was found to better preserve bio-active compounds and retard increases in MC, aw and DB, when compared to polyamide/polyethylene. PMID:26593545

  7. The devolatilization of stellar material that produces rocky planets is more accurately described by non-equilibrium partial sublimation rather than equilibrium partial condensation: implications for water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineweaver, Charles H.

    2015-08-01

    Elemental "50% condensation temperatures" have been used for decades in planetary science to represent the relative volatility of elements. These temperatures are based on taking a hot gas of solar composition and cooling it, with all elements and compounds in chemical equilibrium with each other. Although condensation temperatures are useful as a first approximation, they do not reflect the dominant physical mechanisms responsible for the devolatilization that leads to the formation of rocky planets. Stars begin to form with protoplanetary accretion disks in the densest and coldest (~ 5-30 K) cores of molecular clouds. As the star and midplane of the accretion disk heat up, the cold condensed and clumped material begins to sublimate and fractionate. Because of the clumping and the heating of previously cold material, the devolatilization that leads to rocky planet formation is produced by non-equilibrium partial sublimation, not equilibrium partial condensation. The difference between the temperatures when an element is 50% ("partially") sublimated from a non-equilibrium clump, and 50% condensed at equilibrium is particularly large for the dominant elements carbon and oxygen. Using the elementatl abundance differences between the Sun and the Earth and plotting them as a function of how refractory or volatile an element is, we make new higher estimates of the temperatures that should be used for carbon and oxygen to parametrize the devolatilization of stellar material in protoplanetary disks to produce rocky planets. These modifications have important implications for the C/O ratio that controls redox state and the main chemical composition of a planet, and the amount of H2O on a planet.

  8. Space processing of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.; Kaye, S.

    1975-01-01

    Materials and processes for the testing of aluminum-base fiber and particle composites, and of metal foams under extended-time low-g conditions were investigated. A wetting and dispersion technique was developed, based on the theory that under the absence of a gas phase all solids are wetted by liquids. The process is characterized by a high vacuum environment and a high temperature cycle. Successful wetting and dispersion experiments were carried out with sapphire fibers, whiskers and particles, and with fibers of silicon carbide, pyrolytic graphite and tungsten. The developed process and facilities permit the preparation of a precomposite which serves as sample material for flight experiments. Low-g processing consists then merely in the uniform redistribution of the reinforcements during a melting cycle. For the preparation of metal foams, gas generation by means of a thermally decomposing compound was found most adaptable to flight experiments. For flight experiments, the use of compacted mixture of the component materials limits low-g processing to a simple melt cycle.

  9. Understanding chemical trends in rock surface compositions as measured by ChemCam at Gale crater, Mars: The signatures of rock coatings and rinds in LIBS laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, N.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Leveille, R. J.; Melikechi, N.; Ollila, A.; Tokar, R. L.; Newsom, H. E.; Blank, J. G.; Bridges, N. T.; Clark, B.; Deans, M. C.; Delapp, D.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Hardgrove, C. J.; Jackson, R.; Lasue, J.; McInroy, R.; Meslin, P.; Mezzacappa, A.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    On Earth, the physical and chemical breakdown of rocky materials occurs through interactions with the atmosphere, soil, biological processes, and aqueous solutions. These interactions produce alteration features on the surfaces of rocks, which record information about the amount and types of fluids with which the rock has interacted. Alteration features can also be indicators of and habitats for microbial life in terrestrial environments. Thus, detecting rock surface alteration is an important part of the NASA Curiosity rover mission to Gale crater, Mars. The ChemCam LIBS instrument onboard Curiosity is uniquely suited to detecting and analyzing rock surface alteration. The LIBS technique uses a pulsed laser microbeam (350-550 ?m) to ablate small amounts of material from a target to form a plasma. Because some material is removed during each laser pulse, it is possible to obtain a depth profile of chemical composition by performing multiple laser pulses on one location. Each pulse returns a spectrum that represents the composition at a specific depth, with each subsequent shot sampling the composition at a slightly greater depth. Laboratory measurements of basalts have shown that each LIBS shot removes at least ~0.3-0.82 ?m/shot, suggesting a removal of ~9-25 ?m of the surface for a standard analysis of 30 shots in rocks of similar hardness. Here we present laboratory LIBS experiments on well-characterized terrestrial rock samples with coatings and rinds with the goal of understanding the signatures of such features in LIBS data from Mars. The terrestrial sample set includes a basalt with a ~0-50 ?m thick Mn-rich rock varnish and a thin (<1 mm) weathering rind and a sandy dolomite with a ~500 ?m thick Ca-rich rind. Both samples were interrogated with hundreds of LIBS shots per location three times on the unweathered interior and three times on the exterior. Results from the basalt show that compositions similar to the bulk rock composition was reached by ~50-70 shots, with the observed chemical changes suggesting both the varnish and at least some rind were penetrated. Results from the sandy dolomite do not show as clear a change from rock exterior to interior as the basalt, but a general chemical trend from exterior to interior was observed in all three depth profiles. Laboratory results suggest that depth profiles of at least 100 shots are useful for clearly identifying coatings and rinds of similar thickness to those found on Earth. However, alteration trends may still be discernible with fewer shots. On Mars, the rock Bathurst Inlet (sol 55), which was shot only 30 times per location, shows what appears to be a near-surface gradient of several elements, most notably Li. Trends similar in nature (if not composition) to the terrestrial sandy dolomite sample were also observed on raised ridge materials such as McGrath_5 (sol 234). Additional martian samples also show trends similar to coatings and rinds measured in the laboratory, suggesting that there may be surface alteration of some rocks in Gale crater.

  10. Effect of different growth stages of Ziziphora clinopodioides Lam. on its chemical composition

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wenhuan; Yang, Tao; Liu, Feng; Tian, Shuge

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to monitor the changes in the chemical composition of Ziziphora clinopodioides Lam. throughout nine different growth stages. Materials and Methods: Volatile components such as essential oils were analyzed using the gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry, and the contents of non-volatile components were determined by a visible spectrophotometer. Results: Hydro-distilled essential oil content ranged from a minimum of 1.1% (in the post-flowering stage) to a maximum of 1.8% (in the flowering stage). The essential oils included pulegone, which was the most abundant component (77.48-87.3%), p-menthanone (2.79-12.39%), trans-isopulegone (1.04-2.06%), d-limonene (0.51-3.03%) and eucarvone (1.5-4.48%). The contents of non-volatile components, such as that of total phenolics (TPC), total flavonoids (TFC), total triterpenoids content (TTC) and total free amino acids content (TFAAC) were measured using visible spectrophotometry. In the growing stage, TPC, TFC, TTC and TFAAC were 9.91-12.80 mg/g, 29.84-50.63 mg/g, 0.57-1.41 mg/g and 13.33-28.56 mg/g, respectively. Conclusion: These data can be used as a basis to determine the optimal harvest time of Z. clinopodioide Lam. PMID:24914287

  11. Analysis of Fatty Acid Content and Composition in Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Guido; Evers, Wendy A. C.; de Vree, Jeroen H.; Kleinegris, Dorinde M. M.; Martens, Dirk E.; Wijffels, René H.; Lamers, Packo P.

    2013-01-01

    A method to determine the content and composition of total fatty acids present in microalgae is described. Fatty acids are a major constituent of microalgal biomass. These fatty acids can be present in different acyl-lipid classes. Especially the fatty acids present in triacylglycerol (TAG) are of commercial interest, because they can be used for production of transportation fuels, bulk chemicals, nutraceuticals (?-3 fatty acids), and food commodities. To develop commercial applications, reliable analytical methods for quantification of fatty acid content and composition are needed. Microalgae are single cells surrounded by a rigid cell wall. A fatty acid analysis method should provide sufficient cell disruption to liberate all acyl lipids and the extraction procedure used should be able to extract all acyl lipid classes. With the method presented here all fatty acids present in microalgae can be accurately and reproducibly identified and quantified using small amounts of sample (5 mg) independent of their chain length, degree of unsaturation, or the lipid class they are part of. This method does not provide information about the relative abundance of different lipid classes, but can be extended to separate lipid classes from each other. The method is based on a sequence of mechanical cell disruption, solvent based lipid extraction, transesterification of fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), and quantification and identification of FAMEs using gas chromatography (GC-FID). A TAG internal standard (tripentadecanoin) is added prior to the analytical procedure to correct for losses during extraction and incomplete transesterification. PMID:24121679

  12. Chemical Composition and Heterogeneity of Wild 2 Cometary Particles Determined by Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzirotti,A.; Sutton, S.; Flynn, G.; Newville, M.; Rao, W.

    2008-01-01

    Seven cometary dust particle tracks in Stardust aerogel were studied using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence methods at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NY) and Advanced Photon Source (IL). Elemental maps were produced for each of the tracks and elemental abundances for 156 individual fragments within these tracks were determined. Whole-track elemental abundances were inferred by summing the elemental masses for the fragments in each track and scaling by the ratio of total Fe in the map and total Fe in the fragments. In general, whole-track and terminal-particle abundances are dissimilar. The total Fe masses ranged from 4 to 2200 pg, corresponding to impactors in the size range of 2.7 to 22 {mu}m if Fe abundances are equal to the chondritic value. Systematic variations in element abundance with fragment distance from the aerogel entry point were generally subtle but were pronounced in one track (C2115,19). In this track, Zn/Fe was about three orders of magnitude higher at the top, Cr/Fe was two orders of magnitude higher at the bottom, and S was relatively uniform. Compositional convergence data showed that typically analysis of {approx}10 fragments was needed to reach convergent whole-track abundance. Zinc was an exception, showing nonconvergent profiles and steps due to the presence of rare, high-Zn fragments. The resulting wholetrack elemental abundances show diverse patterns that are generally chondritic (i.e., within a factor of three of CI abundances) with some exceptions, notably depletions in S and enrichments in the moderately volatile elements Cu, Zn, and Ga. Enrichments in large ion lithophile elements relative to Fe were observed in one track. Correlation matrices showed several strong elemental correlations, notably selenium associated with sulfur (sulfides), a ubiquitous correlation of the first-row transition metals Cr, Mn, and Fe attributed to the presence of pyroxene, and enrichments of gallium associated with calcium, likely affiliated with Mg-Al glass.

  13. Composite material impregnation unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, S. P.; Marchello, J. M.; Johnston, N. J.

    1993-01-01

    This memorandum presents an introduction to the NASA multi-purpose prepregging unit which is now installed and fully operational at the Langley Research Center in the Polymeric Materials Branch. A description of the various impregnation methods that are available to the prepregger are presented. Machine operating details and protocol are provided for its various modes of operation. These include, where appropriate, the related equations for predicting the desired prepreg specifications. Also, as the prepregger is modular in its construction, each individual section is described and discussed. Safety concerns are an important factor and a chapter has been included that highlights the major safety features. Initial experiences and observations for fiber impregnation are described. These first observations have given great insight into the areas of future work that need to be addressed. Future memorandums will focus on these individual processes and their related problems.

  14. Compositional Analysis of Ternary and Binary Chemical Mixtures by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering at Trace Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Mengjing; Huang, Yu; Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2015-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering has been proven a powerful means in the fast detection and recognition of chemicals at trace levels, while quantitative analysis especially the compositional analysis of trace chemical mixtures remains a challenge. We report here a "triangle-rule" based on the principal component analysis (PCA) of surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra, to calculate the composition of individual component of ternary chemical mixtures at trace levels, which can be simplified into the "balance-rule" for binary mixtures. We demonstrated the validity of the triangle-rule and balance-rule in estimating the composition of ternary and binary mixtures of methyl orange, methylene blue, and crystal violet with different molecular structures, and the validity for ternary and binary mixtures of three isomers of monochlorobiphenyl with very similar molecular structures. This idea might be also applicable to mixtures of more components at the trace levels.

  15. Compositional Analysis of Ternary and Binary Chemical Mixtures by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering at Trace Levels.

    PubMed

    Hou, Mengjing; Huang, Yu; Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2015-12-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering has been proven a powerful means in the fast detection and recognition of chemicals at trace levels, while quantitative analysis especially the compositional analysis of trace chemical mixtures remains a challenge. We report here a "triangle-rule" based on the principal component analysis (PCA) of surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra, to calculate the composition of individual component of ternary chemical mixtures at trace levels, which can be simplified into the "balance-rule" for binary mixtures. We demonstrated the validity of the triangle-rule and balance-rule in estimating the composition of ternary and binary mixtures of methyl orange, methylene blue, and crystal violet with different molecular structures, and the validity for ternary and binary mixtures of three isomers of monochlorobiphenyl with very similar molecular structures. This idea might be also applicable to mixtures of more components at the trace levels. PMID:26553483

  16. Composite materials inspection. [ultrasonic vibration holographic NDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erf, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation of the application requirements, advantages, and limitations of nondestructive testing by a technique of ultrasonic-vibration holographic-interferometry readout used in a production control facility for the inspection of a single product such as composite compressor blades. It is shown that, for the detection and characterization of disbonds in composite material structures, this technique may represent the most inclusive test method.

  17. Effect of Sintering Temperature on Thermoelectric Properties of PbTe/Ag Composites Fabricated by Chemical Plating and Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sie, F. R.; Hwang, C. S.; Tang, Y. H.; Kuo, C. H.; Chou, Y. W.; Yeh, C. H.; Ho, H. Y.; Lin, Y. L.; Lan, C. H.

    2015-06-01

    PbTe/Ag composite powders were synthesized by a chemical plating method and then compacted by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at 573 K to 673 K and 50 MPa. The effects of the sintering temperature on the thermoelectric properties of PbTe and the PbTe/Ag composites were investigated. The thermoelectric properties of PbTe and PbTe/Ag bulk samples were measured in the temperature range from 300 K to 700 K. PbTe/Ag bulk samples changed electrical transport behavior from p-type to n-type at room temperature. The SPS temperature not only changed the lattice parameter but also affected the conduction behavior of PbTe/Ag composites. The variation in the carrier concentration was determined by the role of the Ag dopant for different SPS temperatures. Moreover, the conduction of the PbTe/Ag samples changed from metallic to semiconducting in the measured temperature range from 300 K to 700 K as the sintering temperature increased. For the PbTe/Ag bulk materials subjected to SPS at 573 K and 673 K, the values of the power factor were 0.38 mW/m K2 and 1.31 mW/m K2 at 700 K, respectively.

  18. Effect of film composition on the performance of interdigitated electrode methods used for chemically amplified photoresist characterization: methods for analyzing photoresist materials containing base quencher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Cody; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2005-05-01

    Previously, a method which utilizes interdigitated electrode (IDE) sensors to collect capacitance versus exposure dose data for thin films containing a photoacid generator (PAG) and polymer and subsequently calculate the Dill C photoreaction rate constant for the photoacid generator has been presented. This paper discusses a method for extending such IDE methods to calculate the Dill C rate constant for a photoacid generator in a film containing a polymer, photoacid generator, and base quencher. This three component formulation more closely resembles the composition of commercial chemically amplified photoresists. It is shown that by using a data normalization approach, the IDE data can be successfully analyzed to compute accurate Dill C values for a PAG in the presence of base quencher and to estimate the concentration of base quencher in the film. The technique also thus allows for measurement of the impact of the presence of base quencher on the photoreaction rate constant of the photoacid generator.

  19. The Development of Low-Cost Integrated Composite Seal for SOFC: Materials and Design Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Xinyu Huang; Kristoffer Ridgeway; Srivatsan Narasimhan; Serg Timin; Wei Huang; Didem Ozevin; Ken Reifsnider

    2006-07-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted by UConn SOFC seal development team during the Phase I program and no cost extension. The work included composite seal sample fabrication, materials characterizations, leak testing, mechanical strength testing, chemical stability study and acoustic-based diagnostic methods. Materials characterization work revealed a set of attractive material properties including low bulk permeability, high electrical resistivity, good mechanical robustness. Composite seal samples made of a number of glasses and metallic fillers were tested for sealing performance under steady state and thermal cycling conditions. Mechanical testing included static strength (pull out) and interfacial fracture toughness measurements. Chemically stability study evaluated composite seal material stability after aging at 800 C for 168 hrs. Acoustic based diagnostic test was conducted to help detect and understand the micro-cracking processes during thermal cycling test. The composite seal concept was successfully demonstrated and a set of material (coating composition & fillers) were identified to have excellent thermal cycling performance.

  20. Composite materials with improved phyllosilicate dispersion

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-09-14

    The present invention provides phyllosilicates edge modified with anionic surfactants, composite materials made from the edge modified phyllosilicates, and methods for making the same. In various embodiments the phyllosilicates are also surface-modified with hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) modifying agents, polymeric hydrotropes, and antioxidants. The invention also provides blends of edge modified phyllosilicates and semicrystalline waxes. The composite materials are made by dispersing the edge modified phyllosilicates with polymers, particularly polyolefins and elastomers.

  1. Method of making a composite refractory material

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A composite refractory material is prepared by combining boron carbide with furan resin to form a mixture containing about 8 wt. % furan resin. The mixture is formed into a pellet which is placed into a grit pack comprising an oxide of an element such as yttrium to form a sinterable body. The sinterable body is sintered under vacuum with microwave energy at a temperature no greater than 2000.degree. C. to form a composite refractory material.

  2. Method of making a composite refractory material

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, M.S.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1995-09-26

    A composite refractory material is prepared by combining boron carbide with furan resin to form a mixture containing about 8 wt. % furan resin. The mixture is formed into a pellet which is placed into a grit pack comprising an oxide of an element such as yttrium to form a sinterable body. The sinterable body is sintered under vacuum with microwave energy at a temperature no greater than 2000 C to form a composite refractory material.

  3. Inequalities in composite materials and Eshelby's Hyundae Lee(Inha University)

    E-print Network

    Kim, Yong Jung

    Inequalities in composite materials and Eshelby's conjecture Hyundae Lee(Inha University) February 11, 2014 Hyundae Lee(Inha University) Inequalities in composite materials and Eshelby's conjecture in composite materials and Eshelby's conjecture #12;Contents Bounds on composite materials and extreme

  4. In situ mineralogical-chemical analysis of Martian materials at landing/roving sites by active and passive remote sensing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neukum, G.; Lehmann, F.; Regner, P.; Jaumann, R.

    1988-01-01

    Remote sensing of the Martian surface from the ground and from orbiting spacecraft has provided some first-order insight into the mineralogical-chemical composition and the weathering state of Martian surface materials. Much more detailed information can be gathered from performing such measurements in situ at the landing sites or from a rover in combination with analogous measurements from orbit. Measurements in the wavelength range of approximately 0.3 to 12.0 micrometers appear to be suitable to characterize much of the physical, mineralogical, petrological, and chemical properties of Martian surface materials and the weathering and other alteration processes that have acted on them. It is of particular importance to carry out measurements at the same time over a broad wavelength range since the reflectance signatures are caused by different effects and hence give different and complementing information. It appears particularly useful to employ a combination of active and passive methods because the use of active laser spectroscopy allows the obtaining of specific information on thermal infrared reflectance of surface materials. It seems to be evident that a spectrometric survey of Martian materials has to be focused on the analysis of altered and fresh mafic materials and rocks, water-bearing silicates, and possibly carbonates.

  5. Reduction study of oxidized two-dimensional graphene-based materials by chemical and thermal reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Amber M.

    Graphene is a two-dimensional (2D) sp2-hybridized carbon-based material possessing properties which include high electrical conductivity, ballistic thermal conductivity, tensile strength exceeding that of steel, high flexural strength, optical transparency, and the ability to adsorb and desorb atoms and molecules. Due to the characteristics of said material, graphene is a candidate for applications in integrated circuits, electrochromic devices, transparent conducting electrodes, desalination, solar cells, thermal management materials, polymer nanocomposites, and biosensors. Despite the above mentioned properties and possible applications, very few technologies have been commercialized utilizing graphene due to the high cost associated with the production of graphene. Therefore, a great deal of effort and research has been performed to produce a material that provides similar properties, reduced graphene oxide due (RGO) to the ease of commercial scaling of the production processes. This material is typically prepared through the oxidation of graphite in an aqueous media to graphene oxide (GO) followed by reduction to yield RGO. Although this material has been extensively studied, there is a lack of consistency in the scientific community regarding the analysis of the resulting RGO material. In this dissertation, a study of the reduction methods for GO and an alternate 2D carbon-based material, humic acid (HA), followed by analysis of the materials using Raman spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Means of reduction will include chemical and thermal methods. Characterization of the material has been carried out on both before and after reduction.

  6. Structural predictions based on the compositions of cathodic materials by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Lian, Fang; Chen, Ning; Hao, Zhen-jia; Chou, Kuo-chih

    2015-05-01

    A first-principles method is applied to comparatively study the stability of lithium metal oxides with layered or spinel structures to predict the most energetically favorable structure for different compositions. The binding and reaction energies of the real or virtual layered LiMO2 and spinel LiM2O4 (M = Sc-Cu, Y-Ag, Mg-Sr, and Al-In) are calculated. The effect of element M on the structural stability, especially in the case of multiple-cation compounds, is discussed herein. The calculation results indicate that the phase stability depends on both the binding and reaction energies. The oxidation state of element M also plays a role in determining the dominant structure, i.e., layered or spinel phase. Moreover, calculation-based theoretical predictions of the phase stability of the doped materials agree with the previously reported experimental data.

  7. Chemical composition studies of flint with different origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarina, Liga; Seglins, Valdis; Kostjukovs, Juris; Burlakovs, Juris

    2015-04-01

    Flint is a widely used material in the Stone Age because of its physical characteristics, which makes the material suitable for obtaining tools with sharp working edges. Chert, flint, chalcedony, agate and jasper in composition and several other physical characteristics are very similar. Therefore in archaeology most often they are determined simplified and are not distinguished, but described as flint or chert, denoting only the material in a general sense. However, in-depth studies it is necessary accurately identify the rock type and, in addition, to determine the origin of the flint and the conditions of the formation for the various archaeological research needs. As a typical example can be noted the localization problems in determining whether flint is local, or have emerged in the region through the exchange or by transportation. Flint consists mainly from quartz and mostly it has cryptocrystalline or amorphous structure. In nature it occurs as nodules and interbedded inclusions in sedimentary deposits as a result of digenesis processes when calcium carbonate is replaced with silicia. Bedded chert primarily is accumulations originated from excess alkalinity in the sediments. Flint can also be formed in the crystallization processes of the chemically unstable amorphous silicia. In this context, it should be noted that flint is naturally heterogeneous and very varied material by the physical properties and therefore problematic in many contemporary studies. In the study different origin flint samples from England, Denmark and Latvia were compared after their chemical composition. Flint nodules from Northern Europe chalk cliffs formed as inclusions in interbedded deposits or results of the digenesis and samples of chalcedony saturated dolomite from Latvia formed in hydrothermal processes were analysed using XRD and XRF methods. The obtained data were statistically analysed, identifying major, minor and trace elements and subsequently assessing the chemical composition characteristics of the various origins flint. The obtained data indicates that in the flint nodules the amount of silicia is large and relatively stable, as well the presence of other chemical elements are uniform and relatively homogeneous. In turn, in the chalcedony saturated dolomite can be observed the highly variable quantity of silicia, the unstable proportion of Ca-Mg and other key chemical elements and the constantly present rare earth elements, whose concentration can be significant. The performed analysis confirmed that with the chemical composition analysis it is possible to distinguish flint formed in the different geological conditions, as well as to evaluate the indicative characteristics.

  8. Compositions and chemical bonding in ceramics by quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; Horton, L.L.; McHargue, C.J.; McKernan, S.; Carter, C.B.; Revcolevschi, A.; Tanaka, S.; Davis, R.F.

    1993-12-31

    Quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry was applied to a range of ceramic materials at a spatial resolution of <5 nm. Analysis of Fe L{sub 23} white lines indicated a low-spin state with a charge transfer of {approximately}1.5 electrons/atom onto the Fe atoms implanted into (amorphized) silicon carbide. Gradients of 2 to 5% in the Co:O stoichiometry were measured across 100-nm-thick Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} layers in an oxidized directionally solidified CoO-ZrO{sub 2} eutectic, with the highest O levels near the ZrO{sub 2}. The energy-loss near-edge structures were dramatically different for the two cobalt oxides; those for CO{sub 3}O{sub 4} have been incorrectly ascribed to CoO in the published literature. Kinetically stabilized solid solubility occurred in an AlN-SiC film grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on {alpha}(6H)-SiC, and no detectable interdiffusion occurred in couples of MBE-grown AlN on SiC following annealing at up to 1750C. In diffusion couples of polycrystalline AlN on SiC, interfacial 8H sialon (aluminum oxy-nitride) and pockets of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rich {beta}{prime} sialon in the SiC were detected.

  9. Evaluation of Microleakage of Silorane and Methacrylate Based Composite Materials in Class I Restorations by Using Two Different Bonding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alshetili, Mohsen S; Aldeyab, Sultan S

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the microleakage of silorane-based composite material (Filtek P90) with that of two homologous methacrylate-based composites materials (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Z250 XT), by using two different bonding techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human maxillary first premolars prepared for standardized Class I cavities (4 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm) were randomly divided into three groups. Group A (n = 20) was filled with Filtek Z250 (Methacrylate) using single bond universal total etching technique, Group B (n = 20) was filled with Filtek Z250 XT (Methacrylate) using single bond universal self-etching technique and Group C (n = 20) restored with Filtek P90 (Silorane) with dedicated two-step self-etching prime and bond adhesive system (P90 system adhesive). Teeth were subjected to thermocycling regime (500×, 5-55°C), and dye penetration by immersing in 2% methylene blue for 24 h. Tooth sectioning was performed, and extent of the dye penetration was scored based on dye penetration scale to evaluate the microleakage. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and inferential statistics of Kruskal–Wallis test to compare the mean ranks between groups. Results: There was no significant difference observed for microleakage among the three composite materials tested in the present study. However, the cavities restored with silorane (Filtek P90) based composite displayed higher microleakage than the Filtek Z250, Z250 XT. Conclusion: All the restorative systems tested in this study exhibited microleakage, but the silorane technology showed more microleakage when compared to the methacrylate-based composite systems.

  10. Cell wall fermentation kinetics impacted more by lignin content and cross-linking than by diverse shifts in lignin composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used a biomimetic model system to ascertain how lignification and diverse shifts in lignin cross-linking and composition influence cell wall fermentation. Primary cell walls from nonlignified maize cell suspensions were artificially lignified with varying ratios of normal monolignols (coniferyl a...

  11. Cell wall fermentation kinetics are impacted more by lignin content and ferulate cross-linking than by lignin composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: We used a biomimetic model system to ascertain how reductions in ferulate-lignin cross-linking and shifts in lignin composition influence ruminal cell wall fermentation. Primary walls from maize cell suspensions with normal or reduced feruloylation were artificially lignified with variou...

  12. Layer by Layer Ex-Situ Deposited Cobalt-Manganese Oxide as Composite Electrode Material for Electrochemical Capacitor.

    PubMed

    Rusi; Chan, P Y; Majid, S R

    2015-01-01

    The composite metal oxide electrode films were fabricated using ex situ electrodeposition method with further heating treatment at 300°C. The obtained composite metal oxide film had a spherical structure with mass loading from 0.13 to 0.21 mg cm(-2). The structure and elements of the composite was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The electrochemical performance of different composite metal oxides was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (CD). As an active electrode material for a supercapacitor, the Co-Mn composite electrode exhibits a specific capacitance of 285 Fg(-1) at current density of 1.85 Ag(-1) in 0.5 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. The best composite electrode, Co-Mn electrode was then further studied in various electrolytes (i.e., 0.5 M KOH and 0.5 M KOH/0.04 M K3Fe(CN) 6 electrolytes). The pseudocapacitive nature of the material of Co-Mn lead to a high specific capacitance of 2.2 x 10(3) Fg(-1) and an energy density of 309 Whkg(-1) in a 0.5 M KOH/0.04 M K3Fe(CN) 6 electrolyte at a current density of 10 Ag(-1). The specific capacitance retention obtained 67% of its initial value after 750 cycles. The results indicate that the ex situ deposited composite metal oxide nanoparticles have promising potential in future practical applications. PMID:26158447

  13. Layer by Layer Ex-Situ Deposited Cobalt-Manganese Oxide as Composite Electrode Material for Electrochemical Capacitor

    PubMed Central

    Rusi; Chan, P. Y.; Majid, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    The composite metal oxide electrode films were fabricated using ex situ electrodeposition method with further heating treatment at 300°C. The obtained composite metal oxide film had a spherical structure with mass loading from 0.13 to 0.21 mg cm-2. The structure and elements of the composite was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The electrochemical performance of different composite metal oxides was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (CD). As an active electrode material for a supercapacitor, the Co-Mn composite electrode exhibits a specific capacitance of 285 Fg-1 at current density of 1.85 Ag-1 in 0.5M Na2SO4 electrolyte. The best composite electrode, Co-Mn electrode was then further studied in various electrolytes (i.e., 0.5M KOH and 0.5M KOH/0.04M K3Fe(CN) 6 electrolytes). The pseudocapacitive nature of the material of Co-Mn lead to a high specific capacitance of 2.2 x 103 Fg-1 and an energy density of 309 Whkg-1 in a 0.5MKOH/0.04MK3Fe(CN) 6 electrolyte at a current density of 10 Ag-1. The specific capacitance retention obtained 67% of its initial value after 750 cycles. The results indicate that the ex situ deposited composite metal oxide nanoparticles have promising potential in future practical applications. PMID:26158447

  14. Insight into acid-base nucleation experiments by comparison of the chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P; Sarnela, Nina; Dommen, Josef; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, Joao; Breitenlechner, Martin; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Tomé, António; Virtanen, Annele; Viisanen, Yrjö; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the nucleation of sulfuric acid together with two bases (ammonia and dimethylamine), at the CLOUD chamber at CERN. The chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters was studied using three Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers: two were operated in positive and negative mode to detect the chamber ions, while the third was equipped with a nitrate ion chemical ionization source allowing detection of neutral clusters. Taking into account the possible fragmentation that can happen during the charging of the ions or within the first stage of the mass spectrometer, the cluster formation proceeded via essentially one-to-one acid-base addition for all of the clusters, independent of the type of the base. For the positive clusters, the charge is carried by one excess protonated base, while for the negative clusters it is carried by a deprotonated acid; the same is true for the neutral clusters after these have been ionized. During the experiments involving sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, it was possible to study the appearance time for all the clusters (positive, negative, and neutral). It appeared that, after the formation of the clusters containing three molecules of sulfuric acid, the clusters grow at a similar speed, independent of their charge. The growth rate is then probably limited by the arrival rate of sulfuric acid or cluster-cluster collision. PMID:25406110

  15. Shifting material source of Chinese loess since ~2.7 Ma reflected by Sr isotopic composition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenfang; Chen, Jun; Li, Gaojun

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering the sources of eolian dust on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) is fundamental to reconstruct paleo-wind patterns and paleo-environmental changes. Existing datasets show contradictory source evolutions of eolian dust on the CLP, both on orbital and tectonic timescales. Here, the silicate Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of a restricted grain size fraction (28–45??m) were measured to trace the source evolution of the CLP since ~2.7?Ma. Our results revealed an unchanged source on orbital timescales but a gradual source shift from the Qilian Mountains to the Gobi Altay Mountains during the past 2.7?Ma. Both tectonic uplift and climate change may have played important roles for this shift. The later uplift of the Gobi Altay Mountains relative to the Qilian Mountains since 5?±?3?Ma might be responsible for the increasing contribution of Gobi materials to the source deserts in Alxa arid lands. Enhanced winter monsoon may also facilitate transportation of Gobi materials from the Alxa arid lands to the CLP. The shifting source of Asian dust was also reflected in north Pacific sediments. The finding of this shifting source calls for caution when interpreting the long-term climate changes based on the source-sensitive proxies of the eolian deposits. PMID:25996645

  16. Shifting material source of Chinese loess since ~2.7 Ma reflected by Sr isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenfang; Chen, Jun; Li, Gaojun

    2015-05-01

    Deciphering the sources of eolian dust on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) is fundamental to reconstruct paleo-wind patterns and paleo-environmental changes. Existing datasets show contradictory source evolutions of eolian dust on the CLP, both on orbital and tectonic timescales. Here, the silicate Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of a restricted grain size fraction (28-45??m) were measured to trace the source evolution of the CLP since ~2.7?Ma. Our results revealed an unchanged source on orbital timescales but a gradual source shift from the Qilian Mountains to the Gobi Altay Mountains during the past 2.7?Ma. Both tectonic uplift and climate change may have played important roles for this shift. The later uplift of the Gobi Altay Mountains relative to the Qilian Mountains since 5?±?3?Ma might be responsible for the increasing contribution of Gobi materials to the source deserts in Alxa arid lands. Enhanced winter monsoon may also facilitate transportation of Gobi materials from the Alxa arid lands to the CLP. The shifting source of Asian dust was also reflected in north Pacific sediments. The finding of this shifting source calls for caution when interpreting the long-term climate changes based on the source-sensitive proxies of the eolian deposits.

  17. Polymer composites and porous materials prepared by thermally induced phase separation and polymer-metal hybrid methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Joonsung

    The primary objective of this research is to investigate the morphological and mechanical properties of composite materials and porous materials prepared by thermally induced phase separation. High melting crystallizable diluents were mixed with polymers so that the phase separation would be induced by the solidification of the diluents upon cooling. Theoretical phase diagrams were calculated using Flory-Huggins solution thermodynamics which show good agreement with the experimental results. Porous materials were prepared by the extraction of the crystallized diluents after cooling the mixtures (hexamethylbenzene/polyethylene and pyrene/polyethylene). Anisotropic structures show strong dependence on the identity of the diluents and the composition of the mixtures. Anisotropic crystal growth of the diluents was studied in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics using DSC, optical microscopy and SEM. Microstructures of the porous materials were explained in terms of supercooling and dendritic solidification. Dual functionality of the crystallizable diluents for composite materials was evaluated using isotactic polypropylene (iPP) and compatible diluents that crystallize upon cooling. The selected diluents form homogeneous mixtures with iPP at high temperature and lower the viscosity (improved processability), which undergo phase separation upon cooling to form solid particles that function as a toughening agent at room temperature. Tensile properties and morphology of the composites showed that organic crystalline particles have the similar effect as rigid particles to increase toughness; de-wetting between the particle and iPP matrix occurs at the early stage of deformation, followed by unhindered plastic flow that consumes significant amount of fracture energy. The effect of the diluents, however, strongly depends on the identity of the diluents that interact with the iPP during solidification step, which was demonstrated by comparing tetrabromobisphenol-A and phthalic anhydride. A simple method to prepare composite surfaces that can change the wettability in response to the temperature change was proposed and evaluated. Composite surfaces prepared by nanoporous alumina templates filled with polymers showed surface morphology and wettability that depend on temperature. This effect is attributed to the significant difference in thermal conductivity and the thermal expansion coefficient between the alumina and the polymers. The reversibility in thermal response depends on the properties of the polymers.

  18. Chemical Composition of Micrometer-Sized Filaments in an Aragonite Host by a Miniature Laser Ablation/Ionization Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tulej, Marek; Neubeck, Anna; Ivarsson, Magnus; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B; Meyer, Stefan; Wurz, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Detection of extraterrestrial life is an ongoing goal in space exploration, and there is a need for advanced instruments and methods for the detection of signatures of life based on chemical and isotopic composition. Here, we present the first investigation of chemical composition of putative microfossils in natural samples using a miniature laser ablation/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LMS). The studies were conducted with high lateral (?15??m) and vertical (?20-200?nm) resolution. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the instrument performance on micrometer-sized samples both in terms of isotope abundance and element composition. The following objectives had to be achieved: (1) Consider the detection and calculation of single stable isotope ratios in natural rock samples with techniques compatible with their employment of space instrumentation for biomarker detection in future planetary missions. (2) Achieve a highly accurate chemical compositional map of rock samples with embedded structures at the micrometer scale in which the rock matrix is easily distinguished from the micrometer structures. Our results indicate that chemical mapping of strongly heterogeneous rock samples can be obtained with a high accuracy, whereas the requirements for isotope ratios need to be improved to reach sufficiently large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). PMID:26247475

  19. Colorimetric evaluation of composite materials with different thickness by reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portero, Priscila Paiva; Florez, Fernando; Bagnato, Vanderlei; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista, Jr.; de Castro Monteiro Loffredo, Leonor

    2007-02-01

    Selection of the proper shade and color matching of restorations to natural dentition continues to be one of the most frustrating problems in dentistry and currently available shade guide presents a limited selection of colors compared to those found in natural dentition. This investigation evaluation if the composites resins shade B2 are equivalent to the Vita shade guide B2. Twelve composite resins (Renamel Microfill Super Brite- Cosmedent USA, Renamel Universal Brite- Cosmedent USA, Renamel Microfill Body- Cosmedent USA, Renamel Universal Body- Cosmedent USA, Opallis EB2-FGM, Opallis DB2-FGM, Filtek Supreme XT-3M/ESPE, Filtek Z250-3M/ESPE, Filtek Z350-3M/ESPE, Z100-3M/ESPE, 4 Seasons Dentin-Ivoclar/Vivadent, Tetric Ceram-Ivoclar/Vivadent) shade B2 were used. From each composite, two specimens were made in a steel matrix with 8.0 mm diameter and 10.0 mm different predetermined thickness (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, 2.0 mm). The specimens were 40 seconds light polymerized by LED Ultrablue (DMC). The specimens were measured 10 times each to determine the shade using a reflectance spectrophotometer (Pocket Spec). According to results was verified that not any of composites resins shade B2 evaluated in this study presented values of color difference (?E) equivalent to the Vita shade guide B2 and the 2 mm thickness showed the closer match to the Vita shade guide B2.

  20. Delamination growth in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlsson, L. A.; Pipes, R. B.; Rothschilds, R.; Trethewey, B.; Smiley, A.

    1986-01-01

    The Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) specimens are employed to characterize MODE I and MODE II interlaminar fracture resistance of graphite/epoxy (CYCOM 982) and graphite/PEEK (APC2) composites. Sizing of test specimen geometries to achieve crack growth in the linear elastic regime is presented. Data reduction schemes based upon beam theory are derived for the ENF specimen and include the effects of shear deformation and friction between crack surfaces on compliance, C, and strain energy release rate, G sub II. Finite element (FE) analyses of the ENF geometry including the contact problem with friction are presented to assess the accuracy of beam theory expressions for C and G sub II. Virtual crack closure techniques verify that the ENF specimen is a pure Mode II test. Beam theory expressions are shown to be conservative by 20 to 40 percent for typical unidirectional test specimen geometries. A FE parametric study investigating the influence of delamination length and depth, span, thickness and material properties on G sub II is presented. Mode I and II interlaminar fracture test results are presented. Important experimental parameters are isolated, such as precracking techniques, rate effects, and nonlinear load-deflection response. It is found that subcritical crack growth and inelastic materials behavior, responsible for the observed nonlinearities, are highly rate-dependent phenomena with high rates generally leading to linear elastic response.

  1. Adhesive bond strength evaluation in composite materials by laser-generated high amplitude ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perton, M.; Blouin, A.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composites laminates is highly efficient but is not used for joining primary aircraft structures, since there is presently no nondestructive inspection technique to ensure the quality of the bond. We are developing a technique based on the propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves to evaluate the adhesive bond strength. Large amplitude compression waves are generated by a short pulse powerful laser under water confinement and are converted after reflection by the assembly back surface into tensile waves. The resulting tensile stresses can cause a delamination inside the laminates or at the bond interfaces. The adhesion strength is evaluated by increasing the laser pulse energy until disbond. A good bond is unaffected by a certain level of stress whereas a weaker one is damaged. The method is shown completely non invasive throughout the whole composite assembly. The sample back surface velocity is measured by an optical interferometer and used to estimate stress history inside the sample. The depth and size of the disbonds are revealed by a post-test inspection by the well established laser-ultrasonic technique. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to differentiate weak bond from strong bonds and to estimate quantitatively their bond strength.

  2. Investigation of composition and chemical state of elements in iron boride by the method of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyoshin, V. G.; Kharlamov, A. I.; Prokopenko, V. M.

    1981-06-01

    The composition and chemical state of iron and boron in the surface layer of iron boride under different kinds of pretreatment of samples have been investigated by the method of X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. It has been found that in the initial sample there is oxygen chemically combined with iron and boron atoms. Upon heating (450°C) in hydrogen, in argon, and in vacuo there occurs removal of oxygen only from iron atoms (no pure iron was found to be formed). Boron oxidizes and there probably appears a new surface combination of boron with oxygen in which the bonding energy of 1 s electrons is higher than that in B 2O 3. Treatment of the iron boride surface with argon ions and with protons ensures uniform removal of oxygen from iron and boron atoms. It has been found that thermal treatment of iron boride leads to depletion of iron atoms from the sample surface layer, and pickling with argon ions and with protons leads to strong enrichment. Iron boride samples subjected to Ar + and H + bombardment tend to undergo significant oxidation when subsequently exposed to air at room temperature.

  3. Fungal degradation of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, J. D.; Lu, C.; Mitchell, R.; Thorp, K.; Crasto, A.

    1997-01-01

    As described in a previous report, a fungal consortium isolated from degraded polymeric materials was capable of growth on presterilized coupons of five composites, resulting in deep penetration into the interior of all materials within five weeks. Data describing the utilization of composite constituents as nutrients for the microflora are described in this article. Increased microbial growth was observed when composite extract was incubated with the fungal inoculum at ambient temperatures. Scanning electron microscopic observation of carbon fibers incubated with a naturally developed population of microorganisms showed the formation of bacterial biofilms on the fiber surfaces, suggesting possible utilization of the fiber chemical sizing as carbon and energy sources. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to monitor the phenomena occurring at the fiber-matrix interfaces. Significant differences were observed between inoculated and sterile panels of the composite materials. A progressive decline in impedance was detected in the inoculated panels. Several reaction steps may be involved in the degradation process. Initial ingress of water into the resin matrix appeared to be followed by degradation of fiber surfaces, and separation of fibers from the resin matrix. This investigation suggested that composite materials are susceptible to microbial attack by providing nutrients for growth.

  4. High indium content InGaN films grown by pulsed laser deposition using a dual-compositing target.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kun-Ching; Wang, Tzu-Yu; Wuu, Dong-Sing; Horng, Ray-Hua

    2012-07-01

    High indium compositions InGaN films were grown on sapphires using low temperature pulse laser deposition (PLD) with a dual-compositing target. This target was used to overcome the obstacle in the InGaN growth by PLD due to the difficulty of target preparation, and provided a co-deposition reaction, where InGaN grains generated from the indium and GaN vapors deposit on sapphire surface and then act as nucleation seeds to promote further InGaN growth. The effects of co-deposition on growth mechanisms, surface morphology, and electrical properties of films were thoroughly investigated and the results clearly show promise for the development of high indium InGaN films using PLD technique with dual-compositing targets. PMID:22772213

  5. Bacterial Community Composition in the Gut Content and Ambient Sediment of Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus Revealed by 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Li, Fenghui; Tan, Jie; Yan, Jingping; Sun, Huiling

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the bacterial communities in the contents of the foregut and hindgut of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus and in the ambient surface sediment was surveyed by 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing. A total of 188,623 optimized reads and 15,527 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from the ten gut contents samples and four surface sediment samples. The sequences in the sediments, foregut contents, and hindgut contents were assigned to 38.0±4.7, 31.2±6.2 and 27.8±6.5 phyla, respectively. The bacterial richness and Shannon diversity index were both higher in the ambient sediments than in the gut contents. Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum in both the gut contents and sediment samples. The predominant classes in the foregut, hindgut, and ambient sediment were Holophagae and Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria, respectively. The potential probiotics, including sequences related to Bacillus, lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, and Streptococcus) and Pseudomonas were detected in the gut of A. japonicus. Principle component analysis and heatmap figure showed that the foregut, hindgut, and ambient sediment respectively harbored different characteristic bacterial communities. Selective feeding of A. japonicus may be the primary source of the different bacterial communities between the foregut contents and ambient sediments. PMID:24967593

  6. Chemical imaging of biological materials by NanoSIMS using isotopic and elemental labels

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P K; Fallon, S J; Pett-Ridge, J; Ghosal, S; Hutcheon, I D

    2006-04-10

    The NanoSIMS 50 combines unprecedented spatial resolution (as good as 50 nm) with ultra-high sensitivity (minimum detection limit of {approx}200 atoms). The NanoSIMS 50 incorporates an array of detectors, enabling simultaneous collection of 5 species originating from the same sputtered volume of a sample. The primary ion beam (Cs{sup +} or O{sup -}) can be scanned across the sample to produce quantitative secondary ion images. This capability for multiple isotope imaging with high spatial resolution provides a novel new approach to the study of biological materials. Studies can be made of sub-regions of tissues, mammalian cells, and bacteria. Major, minor and trace element distributions can be mapped on a submicron scale, growth and metabolism can be tracked using stable isotope labels, and biogenic origin can be determined based on composition. We have applied this technique extensively to mammalian and prokaryotic cells and bacterial spores. The NanoSIMS technology enables the researcher to interrogate the fate of molecules of interest within cells and organs through elemental and isotopic labeling. Biological applications at LLNL will be discussed.

  7. Magnetic porous composite material: Synthesis and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretyat'ko, P. I.; Kulikov, L. A.; Melikhov, I. V.; Perfil'ev, Yu. D.; Pal', A. F.; Timofeev, M. A.; Gudoshnikov, S. A.; Usov, N. A.

    2015-10-01

    A new method of obtaining magnetic porous composite materials is described, which is based on the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) in the form of solid-phase combustion. The SHS process involves transformation of the nonmagnetic ?-Fe2O3 particles (contained in the initial mixture) into magnetic Fe3O4 particles. The synthesized material comprises a porous carbonaceous matrix with immobilized Fe3O4 particles. The obtained composite has been characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements. The sorption capacity of the porous material has been studied.

  8. Characterization of SiC f/SiC and CNT/SiC composite materials produced by liquid phase sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. K.; Lee, S. P.; Cho, K. S.; Byun, J. H.; Bae, D. S.

    2011-10-01

    This paper dealt with the microstructure and mechanical properties of SiC based composites reinforced with different reinforcing materials. The composites were fabricated using reinforcing materials of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and Tyranno Lox-M SiC chopped fibers. The volume fraction of carbon nanotubes was also varied in this composite system. An Al 2O 3-Y 2O 3 powder mixture was used as a sintering additive in the consolidation of the SiC matrix. The characterization of the composites was investigated by means of SEM and three point bending tests. These composites showed a dense morphology of the matrix region, by the creation of a secondary phase. The composites reinforced with SiC chopped fibers possessed a flexural strength of about 400 MPa at room temperature. The flexural strength of the carbon nanotubes composites had a tendency to decrease with increased volume fraction of the reinforcing material.

  9. 3-D textile reinforcements in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miravete, A.

    1999-11-01

    Laminated composite materials have been used in structural applications since the 1960s. However, their high cost and inability to accommodate fibers in the laminate`s thickness direction greatly reduce their damage tolerance and impact resistance. The second generation of materials--3-D textile reinforced composites--offers significant cost reduction, and by incorporating reinforcement in the thickness direction, dramatically increases damage tolerance and impact resistance. However, methods for predicting mechanical properties of 3-D textile reinforced composite materials tend to be more complex. These materials also have disadvantages--particularly in regard to crimps in the yarns--that require more research. Textile preforms, micro- and macromechanical modeling, manufacturing processes, and characterization all need further development. As researchers overcome these problems, this new generation of composites will emerge as a highly competitive family of materials. This book provides a state-of-the-art account of this promising technology. In it, top experts describe the manufacturing processes, highlight the advantages, identify the main applications, analyze methods for predicting mechanical properties, and detail various reinforcement strategies, including grid structure, knitted fabric composites, and the braiding technique. Armed with the information in this book, readers will be prepared to better exploit the advantages of 3-D textile reinforced composites, overcome its disadvantages, and contribute to the further development of the technology.

  10. Flaxseed hull: Chemical composition and antioxidant activity during development.

    PubMed

    Herchi, Wahid; Al Hujaili, Abdullah D; Sakouhi, Faouzi; Sebei, Khaled; Trabelsi, Hajer; Kallel, Habib; Boukhchina, Sadok

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of flaxseed hull during maturation were investigated. P129 hull variety was studied at four maturation stages (St1, St2, St3, and St4). Significant variation in proximate composition and flaxseed hull oil characteristics were observed. A significant increase in the carbohydrates content of the hull was observed during development. The main methyl esters were linolenic acid (48.95 - 51.52 %), oleic acid (20.27-23.41%) and linoleic acid (15.62-17.70%). The highest polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were found to be 67.14 % at the first stage of maturity (St1). Flaxseed hull oil was of good quality, containing an abundance of omega-3 essential fatty acids. The iodine value increased, while the saponification value of oil decreased during seed development. The decrease in ascorbic acid content was steady. The maximum level of total phenolic acid content (128.3 mg/100 g oil) was reached at 7 DAF. The antioxidant activity of oilseed was assessed by means of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging assay. Radical scavenging activity for green hull was 52.74% and mature hull was 69.32%. PMID:24919478

  11. Variation of chemical composition in Australasian tektites from different localities in Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amare, Kassa; Koeberl, Christian

    2006-01-01

    One hundred and thirteen Australasian tektites from Vietnam (Hanoi, Vinh, Dalat, and Saigon areas) were analyzed for their major and trace element contents. The tektites are either of splash form or Muong Nong-type. The splash-form tektites have SiO2 contents ranging from 69.7 to 76.8 wt%, whereas Muong Nong-type tektites, which are considerably larger than splash-form tektites and have a blocky and chunky appearance, have slightly higher silica contents in the range of 74-81 wt%. Major-element relationships, such as FeO versus major oxides, Na2O versus K2O, and oxide ratio plots, were used to distinguish the different groups of the tektites. In addition, correlation coefficients have been calculated for each tektite group of this study. Many chemical similarities are noted between Hanoi and Vinh tektites from the north of Vietnam, except that the Hanoi tektites contain higher contents of CaO than Vinh; the higher content of CaO might be due to some carbonate parent material. Both Dalat and Saigon tektites have nearly similar composition, whereas the bulk chemistries of the tektites from Hanoi and Vinh appear different from those of Saigon and Dalat. There are differences, especially in the lower CaO and Na2O and higher MgO, FeO, for the tektites of Dalat and Saigon in comparison to that of Hanoi tektites. Furthermore, the Dalat and Saigon tektites show enrichments by factors of 3 and 2 for the Ni and Cr contents, respectively, compared to those of Hanoi and Vinh. The difference in chemistry between the North Vietnam tektites (Hanoi, Vinh) to that of South Vietnam tektites (Saigon, Dalat) of this study indicate that the parent material was heterogeneous and possibly mixing between different source rocks took place. Muong Nong-type tektites are enriched in the volatile elements such as Br, Zn, As, and Sb compared to the average splash-form tektites of this study. The chemical compositions of the average splash-form and Muong Nong-type tektites of this study closely resemble published data for average splash-form and Muong Nong-type indochinites, indicating that they have the same source. The trace element ratios Ba/Rb (2.7), Th/U (5.2), Th/Sc (1.3), Th/Sm (2.2), and the rare earth element (REE) abundances of this study show close similarities to those of average upper continental crust.

  12. DOE/MSU composite material fatigue database: Test methods, materials, and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, J.F.; Samborsky, D.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report presents a detailed analysis of the results from fatigue studies of wind turbine blade composite materials carried out at Montana State University (MSU) over the last seven years. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the DOE/MSU composite Materials Fatigue Database. The fatigue testing of composite materials requires the adaptation of standard test methods to the particular composite structure of concern. The stranded fabric E-glass reinforcement used by many blade manufacturers has required the development of several test modifications to obtain valid test data for materials with particular reinforcement details, over the required range of tensile and compressive loadings. Additionally, a novel testing approach to high frequency (100 Hz) testing for high cycle fatigue using minicoupons has been developed and validated. The database for standard coupon tests now includes over 4,100 data points for over 110 materials systems. The report analyzes the database for trends and transitions in static and fatigue behavior with various materials parameters. Parameters explored are reinforcement fabric architecture, fiber content, content of fibers oriented in the load direction, matrix material, and loading parameters (tension, compression, and reversed loading). Significant transitions from good fatigue resistance to poor fatigue resistance are evident in the range of materials currently used in many blades. A preliminary evaluation of knockdowns for selected structural details is also presented. The high frequency database provides a significant set of data for various loading conditions in the longitudinal and transverse directions of unidirectional composites out to 10{sup 8} cycles. The results are expressed in stress and strain based Goodman Diagrams suitable for design. A discussion is provided to guide the user of the database in its application to blade design.

  13. Four-photon spectroscopy of rotational transitions in liquid: recording of changes in the chemical composition of water caused by cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Bunkin, Aleksei F; Pershin, S M

    2010-05-26

    It is shown for the first time by the method of four-photon coherent scattering by rotational molecular resonances that the cavitation action on water changes its chemical composition, resulting in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. It is found that the concentration of hydrogen peroxide during cavitation grows by several times and depends on the cavitation process technology.

  14. Gradient composite materials for artificial intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Migacz, Katarzyna; Ch?opek, Jan; Morawska-Chochó?, Anna; Ambroziak, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Composites with the gradient of Young's modulus constitute a new group of biomimetic materials which affect the proper distribution of stresses between the implant and the bone. The aim of this article was to examine the mechanical properties of gradient materials based on carbon fibre-polysulfone composite, and to compare them to the properties of a natural intervertebral disc. Gradient properties were provided by different orientation or volume fraction of carbon fibres in particular layers of composites. The results obtained during in vitro tests displayed a good durability of the gradient materials put under long-term static load. However, the configuration based on a change in the volume fraction of the fibres seems more advantageous than the one based on a change of the fibres' orientation. The materials under study were designed to replace the intervertebral disc. The effect of Young's modulus of the material layers on the stress distribution between the tissue and the implant was analyzed and the biomimetic character of the gradient composites was stated. Unlike gradient materials, the pure polysulfone and the non-gradient composite resulted in the stress concentration in the region of nucleus pulposus, which is highly disadvantageous and does not occur in the stress distribution of natural intervertebral discs. PMID:25306938

  15. Gaseous composition measured by a chemical ionization mass spectrometer in fresh and aged ship plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faxon, Cameron; Psichoudaki, Magda; Kuuluvainen, Heino; Hallquist, Åsa; Thomson, Erik; Pettersson, Jan; Hallquist, Mattias

    2015-04-01

    The port of Gothenburg is the largest port of the Nordic countries with numerous ships calling the port daily. The ship exhausts contain numerous pollutants including gases such as SO2 and NOx as well as particulate matter and soot. The exhaust also contains numerous organic compounds, a large fraction of which are unidentified. These organics are oxidized in the atmosphere producing more oxygenated and potentially less volatile compounds that may contribute to the secondary organic aerosol (SOA). This work focuses on the characterization of fresh gaseous species present in the exhaust plumes of the passing ships and also on their photochemical aging. Between 26 September and 12 November 2014 measurements were conducted at a sampling site located on a small peninsula at the entrance of Gothenburg's port. The campaign was divided in two periods. During the first period, the fresh plumes of the passing ships were measured through a main inlet. During the second period, the sample passed through the same inlet and was then introduced into a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) reactor. The PAM reactor uses UV lamps and high concentrations of oxidants (OH radicals and O3) to oxidize the organic species present in the plumes. The oxidation that takes place within the reactor can be equivalent to up to one week of atmospheric oxidation. Preliminary tests showed that the oxidation employed in the current camping corresponded to 3.4 days in the atmosphere. A Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) was employed to monitor the concentration of different organic species present in the fresh and aged plumes. Water (positive) and iodide (negative) ionization methods were employed were water was primarily used for fresh plumes (large fraction of non-polar compounds) while iodide was used for the aged plumes (primarily oxidised products). The H2O, O3 and SO2 concentrations inside the PAM chamber were monitored, and an organic tracer for OH exposure determination was also continuously measured. The dominant species concentrations of both fresh and aged ship plumes are presented and their emission factors are estimated from concurrent CO2 measurements.

  16. Microcrack Quantification in Composite Materials by a Neural Network Analysis of Ultrasound Spectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Russell, Samuel S.; Suits, Michael W.

    2003-01-01

    Intra-ply microcracking in unlined composite pressure vessels can be very troublesome to detect and when linked through the thickness can provide leak paths that may hinder mission success. The leaks may lead to loss of pressure/propellant, increased risk of explosion and possible cryo-pumping into air pockets within the laminate. Ultrasonic techniques have been shown capable of detecting the presence of microcracking and in this work they are used to quantify the level of microcracking. Resonance ultrasound methods are utilized with artificial neural networks to build a microcrack prediction/measurement tool. Two networks are presented, one unsupervised to provide a qualitative measure of microcracking and one supervised which provides a quantitative assessment of the level of microcracking. The resonant ultrasound spectroscopic method is made sensitive to microcracking by tuning the input spectrum to the higher frequency (shorter wavelength) components allowing more significant interaction with the defects. This interaction causes the spectral characteristics to shift toward lower amplitudes at the higher frequencies. As the density of the defects increases more interactions occur and more drastic amplitude changes are observed. Preliminary experiments to quantify the level of microcracking induced in graphite/epoxy composite samples through a combination of tensile loading and cryogenic temperatures are presented. Both unsupervised (Kohonen) and supervised (radial basis function) artificial neural networks are presented to determine the measurable effect on the resonance spectrum of the ultrasonic data taken from the samples.

  17. Tailoring The Microwave Permittivity And Permeability Of Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    1 Tailoring The Microwave Permittivity And Permeability Of Composite Materials Kenneth M. Bober/Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 ABSTRACT The microwave permittivity( r ) and permeability( r ) of composite materials the permittivity of a composite material has not been established. The MG theory presented in 1904 by J. C. Maxwell

  18. Chemical provinces reveal Elysium Volcano's compositional evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susko, D. A.; Karunatillake, S.; Wray, J. J.; Skok, J. R.; Hurowitz, J.; Ojha, L.; Judice, T.; Bently, R. O. J.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical provinces of Mars became definable[1-3] with the maps of elemental mass fractions generated with Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data[4,5]. Previous work highlighted the Elysium lava flow province as anomalous, with a depletion in K and Th relative to the average crust in the rest of Mars (ROM).[3] We characterize the elemental composition, geology, and geomorphology of the region to constrain the processes that have contributed to its evolution. We compare SE Elysium with its North West lava fields, advancing prior work on thermal evolution of the martian mantle.[6] Lava fields at both sites probably source from Elysium eruptions. Both show similar Si content, as well as a Ca-enrichment compared to ROM, consistent with prior models.[6,7] Nevertheless, the two fields are compositionally distinct from each other, with NW Elysium decisively depleted in Ca and Fe, but enriched in K and Th. Such distinctness, in elements that reflect magmatic fractionation, reveals the possibility that a single volcanic complex on Mars may evolve rapidly during the Amazonian era, causing variable flow compositions. Interestingly, a chemical province containing volcanics that is contemporaneous with Elysium, overlaps the Tharsis region.[3] Unlike Elysium, the K and Th distributions within Tharsis are indistinguishable from ROM. Meanwhile, the mass fraction signature in Tharsis is enriched in Cl and depleted in Si. Such contrast, in chemical anomalies between volcanic constructs of similar age, may indicate that the depletion of K and Th in SE Elysium did not arise from temporal evolution of the mantle. [1] Taylor, G. et al. Geology 38, 183-186, 2010 [2] Gasnault, O. et al. 207, 226-247, 2010 [3] Karunatillake, S. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 114, E12001, 2009 [4] Boynton, W. V. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 112, E12S99, 2007 [5] Feldman, W. C. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 109, E09006, 2004 [6] Baratoux, D. et al. Nature 472, 338-41, 2011 [7] Balta, J. et al. Geology 41, 1115-1118, 2013

  19. Certification of the reference material of water content in water saturated 1-octanol by Karl Fischer coulometry, Karl Fischer volumetry and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haifeng; Ma, Kang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jia; Sun, Guohua; Li, Hongmei

    2012-10-15

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) of water content are widely used in the calibration and validation of Karl Fischer coulometry and volumetry. In this study, the water content of the water saturated 1-octanol (WSO) CRM was certified by Karl Fischer coulometry, volumetry and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (Q NMR). The water content recovery by coulometry was 99.76% with a diaphragm-less electrode and Coulomat AG anolyte. The relative bias between the coulometry and volumetry results was 0.06%. In Q NMR, the water content of WSO is traceable to the International System (SI) of units through the purity of internal standard. The relative bias of water content in WSO between Q NMR and volumetry was 0.50%. The consistency of results for these three independent methods improves the accuracy of the certification of the RM. The certified water content of the WSO CRM was 4.76% with an expanded uncertainty of 0.09%. PMID:23442697

  20. Optimization of chemical compositions in low-carbon Al-killed enamel steel produced by ultra-fast continuous annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Futao; Du, Linxiu; Liu, Xianghua; Xue, Fei

    2013-10-15

    The influence of Mn,S and B contents on microstructural characteristics, mechanical properties and hydrogen trapping ability of low-carbon Al-killed enamel steel was investigated. The materials were produced and processed in a laboratory and the ultra-fast continuous annealing processing was performed using a continuous annealing simulator. It was found that increasing Mn,S contents in steel can improve its hydrogen trapping ability which is attributed by refined ferrite grains, more dispersed cementite and added MnS inclusions. Nevertheless, it deteriorates mechanical properties of steel sheet. Addition of trace boron results in both good mechanical properties and significantly improved hydrogen trapping ability. The boron combined with nitrogen segregating at grain boundaries, cementite and MnS inclusions, provides higher amount of attractive hydrogen trapping sites and raises the activation energy for hydrogen desorption from them. - Highlights: • We study microstructures and properties in low-carbon Al-killed enamel steel. • Hydrogen diffusion coefficients are measured to reflect fish-scale resistance. • Manganese improves hydrogen trapping ability but decrease deep-drawing ability. • Boron improves both hydrogen trapping ability and deep-drawing ability. • Both excellent mechanical properties and fish-scale resistance can be matched.

  1. The Chemical Composition of Maple Syrup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Maple syrup is one of several high-sugar liquids that humans consume. However, maple syrup is more than just a concentrated sugar solution. Here, we review the chemical composition of maple syrup. (Contains 4 tables and 1 figure.)

  2. Chemical composition of Earth-like planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, M. P.; Thiabaud, A.; Marboeuf, U.; Alibert, Y.; de Elía, G. C.; Guilera, O. M.

    2015-08-01

    Models of planet formation are mainly focused on the accretion and dynamical processes of the planets, neglecting their chemical composition. In this work, we calculate the condensation sequence of the different chemical elements for a low-mass protoplanetary disk around a solar-type star. We incorporate this sequence of chemical elements (refractory and volatile elements) in our semi-analytical model of planet formation which calculates the formation of a planetary system during its gaseous phase. The results of the semi-analytical model (final distributions of embryos and planetesimals) are used as initial conditions to develope N-body simulations that compute the post-oligarchic formation of terrestrial-type planets. The results of our simulations show that the chemical composition of the planets that remain in the habitable zone has similar characteristics to the chemical composition of the Earth. However, differences exist that can be associated to the dynamical environment in which they were formed.

  3. Chemical composition of Earth-like planets

    E-print Network

    Ronco, M P; Marboeuf, U; Alibert, Y; de Elía, G C; Guilera, O M

    2015-01-01

    Models of planet formation are mainly focused on the accretion and dynamical processes of the planets, neglecting their chemical composition. In this work, we calculate the condensation sequence of the different chemical elements for a low-mass protoplanetary disk around a solar-type star. We incorporate this sequence of chemical elements (refractory and volatile elements) in our semi-analytical model of planet formation which calculates the formation of a planetary system during its gaseous phase. The results of the semi-analytical model (final distributions of embryos and planetesimals) are used as initial conditions to develope N-body simulations that compute the post-oligarchic formation of terrestrial-type planets. The results of our simulations show that the chemical composition of the planets that remain in the habitable zone has similar characteristics to the chemical composition of the Earth. However, exist differences that can be associated to the dynamical environment in which they were formed.

  4. Consumer Curriculum Materials: The First Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Joel; Buttolph, Vicki L.

    1987-01-01

    Critics claim that consumer education materials from business sources are commercial in nature. Research evaluating the extent to which this claim is justified found that business-sponsored consumer curriculum materials contain significantly more commercial and advertising content than nonbusiness materials. (Author/CH)

  5. Physical Characterization and Steam Chemical Reactivity of Carbon Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, Robert Andrew; Pawelko, Robert James; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2001-05-01

    This report documents experiments and analyses that have been done at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to measure the steam chemical reactivity of two types of carbon fiber composites, NS31 and NB31, proposed for use at the divertor strike points in an ITER-like tokamak. These materials are 3D CFCs constituted by a NOVOLTEX preform and densified by pyrocarbon infiltration and heat treatment. NS31 differs from NB31 in that the final infiltration was done with liquid silicon to reduce the porosity and enhance the thermal conductivity of the CFC. Our approach in this work was twofold: (1) physical characterization measurements of the specimens and (2) measurements of the chemical reactivity of specimens exposed to steam.

  6. Chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant activities of eight mulberry cultivars from China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Linghong; Wu, Xiangyang; Zhu, Maomao; Zhao, Weiguo; Li, Fang; Zou, Ye; Yang, Liuqing

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mulberry (Morus, Moraceae) is widely distributed in the temperate, subtropical, or tropical regions of the world, while there are no conclusive reports on the chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant properties of mulberry cultivars from China. Objective: To investigate chemical properties and to determine proximate nutritive compounds of the eight mulberry cultivars. Materials and Methods: Chemical properties (including moisture, ash, total dry matter, total soluble solids, pH, and total titratable acidity) of the eight mulberry cultivars were investigated. Proximate nutritive compounds (including crude protein, crude fat, mineral elements, total anthocyanins, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, and total sugars) were also determined. Results: The results indicated that the moisture contents were 70.0-87.4%, the crude protein contents 1.62-5.54%, and the crude fat contents from 1.23-2.23%. The major fatty acids in mulberry fruits were linoleic acid (C18:2) and palmitic acid (C16:0), 26.40-74.77% and 9.29-22.26%, respectively. Mulberry fruit is also a good source of minerals and the potassium content (521.37-1718.60 mg/100g DW) is especially higher than that of other elements. Compared with other species, the Morus atropurpurea Roxb. had relatively high total polyphenols content (189.67-246.00 mg GAE/100mg) and anthocyanins content (114.67-193.00 mg/100mg). There was a good linear correlation between antioxidant activity and total polyphenols content. Conclusion: Significant differences of the chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant activities among the mulberry cultivars were observed, the Morus atropurpurea Roxb. showed considerable high nutritional value and antioxidant activity which could be developed for functional food that benefits human health. PMID:23060696

  7. Chemical composition, antimicrobial property and microencapsulation of Mustard (Sinapis alba) seed essential oil by complex coacervation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Su-Qing; Zhang, Jun; Huang, Gui-Ying; Chen, Lan-Ying; Zhao, Feng-Yi

    2014-12-15

    In this study, the essential oil from mustard seed was isolated by simultaneous steam distillation and extraction (SDE) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fourteen components were identified in the mustard seed essential oil with allyl isothiocyanate being the main component (71.06%). The essential oil has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity with inhibition zones and MIC values in the range of 9.68-15.57 mm and 128-512 ?g/mL respectively. The essential oil was subsequently encapsulated in complex coacervation microcapsules with genipin, a natural water-soluble cross-linker. The optimum parameters for the hardening effectiveness of the genipin-hardened essential oil microcapsules were 8h at 40°C and pH 10.0 with a genipin concentration of 0.075 g/g gelatin. The genipin-hardened microcapsules had a particle size of mainly 5-10 ?m and strong chemistry stability which is potential for its application in food preservation. PMID:25038712

  8. Ceramic Aerogel Composite Materials and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Aerogels a.k.a "Solid Smoke" are gels with the liquid phase replaced by gas, leaving behind a highly porous material with a nanoscale framework. Due to the porous, nanoscale structure, aerogels have the lowest known density and conductivity of solids. Aerogels have the potential for being a breakthrough material because of their extremely light weight and unique properties. In this paper, we address overcoming their most profound weaknesses: mechanical fragility and very high surface activity, which leads to a lowered sintering temperature. A matrix of ceramic aerogel composite materials was produced to investigate their properties and functionality. Mechanical property measurements and Scanning Electron Micrographs are used to identify trends and structure of these ceramic composite materials. Thermal cycling was used to identify the sintering points of the materials.

  9. Chemical compatibility of cartridge materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Roy C.; Zee, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    This twelve month progress report deals with the chemical compatibility of semiconductor crystals grown in zero gravity. Specifically, it studies the chemical compatibility between TZM, a molybdenum alloy containing titanium and zirconium, and WC 103, a titanium alloy containing Niobium and Hafnium, and Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and Cadmium Zinc Tellurite (CdZnTe). Due to the health hazards involved, three approaches were used to study the chemical compatibility between the semiconductor and cartridge materials: reaction retort, thermogravimetric analysis, and bulk cylindrical cartridge containers. A scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer was used to examine all samples after testing. The first conclusion drawn is that reaction rates with TZM were not nearly as great as they were with WC 103. Second, the total reaction between GaAs and WC 103 was almost twice that with TZM. Therefore, even though WC 103 is easier to fabricate, at least half of the cartridge thickness will be degraded if contact is made with one of the semiconductor materials leading to a loss of strength properties.

  10. Chemical and Physical Modification of Graphitic Materials by Oxidative Processes and Solvent Intercalation 

    E-print Network

    Werke, Carrie Beth

    2014-08-27

    Graphene and graphite are materials of high interest for many applications. In order to increase the possible uses of these materials, more must be understood about how their properties can be modified. One way to modify graphitic properties...

  11. Chemical compositions responsible for inflammation and tissue damage in the mouse lung by coarse and fine particulate samples from contrasting air pollution in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Happo, M.S.; Hirvonen, M.R.; Halinen, A.I.; Jalava, P.I.; Pennanen, A.S.; Sillanpaa, M.; Hillamo, R.; Salonen, R.O.

    2008-07-01

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism in mortality and morbidity associated with exposures of cardiorespiratory patients to urban air particulate matter. We investigated the association of the chemical composition and sources of urban air fine (PM2.5-0.2) and coarse (PM10-2.5) particulate samples with the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. The particulate samples were collected during selected seasons in six European cities using a high-volume cascade impactor. Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with a single dose (10 mg/kg) of the particulate samples. At 4, 12, and 24 h after the exposure, the lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation and tissue damage: cell number, total protein, and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and KC). Dicarboxylic acids and transition metals, especially Ni and V, in PM2.5-0.2 correlated positively and some secondary inorganic ions (NO{sub 3}{sup -}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}) negatively with the inflammatory activity. Total organic matter and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} had no consistent correlations. In addition, the soil-derived constituents (Ca{sup 2+}, Al, Fe, Si) showed positive correlations with the PM2.5-0.2-induced inflammatory activity, but their role in PM10 (2.5) remained obscure, possibly due to largely undefined biogenic material. Markers of poor biomass and coal combustion, i.e., monosaccharide anhydrides and As, were associated with elevated PAH contents in PM2.5 (0.2) and a consistent immunosuppressive effect. Overall, our results support epidemiological findings that the local sources of incomplete combustion and resuspended road dust are important in urban air particulate pollution-related health effects.

  12. Properties of five toughened matrix composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Dow, Marvin B.

    1992-01-01

    The use of toughened matrix composite materials offers an attractive solution to the problem of poor damage tolerance associated with advanced composite materials. In this study, the unidirectional laminate strengths and moduli, notched (open-hole) and unnotched tension and compression properties of quasi-isotropic laminates, and compression-after-impact strengths of five carbon fiber/toughened matrix composites, IM7/E7T1-2, IM7/X1845, G40-800X/5255-3, IM7/5255-3, and IM7/5260 have been evaluated. The compression-after-impact (CAI) strengths were determined primarily by impacting quasi-isotropic laminates with the NASA Langley air gun. A few CAI tests were also made with a drop-weight impactor. For a given impact energy, compression after impact strengths were determined to be dependent on impactor velocity. Properties and strengths for the five materials tested are compared with NASA data on other toughened matrix materials (IM7/8551-7, IM6/1808I, IM7/F655, and T800/F3900). This investigation found that all five materials were stronger and more impact damage tolerant than more brittle carbon/epoxy composite materials currently used in aircraft structures.

  13. Pyrolysis of municipal plastic wastes II: Influence of raw material composition under catalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > ZSM-5 zeolite catalytic pyrolysis transforms municipal plastic waste into liquids and gases useful as fuels or source of chemicals. > The composition of the waste sample plays an important role on the catalyst activity and the products obtained. > ZSM-5 zeolite is somehow deactivated when high proportions of fine inorganic materials are present in the sample. > When the sample contains cellulose-based materials, the formation of a two-phase liquid fraction can be avoided by a low temperature step. - Abstract: In this work, the results obtained in catalytic pyrolysis of three plastic waste streams which are the rejects of an industrial packing wastes sorting plant are presented. The samples have been pyrolysed in a 3.5 dm{sup 3} reactor under semi-batch conditions at 440 {sup o}C for 30 min in nitrogen atmosphere. Commercial ZSM-5 zeolite has been used as catalyst in liquid phase contact. In every case, high HHV gases and liquids which can be useful as fuels or source of chemicals are obtained. A solid fraction composed of the inorganic material contained in the raw materials and some char formed in the pyrolysis process is also obtained. The zeolite has shown to be very effective to produce liquids with great aromatics content and C3-C4 fraction rich gases, even though the raw material was mainly composed of polyolefins. The characteristics of the pyrolysis products as well as the effect of the catalyst vary depending on the composition of the raw material. When paper rich samples are pyrolysed, ZSM-5 zeolite increases water production and reduces CO and CO{sub 2} generation. If stepwise pyrolysis is applied to such sample, the aqueous liquid phase can be separated from the organic liquid fraction in a first low temperature step.

  14. Identification of lead chemical form in mine waste materials by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taga, Raijeli L.; Ng, Jack; Zheng Jiajia; Huynh, Trang; Noller, Barry; Harris, Hugh H.

    2010-06-23

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides a direct means for measuring lead chemical forms in complex samples. In this study, XAS was used to identify the presence of plumbojarosite (PbFe{sub 6}(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}(OH){sub 12}) by lead L{sub 3}-edge XANES spectra in mine waste from a small gold mining operation in Fiji. The presence of plumbojarosite in tailings was confirmed by XRD but XANES gave better resolution. The potential for human uptake of Pb from tailings was measured using a physiologically based extract test (PBET), an in-vitro bioaccessibility (BAc) method. The BAc of Pb was 55%. Particle size distribution of tailings indicated that 40% of PM{sub 10} particulates exist which could be a potential risk for respiratory effects via the inhalation route. Food items collected in the proximity of the mine site had lead concentrations which exceed food standard guidelines. Lead within the mining lease exceeded sediment guidelines. The results from this study are used to investigate exposure pathways via ingestion and inhalation for potential risk exposure pathways of Pb in that locality. The highest Pb concentration in soil and tailings was 25,839 mg/kg, exceeding the Australian National Environment Protection Measure (NEPM) soil health investigation levels.

  15. Hyphenation of Thermal Analysis to Ultrahigh-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry) Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization For Studying Composition and Thermal Degradation of Complex Materials.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Christopher P; Miersch, Toni; Schwemer, Theo; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the hyphenation of a thermobalance to an ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (UHR FTICR MS) is presented. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is used for efficient ionization. The evolved gas analysis (EGA), using high-resolution mass spectrometry allows the time-resolved molecular characterization of thermally induced processes in complex materials or mixtures, such as biomass or crude oil. The most crucial part of the setup is the hyphenation between the thermobalance and the APCI source. Evolved gases are forced to enter the atmospheric pressure ionization interface of the MS by applying a slight overpressure at the thermobalance side of the hyphenation. Using the FTICR exact mass data, detailed chemical information is gained by calculation of elemental compositions from the organic species, enabling a time and temperature resolved, highly selective detection of the evolved species. An additional selectivity is gained by the APCI ionization, which is particularly sensitive toward polar compounds. This selectivity on the one hand misses bulk components of petroleum samples such as alkanes and does not deliver a comprehensive view but on the other hand focuses particularly on typical evolved components from biomass samples. As proof of principle, the thermal behavior of different fossil fuels: heavy fuel oil, light fuel oil, and a crude oil, and different lignocellulosic biomass, namely, beech, birch, spruce, ash, oak, and pine as well as commercial available softwood and birch-bark pellets were investigated. The results clearly show the capability to distinguish between certain wood types through their molecular patterns and compound classes. Additionally, typical literature known pyrolysis biomass marker were confirmed by their elemental composition, such as coniferyl aldehyde (C10H10O3), sinapyl aldehyde (C11H12O4), retene (C18H18), and abietic acid (C20H30O2). PMID:26024433

  16. Mechanical properties of Al-mica particulate composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nath, D.; Bhatt, R. T.; Rohatgi, P. K.; Biswas, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    Cast aluminum alloy mica particle composites of varying mica content were tested in tension, compression, and impact. With 2.2 percent mica (size range 40-120 microns) the tensile and compression strengths of aluminum alloy decreased by 56 and 22 percent, respectively. The corresponding decreases in percent elongation and percent reduction are 49 and 39 percent. Previous work shows that despite this decrease in strength the composite with 2.5 percent mica and having an UTS of 15 kg/sq mm and compression strength of 28 kg/sq mm performs well as a bearing material under severe running conditions. The differences in strength characteristics of cast aluminum-mica particle composites between tension and compression suggests that, as in cast iron, expansion of voids at the matrix particle interface may be the guiding mechanism of the deformation. SEM studies show that on the tensile fractured specimen surface, there are large voids at the particle matrix interface.

  17. Electrical-contact properties of a composite material with a copper matrix reinforced by superelastic hard carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailov, V. V.; Drozdova, E. I.; Chernogorova, O. P.; Potapova, I. N.; Novoselova, M. V.; Ekimov, E. A.

    2015-05-01

    The electrical contact resistance and the electric-erosion wear resistance of the composite material consisting of a copper matrix reinforced by superelastic hard carbon are studied. The reinforcing of CM by carbon particles, which have a unique combination of mechanical properties (high microhardness of 30-35 GPa, elastic modulus of 180-200 GPa, and a high ratio of microhardness to elastic modulus ( HV 50 /E > 0.15)), ensures good contact characteristics of the material. The minimum electrical contact resistance of CM is comparable with the electrical contact resistance of a reference sample made of gold. The electric-erosion wear resistance of the CM is more than threefold that of chrome bronze, which is a widely used for high-current electrical contacts.

  18. Comparative Analysis of the Chemical Composition of Mixed and Pure Cultures of Green Algae and Their Decomposed Residues by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zelibor, J. L.; Romankiw, L.; Hatcher, P. G.; Colwell, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    It is known that macromolecular organic matter in aquatic environments, i.e., humic substances, is highly aliphatic. These aliphatic macromolecules, predominantly paraffinic in structure, are prevalent in marine and lacustrine sediments and are believed to originate from algae or bacteria. A comparative study of mixed and pure cultures of green algae and their decomposed residues was performed by using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as the primary analytical method. Results obtained in this study confirm the presence of components that are chemically refractory and that are defined as alghumin and hydrolyzed alghumin. These were detected in heterogeneous, homogeneous, and axenic biomasses composed of several genera of Chlorophyta. Although the chemical composition of algal biomass varied with culture conditions, the chemical structure of the alghumin and hydrolyzed alghumin, demonstrated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy appeared to be constant for members of the Chlorophyta examined in this study. The alghumin was dominated by carbohydrate-carbon, with minor amounts of amide or carboxyl carbon and paraffinic carbon, the latter surviving strong hydrolysis by 6 N HCI (hydrolyzed alghumin). Bacterial decomposition of heterogeneous algal biomass labeled with 13C was conducted under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to determine chemical structure and stability of the refractory material. The refractory fraction ranged from 33% in aerobic to 44% in anaerobic cultures. The refractory fraction recovered from either aerobic or anaerobic degradation comprised 40% alghumin, which represented an enrichment by 10% relative to the proportion of alghumin derived from whole cells of algae. The paraffinic component in the hydrolyzed alghumin of whole algal cells was found to be 1.8% and increased to 5.1 and 6.9% after aerobic and anaerobic bacterial degradation, respectively. It is concluded that members of the Chlorophyta contain a common insoluble structure composed of paraffinic carbon that is resistant to chemical and bacterial degradation under conditions used in this study. The paraffinic structure is identical to those constituting humin of aquatic origin. Thus, alga-derived macromolecular compounds deposited in aquatic environments (alghumin) probably contribute to sedimentary humic substances. PMID:16347601

  19. [Preparation of polyacrylonitrile/natural sand composite materials and analysis of adsorption properties of Pb(II) on it by FAAS].

    PubMed

    Abduwayit, Medine; Nurulla, Ismayil; Abliz, Shawket

    2015-02-01

    Surfaces of natural sand particles were modified with (3-chloropropyl) trichlorosilane, so that bridging groups were introduced on the surfaces of natural sand particles; By grafting polyacrylonitrile onto the modified surfaces of the natural sand particles, a novelpolyacrylonitrile/natural sand composite material was prepared from the acrylonitrile, the azobisisobutyronitrile, the divinylbenzene and the modified natural sand particles, which are as functional monomer, initiator, either skeleton monomer or cross-linking agent and carrier respectively; the composite materials were characterized by using infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy; On the FTIR spectrum, the main characteristic peaks of various functional groups including nitrile, benzene ring, and silicon hydroxyl, which were from functional monomer, cross-linking agent and carrier respectively, were observed. On the SEM, two different cross section morphologies having different density which were from acrylonitrile and modified sand particles were observed; This proved that the polyacrylonitrile was decorated on modified sand particles during our preparation process. After preparing the composite materials, micro-column of separation and preconcentration was prepared using the composite materials as filler; the adsorption of some toxic heavy metal ions onto the composite materials was observed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS); The results show that the adsorption of Pb2+ onto the composite materials was more stronger than the absorption of other toxic heavy metal ions, therefore, in this paper, the adsorption of Pb2+ onto the composite materials was mainly studied, at room temperature, when pH and flow rate of solution were 5. 4 and 4 mL x min(-1) respectively, the trace Pb(II) ions could be quantitatively adsorbed onto the composite materials; the maximum adsorption capacity of Pb(II) on the composite materials can reach 62.9 mg x g(-1). The column was eluted by 0.5 mol x L(-1) HCl and recovery of Pb(II) was more than 96%. PMID:25970928

  20. Profiling the Triacylglyceride Contents in Bat Integumentary Lipids by Preparative Thin Layer Chromatography and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pannkuk, Evan L.; Risch, Thomas S.; Savary, Brett J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian integument includes sebaceous glands that secrete an oily material onto the skin surface. Sebum production is part of the innate immune system that is protective against pathogenic microbes. Abnormal sebum production and chemical composition are also a clinical symptom of specific skin diseases. Sebum contains a complex mixture of lipids, including triacylglycerides, which is species-specific. The broad chemical properties exhibited by diverse lipid classes hinder the specific determination of sebum composition. Analytical techniques for lipids typically require chemical derivatizations that are labor-intensive and increase sample preparation costs. This paper describes how to extract lipids from mammalian integument, separate broad lipid classes by thin-layer chromatography, and profile the triacylglyceride contents using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This robust method enables a direct determination of the triacylglyceride profiles among species and individuals, and it can be readily applied to any taxonomic group of mammals. PMID:24056580

  1. Ferromanganese nodules from MANOP Sites H, S, and R-Control of mineralogical and chemical composition by multiple accretionary processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dymond, J.; Lyle, M.; Finney, B.; Piper, D.Z.; Murphy, K.; Conard, R.; Pisias, N.

    1984-01-01

    The chemical composition of ferromanganese nodules from the three nodule-bearing MANOP sites in the Pacific can be accounted for in a qualitative way by variable contributions of distinct accretionary processes. These accretionary modes are: 1. (1) hydrogenous, i.e., direct precipitation or accumulation of colloidal metal oxides in seawater, 2. (2) oxic diagenesis which refers to a variety of ferromanganese accretion processes occurring in oxic sediments; and 3. (3) suboxic diagenesis which results from reduction of Mn+4 by oxidation of organic matter in the sediments. Geochemical evidence suggests processes (1) and (2) occur at all three MANOP nodule-bearing sites, and process (3) occurs only at the hemipelagic site, H, which underlies the relatively productive waters of the eastern tropical Pacific. A normative model quantitatively accounts for the variability observed in nearly all elements. Zn and Na, however, are not well explained by the three end-member model, and we suggest that an additional accretionary process results in greater variability in the abundances of these elements. Variable contributions from the three accretionary processes result in distinct top-bottom compositional differences at the three sites. Nodule tops from H are enriched in Ni, Cu, and Zn, instead of the more typical enrichments of these elements in nodule bottoms. In addition, elemental correlations typical of most pelagic nodules are reversed at site H. The three accretionary processes result in distinct mineralogies. Hydrogenous precipitation produces ??MnO2. Oxic diagenesis, however, produces Cu-Ni-rich todorokite, and suboxic diagenesis results in an unstable todorokite which transforms to a 7 A?? phase ("birnessite") upon dehydration. The presence of Cu and Ni as charge-balancing cations influence the stability of the todorokite structure. In the bottoms of H nodules, which accrete dominantly by suboxic diagenesis, Na+ and possibly Mn+2 provide much of the charge balance for the todorokite structure. Limited growth rate data for H nodules suggest suboxic accretion is the fastest of the three processes, with rates at least 200 mm/106 yr. Oxic accretion is probably 10 times slower and hydrogenous 100 times slower. Since these rates predict more suboxic component in bulk nodules than is calculated by the normative analysis, we propose that suboxic accretion is a non-steady-state process. Variations in surface water productivity cause pulses of particulate flux to the sea floor which result in transient Mn reduction in the surface sediments and reprecipitation on nodule surfaces. ?? 1984.

  2. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  3. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination theory, finite element method, and Castigliano's method in unidirectional tension and compression, but are less accurate for the more bond-dependent flexural and shear properties. With the acknowledged NFRP matrix bonding issues, the over-prediction of these theoretical models indicates that the flexural stiffness of the kenaf composite may be increased by up to 40% if a better bond between the fiber and matrix can be obtained. The sustainability of NFRPs was examined from two perspectives: environmental and socioeconomic. While the kenaf fibers themselves possess excellent sustainability characteristics, costing less while possessing a lesser environmental impact than the glass fibers, the vinyl ester resin used in the composites is environmentally hazardous and inflated the cost and embodied energy of the composite SIPs. Consistent throughout all the designs was a correlation between the respective costs of the raw materials and the respective environmental impacts. The socioeconomic study looked at the sustainability of natural fiber reinforced composite materials as housing materials in developing countries. A literature study on the country of Bangladesh, where the fibers in this study were grown, showed that the jute and kenaf market would benefit from the introduction of a value-added product like natural fiber composites. The high rate of homeless and inadequately housed in Bangladesh, as well as in the US and throughout the rest of the world, could be somewhat alleviated if a new, affordable, and durable material were introduced. While this study found that natural fiber composites possess sufficient mechanical properties to be adopted as primary structural members, the two major remaining hurdles needing to be overcome before natural fiber composites can be adopted as housing materials are the cost and sustainability of the resin system and the moisture resistance/durability of the fibers. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. Multifunctional composite material based on carbon-filled polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, T.; Melentyev, S.; Pavlov, S.

    2015-10-01

    The research paper deals with the performance of composite resistive material heating coatings based on the polyurethane binder, filled with colloidal-graphite preparation C- 1, which can be used in structures of electric heaters. Frequency dependences of transmission and reflection coefficients, dielectric permeability of composite materials with the various content of carbon fillers (technical carbon, graphite) in polyurethane varnish in ranges of frequencies 26-40 GHz and 110-260 GHz are experimentally investigated.

  5. Chemical evolution of Macondo crude oil during laboratory degradation as characterized by fluorescence EEMs and hydrocarbon composition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengzhen; Liu, Zhanfei; Guo, Laodong

    2013-01-15

    The fluorescence EEM technique, PARAFAC modeling, and hydrocarbon composition were used to characterize oil components and to examine the chemical evolution and degradation pathways of Macondo crude oil under controlled laboratory conditions. Three major fluorescent oil components were identified, with Ex/Em maxima at 226/328, 262/315, and 244/366 nm, respectively. An average degradation half-life of ?20 d was determined for the oil components based on fluorescence EEM and hydrocarbon composition measurements, showing a dynamic chemical evolution and transformation of the oil during degradation. Dispersants appeared to change the chemical characteristics of oil, to shift the fluorescence EEM spectra, and to enhance the degradation of low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons. Photochemical degradation played a dominant role in the transformation of oil components, likely an effective degradation pathway of oil in the water column. Results from laboratory experiments should facilitate the interpretation of field-data and provide insights for understanding the fate and transport of oil components in the Gulf of Mexico. PMID:23174304

  6. Chemical composition and temperature dependent performance of ZnO-thin film transistors deposited by pulsed and continuous spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ortel, Marlis; Balster, Torsten; Wagner, Veit

    2013-12-21

    Zinc oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) deposited by continuous and pulsed spray pyrolysis were investigated to analyze process kinetics which make reduction of process temperature possible. Thus, fluid mechanics, chemical composition, electrical performance, and deposition and annealing temperature were systematically analyzed. It was found that ZnO layers continuously deposited at 360?°C contained zinc oxynitrides, CO{sub 3}, and hydro carbonate groups from pyrolysis of basic zinc acetate. Statistically, every second wurtzite ZnO unit cell contained an impurity atom. The purity and performance of the ZnO-TFTs increased systematically with increasing deposition temperature due to an improved oxidation processes. At 500?°C the zinc to oxygen ratio exceeded a high value of 0.96. Additionally, the ZnO film was not found to be in a stabilized state after deposition even at high temperatures. Introducing additional subsequent annealing steps stabilizes the film and allows the reduction of the overall thermal stress to the substrate. Further improvement of device characteristics was obtained by pulsed deposition which allowed a more effective transport of the by-products and oxygen. A significant reduction of the deposition temperature by 140?°C was achieved compared to the same performance as in continuous deposition mode. The trap density close to the Fermi energy could be reduced by a factor of two to 4?×?10{sup 17}?eV{sup ?1}?cm{sup ?3} due to the optimized combustion process on the surface. The optimization of the deposition processes made the fabrication of TFTs with excellent performance possible. The mobility was high and exceeded 12 cm{sup 2}/V s, the subthreshold slope was 0.3 V dec{sup ?1}, and an on-set close to the ideal value of 0?V was achieved.

  7. Clouds Composition in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Mbarek, Rostom

    2015-12-01

    Attempts to determine the composition of super-Earth atmospheres have so far been plagued by the presence of clouds. Yet the theoretical framework to understand these clouds is still in its infancy. For the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b, KCl, Na2S, and ZnS have been proposed as condensates that would form under the condition of chemical equilibrium, if the planet’s atmosphere has a bulk composition near solar. Condensation chemistry calculations have not been presented for a wider range of atmospheric bulk composition that is to be expected for super-Earth exoplanets. Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds in atmospheres of varied composition by determining which condensates are likely to form, under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We model super-Earth atmospheres assuming they are formed by degassing of volatiles from a solid planetary core of chondritic material. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temperature range of 350-3,000 K. Clouds should form along the temperature-pressure boundaries where the condensed species appear in our calculations. The super-Earth atmospheres that we study range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both sub-solar and super-solar, thereby spanning a diverse range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Some condensates appear across all of our models. However, the majority of condensed species appear only over specific ranges of H:O and C:O ratios. We find that for GJ 1214b, KCl is the primary cloud-forming condensate at solar composition, in agreement with previous work. However, for oxidizing atmospheres, where H:O is less than unity, K2SO4 clouds form instead. For carbon-rich atmospheres with super-solar C:O ratios, graphite clouds additionally appear. At higher temperatures, clouds are formed from a variety of materials including metals, metal oxides, and aluminosilicates.

  8. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  9. UPDATED GOODMAN DIAGRAMS FOR FIBERGLASS COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    E-print Network

    UPDATED GOODMAN DIAGRAMS FOR FIBERGLASS COMPOSITE MATERIALS USING THE DOE/MSU FATIGUE DATABASE for the fiberglass composite materials typically used in wind turbine blades are relatively sparse with material presented a detailed Goodman diagram for these fiberglass materials. Their formulation uses the MSU

  10. Effect of chemical treatments on flax fibre reinforced polypropylene composites on tensile and dome forming behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wentian; Lowe, Adrian; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Tensile tests were performed on two different natural fibre composites (same constituent material, similar fibre fraction and thickness but different weave structure) to determine changes in mechanical properties caused by various aqueous chemical treatments and whether any permanent changes remain on drying. Scanning electronic microscopic examinations suggested that flax fibres and the flax/polypropylene interface were affected by the treatments resulting in tensile property variations. The ductility of natural fibre composites was improved significantly under wet condition and mechanical properties (elongation-to-failure, stiffness and strength) can almost retain back to pre-treated levels when dried from wet condition. Preheating is usually required to improve the formability of material in rapid forming, and the chemical treatments performed in this study were far more effective than preheating. The major breakthrough in improving the formability of natural fibre composites can aid in rapid forming of this class of material system. PMID:25789505

  11. Effect of Chemical Treatments on Flax Fibre Reinforced Polypropylene Composites on Tensile and Dome Forming Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wentian; Lowe, Adrian; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Tensile tests were performed on two different natural fibre composites (same constituent material, similar fibre fraction and thickness but different weave structure) to determine changes in mechanical properties caused by various aqueous chemical treatments and whether any permanent changes remain on drying. Scanning electronic microscopic examinations suggested that flax fibres and the flax/polypropylene interface were affected by the treatments resulting in tensile property variations. The ductility of natural fibre composites was improved significantly under wet condition and mechanical properties (elongation-to-failure, stiffness and strength) can almost retain back to pre-treated levels when dried from wet condition. Preheating is usually required to improve the formability of material in rapid forming, and the chemical treatments performed in this study were far more effective than preheating. The major breakthrough in improving the formability of natural fibre composites can aid in rapid forming of this class of material system. PMID:25789505

  12. Exposure Assessment of Chemicals from Packaging Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poças, Maria De Fátima; Hogg, Timothy

    A variety of chemicals may enter our food supply, by means of intentional or unintentional addition, at different stages of the food chain. These chemicals include food additives, pesticide residues, environmental contaminants, mycotox-ins, flavoring substances, and micronutrients. Packaging systems and other food-contact materials are also a source of chemicals contaminating food products and beverages. Monitoring exposure to these chemicals has become an integral part of ensuring the safety of the food supply. Within the context of the risk analysis approach and more specifically as an integral part of risk assessment procedures, the exercise known as exposure assessment is crucial in providing data to allow sound judgments concerning risks to human health. The exercise of obtaining this data is part of the process of revealing sources of contamination and assessing the effectiveness of strategies for minimizing the risk from chemical contamination in the food supply (Lambe, 2002).

  13. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  14. Global Materials Structure Search with Chemically Motivated Coordinates.

    PubMed

    Panosetti, Chiara; Krautgasser, Konstantin; Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J

    2015-12-01

    Identification of relevant reaction pathways in ever more complex composite materials and nanostructures poses a central challenge to computational materials discovery. Efficient global structure search, tailored to identify chemically relevant intermediates, could provide the necessary first-principles atomistic insight to enable a rational process design. In this work we modify a common feature of global geometry optimization schemes by employing automatically generated collective curvilinear coordinates. The similarity of these coordinates to molecular vibrations enhances the generation of chemically meaningful trial structures for covalently bound systems. In the application to hydrogenated Si clusters, we concomitantly observe a significantly increased efficiency in identifying low-energy structures and exploit it for an extensive sampling of potential products of silicon-cluster soft landing on Si(001) surfaces. PMID:26444084

  15. Graphene-based Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Mohammad Ali

    We investigated the mechanical properties, such as fracture toughness (KIc), fracture energy (GIc), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), Young¡¦s modulus (E), and fatigue crack propagation rate (FCPR) of epoxy-matrix composites with different weight fractions of carbon-based fillers, including graphene platelets (GPL), graphene nanoribbons (GNR), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), and fullerenes (C60). Only ˜0.125 wt.% GPL was found to increase the KIc of the pure epoxy by ˜65% and the GIc by ˜115%. To get similar improvement, CNT and nanoparticle epoxy composites required one to two orders of magnitude greater weight fraction of nanofillers. Moreover, ˜0.125% wt.% GPL also decreased the fatigue crack propagation rate in the epoxy by ˜30-fold. The E value of 0.1 wt.% GPL/epoxy nanocomposite was ˜31% larger than the pure epoxy while there was only an increase of ˜3% for the SWNT composites. The UTS of the pristine epoxy was improved by ˜40% with GPLs in comparison with ˜14% enhancement for the MWNTs. The KIc of the GPL nanocomposite enhanced by ˜53% over the pristine epoxy compared to a ˜20% increase for the MWNT-reinforced composites. The results of the FCPR tests for the GPL nanocomposites showed a different trend. While the CNT nanocomposites were not effective enough to suppress the crack growth at high values of the stress intensity factor (DeltaK), the reverse behavior is observed for the GPL nanocomposites. The advantage of the GPLs over CNTs in terms of mechanical properties enhancement is due to their enormous specific surface area, enhanced adhesion at filler/epoxy interface (because of the wrinkled surfaces of GPLs), as well as the planar structure of the GPLs. We also show that unzipping of MWNTs into graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) enhances the load transfer effectiveness in epoxy nanocomposites. For instance, at ˜0.3 wt.% of fillers, the Young's modulus (E) of the epoxy nanocomposite with GNRs increased by ˜30% compared to their MWNTs counterpart. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) for ˜0.3 wt.% GNR composites showed ˜22% enhancement compared to the MWNT composites at the same loading fraction of fillers (at ˜0.3 wt.%). Our results show that unzipping effect can be used to transform carbon nanotubes into graphene nanoribbons, which are far more effective than the baseline nanotube as a nanofiller in nanocomposites. The mechanical properties of fullerence (C60) epoxy nanocomposites at different loading fractions (wt.%) of fullerene fillers in the pristine epoxy was also studied. Fullerene (C60) fillers demonstrated good potential to improve the mechanical properties of epoxy composites. However the required C60 loading fractions were ˜1% which are still an order of magnitude higher than that for graphene platelets (˜0.1%). This again illustrates the superiority of graphene as a structural reinforcement additive for epoxy polymers at low nanofiller loadings. While the main focus of this work has been on epoxy polymers, initial results with ceramic matrix and metal (aluminum) matrix composites were also generated. These results demonstrate that GPL are highly effective in enahncing the fracture properties of silicon nitride ceramics. The fracture toughness of the baseline silicon nitride matrix increased by ˜235% (from ˜2.8 to ˜6.6 MPa.m1/2) at ˜1.5% GPL volume fraction. However the results were disappointing for aluminim matrix composites. Compared to the pure aluminum, the graphene-aluminum composites showed decreased strength and hardness. This is explained in the context of enhanced aluminum carbide formation with the graphene filler. These results indicate that Graphene Platelets (GPL) show strong potential as a nanofiller for epoxy nanocomposites and can provide a performance comparable to other forms of nanofillers at a significantly lower nanofiller loading fraction.

  16. Evaluation of chemical and mechanical properties of dental composites.

    PubMed

    Shin, M A; Drummond, J L

    1999-01-01

    Composite materials were aged in distilled, deionized water and a solution by volume of 50% distilled, deionized water and 50% ethanol for three mon at 37 degrees C. Also investigated was the effect of aging dental glass filler powder in distilled, deionized water for one, three, six, and ten mon at 2 degrees C, 37 degrees C, and 72 degrees C. Atomic absorption analysis was performed on the aqueous media in which the samples were aged in order to determine the extent of leaching of silicon and strontium. From the leaching rates at various aging temperatures, the activation energies for silicon (10.3-16.4 j/mol) and strontium (57.0-58.4 j/mol) were determined. Aging in the 50% distilled, deionized water and 50% ethanol solution greatly increased the leaching rate of both silicon and strontium, as compared to aging in distilled, deionized water. Glass powder leached far more than the composite materials, due to an increase in exposed surface area, as well as a lack of chemical bonding to a resin matrix or a linked glass network. Temperature greatly increased the leaching rate of both silicon and strontium. Only after ten mon did strontium leach substantially more than silicon. For the dental composites investigated after 3 mon aging, Mode I fracture toughness decreased 57-68% in ethanol and 37-43% in water, and mode II fracture toughness decreased 41-49% in ethanol and 6-11% in water. PMID:10421699

  17. SPECTRAL MEASURE COMPUTATIONS FOR COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    E-print Network

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    SPECTRAL MEASURE COMPUTATIONS FOR COMPOSITE MATERIALS N. B. MURPHY, E. CHERKAEV, C. HOHENEGGER of mathematical techniques have been developed that reduce the analysis of complex composite materials for the effective parameters of composite media. These representations involve the spectral measures of self

  18. Synthesizing Smart Polymeric and Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chaokun

    Smart materials have been widely investigated to explore new functionalities unavailable to traditional materials or to mimic the multifunctionality of biological systems. Synthetic polymers are particularly attractive as they already possess some of the attributes required for smart materials, and there are vast room to further enhance the existing properties or impart new properties by polymer synthesis or composite formulation. In this work, three types of smart polymer and composites have been investigated with important new applications: (1) healable polymer composites for structural application and healable composite conductor for electronic device application; (2) conducting polymer polypyrrole actuator for implantable medical device application; and (3) ferroelectric polymer and ceramic nanoparticles composites for electrocaloric effect based solid state refrigeration application. These application entail highly challenging materials innovation, and my work has led to significant progress in all three areas. For the healable polymer composites, well known intrinsically healable polymer 2MEP4F (a Diels-Alder crosslinked polymer formed from a monomer with four furan groups and another monomer with two maleimide groups) was first chosen as the matrix reinforced with fiber. Glass fibers were successfully functionalized with maleimide functional groups on their surface. Composites from functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F healable polymer were made to compare with composites made from commercial carbon fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. Dramatically improved short beam shear strength was obtained from composite of functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. The high cost of 2MEP4F polymer can potentially limit the large-scale application of the developed healable composite, we further developed a new healable polymer with much lower cost. This new polymer was formed through the Diels-Alder crosslinking of poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) and 1,1'-(Methylenedi-4,1-phenylene)bismaleimide (MDPB). It showed the same healing ability as 2MEP4F while all starting materials are cheaper and commercially available. To further improve the mechanical strength of the PFA-MDPB healable polymer, epoxy as a strengthening component was mixed with PFA-MDPB healable polymer. The PFA, MDPB and epoxy composite polymers were further reinforced by carbon fiber as done with 2MEP4F matrix and the final composites were proved to have higher short beam shear strength than 2MEP4F while exhibiting a similar healing efficiency. Healable polymer MDPB (a two maleimide groups monomer) -- FGEEDR (a four furan groups monomer) was also designed and synthesized for transparent healable polymer. The MDPB-FGEEDR healable polymer was composited with silver nanowires (AgNWs) to afford healable transparent composite conductor. Razer blade cuts in the composite conductor could heal upon heating to recover the mechanical strength and electrical conductivity of the composite. The healing could be repeated for multiple times on the same cut location. The healing process was as fast as 3 minutes for conductivity to recover 97% of the original value. For electroactive polymer polypyrrole, the fast volume change upon electrical field change due to electrochemical oxidization or reduction was studied for actuation targeting toward a robotic application. The flexibility of polypyrrole was improved via copolymerization with pyrrole derivatives. Actuator devices are fabricated that more suitable for implantable medical device application than pyrrole homopolymer. The change of dipole re-orientation and thus dielectric constant of ferroelectric polymers and ceramics upon electrical field may be exploited for electrocaloric effect (ECE) and solid state refrigeration. For ferroelectric ceramics, we synthesized a series of Ba1-xSrxTiO3 nanoparticles with diameter ranging from 8-12 nm and characterized their dielectric and ferroelectric properties through hysteresis measurement. It was found that 8 nm BaTiO3 nanocrystals are stable at cubic crystal structure without ferroelectric

  19. Variations in Vitamin A and in Chemical Composition of Corn. 

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1931-01-01

    A AND IN CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF CORN G. S. FRAPS Sufficient energy, proteins, vitamins, and minerals, such as phosphoric acid, lime, magnesia, sodium, chlorine, sulphur, potash, iron, copper, iodine, and fluorine must be furnishecl by the diet... STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS - JLLETIN NO. 422 MARCH, 1931 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY variations in Vitamin A and Chemical Composition of Corn AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President...

  20. Nano composite phase change materials microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qingwen

    MicroPCMs with nano composite structures (NC-MicroPCMs) have been systematically studied. NC-MicroPCMs were fabricated by the in situ polymerization and addition of silver NPs into core-shell structures. A full factorial experiment was designed, including three factors of core/shell, molar ratio of formaldehyde/melamine and NPs addition. 12 MicroPCMs samples were prepared. The encapsulated efficiency is approximately 80% to 90%. The structural/morphological features of the NC-MicroPCMs were evaluated. The size was in a range of 3.4 mu m to 4.0 mu m. The coarse appearance is attributed to NPs and NPs are distributed on the surface, within the shell and core. The NC-MicroPCMs contain new chemical components and molecular groups, due to the formation of chemical bonds after the pretreatment of NPs. Extra X-ray diffraction peaks of silver were found indicating silver nano-particles were formed into an integral structure with the core/shell structure by means of chemical bonds and physical linkages. Extra functionalities were found, including: (1) enhancement of IR radiation properties; (2) depression of super-cooling, and (3) increase of thermal stabilities. The effects of SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy) arising from the silver nano-particles were observed. The Raman scattering intensity was magnified more than 100 times. These effects were also exhibited in macroscopic level in the fabric coatings as enhanced IR radiation properties were detected by the "Fabric Infrared Radiation Management Tester" (FRMT). "Degree of Crystallinity" (DOC) was measured and found the three factors have a strong influence on it. DOC is closely related to thermal stability and MicroPCMs with a higher DOC show better temperature resistance. The thermal regulating effects of the MicroPCMs coatings were studied. A "plateau regions" was detected around the temperature of phase change, showing the function of PCMs. Addition of silver nano-particles to the MicroPCMs has a positive influence on it. NC-MicroPCMs with introducing silver nano particles into the MicroPCMs structure, have shown excellent multifunctional thermal properties and thermal stabilities that are far beyond those of the conventional MicroPCMs. The novel NC-MicroPCMs can be used to develop advanced smart materials and products with prosperous and promising applications in a number of industries.

  1. Differences in Chemical Composition of Soil Organic Carbon Resulting From Long-Term Fertilization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zengqiang; Zhao, Bingzi; Wang, Qingyun; Cao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jiabao

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is central to soil fertility. We hypothesize that change in SOC content resulting from various long-term fertilization strategies accompanies the shift in SOC chemical structure. This study examined the effect of fertilization strategies along with the time of fertilizer application on the SOC composition by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The soils (Aquic Inceptisol) subjected to seven fertilizer treatments were collected in 1989, 1999 and 2009, representing 0, 10 and 20 years of fertilization, respectively. The seven fertilizer treatments were (1–3) balanced fertilization with application of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) including organic compost (OM), half organic compost plus half chemical fertilizer (1/2OM), and pure chemical NPK fertilizer (NPK); (4–6) unbalanced chemical fertilization without application of one of the major elements including NP fertilizer (NP), PK fertilizer (PK), and NK fertilizer (NK); and (7) an unamended control (CK). The SOC content in the balanced fertilization treatments were 2.3–52.6% and 9.4–64.6% higher than in the unbalanced fertilization/CK treatments in 1999 and 2009, respectively, indicating significant differences in SOC content with time of fertilizer application between the two treatment groups. There was a significantly greater proportion of O-alkyl C and a lower proportion of aromatic C in the balanced fertilization than in unbalanced fertilization/CK treatments in 1999, but not in 2009, because their proportions in the former treatments approached the latter in 2009. Principal component analysis further showed that the C functional groups from various fertilization strategies tended to become compositionally similar with time. The results suggest that a shift in SOC chemical composition may be firstly dominated by fertilization strategies, followed by fertilization duration. PMID:25884713

  2. Shear Failure of Fibrous Composite Materials ICP Oberseminar 25.04.2005

    E-print Network

    Harting, Jens

    Shear Failure of Fibrous Composite Materials ICP Oberseminar 25.04.2005 Frank Raischel . raischel;Contents · Composite Materials · Fiber Bundle Models · Simple Beam Model · Experiment Frank Raischel ICP Oberseminar 25.04.2005 ­ p.2 #12;Fibrous and Composite Materials from: R. W. Cahn, 1993 from: D. Hull, 1996

  3. The filler content of the dental composite resins and their influence on different properties.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Alessandra N S; Jacomassi, Denis P; Faloni, Ana Paula S; Queiroz, Thallita P; Rojas, Seila S; Bernardi, Maria Inês B; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Hernandes, Antônio C

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the inorganic content and morphology of one nanofilled and one nanohybrid composite with one universal microhybrid composite. The Vickers hardness, degree of conversion and scanning electron microscope of the materials light-cured using LED unit were also investigated. One nanofilled (Filtek™ Supreme XT), one nanohybrid (TPH®(3)) and one universal microhybrid (Filtek™ Z-250) composite resins at color A(2) were used in this study. The samples were made in a metallic mould (4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness). Their filler weight content was measured by thermogravimetric analysis (TG). The morphology of the filler particles was determined using scanning electron microscope equipped with a field emission gun (SEM-FEG). Vickers hardness and degree of conversion using FT-IR spectroscopy were measured. Filtek™ Z-250 (microhybrid) composite resin shows higher degree of conversion and hardness than those of Filtek™ Supreme XT (nanofilled) and TPH®(3) (nanohybrid) composites, respectively. The TPH(3)® (nanohybrid) composite exhibits by far the lowest mechanical property. Nanofilled composite resins show mechanical properties at least as good as those of universal hybrids and could thus be used for the same clinical indications as well as for anterior restorations due to their high aesthetic properties. PMID:22213178

  4. Composite materials for the extravehicular mobility unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrera, Enrique V.; Tello, Hector M.

    1992-01-01

    The extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), commonly known as the astronaut space suit assembly (SSA) and primary life support system (PLSS), has evolved through the years to incorporate new and innovative materials in order to meet the demands of the space environment. The space shuttle program which is seeing an increasing level of extravehicular activity (EVA), also called space walks, along with interest in an EMU for Lunar-Mars missions means even more demanding conditions are being placed on the suit and PLSS. The project for this NASA-ASEE Summer Program was to investigate new materials for these applications. The focus was to emphasize the use of composite materials for every component of the EMU to enhance the properties while reducing the total weight of the EMU. To accomplish this, development of new materials called fullerene reinforced materials (FRM's) was initiated. Fullerenes are carbon molecules which when added to a material significantly reduce the weight of that material. The Faculty Fellow worked directly on the development of the fullerene reinforced materials. A chamber for fullerene production was designed and assembled and first generation samples were processed. He also supervised with the JSC Colleague, a study of composite materials for the EMU conducted by the student participant in the NASA-ASEE Program, Hector Tello a Rice University graduate student, and by a NASA Aerospace Technologist (Materials Engineer) Evelyne Orndoff, in the Systems Engineering Analysis Office (EC7), also a Rice University graduate student. Hector Tello conducted a study on beryllium and Be alloys and initiated a study of carbon and glass reinforced composites for space applications. Evelyne Orndoff compiled an inventory of the materials on the SSA. Ms. Orndoff also reviewed SSA material requirements and cited aspects of the SSA design where composite materials might be further considered. Hector Tello spent part of his time investigating the solar radiation sensitivity of anodic coatings. This project was directed toward the effects of ultra-violet radiation on high emissivity anodic coatings. The work of both Evelyne Orndoff and Hector Tello is of interest to the Engineering Directorate at NASA/JSC and is also directed toward their research as Rice University graduate students.

  5. Chemical effects correlated to nitrogen content of iron nitride films observed in the Fe L-shell X-rays induced by 5-keV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R.; Bertol, A. P. L.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Castellano, G.; Vasconcellos, M. A. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Iron nitride thin films, produced by reactive magnetron sputtering, were characterized with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, X-ray reflectometry, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy. Their characteristic L-X-rays spectra, obtained with an electron microprobe analyzer equipped with a wavelength dispersive spectrometer, were compared to the spectrum of an iron standard. The spectra from the nitrides presented several chemical effects: change in the relative peak areas and shifts of the positions of the L?1,2 and the L?1 peaks (chemical shift). The change in relative peak areas, namely the ratio between the L?1 and the L?1,2 peaks, correlated well with the nitrogen content measured with RBS.

  6. Chemical composition changes in eucalyptus and pinus woods submitted to heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Brito, J O; Silva, F G; Leão, M M; Almeida, G

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated the influence of heat treatment on the chemical composition of Eucalyptus saligna and Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis woods to understand its role in wood processing. E. saligna and P. caribaea var. hondurensis woods were treated in a laboratorial electric furnace at 120, 140, 160 and 180 degrees C to induce their heat treatment. The chemical composition of the resulting products and those from original wood were determined by gas chromatography. Eucalyptus and Pinus showed a significant reduction in arabinose, manose, galactose and xylose contents when submitted to increasing temperatures. No significant alteration in glucose content was observed. Lignin content, however, increased during the heat process. There was a significant reduction in extractive content for Eucalyptus. On the other hand, a slight increase in extractive content has been determined for the Pinus wood, and that only for the highest temperature. These different behaviors can be explained by differences in chemical constituents between softwoods and hardwoods. The results obtained in this study provide important information for future research and utilization of thermally modified wood. PMID:18586488

  7. ZnxCd1-xSe alloy nanowires covering the entire compositional range grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, C. X.; Liu, Z.; Ng, C. M.; Hark, S. K.

    2005-07-01

    We show that preferentially oriented, single-crystalline ZnxCd1-xSe alloy nanowires can be grown on GaAs (100) surface using Au as a catalyst over the entire compositional range in a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition system. The composition of the alloy nanowires can be simply adjusted through the ratio of the flow rates of group-II precursors. Electron microscopy shows that the nanowires are smooth and uniform in shape; their diameters range from 20 to 80 nm and lengths exceed a few micrometers. Nanowires containing more than 13% Zn are zinc blende structured and grow along the ?110? direction. Those containing less Zn are wurtzite structured and grow along the ?210? direction. Compared with the bulk alloy, the change from zinc blende to wurtzite structure in nanowires occurs at far smaller x. The preferred orientation and the persistence of the zinc blende structure both reflect the influence of the substrate on the growth of the nanowires. Photoluminescence measurements identify a strong near-band-edge emission for all samples and show that its peak energy tracks the band gap of ZnxCd1-xSe epilayer for x>0.13. The growth of alloy nanowires at many compositions opens up the possibility of realizing quasi-one-dimensional heterojunctions.

  8. Chemical modeling of boron adsorption by humic materials using the constant capacitance model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The constant capacitance surface complexation model was used to describe B adsorption behavior on reference Aldrich humic acid, humic acids from various soil environments, and dissolved organic matter extracted from sewage effluents. The reactive surface functional groups on the humic materials wer...

  9. Conductor-polymer composite electrode materials

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Kurtz, S.R.; Smyrl, W.H.; Zeigler, J.M.

    1984-06-13

    A conductive composite material useful as an electrode, comprises a conductor and an organic polymer which is reversibly electrochemically dopable to change its electrical conductivity. Said polymer continuously surrounds the conductor in intimate electrical contact therewith and is prepared by electrochemical growth on said conductor or by reaction of its corresponding monomer(s) on said conductor which has been pre-impregnated or pre-coated with an activator for said polymerization. Amount of the conductor is sufficient to render the resultant composite electrically conductive even when the polymer is in an undoped insulating state.

  10. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  11. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  12. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  13. 27 CFR 19.308 - Spirits content of chemicals produced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... chemicals produced. 19.308 Section 19.308 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Spirits Rules for Chemical Byproducts § 19.308 Spirits content of chemicals produced. All chemicals and chemical byproducts produced must be substantially free of spirits before being removed from...

  14. Carbon Materials Metal/Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Composite and Battery Anode Composed of the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method of forming a composite material for use as an anode for a lithium-ion battery is disclosed. The steps include selecting a carbon material as a constituent part of the composite, chemically treating the selected carbon material to receive nanoparticles, incorporating nanoparticles into the chemically treated carbon material and removing surface nanoparticles from an outside surface of the carbon material with incorporated nanoparticles. A material making up the nanoparticles alloys with lithium.

  15. Supplementary Materials Table of Contents

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    and neutral red was placed over a chip packaged with two levels of 3108, and the cells allowed to plate over the water and the dye had penetrated the polymer, and electrochemistry occurred at several of the wires, as seen by the dark red and green colors. The reason for the difference in performance between 3340

  16. Research on Microstructure and Property of Fe-VC Composite Material Made by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei

    The experiment of laser cladding on the surface of H13 steel was made. Vanadium carbide (VC) powder and Fe-base alloy powder were used as cladding material. The microstructure and property of laser cladding layer were studied. The research showed that laser cladding layer had better properties such as minute crystals, deeper layer, higher hardness and good metallurgical bonding with base metal. The average hardness of cladding zone was 900HV0.2. The average hardness of cladding layer increased five times than that of base material. H13 steel was widely used in the field of hot dies. Using laser cladding, the good wear layer would greatly increase the mold useful life.

  17. Thin film dielectric composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Gibbons, Brady J. (Los Alamos, NM); Findikoglu, Alp T. (Los Alamos, NM); Park, Bae Ho (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A dielectric composite material comprising at least two crystal phases of different components with TiO.sub.2 as a first component and a material selected from the group consisting of Ba.sub.1-x Sr.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.3 to 0.7, Pb.sub.1-x Ca.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.4 to 0.7, Sr.sub.1-x Pb.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, Ba.sub.1-x Cd.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.02 to 0.1, BaTi.sub.1-x Zr.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Sn.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.15 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Hf.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.24 to 0.3, Pb.sub.1-1.3x La.sub.x TiO.sub.3+0.2x where x is from 0.23 to 0.3, (BaTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFeo.sub.0.5 Nb.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.75 to 0.9, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.- (PbCo.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.1 to 0.45, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbMg.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, and (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFe.sub.0.5 Ta.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0 to 0.2, as the second component is described. The dielectric composite material can be formed as a thin film upon suitable substrates.

  18. Multi-scale Modeling for Piezoelectric Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Qian Zhang; Xingye Yue

    2014-02-17

    In this paper, we focus on multi-scale modeling and simulation of piezoelectric composite materials. A multi-scale model for piezoelectric composite materials under the framework of Heterogeneous Multi-scale Method(HMM) is proposed. For materials with periodic microstructure, macroscopic model is derived from microscopic model of piezoelectric composite material by asymptotic expansion. Convergence analysis under the framework of homogenization theory is carried out. Moreover, error estimate between HMM solutions and homogenization solutions is derived. A 3-D numerical example of 1-3 type piezoelectric composite materials is employed to verify the error estimate.

  19. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  20. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Bawendi, Moungi G. (Boston, MA); Sundar, Vikram C. (New York, NY)

    2008-02-05

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties

  1. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  2. Monojoy Goswami Computational Chemical and Materials Sciences

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    Monojoy Goswami Computational Chemical and Materials Sciences Center for Nanophase Materials: Computational Chemical and Materials Sciences: Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand Sciences Oak Ridge National Laboratory (865) 576-3265 goswamim@ornl.gov Publications Education: Institute

  3. Chemical Fingerprinting Program for RSRM Critical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClennen, William H.; Fife, Dennis J.; Killpack, Michael O.; Golde, Rick P.; Cash, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the chemical fingerprinting of RSRM (Reusable Sold Rocket Motor) components. A chemical fingerprint can be used to identify a material, to differentiate it from similar looking materials, or lead to its source. It can also identify unexpected changes to a vendor or supplier's material, and monitor aging.

  4. The study of chemical composition and elemental mappings of colored over-glaze porcelain fired in Qing Dynasty by micro-X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng; Meitian, Li; Youshi, Kim; Changsheng, Fan; Shanghai, Wang; Qiuli, Pan; Zhiguo, Liu; Rongwu, Li

    2011-02-01

    It is very difficult to measure the chemical composition of colored pigments of over-glaze porcelain by X-ray fluorescence because it contains high concentration of Pb. One of the disadvantages of our polycapillary optics is that it has low transmission efficiency to the high energy X-ray. However, it is beneficial to measure the chemical compositions of rich Pb sample. In this paper, we reported the performances of a tabletop setup of micro-X-ray fluorescence system base on slightly focusing polycapillary and its applications for analysis of rich Pb sample. A piece of Chinese ancient over-glaze porcelain was analyzed by micro-X-ray fluorescence. The experimental results showed that the Cu, Fe and Mn are the major color elements. The possibilities of the process of decorative technology were discussed in this paper, also.

  5. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    DOEpatents

    Ballif, III, John L. (Salt Lake City, UT); Yuan, Wei W. (Seattle, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  6. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  7. Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H. (Richland, WA); Hirth, John P. (Viola, ID)

    1995-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

  8. Using Composite Materials in a Cryogenic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batton, William D.; Dillard, James E.; Rottmund, Matthew E.; Tupper, Michael L.; Mallick, Kaushik; Francis, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the design and operation of an extended-shaft cryogenic pump to increase the efficiency of pumping. In general, the efficiency of pumping a cryogenic fluid is limited by thermal losses which is itself caused by pump inefficiency and leakage of heat through the pump structure. A typical cryogenic pump includes a drive shaft and two main concentric static components (an outer pressure containment tube and an intermediate static support tube) made from stainless steel. The modifications made include replacement of the stainless-steel drive shaft and the concentric static stainless-steel components with components made of a glass/epoxy composite. The leakage of heat is thus reduced because the thermal conductivity of the composite is an order of magnitude below that of stainless steel. Taking advantage of the margin afforded by the decrease in thermal conductivity, the drive shaft could be shortened to increase its effective stiffness, thereby increasing the rotordynamic critical speeds, thereby further making it possible to operate the pump at a higher speed to increase pumping efficiency. During the modification effort, an analysis revealed that substitution of the shorter glass/epoxy shaft for the longer stainless-steel shaft was not, by itself, sufficient to satisfy the rotordynamic requirements at the desired increased speed. Hence, it became necessary to increase the stiffness of the composite shaft. This stiffening was accomplished by means of a carbon-fiber-composite overwrap along most of the length of the shaft. Concomitantly with the modifications described thus far, it was necessary to provide for joining the composite-material components with metallic components required by different aspects of the pump design. An adhesive material formulated specially to bond the composite and metal components was chosen as a means to satisfy these requirements.

  9. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26043177

  10. Research on the interaction of hydrogen-bond acidic polymer sensitive sensor materials with chemical warfare agents simulants by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26043177

  11. New generation poly(?-caprolactone)/gel-derived bioactive glass composites for bone tissue engineering: Part I. Material properties.

    PubMed

    Dziadek, Michal; Menaszek, Elzbieta; Zagrajczuk, Barbara; Pawlik, Justyna; Cholewa-Kowalska, Katarzyna

    2015-11-01

    Poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL) based composite films containing 12 and 21vol.% bioactive glass (SBG) microparticles were prepared by solvent casting method. Two gel-derived SBGs of SiO2-CaO-P2O5 system differing in SiO2 and CaO contents were applied (mol%): S2: 80SiO2, 16CaO, 4P2O5 and A2: 40SiO2, 54CaO, 6P2O5. The surfaces of the films in contact with Petri dish and exposed to the gas phase during casting were denoted as GS and AS, respectively. Both surfaces of films were characterised in terms of their morphology, micro- and nano-topography as well as wettability. Also mechanical properties (tensile strength, Young's modulus) and PCL matrix crystallinity (degree of crystallinity, crystal size) were evaluated. Degradation behaviour was examined by incubation of materials in UHQ-water at 37°C for 56weeks. The crystallinity, melting temperature and mass loss of incubated materials and pH changes of water were monitored. Furthermore, proliferation of MG-63 osteoblastic cells by direct contact and cytotoxic effect of obtained materials were investigated. Results showed that opposite surfaces of the same polymer and composite films differ in studied surface parameters. The addition of SBG particles into PCL matrix improves nano- and micro-roughness of both surfaces, enhances the hydrophilicity of GS surfaces (~67° for 21A2-PCL compared to ~78° for pure PCL) and also makes AS surface more hydrophobic (~94° for 21S2-PCL compared to ~86° for pure PCL). The nucleation density of PCL was increased with increasing content of SBG particles, which results in the large number of fine spherulites on composite AS surfaces observed using polarized optical (POM), scanning electron (SEM), and atomic force (AFM) microscopies. Higher content of SBG particles causes a notable increase of Young's modulus (from 0.38GPa for pure PCL, 0.90GPa for 12A2-PCL to 1.31GPa for 21A2-PCL), which also depends on SBG chemical composition. After 56-week degradation test, considerably higher crystallinity increase (??c ~148% for 21S2-PCL, ~81% for 21A2-PCL) and weight loss (~17% for both) were found for composite materials, depending on SBG composition, in contrast to value variations for pure PCL film (??c ~43%, weight loss ~1.6%). Furthermore, it seems that both SBG could neutralize acidic degradation by-products of PCL at later incubation stages. Obtained SBG-PCL composites show excellent biocompatibility, support cell proliferation also may modulate cell response depending on the glass composition. The results indicate the possibility to use different contents and/or chemical compositions of SBG to obtain composite materials with various, but controlled, surface and mechanical properties as well as degradation kinetics. PMID:26249560

  12. Smart materials: strain sensing and stress determination by means of nanotube sensing systems, composites, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Nagarajaiah, Satish (Inventor); Dharap, Prasad (Inventor); Zhiling, Li (Inventor); Kim, Jong Dae (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward devices comprising carbon nanotubes that are capable of detecting displacement, impact, stress, and/or strain in materials, methods of making such devices, methods for sensing/detecting/monitoring displacement, impact, stress, and/or strain via carbon nanotubes, and various applications for such methods and devices. The devices and methods of the present invention all rely on mechanically-induced electronic perturbations within the carbon nanotubes to detect and quantify such stress/strain. Such detection and quantification can rely on techniques which include, but are not limited to, electrical conductivity/conductance and/or resistivity/resistance detection/measurements, thermal conductivity detection/measurements, electroluminescence detection/measurements, photoluminescence detection/measurements, and combinations thereof. All such techniques rely on an understanding of how such properties change in response to mechanical stress and/or strain.

  13. EFFECTS OF TOUGHENED MATRIX RESINS ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES

    E-print Network

    EFFECTS OF TOUGHENED MATRIX RESINS ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES by Ricardo Orozco. Finally, I would like to thank Sandia National Laboratories for supporting this research and the wind turbine energy project. #12;v TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES

  14. Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Teaching Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saeli, Mara; Perrenet, Jacob; Jochems, Wim M. G.; Zwaneveld, Bert

    2012-01-01

    The scope of this article is to understand to what extent Computer Science teachers can find support for their Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) in teaching material. We report the results of a study in which PCK is used as framework to develop a research instrument to examine three high school computer science textbooks, with special focus on…

  15. Bioactive composite materials for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Boccaccini, Aldo R; Blaker, Jonny J

    2005-05-01

    Synthetic bioactive and bioresorbable composite materials are becoming increasingly important as scaffolds for tissue engineering. Next-generation biomaterials should combine bioactive and bioresorbable properties to activate in vivo mechanisms of tissue regeneration, stimulating the body to heal itself and leading to replacement of the scaffold by the regenerating tissue. Certain bioactive ceramics such as tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite as well as bioactive glasses, such as 45S5 Bioglass, react with physiologic fluids to form tenacious bonds with hard (and in some cases soft) tissue. However, these bioactive materials are relatively stiff, brittle and difficult to form into complex shapes. Conversely, synthetic bioresorbable polymers are easily fabricated into complex structures, yet they are too weak to meet the demands of surgery and the in vivo physiologic environment. Composites of tailored physical, biologic and mechanical properties as well as predictable degradation behavior can be produced combining bioresorbable polymers and bioactive inorganic phases. This review covers recent international research presenting the state-of-the-art development of these composite systems in terms of material constituents, fabrication technologies, structural and bioactive properties, as well as in vitro and in vivo characteristics for applications in tissue engineering and tissue regeneration. These materials may represent the effective optimal solution for tailored tissue engineering scaffolds, making tissue engineering a realistic clinical alternative in the near future. PMID:16288594

  16. Meso-scale imaging of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grandin, R.; Gray, J.

    2015-03-31

    The performance of composite materials is controlled by the interaction between the individual components as well as the mechanical characteristics of the components themselves. Geometric structure on the meso-scale, where the length-scales are of the same order as the material granularity, plays a key role in controlling material performance and having a quantitative means of characterizing this structure is crucial in developing our understanding of NDE technique signatures of early damage states. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) provides an imaging capability which can resolve these structures for many composite materials. Coupling HRCT with three-dimensional physics-based image processing enables quantitative characterization of the meso-scale structure. Taking sequences of these damage states provides a means to structurally observe the damages evolution. We will discuss the limits of present 3DCT capability and challenges for improving this means to rapidly generate structural information of a composite and of the damage. In this presentation we will demonstrate the imaging capability of HRCT.

  17. Compression Testing of Textile Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of existing test methods, which were developed primarily for laminates made of unidirectional prepreg tape, to textile composites is an area of concern. The issue is whether the values measured for the 2-D and 3-D braided, woven, stitched, and knit materials are accurate representations of the true material response. This report provides a review of efforts to establish a compression test method for textile reinforced composite materials. Experimental data have been gathered from several sources and evaluated to assess the effectiveness of a variety of test methods. The effectiveness of the individual test methods to measure the material's modulus and strength is determined. Data are presented for 2-D triaxial braided, 3-D woven, and stitched graphite/epoxy material. However, the determination of a recommended test method and specimen dimensions is based, primarily, on experimental results obtained by the Boeing Defense and Space Group for 2-D triaxially braided materials. They evaluated seven test methods: NASA Short Block, Modified IITRI, Boeing Open Hole Compression, Zabora Compression, Boeing Compression after Impact, NASA ST-4, and a Sandwich Column Test.

  18. Crystal Structure and Chemical Composition of a Presolar Silicate from the Queen Elizabeth Range 99177 Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Mineral characterization of presolar silicate grains, the most abundant stardust phase, has provided valuable information about the formation conditions in circumstellar environments and in super-nova (SN) outflows. Spectroscopic observations of dust around evolved stars suggest a majority of amor-phous, Mg-rich olivine grains, but crystalline silicates, most of which are pyroxene, have also been observed [1]. The chemical compositions of hundreds of presolar silicates have been determined by Auger spectroscopy and reveal high Fe contents and nonstoichiometric compositions intermediate to olivine and pyroxene [2-6]. The unexpectedly high Fe contents can partly be attributed to secondary alteration on the meteorite parent bodies, as some grains have Fe isotopic anomalies from their parent stellar source [7]. Only about 35 presolar silicates have been studied for their mineral structures and chemical compositions by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These grains display a wide range of compositions and structures, including crystalline forsterite, crystalline pyroxene, nanocrystalline grains, and a majority of amorphous nonstoichiometric grains. Most of these grains were identified in the primitive Acfer 094 meteorite. Presolar silicates from this meteorite show a wide range of Fe-contents, suggestive of secondary processing on the meteorite parent body. The CR chondrite QUE 99177 has not suffered as much alteration [8] and displays the highest presolar silicate abundance to date among carbonaceous chondrites [3, 6]. However, no mineralogical studies of presolar silicates from this meteorite have been performed. Here we examine the mineralogy of a presolar silicate from QUE 99177.

  19. Improvement of the chemical content prediction of a model powder system by reducing multiple scattering using polarized light spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bendoula, Ryad; Gobrecht, Alexia; Moulin, Benoit; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a powerful non-destructive analytical method used to analyze major compounds in bulk materials and products and requiring no sample preparation. It is widely used in routine analysis and also in line in industries, in vivo with biomedical applications, or in field for agricultural and environmental applications. However, highly scattering samples subvert Beer-Lambert law's linear relationship between spectral absorbance and the concentration. Instead of spectral pre-processing, which is commonly used by NIR spectroscopists to mitigate the scattering effect, we put forward an optical method, i.e., coupling polarized light with NIR spectrometry, to free spectra from scattering effect. This should allow us to retrieve linear and steady conditions for spectral analysis. When tested in visible-NIR (Vis-NIR) range (400-800 nm) on model media, mixtures of scattering and absorbing particles, the setup provided significant improvements in absorber concentration estimation precision as well as in the quality and robustness of the calibration model. PMID:25498765

  20. Microfluidic encapsulation for self-healing material and investigation of its impacts on composite performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, Ryan J.

    Encapsulation is a key enabling technology of self-healing materials for which incorporation of reactive materials into a composite, without loss of functionality, is required for damage repair. The functionalized particles resulting from such processes must be readily incorporable into a composite and have minimal detrimental impact on its undamaged properties. At the same time, their morphology must preferentially promote the release of their content during a damage event. However, there is still a need for new techniques capable of fine tuning particle properties for the controlled design of composite performance. To introduce superior processing control, two microfluidics based encapsulation processes have been developed, one each for the individual components of a two-part chemical healing system, namely dicyclopentadiene and Grubb's catalyst. These processes have enabled significantly enhanced performance of self-healing epoxy composites by introducing unprecedented control over particle morphology. The microfluidics based encapsulation platform is first demonstrated by emulsification, using droplet microfluidics, and subsequent encapsulation of dicyclopentadiene. The reported approach allows for facile control of mean microcapsule diameter thru variation of fluid flow rates. The microcapsules exhibit coefficients of variation (CV) of diameter in the range 1-3 (i.e. monodisperse is typically defined as CV smaller than 5), an order of magnitude reduction when compared with conventional batch emulsification methods whose typical CV is 20-40. This control over microcapsule uniformity has led to significant improvement in self-healing composite performance as exemplified by ˜25% higher undamaged fracture toughness. A microfluidic solution spinning process is then developed to encapsulate Grubb's catalyst, the most expensive component of this particular material system, in a novel fibrous morphology. The continuous, on-chip fiber production allows for controllable fabrication of uniform diameters with CV in the range 6-10 and the solution processing allows for control of catalyst content. The microfibers exhibit several advantageous characteristics such as uniform catalyst loading, sub-micron catalyst particle size, and amorphous catalyst structure. As a result, the fibers enable faster gelation times during polymerization of dicyclopentadiene. The microfluidic solution spinning process enables dramatically improved catalyst utilization in self-healing epoxy composites. As compared with their traditionally spherical analogue, the microfibers speed the rate of healing by 25% and increase the overall healed strength by 75%. The impacts of particle size distribution on healing performance and the use of fibrous particles are then investigated theoretically through development of two separate analytical models. Both models relate known composite design parameters such as the weight fraction and dimensions of the particles to the respective healing agent delivery modes for solid and liquid phase healing agent. These are the number of particles exposed on a crack surface and the mass of healing agent released into the damage volume. These models provide a theoretical frame work for the controlled design and optimization of composite healing performance through development of novel encapsulation processes. Throughout this work, evaluation of composite properties and healing performance was experimentally performed using a tapered double cantilever beam specimen. Quantification of such composite performance metrics requires careful calibration of this fracture specimen to determine geometry dependent parameters used for calculations. A method is developed here, for this purpose, using finite element analysis of 3D specimen models and through experimental calibration. The development of this method helps to elucidate the influence of side grooving on the parameters and to align the method of evaluating self-healing material performance with previously developed theory.

  1. Mechanics Methodology for Textile Preform Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, Clarence C., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    NASA and its contractors have completed a program to develop a basic mechanics underpinning for textile composites. Three major deliverables were produced by the program: 1. A set of test methods for measuring material properties and design allowables; 2. Mechanics models to predict the effects of the fiber preform architecture and constituent properties on engineering moduli, strength, damage resistance, and fatigue life; and 3. An electronic data base of coupon type test data. This report describes these three deliverables.

  2. A miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for in situ chemical composition investigation of lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuland, M. B.; Mezger, K.; Riedo, A.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.

    2015-10-01

    A miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer (LMS) is presented. The LMS is designed as a flight instrument for planetary and space research and optimised for in situ measurements of the chemical composition of rocks and soils on a planetary surface. By means of measure-ments standard reference materials of soil and a sample of the Allende meteorite we demonstrate that LMS is a suitable instrument for in situ measurements of elemental and isotopic composition with high precision and accuracy. Furthermore, it is shown that LMS data allows deriving of the material mineralogy and petrology with high spatial resolution, lateral and vertical, and the application of in situ age dating methods.

  3. Finite Element Analysis of Active and Sensory Thermopiezoelectric Composite Materials. Degree awarded by Northwestern Univ., Dec. 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2001-01-01

    Analytical formulations are developed to account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite materials. The coupled response is captured at the material level through the thermopiezoelectric constitutive equations and leads to the inherent capability to model both the sensory and active responses of piezoelectric materials. A layerwise laminate theory is incorporated to provide more accurate analysis of the displacements, strains, stresses, electric fields, and thermal fields through-the-thickness. Thermal effects which arise from coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch, pyroelectric effects, and temperature dependent material properties are explicitly accounted for in the formulation. Corresponding finite element formulations are developed for piezoelectric beam, plate, and shell elements to provide a more generalized capability for the analysis of arbitrary piezoelectric composite structures. The accuracy of the current formulation is verified with comparisons from published experimental data and other analytical models. Additional numerical studies are also conducted to demonstrate additional capabilities of the formulation to represent the sensory and active behaviors. A future plan of experimental studies is provided to characterize the high temperature dynamic response of piezoelectric composite materials.

  4. Quantitative Estimation of Chemical Weathering versus Total Denudation Ratio within Tributaries of Yangtze River Basin Based on Size Dependent Chemical Composition Ratio of River Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboki, Y.; Chao, L.; Tada, R.; Saito, K.; Zheng, H.; Irino, T.; He, M.; Ke, W.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative estimation of chemical weathering rate and evaluation of its controlling factors are critical to understand its role on landscape evolution and carbon cycle on a long time scale. In order to reconstruct the past changes in intensities of chemical weathering and erosion, it is necessary to establish a proxy for chemical versus physical weathering intensities based on chemical composition of sediments. However, the chemical composition of sediments is controlled not only by chemical weathering, but by type of source rock and grain size, too. This study aims to develop a method to quantitatively evaluate the contribution of chemical weathering relative to total denudation in the entire Yangtze River basin based on chemical composition of three different grain size fractions of river sediments. Chemical compositions of three different grain size fractions, and grain size distribution of suspended particles and river bed sediments as well as chemical composition of dissolved materials of water samples are analyzed. The result revealed that suspended particles and river bed sediments are composed of three components, aluminosilicate, quartz, and carbonate. K/Al is smaller in the smallest size fraction. We preliminary interpret that original composition of aluminosilcates within different size fractions of the same sample is the same, and the decrease in K/Al with decreasing grain size would reflect increasing influence of chemical weathering. If correct, K/Al of fine to coarse fraction can be used as an index of chemical weathering intensity. To test this idea, we examined the relationship between K/Al of fine to coarse fraction and the ratio of chemical weathering contribution to total denudation rate based on observational data. The result will be presented and its implication will be discussed.

  5. Control of carbon content in amorphous GeTe films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) for phase-change random access memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoukar, M.; Szkutnik, P. D.; Jourde, D.; Pelissier, B.; Michallon, P.; Noé, P.; Vallée, C.

    2015-07-01

    Amorphous and smooth GeTe thin films are deposited on 200?mm silicon substrates by plasma enhanced—metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) using the commercial organometallic precursors TDMAGe and DIPTe as Ge and Te precursors, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements show a stoichiometric composition of the deposited GeTe films but with high carbon contamination. Using information collected by Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) and XPS, the origin of carbon contamination is determined and the dissociation mechanisms of Ge and Te precursors in H2 + Ar plasma are proposed. As a result, carbon level is properly controlled by varying operating parameters such as plasma radio frequency power, pressure and H2 rate. Finally, GeTe films with carbon level as low as 5?at. % are obtained.

  6. Titanium composite materials for transportation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García de Cortazar, M.; Agote, I.; Silveira, E.; Egizabal, P.; Coleto, J.; Le Petitcorps, Y.

    2008-11-01

    Discontinuously reinforced titanium alloys containing in-situ formed TiB needles are emerging as candidate materials for advanced applications. This new family of titanium composites presents technical advantages, and it can be less expensive and easily amenable for net-shape manufacturing relative to titanium metal-matrix composites developed to date. The production of a master compound by a novel and cost-effective process called self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) has been studied. This master compound could be subsequently used in an investment casting process to obtain TiB-reinforced net-shape titanium-matrix composites. The SHS technique and its features were investigated in depth before a suitable master compound was defined and produced. Cast samples obtained from the addition of the master compound have been produced and the most important issues concerning the processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties are highlighted in this paper.

  7. Metal Matrix Composite Materials for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Jones, C. S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) are attractive materials for aerospace applications because of their high specific strength, high specific stiffness, and lower thermal expansion coefficient. They are affordable since complex parts can be produced by low cost casting process. As a result there are many commercial and Department of Defense applications of MMCs today. This seminar will give an overview of MMCs and their state-of-the-art technology assessment. Topics to be covered are types of MMCs, fabrication methods, product forms, applications, and material selection issues for design and manufacture. Some examples of current and future aerospace applications will also be presented and discussed.

  8. [Chemical composition and biological quality of defatted hazelnut flour].

    PubMed

    Villarroel, M; Biolley, E; Schneeberger, R; Ballester, D; Santibáñez, S

    1989-06-01

    The results of the chemical composition and biological quality of deffated hazel nut flour are shown. The samples analyzed contained significant amounts of proteins (19%) comparable to legume flour, higher than cereals and lower than deffated oleaginous flours. The oil extracted from the seed was analyzed and the average results obtained were the following: Refraction index, 1.47; saponification No. 184.8; iodine No. 85.0. The average composition of the fatty acids obtained by gas liquid chromatography was: Palmitic acid 2.3% Palmitoleic acid 37.0% Stearic acid 0.5% Oleic acid 39.5% Linoleic acid 6.9% Linolenic acid 1.1% Eicosanoic acid 2.3% Eicosaenoic acid 4.6% Docosenoic acid 3.4% Tetraeicosanoic acid 0.3% These results indicate a good-quality oil due to the low content of linolenic acid. The nutritive value of the deffated meal measured in the rats gave a net protein ratio (NPR) of 3.58, lower than the corresponding casein value (4.10). The true protein digestibility measured in the rat gave a value of 7.3%, compared to 95% for casein. The amounts of iron and phosphorous are comparatively lower than those reported for rape-seed meal and sunflower meal. PMID:2487030

  9. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material

    DOEpatents

    D'Urso, Brian R. (Clinton, TN); Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN)

    2007-08-21

    A hydrophobic disordered composite material having a protrusive surface feature includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a protrusive surface feature, the protrusive feature being hydrophobic.

  10. Chemical Composition of Defatted Cottonseed and Soy Meal Products

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Hailin; Olk, Dan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition is critical information for product quality and exploration of new use. Hence defatted cottonseed meals from both glanded (with gossypol) and glandless (without gossypol) cotton seeds were separated into water soluble and insoluble fractions, or water soluble, alkali soluble as well as total protein isolates. The contents of gossypol, total protein and amino acids, fiber and carbohydrates, and selected macro and trace elements in these products were determined and compared with each other and with those of soy meal products. Data reported in this work improved our understanding on the chemical composition of different cottonseed meal products that is helpful for more economical utilization of these products. These data would also provide a basic reference for product standards and quality control when the production of the cottonseed meal products comes to pilot and industrial scales. PMID:26079931

  11. Novel materials and device design by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for use in infrared emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Biefeld, R.M.; Kurtz, S.R.; Allerman, A.A.

    1996-12-01

    The authors have grown AlSb and AlAs{sub x}Sb{sub 1{minus}x} epitaxial layers by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition(MOCVD) using trimethylamine or ethyldimethylamine alane, triethylantimony and arsine. These layers were successfully doped p- or n-type using diethylzinc or tetraethyltin, respectively. They examined the growth of AlAs{sub x}Sb{sub 1{minus}x} using temperatures of 500 to 600 C, pressures of 65 to 630 torr, V/III ratios of 1--17, and growth rates of 0.3 to 2.7 {micro}m/hour in a horizontal quartz reactor. They have also grown gain-guided, injection lasers using AlAsSb for optical confinement and a strained InAsSb/InAs multi-quantum well active region using MOCVD. The semi-metal properties of a p-GaAsSb/n-InAs heterojunction were utilized as a source for injection of electrons into the active region of the laser. In pulsed mode, the laser operated up to 210 K with an emission wavelength of 3.8--3.9 {micro}m. The dependence of active region composition on wavelength was determined. They also report on the 2-color emission of a light-emitting diode with two different active regions to demonstrate multi-stage operation of these devices.

  12. Development of carbon composite iron ore micropellets by using the microfines of iron ore and carbon-bearing materials in iron making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jagannath; Ghorai, Satadal; Das, Avimanyu

    2015-02-01

    Iron ore microfines and concentrate have very limited uses in sintering processes. They are used in pelletization; however, this process is cost intensive. Furthermore, the microfines of non-coking coal and other carbon-bearing materials, e.g., blast-furnace flue dust (BFD) and coke fines, are not used extensively in the metallurgical industry because of operational difficulties and handling problems. In the present work, to utilize these microfines, coal composite iron oxide micropellets (2-6 mm in size) were produced through an innovative technique in which lime and molasses were used as binding materials in the micropellets. The micropellets were subsequently treated with CO2 or the industrial waste gas to induce the chemical bond formation. The results show that, at a very high carbon level of 22wt% (38wt% coal), the cold crushing strength and abrasion index of the micropellets are 2.5-3 kg/cm2 and 5wt%-9wt%, respectively; these values indicate that the pellets are suitable for cold handling. The developed micropellets have strong potential as a heat source in smelting reduction in iron making and sintering to reduce coke breeze. The micropellets produced with BFD and coke fines (8wt%-12wt%) were used in iron ore sintering and were observed to reduce the coke breeze consumption by 3%-4%. The quality of the produced sinter was at par with that of the conventional blast-furnace sinter.

  13. Composite Dielectric Materials for Electrical Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, F.A.

    1999-04-25

    Composites that consist of a dielectric host containing a particulate conductor as a second phase are of interest for electrical switching applications. Such composites are "smart" materials that can function as either voltage or current limiters, and the difference in fimction depends largely upon whether the dielectric is filled to below or above the percolation threshold. It also is possible to combine current and voltage limiting in a single composite to make a "super-smart" material.

  14. A Statistical Approach for Judging Stability of Whole Mixture Chemical Composition over Time for Highly Complex Disinfection By-Product Mixtures from EPA's Four Lab Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical characterization of complex mixtures and assessment of stability over time of the characterized chemicals is crucial both to characterize exposure and to use data from one mixture as a surrogate for other similar mixtures. The chemical composition of test mixtures can va...

  15. Achieving tunable sensitivity in composite high-energy density materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkeev, Sergey; Tsyshevsky, Roman; Kuklja, Maija

    2015-06-01

    Laser irradiation provides a unique opportunity for selective, predictive, and controlled initiation of energetic materials. We propose a consistent micro-scale mechanism of photoexcitation at the interface, formed by a molecular energetic material and a metal oxide. A specific PETN-MgO model composite is used to illustrate and explain seemingly puzzling experiments on selective laser initiation of energetic materials, which reported that the presence of metal oxide additives triggered the photoinitiation by an unusually low energy. We suggest that PETN photodecomposition is catalyzed by oxygen vacancies (F0 centers) at the MgO surface. The proposed model suggests ways to tune sensitivity of energetic molecular materials to photoinitiation. Our quantum-chemical calculations suggest that the structural defects (e.g., oxygen vacancies) strongly interact with the molecular material (e.g., adsorbed energetic molecules) by inducing a charge transfer at the interface and hence play an imperative role in governing both energy absorption and energy release in the system. Our approach and conclusions provide a solid basis for novel design of energetic interfaces with desired properties and offers a new perspective in the field of explosive materials and devices.

  16. Materials Advance Chemical Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    In the future, the Planetary Science Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate hopes to use better-performing and lower-cost propulsion systems to send rovers, probes, and observers to places like Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. For such purposes, a new propulsion technology called the Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) was developed under NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project, located at Glenn Research Center. As an advanced chemical propulsion system, AMBR uses nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer and hydrazine fuel to propel a spacecraft. Based on current research and development efforts, the technology shows great promise for increasing engine operation and engine lifespan, as well as lowering manufacturing costs. In developing AMBR, ISPT has several goals: to decrease the time it takes for a spacecraft to travel to its destination, reduce the cost of making the propulsion system, and lessen the weight of the propulsion system. If goals like these are met, it could result in greater capabilities for in-space science investigations. For example, if the amount (and weight) of propellant required on a spacecraft is reduced, more scientific instruments (and weight) could be added to the spacecraft. To achieve AMBR s maximum potential performance, the engine needed to be capable of operating at extremely high temperatures and pressure. To this end, ISPT required engine chambers made of iridium-coated rhenium (strong, high-temperature metallic elements) that allowed operation at temperatures close to 4,000 F. In addition, ISPT needed an advanced manufacturing technique for better coating methods to increase the strength of the engine chamber without increasing the costs of fabricating the chamber.

  17. Open Journal of Composite Materials Open Journal of Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Villa, Marco; Hale, Richard D.; Ewing, Mark Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Prior static studies of three-dimensionally woven carbon/epoxy textile composites show that large interlaminar normal and shear strains occur as a result of layer waviness under static compression loading. This study addresses the dynamic response...

  18. Peculiarities of formation of phase composition, porous structure, and catalytic properties of tungsten oxide-based macroporous materials fabricated by sol–gel synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Papynov, Evgeniy Konstantinovich; Mayorov, Vitaliy Yurevich; Palamarchuk, Marina Sergeevna; Avramenko, Valentin Aleksandrovich

    2014-02-15

    The method of template sol–gel synthesis of tungsten oxide-based macroporous materials using ‘core–shell’ latex particles as colloid templates is described. The chemical composition and structural characteristics of the synthesized macroporous oxide systems have been investigated. The peculiarities of formation of material phase composition and macroporous structure under different template thermal destruction conditions have been revealed. An optimal method of a targeted synthesis of the crystalline tungsten(VI) oxide having a defect-free macroporous structure (average pore size 160 nm) and efficient catalytic properties under organic liquid phase oxidation conditions has been suggested. The prospects of the fabricated material application as catalysts of hydrothermal oxidation of radionuclide organic complexes at radioactive waste decontamination have been demonstrated. - Highlights: • Macroporous tungsten oxides were fabricated via sol–gel process. • The correlation between synthesis conditions and composition was determined. • Influence of synthesis conditions on porous structure has been explained. • The effects of template thermodestruction have been set up. • High potential of such materials for catalysis applications has been shown.

  19. Inhibition of melanogenesis versus antioxidant properties of essential oil extracted from leaves of Vitex negundo Linn and chemical composition analysis by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huey-Chun; Chang, Tzu-Yun; Chang, Long-Zen; Wang, Hsiao-Fen; Yih, Kuang-Hway; Hsieh, Wan-Yu; Chang, Tsong-Min

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the antimelanogenic and antioxidative properties of the essential oil extracted from leaves of V. negundo Linn and the analysis of the chemical composition of this essential oil. The efficacy of the essential oil was evaluated spectrophotometrically, whereas the volatile chemical compounds in the essential oil were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results revealed that the essential oil effectively suppresses murine B16F10 tyrosinase activity and decreases the amount of melanin in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the essential oil significantly scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radicals, and showed potent reducing power versus metal-ion chelating properties in a dose-dependent pattern. The chemical constituents in the essential oil are sesquiterpenes (44.41%), monoterpenes (19.25%), esters (14.77%), alcohols (8.53%), aromatic compound (5.90%), ketone (4.96%), ethers (0.4%) that together account for 98.22% of its chemical composition. It is predicted that the aromatic compound in the essential oil may contribute to its antioxidant activities. The results indicated that essential oil extracted from V. negundo Linn leaves decreased melanin production in B16F10 melanoma cells and showed potent antioxidant activities. The essential oil can thereby serve as an inhibitor of melanin synthesis and could also act as a natural antioxidant. PMID:22466851

  20. Swift chemical sputtering of covalently bonded materials

    E-print Network

    Nordlund, Kai

    Swift chemical sputtering of covalently bonded materials K. Nordlund1 , E. Salonen2 , A. V symmetric case possible is the one where the H atom moves perpendicular to the chemical bond towards ¯fy is an 1 #12;Figure 1: Schematic representation of the swift chemical bond breaking in a carbon

  1. [Determination of the content of sulfur of coal by the infrared absorption method with high acccuracy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Feng; Lu, Hai; Li, Jia; Sun, Guo-Hua; Wang, Jun; Dai, Xin-Hua

    2014-02-01

    The present paper reported the differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetry curves and the infrared (IR) absorption spectrometry under the temperature program analyzed by the combined simultaneous thermal analysis-IR spectrometer. The gas products of coal were identified by the IR spectrometry. This paper emphasized on the combustion at high temperature-IR absorption method, a convenient and accurate method, which measures the content of sulfur in coal indirectly through the determination of the content of sulfur dioxide in the mixed gas products by IR absorption. It was demonstrated, when the instrument was calibrated by varied pure compounds containing sulfur and certified reference materials (CRMs) for coal, that there was a large deviation in the measured sulfur contents. It indicates that the difference in chemical speciations of sulfur between CRMs and the analyte results in a systematic error. The time-IR absorption curve was utilized to analyze the composition of sulfur at low temperatures and high temperatures and then the sulfur content of coal sample was determined by using a CRM for coal with a close composition of sulfur. Therefore, the systematic error due to the difference in chemical speciations of sulfur between the CRM and analyte was eliminated. On the other hand, in this combustion at high temperature-IR absorption method, the mass of CRM and analyte were adjusted to assure the sulfur mass equal and then the CRM and the analyte were measured alternately. This single-point calibration method reduced the effect of the drift of the IR detector and improved the repeatability of results, compared with the conventional multi-point calibration method using the calibration curves of signal intensity vs sulfur mass. The sulfur content results and their standard deviations of an anthracite coal and a bituminous coal with a low sulfur content determined by this modified method were 0.345% (0.004%) and 0.372% (0.008%), respectively. The uncertainty (U, k =2) of sulfur contents of two coal samples was evaluated to be 0.019% and 0.021%, respectively. Two main modifications, namely the calibration using the coal CRM with a similar composition of low-temperature sulfur and high temperature sulfur, and the single-point calibration alternating CRM and analyte, endow the combustion at high temperature-IR absorption method with an accuracy obviously better than that of the ASTM method. Therefore, this modified method has a well potential in the analysis of sulfur content. PMID:24822403

  2. Impact of solids on composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronson, Arturo; Maldonado, Jerry; Chern, Tzong; Martinez, Francisco; Mccord-Medrano, Johnnie; Roschke, Paul N.

    1987-01-01

    The failure modes of composite materials as a result of low velocity impact were investigated by simulating the impact with a finite element analysis. An important facet of the project is the modeling of the impact of a solid onto cylindrical shells composed of composite materials. The model under development will simulate the delamination sustained when a composite material encounters impact from another rigid body. The computer equipment was installed, the computer network tested, and a finite element method model was developed to compare results with known experimental data. The model simulated the impact of a steel rod onto a rotating shaft. Pre-processing programs (GMESH and TANVEL) were developed to generate node and element data for the input into the three dimensional, dynamic finite element analysis code (DYNA3D). The finite element mesh was configured with a fine mesh near the impact zone and a coarser mesh for the impacting rod and the regions surrounding the impacting zone. For the computer simulation, five impacting loads were used to determine the time history of the stresses, the scribed surface areas, and the amount of ridging. The processing time of the computer codes amounted from 1 to 4 days. The calculated surface area were within 6-12 percent, relative error when compated to the actual scratch area.

  3. Flexible Composite-Material Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Glen; Haggard, Roy; Harris, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    A proposed lightweight pressure vessel would be made of a composite of high-tenacity continuous fibers and a flexible matrix material. The flexibility of this pressure vessel would render it (1) compactly stowable for transport and (2) more able to withstand impacts, relative to lightweight pressure vessels made of rigid composite materials. The vessel would be designed as a structural shell wherein the fibers would be predominantly bias-oriented, the orientations being optimized to make the fibers bear the tensile loads in the structure. Such efficient use of tension-bearing fibers would minimize or eliminate the need for stitching and fill (weft) fibers for strength. The vessel could be fabricated by techniques adapted from filament winding of prior composite-material vessels, perhaps in conjunction with the use of dry film adhesives. In addition to the high-bias main-body substructure described above, the vessel would include a low-bias end substructure to complete coverage and react peak loads. Axial elements would be overlaid to contain damage and to control fiber orientation around side openings. Fiber ring structures would be used as interfaces for connection to ancillary hardware.

  4. Assessment of Volatile Chemical Composition of the Essential Oil of Jatropha ribifolia (Pohl) Baill by HS-SPME-GC-MS Using Different Fibers

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Celia Eliane de Lara; da Costa, Willian Ferreira; Minguzzi, Sandro; da Silva, Rogério Cesar de Lara; Simionatto, Euclésio

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oil and volatile obtained from the roots of Jatropha ribifolia (Pohl) Baill was performed in this work. The Clevenger extractor was utilized in hydrodistillation of oil and chemical composition determined by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry detector (GC-MS). The identification of compounds was confirmed by retention index (Kovats index) obtained from a series of straight chain alkanes (C7–C30) and by comparison with NIST and ADAMS library. A total of 61 compounds were identified in essential oil by GC-MS. The extraction of volatile was performed also by the use of the solid phase microextraction (SPME) with four different fibers. The essential oil extraction was extremely rapid (15?s) to avoid saturation of the fiber and the MS detector. The majority of the composition of essential oil is the terpenes: ?-pinene (major compound 9.16%), ?-vatirene (8.34%), ?-gurjunene (6.98%), ?-pinene (6.35%), camphene (4.34%), tricyclene (3.79%) and dehydro aromadendrene (3.52%) it and aldehydes and alcohols. Through the SPME it was possible to determine the nine volatile compounds not identified in oil 2,3,4-trimethyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one, ?-phellandrene, 3-carene, trans-p-mentha-2,8-dienol, pinocamphone, D-verbenon, 1,3,3-trimethyl-2-(2-methyl-cyclopropyl)-cyclohexene, 2,4-diisocyanato-1-methylbenzene, and (6-hydroxymethyl-2,3-dimethylehenyl) methanol. PMID:24371539

  5. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Dishman, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg.sub.1 in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg.sub.2, wherein Eg.sub.2 >Eg.sub.1, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method, comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg.sub.1 but less than Eg.sub.2, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  6. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Dishman, J.L.

    1985-10-11

    Disclosed is a method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 1/ in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 2/, wherein Eg/sub 2/ > Eg/sub 1/, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method. The method comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg/sub 1/ but less than Eg/sub 2/, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  7. Short courses in Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Davies, John N.

    duty composite components. Martyn Jones MRaeS ­ Experience in manufacturing and design of aircraft in designing and manufacturing small or large scale components can provide huge benefits for many industries and future engineers on how composites have revolutionised the engineering world and how new and improved

  8. Wood Chemical Composition in Species of Cactaceae: The Relationship between Lignification and Stem Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Canché-Escamilla, Gonzalo; Soto-Hernández, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs) and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content) in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous) with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35%) of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level. PMID:25880223

  9. The exotic chemical composition of the Sagittarius dwarf Spheroidal galaxy

    E-print Network

    L. Sbordone; P. Bonifacio; R. Buonanno; G. Marconi; L. Monaco; S. Zaggia

    2006-12-05

    The Sagittarius dwarf Spheroidal galaxy is the nearest neighbor of the Milky Way. Moving along a short period quasi-polar orbit within the Halo, it is being destroyed by the tidal interaction with our Galaxy, losing its stellar content along a huge stellar stream. We study the detailed chemical composition of 12 giant stars in the Sagittarius dwarf Spheroidal main body, together with 5 more in the associated globular cluster Terzan 7 by means of high resolution VLT-UVES spectra. Abundances are derived for up to 21 elements from O to Nd, by fitting lines EW or line profiles against ATLAS 9 model atmospheres and SYNTHE spectral syntheses calculated ad-hoc. Temperatures are derived from (V-I)_0 or (B-V)_0 colors, gravities from Fe I - Fe II ionization equilibrium. The metallicity of the observed stars is between [Fe/H]=-0.9 and 0. We detected a highly peculiar ``chemical signature'', with undersolar alpha elements, Na, Al, Sc, V, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn among others, and overabundant La, Ce and Nd. Many of these abundance ratios (in particular light-odd elements and iron peak ones) are strongly at odds with what is observed within the Milky Way, they thus may be a very useful tool to recognize populations originated within the Sagittarius dwarf. This can be clearly seen in the case of the globular Palomar 12, which is believed to have been stripped from Sagittarius: the cluster shows precisely the same chemical ``oddities'', thus finally confirming its extragalactic origin.

  10. Impact of oil on groundwater chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakorenko, N. N.

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the paper is to characterize the chemical composition of groundwater samples from the monitoring wells drilled in the petrol station areas within the vicinity of Tomsk. The level of contamination has increased since many macro - and microcomponent concentrations (such as petroleum products, chlorine, sulphates, carbon dioxide and lead, etc.) in groundwater samples of the present study is higher than that in previous period samples.

  11. Synergistic adsorption of heavy metal ions and organic pollutants by supramolecular polysaccharide composite materials from cellulose, chitosan and crown ether

    PubMed Central

    Mututuvari, Tamutsiwa M.; Tran, Chieu D.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a simple one-step method to synthesize novel supramolecular polysaccharide composites from cellulose (CEL), chitosan (CS) and benzo-15-crown 5 (B15C5). Butylmethylimidazolium chloride [BMIm+Cl?], an ionic liquid (IL), was used as a sole solvent for dissolution and preparation of the composites. Since majority of [BMIm+Cl?] used was recovered for reuse, the method is recyclable. The [CEL/CS + B15C5] composites obtained retain properties of their components, namely superior mechanical strength (from CEL), excellent adsorption capability for heavy metal ions and organic pollutants (from B15C5 and CS). More importantly, the [CEL/CS + B15C5] composites exhibit truly supramolecular properties. By itself CS, CEL and B15C5 can effectively adsorb Cd2+, Zn2+ and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol. However, adsorption capability of the composite was substantially and synergistically enhanced by adding B15C5 to either CEL and/or CS. That is, the adsorption capacity (qe values) for Cd2+ and Zn2+ by [CS + B15C5], [CEL + B15C5] and [CEL + CS + B15C5] composites are much higher than combined qe values of individual CS, CEL and B15C5 composites. It seems that B15C5 synergistically interact with CS (or CEL) to form more stable complexes with Cd2+ (or Zn2+), and as a consequence, the [CS + B15C5] (or the [CEL + B15C5]) composite can adsorb relatively larger amount Cd2+ (or Zn2+). Moreover, the pollutants adsorbed on the composites can be quantitatively desorbed to enable the [CS + CEL + B15C5] composites to be reused with similar adsorption efficiency. PMID:24333678

  12. Polymer Matrix Composite Material Oxygen Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Tom

    2001-01-01

    Carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite materials look promising as a material to construct liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks. Based on mechanical impact tests the risk will be greater than aluminum, however, the risk can probably be managed to an acceptable level. Proper tank design and operation can minimize risk. A risk assessment (hazard analysis) will be used to determine the overall acceptability for using polymer matrix composite materials.

  13. New textile composite materials development, production, application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikhailov, Petr Y.

    1993-01-01

    New textile composite materials development, production, and application are discussed. Topics covered include: super-high-strength, super-high-modulus fibers, filaments, and materials manufactured on their basis; heat-resistant and nonflammable fibers, filaments, and textile fabrics; fibers and textile fabrics based on fluorocarbon poylmers; antifriction textile fabrics based on polyfen filaments; development of new types of textile combines and composite materials; and carbon filament-based fabrics.

  14. Composition analysis by scanning femtosecond laser ultraprobing (CASFLU).

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Campbell, E. Michael; Stuart, Brent C.; Perry, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The composition analysis by scanning femtosecond ultraprobing (CASFLU) technology scans a focused train of extremely short-duration, very intense laser pulses across a sample. The partially-ionized plasma ablated by each pulse is spectrometrically analyzed in real time, determining the ablated material's composition. The steering of the scanned beam thus is computer directed to either continue ablative material-removal at the same site or to successively remove nearby material for the same type of composition analysis. This invention has utility in high-speed chemical-elemental, molecular-fragment and isotopic analyses of the microstructure composition of complex objects, e.g., the oxygen isotopic compositions of large populations of single osteons in bone.

  15. Two-dimensional optimization of material composition of functionally graded materials using meshless analyses

    E-print Network

    Vel, Senthil

    Two-dimensional optimization of material composition of functionally graded materials using to optimize the material composition for two model problems. In the first problem, we minimize the peak reserved. Keywords: Heterogeneous solid; FGM; Inhomogeneous composite material; Local composition control

  16. Enhancement of activated sludge dewatering performance by combined composite enzymatic lysis and chemical re-flocculation with inorganic coagulants: Kinetics of enzymatic reaction and re-flocculation morphology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhan; Zhang, Weijun; Wang, Dongsheng; Ma, Teng; Bai, Runying

    2015-10-15

    The feasibility of combined process of composite enzymatic treatment and chemical flocculation with inorganic salt coagulants was investigated in this study. The evolution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) distribution, composition and morphological properties were analyzed to unravel the sludge conditioning mechanism. It was found that sludge filtration performance was deteriorated due to release of a large amount of biopolymers after enzymatic treatment. The change in EPS followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic equation well under enzymatic treatment. The feeding modes of enzymes had a significant influence on sludge lysis efficiency under compound enzymes treatment. Alpha amylase + protease was more effective in solubilization than other two addition modes (protease + ?-amylase or simultaneous addition). The sludge floc re-formed and macromolecule biopolymers were effectively removed through coagulation process. At the same time, both of filtration rate and cake solid content of sludge treated with enzymes were improved with increasing dosage of coagulants, and ferric iron (FeCl3) had better performance in sludge dewaterability enhancement than polyaluminium chloride (PACl). In addition, sludge filtration property was slightly deteriorated, while the cake moisture reduction was favored at the optimal dosage of inorganic coagulants. PMID:26196306

  17. Flame-retardant composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of eight different graphite composite panels fabricated using four different resin matrices and two types of graphite reinforcement are described. The resin matrices included: VPSP/BMI, a blend of vinylpolystyryl pyridine and bismaleimide; BMI, a bismaleimide; and phenolic and PSP, a polystyryl pyridine. The graphite fiber used was AS-4 in the form of either tape or fabric. The properties of these composites were compared with epoxy composites. It was determined that VPSP/BMI with the graphite tape was the optimum design giving the lowest heat release rate.

  18. Changes in chemical composition, shear values, and sensory properties of deboned broiler breast and thigh meat as effected by cooking form 

    E-print Network

    Savage, Belinda Anita

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of skin removal on the fat content, tenderness, and overall acceptability of grilled chicken thigh and breast meat. Proximate composition and shear value were determined for breast and thigh meat...

  19. Improved Damage Resistant Composite Materials Incorporating Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, Jeffrey S. N.; Rogers, Craig A.

    1996-01-01

    Metallic shape memory alloys (SMA) such as nitinol have unique shape recovery behavior and mechanical properties associated with a material phase change that have been used in a variety of sensing and actuation applications. Recent studies have shown that integrating nitinol-SMA actuators into composite materials increases the composite material's functionality. Hybrid composites of conventional graphite/epoxy or glass/epoxy and nitinol-SMA elements can perform functions in applications where monolithic composites perform inadequately. One such application is the use of hybrid composites to function both in load bearing and armor capacities. While monolithic composites with high strength-to-weight ratios function efficiently as loadbearing structures, because of their brittle nature, impact loading can cause significant catastrophic damage. Initial composite failure modes such as delamination and matrix cracking dissipate some impact energy, but when stress exceeds the composite's ultimate strength, fiber fracture and material perforation become dominant. One of the few methods that has been developed to reduce material perforation is hybridizing polymer matrix composites with tough kevlar or high modulus polyethynylene plies. The tough fibers increase the impact resistance and the stiffer and stronger graphite fibers carry the majority of the load. Similarly, by adding nitinol-SMA elements that absorb impact energy through the stress-induced martensitic phase transformation, the composites' impact perforation resistance can be greatly enhanced. The results of drop-weight and high velocity gas-gun impact testing of various composite materials will be presented. The results demonstrate that hybridizing composites with nitinol-SMA elements significantly increases perforation resistance compared to other traditional toughening elements. Inspection of the composite specimens at various stages of perforation by optical microscope illustrates the mechanisms by which perforation is initiated. Results suggest that the out-of-plane transverse shear properties of the composite and nitinol elements have a significant effect on the perforation resistance. Applications that can utilize the hybrid composites effectively will also be presented with the experimental studies.

  20. Surface composites: A new class of engineered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.; Fitz-Gerald, J.

    1997-03-01

    To integrate irreconcilable material properties into a single component, a new class of engineered materials termed {open_quotes}surface composites{close_quotes} has been developed. In this engineered material, the second phase is spatially distributed in the near surface regions, such that the phase composition is linearly graded as a function of distance from the surface. Surface composites are different from existing engineered materials such as {open_quotes}bulk composites{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}functionally graded materials{close_quotes} (FGM). Unlike bulk composites, the surface phase in surface composites is present only at the near surface regions. In contrast to FGM, the graded properties of surface composites are achieved by unique morphological surface modification of the bulk phase. To fabricate surface composites, the initial surface of the bulk material is transformed using a novel multiple pulse irradiation technique into truncated cone-like structures. The laser induced micro-rough structures (LIMS) possess surface areas which are up to an order of magnitude higher than the original surface. The second phase is deposited on the surface using thin or thick film deposition methods. A key characteristic of surface composites is the formation of a three dimensional, compositionally and thermally graded interface, which gives rise to improved adhesion of the surface phase. Examples of various types of surface composites such as W/Mo, silica/SiC and diamond/steel, etc. are presented in this paper. The unique properties of surface composites make them ideal engineered materials for applications involving adherent thick film coatings of thermally mismatched materials, compositional surface modification for controlled catalytic activity, and creating adherent metal-ceramic and ceramic-polymeric joints. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  1. High Temperature Materials for Chemical Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra; Hickman, Robert; O'Dell, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Radiation or passively cooled thrust chambers are used for a variety of chemical propulsion functions including apogee insertion, reaction control for launch vehicles, and primary propulsion for planetary spacecraft. The performance of these thrust chambers is limited by the operating temperature of available materials. Improved oxidation resistance and increased operating temperatures can be achieved with the use of thermal barrier coatings such as zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and hafnium oxide (HfO2). However, previous attempts to include these materials showed cracking and spalling of the oxide layer due to poor bonding. Current research at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has generated unique, high temperature material options for in-space thruster designs that are capable of up to 2500 C operating temperatures. The research is focused on fabrication technologies to form low cost Iridium,qF_.henium (Ir/Re) components with a ceramic hot wall created as an integral, functionally graded material (FGM). The goal of this effort is to further de?celop proven technologies for embedding a protective ceramic coating within the Ir/Re liner to form a robust functional gradient material. Current work includes the fabrication and testing of subscale samples to evaluate tensile, creep, thermal cyclic/oxidation, and thermophysical material properties. Larger test articles have also being fabricated and hot-fire tested to demonstrate the materials in prototype thrusters at 1O0 lbf thrust levels.

  2. Cured composite materials for reactive metal battery electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Peterson, Eric S.

    2006-03-07

    A solid molecular composite polymer-based electrolyte is made for batteries, wherein silicate compositing produces a electrolytic polymer with a semi-rigid silicate condensate framework, and then mechanical-stabilization by radiation of the outer surface of the composited material is done to form a durable and non-tacky texture on the electrolyte. The preferred ultraviolet radiation produces this desirable outer surface by creating a thin, shallow skin of crosslinked polymer on the composite material. Preferably, a short-duration of low-medium range ultraviolet radiation is used to crosslink the polymers only a short distance into the polymer, so that the properties of the bulk of the polymer and the bulk of the molecular composite material remain unchanged, but the tough and stable skin formed on the outer surface lends durability and processability to the entire composite material product.

  3. Synthesis and Engineering Materials Properties of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Westman, Matthew P.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high practical hydrogen content of 14-16 wt%. This material is selected as a surrogate chemical for a hydrogen storage system. For easier transition to the existing infrastructure, a fluid phase hydrogen storage material is very attractive and thus, we investigated the engineering materials properties of AB in liquid carriers for a chemical hydrogen storage slurry system. Slurries composed of AB and high temperature liquids were prepared by mechanical milling and sonication in order to obtain stable and fluidic properties. Volumetric gas burette system was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the AB slurry and neat AB. Viscometry and microscopy were employed to further characterize slurries engineering properties. Using a tip-sonication method we have produced AB/silicone fluid slurries at solid loadings up to 40wt% (6.5wt% H2) with viscosities less than 500cP at 25°C.

  4. Some functional properties of composite material based on scrap tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesuma, Renate; Malers, Laimonis

    2013-09-01

    The utilization of scrap tires still obtains a remarkable importance from the aspect of unloading the environment from non-degradable waste [1]. One of the most prospective ways for scrap tires reuse is a production of composite materials [2] This research must be considered as a continuation of previous investigations [3, 4]. It is devoted to the clarification of some functional properties, which are considered important for the view of practical applications, of the composite material. Some functional properties of the material were investigated, for instance, the compressive stress at different extent of deformation of sample (till 67% of initial thickness) (LVS EN 826) [5] and the resistance to UV radiation (modified method based on LVS EN 14836) [6]. Experiments were realized on the purposefully selected samples. The results were evaluated in the correlation with potential changes of Shore C hardness (Shore scale, ISO 7619-1, ISO 868) [7, 8]. The results showed noticeable resistance of the composite material against the mechanical influence and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The correlation with the composition of the material, activity of binder, definite technological parameters, and the conditions supported during the production, were determined. It was estimated that selected properties and characteristics of the material are strongly dependent from the composition and technological parameters used in production of the composite material, and from the size of rubber crumb. Obtained results show possibility to attain desirable changes in the composite material properties by changing both the composition and technological parameters of examined material.

  5. Content Development Policy: Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science 1 The University of Manchester Library

    E-print Network

    Abrahams, I. David

    Content Development Policy: Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science 1 The University of Manchester Library Content Development Policy Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science Monday, 30 April 2012 Contents Content Development Policy Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science

  6. Understanding and tuning nanostructured materials for chemical energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Guoqiang

    The conversion of energy that employs chemical reaction is termed chemical energy conversion. In my dissertation, I have focused on chemical energy conversion systems involving energetic materials and lithium ion batteries, where performance is strongly dependent on the properties of materials and their architecture. The objective of this study is to enhance our understanding and tuning of nanostructured materials that might find application toward energetic materials and electrode materials in lithium ion batteries. Rapid heating diagnostics tools, i.e. temperature-jump techniques, have been used to study the ignition of aluminum nanoparticles, nanothermite reaction mechanism and metal oxides nanoparticles decomposition under rapid heating conditions (˜105-106 K/s). Time-resolved mass spectra results support the hypothesis that Al containing species diffuse outwards through the oxide shell. Low effective activation energies were found for metal oxides nanoparticles decomposition at high heating rates, implying the mass transfer control at high heating rates. The role of oxygen release from oxidizer in nanothermite reactions have been examined for several different systems, including some using microsized oxidizer (i.e., nano-Al/micro-I 2O5). In particular, for periodate based nanothermites, direct evidence from high heating rate SEM and mass spectrometry results support that direct gas phase oxygen release from oxidizer decomposition is critical in its ignition and combustion. Efforts have also been made to synthesize nanostructured materials for nanoenergetic materials and lithium ion batteries applications. Hollow CuO spheres were synthesized by aerosol spray pyrolysis, employing a gas blowing mechanism for the formation of hollow structure during aerosol synthesis. The materials synthesized as oxidizers in nanothermite demonstrated superior performance, and of particular note, periodate salts based nanothermite demonstrated the best gas generating performance for nanothermite materials. Energetic composite nanofibrous mats (NC/Al-CuO, NC/Al-Fe2O3, and NC/Al-Bi2O3) were also prepared by an electrospinning method and evaluated for their combustion performance. Aerosol spray pyrolysis was employed to produce carbon coated CuO hollow spheres, Mn3O4 hollow spheres, and Fe2O 3 mesoporous spheres. These hollow/mesoporous spheres demonstrated superior electrochemical performance when used as anode materials in lithium ion batteries. The effects of the amorphous and crystal structures on the electrochemical performance and the structure evolution during electrochemical tests were also investigated.

  7. Composite material pedestrian bridge for the Port of Bilbao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorrochategui, I.; Manteca, C.; Yedra, A.; Miguel, R.; del Valle, F. J.

    2012-09-01

    Composite materials in comparison to traditional ones, steel and concrete, present advantages in civil works construction: lower weight, higher corrosion resistance (especially in the marine environment), and ease of installation. On the other hand, fabrication costs are generally higher. This is the reason why this technology is not widely used. This work illustrates the process followed for the design, fabrication and installation of a composite material pedestrian bridge in the Port of Bilbao (Northern Spain). In order to reduce the price of the bridge, the use of low cost materials was considered, therefore polyester resin was selected as the polymeric matrix, and glass fibres as reinforcement. Two material choices were studied. Currently in the market there is high availability of carbon nanoparticles: carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibres (CNF), so it was decided to add this kind of nanoparticles to the reference material with the objective of improving its mechanical properties. The main challenge was to transfer the CNT and CNF excellent properties to the polymeric matrix. This requires dispersing the nanoreinforcements as individual particles in the polymeric matrix to avoid agglomerates. For this reason, an advanced high shear forces dispersion technique (called "three roll mills") was studied and implemented. Also surface functionalization of the nanoreinforcements by chemical treatment was carried out. Herein, a comparison is performed between both materials studied, the explanation of the employment of the reference material (without nanoreinforcement) as the one used in the fabrication of the pedestrian bridge is justified and, finally, the main characteristics of the final design of the structural element are described.

  8. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Canyonlands National Park using organic particulate material concentrations obtained with a multisystem, multichannel diffusion denuder sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatough, Delbert J.; Eatough, David A.; Lewis, Laura; Lewis, Edwin A.

    1996-08-01

    The concentration of fine particulate carbonaceous material has been measured over a 1-year period at the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) Canyonlands National Park, Utah sampling site using a Brigham Young University organic sampling system (BOSS) multisystem, multichannel diffusion denuder sampler. Samples were collected on the IMPROVE schedule of a 24-hour sample every Wednesday and Saturday. The concentrations of particulate C, determined using only a quartz filter pack sampling system, were low by an average of 39%, as a result of the loss of semi-volatile organic compounds from the particles collected on quartz filters during sampling. The loss was higher during the summer than during the winter sampling periods. The BOSS and IMPROVE quartz filter carbon measurements were in agreement except for a few samples collected during the summer. The fine particulate carbonaceous material concentrations determined using the BOSS have been combined with concentrations of particulate elemental C (soot), sulfate, nitrate, crustal material, and fine and coarse particulate mass from the IMPROVE sampling system, as well as relative humidity, light absorption, and transmissometer measurements of light extinction from IMPROVE. Extinction budgets have been calculated using multilinear regression analyses of the data set. Literature data were used to estimate the change in the mass extinction coefficients for the measured species as a function of relative humidity. The results show carbonaceous material to be the principal contributor to light extinction due to particles during the study period, with the major contributor to light extinction being light-absorbing carbonaceous material. However, the periods of maximum light extinction are associated with high humidity and the associated increased scattering of light due to particulate sulfate during the winter. The effect of particulate organic compounds on light extinction is greatest in the summer and smallest in the winter.

  9. A new silver based composite material for SPA water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Tartanson, M A; Soussan, L; Rivallin, M; Chis, C; Penaranda, D; Lapergue, R; Calmels, P; Faur, C

    2014-10-15

    A new composite material based on alumina (Al2O3) modified by two surface nanocoatings - titanium dioxide (TiO2) and silver (Ag) - was studied for spa water disinfection. Regarding the most common microorganisms in bathing waters, two non-pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (Gram positive) were selected as surrogates for bacterial contamination. The bactericidal properties of the Al2O3-TiO2-Ag material were demonstrated under various operating conditions encountered in spa water (temperature: 22-37 °C, presence of salt: CaCO3 or CaCl2, high oxygen content, etc.). Total removal of 10(8) CFU mL(-1) of bacteria was obtained in less than 10 min with 16 g L(-1) of material. Best results were observed for both conditions: a temperature of 37 °C and under aerobic condition; this latest favouring Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation. The CaCO3 salt had no impact on the bactericidal activity of the composite material and CaCl2 considerably stabilized the silver desorption from the material surface thanks to the formation of AgCl precipitate. Preliminary tests of the Al2O3-TiO2-Ag bactericidal behaviour in a continuous water flow confirmed that 2 g L(-1) of material eliminated more than 90% of a 2.0 × 10(8) CFU mL(-1) bacterial mixture after one water treatment recycle and reached the disinfection standard recommended by EPA (coliform removal = 6 log) within 22 h. PMID:25000196

  10. Synthesis of SiO{sub 2}/?-SiC/graphite hybrid composite by low temperature hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhikun; Bi, Kaifeng; Liu, Yanhong; Qin, Fuwen; Liu, Hongzhu; Bian, Jiming; Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 ; Zhang, Dong; Miao, Lihua; Department of Computer and Mathematical Basic Teaching, Shenyang Medical College, Shenyan 110034

    2013-11-18

    ?-SiC thin films were synthesized directly on graphite by hot filament chemical vapor deposition at low temperature. SiH{sub 4} diluted in hydrogen was employed as the silicon source, while graphite was functioned as both substrate and carbon source for the as-grown ?-SiC films. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis indicate that SiO{sub 2}/?-SiC/graphite hybrid composite was formed after post annealing treatment, and its crystalline quality can be remarkably improved under optimized annealing conditions. The possible growth mechanism was proposed based on in situ etching of graphite by reactive hydrogen radicals at the atomic level.

  11. Composite Materials With Uncured Epoxy Matrix Exposed in Stratosphere During NASA Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela; de Groh, Kim K.

    2013-01-01

    A cassette of uncured composite materials with epoxy resin matrixes was exposed in the stratosphere (40 km altitude) over three days. Temperature variations of -76 to 32.5C and pressure up to 2.1 torr were recorded during flight. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the polymer matrix exposed in the stratosphere becomes crosslinked, while the ground control materials react by way of polymerization reaction of epoxy groups. The space irradiations are considered to be responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The composites were cured on Earth after landing. Analysis of the cured composites showed that the polymer matrix remains active under stratospheric conditions. The results can be used for predicting curing processes of polymer composites in a free space environment during an orbital space flight.

  12. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, Judithann Ruth (Columbia, MD)

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed, wherein the composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures thereof. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  13. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, J.R.

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C{sub 8}{single_bond}C{sub 15} alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  14. Chemical dealloying synthesis of porous silicon anchored by in situ generated graphene sheets as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinkui; Zhang, Zhen; Ci, Lijie; Zhai, Wei; Ai, Qing; Xiong, Shenglin

    2015-08-01

    A novel one-pot chemical dealloying method has been developed to prepare nanocomposite of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and silicon dendrite from cheap commercial Al-Si eutectic precursor. The RGO anchoring could act as both conductive agent and buffer layer for Si volume change in the application of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The Si/RGO composites show an initial reversible capacity of 2280 mAh g-1, excellent capacity retention of 1942 mAh g-1 even after 100 cycles, and a high capacity of 1521 mAh g-1 even at the rate of 4000 mA g-1. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement proved that Si/RGO composite has the lower charge transfer resistance. This work proposes an economic and facile method to prepare silicon based anode material for next generation LIBs with high energy density.

  15. Chemical Engineering & Materials Science MAJORS & AREAS OF EMPHASIS

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Chemical Engineering & Materials Science MAJORS & AREAS OF EMPHASIS CHEMICALENGINEERING, CHEMICAL , MEMBRANE SEPARATION, MEMBRANE REACTORS, MATERIAL CHARACTERIZATION, CORROSION, POLYMERS, CERAMICS CHEMICALENGINEERING & MATERIALS SCIENCE #12;Concoct Materials, Enable Energy, and more Chemical Engineers are employed

  16. Chemical composition and lipoxygenase activity in soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr.) submitted to gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Érica Amanda de; Broetto, Fernando; Bressan, Dayanne F.; Sartori, Maria M. P.; Costa, Vladimir E.

    2014-05-01

    Soybeans are an important food due to their functional and nutritional characteristics. However, consumption by western populations is limited by the astringent taste of soybeans and their derivatives which results from the action of lipoxygenase, an enzyme activated during product processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the chemical composition and specific activity of lipoxygenase in different soybean cultivars. Soybeans were stored in plastic bags and irradiated with doses of 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy. The chemical composition (moisture, protein, lipids, ashes, crude fiber, and carbohydrates) and lipoxygenase specific activity were determined for each sample. Gamma irradiation induced a small increase of protein and lipid content in some soybean cultivars, which did not exceed the highest content of 5% and 26%, respectively, when compared to control. Lipoxygenase specific activity decreased in the three cultivars with increasing gamma irradiation dose. In conclusion, the gamma irradiation doses used are suitable to inactivate part of lipoxygenase while not causing expressive changes in the chemical composition of the cultivars studied.

  17. Radionuclide content and associated radiation hazards of building materials and by-products in Baoji, West China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinwei; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2008-01-01

    Seven types of common building materials and by-products of coal-fired power plants collected from Baoji, West China, were analysed for the natural radioactivity of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K using gamma ray spectrometry with an NaI(Tl) detector. The average activity concentrations vary from 23.0 to 112.2, 20.2 to 147.5 and 113.2 to 890.8 Bq kg(-1) for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. The measured activity concentrations for these radionuclides were compared with the data reported from other countries and with the worldwide average activity of soil. As a measure of radiation hazard to the people, the radium equivalent activities, total annual effective dose and activity concentration index were estimated. The radium equivalent activities of the studied samples are below the internationally accepted values. The calculated total annual effective dose and the activity concentration index of seven types of common building materials are <1 mSv y(-1) and 1, respectively. But fly ash and bottom ash exhibit the higher values that exceed and be close to the acceptable values, respectively. This study shows that the measured building materials do not pose any significant source of radiation hazard and are safe for use in the construction of dwellings. Nevertheless, when fly ash and bottom ash are used in dwelling construction, it is important to assess their radiation potential. PMID:17921511

  18. Chemical modifications of renewable cellulosic materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In agriculture, there is a fair amount of byproducts and waste materials. These materials typically contain significant portions of cellulose and hemicellulose. A good opportunity is to take advantage of these relatively cheap renewable materials, carry out chemical reactions, and increase their v...

  19. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  20. Confined-plume chemical deposition: rapid synthesis of crystalline coatings of known hard or superhard materials on inorganic or organic supports by resonant IR decomposition of molecular precursors.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Borislav L; Wellons, Matthew S; Lukehart, Charles M

    2009-08-26

    A one-step process for preparing microcrystalline coatings of known superhard, very hard, or ultraincompressible ceramic compositions on either inorganic or organic supports is reported. Midinfrared pulsed-laser irradiation of preceramic chemical precursors layered between IR-transmissive hard/soft supports under temporal and spatial confinement at a laser wavelength resonant with a precursor vibrational band gives one-step deposition of crystalline ceramic coatings without incurring noticeable collateral thermal damage to the support material. Reaction plume formation at the precursor/laser beam interface initiates confined-plume, chemical deposition (CPCD) of crystalline ceramic product. Continuous ceramic coatings are produced by rastering the laser beam over a sample specimen. CPCD processing of the Re-B single-source precursor, (B(3)H(8))Re(CO)(4), the dual-source mixtures, Ru(3)(CO)(12)/B(10)H(14) or W(CO)(6)/B(10)H(14), and the boron/carbon single-source precursor, o-B(10)C(2)H(12), confined between Si wafer or NaCl plates gives microcrystalline deposits of ReB(2), RuB(2), WB(4), or B(4)C, respectively. CPCD processing of Kevlar fabric wetted by (B(3)H(8))Re(CO)(4) produces an oriented, microcrystalline coating of ReB(2) on the Kevlar fabric without incurring noticeable thermal damage of the polymer support. Similarly, microcrystalline coatings of ReB(2) can be formed on IR-transmissive IR2, Teflon, or Ultralene polymer films. PMID:19642682

  1. Composite material systems for hydrogen management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pangborn, R. N.; Queeney, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The task of managing hydrogen entry into elevated temperature structural materials employed in turbomachinery is a critical engineering area for propulsion systems employing hydrogen or decomposable hydrocarbons as fuel. Extant structural materials, such as the Inconel series, are embrittled by the ingress of hydrogen in service, leading to a loss of endurance and general deterioration of load-bearing dependability. Although the development of hydrogen-insensitive material systems is an obvious engineering option, to date insensitive systems cannot meet the time-temperature-loading service extremes encountered. A short-term approach that is both feasible and technologically sound is the development and employment of hydrogen barrier coatings. The present project is concerned with developing, analyzing, and physically testing laminate composite hydrogen barrier systems, employing Inconel 718 as the structural material to be protected. Barrier systems will include all metallic, metallic-to-ceramic, and, eventually, metallic/ceramic composites as the lamellae. Since space propulsion implies repetitive engine firings without earth-based inspection and repair, coating durability will be closely examined, and testing regimes will include repetitive thermal cycling to simulate damage accumulation. The target accomplishments include: generation of actual hydrogen permeation data for metallic, ceramic-metallic, and hybrid metallic/ceramic composition barrier systems, practically none of which is currently extant; definition of physical damage modes imported to barrier systems due to thermal cycling, both transient temperature profiles and steady-state thermal mismatch stress states being examined as sources of damage; and computational models that incorporate general laminate schemes as described above, including manufacturing realities such as porosity, and whatever defects are introduced through service and characterized during the experimental programs.

  2. Fuel options from microalgae with representative chemical compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, D. A.

    1984-07-01

    Representative species of microalgae are examined with respect to their reported chemical compositions. Each species is analyzed under a variety of culture conditions, with the objective being to characterize an optimum mixture of fuel products (e.g., methane, ethanol, methylester) which should be produced by the particular species. Historically the emphasis has been on the entire algal cell mass. Using the reported chemical composition for the representative species under specific sets of growth conditions, some conclusions can be drawn about the preferred fuel product conversion routes that could be employed. 10 references, 7 figures, 12 tables.

  3. The chemical composition and structure of the moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    It is assumed that most of the igneous rocks on the lunar surface are the product of partial melting in the lunar interior, followed by segregation and upward transport of an igneous liquid. An attempt is made to determine constraints on the composition of the lunar interior that derive from the chemical composition of the lunar igneous rocks. The salient chemical characteristics of igneous rocks from the lunar surface are summarized, and are compared to analogous characteristics of terrestrial volcanic rocks so that major similarities and differences between terrestrial and lunar basaltic rocks can be established.

  4. Influence of input material and operational performance on the physical and chemical properties of MSW compost.

    PubMed

    Montejo, C; Costa, C; Márquez, M C

    2015-10-01

    Certain controversy exists about the use of compost from MSW (municipal solid waste) and, specifically, from the organic fraction of MSW that has not been separated at the source. In this case, the final composition of MSW compost is related to the performance of the separation process in MBT (Mechanical and Biological Treatment) plants as well as the composition of raw materials and the particular features of composting systems. In an effort to investigate the quality of MSW compost, 30 samples of this product obtained from 10 different MBT plants were studied. The main physical and chemical properties were analyzed and were compared with the requirements of current legislation. The composting systems used to produce these compost samples were studied and the input materials were characterized. The results reveal that the heavy metal content in MSW compost was below the legal restrictions in all samples but one; however, in most of them the percentage of Pb was high. The fertilizing potential of MSW compost has been demonstrated by its high nutrient concentrations, particularly N, K, P, Ca and Mg. Nevertheless, here the percentage of inert impurities with a size larger than 2 mm, such as plastic or glass, was seen to be excessively high exceeding in some cases the legal limit. The source of such pollution lies in the composting inputs, OFMSW (organic fraction of MSW), which showed high percentages of improper materials such as plastic (9%) or glass (11%). Accordingly, the performance of the sorting stage for the collection of the raw material must be improved, as must the refining process, since this does not remove the necessary amounts of these impurities from the final compost. PMID:26254992

  5. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, Howard L. (San Carlos, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  6. Structural characterization of hard materials by transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Diamond-Silicon Carbide composites and Yttria-stabilized Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon Seok

    2008-10-01

    Diamond-Silicon Carbide (SiC) composites are excellent heat spreaders for high performance microprocessors, owing to the unparalleled thermal conductivity of the former component. Such a combination is obtained by the infiltration of liquid silicon in a synthetic diamond compact, where a rigid SiC matrix forms by the reaction between the raw materials. As well as the outstanding thermal properties, this engineered compound also retains the extreme hardness of the artificial gem. This makes it difficult to perform structural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), for it is not possible to produce thin foils out of this solid by conventional polishing methods. For the first time, a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB) instrument successfully allowed site-specific preparation of electron-transparent specimens by the lift-out technique. Subsequent TEM studies revealed that the highest concentration of structural defects occurs in the vicinity of the diamond-SiC interfaces, which are believed to act as the major barriers to the transport of thermal energy. Diffraction contrast analyses showed that the majority of the defects in diamond are isolated perfect screw or 60° dislocations. On the other hand, SiC grains contain partial dislocations and a variety of imperfections such as microtwins, stacking faults and planar defects that are conjectured to consist of antiphase (or inversion) boundaries. Clusters of nanocrystalline SiC were also observed at the diamond-SiC boundaries, and a specific heteroepitaxial orientation relationship was discovered for all cubic SiC that grows on diamond {111} facets. Yttria-stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) is the most common electrolyte material for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. It is an ionic conductor in which charge transfer is achieved by the transport of oxygen ions (O 2-). Like the diamond composite above, it is hard and brittle, and difficult to make into electron transparent TEM samples. Provided an effective supply of the "fuel" (oxygen and hydrogen gas), the performance of an SOFC device is primarily limited by the Ohmic resistance of the electrolyte and the electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrode/electrolyte interfaces. While the former constraint may be substantially diminished by reducing the electrolyte's physical dimension into nanoscale thin films, the incorporation of oxygen ions into YSZ from the cathode side remains a relatively sluggish process. In order to study how structural modifications influence the effectiveness of the oxygen transfer at the cathode/YSZ boundary, ion implantation at different energies and doses was performed on the electrolyte, prior to the deposition of platinum (Pt) electrodes. Xenon ions (Xe+) were used as the implant species, and the irradiation was done on atomic layer deposited (ALD) YSZ films and monocrystalline YSZ (001) substrates. From direct electrochemical measurements on fuel cell structures made on the ALD layers, an improvement by a factor of two was witnessed in the peak power density with relatively low implantation dose (10 13 cm-2) as compared to no irradiation. However the fuel cell properties worsened significantly with elevated dosage. Cross sectional TEM images of xenon implanted YSZ single crystals demonstrated the evidence of considerable defect accumulation (dislocation loops and extended dislocation lines) at 1015 and 1016 cm-2 doses. It is speculated that the bombardment with a relatively low concentration of xenon generates an optimum density of structural defects in the electrolyte that facilitate the incorporation or diffusion of O2- ions, whereas at higher radiation fluences the associated buildup of the imperfections or the implanted elements themselves may act as impediments to the anion transfer and conduction.

  7. Predictive rendering of composite materials: a multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, T.; Callet, P.; da Graça, F.; Paljic, A.; Porral, P.; Hoarau, R.

    2015-03-01

    Predictive rendering of material appearance means going deep into the understanding of the physical interaction between light and matter and how these interactions are perceived by the human brain. In this paper we describe our approach to predict the appearance of composite materials by relying on the multi-scale nature of the involved phenomena. Using recent works on physical modeling of complex materials, we show how to predict the aspect of a composite material based on its composition and its morphology. Specifically, we focus on the materials whose morphological structures are defined at several embedded scales. We rely on the assumption that when the inclusions in a composite material are smaller than the considered wavelength, the optical constants of the corresponding effective media can be computed by a homogenization process (or analytically for special cases) to be used into the Fresnel formulas.

  8. Formation of anodic layers on InAs (111)III. Study of the chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Valisheva, N. A. Tereshchenko, O. E.; Prosvirin, I. P.; Kalinkin, A. V.; Goljashov, V. A.; Levtzova, T. A.; Bukhtiyarov, V. I.

    2012-04-15

    The chemical composition of {approx}20-nm-thick anodic layers grown on InAs (111)III in alkaline and acid electrolytes containing or not containing NH{sub 4}F is studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is shown that the composition of fluorinated layers is controlled by the relation between the concentrations of fluorine and hydroxide ions in the electrolyte and by diffusion processes in the growing layer. Fluorine accumulates at the (anodic layer)/InAs interface. Oxidation of InAs in an acid electrolyte with a low oxygen content and a high NH{sub 4}F content brings about the formation of anodic layers with a high content of fluorine and elemental arsenic and the formation of an oxygen-free InF{sub x}/InAs interface. Fluorinated layers grown in an alkaline electrolyte with a high content of O{sup 2-} and/or OH{sup -} groups contain approximately three times less fluorine and consist of indium and arsenic oxyfluorides. No distinction between the compositions of the layers grown in both types of fluorine-free electrolytes is established.

  9. Advanced composite materials for precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Bland A.; Bowles, David E.

    1988-01-01

    The objective in the NASA Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) project is to develop new composite material concepts for highly stable and durable reflectors with precision surfaces. The project focuses on alternate material concepts such as the development of new low coefficient of thermal expansion resins as matrices for graphite fiber reinforced composites, quartz fiber reinforced epoxies, and graphite reinforced glass. Low residual stress fabrication methods will be developed. When coupon specimens of these new material concepts have demonstrated the required surface accuracies and resistance to thermal distortion and microcracking, reflector panels will be fabricated and tested in simulated space environments. An important part of the program is the analytical modeling of environmental stability of these new composite materials concepts through constitutive equation development, modeling of microdamage in the composite matrix, and prediction of long term stability (including viscoelasticity). These analyses include both closed form and finite element solutions at the micro and macro levels.

  10. Sequence of phase transitions induced by chemical composition and high temperature in [Ba2CaWO6](1-x)[Sr2CaWO6]x double perovskite tungsten oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirinioui, F.; Manoun, Bouchaib; Tamraoui, Y.; Lazor, P.

    2015-12-01

    [Ba2CaWO6]1-x[Sr2CaWO6]x (0?x?1) materials were synthesized by the high temperature solid state reaction and firing methods, and characterized using techniques of X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The crystal structures were determined by Rietveld refinements on the laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data. As a function of composition, upon increasing the strontium content, the samples exhibit a sequence of three phase transitions: from cubic (Fm 3 ?m) to tetragonal (I4/m) to monoclinic structural phases (I2/m, P21/n). These transitions have been confirmed by Raman studies Fm 3 bar m x = 0 ? I 4 / m 0.1 ? x ? 0.2 ? I 2 / m 0.3 ? x ? 0.5 ? P21 / n 0.6 ? x ? 1 Furthermore, increasing the temperature for the compositions [Ba2CaWO6]1-x[Sr2CaWO6]x (0.1?x<1), manifests the P21/n to I2/m, the I2/m to I4/m and the I4/m to Fm 3 ?m phase transitions. For the compositions (0.1?x?0.2) the tetragonal to cubic phase transition is well illustrated. For the room temperature I2/m monoclinic compositions, two phase transitions were observed for all the compositions with x ranging from 0.3 to 0.5: from the monoclinic (I2/m) to tetragonal (I4/m), and from I4/m to Fm 3 ?m structures. Finally, for the room temperature P21/n monoclinic compositions, only two phase transitions are observed in the temperature range probed by Raman spectroscopy, the temperature was not high enough to reach the tetragonal-to-cubic phase transition.

  11. Composite Material Application to Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The substitution of reinforced plastic composite (RPC) materials for metal was studied. The major objectives were to: (1) determine the extent to which composite materials can be beneficially used in liquid rocket engines; (2) identify additional technology requirements; and (3) determine those areas which have the greatest potential for return. Weight savings, fabrication costs, performance, life, and maintainability factors were considered. Two baseline designs, representative of Earth to orbit and orbit to orbit engine systems, were selected. Weight savings are found to be possible for selected components with the substitution of materials for metal. Various technology needs are identified before RPC material can be used in rocket engine applications.

  12. Mineral composition of cottonseed is affected by fertilization management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole cottonseed and its products can be used as human food, animal feed, and industrial raw material. Chemical composition is one of the critical parameters to evaluate cottonseed's quality and potential end use. Whereas there are reports on the improvement of cotton lint yield by poultry litter (P...

  13. Composite, ordered material having sharp surface features

    DOEpatents

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2006-12-19

    A composite material having sharp surface features includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a sharp surface feature. The sharp surface features can be coated to make the surface super-hydrophobic.

  14. Composite materials. Volume 3 - Engineering applications of composites. Volume 4 - Metallic matrix composites. Volume 8 - Structural design and analysis, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noton, B. R. (editor); Kreider, K. G.; Chamis, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    This volume discusses a vaety of applications of both low- and high-cost composite materials in a number of selected engineering fields. The text stresses the use of fiber-reinforced composites, along with interesting material systems used in the electrical and nuclear industries. As to technology transfer, a similarity is noted between many of the reasons responsible for the utilization of composites and those problems requiring urgent solution, such as mechanized fabrication processes and design for production. Features topics include road transportation, rail transportation, civil aircraft, space vehicles, builing industry, chemical plants, and appliances and equipment. The laminate orientation code devised by Air Force materials laboratory is included. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  15. Study of the chemical composition of particulate matter from the Rio de Janeiro metropolitan region, Brazil, by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateus, Vinícius Lionel; Monteiro, Isabela Luizi Gonçalves; Rocha, Rafael Christian Chávez; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana Dillenburg; Gioda, Adriana

    2013-08-01

    Air quality in the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro was evaluated by analysis of particulate matter (PM) in industrial (Santa Cruz) and rural (Seropédica) areas. Total suspended particles (TSP) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected in filters over 24 h were quantified and their chemical composition determined. TSP exceeded Brazilian guidelines (80 ?g m- 3) in Santa Cruz, while PM2.5 levels exceeded the World Health Organization guidelines (10 ?g m- 3) in both locations. Filters were extracted with water and/or HNO3, and the concentrations of 20 elements, mostly metals, were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Water soluble inorganic anions were determined by ion chromatography (IC). To estimate the proportion of these elements extracted, a certified reference material (NIST SRM 1648a, Urban Dust) was subjected to the same extraction process. Concordant results were obtained by ICP-MS and ICP OES for most elements. Some elements could not be quantified by both techniques; the most appropriate technique was chosen in each case. The urban dust was also analyzed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) method, which employs a combination of hydrochloric and nitric acids for the extraction, but higher extraction efficiency was obtained when only nitric acid was employed. The US EPA method gave better results only for Sb. In the PM samples, the elements found in the highest average concentrations by ICP were Zn and Al (3-6 ?g m- 3). The anions found in the highest average concentrations were SO42 - in PM2.5 (2-4 ?g m- 3) and Cl- in TSP (2-6 ?g m- 3). Principal component analysis (PCA) in combination with enrichment factors (EF) indicated industrial sources in PM2.5. Analysis of TSP suggested both anthropogenic and natural sources. In conclusion, this work contributes data on air quality, as well as a method for the analysis of PM samples by ICP-MS.

  16. CO2 Sequestraion by Mineral Carbonation of Cement Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, H.; Jang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation with cement materials was investigated in this study. Ca extraction and CO2 injection tests were conducted on three different materials (lime, Portland cement, waste concrete) using different extract reagents (NH4Cl, CH3COOH, HCl, and Deionized water) under ambient temperature and pressure conditions. CO2 gas (99.9%) was injected to either supernatant without solids or suspension with solids obtained from extraction tests at 4 ml/min of flow rate. Ca concentrations were measured from filtered solutions before and after CO2 injection. The chemical and mineralogical composition of raw materials and precipitates were determined using X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The morphology and chemical composition of precipitates were analyzed with Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy equipped with the Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis. For the extraction tests, Ca concentrations of the extracts were related with the CaO content and type of CaO bearing minerals of the materials, regardless of the extraction solutions. Lime had a higher Ca concentration ranging between 942.7 and 39945.0 mg/L in the extracts than waste concrete (188.4 ~ 2978.1 mg/L) in the extracts due to its higher content of CaO (CaO : 24.5% and waste concrete : 20.3%). In contrast, the Portland cement (6346.0 and 28903.5 mg/L) had lower Ca concentrations than lime (94.27 ~ 39945.0 mg/L), even though the Portland cement (56.3%) had a higher CaO content than lime (24.5%). For a given extraction solution, lime had the highest CO2 carbonation efficiency. In addition, for a given material, the CO2 carbonation efficiency was the highest when NH4Cl solution was used as an extraction solution. Results of material analyses indicate that precipitates from the CO2 injection tests consisted of mostly CaCO3, regardless of types of materials and extraction solutions.

  17. Enamels in stained glass windows: Preparation, chemical composition, microstructure and causes of deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schalm, O.; Van der Linden, V.; Frederickx, P.; Luyten, S.; Van der Snickt, G.; Caen, J.; Schryvers, D.; Janssens, K.; Cornelis, E.; Van Dyck, D.; Schreiner, M.

    2009-08-01

    Stained glass windows incorporating dark blue and purple enamel paint layers are in some cases subject to severe degradation while others from the same period survived the ravages of time. A series of dark blue, green-blue and purple enamel glass paints from the same region (Northwestern Europe) and from the same period (16-early 20th centuries) has been studied by means of a combination of microscopic X-ray fluorescence analysis, electron probe micro analysis and transmission electron microscopy with the aim of better understanding the causes of the degradation. The chemical composition of the enamels diverges from the average chemical composition of window glass. Some of the compositions appear to be unstable, for example those with a high concentration of K 2O and a low content of CaO and PbO. In other cases, the deterioration of the paint layers was caused by the less than optimal vitrification of the enamel during the firing process. Recipes and chemical compositions indicate that glassmakers of the 16-17th century had full control over the color of the enamel glass paints they made. They mainly used three types of coloring agents, based on Co (dark blue), Mn (purple) and Cu (light-blue or green-blue) as coloring elements. Blue-purple enamel paints were obtained by mixing two different coloring agents. The coloring agent for red-purple enamel, introduced during the 19th century, was colloidal gold embedded in grains of lead glass.

  18. Fiber composite materials with integrated piezoceramic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajenski, Volker; Mook, Gerhard; Wierach, Peter; Hanselka, Holger

    2000-08-01

    In contrast to conventional lightweight material like aluminum or titanium, fiber composites offer the possibility to integrate functional elements directly into the material. Thus, multifunctional materials are developed which have the ability to serve more than the load-carrying function. As there is extensive work on the field of integration of thin piezoceramic platse and foils into carbon fiber reinforced polymeres, this will be focused on in this paper. First, the design of an active carbon fiber composite with integrated piezoceramic is shown. Different fiber layups and connecting methods to supply the piezoceramic are discussed. A sophisticated processing technology for active composite materials, the so-called DP-RTM (Differential Pressure - Resin Transfer Moulding), is presented. Various damage mechanisms may reduce or even destroy the sensing and actuaing capabilities of the piezoceramic material. Therefore the capability of high resolution non-destructive methods to evaluate manufacturing defects as well as defects resulting from mechanical overload is presented. Finally two applications are discussed in more detail to demonstrate the potential of the active composite material. Representing static applications an active composite plate is shown which has an infinite bending stiffness up to a certain load. A second active composite plate is used for active noise control.

  19. Complex phase compositions in nanostructured coatings as evidenced by photoelectron spectroscopy: The case of Al-Si-N hard coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Pelisson-Schecker, Aude; Patscheider, Joerg; Hug, Hans Josef

    2010-07-15

    The chemical state evolution of the Al-Si-N thin films at various Si contents is investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The detailed evolution of the Al 2p, Si 2p, and N 1s photoelectrons line positions and widths are used to identify different chemical environments as the Si content is changed. The results are compared to x-ray diffraction (XRD) data that indicate the formation of a two-phase Al{sub 1-x}Si{sub x}N/SiN{sub y} composite when the solubility limit of 6 at. % of Si in AlN is exceeded. In contrast to XRD data, no particular effect is observed in the XPS data at the solubility limit of Si. Instead, two compositional regions can be identified that are separated by a distinct change in the evolution of core level binding energy differences and chemical shifts at about 10-15 at. % of Si. This silicon concentration is identified as the onset of the formation of a SiN{sub y} intergranular phase that is a few monolayers thick, having a chemical bonding similar to that in bulk silicon nitride. The observed changes in the XPS data coincide well with the structural changes in the material at different silicon contents. The unambiguous identification of phases, especially of minority phases from XPS data, is, however, not possible.

  20. Engineering, Modeling and Testing of Composite Absorbing Materials for

    E-print Network

    Koledintseva, Marina Y.

    13 Engineering, Modeling and Testing of Composite Absorbing Materials for EMC Applications Marina, including applications of magneto-dielectric composite materials for electromagnetic shielding purposes application, they may be shaped as needed. Frequency characteristics of composite absorbing materials may

  1. Thermal and Chemical Characterization of Non-Metallic Materials Using Coupled Thermogravimetric Analysis and Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is widely employed in the thermal characterization of non-metallic materials, yielding valuable information on decomposition characteristics of a sample over a wide temperature range. However, a potential wealth of chemical information is lost during the process, with the evolving gases generated during thermal decomposition escaping through the exhaust line. Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is a powerful analytical technique for determining many chemical constituents while in any material state, in this application, the gas phase. By linking these two techniques, evolving gases generated during the TGA process are directed into an appropriately equipped infrared spectrometer for chemical speciation. Consequently, both thermal decomposition and chemical characterization of a material may be obtained in a single sample run. In practice, a heated transfer line is employed to connect the two instruments while a purge gas stream directs the evolving gases into the FT-IR. The purge gas can be either high purity air or an inert gas such as nitrogen to allow oxidative and pyrolytic processes to be examined, respectively. The FT-IR data is collected realtime, allowing continuous monitoring of chemical compositional changes over the course of thermal decomposition. Using this coupled technique, an array of diverse materials has been examined, including composites, plastics, rubber, fiberglass epoxy resins, polycarbonates, silicones, lubricants and fluorocarbon materials. The benefit of combining these two methodologies is of particular importance in the aerospace community, where newly developing materials have little available data with which to refer. By providing both thermal and chemical data simultaneously, a more definitive and comprehensive characterization of the material is possible. Additionally, this procedure has been found to be a viable screening technique for certain materials, with the generated data useful in the selection of other appropriate analytical procedures for further material characterization.

  2. Thermal and Chemical Characterization of Non-metallic Materials Using Coupled Thermogravimetric Analysis and Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.; Griffin, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is widely employed in the thermal characterization of non-metallic materials, yielding valuable information on decomposition characteristics of a sample over a wide temperature range. However, a potential wealth of chemical information is lost during the process, with the evolving gases generated during thermal decomposition escaping through the exhaust line. Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is a powerful analytical technique for determining many chemical constituents while in any material state, in this application, the gas phase. By linking these two techniques, evolving gases generated during the TGA process are directed into an appropriately equipped infrared spectrometer for chemical speciation. Consequently, both thermal decomposition and chemical characterization of a material may be obtained in a single sample run. In practice, a heated transfer line is employed to connect the two instruments while a purge gas stream directs the evolving gases into the FT-IR, The purge gas can be either high purity air or an inert gas such as nitrogen to allow oxidative and pyrolytic processes to be examined, respectively. The FT-IR data is collected real-time, allowing continuous monitoring of chemical compositional changes over the course of thermal decomposition. Using this coupled technique, an array of diverse materials has been examined, including composites, plastics, rubber, fiberglass epoxy resins, polycarbonates, silicones, lubricants and fluorocarbon materials. The benefit of combining these two methodologies is of particular importance in the aerospace community, where newly developing materials have little available data with which to refer. By providing both thermal and chemical data simultaneously, a more definitive and comprehensive characterization of the material is possible. Additionally, this procedure has been found to be a viable screening technique for certain materials, with the generated data useful in the selection of other appropriate analytical procedures for further material characterization.

  3. Chemical Composition of Soils of Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

    1937-01-01

    loam ........................... 4 Yahola very fine sandy loam.. ............... 6 Soluble Basicity Soluble pH Acid 1 1h4a::siJ Lime CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF SOILS OF TEXAS 21 EAST TEXAS TIMBER COUNTRY The East Texas Timber County is a... for total nitrogen, active phosphoric acid, total phosphoric acid, active potash, acid-soluble potash, total potash, acid-soluble lime, basic- ity, acidity, and acid-soluble magnesia. These maps show that wide areas of Texas soils are low in phosphoric...

  4. Accelerated hygrothermal stabilization of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, J.A.

    1994-05-01

    Experimentation validated a simple moisture conditioning scheme to prepare Gr/Ep composite parts for precision applications by measuring dimensional changes over 90 days. It was shown that an elevated temperature moisture conditioning scheme produced a dimensionally stable part from which precision structures could be built/machined without significant moisture induced dimensional changes after fabrication. Conversely, that unconditioned Gr/Ep composite panels exhibited unacceptably large dimensional changes (i.e., greater than 125 ppM). It was also shown that time required to produce stable parts was shorter, by more than an order of magnitude, employing the conditioning scheme than using no conditioning scheme (46 days versus 1000+ days). Two final use environments were chosen for the experiments: 50% RH/21C and 0% RH/21C. Fiberite 3034K was chosen for its widespread use in aerospace applications. Two typical lay-ups were chosen, one with low sensitivity to hygrothermal distortions and the other high sensitivity: [0, {plus_minus} 45, 90]s, [0, {plus_minus} 15, 0]s. By employing an elevated temperature, constant humidity conditioning scheme, test panels achieved an equilibrium moisture content in less time, by more than an order of magnitude, than panels exposed to the same humidity environment and ambient temperature. Dimensional changes, over 90 days, were up to 4 times lower in the conditioned panels compared to unconditioned panels. Analysis of weight change versus time of test coupons concluded that the out-of-autoclave moisture content of Fiberite 3034K varied between 0.06 and 0.1%.

  5. Functionalization of Graphene Oxide and its Composite with Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) as Electrode Material for Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minchao; Jamal, Ruxangul; Wang, Yujie; Yang, Lei; Liu, Fangfang; Abdiryim, Tursun

    2015-09-01

    In this study, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/thiophene-grafted graphene oxide (PEDOT/Th-GO) composites from covalently linking of Th-GO with PEDOT chains were prepared via in situ chemical polymerization with different weight percentage of Th-GO ranging between 40 and 70 % in reaction medium. The resulting composite materials were characterized using a various analytical techniques. The structural analysis showed that the composites displayed a higher degree of conjugation and thermal stability than pure PEDOT, and the weight percentage of Th-GO could affect the doping level, amount of undesired conjugated segments, and porous structure of composites. Electrochemical analysis suggested that the highest specific capacitance of 320 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1 with good cycling stability (capacitance retention of 80 % at 1 A g-1 after 1000 cycles) was achieved for the composite prepared from 50 wt% Th-GO content in reaction medium.

  6. Functionalization of Graphene Oxide and its Composite with Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) as Electrode Material for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minchao; Jamal, Ruxangul; Wang, Yujie; Yang, Lei; Liu, Fangfang; Abdiryim, Tursun

    2015-12-01

    In this study, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/thiophene-grafted graphene oxide (PEDOT/Th-GO) composites from covalently linking of Th-GO with PEDOT chains were prepared via in situ chemical polymerization with different weight percentage of Th-GO ranging between 40 and 70 % in reaction medium. The resulting composite materials were characterized using a various analytical techniques. The structural analysis showed that the composites displayed a higher degree of conjugation and thermal stability than pure PEDOT, and the weight percentage of Th-GO could affect the doping level, amount of undesired conjugated segments, and porous structure of composites. Electrochemical analysis suggested that the highest specific capacitance of 320 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1) with good cycling stability (capacitance retention of 80 % at 1 A g(-1) after 1000 cycles) was achieved for the composite prepared from 50 wt% Th-GO content in reaction medium. PMID:26395203

  7. What processes control the chemical compositions of arc front stratovolcanoes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Stephen J.; Langmuir, Charles H.

    2015-06-01

    Arc front stratovolcanoes have global chemical systematics that constrain processes at convergent margins. Positive correlations exist for arc averages among "fluid mobile," "high field strength," and "large ion lithophile" elements. 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr from rear-arc lavas lacking subduction signature align with the oceanic "mantle array," and correlate with arc front 143Nd/144Nd. Most chemical parameters (but not isotopes) also correlate well with crustal thickness and slightly less well with the slab thermal parameter, but not with the depth of the slab nor model slab surface temperatures. Successful models of arc volcanism should account for these global regularities. Two distinct models can quantitatively account for the observations—different extents of melting of the mantle wedge caused by variations in wedge thermal structure, or varying contributions from the subducting slab owing to variations in the slab thermal structure. Both successful model scenarios require a significant flux of melted ocean crust to the mantle source of all volcanic arcs. The wedge melting model has constant contributions from ocean crust, sediment, and mantle wedge to lavas globally, while the slab model varies slab contributions with slab temperature. The wedge melting model fit improves by incorporating convergence rate and slab dip, which should affect the wedge thermal structure; the slab model is not supported by a similar analysis. The wedge model also more easily accommodates the isotope data. The two models predict different primary H2O contents, with large variations in H2O for the wedge model, and relatively constant H2O for the slab model. An evaluation of the effects of varying sediment compositions on arc lavas will benefit from considering the very different consequences of the two models.

  8. Composition and Thermodynamic Properties of Air in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeckel, W E; Weston, Kenneth C

    1958-01-01

    Charts have been prepared relating the thermodynamic properties of air in chemical equilibrium for temperatures to 15,000 degrees k and for pressures 10(-5) to 10 (plus 4) atmospheres. Also included are charts showing the composition of air, the isentropic exponent, and the speed of sound. These charts are based on thermodynamic data calculated by the National Bureau of Standards. (author)

  9. Proceedings of chemical processes in inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Persans, P.D. ); Bradely, J.S.; Chianelli, R.R. ); Schmid, G. )

    1992-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of the Symposium on Chemical Processes in Inorganic Materials: Metal and Semiconductor Clusters and Colloids. Topics covered include: chemical synthesis; particle stabilization; and optical, electronic and catalytic characterization; preparation of metal particles; preparation of semiconductor particles; characterization of metal particles; characterization of semiconductor particles; and stability of clusters and nanoparticles.

  10. Chemical compositions of four barium stars

    E-print Network

    Y. C. Liang; G. Zhao; Y. Q. Chen; H. M. Qiu; B. Zhang

    2003-12-15

    Chemical compositions of four barium stars HD 26886, HD 27271, HD 50082 and HD 98839 are studied based on high resolution, high signal-to-noise Echelle spectra. Results show that all of them are disk stars. Their \\alpha and iron peak elements are similar to the solar abundances. The neutron-capture process elements are overabundant relative to the Solar. The heavy-element abundances of the strong Ba star HD 50082 are higher than those of other three mild Ba stars. Its mass is 1.32Msun (+0.28,-0.22Msun), and is consistent with the average mass of strong Ba stars (1.5Msun). For mild Ba star HD 27271 and HD 26886, the derived masses are 1.90Msun (+0.25,-0.20Msun) and 2.78Msun (+0.75,-0.78M_sun), respectively, which are consistent with the average mass of mild Ba stars. We also calculate the theoretical abundances of Ba stars by combining the AGB stars nucleosynthesis and wind accretion formation scenario of Ba binary systems. The comparisons between the observed abundance patterns of the sample stars with the theoretical results show that wind accretion scenario can explain the abundance patterns of HD 50082 and HD 27271 well, but fail to explain the abundances of HD 26886. It means that the mild Ba star HD 26886, with shorter orbital period (P11000 d), may be either a star with the heavy elements enriched by itself or a "true Ba" star.

  11. Multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling of a person employs an evaporative cooling liquid that changes phase from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The evaporative cooling liquid is absorbed into a superabsorbent material enclosed within the multilayer composite material. The multilayer composite material has a high percentage of the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix. The cooling effect can be sustained for an extended period of time because of the high percentage of phase change liquid that can be absorbed into the superabsorbent. Such a composite can be used for cooling febrile patients by evaporative cooling as the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix changes from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The composite can be made with a perforated barrier material around the outside to regulate the evaporation rate of the phase change liquid. Alternatively, the composite can be made with an imperveous barrier material or semipermeable membrane on one side to prevent the liquid from contacting the person's skin. The evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix can be recharged by soaking the material in the liquid. The multilayer composite material can be fashioned into blankets, garments and other articles.

  12. Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Craig; Kurup, Parthiv; Akar, Sertac; Flores, Francisco

    2015-08-26

    This study lists material composition data for two concentrating solar power (CSP) plant designs: a molten-salt power tower and a hypothetical parabolic trough plant, both of which employ a molten salt for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) and thermal storage media. The two designs have equivalent generating and thermal energy storage capacities. The material content of the saltHTF trough plant was approximately 25% lower than a comparably sized conventional oil-HTF parabolic trough plant. The significant reduction in oil, salt, metal, and insulation mass by switching to a salt-HTF design is expected to reduce the capital cost and LCOE for the parabolic trough system.

  13. Offgassing test methodology for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, Dale A.

    1994-01-01

    A significant increase in the use of composite materials has occurred during the past 20 years. Associated with this increased use is the potential for employees to be exposed to offgassing components from composite systems. Various components in composite systems, particularly residual solvents, offgas under various conditions. The potential for offgassing to occur increases as a composite material is heated either during cure or during lay-up operations. Various techniques can be employed to evaluate the offgassing characteristics of a composite system. A joint effort between AIA and SACMA resulted in the drafting of a proposed test method for evaluating the offgassing potential of composite materials. The purpose of testing composite materials for offgassing is to provide the industrial hygienist with information which can be used to assess the safety of the workplace. This paper outlines the proposed test method and presents round robin testing data associated with the test method. Also in this presentation is a discussion of classes of compounds which require specialized sampling techniques.

  14. Systems With Variable Composition: The Chemical Potential Chemistry CHEM 213W

    E-print Network

    Ronis, David M.

    Systems With Variable Composition: The Chemical Potential Chemistry CHEM 213W David Ronis Mc or 2) by changing the composition through chemical reaction. Nonetheless, as far as state functions the composition of the system. For example, you may add compounds with different types of bonds

  15. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, E.D.

    1981-02-25

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

  16. Nanoscale characterization of the thermal interface resistance of a heat-sink composite material by in situ TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Kakefuda, Yohei; Mori, Takao; Hirose, Kenji; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-11-01

    We developed an original method of in situ nanoscale characterization of thermal resistance utilizing a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The focused electron beam of the HRTEM was used as a contact-free heat source and a piezo-movable nanothermocouple was developed as a thermal detector. This method has a high flexibility of supplying thermal-flux directions for nano/microscale thermal conductivity analysis, and is a powerful way to probe the thermal properties of complex or composite materials. Using this method we performed reproducible measurements of electron beam-induced temperature changes in pre-selected sections of a heat-sink ?-Al2O3/epoxy-based resin composite. Observed linear behavior of the temperature change in a filler reveals that Fourier’s law holds even at such a mesoscopic scale. In addition, we successfully determined the thermal resistance of the nanoscale interfaces between neighboring ?-Al2O3 fillers to be 1.16 × 10?8 m2K W?1, which is 35 times larger than that of the fillers themselves. This method that we have discovered enables evaluation of thermal resistivity of composites on the nanoscale, combined with the ultimate spatial localization and resolution sample analysis capabilities that TEM entails.

  17. Nanoscale characterization of the thermal interface resistance of a heat-sink composite material by in situ TEM.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Kakefuda, Yohei; Mori, Takao; Hirose, Kenji; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-11-20

    We developed an original method of in situ nanoscale characterization of thermal resistance utilizing a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The focused electron beam of the HRTEM was used as a contact-free heat source and a piezo-movable nanothermocouple was developed as a thermal detector. This method has a high flexibility of supplying thermal-flux directions for nano/microscale thermal conductivity analysis, and is a powerful way to probe the thermal properties of complex or composite materials. Using this method we performed reproducible measurements of electron beam-induced temperature changes in pre-selected sections of a heat-sink ?-Al2O3/epoxy-based resin composite. Observed linear behavior of the temperature change in a filler reveals that Fourier's law holds even at such a mesoscopic scale. In addition, we successfully determined the thermal resistance of the nanoscale interfaces between neighboring ?-Al2O3 fillers to be 1.16 × 10(-8) m(2)K W(-1), which is 35 times larger than that of the fillers themselves. This method that we have discovered enables evaluation of thermal resistivity of composites on the nanoscale, combined with the ultimate spatial localization and resolution sample analysis capabilities that TEM entails. PMID:26508524

  18. Flaw detection in multi-layer, multi-material composites by resonance imaging: Utilizing Air-coupled Ultrasonics and Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livings, Richard Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Ceramic tiles are the main ingredient of a multi-material, multi-layered composite being considered for the modernization of tank armors. The high stiffness, low attenuation, and precise dimensions of these uniform tiles make them remarkable resonators when driven to vibrate. Defects in the tile, during manufacture or after usage, are expected to change the resonance frequencies and resonance images of the tile. The comparison of the resonance frequencies and resonance images of a pristine tile/lay-up to a defective tile/lay-up will thus be a quantitative damage metric. By examining the vibrational behavior of these tiles and the composite lay-up with Finite Element Modeling and analytical plate vibration equations, the development of a new Nondestructive Evaluation technique is possible. This study examines the development of the Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Resonance Imaging technique as applied to a hexagonal ceramic tile and a multi-material, multi-layered composite.

  19. Ultrasonic stress wave characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The work reported covers three simultaneous projects. The first project was concerned with: (1) establishing the sensitivity of the acousto-ultrasonic method for evaluating subtle forms of damage development in cyclically loaded composite materials, (2) establishing the ability of the acousto-ultrasonic method for detecting initial material imperfections that lead to localized damage growth and final specimen failure, and (3) characteristics of the NBS/Proctor sensor/receiver for acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of laminated composite materials. The second project was concerned with examining the nature of the wave propagation that occurs during acoustic-ultrasonic evaluation of composite laminates and demonstrating the role of Lamb or plate wave modes and their utilization for characterizing composite laminates. The third project was concerned with the replacement of contact-type receiving piezotransducers with noncontacting laser-optical sensors for acousto-ultrasonic signal acquisition.

  20. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Neil A.; Hudgins, Richard J.; McBain, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite liquid oxygen LO2 tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW), which is possible due to the 25%-40% reduction in weight that composite materials could provide over current aluminum technology. Although a composite LO2 tank makes these weight savings feasible, composite materials have not historically been viewed as "LO2 compatible." To be considered LO2 compatible, materials must be selected that will resist any type of detrimental, combustible reaction when exposed to usage environments. This is traditionally evaluated using a standard set of tests. However, materials that do not pass the standard tests can be shown to be safe for a particular application. This paper documents the approach and results of a joint NASA/Lockheed Martin program to select and verify LO2 compatible composite materials for liquid oxygen fuel tanks. The test approach developed included tests such as mechanical impact, particle impact, puncture, electrostatic discharge, friction, and pyrotechnic shock. These tests showed that composite liquid oxygen tanks are indeed feasible for future launch vehicles.