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Sample records for chemical composition chemical

  1. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  2. Chemical Compositions of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckrone, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In 1835, in a famously inaccurate forecast, the French philosopher Auguste Comte wrote of stars that, `We understand the possibility of determining their shapes, their distances, their sizes and their movements; whereas we would never know how to study by any means their chemical composition…'. At the close of the 20th century the accurate measurement of the abundances of the chemical elements in...

  3. Chemical composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. W.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical composition of Mars is estimated from the cosmochemical model of Ganapathy and Anders (1974) with additional petrological and geophysical constraints. The model assumes that planets and chondrites underwent the same fractionation processes in the solar nebula, and constraints are imposed by the abundance of the heat-producing elements, U, Th and K, the volatile-rich component and the high density of the mantle. Global abundances of 83 elements are presented, and it is noted that the mantle is an iron-rich garnet wehrlite, nearly identical to the bulk moon composition of Morgan at al. (1978) and that the core is sulfur poor (3.5% S). The comparison of model compositions for the earth, Venus, Mars, the moon and a eucrite parent body suggests that volatile depletion correlates mainly with size rather than with radial distance from the sun.

  4. Aqueous chemical wash compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, C.E.

    1987-07-21

    This patent describes an aqueous, substantially unfoamed chemical wash composition having properties making it suitable for use as a pre-flush in well cementing operations and/or for removal of drilling mud from a borehole at a temperature of from about 150/sup 0/F to about 270/sup 0/F, the wash a. being predominantly composed of water, b. containing an active surfactant component comprising a combination of (1) from about 0.1 to about 1.5 weight percent (total weight basis) of a water soluble anionic surfactant; (2) from about 0.1 to about 1.5 weight percent (total weight basis) of a nonionic surfactant; and (3) from about 0.05 to about 0.54 weight percent (total weight basis) of at least one water soluble amphoteric surfactant, and c. having dispersed therein a heterogeneous mixture of distinct particles comprising both a first particulate oil soluble resin which is friable and a second particulate oil soluble resin which is pliable and where the size of the friable resin particles ranges from about 0.5 to about 300 microns and the size of the pliable resin particles ranges from about 0.05 to about 30 microns. The amount of the friable-pliable resin mixture is sufficient to impart effective fluid loss control to the chemical wash composition.

  5. Method of forming a chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wendt, Kraig M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-09

    A method of forming a chemical composition such as a chemical hydride is described and which includes the steps of selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of hydrogen; and exposing the selected composition to an amount of ionizing radiation to encourage the changing of the chemical bonds of the selected composition, and chemically reacting the selected composition with the source of hydrogen to facilitate the formation of a chemical hydride.

  6. The Chemical Composition of Honey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Honey is a supersaturated sugar solution, created by bees, and used by human beings as a sweetener. However, honey is more than just a supersaturated sugar solution; it also contains acids, minerals, vitamins, and amino acids in varying quantities. In this article, we will briefly explore the chemical composition of honey. (Contains 2 figures and…

  7. Chemical composition of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, J.W.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The composition of Mars has been calculated from the cosmochemical model of Ganapathy and Anders (1974) which assumes that planets and chondrites underwent the same 4 fractionation processes in the solar nebula. Because elements of similar volatility stay together in these processes, only 4 index elements (U, Fe, K and Tl or Ar36) are needed to calculate the abundances of all 83 elements in the planet. The values chosen are U = 28 ppb, K = 62 ppm (based on K U = 2200 from orbital ??-spectrometry and on thermal history calculations by Tokso??z and Hsui (1978) Fe = 26.72% (from geophysical data), and Tl = 0.14 ppb (from the Ar36 and Ar40 abundances measured by Viking). The mantle of Mars is an iron-rich [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.77] garnet wehrlite (?? = 3.52-3.54 g/cm3), similar to McGetchin and Smyth's (1978) estimate but containing more Ca and Al. It is nearly identical to the bulk Moon composition of Morgan et al. (1978b). The core makes up 0.19 of the planet and contains 3.5% S-much less than estimated by other models. Volatiles have nearly Moon-like abundances, being depleted relative to the Earth by factors of 0.36 (K-group, Tcond = 600-1300 K) or 0.029 (Tl group, Tcond < 600 K). The water abundance corresponds to a 9 m layer, but could be higher by as much as a factor of 11. Comparison of model compositions for 5 differentiated planets (Earth, Venus, Mars, Moon, and eucrite parent body) suggests that volatile depletion correlates mainly with size rather than with radial distance from the Sun. However, the relatively high volatile content of shergottites and some chondrites shows that the correlation is not simple; other factors must also be involved. ?? 1979.

  8. Chemical recycling of scrap composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald E.; Salas, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    There are no well-developed technologies for recycling composite materials other than grinding to produce fillers. New approaches are needed to reclaim these valuable resources. Chemical or tertiary recycling, conversion of polymers into low molecular weight hydrocarbons for reuse as chemicals or fuels, is emerging as the most practical means for obtaining value from waste plastics and composites. Adherent Technologies is exploring a low-temperature catalytic process for recycling plastics and composites. Laboratory results show that all types of plastics, thermosets as well as thermoplastics, can be converted in high yields to valuable hydrocarbon products. This novel catalytic process runs at 200 C, conversion times are rapid, the process is closed and, thus, nonpolluting, and no highly toxic gas or liquid products have been observed so no negative environmental impact will result from its implementation. Tests on reclamation of composite materials show that epoxy, imide, and engineering thermoplastic matrices can be converted to low molecular weight hydrocarbons leaving behind the reinforcing fibers for reuse as composite reinforcements in secondary, lower-performance applications. Chemical recycling is also a means to dispose of sensitive or classified organic materials without incineration and provides a means to eliminate or reduce mixed hazardous wastes containing organic materials.

  9. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  10. Chemical composition of Earth-like planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, M. P.; Thiabaud, A.; Marboeuf, U.; Alibert, Y.; de Elía, G. C.; Guilera, O. M.

    2015-08-01

    Models of planet formation are mainly focused on the accretion and dynamical processes of the planets, neglecting their chemical composition. In this work, we calculate the condensation sequence of the different chemical elements for a low-mass protoplanetary disk around a solar-type star. We incorporate this sequence of chemical elements (refractory and volatile elements) in our semi-analytical model of planet formation which calculates the formation of a planetary system during its gaseous phase. The results of the semi-analytical model (final distributions of embryos and planetesimals) are used as initial conditions to develope N-body simulations that compute the post-oligarchic formation of terrestrial-type planets. The results of our simulations show that the chemical composition of the planets that remain in the habitable zone has similar characteristics to the chemical composition of the Earth. However, differences exist that can be associated to the dynamical environment in which they were formed.

  11. Chemical composition of Earth-like planets

    E-print Network

    Ronco, M P; Marboeuf, U; Alibert, Y; de Elía, G C; Guilera, O M

    2015-01-01

    Models of planet formation are mainly focused on the accretion and dynamical processes of the planets, neglecting their chemical composition. In this work, we calculate the condensation sequence of the different chemical elements for a low-mass protoplanetary disk around a solar-type star. We incorporate this sequence of chemical elements (refractory and volatile elements) in our semi-analytical model of planet formation which calculates the formation of a planetary system during its gaseous phase. The results of the semi-analytical model (final distributions of embryos and planetesimals) are used as initial conditions to develope N-body simulations that compute the post-oligarchic formation of terrestrial-type planets. The results of our simulations show that the chemical composition of the planets that remain in the habitable zone has similar characteristics to the chemical composition of the Earth. However, exist differences that can be associated to the dynamical environment in which they were formed.

  12. The Chemical Composition of Maple Syrup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Maple syrup is one of several high-sugar liquids that humans consume. However, maple syrup is more than just a concentrated sugar solution. Here, we review the chemical composition of maple syrup. (Contains 4 tables and 1 figure.)

  13. Lunar Skylights and Their Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, J.; Torres, J.; FitzHoward, S.; Luu, E.; Hua, J.; Irby, R.

    2013-12-01

    In 2009, the Japanese orbiter, SELenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) discovered a skylight on the near side of the moon. Skylights are collapsed ceilings of rilles, thought to be caused by moonquakes, meteoroids, or incomplete formation of these lava tube ceilings. Since then, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has discovered two more skylights, also located on the near side of the moon. Previous research has shown that the physical characteristics of known rilles, can be used as indicators of the presence of yet undiscovered rille and lava dome locations across the lunar surface. We hypothesize that skylights have a signature chemical composition that is unique, and can be used to predict the location of additional skylights on the surface of the moon. For this study, we compared chemical composition data of the three mare sites containing skylights with the 21 mare sites without skylights. Using the software JMARS for the Moon, we compiled multiple datasets to measure the concentrations of 13 different chemical compounds including calcium, iron oxide, titanium dioxide, and thorium. We then conducted a two-tailed T-test of the data, which generated probability values for the mean differences across all 13 chemical compounds of the maria sites with skylights and the maria sites without skylights. Our results show that there is no statistical difference in chemical composition across all of the maria sites examined. Therefore, we conclude that chemical composition does not predict or indicate potential skylight locations on the moon. Further research on other skylight characteristics, for example depth and surrounding underground lava channels, may shed light on the relationships between mare and skylights locations. Three Skylight Locations Found on Lunar Surface 100m View of Mare Tranquilitatis Skylight

  14. Chemical compositions of primitive solar system particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Steve R.; Bajt, S.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical studies of micrometeorites are of fundamental importance primarily because atmospheric entry selection effects (such as destruction of friable objects) are less significant than those for conventional meteorites. As a result, particles that have experienced very little postaccretional processing have a significant chance of surviving the Earth encounter and subsequent collection. Thus, chemical analyses of these relatively unaltered micrometeorites may lead to a better understanding of the compositions of the most primitive materials in the solar system and thereby constrain the conditions (physical and chemical) that existed in the early solar nebula. Micrometeorites have been collected from the stratosphere, polar ices, and ocean sediments, but the stratospheric collection is the best source for the most unaltered material because they are small and are not heated to their melting points. Despite the fact that the stratospheric micrometeorites have masses in the nanogram range, a variety of microanalytical techniques have been applied to bulk chemical analyses with part-per-million sensitivity. In some cases, multi-disciplinary studies (e.g., chemistry and mineralogy) have been performed on individual particles. The first-order conclusion is that the chondrite-like particles are chemically similar to carbonaceous chondrites but in detail are distinct from members of the conventional meteorite collection. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the results to date and identify important areas for further study.

  15. Chemical composition of Luna 16 lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Chupakhin, M. S.; Belyayev, Y. I.

    1974-01-01

    Data on the chemical composition of regolith returned by the Luna 16 automatic station and two fragments of basalts from the lower layer of the core are presented. Spark mass spectrometric, primary X-ray spectral, emission spectral, and atomic absorption methods were used in the analysis. The regolith of mare provinces were shown to be a mixture of material of various origins. The source of the material of the mare regolith was principally basalts of the corresponding lunar lava maria. The regolith is genetically related to it. This follows from a comparison of the chemical composition, mineralogical, and petrochemical features of the basesalts and the regolith from the Sea of Fertility, Sea of Tranquillity, and Ocean of Storms, respectively.

  16. Impact of oil on groundwater chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakorenko, N. N.

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the paper is to characterize the chemical composition of groundwater samples from the monitoring wells drilled in the petrol station areas within the vicinity of Tomsk. The level of contamination has increased since many macro - and microcomponent concentrations (such as petroleum products, chlorine, sulphates, carbon dioxide and lead, etc.) in groundwater samples of the present study is higher than that in previous period samples.

  17. Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 325394 The chemical composition of subducting sediment and its

    E-print Network

    Langmuir, Charles H.

    Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 325­394 The chemical composition of subducting sediment and its heterogeneity all require a better understanding of the mass and chemical fluxes associated with subducting sediments. We have evaluated subducting sediments on a global basis in order to better define their chemical

  18. Chemical Composition of Soils of Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

    1937-01-01

    loam ........................... 4 Yahola very fine sandy loam.. ............... 6 Soluble Basicity Soluble pH Acid 1 1h4a::siJ Lime CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF SOILS OF TEXAS 21 EAST TEXAS TIMBER COUNTRY The East Texas Timber County is a... for total nitrogen, active phosphoric acid, total phosphoric acid, active potash, acid-soluble potash, total potash, acid-soluble lime, basic- ity, acidity, and acid-soluble magnesia. These maps show that wide areas of Texas soils are low in phosphoric...

  19. Chemical Composition and Photometry of BE Lyncis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhee; Yushchenko, A. V.; Kim, S.-L.; Jeon, Y.-B.; Kim, Chun-Hwey

    2012-05-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic observation was carried out to find the chemical composition of BE Lyn. The abundances of 25 chemical elements from carbon to neodymium were found. The deficiency of iron appeared to be equal to ?log N(Fe) = -0.26 ± 0.08 with respect to the solar metallicity, and the abundances of other elements were mainly undersolar. Only nitrogen, sodium, aluminum, and sulfur showed overabundances near 0.2--0.3 dex. The abundance pattern showed no clear signs of accretion or mass transfer events. It is not possible to exclude the classification of BE Lyn as a SX Phe--type star with slightly undersolar abundances of chemical elements. In addition, new differential time-series observations of BE Lyn were secured using V filters, and seven new times of light maximum were identified. We collected 162 times of light maximum from the literature, unpublished data, and an open database, and we proceeded to investigate the pulsational properties of BE Lyn. All five harmonic frequencies were identified using the Fourier decomposition method.

  20. Environmental effects of oilfield chemicals on composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sorem, R.M.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents a feasibility study of the effects of oilfield chemicals on composite materials. In this initial study only hydrochloric acid is considered. Initial attempts were made to test stressed specimens, but results were very poor. Subsequent testing was performed to determine how the composite material constituents reacted to the hydrochloric acid. The initial testing was performed on tubular specimens with axial and essentially hoop wound fibers of different materials with different resins. The specimens were loaded in bending to induce representative strains in the tubing. All specimens failed. The second tests consisted of only an environmental soak to determine the amount of mass uptake as well as the reduction in strength. The strength reduction results will be presented at a later time. Testing was performed on S-2 glass, carbon and Kevlar 49 as well as three different resins.

  1. Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Glenn C.; Clark, Benton C.; Knocke, Philip C.; OHara, Bonnie J.; Adams, Larry; Niemann, Hasso B.; Alexander, Merle; Veverka, Joseph; Goldstein, Raymond; Huebner, Walter; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Cometary exploration remains of great importance to virtually all of space science. Because comets are presumed to be remnants of the early solar nebula, they are expected to provide fundamental knowledge as to the origin and development of the solar system as well as to be key to understanding of the source of volatiles and even life itself in the inner solar system. Clearly the time for a detailed study of the composition of these apparent messages from the past has come. A comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, is now being studied as a candidate for the new Discovery program. This mission is a highly-focussed and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission. The C4 mission will concentrate on measurements that will produce an understanding of the composition and physical makeup of a cometary nucleus. The core science goals of the C4 mission are 1) to determine the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of a cometary nucleus and 2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. A related goal is to obtain temporal information about the development of the cometary coma as a function of time and orbital position. The four short-period comets -- Tempel 1, Tempel 2, Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and Wirtanen -which all appear to have acceptable dust production rates, were identified as candidate targets. Mission opportunities have been identified beginning as early as 1998. Tempel I with a launch in 1999, however, remains the baseline comet for studies of and planning the C4 mission. The C4 mission incorporates two science instruments and two engineering instruments in the payload to obtain the desired measurements. The science instruments include an advanced version of the Cometary Ice and Dust Experiment (CIDEX), a mini-CIDEX with a sample collection system, an X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer and a Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatograph, and a simplified version of the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NIGMS). Both of these instruments have substantial heritage as they are based on those developed for the CRAF Mission. The engineering instruments include a simplified Comet Dust Environmental Monitor (SCODEM) and a navigational Camera, NAVCAM. While neither of the instruments will be permitted to establish science requirements, it is anticipated that significant science return will be accomplished Radio science will also be included.

  2. Chemical provinces reveal Elysium Volcano's compositional evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susko, D. A.; Karunatillake, S.; Wray, J. J.; Skok, J. R.; Hurowitz, J.; Ojha, L.; Judice, T.; Bently, R. O. J.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical provinces of Mars became definable[1-3] with the maps of elemental mass fractions generated with Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data[4,5]. Previous work highlighted the Elysium lava flow province as anomalous, with a depletion in K and Th relative to the average crust in the rest of Mars (ROM).[3] We characterize the elemental composition, geology, and geomorphology of the region to constrain the processes that have contributed to its evolution. We compare SE Elysium with its North West lava fields, advancing prior work on thermal evolution of the martian mantle.[6] Lava fields at both sites probably source from Elysium eruptions. Both show similar Si content, as well as a Ca-enrichment compared to ROM, consistent with prior models.[6,7] Nevertheless, the two fields are compositionally distinct from each other, with NW Elysium decisively depleted in Ca and Fe, but enriched in K and Th. Such distinctness, in elements that reflect magmatic fractionation, reveals the possibility that a single volcanic complex on Mars may evolve rapidly during the Amazonian era, causing variable flow compositions. Interestingly, a chemical province containing volcanics that is contemporaneous with Elysium, overlaps the Tharsis region.[3] Unlike Elysium, the K and Th distributions within Tharsis are indistinguishable from ROM. Meanwhile, the mass fraction signature in Tharsis is enriched in Cl and depleted in Si. Such contrast, in chemical anomalies between volcanic constructs of similar age, may indicate that the depletion of K and Th in SE Elysium did not arise from temporal evolution of the mantle. [1] Taylor, G. et al. Geology 38, 183-186, 2010 [2] Gasnault, O. et al. 207, 226-247, 2010 [3] Karunatillake, S. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 114, E12001, 2009 [4] Boynton, W. V. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 112, E12S99, 2007 [5] Feldman, W. C. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 109, E09006, 2004 [6] Baratoux, D. et al. Nature 472, 338-41, 2011 [7] Balta, J. et al. Geology 41, 1115-1118, 2013

  3. Systems With Variable Composition: The Chemical Potential Chemistry 223

    E-print Network

    Ronis, David M.

    Systems With Variable Composition: The Chemical Potential Chemistry 223 David Ronis Mc or 2) by changing the composition through chemical reaction. Nonetheless, as far as state functions the composition of the system. For example, you may add compounds with different types of bonds

  4. Chemical composition of selected edible nut seeds.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2006-06-28

    Commercially important edible nut seeds were analyzed for chemical composition and moisture sorption. Moisture (1.47-9.51%), protein (7.50-21.56%), lipid (42.88-66.71%), ash (1.16-3.28%), total soluble sugars (0.55-3.96%), tannins (0.01-0.88%), and phytate (0.15-0.35%) contents varied considerably. Regardless of the seed type, lipids were mainly composed of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (>75% of the total lipids). Fatty acid composition analysis indicated that oleic acid (C18:1) was the main constituent of monounsaturated lipids in all seed samples. With the exception of macadamia, linoleic acid (C18:2) was the major polyunsaturated fatty acid. In the case of walnuts, in addition to linoleic acid (59.79%) linolenic acid (C18:3) also significantly contributed toward the total polyunsaturated lipids. Amino acid composition analyses indicated lysine (Brazil nut, cashew nut, hazelnut, pine nut, and walnut), sulfur amino acids methionine and cysteine (almond), tryptophan (macadamia, pecan), and threonine (peanut) to be the first limiting amino acid as compared to human (2-5 year old) amino acid requirements. The amino acid composition of the seeds was characterized by the dominance of hydrophobic (range = 37.16-44.54%) and acidic (27.95-33.17%) amino acids followed by basic (16.16-21.17%) and hydrophilic (8.48-11.74%) amino acids. Trypsin inhibitory activity, hemagglutinating activity, and proteolytic activity were not detected in the nut seed samples analyzed. Sorption isotherms (Aw range = 0.08-0.97) indicated a narrow range for monolayer water content (11-29 mg/g of dry matter). No visible mold growth was evident on any of the samples stored at Aw < 0.53 and 25 degrees C for 6 months. PMID:16787018

  5. On-line chemical composition analyzer development

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Garrison, A.A.; Muly, E.C.; Moore, C.F.

    1992-02-01

    The energy consumed in distillation processes in the United States represents nearly three percent of the total national energy consumption. If effective control of distillation columns can be accomplished, it has been estimated that it would result in a reduction in the national energy consumption of 0.3%. Real-time control based on mixture composition could achieve these savings. However, the major distillation processes represent diverse applications and at present there does not exist a proven on-line chemical composition sensor technology which can be used to control these diverse processes in real-time. This report presents a summary of the findings of the second phase of a three phase effort undertaken to develop an on-line real-time measurement and control system utilizing Raman spectroscopy. A prototype instrument system has been constructed utilizing a Perkin Elmer 1700 Spectrometer, a diode pumped YAG laser, two three axis positioning systems, a process sample cell land a personal computer. This system has been successfully tested using industrially supplied process samples to establish its performance. Also, continued application development was undertaken during this Phase of the program using both the spontaneous Raman and Surface-enhanced Raman modes of operation. The study was performed for the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, whose mission is to conduct cost-shared R D for new high-risk, high-payoff industrial energy conservation technologies. Although this document contains references to individual manufacturers and their products, the opinions expressed on the products reported do not necessarily reflect the position of the Department of Energy.

  6. Origin and Bulk Chemical Composition of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Andrew J. R.; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The planet Mercury is remarkable because its mean uncompressed density ˜5.3 g/cc implies a Fe-Ni mass content of ˜67%. This is more than twice the ˜32% metal fractions of Venus and Earth. This factor coupled with other marked chemical and isotopic differences between the four terrestrial planets points to the conclusion that each planet ?received the overwhelming majority of its mass from a narrow compositionally-distinct annulus of material around the Sun? (Drake & Righter 2002 Nature 416 39; Taylor & Scott 2001 in URL below). This situation finds an explanation within the Modern Laplacian theory of Solar system origin (Prentice 2001 Earth Moon & Planets 87 11; URL: www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/mercury01). Here the planets condensed from a concentric family of circular gas rings shed by the proto-Solar cloud. The temperatures and mean orbit pressures of the gas rings scale with heliocentric distance r as T ~ 1/r0.9 and p ˜1/r4.0 respectively. At Mercury?s orbit T = 1640 K p= 0.16 bar and the three primary equilibrium condensates are Fe-Ni (67 %) gehlenite (26.1%) and spinel (4.1%). A simple 2-zone structural model of Mercury based on this mix has mean density 5.43 g/cc and axial moment-of-inertia coefficent C/MR2 = 0.325.

  7. Honey: Chemical composition, stability and authenticity.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Priscila Missio; Gauche, Cony; Gonzaga, Luciano Valdemiro; Costa, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Fett, Roseane

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this review is to describe the chemical characteristics of compounds present in honey, their stability when heated or stored for long periods of time and the parameters of identity and quality. Therefore, the chemical characteristics of these compounds were examined, such as sugars, proteins, amino acids, enzymes, organic acids, vitamins, minerals, phenolic and volatile compounds present in honey. The stability of these compounds in relation to the chemical reactions that occur by heating or prolonged storage were also discussed, with increased understanding of the behavior regarding the common processing of honey that may compromise its quality. In addition, the identity and quality standards were described, such as sugars, moisture, acidity, ash and electrical conductivity, color, 5-HMF and diastase activity, along with the minimum and maximum limits established by the Codex Alimentarius. PMID:26593496

  8. Chemical compositions of large cluster IDPs

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S.R.

    2006-12-06

    We performed X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy on two large cluster IDPs, which sample the IDP parent body at a mass scale two orders-of-magnitude larger than {approx}10 {micro}m IDPs, allowing proper incorporation of larger mineral grains into the bulk composition of the parent body. We previously determined that {approx}10 {micro}m interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere are enriched in many moderately volatile elements by a factor of {approx}3 over the CI meteorites. However, these IDP measurements provide no direct constraint on the bulk chemical composition of the parent body (or parent bodies) of the IDPs. Collisions are believed to be the major mechanism for dust production by the asteroids, producing dust by surface erosion, cratering and catastrophic disruption. Hypervelocity impact experiments at {approx}5 km/sec, which is the mean collision velocity in the main belt, performed by Flynn and Durda on ordinary chondrite meteorites and the carbonaceous chondrite meteorite Allende show that the 10 {micro}m debris is dominated by matrix material while the debris larger than {approx}25 {micro}m is dominated by chondrule fragments. Thus, if the IDP parent body is similar in structure to the chondritic meteorites, it is likely that the {approx}10 {micro}m IDPs oversample the fine-grained component of the parent body. We have examined the matrix material from the few meteorites that are sufficiently fine-grained to be samples of potential IDP parent bodies. This search has, thus far, not produced a compositional and mineralogical match to either the hydrous or anhydrous IDPs. This result, coupled with our recent mapping of the element distributions, which indicates the enrichment of moderately volatile elements is not due to contamination on their surfaces, suggests the IDPs represent a new type of extraterrestrial material. Nonetheless, the meteorite fragmentation results suggest that compositional measurements on 10 {micro}m IDPs only provide a direct constraint on the bulk chemical composition of the IDP parent body if the size-scale of the grains in the parent body is <<10 {micro}m. The stratospheric collections include many nonchondritic, mono-mineralic grains, collected along with the fine-grained chondritic IDPs. Some of these grains, which include volatile-poor olivine and pyroxene as well as calcophile-rich sulfides, have fine-grained, chondritic material (i.e., small bits of typical IDPs) adhering to their surfaces. This indicates that at least some of the non-chondritic grains found on the stratospheric collectors are fragments from the same parent as the fine-grained IDPs. Thus, the bulk composition of the IDP parent body can only be reconstructed by adding to the fine-grained, chondritic IDPs the correct amount of this non-chondritic material. Qualitatively, the addition of olivines and pyroxenes will reduce the mean content of many moderately volatile elements while the addition of sulfides will increase the content of some of these elements. However, the quantitative task of adding these monomineralic grains to the fine-grained IDPs cannot be accomplished by simply adding the non-chondritic material in proportion to its occurrence on the stratospheric collectors because: (1) it is not clear that all of the olivines, pyroxenes, sulfides or other mineral grains found on the stratospheric collectors are extraterrestrial; (2) the settling rate of a particle depends on its density and shape, thus the concentration factor for these high-density, mono-mineralic grains is lower at the collection altitude than it is for the lower-density, fine-grained aggregate IDPs; and (3) the atmospheric entry survival of a particle is a function of density, so higher density grains (e.g., sulfides) are more likely to vaporize on entry, even if they enter with the same velocity as fine-grained, lower-density aggregates. The collection of 'cluster IDPs,' which enter the atmosphere as large particles, some larger than 50 {micro}m in diameter, containing both fine-grained aggregate material

  9. Chemical compositions of four barium stars

    E-print Network

    Y. C. Liang; G. Zhao; Y. Q. Chen; H. M. Qiu; B. Zhang

    2003-12-15

    Chemical compositions of four barium stars HD 26886, HD 27271, HD 50082 and HD 98839 are studied based on high resolution, high signal-to-noise Echelle spectra. Results show that all of them are disk stars. Their \\alpha and iron peak elements are similar to the solar abundances. The neutron-capture process elements are overabundant relative to the Solar. The heavy-element abundances of the strong Ba star HD 50082 are higher than those of other three mild Ba stars. Its mass is 1.32Msun (+0.28,-0.22Msun), and is consistent with the average mass of strong Ba stars (1.5Msun). For mild Ba star HD 27271 and HD 26886, the derived masses are 1.90Msun (+0.25,-0.20Msun) and 2.78Msun (+0.75,-0.78M_sun), respectively, which are consistent with the average mass of mild Ba stars. We also calculate the theoretical abundances of Ba stars by combining the AGB stars nucleosynthesis and wind accretion formation scenario of Ba binary systems. The comparisons between the observed abundance patterns of the sample stars with the theoretical results show that wind accretion scenario can explain the abundance patterns of HD 50082 and HD 27271 well, but fail to explain the abundances of HD 26886. It means that the mild Ba star HD 26886, with shorter orbital period (P11000 d), may be either a star with the heavy elements enriched by itself or a "true Ba" star.

  10. Chemical composition of major ions in rainwater.

    PubMed

    Salve, P R; Maurya, A; Wate, S R; Devotta, Sukumar

    2008-03-01

    The present study investigated the chemical composition of rainwater at Kabir nagar, Nari, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India. The rainwater samples were collected on event basis during June-July-August-2006 and were analyzed for pH, major anions Cl, NO(3), SO(4)) and cations (Ca, Mg, Na, K, NH4). The pH value varied from 6.0 to 7.3 (avg. 6.3 +/- 0.3) indicating alkaline nature of rainwater. The pH of the rainwater was found well above the reference pH (5.6), showing alkalinity during the monsoon season. The average and standard deviation of ionic composition was found to be 98.1 +/- 10.6 micro eql(-1). The total anions contribute 45.1% and cations 54.9%, respectively to rainwater. Neutralization factors (NF) followed a sequence of NF(Ca) > NF(Mg) > NF(NH4) with factors of 1.1, 0.38 and 0.15 indicating the crustal components are responsible for neutralization of anions. The average ratio of (NO(3) + Cl)/SO(4) observed as 1.1 indicates that nitric and hydrochloric acid influences the acidity of rainwater. The ratio of NH(4)/NO(3) and NH(4)/SO(4) was observed as 0.68 and 0.34 indicate that the possible compounds which may predominate in the atmosphere are NH(4)NO(3) and (NH(4))(2)SO(4). Ionic correlation was established to identify sources of origin. A good correlation was seen between Ca and Mg (r = 0.95); suggesting the common occurrence of these ions from crustal origin. Similarly, the acidic ions SO(4) and NO(3) correlated well (r = 0.60) indicating their origin from similar sources. Other relatively significant correlations were observed between Ca and SO4 (r = 0.92), Mg and SO(4) (r = 0.83), Ca and NO(3) (r = 0.09), Ca and Cl (r = 0.34) and Mg and Cl (r = 0.31), and Mg and NO(3) (r = 0.71). The observed rainwater ratio of Cl/Na (1.1) is closer to that of seawater ratio (1.16) indicates fractionation of sea-salt and modifications by non-marine constituents as the site is 834 km away from the sea coast. The nss-Ca contribution was observed as 95.7% suggesting their crustal origin whereas nss-Mg and nss-K shows their contribution as 87.9% and 83.2% indicating influence of soil sources. The nss-SO(4) contributed as 87.4% shows anthropogenic origin. PMID:18196188

  11. Characterization of Stem Growth and Chemical Composition in Sorghum Bicolor 

    E-print Network

    Anderson Jr, Robert Taylor

    2014-03-31

    Sorghum bicolor is a subtropical grass grown throughout the world for human consumption, animal feed and for the growing biofuels industry. In this thesis I characterize sorghum stem growth and chemical composition, and identify QTL and candidate...

  12. WOOD STOVE EMISSIONS: PARTICLE SIZE AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes wood stove particle size and chemical composition data gathered to date. [NOTE: In 1995, EPA estimated that residential wood combustion (RWC), including fireplaces, accounted for a significant fraction of national particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter...

  13. Variations in Vitamin A and in Chemical Composition of Corn. 

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1931-01-01

    A AND IN CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF CORN G. S. FRAPS Sufficient energy, proteins, vitamins, and minerals, such as phosphoric acid, lime, magnesia, sodium, chlorine, sulphur, potash, iron, copper, iodine, and fluorine must be furnishecl by the diet... STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS - JLLETIN NO. 422 MARCH, 1931 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY variations in Vitamin A and Chemical Composition of Corn AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President...

  14. The Chemical Composition of Praesepe (M44)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Roper, Brian W.; Lum, Michael G.

    2013-09-01

    Star clusters have long been used to illuminate both stellar evolution and Galactic evolution. They also hold clues to the chemical and nucleosynthetic processes throughout the history of the Galaxy. We have taken high signal-to-noise (S/N), high-resolution spectra of 11 solar-type stars in the Praesepe open cluster to determine the chemical abundances of 16 elements: Li, C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Y, and Ba. We have determined Fe from Fe I and Fe II lines and find [Fe/H] = +0.12 ±0.04. We find that Li decreases with temperature due to increasing Li depletion in cooler stars; it matches the Li-temperature pattern found in the Hyades. The [C/Fe] and [O/Fe] abundances are below solar and lower than the field star samples due to the younger age of Praesepe (0.7 Gyr) than the field stars. The alpha-elements, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, have solar ratios with respect to Fe, and are also lower than the field star samples. The Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, track Fe and have solar values. The neutron capture element [Y/Fe] is found to be solar, but [Ba/Fe] is enhanced relative to solar and to the field stars. Three Praesepe giants were studied by Carrera and Pancino; they are apparently enhanced in Na, Mg, and Ba relative to the Praesepe dwarfs. The Na enhancement may indicate proton-capture nucleosynthesis in the Ne ? Na cycling with dredge-up into the atmospheres of the red giants.

  15. THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF PRAESEPE (M44)

    SciTech Connect

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Roper, Brian W.; Lum, Michael G. E-mail: brianwroper@gmail.com

    2013-09-20

    Star clusters have long been used to illuminate both stellar evolution and Galactic evolution. They also hold clues to the chemical and nucleosynthetic processes throughout the history of the Galaxy. We have taken high signal-to-noise (S/N), high-resolution spectra of 11 solar-type stars in the Praesepe open cluster to determine the chemical abundances of 16 elements: Li, C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Y, and Ba. We have determined Fe from Fe I and Fe II lines and find [Fe/H] = +0.12 ±0.04. We find that Li decreases with temperature due to increasing Li depletion in cooler stars; it matches the Li-temperature pattern found in the Hyades. The [C/Fe] and [O/Fe] abundances are below solar and lower than the field star samples due to the younger age of Praesepe (0.7 Gyr) than the field stars. The alpha-elements, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, have solar ratios with respect to Fe, and are also lower than the field star samples. The Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, track Fe and have solar values. The neutron capture element [Y/Fe] is found to be solar, but [Ba/Fe] is enhanced relative to solar and to the field stars. Three Praesepe giants were studied by Carrera and Pancino; they are apparently enhanced in Na, Mg, and Ba relative to the Praesepe dwarfs. The Na enhancement may indicate proton-capture nucleosynthesis in the Ne ? Na cycling with dredge-up into the atmospheres of the red giants.

  16. Chemical evolution of galaxies. I. A composition-dependent SPH model for chemical evolution and cooling

    E-print Network

    Francisco J. Martínez-Serrano; Arturo Serna; Rosa Domínguez-Tenreiro; Mercedes Mollá

    2008-04-23

    We describe an SPH model for chemical enrichment and radiative cooling in cosmological simulations of structure formation. This model includes: i) the delayed gas restitution from stars by means of a probabilistic approach designed to reduce the statistical noise and, hence, to allow for the study of the inner chemical structure of objects with moderately high numbers of particles; ii) the full dependence of metal production on the detailed chemical composition of stellar particles by using, for the first time in SPH codes, the Qij matrix formalism that relates each nucleosynthetic product to its sources; and iii) the full dependence of radiative cooling on the detailed chemical composition of gas particles, achieved through a fast algorithm using a new metallicity parameter zeta(T) that gives the weight of each element on the total cooling function. The resolution effects and the results obtained from this SPH chemical model have been tested by comparing its predictions in different problems with known theoretical solutions. We also present some preliminary results on the chemical properties of elliptical galaxies found in self-consistent cosmological simulations. Such simulations show that the above zeta-cooling method is important to prevent an overestimation of the metallicity-dependent cooling rate, whereas the Qij formalism is important to prevent a significant underestimation of the [alpha/Fe] ratio in simulated galaxy-like objects.

  17. Cometary coma chemical composition (C4) mission. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Clark, B. C.; Niemann, H. B.; Alexander, M.; Knocke, P. C.; O'Hara, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary missions are of enormous fundamental importance for many different space science disciplines, including exobiology. Comets are presumed relics of the earliest, most primitive material in the solar nebula and are related to the planetesimals. They undoubtedly provided a general enrichment of volatiles to the inner solar system (contributing to atmospheres and oceans) and may have been key to the origin of life. A Discovery class, comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, was selected for further study by NASA earlier this year. The C4 Mission is a highly focused and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission, concentrating exclusively on measurements which will lead to an understanding of the chemical composition and make-up of the cometary nucleus. The scientific goals of the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission are to rendezvous with a short-period comet and (1) to determine the elemental, chemical, and isotopic composition of the nucleus and (2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. Further, it is a goal to obtain preliminary data on the development of the coma (dust and gas composition) as a function of time and orbital position.

  18. Fuel options from microalgae with representative chemical compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, D. A.

    1984-07-01

    Representative species of microalgae are examined with respect to their reported chemical compositions. Each species is analyzed under a variety of culture conditions, with the objective being to characterize an optimum mixture of fuel products (e.g., methane, ethanol, methylester) which should be produced by the particular species. Historically the emphasis has been on the entire algal cell mass. Using the reported chemical composition for the representative species under specific sets of growth conditions, some conclusions can be drawn about the preferred fuel product conversion routes that could be employed. 10 references, 7 figures, 12 tables.

  19. The chemical composition and structure of the moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    It is assumed that most of the igneous rocks on the lunar surface are the product of partial melting in the lunar interior, followed by segregation and upward transport of an igneous liquid. An attempt is made to determine constraints on the composition of the lunar interior that derive from the chemical composition of the lunar igneous rocks. The salient chemical characteristics of igneous rocks from the lunar surface are summarized, and are compared to analogous characteristics of terrestrial volcanic rocks so that major similarities and differences between terrestrial and lunar basaltic rocks can be established.

  20. Chemical Equilibrium Composition of Aqueous Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-12-30

    MINEQL is a subroutine package to calculate equilibrium composition of an aqueous system, accounting for mass transfer. MINEQL-EIR contains an additional base on enthalpy and heat capacity data and has the option to do calculations at temperatures different from 25 degrees C.

  1. Energetic composites and method of providing chemical energy

    DOEpatents

    Danen, Wayne C. (Los Alamos, NM); Martin, Joe A. (Espanola, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application.

  2. Energetic composites and method of providing chemical energy

    DOEpatents

    Danen, W.C.; Martin, J.A.

    1997-02-25

    A method is described for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application. 3 figs.

  3. Chemical vapor infiltration of non-oxide ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites are enabling new, high temperature structural applications. Chemical vapor infiltration methods for producing these composites are being investigated, with the complexity of filament weaves and deposition chemistry merged with standard heat and mass transport relationships. Silicon carbide- based materials are, by far, the most mature, and are already being used in aerospace applications. This paper addresses the state-of-the-art of the technology and outlines current issues.

  4. Chemical composition of cottonseed affected by cropping management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed is a valuable raw material for a range of food, animal feed, and industrial (such as adhesives) products. Chemical composition is one of the critical parameters to evaluate cottonseed's quality and potential end use. However, the information on the impacts of cropping management practices...

  5. Coma chemical composition at the Abydos landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, A.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G.; Andrews, D.; Barber, S.; Wright, I.

    2015-10-01

    The Ptolemy instrument, onboard the Rosetta Philae Lander, made measurements of the chemical composition of the coma mid-bounce, just after the non-nominal landing on the surface, and subsequently at the Abydos landing site. This presentation will discuss Ptolemy's operations throughout this 45 hour period and the results obtained.

  6. Computer program determines chemical composition of physical system at equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, S. S.

    1966-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 digital computer program calculates equilibrium composition of complex, multiphase chemical systems. This is a free energy minimization method with solution of the problem reduced to mathematical operations, without concern for the chemistry involved. Also certain thermodynamic properties are determined as byproducts of the main calculations.

  7. Composition and Thermodynamic Properties of Air in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeckel, W E; Weston, Kenneth C

    1958-01-01

    Charts have been prepared relating the thermodynamic properties of air in chemical equilibrium for temperatures to 15,000 degrees k and for pressures 10(-5) to 10 (plus 4) atmospheres. Also included are charts showing the composition of air, the isentropic exponent, and the speed of sound. These charts are based on thermodynamic data calculated by the National Bureau of Standards. (author)

  8. Chemical composition and bioactivity studies of Alpinia nigra essential oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Free radical scavenging, bactericidal and bitting deterrent properties of Alpinia nigra essential oils (EOs) were investigated in the present study. Chemical composition of the EOs were analyzed using GC-MS/GC-FID which revealed the presence of 63 constituents including ß-caryophyllene as major comp...

  9. Chemical composition, antifungal and insecticidal activities of Hedychium essential oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial properties of essential oils have been documented, and their use as “biocides” is gaining popularity. The aims of this study were to analyze the chemical composition and assess the biological activities of Hedychium essential oils. Oils from 19 Hedychium species and cultivars were ...

  10. Chemical composition of defatted cottonseed and soy meal products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical composition is critical information for product quality and exploration of new use. Hence defatted cottonseed meals from both glanded (with gossypol) and glandless (without gossypol) cotton seeds were separated into water soluble and insoluble fractions, or water soluble, alkali soluble as ...

  11. Chemical Composition of the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Martin; Spaans, Marco

    2003-05-01

    A prediction of standard inflationary cosmology is that the elemental composition of the medium out of which the earliest stars and galaxies condensed consisted primarily of hydrogen and helium 4He, with small admixtures of deuterium, lithium 7Li, and 3He. The most redshifted quasars, galaxies, and Ly? absorbers currently observed, however, all exhibit at least some admixture of heavier elements, as do the most ancient stars in the Galaxy. Here we examine ways in which the abundance of these same elements, if present before the epoch of Population III formation, might be observationally established or ruled out.

  12. Chemical Composition of the Early Universe

    E-print Network

    Martin Harwit; Marco Spaans

    2003-02-13

    A prediction of standard inflationary cosmology is that the elemental composition of the medium out of which the earliest stars and galaxies condensed consisted primarily of hydrogen and helium 4He with small admixtures of deuterium, lithium 7Li, and 3He. The most red-shifted quasars, galaxies, and Ly-alpha absorbers currently observed, however, all exhibit at least some admixture of heavier elements, as do the most ancient stars in the Galaxy. Here we examine ways in which the abundance of these same elements, if present before the epoch of population III formation, might be observationally established or ruled out.

  13. Chemical Composition of the Early Universe

    E-print Network

    Harwit, M; Harwit, Martin; Spaans, Marco

    2003-01-01

    A prediction of standard inflationary cosmology is that the elemental composition of the medium out of which the earliest stars and galaxies condensed consisted primarily of hydrogen and helium 4He with small admixtures of deuterium, lithium 7Li, and 3He. The most red-shifted quasars, galaxies, and Ly-alpha absorbers currently observed, however, all exhibit at least some admixture of heavier elements, as do the most ancient stars in the Galaxy. Here we examine ways in which the abundance of these same elements, if present before the epoch of population III formation, might be observationally established or ruled out.

  14. Chemical composition of Hanford Tank SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, E.; Agnew, S.; Jarvinen, G.; Yarbro, S.

    1993-12-01

    The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of the radioactive waste, both current and future, stored in double-shell and single-shell tanks at the Hanford sites. One major program element in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal using the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. In support of this program, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a conceptual process flow sheet which will remediate the entire contents of a selected double-shelled underground waste tank, including supernatant and sludge, into forms that allow storage and final disposal in a safe, cost-effective and environmentally sound manner. The specific tank selected for remediation is 241-SY-102 located in the 200 West Area. As part of the flow sheet development effort, the composition of the tank was defined and documented. This database was built by examining the history of liquid waste transfers to the tank and by performing careful analysis of all of the analytical data that have been gathered during the tank`s lifetime. In order to more completely understand the variances in analytical results, material and charge balances were done to help define the chemistry of the various components in the tank. This methodology of defining the tank composition and the final results are documented in this report.

  15. Chemical composition analysis and authentication of whisky.

    PubMed

    Wi?niewska, Paulina; Dymerski, Tomasz; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namie?nik, Jacek

    2015-08-30

    Whisky (whiskey) is one of the most popular spirit-based drinks made from malted or saccharified grains, which should mature for at least 3 years in wooden barrels. High popularity of products usually causes a potential risk of adulteration. Thus authenticity assessment is one of the key elements of food product marketing. Authentication of whisky is based on comparing the composition of this alcohol with other spirit drinks. The present review summarizes all information about the comparison of whisky and other alcoholic beverages, the identification of type of whisky or the assessment of its quality and finally the authentication of whisky. The article also presents the various techniques used for analyzing whisky, such as gas and liquid chromatography with different types of detectors (FID, AED, UV-Vis), electronic nose, atomic absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In some cases the application of chemometric methods is also described, namely PCA, DFA, LDA, ANOVA, SIMCA, PNN, k-NN and CA, as well as preparation techniques such SPME or SPE. PMID:25315338

  16. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of Polish herbhoneys.

    PubMed

    Isidorov, V A; Bagan, R; Bakier, S; Swiecicka, I

    2015-03-15

    The present study focuses on samples of Polish herbhoneys (HHs), their chemical composition and antimicrobial activity. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was used to analyse eight samples of herbal honeys and three samples of nectar honeys. Their antimicrobial activities were tested on selected Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus schleiferi) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, as well as on pathogenic fungi Candida albicans. Ether extracts of HHs showed significant differences in composition but the principal groups found in the extracts were phenolics and aliphatic hydroxy acids typical of royal jelly and unsaturated dicarboxylic acids. In spite of the differences in chemical composition, antimicrobial activity of the extracts of HHs against all the tested microorganisms except E. coli was observed. PMID:25308646

  17. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.; Orsini, Douglas

    2006-04-18

    An apparatus for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution is provided. The apparatus includes an enhanced particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and an enhanced collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical means. Methods for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles are also provided, the method including exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; and flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  18. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E. (East Setauket, NY); Weber, Rodney J. (Atlanta, GA)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution are provided. The apparatus includes a modified particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and a collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical methods. The method provided for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles includes exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  19. Chemical Composition of Defatted Cottonseed and Soy Meal Products

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Hailin; Olk, Dan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition is critical information for product quality and exploration of new use. Hence defatted cottonseed meals from both glanded (with gossypol) and glandless (without gossypol) cotton seeds were separated into water soluble and insoluble fractions, or water soluble, alkali soluble as well as total protein isolates. The contents of gossypol, total protein and amino acids, fiber and carbohydrates, and selected macro and trace elements in these products were determined and compared with each other and with those of soy meal products. Data reported in this work improved our understanding on the chemical composition of different cottonseed meal products that is helpful for more economical utilization of these products. These data would also provide a basic reference for product standards and quality control when the production of the cottonseed meal products comes to pilot and industrial scales. PMID:26079931

  20. Chemical Composition of Galactic Cosmic Rays with Space Experiments

    E-print Network

    Mirko Boezio; Emiliano Mocchiutti

    2012-08-07

    The origin and properties of the cosmic radiation are one of the most intriguing question in modern astrophysics. The precise measurement of the chemical composition and energy spectra of the cosmic rays provides fundamental insight into these subjects. In this paper we will review the existing experimental data. Specifically, we will analyse results collected by space-born experiments discussing the experimental uncertainties and challenges with a focus on the PAMELA experiment.

  1. The chemical composition of the pre-solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    The chemical composition of comets may reflect an origin in the molecular cloud which subsequently formed the solar nebula. The chemistry of different types of interstellar clouds is contrasted, including an inventory of molecular species detected in Orion and in TMC 1. The first astronomical detections of the J = (1-0) transition of HCS(+) and the J = (16-15) transition of HC5N and the first detection of SO2 in a cold dust cloud are reported.

  2. Chemical composition studies of flint with different origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarina, Liga; Seglins, Valdis; Kostjukovs, Juris; Burlakovs, Juris

    2015-04-01

    Flint is a widely used material in the Stone Age because of its physical characteristics, which makes the material suitable for obtaining tools with sharp working edges. Chert, flint, chalcedony, agate and jasper in composition and several other physical characteristics are very similar. Therefore in archaeology most often they are determined simplified and are not distinguished, but described as flint or chert, denoting only the material in a general sense. However, in-depth studies it is necessary accurately identify the rock type and, in addition, to determine the origin of the flint and the conditions of the formation for the various archaeological research needs. As a typical example can be noted the localization problems in determining whether flint is local, or have emerged in the region through the exchange or by transportation. Flint consists mainly from quartz and mostly it has cryptocrystalline or amorphous structure. In nature it occurs as nodules and interbedded inclusions in sedimentary deposits as a result of digenesis processes when calcium carbonate is replaced with silicia. Bedded chert primarily is accumulations originated from excess alkalinity in the sediments. Flint can also be formed in the crystallization processes of the chemically unstable amorphous silicia. In this context, it should be noted that flint is naturally heterogeneous and very varied material by the physical properties and therefore problematic in many contemporary studies. In the study different origin flint samples from England, Denmark and Latvia were compared after their chemical composition. Flint nodules from Northern Europe chalk cliffs formed as inclusions in interbedded deposits or results of the digenesis and samples of chalcedony saturated dolomite from Latvia formed in hydrothermal processes were analysed using XRD and XRF methods. The obtained data were statistically analysed, identifying major, minor and trace elements and subsequently assessing the chemical composition characteristics of the various origins flint. The obtained data indicates that in the flint nodules the amount of silicia is large and relatively stable, as well the presence of other chemical elements are uniform and relatively homogeneous. In turn, in the chalcedony saturated dolomite can be observed the highly variable quantity of silicia, the unstable proportion of Ca-Mg and other key chemical elements and the constantly present rare earth elements, whose concentration can be significant. The performed analysis confirmed that with the chemical composition analysis it is possible to distinguish flint formed in the different geological conditions, as well as to evaluate the indicative characteristics.

  3. Chemical and isotopic compositions in acid residues from various meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kano, N.; Yamakoshi, K.; Matsuzaki, H.; Nogami, K.

    1993-01-01

    We are planning to carry out systematic isotopic investigations of Ru, Mg, etc., in primordial samples. The investigations will be pursued in the context of a study of the pre-history of the solar system. It is hoped that the study will yield direct evidence for processes of nucleosynthesis in the pre-solar stage and detection of extinct radioactive nuclides. In this paper, we present the results of chemical compositions of acid residues obtained from three types of meteorites: Canyon Diablo (IA), Allende (CV3), and Nuevo Mercuro (H5); and the preliminary results of Ru isotopic compositions.

  4. The density of volatile bearing melts in the Earth's deep mantle: The role of chemical composition

    E-print Network

    2009 Keywords: Silicate melts Chemical composition Water Mg# Density Equation of state DensityThe density of volatile bearing melts in the Earth's deep mantle: The role of chemical composition in the mantle. We study the role of chemical composition on melt density based on the ideal-mixing model

  5. Chemical Composition of Rainwater in Córdoba City, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, M. L.; Asar, M. L.; Ceppi, S.; Bürgesser, R. E.; Avila, E.

    2013-05-01

    Sampling and chemical analysis of rainwater has proved to be a useful technique for studying its chemical composition and provides a greater understanding of local and regional dispersion of pollutants and their potential impacts to ecosystems through deposition processes. Samples of rainwater were collected during 2009-2012, in Córdoba city, Argentina. Two kind of sampling were performed: event-specific and sequential. The objective of the first of these was to determine the chemical concentration of the total rain, while the objective of the second one was to analyze the variability of the chemical concentration during an individual rain event. The total volume of each sample was divided in halves. One half was filtered through 0.45 ?m membrane filter. After this, all the samples were reduced by evaporation to a final volume of 10 ml. The non-filtered samples were acidified and digested in accordance to the method 3050B of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for acid digestion of sediments. Multi-elemental standard solutions in different concentrations were prepared by adequate dilutions. Gallium was added as an internal standard in all standard solutions and samples. Exactly 5 ?L of these solutions were deposited on acrylic supports. When these droplets were dried, Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence technique was used for determining the chemical elements. Spectra were analyzed with the AXIL package for spectrum analysis. Due to the intrinsic characteristics of the total reflection technique, the background of the measurements is significantly reduced and there are no matrix effects, therefore quantification can be obtained from the linear correlation between fluorescence intensity and the concentration of the element of interest. The elements quantified were S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, and Pb. For all of them a calibration curve was performed in order to quantify their concentrations on the samples. The results show that the average pH in city rainwater was pH=6.5; the elements found in the samples were S, Ca, Cu, Cr, Sr, P, Fe, Mn, Pb, K, Ti, V, Zn and the average concentrations of these elements were below the limits established by World Health Organization for drinking water, and show a high natural variability. The temporal evolution of inorganic ion concentration during rain events was analyzed and the scavenging coefficients were calculated and compared with data from literature. A comparison was made between the rainwater chemical composition and chemical composition in the aerosols scavenging during the rain. This study is the first in Córdoba city to analyze the chemical composition of rainwater and constitute a base for future comparison of variability in pH and elemental composition.

  6. Physical Characterization and Steam Chemical Reactivity of Carbon Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, Robert Andrew; Pawelko, Robert James; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2001-05-01

    This report documents experiments and analyses that have been done at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to measure the steam chemical reactivity of two types of carbon fiber composites, NS31 and NB31, proposed for use at the divertor strike points in an ITER-like tokamak. These materials are 3D CFCs constituted by a NOVOLTEX preform and densified by pyrocarbon infiltration and heat treatment. NS31 differs from NB31 in that the final infiltration was done with liquid silicon to reduce the porosity and enhance the thermal conductivity of the CFC. Our approach in this work was twofold: (1) physical characterization measurements of the specimens and (2) measurements of the chemical reactivity of specimens exposed to steam.

  7. On the chemical composition of Titan's dry lakebed evaporites

    E-print Network

    Cordier, Daniel; Ferreira, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Titan, the main satellite of Saturn, has an active cycle of methane in its troposphere. Among other evidence for a mechanism of evaporation at work on the ground, dry lakebeds have been discovered. Recent Cassini infrared observations of these empty lakes have revealed a surface composition poor in water ice compared to that of the surrounding terrains --- suggesting the existence of organic evaporites deposits. The chemical composition of these possible evaporites is unknown. In this paper, we study evaporite composition using a model that treats both organic solids dissolution and solvent evaporation. Our results suggest the possibility of large abundances of butane and acetylene in the lake evaporites. However, due to uncertainties of the employed theory, these determinations have to be confirmed by laboratory experiments.

  8. Chemical composition of dissolved organic matter draining permafrost soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Collin P.; Cory, Rose M.

    2015-10-01

    Northern circumpolar permafrost soils contain roughly twice the amount of carbon stored in the atmosphere today, but the majority of this soil organic carbon is perennially frozen. Climate warming in the arctic is thawing permafrost soils and mobilizing previously frozen dissolved organic matter (DOM) from deeper soil layers to nearby surface waters. Previous studies have reported that ancient DOM draining deeper layers of permafrost soils was more susceptible to degradation by aquatic bacteria compared to modern DOM draining the shallow active layer of permafrost soils, and have suggested that DOM chemical composition may be an important control for the lability of DOM to bacterial degradation. However, the compositional features that distinguish DOM drained from different depths in permafrost soils are poorly characterized. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize the chemical composition of DOM drained from different depths in permafrost soils, and relate these compositional differences to its susceptibility to biological degradation. DOM was leached from the shallow organic mat and the deeper permafrost layer of soils within the Imnavait Creek watershed on the North Slope of Alaska. DOM draining both soil layers was characterized in triplicate by coupling ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry, 13C solid-state NMR, and optical spectroscopy methods with multi-variate statistical analyses. Reproducibility of replicate mass spectra was high, and compositional differences resulting from interfering species or isolation effects were significantly smaller than differences between DOM drained from each soil layer. All analyses indicated that DOM leached from the shallower organic mat contained higher molecular weight, more oxidized, and more unsaturated aromatic species compared to DOM leached from the deeper permafrost layer. Bacterial production rates and bacterial efficiencies were significantly higher for permafrost compared to organic mat DOM; however, respiration rates were similar between DOM sources. Increased release of permafrost DOM from arctic soils to surface waters will change the chemical composition of DOM and its lability to bacteria, but this study suggests that these shifts in DOM composition and lability may not increase the carbon dioxide produced by bacterial respiration of permafrost DOM exported to arctic surface waters compared to DOM currently draining the shallow active layer.

  9. Chem I Supplement: The Chemical Composition of the Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holum, John R.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the principal chemical substances which occur in most cells. These chemicals are the lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, and nucleic acids. Suggests that the structures of these substances be taught first since structure determines function. (JN)

  10. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Algerian propolis.

    PubMed

    Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Mencherini, Teresa; Celano, Rita; Mouhoubi, Zina; Tamendjari, Azeddine; Aquino, Rita Patrizia; Rastrelli, Luca

    2013-05-29

    Chemical composition of propolis samples from north Algeria was characterized by chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses. High-performance liquid chromatorgaphy with diode-array detection (HPLC-DAD) fingerprint of the methanol extracts allowed the definition of two main types of Algerian propolis (AP) directly related to their secondary metabolite composition. Investigation of two representative types of AP by preparative chromatographic procedure and mass spectrometric (MS) and NMR techniques led to the identification of their main constituents: caffeate esters and flavonoids from an AP type rich in phenolic compounds (PAP) and labdane and clerodane diterpenes, together with a polymethoxyflavonol, from an AP type containing mainly diterpenes (DAP). Subsequently, two specific HPLC-MS/MS methods for detection of PAP and DAP markers were developed to study the chemical composition of propolis samples of different north Algerian regions. Antioxidant activity of AP samples was evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) assay, and a significant free-radical scavenging effect was observed for propolis of the PAP series rich in polyphenols. PMID:23650897

  11. Chemical composition of yak colostrum and transient milk.

    PubMed

    Cui, N; Wen, P C; Liang, Q; Liu, H N; Zhang, W B; Wang, P J; Guo, H Y; Ren, F Z

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the changes in the chemical composition of yak colostrum and transient milk. Samples were collected from 12 yaks on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 post-partum (PP). The gross composition, nitrogen fraction distribution, amino acid (AA) profile and fatty acid (FA) profile were analysed. All the components decreased rapidly during the first 3 days except lactose which increased. The ratio of whey protein to casein protein decreased from 46:54 to 17:83 during the first 7 days PP. The content of all the AAs decreased, while the percentages of eight essential AAs in protein of samples increased during the study period. Monounsaturated FAs and polyunsaturated FAs decreased in the first 7 days PP, whereas saturated FAs increased. In conclusion, the changes in chemical composition were remarkable during the first 3 days. The slight variations, happened during the transient period, are not negligible, which also should be taken into account in the development of yak colostrum supplements. PMID:25545664

  12. IR spectroscopic study of the chemical composition of epiphytic lichens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meysurova, A. F.; Khizhnyak, S. D.; Pakhomov, P. M.

    2011-11-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of lichens exposed to pollutants are investigated by means of FTIR spectroscopy. According to model experiments, alkyl nitrates, ammonium salts, amines, and sulfones develop in the lichen thallus through the action of ammonia and nitric and sulfuric acids. Spectroscopic data of modeling experiments enabled nitrogen- and sulfur-containing substances to be identified as the main air pollutants in the vicinity of a pig-breeding complex and information to be obtained on the content of the pollutants and their impact on the lichens.

  13. Model atmospheres for cool stars. [varying chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    This report contains an extensive series of model atmospheres for cool stars having a wide range in chemical composition. Model atmospheres (temperature, pressure, density, etc.) are tabulated, along with emergent energy flux distributions, limb darkening, and information on convection for selected models. The models are calculated under the usual assumptions of hydrostatic equilibrium, constancy of total energy flux (including transport both by radiation and convection) and local thermodynamic equilibrium. Some molecular and atomic line opacity is accounted for as a straight mean. While cool star atmospheres are regimes of complicated physical conditions, and these atmospheres are necessarily approximate, they should be useful for a number of kinds of spectral and atmospheric analysis.

  14. Thesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Global riverine sediments discharge into the ocean: chemical composition and modelling

    E-print Network

    Bordenave, Charles

    the chemical composition of the riverine sediemnts fluxes and their origins (mainly natural weathering versusThesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Title: Global riverine sediments discharge into the ocean: chemical #12;than the fluxes of dissolved elements. Today we know rather well the chemical composition

  15. Clouds Composition in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Mbarek, Rostom

    2015-12-01

    Attempts to determine the composition of super-Earth atmospheres have so far been plagued by the presence of clouds. Yet the theoretical framework to understand these clouds is still in its infancy. For the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b, KCl, Na2S, and ZnS have been proposed as condensates that would form under the condition of chemical equilibrium, if the planet’s atmosphere has a bulk composition near solar. Condensation chemistry calculations have not been presented for a wider range of atmospheric bulk composition that is to be expected for super-Earth exoplanets. Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds in atmospheres of varied composition by determining which condensates are likely to form, under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We model super-Earth atmospheres assuming they are formed by degassing of volatiles from a solid planetary core of chondritic material. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temperature range of 350-3,000 K. Clouds should form along the temperature-pressure boundaries where the condensed species appear in our calculations. The super-Earth atmospheres that we study range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both sub-solar and super-solar, thereby spanning a diverse range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Some condensates appear across all of our models. However, the majority of condensed species appear only over specific ranges of H:O and C:O ratios. We find that for GJ 1214b, KCl is the primary cloud-forming condensate at solar composition, in agreement with previous work. However, for oxidizing atmospheres, where H:O is less than unity, K2SO4 clouds form instead. For carbon-rich atmospheres with super-solar C:O ratios, graphite clouds additionally appear. At higher temperatures, clouds are formed from a variety of materials including metals, metal oxides, and aluminosilicates.

  16. Switchgrass biomass and chemical composition for biofuel in eastern Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Madakadze, I.C.; Stewart, K.; Peterson, P.R.; Coulman, B.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1999-08-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is one of several warm-season grasses that have been identified as potential biomass crops in North America. A two-year field study was conducted, on a free-draining sandy clay loam (St. Bernard, Typic Hapludalf), to characterize the growth and evaluate changes in biomass accumulation and composition of switchgrass at Montreal, QC. Three cultivars, Cave-in-Rock, Pathfinder, and Sunburst, were grown in solid stands in a randomized complete block design. Canopy height, dry matter (DM) accumulation and chemical composition were monitored biweekly throughout the growing season. Average maximum canopy heights were 192.5 cm for Cave-in-Rock, 169.9 for Pathfinder, and 177.8 for Sunburst. The respective end-of-season DM yields were 12.2, 11.5, and 10.6 Mg/ha. Biomass production among cultivars appeared to be related to time of maturation. Nitrogen concentration of DM decreased curvilinearly from 25 g/kg at the beginning of the season to 5 g/kg DM at season's end. Both acid-detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral-detergent fiber (NDF) concentrations increased to a maximum early in the season, after which no changes were detected. The average maximum values of ADF and NDF were, respectively, 647.6 and 849.0 g/kg DM for Cave-in-Rock, 669.1 and 865.2 for Pathfinder, and 661.8 and 860.9 for Sunburst. Changes in canopy height, DM accumulation, and chemical composition could all be described by predictive regression equations. These results indicate that switchgrass has potential as a biomass crop in a short-season environment.

  17. Vector diagram of the chemical compositions of tektites and earth lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvasha, L. G.; Gorshkov, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical compositions of tektites and various volcanic glasses, similar in composition to tektites are compared by a petrochemical method. The advantage of the method is that a large number of chemical analyses of igneous rocks can be graphically compared with the help of vectors, plotted in relation to six parameters. These parameters, calculated from ratios of the main oxides given by silicate analysis, reflect the chief characteristics of igneous rock. Material for the study was suppled by data from chemical analysis characterizing tektites of all known locations and data from chemical analyses of obsidians similar in chemical composition to tektites of various petrographical provinces.

  18. The exotic chemical composition of the Sagittarius dwarf Spheroidal galaxy

    E-print Network

    L. Sbordone; P. Bonifacio; R. Buonanno; G. Marconi; L. Monaco; S. Zaggia

    2006-12-05

    The Sagittarius dwarf Spheroidal galaxy is the nearest neighbor of the Milky Way. Moving along a short period quasi-polar orbit within the Halo, it is being destroyed by the tidal interaction with our Galaxy, losing its stellar content along a huge stellar stream. We study the detailed chemical composition of 12 giant stars in the Sagittarius dwarf Spheroidal main body, together with 5 more in the associated globular cluster Terzan 7 by means of high resolution VLT-UVES spectra. Abundances are derived for up to 21 elements from O to Nd, by fitting lines EW or line profiles against ATLAS 9 model atmospheres and SYNTHE spectral syntheses calculated ad-hoc. Temperatures are derived from (V-I)_0 or (B-V)_0 colors, gravities from Fe I - Fe II ionization equilibrium. The metallicity of the observed stars is between [Fe/H]=-0.9 and 0. We detected a highly peculiar ``chemical signature'', with undersolar alpha elements, Na, Al, Sc, V, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn among others, and overabundant La, Ce and Nd. Many of these abundance ratios (in particular light-odd elements and iron peak ones) are strongly at odds with what is observed within the Milky Way, they thus may be a very useful tool to recognize populations originated within the Sagittarius dwarf. This can be clearly seen in the case of the globular Palomar 12, which is believed to have been stripped from Sagittarius: the cluster shows precisely the same chemical ``oddities'', thus finally confirming its extragalactic origin.

  19. A New Mathematical Formulation of the Governing Equations for the Chemical Compositional Simulation

    E-print Network

    Bekbauov, Bakhbergen E; Berdyshev, Abdumauvlen

    2015-01-01

    It is the purpose of this work to develop new approach for chemical compositional reservoir simulation, which may be regarded as a sequential method. The development process can be roughly divided into the following two stages: (1) development of a new mathematical formulation for the sequential chemical compositional reservoir simulation, (2) implementation of a sequential solution approach for chemical compositional reservoir simulation based on the formulation described in this paper. This paper addresses the first stage of the development process by presenting a new mathematical formulation of the chemical compositional reservoir flow equations for the sequential simulation. The newly developed mathematical formulation is extended from the model formulation used in existing chemical compositional simulators. During the model development process, it was discovered that the currently used chemical compositional model estimates the adsorption effect on the transport of a component reasonably well but it viol...

  20. Chemical composition of rainwater in western Amazonia — Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honório, B. A. D.; Horbe, A. M. C.; Seyler, P.

    2010-11-01

    An extensive sample study in western Amazonia, Brazil was performed over the course of one year to i) establish the natural influence of the forest, ii) determine the contribution of the vegetation and fossil fuel burning and iii) detect the geographical and temporal influences on the rainwater composition. Six sampling stations were chosen on two 1000 km-long orthogonal axes. Parintins, Itapiranga, Manaus, Tabatinga were the stations from East to West, and Boa Vista, Manaus, and Apui were the stations from North to South. The results indicate a complex control of the chemical composition of the rainwater and a rather high heterogeneity among the stations. This heterogeneity can be explained by the influence of biogenic, terrestrial dust, agriculture activities and biomass-burning aerosols, and the urban development of Manaus City with its rapid increase in the use of fossil fuel. The isotopic composition of the rainwater indicates that from the north and west sides to the south and east sides, a slight geographical and temporal gradient exists, and more ?180 enriched rainwater tends to be present in the west (Tabatinga) and in the North (Boa Vista). During the dry season a more negative ?180 rainwater was observed in Manaus and Boa Vista stations, as compared to others stations. This observation indicates the more intense evaporative contribution of rainwater as a consequence of a rapid deforestation (savannization) process in the Manaus region.

  1. Photovoltaic Study of Chemically Derived Titanium-Doped Polythiophene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takpire, S. R.; Waghuley, S. A.

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, titanium (Ti)-doped polythiophene (PTh) was synthesized by a chemical route using titanium chloride as oxidant. As-synthesized composites were further used for fabrication of photovoltaic (PV) cells with indium tin oxide/Ti-doped PTh/aluminum architecture. Structural, morphological, and optical analyses of as-synthesized composites were carried out through x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. A broad peak was found in the PL spectra of the composites at around 480 nm, indicating high charge generation efficiency. Different PV parameters of the fabricated PV cells were measured at room temperature under incandescent light of 100 W/m2. The optimized PV cell exhibited short-circuit current ( I sc) and open-circuit voltage ( V oc) on the order of 176 ?A and 0.595 V, respectively. The values of I sc and V oc were used to compute the fill factor, which was found to be 0.521. The corresponding power conversion efficiency associated with the optimized cell was found to be 2.41%.

  2. Evaluation of chemical and mechanical properties of dental composites.

    PubMed

    Shin, M A; Drummond, J L

    1999-01-01

    Composite materials were aged in distilled, deionized water and a solution by volume of 50% distilled, deionized water and 50% ethanol for three mon at 37 degrees C. Also investigated was the effect of aging dental glass filler powder in distilled, deionized water for one, three, six, and ten mon at 2 degrees C, 37 degrees C, and 72 degrees C. Atomic absorption analysis was performed on the aqueous media in which the samples were aged in order to determine the extent of leaching of silicon and strontium. From the leaching rates at various aging temperatures, the activation energies for silicon (10.3-16.4 j/mol) and strontium (57.0-58.4 j/mol) were determined. Aging in the 50% distilled, deionized water and 50% ethanol solution greatly increased the leaching rate of both silicon and strontium, as compared to aging in distilled, deionized water. Glass powder leached far more than the composite materials, due to an increase in exposed surface area, as well as a lack of chemical bonding to a resin matrix or a linked glass network. Temperature greatly increased the leaching rate of both silicon and strontium. Only after ten mon did strontium leach substantially more than silicon. For the dental composites investigated after 3 mon aging, Mode I fracture toughness decreased 57-68% in ethanol and 37-43% in water, and mode II fracture toughness decreased 41-49% in ethanol and 6-11% in water. PMID:10421699

  3. Systems With Variable Composition: The Chemical Potential Chemistry CHEM 213W

    E-print Network

    Ronis, David M.

    Systems With Variable Composition: The Chemical Potential Chemistry CHEM 213W David Ronis Mc or 2) by changing the composition through chemical reaction. Nonetheless, as far as state functions the composition of the system. For example, you may add compounds with different types of bonds

  4. Chemical composition of biomass generated in the guava tree pruning

    PubMed Central

    Camarena-Tello, Julio César; Rocha-Guzmán, Nuria Elizabeth; Gallegos-Infante, José Alberto; González-Laredo, Rubén Francisco; Pedraza-Bucio, Fabiola Eugenia; López-Albarrán, Pablo; Herrera-Bucio, Rafael; Rutiaga-Quiñones, José Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) is a native plant of Central America and is now widely cultivated in many tropical regions of the world for the fruit production. In Mexico, in the guava orchards common practices to control fruit production are: water stress, defoliation and pruning. In this study, we report the chemical composition of the biomass (branches and leaves) generated in the pruning practices. The results ranged as follows: pH (4.98-5.88), soda solubility (39.01-70.49 %), ash (1.87-8.20 %); potassium and calcium were the major inorganic elements in ash. No heavy metals were detected in the studied samples; total solubility (15.21-46.60 %), Runkel lignin (17.77-35.26 %), holocellulose (26.56 -69.49 %), ?-cellulose (15.53-35.36 %), hemicelluloses (11.02-34.12 %), tannins in aqueous extracts (3.81-9.06 %), and tannins in ethanolic extracts (3.42-15.24 %). PMID:26417359

  5. Chemical composition of biomass generated in the guava tree pruning.

    PubMed

    Camarena-Tello, Julio César; Rocha-Guzmán, Nuria Elizabeth; Gallegos-Infante, José Alberto; González-Laredo, Rubén Francisco; Pedraza-Bucio, Fabiola Eugenia; López-Albarrán, Pablo; Herrera-Bucio, Rafael; Rutiaga-Quiñones, José Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) is a native plant of Central America and is now widely cultivated in many tropical regions of the world for the fruit production. In Mexico, in the guava orchards common practices to control fruit production are: water stress, defoliation and pruning. In this study, we report the chemical composition of the biomass (branches and leaves) generated in the pruning practices. The results ranged as follows: pH (4.98-5.88), soda solubility (39.01-70.49 %), ash (1.87-8.20 %); potassium and calcium were the major inorganic elements in ash. No heavy metals were detected in the studied samples; total solubility (15.21-46.60 %), Runkel lignin (17.77-35.26 %), holocellulose (26.56 -69.49 %), ?-cellulose (15.53-35.36 %), hemicelluloses (11.02-34.12 %), tannins in aqueous extracts (3.81-9.06 %), and tannins in ethanolic extracts (3.42-15.24 %). PMID:26417359

  6. Optimum conditions for composites fiber coating by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, S.K.; Nilson, R.H.

    1997-04-01

    A combined analytical and numerical method is employed to optimize process conditions for composites fiber coating by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). For a first-order deposition reaction, the optimum pressure yielding the maximum deposition rate at a preform center is obtained in closed form and is found to depend only on the activation energy of the deposition reaction, the characteristic pore size, and properties of the reactant and product gases. It does not depend on the preform specific surface area, effective diffusivity or preform thickness, nor on the gas-phase yield of the deposition reaction. Further, this optimum pressure is unaltered by the additional constraint of a prescribed deposition uniformity. Optimum temperatures are obtained using an analytical expression for the optimum value along with numerical solutions to the governing transport equations. These solutions account for both diffusive and advective transport, as well as both ordinary and Knudsen diffusion. Sample calculations are presented for coating preform fibers with boron nitride.

  7. Chemical and amino acid composition of Iraqi mung beans.

    PubMed

    Shehata, A A; Thannoun, A M

    1980-01-01

    The chemical composition of five samples of Iraqi mung beans chosen from different geographical regions were investigated as well as their amino acid contents. The results indicated that all the samples were good sources of protein, carbohydrates and minerals. They contained 24.95-28.04% protein, 64,15-66.32% carbohydrates, 0.86-0.96% crude fat, 3.37-4.05% ash and 4.13-5.01% crude fibre. The amounts of phosphorus, calcium and iron were within the ranges; 381-528, 128-143 and 5.14-5.76 milligrams per 100 grams of flour, respectively (all results on a dry weight basis). Further, all samples were rich in most essential amino acids, especially lysine (5.85-8.24 grams per 100 grams of protein) but they were deficient in methionine (0.96-1.48 gram per 100 grams of protein). PMID:7445757

  8. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Borug?, O; Jianu, C; Mi?c?, C; Gole?, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), ?-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:25870697

  9. Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePLUS

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  10. Chemical Peels

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Z Diseases and treatments A - D Chemical peel Chemical peels Also called chemexfoliation , derma peeling Do you ... the cost of cosmetic treatments. Learn more about chemical peels: Is a chemical peel the right choice ...

  11. Composition and chemical bonding of pulsed laser deposited carbon nitride thin films

    E-print Network

    Brune, Harald

    Composition and chemical bonding of pulsed laser deposited carbon nitride thin films E. Riedo,a) F structure in DLC and CNx films.12 Carbon atoms in nonhydrogenated a-C films form chemical bonds among them to different coordination numbers and also the chemical bonds are different. bonds are more energetic

  12. Flaxseed hull: Chemical composition and antioxidant activity during development.

    PubMed

    Herchi, Wahid; Al Hujaili, Abdullah D; Sakouhi, Faouzi; Sebei, Khaled; Trabelsi, Hajer; Kallel, Habib; Boukhchina, Sadok

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of flaxseed hull during maturation were investigated. P129 hull variety was studied at four maturation stages (St1, St2, St3, and St4). Significant variation in proximate composition and flaxseed hull oil characteristics were observed. A significant increase in the carbohydrates content of the hull was observed during development. The main methyl esters were linolenic acid (48.95 - 51.52 %), oleic acid (20.27-23.41%) and linoleic acid (15.62-17.70%). The highest polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were found to be 67.14 % at the first stage of maturity (St1). Flaxseed hull oil was of good quality, containing an abundance of omega-3 essential fatty acids. The iodine value increased, while the saponification value of oil decreased during seed development. The decrease in ascorbic acid content was steady. The maximum level of total phenolic acid content (128.3 mg/100 g oil) was reached at 7 DAF. The antioxidant activity of oilseed was assessed by means of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging assay. Radical scavenging activity for green hull was 52.74% and mature hull was 69.32%. PMID:24919478

  13. [Chemical composition and biological quality of defatted hazelnut flour].

    PubMed

    Villarroel, M; Biolley, E; Schneeberger, R; Ballester, D; Santibáñez, S

    1989-06-01

    The results of the chemical composition and biological quality of deffated hazel nut flour are shown. The samples analyzed contained significant amounts of proteins (19%) comparable to legume flour, higher than cereals and lower than deffated oleaginous flours. The oil extracted from the seed was analyzed and the average results obtained were the following: Refraction index, 1.47; saponification No. 184.8; iodine No. 85.0. The average composition of the fatty acids obtained by gas liquid chromatography was: Palmitic acid 2.3% Palmitoleic acid 37.0% Stearic acid 0.5% Oleic acid 39.5% Linoleic acid 6.9% Linolenic acid 1.1% Eicosanoic acid 2.3% Eicosaenoic acid 4.6% Docosenoic acid 3.4% Tetraeicosanoic acid 0.3% These results indicate a good-quality oil due to the low content of linolenic acid. The nutritive value of the deffated meal measured in the rats gave a net protein ratio (NPR) of 3.58, lower than the corresponding casein value (4.10). The true protein digestibility measured in the rat gave a value of 7.3%, compared to 95% for casein. The amounts of iron and phosphorous are comparatively lower than those reported for rape-seed meal and sunflower meal. PMID:2487030

  14. What processes control the chemical compositions of arc front stratovolcanoes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Stephen J.; Langmuir, Charles H.

    2015-06-01

    Arc front stratovolcanoes have global chemical systematics that constrain processes at convergent margins. Positive correlations exist for arc averages among "fluid mobile," "high field strength," and "large ion lithophile" elements. 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr from rear-arc lavas lacking subduction signature align with the oceanic "mantle array," and correlate with arc front 143Nd/144Nd. Most chemical parameters (but not isotopes) also correlate well with crustal thickness and slightly less well with the slab thermal parameter, but not with the depth of the slab nor model slab surface temperatures. Successful models of arc volcanism should account for these global regularities. Two distinct models can quantitatively account for the observations—different extents of melting of the mantle wedge caused by variations in wedge thermal structure, or varying contributions from the subducting slab owing to variations in the slab thermal structure. Both successful model scenarios require a significant flux of melted ocean crust to the mantle source of all volcanic arcs. The wedge melting model has constant contributions from ocean crust, sediment, and mantle wedge to lavas globally, while the slab model varies slab contributions with slab temperature. The wedge melting model fit improves by incorporating convergence rate and slab dip, which should affect the wedge thermal structure; the slab model is not supported by a similar analysis. The wedge model also more easily accommodates the isotope data. The two models predict different primary H2O contents, with large variations in H2O for the wedge model, and relatively constant H2O for the slab model. An evaluation of the effects of varying sediment compositions on arc lavas will benefit from considering the very different consequences of the two models.

  15. Chemical composition of sedimentary rocks in California and Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Thelma P., (compiler)

    1981-01-01

    A compilation of published chemical analyses of sedimentary rocks of the United States was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1952 to make available scattered data that are needed for a wide range of economic and scientific uses. About 20,000-25,000 chemical analyses of sedimentary rocks in the United States have been published. This report brings together 2,312 of these analyses from California and Hawaii. The samples are arranged by general lithologic characteristics and locality. Indexes of stratigraphy, rock name, commercial uses, and minor elements are provided. The sedimentary rocks are classified into groups and into categories according to the chemical analyses. The groups (A through F2) are defined by a system similar to that proposed by Brian Mason in 1952, in which the main parameters are the three major components of sedimentary rocks: (1) uncombined silica, (2) clay (R203 ? 3Si02 ? nH20), and (3) calcium-magnesium carbonate. The categories are based on the degree of admixture of these three major components with other components, such as sulfate, phos- phate, and iron oxide. Common-rock, mixed-rock, and special-rock categories apply to rocks consisting of 85 percent or more, 50-84 percent, and less than 49 percent, respectively, of the three major components combined. Maps show distribution of sample localities by States; triangular diagrams show the lithologic characteristics and classification groups. Cumulative-frequency curves of each constituent in each classification group of the common-rock and mixed-rock categories are also included. The numerous analyses may not adequately represent the geochemical nature of the rock types and formations of the region because of sampling bias. Maps showing distribution of sample localities indicate that many of the localities are in areas where, for economic or other reasons, special problems attracted interest. Most of the analyzed rocks tended to be fairly simple in composition - mainly mixtures of just two of the three major components or a mixture of these and a fourth component such as phosphate, gypsum, or iron oxide.

  16. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF EXHAUST PARTICLES FROM GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A program was conducted to chemically characterize particulate emissions from a current technology, high population, gas turbine engine. Attention was focused on polynuclear aromatic compounds, phenols, nitrosamines and total organics. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were...

  17. Composite-Material Tanks with Chemically Resistant Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    Lightweight composite-material tanks with chemically resistant liners have been developed for storage of chemically reactive and/or unstable fluids . especially hydrogen peroxide. These tanks are similar, in some respects, to the ones described in gLightweight Composite-Material Tanks for Cryogenic Liquids h (MFS-31379), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 58; however, the present tanks are fabricated by a different procedure and they do not incorporate insulation that would be needed to prevent boil-off of cryogenic fluids. The manufacture of a tank of this type begins with the fabrication of a reusable multisegmented aluminum mandrel in the shape and size of the desired interior volume. One or more segments of the mandrel can be aluminum bosses that will be incorporated into the tank as end fittings. The mandrel is coated with a mold-release material. The mandrel is then heated to a temperature of about 400 F (approximately equal to 200 C) and coated with a thermoplastic liner material to the desired thickness [typically approxiamtely equal to 15 mils (approximately equal to 0.38 mm)] by thermal spraying. In the thermal-spraying process, the liner material in powder form is sprayed and heated to the melting temperature by a propane torch and the molten particles land on the mandrel. The sprayed liner and mandrel are allowed to cool, then the outer surface of the liner is chemically and/or mechanically etched to enhance bonding of a composite overwrap. The etched liner is wrapped with multiple layers of an epoxy resin reinforced with graphite fibers; the wrapping can be done either by manual application of epoxy-impregnated graphite cloth or by winding of epoxy-impregnated filaments. The entire assembly is heated in an autoclave to cure the epoxy. After the curing process, the multisegmented mandrel is disassembled and removed from inside, leaving the finished tank. If the tank is to be used for storing hydrogen peroxide, then the liner material should be fluorinated ethylene/propylene (FEP), and one or more FEP O ring(s) should be used in the aluminum end fitting(s). This choice of materials is dictated by experimental observations that pure aluminum and FEP are the only materials suitable for long-term storage of hydrogen peroxide and that other materials tend to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. Other thermoplastic liner materials that are suitable for some applications include nylon 6 and polyethylene. The processing temperatures for nylon 6 are lower than those for FEP. Nylon 6 is compatible with propane, natural gas, and other petroleum-based fuels. Polyethylene is compatible with petroleum- based products and can be used for short-term storage of hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Exploring the chemical composition of water in the Kandalaksha Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazukhina, Svetlana; Masloboev, Vladimir; Chudnenko, Konstantin; Khaitov, Vadim; Maksimova, Victoria; Belkina, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Oil films were noted at the head of the Kandalaksha Bay as far back as in 1971, as soon as the first stage of the oil tank farm had been commissioned (the autumn of 1970). In 1997-1998 there were accidental oil spills posing a real threat to the Kandalaksha Reserve biota. In May 2011, oil spills from the Belomorsk oil tank farm resulted in a local environmental emergency. In this work we have traced the evolution of polluted water by means of hydrogeochemical monitoring and reconstructing the chemical composition of surface and near-bottom water of the Kandalaksha Bay by using physical-chemical modeling (Selector software package, Chudnenko, 2010). The surface and near-bottom water was sampled in the summer of 2012 and 2013 at the following sites: under the numbers 3 (N 67.2.673, E 32.23.753); 4 (N 67.3.349, E 32.28.152); 1 (N 67.5.907, E 32.29.779), and 2 (N 67.6.429, E 32.30.539). The monitored objects and sampling time were sensitive to both the effects of the White Sea water (high tide), fresh water, and water affected by human impact (the oil tank farm). At each site, three samples were taken. The next stage involved reconstructing of the sea water ion composition by modeling within the Al-B-Br-Ar-He-Ne-C-Ca-Cl-F-K-Mg-Mn-N-Na-P-S-Si-Sr-Cu-Zn-H-O-e system, where e is an electron. Modeling of the chemical composition of near-bottom water (site 3) has revealed high contents of carbon dioxide, hydrogen disulphide, hydrocarbonates, and no oxygen (Eh<0). All this suggests a transformation of hydrocarbons that might have got to the sampling area in May 2011, or as the result of constant leakage of petroleum hydrocarbons from the oil tank farm. Sampling at site 4 in 2013 has revealed petroleum hydrocarbons both in surface (0.09 mg/l) and near-bottom (0.1 mg/l) water. Both monitoring and modeling have demonstrated that hydrobionts on areas adjoining the oil tank farm are far from prospering. Monitoring should be accompanied by express analysis of oxidizing conditions in both the soil and near-bottom water. Since the water contamination in the White Sea has lasted for decades, it is necessary to examine the near-bottom water, in particular in its deeper areas, to reveal the possible accumulation and destruction of organic substances at the sea floor. It is evident that an unbiased assessment of the environmental situation can be obtained by involving all kinds of information processing technologies.

  19. Dissolved organic matter discharge in the six largest arctic rivers-chemical composition and seasonal variability 

    E-print Network

    Rinehart, Amanda J.

    2009-05-15

    watershed characteristics influence DOM composition. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations followed the hydrograph with highest concentrations measured during peak river flow. The chemical composition of peak-flow DOM indicates a dominance of freshly...

  20. Chemical composition of inks of diverse marine molluscs suggests convergent chemical defenses.

    PubMed

    Derby, Charles D; Kicklighter, Cynthia E; Johnson, P M; Zhang, Xu

    2007-05-01

    Some marine molluscs, notably sea hares, cuttlefish, squid, and octopus, release ink when attacked by predators. The sea hare Aplysia californica releases secretions from the ink gland and opaline gland that protect individuals from injury or death from predatory spiny lobsters through a combination of mechanisms that include chemical deterrence, sensory disruption, and phagomimicry. The latter two mechanisms are facilitated by millimolar concentrations of free amino acids (FAA) in sea hare ink and opaline, which stimulate the chemosensory systems of predators, ultimately leading to escape by sea hares. We hypothesize that other inking molluscs use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense. To investigate this, we examined concentrations of 21 FAA and ammonium in the defensive secretions of nine species of inking molluscs: three sea hares (Aplysia californica, Aplysia dactylomela, Aplysia juliana) and six cephalopods (cuttlefish: Sepia officinalis; squid: Loligo pealei, Lolliguncula brevis, Dosidicus gigas; octopus: Octopus vulgaris, Octopus bimaculoides). We found millimolar levels of total FAA and ammonium in these secretions, and the FAA in highest concentration were taurine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, and lysine. Crustaceans and fish, which are major predators of these molluscs, have specific receptor systems for these FAA. Our chemical analysis supports the hypothesis that inking molluscs have the potential to use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense. PMID:17393278

  1. Chemical composition analysis of simulated waste glass T10-G-16A

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.

    2015-08-01

    In this report, SRNL provides chemical composition analyses of a simulated LAW glass designated T10-G-16A.The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component. No issues were identified in reviewing the analytical data.

  2. To measure the chemical composition of a Near Earth Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasnault, 0.; Ball, A.; Biele, J.; D'Uston, C.; Forni, O.; Klingelhofer, G.; Maurice, S.; Ulamec, S.

    Introduction. Scenarios for a Near Earth Object (NEO) rendezvous mission were discussed recently in Europe. Such a mission would address scientific questions about the initial conditions and evolutionary history of the solar nebula, as well as mitigation considerations to prevent impact with the Earth. In our opinion the measurement of the elemental composition and the distribution of volatiles in the shallow sub-surface are two of the key observations to be conducted, either from an orbiter or a lander. These measurements are also valuable for documentation (landing site candidates and sample context). This report is limited to the chemical composition, but we assume that remote and/or in-situ observations of physical characteristics, interior, morphology, mineralogy, and organic compounds will also be made as essential complements to achieve the mission scientific objectives. Scientific Interest. The analysis of the bulk composition addresses three fundamental aspects of the scientific mission: (1) the formation of the asteroid or the comet; (2) the evolution of the object; (3) the relation between the parent body and collected meteorites on Earth. Classification of an asteroid/comet can be based on its global composition (abundances of Mg, Si, Fe, Al, Ca, etc. along with its mineralogy), which bears the signature of the feeding zone where it formed. For example the K/U and K/Th ratios seem to increase with distance from the Sun (decreasing temperature). The hydrogen content is another measurable to study the distribution of volatiles in the Solar System. The surface composition is also the result of the degree of evolution of the object and of the interactions with its environment. Building a compositional map of the major elements is necessary to identify and characterize the processes that influenced the asteroid along its history. Finally, knowing the chemical composition will obviously help to relate the parent 1 body to meteorites. Ideally the measurement of specific isotopes, including O, C and those produced by the exposure to the cosmic rays, such as 38 Ar or 21 Ne, can pinpoint to the family of meteorites, but such measurements are challenging with restricted resources. Instrument Payload Options. To define the most appropriate instrument(s) in terms of scientific return and technical constraints, various solutions have been studied. For the orbiter this includes an X-ray spectrometer with a solar monitor, and a gamma-ray spectrometer with a neutron sensor. For a lander, it has been demonstrated that an active X-ray spectrometer gives outstanding results for very low resources. If mass is available in the frame of an ambitious mission, one can consider active experiments such as a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer, a mass spectrometer (needing sample manipulation, a laser ablation system, or an ion source), or evolved gas analyzers. It is very difficult however to baseline the use of active experiments from the orbiter (very close fly-bys) such as those on board the Phobos missions. On the one hand the main constraints on the lander are related to the resources (mass, power, volume) and possibly the need for target contact/manipulation. On the other hand the difficulties from the orbiter are the sensitivity to prioritized chemical elements and the mapping resolution (e.g. of the order of 1/10 of the altitude for X-rays, and equivalent to the altitude for gamma-rays). Remote-sensing experiments have been evaluated from that perspective; It is possible to estimate the accumulation time needed to reach enough precision: of the order of 1 h for X-rays and several hours for gamma-rays above each pixel (defined by the spatial resolution, see above). In a classical orbital mission scenario these numbers translate into several weeks of observations (more than 1 month). Lessons learned from previous missions (Apollo, Lunar Prospector, NEAR, Mars Odyssey, SMART-1) are also taken into account: the difficulty to monitor the solar activity for the X-rays, the low signal to noise ratio for the gamma-rays. Previous exper

  3. An investigation into the chemical composition of alternative invertebrate prey.

    PubMed

    Oonincx, D G A B; Dierenfeld, E S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition of eight invertebrate species and evaluate their suitability as alternative prey. The species selected were rusty red cockroaches (Blatta lateralis), six-spotted cockroaches (Eublaberus distanti), Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa), fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), false katydids (Microcentrum rhombifolium), beetles of the mealworm (Tenebrio molitor), and superworm beetles (Zophobas morio), as well as woodlice (Porcellio scaber). Dry matter (DM), crude protein, crude fat, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, ash, macro and trace minerals, vitamins A and E, and carotenoid concentrations were quantified. Significant differences were found between species. Crude protein content ranged from 38 to 76% DM, fat from14 to 54% DM, and ash from 2 to 8% DM. In most species, calcium:phosphorus was low (0.08-0.30:1); however, P. scaber was an exception (12:1) and might prove useful as a dietary source of calcium for insectivores. Vitamin E content was low for most species (6-16?mg/kg DM), except for D. melanogaster and M. rhombifolium (112 and 110?mg/kg DM). The retinol content, as a measure of vitamin A activity, was low in all specimens, but varied greatly among samples (0.670-886?mg/kg DM). The data presented can be used to alter diets to better suit the estimated requirements of insectivores in captivity. Future research on the topic of composition of invertebrate prey species should focus on determination of nutrient differences owing to species, developmental stage, and diet. PMID:21442652

  4. Carbonate cements in sandstones - mineralogy and chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Slow, E.S.; Anderhalt, R.

    1985-02-01

    The chemical compositions of carbonate cements in sandstones were analyzed with an energy dispersive analyzer (KEVEX) and a scanning electron microscope in order to provide a baseline data base for one of the most common authigenic phases in sandstones. A total of 205 spectra was analyzed with respect to mineral standards using ZAF corrections. These spectra were acquired from 35 Cambrian to Cretaceous carbonate-cemented sandstones from our sedimentary rock collections. Only 19% of the analyses were pure calcite (i.e., no Mg, Mn, or Fe were detected). Impure calcites accounted for 54% of the analyses, and dolomites and ankerites accounted for 27%. When the calcites were treated as a single group, the distribution of the components was as follows: calcite 91.6-100%; magnesite, 0-8.4%; rhodochrosite, 0-2.3%;p and siderite, 0-4%. The dolomites and ankerites showed a larger range: calcite, 47.8-60.6%; magnesite, 20-52.2%; rhodochrosite, 0-12%; and siderite, 0-28.6%. The values of the calcite component in the dolomites that were significantly higher than 50% probably resulted from the beam (spot mode) encountering dolomite plus some calcite. In most cases, the calcite component was nearly 50%. Many of these compositions displayed a large variation within a sample, even at the micron-level scale. A series of closely spaced analyses - all within an area 200 x 100 ..mu..m - from a sample rich in dolomite and/or ankeite ranged between 20 and 43% magnesite and 6 and 29% siderite. The calcites normally only ranged a few percent for each component in analyses that were spaced at a similar scale.

  5. Effect of flares on the chemical composition of exoplanets atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venot, O.; Decin, L.

    2015-10-01

    M stars are very abundant in our Galaxy, and very likely harbour the majority of planetary systems. But a particularity of M stars is that they are the most active class of stars. Indeed, they experience stellar variability such as flares. These violent and unpredictable outbursts originate from the photosphere and are caused by magnetic processus. During such an event, the energy emitted by the star can vary by several orders of magnitude for the whole wavelength range. It results in an enhancement of the H# emission and of the continuum. Different studies on the effect of flares on exoplanets have already been conducted [1, 2]. Here we are interested in the effect of a flare on the atmospheric composition of a warm Neptune orbiting around an M star. Using the stellar flux of AD Leo recorded during a flare event [1] and the chemical model of [3], we have studied the impact on the atmosphere. We have also computed the synthetic spectra assuming that such an event occurs during a transit. We will present these results.

  6. Microbial population, chemical composition and silage fermentation of cassava residues.

    PubMed

    Napasirth, Viengsakoun; Napasirth, Pattaya; Sulinthone, Tue; Phommachanh, Kham; Cai, Yimin

    2015-09-01

    In order to effectively use the cassava (Manihot esculenta?Crantz) residues, including cassava leaves, peel and pulp for livestock diets, the chemical and microbiological composition, silage preparation and the effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants on silage fermentation of cassava residues were studied. These residues contained 10(4) to 10(5) LAB and yeasts, 10(3) to 10(4) coliform bacteria and 10(4) aerobic bacteria in colony forming units (cfu) on a fresh matter (FM) basis. The molds were consistently at or below the detectable level (10(2) cfu of FM) in three kinds of cassava residues. Dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content of cassava residues were 17.50-30.95%, 1.30-16.41% and 25.40-52.90% on a DM basis, respectively. The silage treatments were designed as control silage without additive (CO) or with LAB inoculants Chikuso-1 (CH, Lactobacillus plantarum) and Snow Lacto (SN, Lactobacillus rhamnosus) at a rate of 5?mg/kg of FM basis. All silages were well preserved with a low pH (below 4.0) value and when cassava residues silage treated with inoculants CH and SN improved fermentation quality with a lower pH, butyric acid and higher lactic acid than control silage. PMID:25781881

  7. Calorimetry, chemical composition and in vitro digestibility of oilseeds.

    PubMed

    Ítavo, Luís Carlos Vinhas; Soares, Cláudia Muniz; Ítavo, Camila Celeste Brandão Ferreira; Dias, Alexandre Menezes; Petit, Hélène Veronique; Leal, Eduardo Souza; de Souza, Anderson Dias Vieira

    2015-10-15

    The objective of the study was to determine the quality of sunflower, soybean, crambe, radish forage and physic nut, by measuring chemical composition, in vitro digestibility and kinetics of thermal decomposition processes of mass loss and heat flow. Lipid was inversely correlated with protein of whole seed (R = -0.67), meal (R = -0.95), and press cake (R = -0.78), and positively correlated with the enthalpy (?H) of whole seed. Soybean seed and meal presented a high in vitro digestibility but poor energy sources with ?H averaging 5907.5 J/g and 2570.1J/g for whole seed and meal, respectively. As suggested by the release of heat, measured by ?H, whole seeds of crambe (6295.1J/g), radish forage (6182.7 J/g), and physic nut (6420.0 J/g) may be potential energy sources for ruminant animals. The thermal analysis provided additional information besides that obtained from the usual wet chemistry and in vitro measurements. PMID:25952861

  8. Chemical composition of biomass from tall perennial tropical grasses

    SciTech Connect

    Prine, G.M.; Stricker, J.A.; Anderson, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The tall perennial tropical grasses, elephantgrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum.), sugarcane and energycane (Saccharum sp.) and erianthus (Erianthus arundenaceum (Retz) Jesw.) have given very high oven dry biomass yields in Florida and the warm Lower South USA. No good complete analyses of the chemical composition of these grasses for planning potential energy use was available. We sampled treatments of several tall grass demonstrations and experiments containing high-biomass yielding genotypes of the above tall grass crops at several locations in Florida over the two growing seasons, 1992 and 1993. These samples were analyzed for crude protein, NDF, ADF, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and IVDMD or IVOMD. The analysis for the above constituents are reported, along with biomass yields where available, for the tall grass accessions in the various demonstrations and experiments. Particular attention is given to values obtained from the high-yielding tall grasses grown on phosphatic clays in Polk County, FL, the area targeted by a NREL grant to help commercialize bioenergy use from these crops.

  9. Porosity prediction of calcium phosphate cements based on chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Caroline; Unosson, Johanna; Carlsson, Elin; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2015-07-01

    The porosity of calcium phosphate cements has an impact on several important parameters, such as strength, resorbability and bioactivity. A model to predict the porosity for biomedical cements would hence be a useful tool. At the moment such a model only exists for Portland cements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a first porosity prediction model for calcium phosphate cements. On the basis of chemical reaction, molar weight and density of components, a volume-based model was developed and validated using calcium phosphate cement as model material. 60 mol% ?-tricalcium phosphate and 40 mol% monocalcium phosphate monohydrate were mixed with deionized water, at different liquid-to-powder ratios. Samples were set for 24 h at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Thereafter, samples were dried either under vacuum at room temperature for 24 h or in air at 37 °C for 7 days. Porosity and phase composition were determined. It was found that the two drying protocols led to the formation of brushite and monetite, respectively. The model was found to predict well the experimental values and also data reported in the literature for apatite cements, as deduced from the small absolute average residual errors (<2.0%). In conclusion, a theoretical model for porosity prediction was developed and validated for brushite, monetite and apatite cements. The model gives a good estimate of the final porosity and has the potential to be used as a porosity prediction tool in the biomedical cement field. PMID:26169187

  10. Chemical composition and antigenotoxic properties of Lippia alba essential oils

    PubMed Central

    López, Molkary Andrea; Stashenko, Elena E.; Fuentes, Jorge Luis

    2011-01-01

    The present work evaluated the chemical composition and the DNA protective effect of the essential oils (EOs) from Lippia alba against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity. EO constituents were determined by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis. The major compounds encountered being citral (33% geranial and 25% neral), geraniol (7%) and trans-?-caryophyllene (7%) for L. alba specimen COL512077, and carvone (38%), limonene (33%) and bicyclosesquiphellandrene (8%) for the other, COL512078. The genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of EO and the compounds citral, carvone and limonene, were assayed using the SOS Chromotest in Escherichia coli. The EOs were not genotoxic in the SOS chromotest, but one of the major compound (limonene) showed genotoxicity at doses between 97 and 1549 mM. Both EOs protected bacterial cells against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity. Antigenotoxicity in the two L. alba chemotypes was related to the major compounds, citral and carvone, respectively. The results were discussed in relation to the chemopreventive potential of L. alba EOs and its major compounds. PMID:21931523

  11. Fabrication, chemical composition change and phase evolution of biomorphic hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Qian, Junmin; Kang, Yahong; Zhang, Wei; Li, Zhe

    2008-11-01

    Biomorphous, highly porous hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics have been prepared by a combination of a novel biotemplating process and a sol-gel method, using natural plants like cane and pine as biotemplates. A HA sol was first synthesized from triethylphosphate and calcium nitrate used as the phosphorus and calcium precursors, respectively, and infiltrated into the biotemplates, and subsequently they were sintered at elevated temperatures to obtain porous HA ceramics. The microstructural changes, phase and chemical composition evolutions during the biotemplate-to-HA conversion were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The XRD and FT-IR analysis revealed that the dominant phase of the product was HA, which contained a small amount of mixed A/B-type carbonated HA, closely resembling that of human bone apatite. Moreover, the appearance of a small amount of secondary phase CaCO(3) seemed unavoidable. The HA was not transformed to the other calcium phosphate phases up to 1400 degrees C, but it contained a trace amount of CaO when sintered at above 1100 degrees C. The possible transformation mechanism was proposed. The SEM observation and mechanical property test showed that as-produced HA ceramics retained the macro-/micro-porous structures of the biotemplates with high precision, and possessed acceptable mechanical strength, which is suggested to be potential scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. PMID:18545942

  12. Lunar clinopyroxenes: Chemical composition, structural state, and texture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, M.; Bence, A.E.; Dwornik, E.J.; Clark, J.R.; Papike, J.J.

    1970-01-01

    Single-crystal x-ray diffraction, microprobe, optical and electron optical examinations of clinopyroxenes from Apollo 11 lunar samples 10003, 10047, 10050, and 10084 show that generally the crystals are composed of (001) augite-pigeonite intergrowths in varying ratios. Transmission electron micrographs reveal abundant exsolution lamellae, many only 60 A?? thick. In addition to the phase inhomogeneities, primary chemical inhomogeneities are clearly demonstrated. There are reciprocal relationships between calcium and iron and between Ti4+ + 2Al and R2+ + 2Si. Our evidence suggests that a chemically inhomogeneous subcalcic C2/c augite was the only primary pyroxene from which pigeonite later exsolved.

  13. Aqueous fluid composition in CI chondritic materials: Chemical equilibrium assessments in closed systems

    E-print Network

    Rhoads, James

    Aqueous fluid composition in CI chondritic materials: Chemical equilibrium assessments in closed, Composition Satellites, Composition Meteorites a b s t r a c t Solids of nearly solar composition have interacted with aqueous fluids on carbonaceous asteroids, icy moons, and trans-neptunian objects

  14. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  15. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  16. Floral Scent in Wisteria: Chemical Composition, Emission Pattern and Regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile chemicals emitted from the flowers of Chinese wisteria (Wisteria sinenesis) and Japanese wisteria (W. floribunda) were collected using a dynamic headspace technique and identified by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. About 30 and 22 compounds were detected from Chinese wisteria and Ja...

  17. Chemical composition of pen surface layers of beef cattle feedyards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biological, physical, and chemical characteristics of beef cattle feedyard pen surfaces may affect nutrient transformations and losses to the atmosphere, ground water, or surface water. Feedyard pen surfaces can typically segregate into three or four layers. The purpose of this study was to dete...

  18. A study on chemical composition and detection of chemical adulteration in tetra pack milk samples commercially available in Multan.

    PubMed

    Awan, Adeela; Naseer, Misbah; Iqbal, Aasfa; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Rehana; Iqbal, Furhan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the chemical composition of 8 tetra pack milk samples, Olpers (S1), Haleeb (S2), Good milk (S3), Everyday (S4), Milk Pack (S5), Dairy Queen (S6), Dairy Umang (S7), Nurpur (S8) available in local markets and to detect the presence of various chemical adulterants in tetra pack milk samples in Southern Punjab (Pakistan). Density, pH, solid not fat, total solids, lactometer reading, specific gravity and fat contents were analyzed to determine the chemical composition of milk samples. Our results revealed that all the studied parameters had statistically non significant differences (P>0.05) except total fat in milk samples which was significantly different (P=0.03) among the 8 studied milk samples. Presence of a number of chemical adulterants, formalin, cane sugar, starch, glucose, ammonium sulphate, salt, pulverized soap, detergents, skim milk powder, benzoic acid, salicylic acid, borax, boric acid and alkalinity were also detected in milk samples following standard procedures. Results indicated that formalin, cane sugar, glucose, alkalinity and benzoic acid were present in all samples while salt test was positive only for Olper milk. All other studied adulterants were not detected in 8 milk samples under study. % fat was the only significantly different feature among the studied milk quality parameters with S8 containing lowest while S5 having the maximum % fat. PMID:24374447

  19. Growth of multi-component alloy films with controlled graded chemical composition on sub-nanometer scale

    DOEpatents

    Bajt, Sasa; Vernon, Stephen P.

    2005-03-15

    The chemical composition of thin films is modulated during their growth. A computer code has been developed to design specific processes for producing a desired chemical composition for various deposition geometries. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results was achieved.

  20. Chemical composition of optically bright post-AGB stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Winckel, H.

    1997-03-01

    We present a detailed LTE chemical analysis of 10 optically bright F-type post-AGB objects on the basis of the analysis of high-resolution optical spectra and compare the results with similar objects discussed in the literature. The iron content is low on average, and so confirms the old and hence low-mass nature of the supergiants, with a noticable exception of HD 95767. We emphasize the fact that the chemical patterns observed are very diverse : several different classes can be distinguished. Only a minor fraction of the objects are conform to standard post third dredge-up theory. Only in HD 187885 (Van Winckel et al., 1996A&A...306L..37V), HD 56126 (Klochkova, 1995MNRAS.272..710K) and HD 158616 (this paper) is there conclusive chemical evidence that they occur in a post-AGB evolutionary phase : a high total CNO abundance, for HD 187885 a supersolar He content and-above all-a large overabundance of s-process elements. The other objects, together with other well studied high galactic latitude F-supergiants, display no s-process enhancement but even depletion in some cases. The high N abondance and the mildly enhanced total CNO abundance indicate that the atmospheres of these objects contain a mixture of CNO-cycled material and He-burning products. For some sources, however, this enhancement of the total CNO abundance is barely significant. HD 107369, the only object in our sample with neither H? emission nor observed IR excess, displays also unique chemical patterns among our sample stars (a C deficiency coupled with a moderate Fe depletion of [Fe/H]=-1.1). This star is the only object in our sample showing similar chemical patterns to the metal poor B stars at high galactic latitude (Conlon et al., 1993, in ASP Conf. Ser., Vol. 45, p. 146). Our chemical analysis does therefore not point to an evolutionary connection between the dusty high-latitude supergiants and the metal-poor B stars, but rather suggests that the latter evolve from stars such as HD 107369.

  1. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus; Morton, Douglas M.; Little, Mark G.; Kistler, Ronald; Horodyskyj, Ulyana N.; Leeman, William P.; Agranier, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms. PMID:18362343

  2. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, C.-T.A.; Morton, D.M.; Little, M.G.; Kistler, R.; Horodyskyj, U.N.; Leeman, W.P.; Agranier, A.

    2008-01-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  3. Fog water chemical composition in different geographic regions of Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B?a?, Marek; Polkowska, ?aneta; Sobik, Mieczys?aw; Klimaszewska, Kamila; Nowi?ski, Kamil; Namie?nik, Jacek

    2010-03-01

    The fog water samples were collected with the use of both passive and active fog collectors during 2005-2006 at 3 sites: lowland in northern Poland (Borucino; 186 m a.s.l.), valley basin in southern Poland (Zakopane; 911 m a.s.l.) and mountain top (Szrenica Mt.; 1330 m a.s.l.) in south-western Poland. For all daily samples (Borucino—25; Zakopane—4 and Szrenica—155), electric conductivity, pH, and concentrations of some anions: Cl -, F -, Br -, NO 2-, NO 3-, SO 42-, PO 43-and cations: NH 4+, Ca 2+, K +, Na + and Mg 2+ were measured. The selected ions were determined using ion suppressed chromatography (IC). Fog consists of a specific type of atmospheric phenomena. Results obtained on the basis of analysis of suitable fog samples can be treated as a source of valuable information on the chemistry of the atmosphere. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences depending on region, altitude, local morphology and, last but not least, fog origin. A distinct contrast is evident in the concentration and chemical composition between lowland radiation fog (represents lower layers of the atmosphere which are more influenced by continental emissions) versus orographic slope fog represented by a summit station, Mt Szrenica. It is partly induced by a distinction in weather conditions favouring fog existence, height of fog formation and its microphysical parameters. Acidity was associated with high concentrations of excess sulphate and nitrate in the fog water samples. Ammonium and calcium concentrations represent the most important neutralizing inputs. Collected cloud water at Szrenica Mt. includes solute contributions from emission sources located at much larger upwind distances. The fact that 95% of fog/cloud deposition is concentrated during SW-W-NW-N-NE, atmospheric circulation exerts an influence on the environmental quality of montane forests in the Sudety Mts. At numerous conspicuous convex landforms, where fog/cloud deposition becomes at least as important as wet deposition via atmospheric precipitation, a distinct difference in the health of coniferous forests is clearly visible, with the areas of the NW aspect being the worst affected, contrary to SE slopes with relatively healthy forest stands.

  4. Rapid computation of chemical equilibrium composition - An application to hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. D.; Prabhu, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    A scheme for rapidly computing the chemical equilibrium composition of hydrocarbon combustion products is derived. A set of ten governing equations is reduced to a single equation that is solved by the Newton iteration method. Computation speeds are approximately 80 times faster than the often used free-energy minimization method. The general approach also has application to many other chemical systems.

  5. Chemically vapor deposited diamond-tipped one-dimensional nanostructures and nanodiamondsilicananotube composites

    E-print Network

    Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

    Chemically vapor deposited diamond-tipped one-dimensional nanostructures and nanodiamond vapor deposition Composite thin films of nanodiamond and silica nanotubes were synthesized by means of microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) on silica nanotube matrix that was seeded

  6. Chemical durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuer, K.D.; Warhus, U.

    1986-03-01

    The chemical durability of NASICON (Na/sub 1+x/Zr/sub 2/Si/sub x/P/sub 3-x/O/sub 12/, x=0-3) versus molten sodium and sulfur at 600 K has been investigated. Degradation by molten sodium has been observed for phosphorus-containing compositions only. The pure silicate (x=3), however, appeared to be stable, because reduction of silicon demanded by thermodynamics did not occur at the given temperature for kinetic reasons. The latter composition has also been shown to have good durability against molten sulfur.

  7. 40 CFR 761.292 - Chemical extraction and analysis of individual samples and composite samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... individual samples and composite samples. 761.292 Section 761.292 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....61(a)(6) § 761.292 Chemical extraction and analysis of individual samples and composite samples. Use... individual and composite samples of PCB remediation waste. Use Method 8082 from SW-846, or a method...

  8. Comparison of Chemical Composition of Complex Disinfection Byproduct (DBP) Mixtures Produced by Different Treatment Methods - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of the chemical composition of complex DBP mixtures, produced by different drinking water treatment processes, are essential to generate toxicity data required for assessing their risks to humans. For mixture risk assessments, whole mixture toxicology studies generally a...

  9. Comparison of Chemical Composition of Complex Disinfection Byproduct (DBP) Mixtures Produced by Different Treatment Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of the chemical composition of complex DBP mixtures, produced by different drinking water treatment processes, are essential to generate toxicity data required for assessing their risks to humans. For mixture risk assessments, whole mixture toxicology studies generally a...

  10. Quantitative Estimation of Chemical Weathering versus Total Denudation Ratio within Tributaries of Yangtze River Basin Based on Size Dependent Chemical Composition Ratio of River Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboki, Y.; Chao, L.; Tada, R.; Saito, K.; Zheng, H.; Irino, T.; He, M.; Ke, W.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative estimation of chemical weathering rate and evaluation of its controlling factors are critical to understand its role on landscape evolution and carbon cycle on a long time scale. In order to reconstruct the past changes in intensities of chemical weathering and erosion, it is necessary to establish a proxy for chemical versus physical weathering intensities based on chemical composition of sediments. However, the chemical composition of sediments is controlled not only by chemical weathering, but by type of source rock and grain size, too. This study aims to develop a method to quantitatively evaluate the contribution of chemical weathering relative to total denudation in the entire Yangtze River basin based on chemical composition of three different grain size fractions of river sediments. Chemical compositions of three different grain size fractions, and grain size distribution of suspended particles and river bed sediments as well as chemical composition of dissolved materials of water samples are analyzed. The result revealed that suspended particles and river bed sediments are composed of three components, aluminosilicate, quartz, and carbonate. K/Al is smaller in the smallest size fraction. We preliminary interpret that original composition of aluminosilcates within different size fractions of the same sample is the same, and the decrease in K/Al with decreasing grain size would reflect increasing influence of chemical weathering. If correct, K/Al of fine to coarse fraction can be used as an index of chemical weathering intensity. To test this idea, we examined the relationship between K/Al of fine to coarse fraction and the ratio of chemical weathering contribution to total denudation rate based on observational data. The result will be presented and its implication will be discussed.

  11. Absolute parameters and chemical composition of the binary star OU Gem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazunova, L. V.; Mishenina, T. V.; Soubiran, C.; Kovtyukh, V. V.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute parameters and chemical composition of the BY Dra-type spectroscopic binary OU Gem (HD 45088) were determined on the basis of 10 high-resolution spectra. A new orbital solution of the binary system was determined, the binary ephemerides were specified, and the main physical and atmospheric parameters of the binary components were obtained. The chemical composition of both components was estimated for the first time for the stars of such type.

  12. Quantitative mapping of chemical compositions with MRI using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Harbou, Erik; Fabich, Hilary T.; Benning, Martin; Tayler, Alexander B.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Gladden, Lynn F.; Holland, Daniel J.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging method for accelerating the acquisition time of two dimensional concentration maps of different chemical species in mixtures by the use of compressed sensing (CS) is presented. Whilst 2D-concentration maps with a high spatial resolution are prohibitively time-consuming to acquire using full k -space sampling techniques, CS enables the reconstruction of quantitative concentration maps from sub-sampled k -space data. First, the method was tested by reconstructing simulated data. Then, the CS algorithm was used to reconstruct concentration maps of binary mixtures of 1,4-dioxane and cyclooctane in different samples with a field-of-view of 22 mm and a spatial resolution of 344 ?m × 344 ?m . Spiral based trajectories were used as sampling schemes. For the data acquisition, eight scans with slightly different trajectories were applied resulting in a total acquisition time of about 8 min. In contrast, a conventional chemical shift imaging experiment at the same resolution would require about 17 h. To get quantitative results, a careful weighting of the regularisation parameter (via the L-curve approach) or contrast-enhancing Bregman iterations are applied for the reconstruction of the concentration maps. Both approaches yield relative errors of the concentration map of less than 2 mol-% without any calibration prior to the measurement. The accuracy of the reconstructed concentration maps deteriorates when the reconstruction model is biased by systematic errors such as large inhomogeneities in the static magnetic field. The presented method is a powerful tool for the fast acquisition of concentration maps that can provide valuable information for the investigation of many phenomena in chemical engineering applications.

  13. A rapid method for the computation of equilibrium chemical composition of air to 15000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Erickson, Wayne D.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid computational method has been developed to determine the chemical composition of equilibrium air to 15000 K. Eleven chemically reacting species, i.e., O2, N2, O, NO, N, NO+, e-, N+, O+, Ar, and Ar+ are included. The method involves combining algebraically seven nonlinear equilibrium equations and four linear elemental mass balance and charge neutrality equations. Computational speeds for determining the equilibrium chemical composition are significantly faster than the often used free energy minimization procedure. Data are also included from which the thermodynamic properties of air can be computed. A listing of the computer program together with a set of sample results are included.

  14. Software for analysis of chemical mixtures--composition, occurrence, distribution, and possible toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Jonathon C.; Skach, Kenneth A.; Toccalino, Patricia L.

    2013-01-01

    The composition, occurrence, distribution, and possible toxicity of chemical mixtures in the environment are research concerns of the U.S. Geological Survey and others. The presence of specific chemical mixtures may serve as indicators of natural phenomena or human-caused events. Chemical mixtures may also have ecological, industrial, geochemical, or toxicological effects. Chemical-mixture occurrences vary by analyte composition and concentration. Four related computer programs have been developed by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey for research of chemical-mixture compositions, occurrences, distributions, and possible toxicities. The compositions and occurrences are identified for the user-supplied data, and therefore the resultant counts are constrained by the user’s choices for the selection of chemicals, reporting limits for the analytical methods, spatial coverage, and time span for the data supplied. The distribution of chemical mixtures may be spatial, temporal, and (or) related to some other variable, such as chemical usage. Possible toxicities optionally are estimated from user-supplied benchmark data. The software for the analysis of chemical mixtures described in this report is designed to work with chemical-analysis data files retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System but can also be used with appropriately formatted data from other sources. Installation and usage of the mixture software are documented. This mixture software was designed to function with minimal changes on a variety of computer-operating systems. To obtain the software described herein and other U.S. Geological Survey software, visit http://water.usgs.gov/software/.

  15. Chemical Composition of Nebulosities in the Magellanic Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Aller, L. H.; Czyzak, S. J.; Keyes, C. D.; Boeshaar, G.

    1974-01-01

    From photoelectric spectrophotometric data secured at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory we have attempted to derive electron densities and temperatures, ionic concentrations, and chemical abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne, S, and Ar in nebulosities in the Magellanic Clouds. Although 10 distinct nebulosities were observed in the Small Cloud and 20 such objects in the Large Cloud, the most detailed observations were secured only for the brighter objects. Results for 30 Doradus are in harmony with those published previously and recent work by Peimbert and Torres-Peimbert. Nitrogen and heavier elements appear to be less abundant in the Small Cloud than in the Large Cloud, in accordance with the conclusions of Dufour. A comparison with the Orion nebula suggests He, N, Ne, O, and S may all be less abundant in the Megellanic Clouds, although adequate evaluations will require construction of detailed models. For example, if we postulate that the [NII], [OII], and [SII] radiations originate primarily in regions with electron temperatures near 8000°K, while the [OIII], [NeIII], [ArIII], and H radiations are produced primarily in regions with T? = 10,000° K, the derived chemical abundances in the clouds are enhanced. PMID:16592199

  16. CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS OF KINEMATICALLY SELECTED OUTER HALO STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lan; Zhao Gang; Ishigaki, Miho; Chiba, Masashi; Aoki, Wako E-mail: zhanglan@bao.ac.c E-mail: chiba@astr.tohoku.ac.j

    2009-12-01

    Chemical abundances of 26 metal-poor dwarfs and giants are determined from high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra obtained with the Subaru/High Dispersion Spectrograph. The sample is selected so that most of the objects have outer-halo kinematics. Self-consistent atmospheric parameters were determined by an iterative procedure based on spectroscopic analysis. Abundances of 13 elements, including alpha-elements (Mg, Si, Ca, Ti), odd-Z light elements (Na, Sc), iron-peak elements (Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn), and neutron-capture elements (Y, Ba), are determined by two independent data reduction and local thermodynamic equillibrium analysis procedures, confirming the consistency of the stellar parameters and abundances results. We find a decreasing trend of [alpha/Fe] with increasing [Fe/H] for the range of -3.5< [Fe/H] <-1, as found by Stephens and Boesgaard. [Zn/Fe] values of most objects in our sample are slightly lower than the bulk of halo stars previously studied. These results are discussed as possible chemical properties of the outer halo in the Galaxy.

  17. Chemical composition and biological activity of Citrus jambhiri Lush.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Dalia; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki; Tahrani, Ahmad; Herrmann, Florian; Kaufmann, Dorothea; Farrag, Nawal; El-Shazly, Assem; Wink, Michael

    2011-07-15

    The fresh peel of Citrus jambhiri was extracted with aqueous methanol and the residue was fractionated using light petroleum, chloroform and ethyl acetate. The constituents of the extracts were separated by column chromatography employing solvents of different polarity. The chemical structure of the isolated compounds was then identified by MS and NMR. Column chromatography of the petroleum fraction resulted in the isolation of nobiletin, 5-O-demethylnobiletin, tangeretin, 5-hydroxy-3,6,7,8,3',4'-hexamethoxyflavone, 3,5,6,7,8,3',4'-heptamethoxyflavone, and a mixture of ?-sitosterol and stigmasterol. The chloroform fraction afforded 6-demethoxynobiletin, 5,4'-dihydroxy-6,7,8,3'-tetramethoxyflavone, limonin and nomilin. The flavonoid glycosides naringin, hesperidin and neohesperidin were isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction. The chemical structure of the isolated compounds was established by MS and NMR (APT, COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY). LC-ESI-MS analysis of the ethyl acetate fraction afforded eight flavonoid glycosides, while the dichloromethane fraction of the defatted seeds contained seven limonoid aglycones. The chloroform fraction exerted the strongest DPPH(?) free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. The petroleum fraction showed a significant inhibition of lipoxygenase indicating an anti-inflammatory action (IC(50) 29±1?g/mL). Some of the isolated polymethoxyflavones exhibited strong cytotoxicity against COS7, HeLa and Caco-2 cell lines. PMID:23140678

  18. Chemical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  19. The chemical composition of red giants in 47 Tucanae. I. Fundamental parameters and chemical abundance patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thygesen, A. O.; Sbordone, L.; Andrievsky, S.; Korotin, S.; Yong, D.; Zaggia, S.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.; Ventura, P.; D'Antona, F.; Meléndez, J.; D'Ercole, A.

    2014-12-01

    Context. The study of chemical abundance patterns in globular clusters is key importance to constraining the different candidates for intracluster pollution of light elements. Aims: We aim at deriving accurate abundances for a wide range of elements in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) to add new constraints to the pollution scenarios for this particular cluster, expanding the range of previously derived element abundances. Methods: Using tailored 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) atmospheric models, together with a combination of equivalent width measurements, LTE, and NLTE synthesis, we derive stellar parameters and element abundances from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 13 red giant stars near the tip of the RGB. Results: We derive abundances of a total 27 elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Mo, Ru, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy). Departures from LTE were taken into account for Na, Al, and Ba. We find a mean [Fe/H] = -0.78 ± 0.07 and [ ?/ Fe ] = 0.34 ± 0.03 in good agreement with previous studies. The remaining elements show good agreement with the literature, but including NLTE for Al has a significant impact on the behavior of this key element. Conclusions: We confirm the presence of an Na-O anti-correlation in 47 Tucanae found by several other works. Our NLTE analysis of Al shifts the [Al/Fe] to lower values, indicating that this may be overestimated in earlier works. No evidence of an intrinsic variation is found in any of the remaining elements. Based on observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory, Chile (Programmes 084.B-0810 and 086.B-0237).Full Tables 2, 5, and 9 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A108Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. [Rapid identification of chemical composition in safflower with UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap].

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-song; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Li, De-feng; Yang, Hong-jun; Liang, Ri-xin

    2015-04-01

    The UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometer was used to explore the chemical compositions in safflower. The rapid separation of the compositions was conducted by the UHPLC, following by high resolution full scan and MS2 scan, under the positive and negative ion mode. The chemical formula of compositions were deduced by full scan data in less than 5, then the potential structures were confirmed by the MS2 data. Forty-nine compounds were detected, of which 26 was identified, and 5 compounds was validated by the standard substances. PMID:26281560

  1. ENERGY SPECTRUM AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ULTRAHIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS FROM SEMI-RELATIVISTIC HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ruoyu; Wang Xiangyu

    2012-02-10

    It has been suggested that hypernova remnants, with a substantial amount of energy in semi-relativistic ejecta, can accelerate intermediate mass or heavy nuclei to ultrahigh energies and provide a sufficient amount of energy in cosmic rays to account for the observed flux. We here calculate the expected energy spectrum and chemical composition of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays from such semi-relativistic hypernovae. With a chemical composition equal to that of the hypernova ejecta and a flat or hard spectrum for cosmic rays at the sources, the spectrum and composition of the propagated cosmic rays observed at the Earth can be compatible with the measurements by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  2. The Effect of Chemical Functionalization on Mechanical Properties of Nanotube/Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Gates, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the chemical functionalization of a carbon nanotube embedded in a nanotube/polyethylene composite on the bulk elastic properties are presented. Constitutive equations are established for both functionalized and non-functionalized nanotube composites systems by using an equivalent-continuum modeling technique. The elastic properties of both composites systems are predicted for various nanotube lengths, volume fractions, and orientations. The results indicate that for the specific composite material considered in this study, most of the elastic stiffness constants of the functionalized composite are either less than or equal to those of the non-functionalized composite.

  3. Chemical composition and biological activities of Gerbera anandria.

    PubMed

    He, Fa; Wang, Miao; Gao, Minghuan; Zhao, Min; Bai, Yuhua; Zhao, Chunjie

    2014-01-01

    Gerbera anandria (Compositae) was extracted with 75% ethanol and the residue was fractionated using light petroleum, chloroform and ethyl acetate. The constituents of the extracts were separated by column chromatography employing solvents of different polarity. Column chromatography of the light petroleum fraction resulted in the isolation of methyl hexadecanoate, while the chloroform fraction afforded xanthotoxin, 2-hydroxy-6-methylbenzoic acid, 7-hydroxy-1(3H)-isobenzofuranone, a mixture of ?-sitosterol and stigmasterol, and 8-methoxysmyrindiol and the ethyl acetate fraction gave gerberinside, apigenin-7-O-?-d-glucopyranoside and quercetin. A new coumarin, 8-methoxysmyrindiol, was found. The chemical structures of the isolated compounds were established by MS and NMR (HSQC, HMBC). Free radical scavenging and cytotoxic activities of crude extracts and 8-methoxysmyrindiol were further investigated. The ethyl acetate phase exerted the strongest DPPH free radical scavenging activity in comparison to the other fractions. The coumarin 8-methoxysmyrindiol demonstrated cytotoxicity against multiple human cancer cell lines, with the highest potency in HepG2 cells. PMID:24699147

  4. Chemical composition and fundamental parameters of roAp stars

    E-print Network

    M. J. Gelbmann

    1998-05-05

    Element abundances of three roAp stars, HD 166473, HD 203932, and HD 217522, were determined using Kurucz model atmospheres with metal abundances scaled to solar ones and the results were compared with data from the literature concerning three further roAp stars, normal B and A stars and two lambda Bootis stars. Up to 38 elements could be identified and therefore, this work represents the most complete chemical investigation hitherto published, which can be summarized as follows: - all investigated roAp stars have a similar abundance pattern, - the overabundances of rare earth and other heavy elements are comparable to cool non-pulsating Ap-stars, - iron belongs to the most deficient and cobalt to the most enhanced elements in the group of the iron peak elements, and - the light elements carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are less abundant than in atmospheres with abundances scaled to the Sun. Beside an unexpected possible relation between effective temperature and metallicity of roAp stars, no outstanding differences from non-pulsating Ap stars could be detected. This statement, however, suffers from the lack of comparably detailed investigations of the latter.

  5. The chemical compositions of RR Lyrae type c variable stars

    SciTech Connect

    Govea, Jose; Gomez, Thomas; Sneden, Christopher; Preston, George W. E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu

    2014-02-20

    We present a detailed chemical abundance study of eight RR Lyrae variable stars of subclass c (RRc). The target RRc stars chosen for study exhibit 'Blazhko-effect' period and amplitude modulations to their pulsational cycles. Data for this study were gathered with the echelle spectrograph of the 100 inch du Pont telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Spectra were obtained throughout each star's pulsation cycle. Atmospheric parameters—effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity, and metallicity—were derived at multiple phase points. We found metallicities and element abundance ratios to be constant within observational uncertainties over the pulsational cycles of all stars. Moreover, the ?-element and Fe-group abundance ratios with respect to iron are consistent with other horizontal-branch members (RRab, blue and red non-variables). Finally, we have used the [Fe/H] values of these eight RRc stars to anchor the metallicity estimates of a large-sample RRc snapshot spectroscopic study being conducted with the same telescope and instrument combination employed here.

  6. Application of chemical vapor composites (CVC) to terrestrial thermionics

    SciTech Connect

    Miskolczy, G.; Reagan, P.

    1995-01-20

    Terrestrial flame fired thermionics took a great leap forward in the earlier 1980`s with the development of reliable long-lived hot shells. These results were presented by Goodale (1981). The hot shell protects the fractory emitter from oxidizing in the combustion environment. In earlier efforts with supralloys emitters it was found that superalloys were poor thermionic emitters since they operated at too low a temperature for practical and economical use as discussed by Huffman (1978). With the development of Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) silicon carbide and CVD tungsten, it became possible to fabricate long-lived thermionic converters. These results were shown by Goodale (1980). Further improvements were achieved with the use of oxygen additives on the electrodes. These developments made thermionics attractive for topping a power plant or as the energy conversion part of a cogeneration plant as described by Miskolczy (1982) and Goodale (1983). The feasibility of a thermonic steam boiler and a thermionic topped gas turbine plant become a possibility, as shown by Miskolczy (1980). {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  7. Conical intersection seams in polyenes derived from their chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Nenov, Artur; Vivie-Riedle, Regina de

    2012-08-21

    The knowledge of conical intersection seams is important to predict and explain the outcome of ultrafast reactions in photochemistry and photobiology. They define the energetic low-lying reachable regions that allow for the ultrafast non-radiative transitions. In complex molecules it is not straightforward to locate them. We present a systematic approach to predict conical intersection seams in multifunctionalized polyenes and their sensitivity to substituent effects. Included are seams that facilitate the photoreaction of interest as well as seams that open competing loss channels. The method is based on the extended two-electron two-orbital method [A. Nenov and R. de Vivie-Riedle, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034304 (2011)]. It allows to extract the low-lying regions for non-radiative transitions, which are then divided into small linear segments. Rules of thumb are introduced to find the support points for these segments, which are then used in a linear interpolation scheme for a first estimation of the intersection seams. Quantum chemical optimization of the linear interpolated structures yields the final energetic position. We demonstrate our method for the example of the electrocyclic isomerization of trifluoromethyl-pyrrolylfulgide.

  8. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Delbert J. Eatough; Wenxuan Cui; Jeffery Hull; Robert J. Farber

    2006-12-15

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr daynight samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was {+-} 0.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3} organic material, {+-} 0.3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium sulfate, and {+-} 0.07 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium nitrate. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides sources in the region indicate that the major anthropogenic contributors to light extinction were from the Los Angeles, CA, and Las Vegas, NV, urban areas. Mohave Power Project associated secondary sulfate was a negligible contributor to light extinction. 49 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Structure and chemical composition of the dentin-enamel junction analyzed by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desoutter, A.; Salehi, H.; Slimani, A.; Marquet, P.; Jacquot, B.; Tassery, H.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-02-01

    The structure and chemical composition of the human dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) was studied using confocal Raman microscopy - a chemical imaging technique. Slices of non-fixed, sound teeth were prepared with an Isomet diamond saw and scanned with Witec Alpha300R system. The combination of different characteristics peaks of phosphate, carbonate and organic matrix (respectively 960, 1072 and 1545 cm-1), generates images representing the chemical composition of the DEJ area. Images are also calculated using peak ratios enabling precise determination of the chemical composition across the DEJ. Then, with two characterized peaks, different pictures are calculated to show the ratio of two components. The images of the spatial distribution of mineral phosphate (960cm-1) to organic matrix (1545 cm-1) ratios, mineral carbonates (1072cm-1) to mineral phosphate ratios; and mineral carbonates to organic matrix ratios were reconstructed. Cross sectional and calculated graphic profile show the variations of the different chemical component ratios through the enamel and the dentin. Phosphate to organic ratio shows an accumulation of organic material under the enamel surface. The cross sectional profile of these pictures shows a high phosphate content compared to enamel in the vicinity of the DEJ. The Confocal Raman imaging technique can be used to further provide full chemical imaging of tooth, particularly of the whole DEJ and to study enamel and dentin decay.

  10. Chemical burns

    PubMed Central

    Cartotto, Robert C.; Peters, Walter J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Douglas, Leith G.; Beeston, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To report a burn unit’s experience with chemical burns and to discuss the fundamental principles in managing chemical burns. Design A chart review. Setting A burn centre at a major university-affiliated hospital. Patients Twenty-four patients with chemical burns, representing 2.6% of all burn admissions over an 8-year period at the Ross Tilley Regional Adult Burn Centre. Seventy-five percent of the burn injuries were work-related accidents. Chemicals involved included hydrofluoric acid, sulfuric acid, black liquor, various lyes, potassium permanganate and phenol. Results Fourteen patients required excision and skin grafting. Complications were frequent and included ocular chemical contacts, wound infections, tendon exposures, toe amputation and systemic reactions from absorption of chemical. One patient died from a chemical scald burn to 98% of the body surface area. Conclusions The key principles in the management of chemical burns include removal of the chemical, copious irrigation, limited use of antidotes, correct estimation of the extent of injury, identification of systemic toxicity, treatment of ocular contacts and management of chemical inhalation injury. Individualized treatment is emphasized. PMID:8640619

  11. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ.

    PubMed

    Eatough, Delbert J; Cui, Wenxuan; Hull, Jeffery; Farber, Robert J

    2006-12-01

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr day-night samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was +/- 0.6 microg/m3 organic material, +/- 0.3 microg/m3 ammonium sulfate, and +/- 0.07 microg/m3 ammonium nitrate. Data were also available on fine particulate crustal material, fine and coarse particulate mass from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments sampling system, and relative humidity (RH), light absorption, particle scattering, and light extinction measurements from Project MOHAVE. An extinction budget was obtained using mass scattering coefficients estimated from particle size distribution data. Literature data were used to estimate the change in the mass scattering coefficients for the measured species as a function of RH and for the absorption of light by elemental carbon. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. During periods of highest light extinction, contributions from fine particulate organic material, sulfate, and light-absorbing carbon dominated the extinction of light by particles. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides sources in the region indicate that the major anthropogenic contributors to light extinction were from the Los Angeles, CA, and Las Vegas, NV, urban areas. Mohave Power Project associated secondary sulfate was a negligible contributor to light extinction. PMID:17195488

  12. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary. PMID:16296384

  13. Effect of interfacial chemical bonding and surface topography on adhesion in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Drzal, L.T.; Sugiura, N.; Hook, D.

    1994-12-31

    A series of PAN-based IM6 carbon fibers having varying amounts of surface treatment were, pretreated with compounds representing the constituents encountered in epoxy composites to pre-react any groups on the fiber surface before composite fabrication in order to determine the effect of chemical bonding on fiber-matrix adhesion. Chemical bonding was quantified using XPS. Chemical bonding between reactive groups in amine cured epoxy matrices and the surface groups present on IN46 carbon fibers as a result of commercial surface treatments has been detected although the absolute amount of chemical bonding is low (1-3%). It was found that reaction with monofunctional epoxy groups having hydrocarbon functionalities blocked the surface from further reaction and reduced the adhesion that could be attained to its lowest value. Prereaction with difunctional amines had little effect on adhesion when compared to normal composite fabrication procedures. Prereaction with difunctional epoxy groups did enhance adhesion levels over the level attained in normal composite fabrication methods. These results showed that chemical bonding between epoxy and the carbon fiber surface could increases the adhesion between fiber and matrix about 25% while between the amino group and the carbon fiber surface about 15%. Quantitative measurements of the fiber surface microtopography were made with scanning tunneling microscopy. An increase in roughness was detected with increasing surface treatment. It was concluded that surface roughness also accounted for a significant increase in fiber-matrix adhesion.

  14. Nextel{trademark}/SiC composites fabricated using forced chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, B.L.; Lowden, R.A.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Schwarz, O.J.

    1993-06-01

    Oxide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated employing the forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process. Composites using Nextel{sup TM} fibers of varying composition were prepared to investigate the effectiveness of each Nextel{sup TM} fiber as a reinforcement for the given matrix. A carbon interface coating was used for the baseline materials, however, alternate interlayers with improved oxidation resistance were also explored Room-temperature flexure strengths of as-fabricated composites and specimens heated in air at 1273 K were measured and compared to results for other SiC-matrix composites.

  15. Chemical microsensors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

  16. Model nebulae and determination of the chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Keyes, C D; Czyzak, S J

    1979-04-01

    An analysis of previously presented photoelectric spectrophotometry of HII regions (emission-line diffuse nebulae) in the two Magellanic Clouds is carried out with the aid of theoretical nebular models, which are used primarily as interpolation devices. Some advantages and limitations of such theoretical models are discussed. A comparison of the finally obtained chemical compositions with those found by other observers shows generally a good agreement, suggesting that it is possible to obtain reliable chemical compositions from low excitation gaseous nebulae in our own galaxy as well as in distant stellar systems. PMID:16592633

  17. Model nebulae and determination of the chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Aller, L. H.; Keyes, C. D.; Czyzak, S. J.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of previously presented photoelectric spectrophotometry of HII regions (emission-line diffuse nebulae) in the two Magellanic Clouds is carried out with the aid of theoretical nebular models, which are used primarily as interpolation devices. Some advantages and limitations of such theoretical models are discussed. A comparison of the finally obtained chemical compositions with those found by other observers shows generally a good agreement, suggesting that it is possible to obtain reliable chemical compositions from low excitation gaseous nebulae in our own galaxy as well as in distant stellar systems. PMID:16592633

  18. Level and Chemical Composition of Cryoglobulins in Schizophrenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoyetsyan, Aren; Boyajyan, Anna; Melkumova, Maya

    The blood samples of 40 schizophrenic patients were tested for the presence of cryoglobulins (Cgs) and composition of Cgs was examined. The elevated levels of type III Cgs, containing complement components, were detected in all study subjects.

  19. Regional and Temporal Variability in the Chemical Composition of Individual Particles Sampled During ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzotti, S. A.; Sodeman, D. A.; Suess, D. T.; Moffet, R.; Prather, K. A.

    2002-12-01

    During the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Chemical Characterization Experiment, ACE-Asia, size and chemical composition of individual particles were evaluated with high temporal resolution using a transportable Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) aboard the NOAA Research Vessel Ronald H. Brown (14 March - 20 April 2001). During the campaign, the chemical composition, number concentration, and temporal variability of aerosol particles were assessed under different synoptic meteorological patterns and at various locations and distances from continental influences. Periods with pristine marine characteristics, high loadings of mineral dust, and air parcels modified by anthropogenic emissions were encountered. Size-resolved chemical characteristics of sampled particles are discussed in detail, with special focus given to the chemical associations and the degrees of aging, reaction, and/or mixing, which can alter the optical properties of these particles. Changes in the aerosol physical-chemical characteristics due to heterogeneous reactions are discussed in terms of single particle mass spectral ion markers (e.g., sulfate and/or nitrate). Results from ATOFMS characterization studies of relevant source samples (dust, coal combustion, biomass/ biofuel burning, vehicular emissions) are also presented and compared to those obtained from ACE-Asia ambient data to illustrate the determination of probable sources from a single particle perspective.

  20. Estimation of Macronutrient Content in Kindergartens Meals: Food Composition Tables or Chemical Analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Konstansa, Lazarevic; Dusica, Stojanovic; Dragan, Bogdanovic

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The nutrition of children in kindergartens has a great significance for proper growth and development of children. In order to save time and money, the control of macronutrients content is performed by calculations using food composition tables instead of performing a chemical analysis. Methods: We examined the macronutrients content of 240 whole day meals using food composition tables and performed chemical analysis of meals to determine adequacy and validity of food composition tables in calculation of macronutrient contents in kindergarten meals. Findings: We established no correlation (P>0.05) between the value of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Significant difference was established between the average content of proteins (t=2.57; P<0.05), and carbohydrates (t=3.20; P<0.01), but not with the content of fats in the meals (t=1.26; P>0.05) (food composition tables vs chemical analysis). Conclusion: Until we establish new food composition tables, chemical analysis remains the only valid method for assessment of macronutrients content and energy value of a meal in kindergarten. PMID:25793075

  1. [Application of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy to predict meat chemical compositions: a review].

    PubMed

    Tao, Lin-Li; Yang, Xiu-Juan; Deng, Jun-Ming; Zhang, Xi

    2013-11-01

    In contrast to conventional methods for the determination of meat chemical composition, near infrared reflectance spectroscopy enables rapid, simple, secure and simultaneous assessment of numerous meat properties. The present review focuses on the use of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy to predict meat chemical compositions. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy to predict crude protein, intramuscular fat, fatty acid, moisture, ash, myoglobin and collagen of beef, pork, chicken and lamb is reviewed. This paper discusses existing questions and reasons in the current research. According to the published results, although published results vary considerably, they suggest that near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy shows a great potential to replace the expensive and time-consuming chemical analysis of meat composition. In particular, under commercial conditions where simultaneous measurements of different chemical components are required, near infrared reflectance spectroscopy is expected to be the method of choice. The majority of studies selected feature-related wavelengths using principal components regression, developed the calibration model using partial least squares and modified partial least squares, and estimated the prediction accuracy by means of cross-validation using the same sample set previously used for the calibration. Meat fatty acid composition predicted by near-infrared spectroscopy and non-destructive prediction and visualization of chemical composition in meat using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging and multivariate regression are the hot studying field now. On the other hand, near infrared reflectance spectroscopy shows great difference for predicting different attributes of meat quality which are closely related to the selection of calibration sample set, preprocessing of near-infrared spectroscopy and modeling approach. Sample preparation also has an important effect on the reliability of NIR prediction; in particular, lack of homogeneity of the meat samples influenced the accuracy of estimation of chemical components. In general the predicting results of intramuscular fat, fatty acid and moisture are best, the predicting results of crude protein and myoglobin are better, while the predicting results of ash and collagen are less accurate. PMID:24555369

  2. Chemical compositions of the moon, earth, and eucrite parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.

    1977-01-01

    Model compositions of the moon and earth were calculated on the assumption that these planets had experienced chondrite-like nebular fractionation processes. The model correctly predicts the abundance ratios of certain volatile/refractory element pairs (e.g., Cd/Ba, Ga/La, Sn/Th, and Pb/U), the density of the moon, and the major rock types. The model is also used to reconstruct the composition of the parent eucrite body, which resembles the moon except for a lower content of refractory elements.

  3. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  4. Chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

  5. Chemical composition of black rockfish (Sebastes melanops) fillets and byproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black rockfish are important in the near shore fishery of Southeast Alaska. They are the only species among the pelagic shelf rockfishes for which there is a directed fishery in state waters. The purpose of this study was to determine the composition black rockfish fillets and its major processing b...

  6. The Chemical Composition of an Extrasolar Minor Planet

    E-print Network

    B. Zuckerman; D. Koester; C. Melis; B. Hansen; M. Jura

    2007-08-01

    We report the relative abundances of 17 elements in the atmosphere of the white dwarf star GD 362, material that, very probably, was contained previously in a large asteroid or asteroids with composition similar to the Earth/Moon system. The asteroid may have once been part of a larger parent body not unlike one of the terrestrial planets of our solar system.

  7. Generation rates and chemical compositions of waste streams in a typical crewed space habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, Theodore; Golub, Morton A.

    1990-01-01

    A judicious compilation of generation rates and chemical compositions of potential waste feed streams in a typical crewed space habitat was made in connection with the waste-management aspect of NASA's Physical/Chemical Closed-Loop Life Support Program. Waste composition definitions are needed for the design of waste-processing technologies involved in closing major life support functions in future long-duration human space missions. Tables of data for the constituents and chemical formulas of the following waste streams are presented and discussed: human urine, feces, hygiene (laundry and shower) water, cleansing agents, trash, humidity condensate, dried sweat, and trace contaminants. Tables of data on dust generation and pH values of the different waste streams are also presented and discussed.

  8. Chemical Composition of Different Botanical Origin Honeys Produced by Sicilian Black Honeybees (Apis mellifera ssp. sicula).

    PubMed

    Mannina, Luisa; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Vista, Silvia; Tenore, Gian Carlo; Daglia, Maria

    2015-07-01

    In 2008 a Slow Food Presidium was launched in Sicily (Italy) for an early warning of the risk of extinction of the Sicilian native breed of black honeybee (Apis mellifera L. ssp sicula). Today, the honey produced by these honeybees is the only Sicilian honey produced entirely by the black honeybees. In view of few available data regarding the chemical composition of A. mellifera ssp. sicula honeys, in the present investigation the chemical compositions of sulla honey (Hedysarum coronarium L.) and dill honey (Anethum graveolens L.) were studied with a multimethodological approach, which consists of HPLC-PDA-ESI-MSn and NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, three unifloral honeys (lemon honey (obtained from Citrus limon (L.) Osbeck), orange honey (Citrus arantium L.), and medlar honey (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl)), with known phenol and polyphenol compositions, were studied with NMR spectroscopy to deepen the knowledge about sugar and amino acid compositions. PMID:25730368

  9. Differences in Chemical Composition of Soil Organic Carbon Resulting From Long-Term Fertilization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zengqiang; Zhao, Bingzi; Wang, Qingyun; Cao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jiabao

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is central to soil fertility. We hypothesize that change in SOC content resulting from various long-term fertilization strategies accompanies the shift in SOC chemical structure. This study examined the effect of fertilization strategies along with the time of fertilizer application on the SOC composition by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The soils (Aquic Inceptisol) subjected to seven fertilizer treatments were collected in 1989, 1999 and 2009, representing 0, 10 and 20 years of fertilization, respectively. The seven fertilizer treatments were (1–3) balanced fertilization with application of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) including organic compost (OM), half organic compost plus half chemical fertilizer (1/2OM), and pure chemical NPK fertilizer (NPK); (4–6) unbalanced chemical fertilization without application of one of the major elements including NP fertilizer (NP), PK fertilizer (PK), and NK fertilizer (NK); and (7) an unamended control (CK). The SOC content in the balanced fertilization treatments were 2.3–52.6% and 9.4–64.6% higher than in the unbalanced fertilization/CK treatments in 1999 and 2009, respectively, indicating significant differences in SOC content with time of fertilizer application between the two treatment groups. There was a significantly greater proportion of O-alkyl C and a lower proportion of aromatic C in the balanced fertilization than in unbalanced fertilization/CK treatments in 1999, but not in 2009, because their proportions in the former treatments approached the latter in 2009. Principal component analysis further showed that the C functional groups from various fertilization strategies tended to become compositionally similar with time. The results suggest that a shift in SOC chemical composition may be firstly dominated by fertilization strategies, followed by fertilization duration. PMID:25884713

  10. Wood Chemical Composition in Species of Cactaceae: The Relationship between Lignification and Stem Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Canché-Escamilla, Gonzalo; Soto-Hernández, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs) and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content) in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous) with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35%) of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level. PMID:25880223

  11. Hypertrophy of colonic smooth muscle: structural remodeling, chemical composition, and force output

    E-print Network

    Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura

    Hypertrophy of colonic smooth muscle: structural remodeling, chemical composition, and force output muscle lengths. In megacolon the following occur: 1) structural remodeling expressed as a greater Narayan, William S. Stirewalt, and Barry C. Starcher. Hypertro- phy of colonic smooth muscle: structural

  12. Phoenix dactylifera L. spathe essential oil: Chemical composition and repellent activity against the yellow fever mosquito

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L. (Arecaceae), grows commonly in the Arabian Peninsula and is traditionally used to treat various diseases. The aim of the present study was to identify chemical composition of the essential oil and to investigate the repellent activity. The essential oil of P. dacty...

  13. Prediction of chemical contaminants and food compositions by near infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prediction of Food Adulteration by Infrared Spectroscopy H. Zhuang Quality and Safety Assessment Research Unit, ARS-USDA, 950 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605 Food adulteration, including both chemical contamination and composition alternation, has been one of major quality and/or safety c...

  14. In-situ aircraft observations of the 2000 Mt. Hekla volcanic cloud: Composition and chemical

    E-print Network

    Lee, Shan-Hu

    In-situ aircraft observations of the 2000 Mt. Hekla volcanic cloud: Composition and chemical An instrumented NASA aircraft made comprehensive, in-situ measurements of trace gas concentrations and aerosol stratosphere. Thirty-five hours after the initial, sub- Plinian explosion on February 26, 2000, the aircraft

  15. Discerning the Chemical Composition and Mutagenic Effects of Soy Biodiesel PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discerning the Chemical Composition and Mutagenic Effects of Soy Biodiesel PM David G. Nashab, Esra Mutluc, William T. Prestond, Michael D. Haysb, Sarah H. Warrenc, Charly Kingc, William P. Linakb, M. lan Gilmourc, and David M. DeMarinic aOak Ridge Institute for Science and Ed...

  16. Chemical composition of Titan's haze: Are PAHs present? Melissa G. Trainer,1

    E-print Network

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    Chemical composition of Titan's haze: Are PAHs present? Melissa G. Trainer,1 Alexander A. Pavlov,2 laboratory studies of haze aerosols analogous to those in Titan's atmosphere have shown evidence particle formation and nitrogen incorporation. We have conducted new experiments simulating Titan haze

  17. Galactic chemical evolution and the oxygen isotopic composition of the solar system Larry R. NITTLER1*

    E-print Network

    Nittler, Larry R.

    Galactic chemical evolution and the oxygen isotopic composition of the solar system Larry R, or the existence of distinct 16 O-rich and 16 O-poor reservoirs in the solar system. Although the production birth (``starburst'') can explain the solar-ISM O-isotopic difference without requiring a local input

  18. Visualizing Chemical Compositions and Kinetics of Sol-Gel by Near-Infrared Multispectral Imaging

    E-print Network

    Reid, Scott A.

    Visualizing Chemical Compositions and Kinetics of Sol-Gel by Near-Infrared Multispectral Imaging, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 Kinetics of sol-gel formation were studied using the recently developed near-infrared (NIR) multispectral im- aging instrument. This imaging spectrometer possesses all the advantages

  19. 40 CFR 761.292 - Chemical extraction and analysis of individual samples and composite samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...of Self-Implementing Cleanup and On-Site Disposal of Bulk PCB Remediation Waste and Porous Surfaces in Accordance With Â...chemical extraction of PCBs from individual and composite samples of PCB remediation waste. Use Method 8082 from SW-846, or a...

  20. 40 CFR 761.292 - Chemical extraction and analysis of individual samples and composite samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...of Self-Implementing Cleanup and On-Site Disposal of Bulk PCB Remediation Waste and Porous Surfaces in Accordance With Â...chemical extraction of PCBs from individual and composite samples of PCB remediation waste. Use Method 8082 from SW-846, or a...

  1. 40 CFR 761.292 - Chemical extraction and analysis of individual samples and composite samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...of Self-Implementing Cleanup and On-Site Disposal of Bulk PCB Remediation Waste and Porous Surfaces in Accordance With Â...chemical extraction of PCBs from individual and composite samples of PCB remediation waste. Use Method 8082 from SW-846, or a...

  2. 40 CFR 761.292 - Chemical extraction and analysis of individual samples and composite samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...of Self-Implementing Cleanup and On-Site Disposal of Bulk PCB Remediation Waste and Porous Surfaces in Accordance With Â...chemical extraction of PCBs from individual and composite samples of PCB remediation waste. Use Method 8082 from SW-846, or a...

  3. 40 CFR 761.292 - Chemical extraction and analysis of individual samples and composite samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...of Self-Implementing Cleanup and On-Site Disposal of Bulk PCB Remediation Waste and Porous Surfaces in Accordance With Â...chemical extraction of PCBs from individual and composite samples of PCB remediation waste. Use Method 8082 from SW-846, or a...

  4. Atmospheric aerosols: A literature summary of their physical characteristics and chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This report contains a summary of 199 recent references on the characterization of atmospheric aerosols with respect to their composition, sources, size distribution, and time changes, and with particular reference to the chemical elements measured by modern techniques, especially activation analysis.

  5. Global Chemical Composition of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter for Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic and health impact studies are inhibited by the paucity of global, long-term measurements of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter. We inferred PM2.5 chemical composition at 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution for 2004–2008 by combining aerosol optical depth retrieved from the MODIS and MISR satellite instruments, with coincident profile and composition information from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Evaluation of the satellite-model PM2.5 composition data set with North American in situ measurements indicated significant spatial agreement for secondary inorganic aerosol, particulate organic mass, black carbon, mineral dust, and sea salt. We found that global population-weighted PM2.5 concentrations were dominated by particulate organic mass (11.9 ± 7.3 ?g/m3), secondary inorganic aerosol (11.1 ± 5.0 ?g/m3), and mineral dust (11.1 ± 7.9 ?g/m3). Secondary inorganic PM2.5 concentrations exceeded 30 ?g/m3 over East China. Sensitivity simulations suggested that population-weighted ambient PM2.5 from biofuel burning (11 ?g/m3) could be almost as large as from fossil fuel combustion sources (17 ?g/m3). These estimates offer information about global population exposure to the chemical components and sources of PM2.5. PMID:25343705

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of the chemical composition of the potent sweetener Vartamil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosova, T. E.; Prokhodchenko, L. K.; Pilipenko, V. V.; Suboch, V. P.

    2008-03-01

    The chemical composition of the potent sweetener Vartamil was characterized using spectral methods. It was demonstrated that Vartamil is a mixture of saccharose chloro derivatives, the main one of which is 4,1',6'-trichloro-4,1',6'-trideoxygalactosaccharose (Sucralose).

  7. Chemical composition and biological activity of the essential oil of rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) smith

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: The aim was designed to study the biological activity and chemical composition of essential oil of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith. The essential oil extracted from the rhizome of the plant was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and its major components amounting t...

  8. Chemical composition of Silene morganae Freyn volatile oil.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Boshra; Sohrabi, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    The essential oil composition of flowering aerial parts of Iranian Silene morganae Freyn (Caryophyllaceae) was analysed for the first time using gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Thirty-one compounds consisting of 90.3% of the volatile oil were detected. The major constituents were benzaldehyde (11.6%), (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate (9.6%), (E)-?-ocimene (8.2%) and linalool (7.4%). Terpenoids (43.5%), particularly monoterpene hydrocarbons (24.2%), had the highest contribution in S. morganae Freyn flowering aerial parts oil. PMID:25422069

  9. Vitrified metal finishing wastes I. Composition, density and chemical durability.

    PubMed

    Bingham, P A; Hand, R J

    2005-03-17

    Durable phosphate glasses were formed by vitrifying waste filter cakes from two metal finishing operations. Some melts formed crystalline components during cooling. Compositional analysis of dried, heat treated and vitrified samples was made using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy and Leco induction furnace combustion analysis. Hydrolytic dissolution, measured by an adapted product consistency test, was reduced by up to 3 orders of magnitude upon heat treatment or vitrification, surpassing the performance of borosilicate glass in some cases. This was attributed to the high levels of iron and zinc in the wastes, which greatly improve the durability of phosphate glasses. One of the wastes arose from a metal phosphating process and was particularly suitable for vitrification due to its high P2O5 content and favourable melting behaviour. The other waste, which arose from a number of processes, was less suitable as it had a low P2O5 content and during heating it emitted harmful corrosive gases and underwent violent reactions. Substantial volume reductions were obtained by heat treatment and vitrification of both wastes. Compositions and performances of some vitrified wastes were comparable with those of glasses which are under consideration for the immobilisation of toxic and nuclear wastes. PMID:15752857

  10. The chemical composition of fogs and clouds in Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The major inorganic species in cloud and fog water samples were NH{sub 4}{sup +}, H{sup +}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Concentrations in fog water samples were 1 - 10 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M; pH values ranged from {approx equal} 2 to 6. Nitrate usually exceeded sulfate. Acidity depended on the availability of NH{sub 3} from agricultural operations. Stratus cloudwater had somewhat lower concentrations; pH values were in the range 3-4. The major factors accounting for variation in fog- or cloudwater composition were the preexisting aerosol and gas concentrations and variations in liquid water content. Deposition and entrainment or advection of different air masses were also important during extended cloud or fog episodes. The droplet size dependence of cloudwater composition was investigated on one occasion in an intercepted coastal stratus clouds. Concentrations of S(IV) and CH{sub 2}O in the range 100-1000 {mu}M were observed in fogwater from urban sites in Southern California. Lower concentrations were observed in stratus clouds. The high levels of S(IV) and CH{sub 2}O were attributed to the formation of hydroxymethanesulfonate (HMSA), the S(IV) adduct of CH{sub 2}O. Direct measurements of HMSA in fogwater samples from Bakersfield, CA were made by ion-pairing chromatography. Glyoxal and methyglyoxal were observed at concentrations comparable to CH{sub 2}O in fogwater samples from Riverside, CA and in stratus cloudwater samples from sites along the Santa Barbara Channel.

  11. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hameed, S.; Cess, R. D.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al, 1978; Hameed et al, 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NO(x), and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NO(x). The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NO(x) and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  12. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection...Subpart Z of Part 98—Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight)...

  13. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection...Subpart Z of Part 98—Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight)...

  14. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection...Subpart Z of Part 98—Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight)...

  15. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection...Subpart Z of Part 98—Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight)...

  16. Laboratory Inquiry for Determining the Chemical Composition of a Component in a Daily Use Detergent: Sodium Sesquicarbonate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koga, Nobuyoshi; Kimura, Tomoyasu; Shigedomi, Kana

    2011-01-01

    An inquiry-based laboratory activity to determine the chemical composition of a component in alkaline detergents, sodium sesquicarbonate (SSC), is proposed. On the basis of introductory demonstrations by the instructor on the chemical properties and reactions of SSC, students propose the hypothetical composition of SSC and possible quantitative…

  17. Effects of Chemical Weathering on TIR-Derived Bulk Compositions From Deconvolution Models of Mineral Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Rogers, A. D.

    2007-12-01

    The Martian surface may be chemically altered on regional scales. Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution are commonly used to determine mineral abundances of the surface. Chemically weathered surfaces tend to be intimate mixtures of igneous minerals and fine-grained alteration products. To understand how alteration products affect deconvolution models of TIR spectra and model-derived bulk compositions, we measured TIR spectra of physical mineral mixtures, composed of an igneous component (augite, andesine, or 50-50 weight percent augite-andesine) and an alteration phase (montmorillonite clay or synthetic amorphous silica). Weathering products can cause significant differences between the actual and the modeled primary igneous mineral abundances and cause the false identification of significant amounts of volcanic glass in deconvolution models (Rampe et al., 2007). We calculated the bulk oxide compositions (Hamilton et al., 2000) from spectral model results of our physical mixtures and compared them to the actual bulk compositions of the mixtures. Previous studies have shown that bulk chemical compositions can be derived from TIR spectral model results (Hamilton et al., 2001; Wyatt et al., 2001), and bulk oxide data of the Martian surface are commonly derived from spectral models of data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) (Hamilton et al., 2001; Hurowitz et al., 2007). In alkali-vs.-SiO2 plots, model-derived compositions for clay- bearing mixtures were similar to the actual compositions of the mixtures; however, model-derived compositions for silica-bearing mixtures varied significantly from the actual values of the mixtures. In Al2O3-vs.- (CaO+Na2O+K2O)-vs.-(FeO+MgO) ternary plots, the model-derived compositions of clay-bearing mixtures followed trends typical of terrestrial basalt weathering, whereas the model-derived compositions for silica-bearing mixtures followed trends seen in compositional data derived from TES spectra from Mars (Hurowitz et al., 2007). Our data show that chemical weathering and precipitation of amorphous silica may account for some of the chemical variations of rocks on Mars as derived from TES spectral data.

  18. Effect of chemical treatment of Kevlar fibers on mechanical interfacial properties of composites.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Seo, Min-Kang; Ma, Tae-Jun; Lee, Douk-Rae

    2002-08-01

    In this work, the effects of chemical treatment on Kevlar 29 fibers have been studied in a composite system. The surface characteristics of Kevlar 29 fibers were characterized by pH, acid-base value, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and FT-IR. The mechanical interfacial properties of the final composites were studied by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)), and specific fracture energy (G(IC)). Also, impact properties of the composites were investigated in the context of differentiating between initiation and propagation energies and ductile index (DI) along with maximum force and total energy. As a result, it was found that chemical treatment with phosphoric acid solution significantly affected the degree of adhesion at interfaces between fibers and resin matrix, resulting in improved mechanical interfacial strength in the composites. This was probably due to the presence of chemical polar groups on Kevlar surfaces, leading to an increment of interfacial binding force between fibers and matrix in a composite system. PMID:16290785

  19. The Relationship Between the Surface Morphology and Chemical Composition of Gunshot Residue Particles.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ilker; Lisesivdin, Sefer Bora; Kasap, Mehmet; Er, Elif; Uzek, Ugur

    2015-07-01

    In this study, chemical composition and morphology of gunshot residue (GSR) of 9 × 19 mm Parabellum-type MKE (Turkey)-brand ammunition were analyzed by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. GSR samples were collected by "swab" technique from the shooter's right hand immediately after shooting. According to general principles of thermodynamics, it is likely that the structures will have a more regular (homogeneous) spherical form to minimize their surface area due to very high temperatures and pressures that occur during explosion. Studied samples were collected under the same conditions with the same original ammunition, from the same firearm and a single shooter. This is because many other variables may affect size, structure, and composition in addition to the concentrations of elements of the structure. Results indicated that the chemical compositions are effective in the formation of GSR morphological structures. PMID:25864563

  20. Effect of chemical treatments on flax fibre reinforced polypropylene composites on tensile and dome forming behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wentian; Lowe, Adrian; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Tensile tests were performed on two different natural fibre composites (same constituent material, similar fibre fraction and thickness but different weave structure) to determine changes in mechanical properties caused by various aqueous chemical treatments and whether any permanent changes remain on drying. Scanning electronic microscopic examinations suggested that flax fibres and the flax/polypropylene interface were affected by the treatments resulting in tensile property variations. The ductility of natural fibre composites was improved significantly under wet condition and mechanical properties (elongation-to-failure, stiffness and strength) can almost retain back to pre-treated levels when dried from wet condition. Preheating is usually required to improve the formability of material in rapid forming, and the chemical treatments performed in this study were far more effective than preheating. The major breakthrough in improving the formability of natural fibre composites can aid in rapid forming of this class of material system. PMID:25789505

  1. Effect of Chemical Treatments on Flax Fibre Reinforced Polypropylene Composites on Tensile and Dome Forming Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wentian; Lowe, Adrian; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Tensile tests were performed on two different natural fibre composites (same constituent material, similar fibre fraction and thickness but different weave structure) to determine changes in mechanical properties caused by various aqueous chemical treatments and whether any permanent changes remain on drying. Scanning electronic microscopic examinations suggested that flax fibres and the flax/polypropylene interface were affected by the treatments resulting in tensile property variations. The ductility of natural fibre composites was improved significantly under wet condition and mechanical properties (elongation-to-failure, stiffness and strength) can almost retain back to pre-treated levels when dried from wet condition. Preheating is usually required to improve the formability of material in rapid forming, and the chemical treatments performed in this study were far more effective than preheating. The major breakthrough in improving the formability of natural fibre composites can aid in rapid forming of this class of material system. PMID:25789505

  2. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers.

    PubMed

    Ennouri, Monia; Ammar, Imene; Khemakhem, Bassem; Attia, Hamadi

    2014-08-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers have wide application in folk medicine. However, there are few reports focusing on their biological activity and were no reports on their chemical composition. The nutrient composition and hexane extracts of Opuntia flowers at 4 flowering stages and their antibacterial and antifungal activities were investigated. The chemical composition showed considerable amounts of fiber, protein, and minerals. Potassium (K) was the predominant mineral followed by calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn). The main compounds in the various hexane extracts were 9.12-octadecadienoic acid (29-44%) and hexadecanoic acid (8.6-32%). The antibacterial activity tests showed that O. inermis hexane extracts have high effectiveness against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, making this botanical source a potential contender as a food preservative or food control additive. PMID:24650181

  3. Chemical compositions and classifica tion of five thermally altered carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noronha, Bianca A.; Friedrich, Jon M.

    2014-08-01

    To establish the chemical group provenance of the five thermally altered carbonaceous chondrites Asuka (A-) 881551, Asuka-882113, Elephant Moraine (EET) 96026, Mulga (west), and Northwest Africa (NWA) 3133, we quantified 44 trace elements in each of them. We also analyzed Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 04318 (CK4), Miller Range (MIL) 090001 (CR2), Roberts Massif (RBT) 03522 (CK5) as reference samples as their chemical group affinity is already recognized. We conclude that Asuka-881551, Asuka-882113, and Mulga (west) are thermally metamorphosed CK chondrites. Compositionally, Elephant Moraine 96026 most resembles the CV chondrites. NWA 3133 is the most significantly thermally altered carbonaceous chondrite in our suite of samples. It is completely recrystallized (no chondrules or matrix remain), but its bulk composition is consistent with a CV-CK clan provenance. The thermally labile element (e.g., Se, Te, Zn, and Bi) depletion in NWA 3133 indicates a chemically open system during the heating episode. It remains unclear if the heat necessary for its thermal alteration of NWA 3133 was due to the decay of 26Al or was impact related. Finally, we infer that MIL 090001, Mulga (west), and NWA 3133 show occasional compositional signatures indicative of terrestrial alteration. The alteration is especially evident within the elements Sr, Ba, La, Ce, Th, U, and possibly Sb. Despite the alteration, we can still confidently place each of the altered chondrites within an established chemical group or clan.

  4. Chemical composition of essential oils and aromatic waters from different Italian Anthemis maritima populations.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Daniela; Noccioli, Cecilia; Pistelli, Luisa

    2013-09-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils and aromatic waters isolated from six Italian Anthemis maritima populations was determined by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. In total, 122 and 100 chemical compounds were identified in the essential oils and the aromatic waters, respectively. The main compound classes represented in the oils were monoterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes, sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated sesquiterpenes, and terpene esters. Multivariate chemometric techniques such as cluster analysis (CA) and principal coordinate analysis (PCO) were used to classify the samples according to the geographical origin. Statistical analysis allowed the attribution of the analyzed populations to different chemotype groups. PMID:24078600

  5. Morphology tailoring of nano/micro-structured conductive polymers, composites and their applications in chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingfa; Gao, Mingjun; He, Xiaochun; Li, Guang

    2010-11-01

    Conductive polymer is one of the important multi-functional materials. It has many applications in light-emitting diodes, chemical sensors, biosensors, et al. This paper provides a relatively comprehensive review on the progress of conductive polymer and composite as sensitive film for sensors to chemical vapors including patents, papers and our preliminary research results. Especially, the feature of conjugated polymers, the processing technology, doping characteristics and some factors affecting gas responses are discussed. Otherwise, the developments of nanostructured conductive polymer and organic-inorganic hybrid film sensor with high sensitivity and rapid response to vapors are also described, and some suggestions are proposed. PMID:20615192

  6. Separating topographical and chemical analysis of nanostructure of polymer composite in low voltage SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Q.; Plenderleith, R. A.; Dapor, M.; Rimmer, S.; Claeyssens, F.; Rodenburg, C.

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of separating the topographical and chemical information in a polymer nano-composite using low-voltage SEM imaging is demonstrated, when images are acquired with a Concentric Backscattered (CBS) detector. This separation of chemical and topographical information is based on the different angular distribution of electron scattering which were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation based on angular restricted detection was applied to a semi-branched PNIPAM/PEGDA interpenetration network for which a linear relationship of topography SEM contrast and feature height data was observed.

  7. Chemical Composition of Martian Soil and Rocks: Complex Mixing and Sedimentary Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLennan, Scott M.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical compositions of Martian soil and rocks indicate complex mixing relationships. Mixing of rock and soil clearly takes place and explains some of the chemical variation because sulfur, chlorine, magnesium, and perhaps iron are positively correlated due to their control from a secondary 'sedimentary' mineralogy (e.g., Mg- and possibly Fe-sulfate; Fe-oxides) that is present within the soils. Certain deviations from simple soil-rock mixing are consistent with mineralogical fractionation of detrital iron and titanium oxides during sedimentary transport.

  8. Chemical composition of nuts and seeds sold in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyung Ok; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Choi, Kyung-Soon

    2013-01-01

    Eleven types of nuts and seeds were analyzed to determine their energy (326-733 mg), moisture (1.6-18.3 mg), carbohydrate (8.8-70.9 mg), protein (4.9-30.5 mg), lipid (2.5-69.8 mg), and ash (1.2-5.5 mg) contents per 100 g of sample. Energy content was highest in pine nuts (733 mg/100 g), carbohydrate level was highest in dried figs (70.9 mg/100 g) and protein was highest in peanuts (30.5 mg/100 g). The amino acid compositions of nuts and seeds were characterized by the dominance of hydrophobic (range = 1,348.6-10,284.6 mg), hydrophilic (range = 341.1-3,244.3 mg), acidic (range = 956.1-8,426.5 mg), and basic (range = 408.6-4,738.5 mg) amino acids. Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) were highest in macadamia nuts (81.3%), whereas polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were highest in the walnuts (76.7%). Macadamia nuts did not contain any vitamin E, whereas sunflower seeds contained the highest level (60.3 mg/kg). Iron (Fe) content was highest in pumpkin seeds (95.85 ± 33.01 ppm), zinc (Zn) content was highest in pistachios (67.24 ± 30.25 ppm), copper (Cu) content was greatest in walnuts (25.45 ± 21.51 ppm), and lead (Pb) content was greatest in wheat nuts (25.49 ± 4.64 ppm), significantly (P < 0.05). In conclusion, current commercial nuts and seeds have no safety concerns, although further analysis of Pb contents is necessary to ensure safety. PMID:23610599

  9. Chemical composition of nuts and seeds sold in Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Keun Hee; Shin, Kyung Ok; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Choi, Kyung-Soon

    2013-04-01

    Eleven types of nuts and seeds were analyzed to determine their energy (326-733 mg), moisture (1.6-18.3 mg), carbohydrate (8.8-70.9 mg), protein (4.9-30.5 mg), lipid (2.5-69.8 mg), and ash (1.2-5.5 mg) contents per 100 g of sample. Energy content was highest in pine nuts (733 mg/100 g), carbohydrate level was highest in dried figs (70.9 mg/100 g) and protein was highest in peanuts (30.5 mg/100 g). The amino acid compositions of nuts and seeds were characterized by the dominance of hydrophobic (range = 1,348.6-10,284.6 mg), hydrophilic (range = 341.1-3,244.3 mg), acidic (range = 956.1-8,426.5 mg), and basic (range = 408.6-4,738.5 mg) amino acids. Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) were highest in macadamia nuts (81.3%), whereas polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were highest in the walnuts (76.7%). Macadamia nuts did not contain any vitamin E, whereas sunflower seeds contained the highest level (60.3 mg/kg). Iron (Fe) content was highest in pumpkin seeds (95.85 ± 33.01 ppm), zinc (Zn) content was highest in pistachios (67.24 ± 30.25 ppm), copper (Cu) content was greatest in walnuts (25.45 ± 21.51 ppm), and lead (Pb) content was greatest in wheat nuts (25.49 ± 4.64 ppm), significantly (P < 0.05). In conclusion, current commercial nuts and seeds have no safety concerns, although further analysis of Pb contents is necessary to ensure safety. PMID:23610599

  10. Unnecessary Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  11. Chemical Peels

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and ... dermatologist Home Public and patients Diseases and treatments Cosmetic treatments Chemical peels public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases ...

  12. Chemical Agents

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Info Chemical Emergencies A–Z Abrin Adamsite Ammonia Arsenic Arsine Barium Benzene Brevetoxin Bromine BZ Carbon monoxide ... X Y Z A Abrin Adamsite (DM) Ammonia Arsenic Arsine (SA) B Barium Benzene Brevetoxin Bromine (CA) ...

  13. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  14. Apxs Chemical Composition of the Kimberley Sandstone in Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellert, R.; Boyd, N.; Campbell, J. L.; VanBommel, S.; Thompson, L. M.; Schmidt, M. E.; Berger, J. A.; Clark, B. C.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Yen, A. S.; Fisk, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Kimberley was chosen as a major waypoint of the MSL rover Curiosity on its way to Mount Sharp. APXS data before drilling showed interestingly high K, Fe and Zn. This warranted drilling of the fine-grained sandstone for detailed investigations with SAM and Chemin. With significantly lower Na, Al and higher K, Mg and Fe, the composition of the drill target Windjana is very distinct from the previous ones in the mudstones at Yellowknife Bay. Up to 2000 ppm Br and 4000 ppm Zn post-brush were among the highest measured values in Gale Crater. The excavated fines, stemming from about 6cm, showed lower Br, but even higher Zn. Preliminary Chemin results indicate K-feldspar and magnetite being major mineral phases in Windjana, which is consistent with the pre drill APXS result and derived CIPW norms. Inside the accessible work volume of the arm at the drill site ChemCam exposed a greyish, shinier patch of rock underneath the dust, dubbed Stephen. ChemCam sees a high Mn signal in most of the spots. An APXS integration revealed high MnO as well (~4%), in addition to high Mg, Cl,K,Ni,Zn,Br,Cu,Ge and for the first time an APXS detectable amount of ~300 ppm Co. The surface might reflect a thin surface layer and may underestimate the higher Z elemental concentration since the APXS analysis assumes an infinite sample. Important elemental correlations are likely not impacted. A four spot daytime raster of Stephen before leaving the drill site showed a good correlation of Mn with Zn, Cu and Ni. All spots have 3-3.5% Cl, the highest values measured on Mars so far. While the stratigraphic setting of the Stephen sample is discussed elsewhere, the similarity with Mn deep-sea nodules is striking, e.g. the APXS calibration sample GBW07296. Whatever process formed Stephen, the process of Mn scavenging high Z trace metals from solutions seems to have happened similarly at this site on Mars.

  15. Mantle Metasomatism in Mars: Evidence from Bulk Chemical Compositions of Martian Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    Bulk compositions of martian meteorite basalts suggest that they formed from a highly depleted mantle that was variably metasomatised and enriched in incompatible elements. These results are consistent with radio-isotope results. Bulk chemical compositions of basaltic rocks retain clues and tracers to their origins and histories. Interpretations of bulk compositions are not so straight-forward as once envisioned, because real-world magmatic processes can be far from theoretical simple models like one-stage partial melting or closed-system fractional crystallization. Yet, bulk chemistry can shed a broad (if dim) light on Martian basalt petrogenesis that complements the sharply focussed illumination of radio-isotope systematics.

  16. A Raman model for determining the chemical composition of silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Genova, Danilo; Morgavi, Daniele; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Neuville, Daniel R.; Perugini, Diego; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique based on inelastic scattering of monochromatic light which provides information about molecular vibrations of the investigated sample. Since the discovery of the Raman Effect (1928) in scattered light from liquids, the Raman investigation has been extended to a large number of substances at different pressure-temperature conditions. Recently, the Raman instrument setup has rapidly grown thanks to the progress in development of lasers, charge coupled devices and confocal systems (see Neuville et al. 2014 for a review). Here we present the first Raman model able to determine the chemical composition of silicate glasses. In this study we combine chemical analysis from magma mixing experiments between remelted basaltic and rhyolitic melts, with a high spatial resolution Raman spectroscopy investigation; we focus on tracking the evolution of the Raman spectrum with chemical composition of silicate glasses. The mixing process is driven by a recently-developed apparatus that generates chaotic streamlines in the melts (Morgavi et al., 2013), mimicking the development of magma mixing in nature. From these experiments we obtained a glassy filament with a chemical composition ranging from a basalt to a rhyolite. Raman and microprobe measurements have been performed on a filament of ~1000 ?m diameter, every 2.5-20 ?m. The evolution of the acquired Raman spectra with the measured chemical composition has been parametrized by combining both the Raman spectra of the basaltic and rhyolitic end-members. Using the developed Raman model we have been able to determine the chemical composition (mol% of SiO2, Al2O3, FeO, CaO, MgO, Na2O and K2O) of the investigated filament. Additionally, the proposed Raman model has been successfully tested using external remelted natural samples; reference glasses (Jochum et al., 2000), a remelted basalt, andesite from Etna and Montserrat respectively. Finally, as the Raman spectrum depends on the silicate structure yielding information about network-forming structural units (Qn species, where n indicates the number of bridging oxygen), we combined the deconvoluted Raman spectra, in the rhyolitic field, with the chemical analyses and abundance of Qn species. This demonstrate how the evolution of silicate structure might control the bimodal eruptive style (explosive vs effusive) as shown by silica-rich volcanic systems. References: D. Morgavi et al., 2013. Morphochemistry of patterns produced by mixing of rhyolitic and basaltic melts. JVGR, 253, 87-96. D. R. Neuville, et al. 2014. Advances in Raman Spectroscopy Applied to Earth and Material Sciences. Rev. Min. Geochem., 78, 509-541.

  17. Relating particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity to chemical composition during the HCCT-2010 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. J.; Poulain, L.; Henning, S.; Dieckmann, K.; Birmili, W.; Merkel, M.; van Pinxteren, D.; Spindler, G.; Müller, K.; Stratmann, F.; Herrmann, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-03-01

    Particle hygroscopic growth at RH =90%, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, and size-resolved chemical composition were concurrently measured in the Thüringer Wald mid-level mountain range in central Germany in fall season of 2010. The median hygroscopicity parameter values, ?, of 50, 75, 100, 150, 200, and 250 nm particles derived from hygroscopicity measurements are respectively 0.14, 0.14, 0.17, 0.21, 0.24, and 0.28 during the sampling period. The closure between HTDMA-measured (?HTDMA) and chemical composition-derived (?chem) hygroscopicity parameters was performed based on the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule. Using size-averaged chemical composition, the ? values are substantially overpredicted (30% and 40% for 150 and 100 nm particles). Introducing size-resolved chemical composition substantially improved closure, and the differences between ?HTDMA and ?chem are within 10%. We found that the evaporation of NH4NO3, which may happen in H-TDMA system, could lead to a discrepancy in predicted and measured particle hygroscopic growth. The hygroscopic parameter of the organic fraction, ?org is positively correlated with the O : C ratio (?org =0.19 · (O : C)-0.03). Such correlation is helpful to define the ?org value in the closure study. ? derived from CCN measurement was around 30% (varied with particle diameters) higher than that determined from particle hygroscopic growth measurements (here, hydrophilic mode is considered only). This difference might be explained by the surface tension effects, solution non-ideality, and the partial solubility of constituents or non-dissolved particle matter. However, due to these effects being included in HTDMA-derived ? calculations, we could not distinguish the specific roles of these effects in creating this gap. Therefore, extrapolating from HTDMA data to properties at the point of activation should be done with great care. Finally, closure study between CCNc-measured (?CCN) and chemical composition (?CCN,chem) was performed using CCNc-derived ? values for individual components. The results show that the ?CCN can be well predicted using particle size-resolved chemical composition and the ZSR mixing rule.

  18. Enamels in stained glass windows: Preparation, chemical composition, microstructure and causes of deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schalm, O.; Van der Linden, V.; Frederickx, P.; Luyten, S.; Van der Snickt, G.; Caen, J.; Schryvers, D.; Janssens, K.; Cornelis, E.; Van Dyck, D.; Schreiner, M.

    2009-08-01

    Stained glass windows incorporating dark blue and purple enamel paint layers are in some cases subject to severe degradation while others from the same period survived the ravages of time. A series of dark blue, green-blue and purple enamel glass paints from the same region (Northwestern Europe) and from the same period (16-early 20th centuries) has been studied by means of a combination of microscopic X-ray fluorescence analysis, electron probe micro analysis and transmission electron microscopy with the aim of better understanding the causes of the degradation. The chemical composition of the enamels diverges from the average chemical composition of window glass. Some of the compositions appear to be unstable, for example those with a high concentration of K 2O and a low content of CaO and PbO. In other cases, the deterioration of the paint layers was caused by the less than optimal vitrification of the enamel during the firing process. Recipes and chemical compositions indicate that glassmakers of the 16-17th century had full control over the color of the enamel glass paints they made. They mainly used three types of coloring agents, based on Co (dark blue), Mn (purple) and Cu (light-blue or green-blue) as coloring elements. Blue-purple enamel paints were obtained by mixing two different coloring agents. The coloring agent for red-purple enamel, introduced during the 19th century, was colloidal gold embedded in grains of lead glass.

  19. Spectroscopic Investigations of the Chemical Composition and Coma Morphology of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, D.; Lewis, B.; Vaughan, C.; Cochran, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ground-based emission spectroscopy at optical wavelengths is important for understanding the chemical composition of comets. We have made spectroscopic observations of comets using both long-slit and integral-field unit spectrographs on the Harlan J. Smith telescope at the University of Texas McDonald Observatory in order to study radical species in cometary comae. We will discuss the techniques used to extract chemical abundances in comets from these data and show how the spatial distribution of the observed species and large-scale coma morphological features (e.g. jets or fans) are mapped and characterized. Analyses of data we have acquired for several comets to date will be presented that examine their chemical abundances, track the temporal evolution of coma morphology in relation to nuclear rotational behavior (where known), and gauge potential chemical heterogeneity of cometary nuclei. We will also place this work into broader context by comparing our results to existing large-sample photometric and spectroscopic surveys of comets, as well as comparing our results to those obtained during prior apparitions to determine whether these comets show any evolutionary changes in measured chemical abundances or sources of outgassing on their surfaces. This work has been funded by the NSF GK-12 STEM Fellowship program, NASA's Planetary Astronomy and Planetary Atmospheres programs, and the Fund for Astrophysical Research, Inc.

  20. Surface chemical composition of human maxillary first premolar as assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Leo; Nelson, Alan E.; Heo, Giseon; Major, Paul W.

    2008-08-01

    The surface chemical composition of dental enamel has been postulated as a contributing factor in the variation of bond strength of brackets bonded to teeth, and hence, the probability of bracket failure during orthodontic treatment. This study systematically investigated the chemical composition of 98 bonding surfaces of human maxillary premolars using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to ascertain compositional differences between right and left first premolars. The major elements detected in all samples were calcium, phosphorus, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. Surface compositions were highly variable between samples and several elements were found to be highly correlated. No statistical significant difference in the chemical composition of the maxillary right and left first premolars was found ( p > 0.05). Knowledge of the chemical composition of enamel surfaces will facilitate future studies that relate this information to the variations in dental enamel bond strength.

  1. Gamma irradiation effect on the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, D. Halide, H. Kurniawan, D.; Wahab, A. W.

    2014-09-25

    The chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. (sweet potato) were studied by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity. The irradiation treatment was performed by using Cs-137 as a gamma sources in experimental equipment. Treatment by irradiation emerges as a possible conservation technique that has been tested successfully in several food products. The amount of chemical composition was changed and resulting new chemical for absorbed dose 40 mSv. Interestingly, it was found that gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant activity, as measured by DPPH radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extract was dramatically increased in the non-irradiated sample to the sample irradiated at 40 mSv. These results indicate that gamma irradiation of Ipomoea batatas L. extract can enhance its antioxidant activity through the formation of a new chemical compound. Based on these results, increased antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extracts by gamma rays can be applied to various industries, especially cosmetics, foodstuffs, and pharmaceuticals.

  2. Gamma irradiation effect on the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, D.; Halide, H.; Wahab, A. W.; Kurniawan, D.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. (sweet potato) were studied by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity. The irradiation treatment was performed by using Cs-137 as a gamma sources in experimental equipment. Treatment by irradiation emerges as a possible conservation technique that has been tested successfully in several food products. The amount of chemical composition was changed and resulting new chemical for absorbed dose 40 mSv. Interestingly, it was found that gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant activity, as measured by DPPH radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extract was dramatically increased in the non-irradiated sample to the sample irradiated at 40 mSv. These results indicate that gamma irradiation of Ipomoea batatas L. extract can enhance its antioxidant activity through the formation of a new chemical compound. Based on these results, increased antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extracts by gamma rays can be applied to various industries, especially cosmetics, foodstuffs, and pharmaceuticals.

  3. Chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section.

  4. Effect of chemical degradation followed by toothbrushing on the surface roughness of restorative composites

    PubMed Central

    VOLTARELLI, Fernanda Regina; dos SANTOS-DAROZ, Claudia Batitucci; ALVES, Marcelo Corrêa; CAVALCANTI, Andrea Nóbrega; MARCHI, Giselle Maria

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of the exposure to food-simulating liquids prior to brushing simulation on the surface roughness of five composite materials (Quixfil, Filtek Supreme, Esthet-X, Filtek Z250, Tetric Ceram). Material and methods Twenty cylinders (5 mm diameter and 4 mm height) of each composite were randomly allocated to 4 groups (n=5), according to the food-simulating liquid in which they were immersed for 7 days at 37ºC: artificial saliva, heptane, citric acid, and ethanol. After this period, the top surface of composite cylinders was submitted to 7,500 brushing cycles (200 g load). Measurements of the surface roughness (Ra, µm) were carried out before and after the exposure to the chemicals/brushing simulation. Changes on the morphology of composite surfaces were observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The statistical analysis (ANOVA with cofactor / Tukey's test, ?=5%) detected a significant interaction between solutions and composite resins. Esthet-X, Filtek Z250 and Tetric Ceram were not affected by the food-simulating liquids/toothbrushing. Citric acid and ethanol increased the surface roughness of Quixfil and Filtek Supreme, respectively. SEM images corroborate the surface roughness findings, demonstrating the negative effect from chemical solutions and mechanical abrasion. Conclusions The surface roughness of composite resin materials are differently affected by the food-simulating solutions, depending on the immersion media. PMID:21308289

  5. Influence of chemical composition of precipitation on migration of radioactive caesium in natural soils.

    PubMed

    Thørring, H; Skuterud, L; Steinnes, E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the impact of the chemical composition of precipitation on radiocaesium mobility in natural soil. This was done through column studies. Three types of precipitation regimes were studied, representing a natural range found in Norway: Acidic precipitation (southernmost part of the country); precipitation rich in marine cations (highly oceanic coastal areas); and low concentrations of sea salts (slightly continental inland areas). After 50 weeks and a total precipitation supply of ?10 000 L m(-2) per column, results indicate that acidic precipitation increased the mobility of (134)Cs added during the experiment. However, depth distribution of already present Chernobyl fallout (137)Cs was not significantly affected by the chemical composition of precipitation. PMID:24704765

  6. Chemical composition and moisture-absorption/retention ability of polysaccharides extracted from five algae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Jin, Weihua; Hou, Yun; Niu, Xizhen; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Quanbin

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we prepared seven polysaccharides extracted from five algae including one brown alga Saccharina japonica, one red alga Porphyra haitanensis and three green algae Codium fragile, Enteromorpha linza and Bryopsis plumose. The chemical composition and capability of moisture-absorption and moisture-retention were investigated in comparison with those of hyaluronic acid (HA). The low molecular weight polysaccharides extracted from brown seaweed exhibited the highest moisture-absorption and moisture-retention abilities of all of the polysaccharides studied and performed better than HA. The relationships between chemical composition (including sulfated groups, monosaccharide, and molecular weight) and the functions of polysaccharides were also studied. We found the sulfated group was a main active site for moisture-absorption and moisture-retention abilities. These abilities were also related to molecular weight; with the exception of the low molecular weight polysaccharide extracted from red seaweed, lower molecular weight improved moisture-absorption and moisture-retention abilities. PMID:23500437

  7. Expected gamma-ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines were calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions were those of Reedy and Arnold and Lingenfelter. The areal resolution of the experiment was calculated to be around 70 to 140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method was described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  8. Spectrum and chemical composition of the remarkable planetary nebula NGC 6537

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W.; Aller, L. H.; Keyes, C. D.; Czyzak, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    The planetary nebula NGC 6537 appears to be an irregular bipolar object. Conventional procedures have been employed to observe the spectrum of NGC 6537 with the image dissector scanner at the Lick 3-m telescope. Both red- and green-sensitive tubes were employed in order to cover the spectrum from the practical UV limit near lambda 3300 A to the near-infrared limit near lambda 8600 A. The instrumental response function was determined on the basis of the observation of suitable comparison stars. On Oct. 23, 1984, observations with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) were obtained. A table containing the optical region spectrum of NGC 6537 is presented along with a table providing the UV fluxes, a table listing the ionic concentrations, and a table with data describing the chemical composition of NGC 6537. Attention is given to theoretical models and the determination of the nebular chemical composition, and aspects of plasma diagnostics.

  9. Chemical composition, phytotoxic and antifungal properties of Ruta chalepensis L. essential oils.

    PubMed

    Bouabidi, Wafa; Hanana, Mohsen; Gargouri, Samia; Amri, Ismail; Fezzani, Tarek; Ksontini, Mustapha; Jamoussi, Bassem; Hamrouni, Lamia

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition, and phytotoxic and antifungal activities of the essential oils isolated by using hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Tunisian rue were evaluated. Significant variations were observed among harvest periods. The analysis of the chemical composition by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry showed that 2-undecanone (33.4-49.8%), 2-heptanol acetate (13.5-15.4%) and ?-pinene (9.8-11.9%) were the main components. The antifungal ability of rue essential oils was tested by using disc agar diffusion against ten plant pathogenic fungi. A high antifungal activity was observed for the essential oil isolated at flowering developmental phase. Furthermore, rue essential oils showed high level of herbicidal activity against several weeds. PMID:25553803

  10. Variation of the glass transition temperature with rigidity and chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumis, Gerardo

    2007-03-01

    The effects of flexibility and chemical composition in the variation of the glass transition temperature are obtained by using the Lindemann criteria, that relates melting temperature with atomic vibrations, and rigidity theory. Using this criteria and that floppy modes at low frequencies enhance in a considerable way the average cuadratic displacement, we show that the consequence is a modified glass transition temperature. This approach allows to obtain in a simple way the empirically modified Gibbs-DiMarzio law, which has been widely used in chalcogenide glasses to fit the changes in the glass transition temperature with the chemical composition . The method predicts that the constant that appears in the law depends upon the ratio of two characteristic frequencies (or temperatures). This constant is estimated for the Se-Ge-As glass by using the experimental density of vibrational states, and the result shows a very good agreement with the experimental fit from glass transition temperature variation.

  11. Determination of Chemical Compositions on Adult Kidney Stones—A Spectroscopic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, K.; Rakkappan, C.

    2008-11-01

    The chemical compositions of the kidney stones of both the sexes of patients, aged from 40 to 70, living in and around Chidambaram town are determined by using FT-IR and X-RD technique. The kidney stone samples used in the present study were procured from the Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital, Annamalai University. The FT-IR spectra of different kidney stone samples were recorded in the range of 4000-400 cm-1. By identifying the characteristic frequency, the chemical compositions of the samples are determined. The results analyzed by FTIR technique were confirmed by X-RD method, in which the recorded X-ray diffractogram are compared with JCPDS files using search match method. Further analysis of XRD pattern also reveals the same.

  12. Chemical composition of the essential oil and fixed oil Bauhinia pentandra (Bong.) D. Dietr

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Macia C. S.; Souza, Luciana G. S.; Ferreira, Daniele A.; Monte, Francisco J. Q.; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; de Lemos, Telma L. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bauhinia pentandrais popularly known as “mororó” and inhabits the Caatinga and Savannah biomes. Objective: This paper reports the chemical composition of the essential and fatty oils of the leaves from B. pentandra. Materials and Methods: The essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and the fixed oil by extraction with hexane, followed by saponification with KOH/MeOH, and methylation using MeOH/HCl. The constituents were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: The major constituent of the essential oil was the phytol (58.78% ±8.51%), and of the fatty oil were palmitic (29.03%), stearic (28.58%) and linolenic (10.53%) acids. Conclusion: Of the compounds identified in the essential oil, three are first reported in this species, and this is the first record of the chemical composition of the fixed oil. PMID:26664026

  13. Neem cake: chemical composition and larvicidal activity on Asian tiger mosquito.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Marcello; Mariani, Susanna; Maccioni, Oliviero; Coccioletti, Tiziana; Murugan, Kardaray

    2012-07-01

    New pesticides based on natural products are urgently needed, in consideration of their environmental care and lower collateral effects. Neem oil, the main product obtained from Azadiractha indica A. Juss, commonly known as neem tree, is mainly used in medical devices, cosmetics and soaps, as well as important insecticide. Manufacturing of neem oil first includes the collection of the neem seeds as raw material used for the extraction. Neem cake is the waste by-product remaining after extraction processes. The quality of the oil, as that of the cake, strictly depends from the quality of seeds as well as from the type of extraction processes used, which strongly influences the chemical composition of the product. Currently, the different types of commercial neem cake on the market are roughly identified as oiled and deoiled cake, but several other differences can be detected. The differences are relevant and must be determined, to obtain the necessary correlation between chemical constitution and larvicidal activities. Six different batches of neem cake, marketed by several Indian and European companies, were analyzed by HPLC and HPTLC, and their fingerprints compared, obtaining information about the different compositions, focusing in particular on nortriterpenes, considered as the main active components of neem oil. Therefore, the chemical composition of each cake was connected with the biological activitiy, i.e., the effects of the extracts of the six neem cakes were tested on eggs and larvae of Aedes albopictus (Stegomyia albopicta) (Diptera: Culicidae), commonly known as Asian tiger mosquito. The results confirmed the previously reported larvicide effects of neem cake that, however, can now be related to the chemical composition, in particular with nortriterpenes, allowing in that way to discriminate between the quality of the various marketed products, as potential domestic insecticides. PMID:22422292

  14. Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Fragrant Mexican Copal (Bursera spp.).

    PubMed

    Gigliarelli, Giulia; Becerra, Judith X; Curini, Massimo; Marcotullio, Maria Carla

    2015-01-01

    Copal is the Spanish word used to describe aromatic resins from several genera of plants. Mexican copal derives from several Bursera spp., Protium copal, some Pinus spp. (e.g., P. pseudostrobus) and a few Fabaceae spp. It has been used for centuries as incense for religious ceremonies, as a food preservative, and as a treatment for several illnesses. The aim of this review is to analyze the chemical composition and biological activity of commercial Mexican Bursera copal. PMID:26703535

  15. Essential-oil composition and chemical variability of Senecio vulgaris L. from Corsica.

    PubMed

    Andreani, Stéphane; Paolini, Julien; Costa, Jean; Muselli, Alain

    2015-05-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils isolated from the aerial parts of Senecio vulgaris plants collected in 30 Corsican localities was characterized using GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. Altogether, 54 components, which accounted for 95.2% of the total oil composition, were identified in the 30 essential-oil samples. The main compounds were ?-humulene (1; 57.3%), (E)-?-caryophyllene (2; 5.6%), terpinolene (3; 5.3%), ar-curcumene (4; 4.3%), and geranyl linalool (5; 3.4%). The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from separate organs and during the complete vegetative cycle of the plants were also studied, to gain more knowledge about the plant ecology. The production of monoterpene hydrocarbons, especially terpinolene, seems to be implicated in the plant-flowering process and, indirectly, in the dispersal of this weed species. Comparison of the present results with the literature highlighted the originality of the Corsican S. vulgaris essential oils and indicated that ?-humulene might be used as taxonomical marker for the future classification of the Senecio genus. A study of the chemical variability of the 30 S. vulgaris essential oils using statistical analysis allowed the discrimination of two main clusters according to the soil nature of the sample locations. These results confirmed that there is a relation between the soil nature, the chemical composition of the essential oils, and morphological plant characteristics. Moreover, they are of interest for commercial producers of essential oil in selecting the most appropriate plants. PMID:26010664

  16. Table 1 Chemical composition of steels, wt-% Steel C Si Mn Cr Fe

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    that the reaction rate was accelerated by decreasing the grain size, because of an increase in the number density of maximum heating temperature on the overall kinetics of the bainite transform- ation. The reaction rateTable 1 Chemical composition of steels, wt-% Steel C Si Mn Cr Fe A 0·12 2·03 2·96 ... Bal. B 0·96 0

  17. In-situ DLC/TiC composite coating by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsiao Lei; Hon, Min Hsiung

    1995-12-31

    In-situ diamond like carbon (DLC)/TiC composite film was coated on silicon wafer, steel and glass substrates with titanium chloride, methane, hydrogen and argon gas mixtures by R.F. plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectra showed the coexistance of DLC and TiC in the films. The growth rate and DLC/TiC ratio of these films were investigated as a function of the inert gas flow rate.

  18. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Pinus halepensis Miller growing in West Northern of Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Fekih, Nadia; Allali, Hocine; Merghache, Salima; Chaïb, Faïza; Merghache, Djamila; El Amine, Mohamed; Djabou, Nassim; Muselli, Alain; Tabti, Boufeldja; Costa, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Objective To find new bioactive natural products, the chemical composition and to sudy the antibacterial activity of essential oil components extracted from the aerial parts of the Algerian aromatic plant Pinus halepensis Miller (P. halepensis) (needles, twigs and buds). Methods The essential oil used in this study was isolated by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus according to the European Pharmacopoeia. The chemical composition was investigated using GC-retention indices (RI) and GC-MS. Results Forty-nine compounds, representing 97.9% of the total collective oil, were identified. Essential oil was dominated by hydrocarbon compounds (80.6%) especially monoterpenes (65.5%). The major compounds from ten oils stations were: myrcene (15.2%-32.0%), ?-pinene (12.2%-24.5%), E-?-caryophyllene (7.0%-17.1%), terpinolene (1.8%-13.3%), 2-phenyl ethyl isovalerate (4.8%-10.9%), terpinene-4-ol (1.0%-8.2 %) and sabinene (1.5%-6.3%). The intra-species variations of the chemical compositions of P. halepensis aerial parts essential oils from ten Algerian sample locations were investigated using statistical analysis. Essential oil samples were clustered in 2 groups by hierarchical cluster analysis, according to their chemical composition. The essential oil revealed an interesting antimicrobial effect against Lysteria monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusions These results suggest that the essential oil from P. halepensis may be a new potential source as natural antimicrobial applied in pharmaceutical and food industries.

  19. Concentration of mycotoxins and chemical composition of corn silage: A farm survey using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, P; Novinski, C O; Junges, D; Almeida, R; de Souza, C M

    2015-09-01

    This work evaluated the chemical composition and mycotoxin incidence in corn silage from 5 Brazilian dairy-producing regions: Castro, in central-eastern Paraná State (n=32); Toledo, in southwestern Paraná (n=20); southeastern Goiás (n=14); southern Minas Gerais (n=23); and western Santa Catarina (n=20). On each dairy farm, an infrared thermography camera was used to identify 3 sampling sites that exhibited the highest temperature, a moderate temperature, and the lowest temperature on the silo face, and 1 sample was collected from each site. The chemical composition and concentrations of mycotoxins were evaluated, including the levels of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2; zearalenone; ochratoxin A; deoxynivalenol; and fumonisins B1 and B2. The corn silage showed a highly variable chemical composition, containing, on average, 7.1±1.1%, 52.5±5.4%, and 65.2±3.6% crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and total digestible nutrients, respectively. Mycotoxins were found in more than 91% of the samples, with zearalenone being the most prevalent (72.8%). All samples from the Castro region contained zearalenone at a high average concentration (334±374µg/kg), even in well-preserved silage. The incidence of aflatoxin B1 was low (0.92%). Silage temperature and the presence of mycotoxins were not correlated; similarly, differences were not observed in the concentration or incidence of mycotoxins across silage locations with different temperatures. Infrared thermography is an accurate tool for identifying heat sites, but temperature cannot be used to predict the chemical composition or the incidence of mycotoxins that have been analyzed, within the silage. The pre-harvest phase of the ensiling process is most likely the main source of mycotoxins in silage. PMID:26162792

  20. [Chemical composition of breast milk in females with preterm deliveries in the Primorsky Krai].

    PubMed

    Beniova, S N; Rudenko, N V; Maslov, D V; Anan'ev, V Iu

    2013-01-01

    In the article there are presented data on the chemical composition of breast milk in females with preterm labor in the Primorye Territory, who were in the Department of newborns for premature babies of the Municipal Institution of Health "Children's city clinical hospital" in Vladivostok during 2010-2011 to care for their newborn infants. Laboratory studies were performed in the Federal State Institution of Health "Center of Hygiene and Epidemiology in the Primorye Territory." PMID:24340586

  1. Chemical composition and lipoxygenase activity in soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr.) submitted to gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Érica Amanda de; Broetto, Fernando; Bressan, Dayanne F.; Sartori, Maria M. P.; Costa, Vladimir E.

    2014-05-01

    Soybeans are an important food due to their functional and nutritional characteristics. However, consumption by western populations is limited by the astringent taste of soybeans and their derivatives which results from the action of lipoxygenase, an enzyme activated during product processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the chemical composition and specific activity of lipoxygenase in different soybean cultivars. Soybeans were stored in plastic bags and irradiated with doses of 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy. The chemical composition (moisture, protein, lipids, ashes, crude fiber, and carbohydrates) and lipoxygenase specific activity were determined for each sample. Gamma irradiation induced a small increase of protein and lipid content in some soybean cultivars, which did not exceed the highest content of 5% and 26%, respectively, when compared to control. Lipoxygenase specific activity decreased in the three cultivars with increasing gamma irradiation dose. In conclusion, the gamma irradiation doses used are suitable to inactivate part of lipoxygenase while not causing expressive changes in the chemical composition of the cultivars studied.

  2. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of a Lebanese plant Euphorbia macroclada schyzoceras

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Hussein; Rammal, Hassan; Hijazi, Akram; Daher, Ahmad; Reda, Mohamad; Annan, Hussein; Chokr, Ali; Bassal, Ali; Badran, Bassam; Ghaloub, Abdulameer Nasser

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the chemical composition, total phenolic and total flavonoid contents of the crude extracts from leaves and stems of a Lebanese plant Euphorbia macroclada schyzoceras (E. macroclada), and to evaluate their antioxidant potential using DPPH, H2O2, and chelating of ferrous ions tests. Methods Quantification of the total phenolic and total flavonoid contents of the crude extracts from leaves and stems and the antioxidant activities were evaluated using spectrophotometric analyses. The chemical composition has been estimated using different techniques such as IR, LC/MS and NMR. Results Ethanolic extract from leaves of E. macroclada was better than aqueous extract and showed higher content in total phenolic and total flavonoid than found in the stems. On the other hand, using DPPH and H2O2 tests, this extract from leaves showed higher antioxidant capacity than aqueous extract. However, using the chelating of ferrous ions test, the antioxidant activity of the aqueous extract of both stems and leaves was stronger than that of ethanolic once. The chemical composition of the whole plant showed the presence of some aromatic compounds and fatty acids. Conclusions Both ethanolic and water extracts from both parts of this plant are effective and have good antioxidant power. So, this plant can be used in the prevention of a number of diseases related to oxidative stress. PMID:23836193

  3. Relationship between the surface chemical composition of implants and contact with the substrate.

    PubMed

    Lima da Costa Valente, Mariana; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; Marcantonio Junior, Elcio; Reis, Andréa Candido Dos

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to use scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry to assess possible morphologic and chemical changes after performing double-insertion and pullout tests of implants of different shapes and surface treatments. Four different types of implants were used-cylindrical machined-surface implants, cylindrical double-surface-treated porous implants, cylindrical surface-treated porous implants, and tapered surface-treated porous implants-representing a total of 32 screws. The implants were inserted into synthetic bone femurs, totaling 8 samples, before performing each insertion with standardized torque. After each pullout the implants were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry using a universal testing machine and magnified 35 times. No structural changes were detected on morphological surface characterization, only substrate accumulation. As for composition, there were concentration differences in the titanium, oxygen, and carbon elements. Implants with surface acid treatment undergo greater superficial changes in chemical composition than machined implants, that is, the greater the contact area of the implant with the substrate, the greater the oxide layer change. In addition, prior manipulation can alter the chemical composition of implants, typically to a greater degree in surface-treated implants. PMID:23339297

  4. Refinery piping fires resulting from variations in chemical composition of piping materials

    SciTech Connect

    Setterlund, R.B.

    1996-07-01

    A number of refinery fires in recent years are traceable to variations in the chemical composition of piping materials. These fires are typically more destructive than those due to other causes and can take place without warning. Some, but not all, were the result of the inadvertent use of carbon steel in alloy steel piping systems. Others were the result of alloy welds in carbon steel systems while still others were due to variations in residual elements leading to anomalous corrosion behavior. Recommendations are given on areas of refinery units where the greatest need for close control of material composition exists.

  5. A miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for in situ chemical composition investigation of lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuland, M. B.; Mezger, K.; Riedo, A.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.

    2015-10-01

    A miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer (LMS) is presented. The LMS is designed as a flight instrument for planetary and space research and optimised for in situ measurements of the chemical composition of rocks and soils on a planetary surface. By means of measure-ments standard reference materials of soil and a sample of the Allende meteorite we demonstrate that LMS is a suitable instrument for in situ measurements of elemental and isotopic composition with high precision and accuracy. Furthermore, it is shown that LMS data allows deriving of the material mineralogy and petrology with high spatial resolution, lateral and vertical, and the application of in situ age dating methods.

  6. Exploring the Chemical Sensitivity of a Carbon Nanotube/Green Tea Composite

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanan; Lee, Yang Doo; Vedala, Harindra; Allen, Brett L.; Star, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess unique electronic and physical properties, which make them very attractive for a wide range of applications. In particular, SWNTs and their composites have shown a great potential for chemical and biological sensing. Green tea, or more specifically its main antioxidant component, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), has been found to disperse SWNTs in water. However, the chemical sensitivity of this SWNT/green tea (SWNT/EGCG) composite remained unexplored. With EGCG present, this SWNT composite should have strong antioxidant properties and thus respond to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we report on fabrication and characterization of SWNT/EGCG thin films and the measurement of their relative conductance as a function of H2O2 concentrations. We further investigated the sensing mechanism by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and field-effect transistor measurements (FET). We propose here that the response to H2O2 arises from the oxidation of EGCG in the composite. These findings suggest that SWNT/green tea composite has a great potential for developing simple resistivity-based sensors. PMID:21043457

  7. Exploring the chemical sensitivity of a carbon nanotube/green tea composite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanan; Lee, Yang Doo; Vedala, Harindra; Allen, Brett L; Star, Alexander

    2010-11-23

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess unique electronic and physical properties, which make them very attractive for a wide range of applications. In particular, SWNTs and their composites have shown a great potential for chemical and biological sensing. Green tea, or more specifically its main antioxidant component, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), has been found to disperse SWNTs in water. However, the chemical sensitivity of this SWNT/green tea (SWNT/EGCG) composite remained unexplored. With EGCG present, this SWNT composite should have strong antioxidant properties and thus respond to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we report on fabrication and characterization of SWNT/EGCG thin films and the measurement of their relative conductance as a function of H(2)O(2) concentrations. We further investigated the sensing mechanism by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and field-effect transistor measurements (FET). We propose here that the response to H(2)O(2) arises from the oxidation of EGCG in the composite. These findings suggest that SWNT/green tea composite has a great potential for developing simple resistivity-based sensors. PMID:21043457

  8. Access to data on chemical composition of products used in auto repair and body shops.

    PubMed

    Karstadt, M; Bobal, R

    1984-01-01

    Some information on chemical composition of products used in the workplace can be obtained by requesting composition data from product marketers. Workers in auto repair and body shops identified 253 products used in their shops. Full disclosure of composition was obtained for approximately 20% of the 174 products marketed by companies which answered our letters. Composition was partially disclosed for approximately 40% of the products, and about 10% of the product formulations were claimed to be trade secret or confidential. The study reported in this paper was carried out in New York State in 1980, before the effective date of the New York State right-to-know law. The results of this study can be used as a benchmark to judge the effectiveness of worker right-to-know laws and product labeling regulations. PMID:6517067

  9. Modification of Chemically Exfoliated Graphene to Produce Efficient Piezoresistive Polystyrene-Graphene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirpouri, Farzad; Pourmahmoudi, Hassan; Abbasi, Farhang; Littlejohn, Samuel; Chauhan, Ashok S.; Nogaret, Alain

    2015-10-01

    We report the chemical exfoliation of grapheneoxide from graphite and its subsequent reduction to graphene nanosheets (GN) to obtain highly conducting composites of graphene sheets in a polymer matrix. The effect of using graphite nanoparticles or flakes as precursors, and different drying methods, was investigated to obtain multilayer graphene sheets of atomically controlled thickness, which was essential to optimizing their dispersion in a polystyrene (PS) polymer matrix. In situ emulsion polymerization of the styrene monomer in the presence of GN was performed to obtain thin composite films with highly uniform dispersion and fewer graphene layers when GN were obtained from graphite flakes then freeze drying. The highest electrical conductivity of PS-GN composites was ~0.01 S/m for a graphene filling fraction of 2%. The piezoresistance of the PS-GN composites was evaluated and used in pressure sensor arrays with pressure field imaging capability.

  10. Delicious Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana M.

    This paper presents an approach to chemistry and nutrition that focuses on food items that people consider delicious. Information is organized according to three categories of food chemicals that provide energy to the human body: (1) fats and oils; (2) carbohydrates; and (3) proteins. Minerals, vitamins, and additives are also discussed along with…

  11. Chemical Evolution

    E-print Network

    Francesca Matteucci

    2007-04-05

    In this series of lectures we first describe the basic ingredients of galactic chemical evolution and discuss both analytical and numerical models. Then we compare model results for the Milky Way, Dwarf Irregulars, Quasars and the Intra-Cluster- Medium with abundances derived from emission lines. These comparisons allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar nucleosynthesis and the mechanisms of galaxy formation.

  12. Chemical Mahjong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  13. Chemical compositions of soluble aerosols around the last termination in the NEEM (Greenland) ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyabu, Ikumi; Iizuka, Yoshinori; Karlin, Torbjorn; Fukui, Manabu; Hondoh, Takeo; Hansson, Margareta

    2013-04-01

    The polar ice cores provide us with reconstruction of past atmospheric aerosols. Atmospheric aerosols such as dust and sea salt in both Arctic and Antarctic ice cores are well discussed by using the proxy of ion concentration/flux. Recently, studies on the chemical compositions of soluble aerosols in the ice cores have been carried out. The chemical compositions and transition of soluble aerosols in the Dome Fuji (Antarctica) has been revealed, however, there are few studies on those of soluble aerosols in Greenland ice cores. Using ice sublimation method #1, we analyzed the chemical compositions of soluble aerosols around the last termination in the NEEM (Greenland) ice core. A total of 43 samples were distributed from NEEM ice core section from 1280 to 1580 m. Soluble aerosols were extracted from the samples by sublimation system. Constituent elements and diameter of each non-volatile particle were measured by scanning electron micro scope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). By using a method in our recent paper #2, we assumed that particles containing Ca and S are calcium sulfate and particles containing Na and S are sodium sulfate. We divided around the last termination into 4 stages by focusing on the temperature; Holocene, Younger Dryas (YD), Bølling-Allerød (B-A) and Last Glacial Period (LGP), and compared the mass ratio of sulfate and chloride aerosols in each stage. During the cold stage in YD and LGP, calcium sulfate accounted large percentage of soluble aerosols. On the other hand, during the warm stage in Holocene and B-A, sodium sulfate accounted large percentage of soluble aerosols. These relationships between chemical composition and temperature are probably related to non sea salt (nss)-calcium ion concentration. We will discuss the relationship between nss-calcium ion concentration and chemical compositions of soluble aerosols in the presentation. References #1 Iizuka et al., J. Glaciol., 55(191), 58-64, 2009. #2 Iizuka, Y. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 117, D04308, 2012.

  14. Phylogenetic or environmental control on the organo-chemical composition of Sphagnum mosses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limpens, Juul; Nilsson, Mats

    2014-05-01

    Decomposition of organic material is one of the key processes that determines the size of the soil-feedback to global warming, but it is also a process surrounded with one of the largest uncertainties, making understanding its mechanistic drivers of crucial importance. In organic soils decomposition is closely determined by the organo-chemical composition of the litter entering the soil. But what, in turn drives the organo-chemical composition? Is it an emergent feature of the environment the species producing the litter grow in, or is it an evolutionary trait that can be tracked through the species' phylogeny? We set out to answer this question for one of the most import peat-forming plants on earth: the genus Sphagnum. We sampled 18 Sphagnum species, about equally distributed over 6 sites spanning a wide range of environmental conditions: most species were collected at multiple sites. For all species we characterised the chemical composition, focussing on three functional chemistry groups: (i) mineral elements, (ii) carbohydrate polymers (iii) non-carbohydrate polymers (aromatic and aliphatic compounds) . For each group of compounds we used multivariate statistical techniques to derive the degree of variation explained by environment: (site, position within site) and phylogeny (sections within genus Sphagnum). We found that the variation in mineral element concentrations was mostly explained by environment, with the biggest differences in the concentrations of basic cat-ions calcium and magnesium. In contrast, the variation in carbohydrates was mostly explained by phylogeny, with clear associations between sections and monosaccharides. The monosaccharide rhamnose was associated with species from the Acutifolia section known for their poor degradability, whereas xylose and galactose were closely associated with degradable species from the Cuspidata section. The composition non-carbohydrate polymers took an intermediate position: both environment and phylogeny explained a significant part of the variation. We conclude that organo-chemical composition a function of both environment and phylogeny, but that the relative importance of these drivers depends on the type of compounds studied. Environment mainly drives the mineral element composition and a large part of the non-carbohydrate polymer composition, whereas phylogeny drives the variation in carbohydrate polymers. In our presentation we discuss the implications of our findings for carbon accumulation in peatlands and decomposition processes in general.

  15. Effects of chemical fuel composition on energy generation from thermopower waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Taehan; Hwang, Hayoung; Jeong, Dong-Cheol; Lee, Kang Yeol; Hong, Jongsup; Song, Changsik; Choi, Wonjoon

    2014-11-01

    Thermopower waves, which occur during combustion within hybrid structures formed from nanomaterials and chemical fuels, result in a self-propagating thermal reaction and concomitantly generate electrical energy from the acceleration of charge carriers along the nanostructures. The hybrid structures for thermopower waves are composed of two primary components: the core thermoelectric material and the combustible fuel. So far, most studies have focused on investigating various nanomaterials for improving energy generation. Herein, we report that the composition of the chemical fuel used has a significant effect on the power generated by thermopower waves. Hybrid nanostructures consisting of mixtures of picric acid and picramide with sodium azide were synthesized and used to generate thermopower waves. A maximum voltage of ˜2 V and an average peak specific power as high as 15 kW kg-1 were obtained using the picric acid/sodium azide/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) array composite. The average reaction velocity and the output voltage in the case of the picric acid/sodium azide were 25 cm s-1 and 157 mV, while they were 2 cm s-1 and 3 mV, in the case of the picramide/sodium azide. These marked differences are attributable to the chemical and structural differences of the mixtures. Mixing picric acid and sodium azide in deionized water resulted in the formation of 2,4,6-trinitro sodium phenoxide and hydrogen azide (H-N3), owing to the exchange of H+ and Na+ ions, as well as the formation of fiber-like structures, because of benzene ? stacking. The negative enthalpy of formation of the new compounds and the fiber-like structures accelerate the reaction and increase the output voltage. Elucidating the effects of the composition of the chemical fuel used in the hybrid nanostructures will allow for the control of the combustion process and help optimize the energy generated from thermopower waves, furthering the development of thermopower waves as an energy source.

  16. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Activities of Three Polysaccharide Fractions from Pine Cones

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Bo; Yang, Xin; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Hai-Tian; Lu, Wei-Hong; Cui, Jie; Cheng, Cui-Lin; Zou, Pan; Huang, Wei-Wei; Wang, Pu; Li, Wen-Jing; Hu, Xing-Long

    2012-01-01

    The traditional method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for monosaccharide component analysis with pretreatment of acetylation is described with slight modifications and verified in detail in this paper. It was then successfully applied to the quantitative analysis of component monosaccharides in polysaccharides extracted from the pine cones. The results demonstrated that the three pine cone polysaccharides all consisted of ribose, rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose and galactose in different molar ratios. According to the recovery experiment, the described method was proved accurate and practical for the analysis of pine cone polysaccharides, meeting the need in the field of chemical analysis of Pinus plants. Furthermore; the chemical characteristics, such as neutral sugar, uronic acids, amino acids, molecular weights, and antioxidant activities of the polysaccharides were investigated by chemical and instrumental methods. The results showed that the chemical compositions of the polysaccharides differed from each other, especially in the content of neutral sugar and uronic acid. In the antioxidant assays, the polysaccharide fractions exhibited effective scavenging activities on ABTS radical and hydroxyl radical, with their antioxidant capabilities decreasing in the order of PKP > PAP > PSP. Therefore, although the polysaccharide fractions had little effect on superoxide radical scavenging, they still have potential to be developed as natural antioxidant agents in functional foods or medicine. PMID:23203063

  17. Influence of gas composition on wafer temperature in a tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor: Experimental measurements, model

    E-print Network

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Influence of gas composition on wafer temperature in a tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor 13 April 2000; accepted 23 October 2000 Experimental measurements of wafer temperature in a single-wafer, lamp-heated chemical vapor deposition system were used to study the wafer temperature response to gas

  18. Lab 2: Mineral Lab notes. Minerals are inorganic, solid, naturally occurring substances that have a characteristic chemical compositions,

    E-print Network

    Li, X. Rong

    Lab 2: Mineral Lab notes. Minerals are inorganic, solid, naturally occurring substances that have composition is the chemical elements that make up any given mineral. For instance, the mineral quartz is silicon dioxide SiO2; the mineral galena is an ore of lead, and its chemical formula is PbS, a lead

  19. Chemical composition observed over the mid-Atlantic and the detection of pollution signatures far from source regions

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Steve

    of chemicals on scales of thousands of miles in distinct stratified layers of pollution rich air [e.g., StohlChemical composition observed over the mid-Atlantic and the detection of pollution signatures far and our knowledge of the seasonal cycles within the region. A cluster analysis technique is used

  20. Aging of Secondary Organic Aerosol from ?-Pinene: Changes in Chemical Composition, Density and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrafzadeh, M.; Hastie, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) are emitted in large quantities into the atmosphere. These VOC, which includes ?-pinene, can react to produce secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which contribute to a substantial fraction of ambient organic aerosols and are known to adversely affect visibility, climate and health. Despite this, the current knowledge regarding the SOA composition, their physical properties and the chemical aging processes they undergo in the atmosphere is limited. In this study, chemical aging of SOA generated from the photooxidation of ?-pinene was investigated in the York University smog chamber. The formation and aging of both gas and particle phase products were analyzed using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The density of secondary organic matter was also simultaneously measured over the course of the aging experiments, allowing us to improve our understanding in changes in particle composition that may occur. In addition, particle phase and shape was investigated for generated particles from ?-pinene oxidation by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results of this work, including particle density and morphology will be presented as well as comparisons of gas and particle phase products time profiles during aging.

  1. Chemical composition of odorous secretions in the Tasmanian short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus setosus).

    PubMed

    Harris, Rachel L; Davies, Noel W; Nicol, Stewart C

    2012-11-01

    The short-beaked echidna is believed to use olfactory cues from a cloacal scent gland to attract and locate mates during the breeding season. We investigated the chemical composition of echidna secretions, including cloacal swabs and solid, "waxy" exudates from the cloaca and spurs. Scent samples from 37 individuals were collected over a 1-year period and analyzed using a range of different analytical techniques. A total of 186 compounds were identified, including volatile carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, fatty acids, methyl esters, ethyl esters, terpenes, nitrogen- and sulphur-containing compounds, alcohols, and aromatics. Long chain and very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids, sterols, and sterol esters were identified as the major constituents of solid exudates, some of which have not previously been described from any animal skin gland. There was a high degree of composition overlap between male and female cloaca swabs; however, there is significant variation, which could mediate echidna mating behavior. Many of the volatile and nonvolatile chemicals detected are used for communication in other species, suggesting that chemical signals have important and diverse functions in echidna social interactions. PMID:22871649

  2. Chemical composition changes in eucalyptus and pinus woods submitted to heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Brito, J O; Silva, F G; Leão, M M; Almeida, G

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated the influence of heat treatment on the chemical composition of Eucalyptus saligna and Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis woods to understand its role in wood processing. E. saligna and P. caribaea var. hondurensis woods were treated in a laboratorial electric furnace at 120, 140, 160 and 180 degrees C to induce their heat treatment. The chemical composition of the resulting products and those from original wood were determined by gas chromatography. Eucalyptus and Pinus showed a significant reduction in arabinose, manose, galactose and xylose contents when submitted to increasing temperatures. No significant alteration in glucose content was observed. Lignin content, however, increased during the heat process. There was a significant reduction in extractive content for Eucalyptus. On the other hand, a slight increase in extractive content has been determined for the Pinus wood, and that only for the highest temperature. These different behaviors can be explained by differences in chemical constituents between softwoods and hardwoods. The results obtained in this study provide important information for future research and utilization of thermally modified wood. PMID:18586488

  3. Effects of chemical composition, water and temperature on physical properties of continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Connolly, James A. D.

    2015-07-01

    We explore the influence of major elements chemistry and H2O-content on the density and seismic velocity of crustal rocks by computing stable and metastable crustal mineralogy and elastic properties as a function of pressure and temperature (P-T). Proposed average compositions of continental crust result in significantly different properties, for example a difference in computed density of ˜ 4 % is obtained at a given P-T. Phase transformations affect crustal properties at the point that crustal seismic discontinuities can be explained with mineral reactions rather than chemical stratification. H2O, even if introduced in small amount in the chemical system, has an effect on physical properties comparable to that attributed to variations in major elements composition. Thermodynamical relationships between physical properties differ significantly from commonly used empirical relationships. Density models obtained by inverting CRUST 1.0 compressional wave velocity are different from CRUST 1.0 density and translate into variations in isostatic topography and gravitational field that ranges ±600 m and ±150 mGal respectively. Inferred temperatures are higher than reference geotherms in the upper crust and in the deeper portions of thick orogenic crust, consistently with presence of metastable rocks. Our results highlight interconnections/dependencies among chemistry, pressure, temperature, seismic velocities and density that need to be addressed to better understand the crustal thermo-chemical state.

  4. The effect of natural weathering on the chemical and isotopic compositions of biotites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clauer, Norbert; O'Neil, J.R.; Bonnot-Courtois, C.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of progressive natural weathering on the isotopic (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, ??D, ??18O) and chemical (REE, H2O+) compositions of biotite has been studied on a suite of migmatitic biotites from the Chad Republic. During the early stages of weathering the Rb-Sr system is strongly affected, the hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions change markedly, the minerals are depleted in light REE, the water content increases by a factor of two, and the K-Ar system is relatively little disturbed. During intensive weathering the K-Ar system is more strongly disturbed than the Rb-Sr system. Most of the isotopic and chemical modifications take place under nonequilibrium conditions and occur before newly formed kaolinite and/or smectite can be detected. These observations suggest that 1. (a) "protominerals" may form within the biotite structure during the initial period of weathering, and 2. (b) only when chemical equilibrium is approached in the weathering profile are new minerals able to form. ?? 1982.

  5. Chemical Composition and Vasorelaxant and Antispasmodic Effects of Essential Oil from Rosa indica L. Petals

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Hafiz Majid; Khan, Taous; Wahid, Fazli; Khan, Rasool; Shah, Abdul Jabbar

    2015-01-01

    Rosa indica L. belongs to the family Rosaceae and is locally known as gulaab. It has different traditional uses in cardiovascular and gastrointestinal disorders but there is no scientific data available in this regard. Therefore, the basic aim of this study was to explore the chemical composition and gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects of the essential oil obtained from R. indica. The chemical composition of the essential oil was investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technique. The cardiovascular and gastrointestinal effects were investigated using electrophysiological measurements. The GC-MS analysis of the essential oil showed various chemical components including acetic acid, mercaptohexyl ester, butanoic acid, 2-methyl-5-oxo-1-cyclopentene-1-yl ester, artemiseole, methyl santonilate, isosteviol, caryophyllene oxide, pentyl phenyl acetate, dihydromyrcene, 1,5-octadecadien, octadecanoic acid, ethyl ester, palmitic acid (2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl methyl ester), santolina epoxide, and 9-farnesene. The electrophysiological measurements revealed that essential oil was more potent against K+ (80?mM) than phenylephrine precontractions using isolated rabbit aorta preparations. In isolated rabbit jejunum preparations, it showed more potency against high K+ induced contractions than spontaneous contractions. Considering these evidences, it can be concluded that R. indica essential oil may work as a complementary and alternative medicine in gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26357519

  6. The Perils of Partition: Difficulties in Retrieving Magma Compositions from Chemically Equilibrated Basaltic Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1996-01-01

    The chemical compositions of magmas can be derived from the compositions of their equilibrium minerals through mineral/magma partition coefficients. This method cannot be applied safely to basaltic rocks, either solidified lavas or cumulates, which have chemically equilibrated or partially equilibrated at subsolidus temperatures, i.e., in the absence of magma. Applying mineral/ melt partition coefficients to mineral compositions from such rocks will typically yield 'magma compositions' that are strongly fractionated and unreasonably enriched in incompatible elements (e.g., REE's). In the absence of magma, incompatible elements must go somewhere; they are forced into minerals (e.g., pyroxenes, plagioclase) at abundance levels far beyond those established during normal mineral/magma equilibria. Further, using mineral/magma partition coefficients with such rocks may suggest that different minerals equilibrated with different magmas, and the fractionation sequence of those melts (i.e., enrichment in incompatible elements) may not be consistent with independent constraints on the order of crystallization. Subsolidus equilibration is a reasonable cause for incompatible- element-enriched minerals in some eucrites, diogenites, and martian meteorites and offers a simple alternative to petrogenetic schemes involving highly fractionated magmas or magma infiltration metasomatism.

  7. Crystal Structure and Chemical Composition of a Presolar Silicate from the Queen Elizabeth Range 99177 Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Mineral characterization of presolar silicate grains, the most abundant stardust phase, has provided valuable information about the formation conditions in circumstellar environments and in super-nova (SN) outflows. Spectroscopic observations of dust around evolved stars suggest a majority of amor-phous, Mg-rich olivine grains, but crystalline silicates, most of which are pyroxene, have also been observed [1]. The chemical compositions of hundreds of presolar silicates have been determined by Auger spectroscopy and reveal high Fe contents and nonstoichiometric compositions intermediate to olivine and pyroxene [2-6]. The unexpectedly high Fe contents can partly be attributed to secondary alteration on the meteorite parent bodies, as some grains have Fe isotopic anomalies from their parent stellar source [7]. Only about 35 presolar silicates have been studied for their mineral structures and chemical compositions by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These grains display a wide range of compositions and structures, including crystalline forsterite, crystalline pyroxene, nanocrystalline grains, and a majority of amorphous nonstoichiometric grains. Most of these grains were identified in the primitive Acfer 094 meteorite. Presolar silicates from this meteorite show a wide range of Fe-contents, suggestive of secondary processing on the meteorite parent body. The CR chondrite QUE 99177 has not suffered as much alteration [8] and displays the highest presolar silicate abundance to date among carbonaceous chondrites [3, 6]. However, no mineralogical studies of presolar silicates from this meteorite have been performed. Here we examine the mineralogy of a presolar silicate from QUE 99177.

  8. Chemical composition of major VOC emission sources in the Seoul atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Na, Kwangsam; Kim, Yong Pyo; Moon, Il; Moon, Kil-Choo

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes a chemical analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for five emission sources in Seoul. The source categories included motor vehicle exhaust, gasoline evaporation, paint solvents, natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). These sources were selected because they have been known to emit significant quantities of VOCs in the Seoul area (more than 5% of the total emission inventory). Chemical compositions of the five emission sources are presented for a group of 45 C2-C9 VOCs. Motor vehicle exhaust profiles were developed by conducting an urban tunnel study. These emissions profiles were distinguished from the other emission profiles by a high weight percentage of butanes over seasons and propane in the wintertime. It was found that this is due to the wide use of butane-fueled vehicles. To obtain gasoline vapor profiles, gasoline samples from five major brands for each season were selected. The brands were blended on the basis of the marketshare of these brands in Seoul area. Raoult's law was used to calculate gasoline evaporative compositions based on the liquid gasoline compositions. The measured and estimated gasoline vapor compositions were found to be in good agreement. Vehicle and gasoline evaporation profiles were made over seasons because of the seasonal change in their compositions. Paint solvent emissions profiles were produced based on a product-use survey and sales figures. These profiles are a composite of four major oil-based paints and thinning solvent. The source profile of natural gas was made on a methane-free basis. It was found that Ethane and propane were the most abundant compounds accounting for 95% of the natural gas composition. LPG was largely composed of propane and ethane and the remaining components were minor contributors. PMID:15006511

  9. Plant Species Rather Than Climate Greatly Alters the Temporal Pattern of Litter Chemical Composition During Long-Term Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongfu; Chen, Na; Harmon, Mark E.; Li, Yuan; Cao, Xiaoyan; Chappell, Mark A.; Mao, Jingdong

    2015-10-01

    A feedback between decomposition and litter chemical composition occurs with decomposition altering composition that in turn influences the decomposition rate. Elucidating the temporal pattern of chemical composition is vital to understand this feedback, but the effects of plant species and climate on chemical changes remain poorly understood, especially over multiple years. In a 10-year decomposition experiment with litter of four species (Acer saccharum, Drypetes glauca, Pinus resinosa, and Thuja plicata) from four sites that range from the arctic to tropics, we determined the abundance of 11?litter chemical constituents that were grouped into waxes, carbohydrates, lignin/tannins, and proteins/peptides using advanced 13C solid-state NMR techniques. Decomposition generally led to an enrichment of waxes and a depletion of carbohydrates, whereas the changes of other chemical constituents were inconsistent. Inconsistent convergence in chemical compositions during decomposition was observed among different litter species across a range of site conditions, whereas one litter species converged under different climate conditions. Our data clearly demonstrate that plant species rather than climate greatly alters the temporal pattern of litter chemical composition, suggesting the decomposition-chemistry feedback varies among different plant species.

  10. Plant Species Rather Than Climate Greatly Alters the Temporal Pattern of Litter Chemical Composition During Long-Term Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongfu; Chen, Na; Harmon, Mark E.; Li, Yuan; Cao, Xiaoyan; Chappell, Mark A.; Mao, Jingdong

    2015-01-01

    A feedback between decomposition and litter chemical composition occurs with decomposition altering composition that in turn influences the decomposition rate. Elucidating the temporal pattern of chemical composition is vital to understand this feedback, but the effects of plant species and climate on chemical changes remain poorly understood, especially over multiple years. In a 10-year decomposition experiment with litter of four species (Acer saccharum, Drypetes glauca, Pinus resinosa, and Thuja plicata) from four sites that range from the arctic to tropics, we determined the abundance of 11?litter chemical constituents that were grouped into waxes, carbohydrates, lignin/tannins, and proteins/peptides using advanced 13C solid-state NMR techniques. Decomposition generally led to an enrichment of waxes and a depletion of carbohydrates, whereas the changes of other chemical constituents were inconsistent. Inconsistent convergence in chemical compositions during decomposition was observed among different litter species across a range of site conditions, whereas one litter species converged under different climate conditions. Our data clearly demonstrate that plant species rather than climate greatly alters the temporal pattern of litter chemical composition, suggesting the decomposition-chemistry feedback varies among different plant species. PMID:26515033

  11. Plant Species Rather Than Climate Greatly Alters the Temporal Pattern of Litter Chemical Composition During Long-Term Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfu; Chen, Na; Harmon, Mark E; Li, Yuan; Cao, Xiaoyan; Chappell, Mark A; Mao, Jingdong

    2015-01-01

    A feedback between decomposition and litter chemical composition occurs with decomposition altering composition that in turn influences the decomposition rate. Elucidating the temporal pattern of chemical composition is vital to understand this feedback, but the effects of plant species and climate on chemical changes remain poorly understood, especially over multiple years. In a 10-year decomposition experiment with litter of four species (Acer saccharum, Drypetes glauca, Pinus resinosa, and Thuja plicata) from four sites that range from the arctic to tropics, we determined the abundance of 11?litter chemical constituents that were grouped into waxes, carbohydrates, lignin/tannins, and proteins/peptides using advanced (13)C solid-state NMR techniques. Decomposition generally led to an enrichment of waxes and a depletion of carbohydrates, whereas the changes of other chemical constituents were inconsistent. Inconsistent convergence in chemical compositions during decomposition was observed among different litter species across a range of site conditions, whereas one litter species converged under different climate conditions. Our data clearly demonstrate that plant species rather than climate greatly alters the temporal pattern of litter chemical composition, suggesting the decomposition-chemistry feedback varies among different plant species. PMID:26515033

  12. Chemical composition and biological activity of essential oils of Dracocephalum heterophyllum and Hyssopus officinalis from Western Himalaya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The essential oils of two representatives of the Lamiaceae-family, Dracocephalum heterophyllum Benth. and Hyssopus officinalis L., are described for their antifungal, antibacterial and larvicidal as well as biting deterrent activities. Additionally, the essential oils’ chemical compositions, analyze...

  13. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Extremely Metal-Poor Stars from SDSS/SEGUE: I. Atmospheric Parameters and Chemical Compositions

    E-print Network

    Aoki, Wako

    Chemical compositions are determined based on high-resolution spectroscopy for 137 candidate extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its first stellar extension, the Sloan ...

  14. Chemical composition and in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of apple phenolic extracts and of their sub-fractions.

    PubMed

    Lauren, Denis R; Smith, Wendy A; Adaim, Aselle; Cooney, Janine M; Wibisono, Reginald; Jensen, Dwayne J; Zhang, Jingli; Skinner, Margot A

    2009-01-01

    Apple extract powders from three different manufacturers were investigated for their anti-inflammatory activity, their total phenolic content, and their chemical composition. The samples represented two production batches for two products and a single batch of a third. The samples showed similar, but clearly different, anti-inflammatory activities, and had substantially different total phenolic contents, and different chemical compositions. Differences in chemical composition for batches of the same product were significant, although not as great as differences between products. The samples were fractionated into chemical classes. The most active fractions were those that contained epicatechin, catechin with phloridzin and quercetin glycosides, or those that contained procyanidin polymers. It was not possible to link activity to the presence of individual components or combinations of these. If fruit extracts are to be reliably linked to validated health benefits, then the source materials, the extraction processes, and the final composition of such products need to be more clearly defined than at present. PMID:19391030

  15. [Comparison of green coffee beans volatiles chemical composition of Hainan main area].

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong-Suo; Chu, Zhong; Gu, Feng-Lin; Lu, Min-Quan; Lu, Shao-Fang; Wu, Gui-Ping; Tan, Le-He

    2013-02-01

    Chemical component of Hainan green coffee beans was analyzed with solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the discrepancy between two green coffee beans was differentiated through the spectrum database retrieval and retention index of compound characterization. The experimental results show that: the chemical composition of Wanning coffee beans and Chengmai coffee beans is basically the same. The quantity of analyzed compound in Wanning area coffee is 91, and in Chengmai area coffee is 106, the quantity of the same compound is 66, and the percent of the same component is 75.52%. The same compounds accounted for 89.86% of the total content of Wanning area coffee, and accounted for 85.70% of the total content of Chengmai area coffee. PMID:23697152

  16. Chemical composition of Titan’s atmosphere and ionosphere: Observations and the photochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2014-07-01

    Basic observational data on hydrocarbons, nitriles, and ions on Titan are compared with predictions of the photochemical model. Uncertainties of the observed abundances and differences between the data from different instruments and observing teams are comparable with the differences between the observations and the model results. Main reactions of production and loss for each species are quantitatively assessed and briefly discussed. Formation of haze by polymerization of hydrocarbons and nitriles and recombination of heavy ions is calculated along with condensation of various species near the tropopause. Overall deposition is a layer of 300 m thick for the age of the Solar System, and nitrogen constitutes 8% of the deposition. The model reproduces the basic observational data and adequately describes basic chemical processes in Titan’s atmosphere and ionosphere. The presented model results and the observational data may be used as a reference to chemical composition of Titan’s atmosphere and ionosphere.

  17. Variability of biomass chemical composition and rapid analysis using FT-NIR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lu; Ye, Philip; Womac, A.R.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2010-04-01

    A quick method for analyzing the chemical composition of renewable energy biomass feedstock was developed by using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis. The study presents the broad-based model hypothesis that a single FT-NIR predictive model can be developed to analyze multiple types of biomass feedstock. The two most important biomass feedstocks corn stover and switchgrass were evaluated for the variability in their concentrations of the following components: glucan, xylan, galactan, arabinan, mannan, lignin, and ash. A hypothesis test was developed based upon these two species. Both cross-validation and independent validation results showed that the broad-based model developed is promising for future chemical prediction of both biomass species; in addition, the results also showed the method's prediction potential for wheat straw.

  18. Chemical composition, stratigraphy, and depositional environments of the Black River Group (Middle Ordovician), southwestern Ohio.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stith, David A.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical composition and stratigraphy of the Black River Group in southwestern Ohio were studied. Chemical analyses were done on two cores of the Black River from Adams and Brown Counties, Ohio. These studies show that substantial reserves of high-carbonate rock are present in the Black River at depths of less than 800 ft, in proximity to Cincinnati and the Ohio River. Stratigraphic studies show that the Black River Group has eight marker beds in its middle and upper portions and three distinct lithologic units in its lower portion; these marker beds and units are present throughout southwestern Ohio. The Black River Group correlates well with the High Bridge Group of Kentucky. Depositional environments of the Black River are similar to those of the High Bridge and to present-day tidal flats in the Bahamas.-Author

  19. Process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Caputo, Anthony J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1986-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for preparing fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of a fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  20. Recent Progress of Propolis for Its Biological and Chemical Compositions and Its Botanical Origin

    PubMed Central

    Toreti, Viviane Cristina; Sato, Helia Harumi; Pastore, Glaucia Maria; Park, Yong Kun

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is the generic name given to the product obtained from resinous substances, which is gummy and balsamic and which is collected by bees from flowers, buds, and exudates of plants. It is a popular folk medicine possessing a broad spectrum of biological activities. These biological properties are related to its chemical composition and more specifically to the phenolic compounds that vary in their structure and concentration depending on the region of production, availability of sources to collect plant resins, genetic variability of the queen bee, the technique used for production, and the season in which propolis is produced. Many scientific articles are published every year in different international journal, and several groups of researchers have focused their attention on the chemical compounds and biological activity of propolis. This paper presents a review on the publications on propolis and patents of applications and biological constituents of propolis. PMID:23737843

  1. Comparative chemical composition and variability of biological activity of methanolic extracts from Hypericum perforatum L.

    PubMed

    Conforti, F; Statti, G A; Tundis, R; Bianchi, A; Agrimonti, C; Sacchetti, G; Andreotti, E; Menichini, F; Poli, F

    2005-04-01

    The biovariability of Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's Wort) grown wild in Calabria and Sardinia (Italy) was reported with the aim to characterize the species through the isolation, detection, and quantitative evaluations of chemical markers (hypericin, quercetin, rutin) by HPLC analysis. Antioxidant activity of the methanolic H. perforatum extracts showed that the Calabrian samples were more active than those from Sardinia. The antibacterial activity evidenced the best performance on the gram positive bacteria with a MIC value of 50 microg/mL. Moreover, antifungal activity of all the extracts was also tested which showed interesting results particularly on the phytopathogene fungus P. ultimum. The variability shown by the samples could be attributed to environmental factors such as chemical-physical properties, composition of the soil, geographical coordinate, altitude, and solar exposure. The phytochemical analysis and the biological activity data suggested a possible use of H. perforatum extracts in the alimentary, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical fields. PMID:15702645

  2. Chemical warfare

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Richard Ian; Mattoso, Thalles Cardoso; Moreira, Denise D.O.

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-cutting ants are well known for their highly complex social organization, which provides them with a strong defense against parasites invading their colonies. Besides this attribute, these insects have morphological, physiological and structural characteristics further reinforcing the defense of their colonies. With the discovery of symbiotic bacteria present on the integument of leaf-cutting ants, a new line of defense was proposed and considered to be specific for the control of a specialized fungal parasite of the ants’ fungus gardens (Escovopsis). However, recent studies have questioned the specificity of the integumental bacteria, as they were also found to inhibit a range of fungi, including entomopathogens. The microbiota associated with the leaf-cutting ant gardens has also been proposed as another level of chemical defense, protecting the garden from parasite invasion. Here we review the chemical defense weaponry deployed by leaf-cutting ants against parasites of their fungus gardens and of the ants themselves. PMID:23795235

  3. The Chemical Nature of the Fiber/resin Interface in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diefendorf, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites are considered. The nature of the fiber structure and the interaction that occurs at the interface between fiber and matrix are emphasized. Composite toughness can be improved by increased axial tensile and compressive strengths in the fibers. The structure of carbon fibers indicates that the fiber itself can fail transversely, and different transverse microstructures could provide better transverse strengths. The higher surface roughness of lower modulus and surface-treated carbon fibers provides better mechanical interlocking between the fiber and matrix. The chemical nature of the fiber surface was determined, and adsorption of species on this surface can be used to promote wetting and adhesion. Finally, the magnitude of the interfacial bond strength should be controlled such that a range of composites can be made with properties varying from relatively brittle and high interlaminar shear strength to tougher but lower interlaminar shear strength.

  4. Wet chemically grown composite thin film for room temperature LPG sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birajadar, Ravikiran; Desale, Dipalee; Shaikh, Shaheed; Mahajan, Sandip; Upadhye, Deepak; Ghule, Anil; Sharma, Ramphal

    2014-04-01

    We have synthesized thin film of zinc oxide-polyaniline (ZnO/PANI) composite using a simple wet chemical approach. As-synthesized ZnO/PANI composite thin film studied using different characterization techniques. The optical study reveals the penetration and interaction of PANI molecules with ZnO thin film. Prominent blue shift in UV-vis due to interaction between ZnO and PANI indicate presence of zinc oxide in polyaniline matrix. It is observed that ZnO thin film is not sensitive to LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) at room temperature. On the other hand ZnO/PANI composite thin film shows good response and recovery behaviors at room temperature.

  5. Chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant activities of eight mulberry cultivars from China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Linghong; Wu, Xiangyang; Zhu, Maomao; Zhao, Weiguo; Li, Fang; Zou, Ye; Yang, Liuqing

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mulberry (Morus, Moraceae) is widely distributed in the temperate, subtropical, or tropical regions of the world, while there are no conclusive reports on the chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant properties of mulberry cultivars from China. Objective: To investigate chemical properties and to determine proximate nutritive compounds of the eight mulberry cultivars. Materials and Methods: Chemical properties (including moisture, ash, total dry matter, total soluble solids, pH, and total titratable acidity) of the eight mulberry cultivars were investigated. Proximate nutritive compounds (including crude protein, crude fat, mineral elements, total anthocyanins, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, and total sugars) were also determined. Results: The results indicated that the moisture contents were 70.0-87.4%, the crude protein contents 1.62-5.54%, and the crude fat contents from 1.23-2.23%. The major fatty acids in mulberry fruits were linoleic acid (C18:2) and palmitic acid (C16:0), 26.40-74.77% and 9.29-22.26%, respectively. Mulberry fruit is also a good source of minerals and the potassium content (521.37-1718.60 mg/100g DW) is especially higher than that of other elements. Compared with other species, the Morus atropurpurea Roxb. had relatively high total polyphenols content (189.67-246.00 mg GAE/100mg) and anthocyanins content (114.67-193.00 mg/100mg). There was a good linear correlation between antioxidant activity and total polyphenols content. Conclusion: Significant differences of the chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant activities among the mulberry cultivars were observed, the Morus atropurpurea Roxb. showed considerable high nutritional value and antioxidant activity which could be developed for functional food that benefits human health. PMID:23060696

  6. Aspen defense chemicals influence midgut bacterial community composition of gypsy moth.

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Lindroth, Richard L; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2015-01-01

    Microbial symbionts are becoming increasingly recognized as mediators of many aspects of plant - herbivore interactions. However, the influence of plant chemical defenses on gut associates of insect herbivores is less well understood. We used gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.), and differing trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) genotypes that vary in chemical defenses, to assess the influence of foliar chemistry on bacterial communities of larval midguts. We evaluated the bacterial community composition of foliage, and of midguts of larvae feeding on those leaves, using next-generation high-throughput sequencing. Plant defense chemicals did not influence the composition of foliar communities. In contrast, both phenolic glycosides and condensed tannins affected the bacterial consortia of gypsy moth midguts. The two most abundant operational taxonomic units were classified as Ralstonia and Acinetobacter. The relative abundance of Ralstonia was higher in midguts than in foliage when phenolic glycoside concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when phenolic glycosides were high. In contrast, the relative abundance of Ralstonia was lower in midguts than in foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but higher in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter showed a different relationship with host chemistry, being relatively more abundant in midguts than with foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter tended to have a greater relative abundance in midguts of insects feeding on genotypes with high phenolic glycoside concentrations. These results show that plant defense chemicals influence herbivore midgut communities, which may in turn influence host utilization. PMID:25475786

  7. Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Voudrias, Evangelos; Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for reagents 1.7 (2.4) g/patient/d and 0.3 (0.4) g/examination/d, (2) for solvents 248 (127) g/patient/d and 192 (101) g/examination/d, (3) for dyes and tracers 4.7 (1.4) g/patient/d and 2.5 (0.9) g/examination/d and (4) for solid waste 54 (28) g/patient/d and 42 (22) g/examination/d.

  8. Evaluating the influence of chemical weathering on the composition of the continental crust using lithium and its isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, R. L.; Liu, X.

    2011-12-01

    The continental crust has an "intermediate" bulk composition that is distinct from primary melts of peridotitic mantle (basalt or picrite). This mismatch between the "building blocks" and the "edifice" of the continental crust points to the operation of processes that preferentially remove mafic to ultramafic material from the continents. Such processes include lower crustal recycling (via density foundering or lower crustal subduction - e.g., relamination, Hacker et al., 2011, EPSL), generation of evolved melts via slab melting, and/or chemical weathering. Stable isotope systems document the influence of chemical weathering on the bulk crust composition: the oxygen isotope composition of the bulk crust is distinctly heavier than that of primary, mantle-derived melts (Simon and Lecuyer, 2005, G-cubed) and the Li isotopic composition of the bulk crust is distinctly lighter than that of mantle-derive melts (Teng et al., 2004, GCA; 2008, Chem. Geol.). Both signatures mark the imprint of chemical weathering on the bulk crust composition. Here, we use a simple mass balance model for lithium inputs and outputs from the continental crust to quantify the mass lost due to chemical weathering. We find that a minimum of 15%, a maximum of 60%, and a best estimate of ~40% of the original juvenile rock mass may have been lost via chemical weathering. The accumulated percentage of mass loss due to chemical weathering leads to an average global chemical weathering rate (CWR) of ~ 8×10^9 to 2×10^10 t/yr since 3.5 Ga, which is about an order of magnitude higher than the minimum estimates based on modern rivers (Gaillardet et al., 1999, Chem. Geol.). While we cannot constrain the exact portion of crustal mass loss via chemical weathering, given the uncertainties of the calculation, we can demonstrate that the weathering flux is non-zero. Therefore, chemical weathering must play a role in the evolution of the composition and mass of the continental crust.

  9. Chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles over the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezantakos, S.; Barmpounis, K.; Giamarelou, M.; Bossioli, E.; Tombrou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Kalogiros, J.; Allan, J. D.; Bacak, A.; Percival, C. J.; Coe, H.; Biskos, G.

    2013-11-01

    The chemical composition and water uptake characteristics of sub-micrometre atmospheric particles over the region of the Aegean Sea were measured between 25 August and 11 September 2011 within the framework of the Aegean-Game campaign. High temporal-resolution measurements of the chemical composition of the particles were conducted using an airborne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (cToF-AMS). These measurements were performed during two flights from the island of Crete to the island of Lemnos and back. A hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA) located on the island of Lemnos was used to measure the ability of the particles to take up water. The HTDMA measurements showed that the particles in the dominant mode were internally mixed, having hygroscopic growth factors that ranged from 1.00 to 1.59 when exposed to 85% relative humidity. When the aircraft flew near the ground station on Lemnos, the cToF-AMS measurements showed that the organic volume fraction of the particles ranged from 43 to 56%. These measurements corroborate the range of hygroscopic growth factors measured by the HTDMA during that time. Good closure between HTDMA and cToF-AMS measurements was achieved when assuming that the organic species were less hygroscopic and had an average density that corresponds to aged organic species. Using the results from the closure study, the cToF-AMS measurements were employed to determine vertical profiles of a representative aerosol hygroscopic parameter ?mix. Calculated ?mix values ranged from 0.19 to 0.84 during the first flight and from 0.22 to 0.80 during the second flight. Air masses of different origin as determined by back trajectory calculations can explain the spatial variation in chemical composition and ?mix values of the particles observed in the region.

  10. Chemical composition and physicochemical properties of green banana (Musa acuminata x balbisiana Colla cv. Awak) flour.

    PubMed

    Haslinda, W H; Cheng, L H; Chong, L C; Noor Aziah, A A

    2009-01-01

    Flour was prepared from peeled and unpeeled banana Awak ABB. Samples prepared were subjected to analysis for determination of chemical composition, mineral, dietary fibre, starch and total phenolics content, antioxidant activity and pasting properties. In general, flour prepared from unpeeled banana was found to show enhanced nutrition values with higher contents of mineral, dietary fibre and total phenolics. Hence, flour fortified with peel showed relatively higher antioxidant activity. On the other hand, better pasting properties were shown when banana flour was blended with peel. It was found that a relatively lower pasting temperature, peak viscosity, breakdown, final viscosity and setback were evident in a sample blended with peel. PMID:19449278

  11. Effect of stainless steel chemical composition on brazing ability of filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Kei; Nishiyama, Akira

    2014-08-01

    Many kinds of stainless steel have been used in the engineering field. So it is necessary to investigate the effect of SUS chemical compositions on the brazing ability of filler metal. In this study, SUS315J containing Cr, Ni, Si, Cu, and Mo was employed as a base metal. Excellent spreading ability of the molten nickel-based brazing filler on SUS315J was obtained as compared with that on SUS316. Copper and silicon influenced the significant spreading ability of the filler.

  12. LOAD TRANSFER AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CHEMICALLY DERIVED SINGLE LAYER GRAPHENE REINFORCEMENTS IN POLYMER COMPOSITES

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Loomis, James; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    We report load transfer and mechanical properties of chemically derived single layer graphene (SLG) as reinforcements in poly (dimethyl) siloxane (PDMS) composites. Mixing single layer graphene in polymers resulted in the marked decrease of the G’ or 2D band intensity due to doping and functionalization. A Raman G mode shift of 11.2 cm?1/% strain in compression and 4.2 cm?1/% strain in tension is reported. An increase in elastic modulus of PDMS by ~42%, toughness by ~39%, damping capability by ~673%, and strain energy density of ~43% by the addition of 1 wt. % SLG in PDMS is reported. PMID:23196792

  13. Biological activity and chemical composition of the essential oil from Jamaican Hyptis verticillata Jacq.

    PubMed

    Facey, Petrea C; Porter, Roy B R; Reese, Paul B; Williams, Lawrence A D

    2005-06-15

    The chemical composition of the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Hyptis verticillata Jacq. was elucidated by a combination of GC and GC-MS analyses. The oil was dominated by the sesquiterpenoids cadina-4,10(15)-dien-3-one (15.1%) (1) and aromadendr-1(10)-en-9-one (squamulosone) (30.7%) (2). The oil exhibited chemosterilant activities against the cattle tick, Boophilus microplus Canest., and toxic action against adult Cylas formicarius elegantulus Summer, the most destructive pest of sweet potato (Ipomoea species). PMID:15941314

  14. Pharmacological activity and chemical composition of callus culture extracts from selected species of Phyllanthus.

    PubMed

    Catapan, E; Otuki, M F; Viana, A M; Yunes, R A; Bresciani, L F; Ferreira, J; Santos, A R; Calixto, J B; Cechinel-Filho, V

    2000-12-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the chemical composition and the possible antinociceptive effects in mice of some species of Phyllanthus in vitro. The methanolic extracts obtained from callus cultures of P. fraternus, P. stipulatus and P. caroliniensis caused significant inhibition in to the late phase of the formalin test, whereas the extract from P. urinaria inhibited both neurogenic and inflammatory phases of the test. Conventional chromatographic methods (TLC, GC) permitted the detection of some steroids or triterpenes, including beta-sitosterol, glochidonol and glochidone, which seem be responsible for the antinociceptive effects of the callus extracts studied. PMID:11189874

  15. Microbial Mineralization of Soil Organic Matter: Role of Chemical Composition and Structural Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, M. M. R.; Chilom, G.; Rice, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantitatively assess the effect of organic matter self-assembly on its resistance to microbial mineralization. Humic acids isolated from leonardite, two peats and a mineral soil were used as organic matter samples because they provide a broad range of variability in terms of the origin and nature of their organic components. Using a solvent-based fractionation method, humic acid samples were disassembled into a humic-like component and a humic-lipid composite. The humic-lipid composite was further disassembled into an amphiphilic and a lipid component using an alkaline aqueous solution. Mixtures that reproduced the composition of self-assembled samples were prepared by mixing the solid individual fractions in the exact proportions that they were present in the original material. The original humic acids or their corresponding mixtures were added as the sole carbon source in separate aerobic cultures containing a microbial consortium isolated from a mineral soil. After incubation for 125 days mineralization of the self-assembled samples was shown to be higher by as much as 70% compared to their corresponding physical mixtures. The extent of mineralization of the self-assembled samples was not correlated to the material's chemical composition or hydrophobicity index obtained from their 13C solid-state NMR spectra. In contrast, mineralization of the physical mixtures and the individual fractions did vary with chemical composition and was accompanied by preferential mineralization of alkyl carbon. These results suggest the microbial mineralization of humic acids is related to their self-assembly.

  16. Quantum Dot and Polymer Composite Cross-Reactive Array for Chemical Vapor Detection.

    PubMed

    Bright, Collin J; Nallon, Eric C; Polcha, Michael P; Schnee, Vincent P

    2015-12-15

    A cross-reactive chemical sensing array was made from CdSe Quantum Dots (QDs) and five different organic polymers by inkjet printing to create segmented fluorescent composite regions on quartz substrates. The sensor array was challenged with exposures from two sets of analytes, including one set of 14 different functionalized benzenes and one set of 14 compounds related to security concerns, including the explosives trinitrotoluene (TNT) and ammonium nitrate. The array was broadly responsive to analytes with different chemical functionalities due to the multiple sensing mechanisms that altered the QDs' fluorescence. The sensor array displayed excellent discrimination between members within both sets. Classification accuracy of more than 93% was achieved, including the complete discrimination of very similar dinitrobenzene isomers and three halogenated, substituted benzene compounds. The simple fabrication, broad responsivity, and high discrimination capacity of this type of cross-reactive array are ideal qualities for the development of sensors with excellent sensitivity to chemical and explosive threats while maintaining low false alarm rates. PMID:26548712

  17. Influence of origin and extraction method on argan oil physico-chemical characteristics and composition.

    PubMed

    Hilali, Miloudi; Charrouf, Zoubida; Soulhi, Abd El Aziz; Hachimi, Larbi; Guillaume, Dominique

    2005-03-23

    Twenty one samples of argan oil of different geographical origin (Tidzi, Tamanar, Benaiznassen, Ait mzal, Ait Baha, Ighrem, Aoulouz) and/or prepared following a different process (traditional, mechanical, or industrial) were collected and their physico-chemical properties analyzed. Sample acidity was found between 0.14 and 1.40%, unsaponifiable matter between 0.34 and 0.79%, saponification value between 180.0 and 199.6, highest peroxide index was 5.72 meq/kg, refractive index (20 degrees C) between 1.4644 and 1.4705, and UV absorption at 270 nm between 0.228 and 0.605. This study, carried out on randomly selected samples, clearly demonstrates that press extraction does not alter either the chemical composition of argan oil or its physico-chemical characteristics. It also demonstrates that press extraction respects the critical factors reported for traditionally prepared oils and necessary to obtain a beneficial effect on human health (a specific fatty acid balance and high tocopherol and sterol levels). In addition, this study should be useful for the establishment of a national quality standard. PMID:15769139

  18. Variation in chemical composition and acaricidal activity against Dermanyssus gallinae of four eucalyptus essential oils.

    PubMed

    George, David R; Masic, Dino; Sparagano, Olivier A E; Guy, Jonathan H

    2009-06-01

    The results of this study suggest that certain eucalyptus essential oils may be of use as an alternative to synthetic acaricides in the management of the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae. At a level of 0.21 mg/cm(2), the essential oil from Eucalyptus citriodora achieved 85% mortality in D. gallinae over a 24 h exposure period in contact toxicity tests. A further two essential oils from different eucalyptus species, namely E. globulus and E. radiata, provided significantly (P < 0.05) lower mite mortality (11 and 19%, respectively). Notable differences were found between the eucalyptus essential oils regarding their chemical compositions. There appeared to be a trend whereby the essential oils that were composed of the fewer chemical components were the least lethal to D. gallinae. It may therefore be the case that the complexity of an essential oil's chemical make up plays an important role in dictating the toxicity of that oil to pests such as D. gallinae. PMID:19089590

  19. The impact of infield biomass burning on PM levels and its chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Dambruoso, P; de Gennaro, G; Di Gilio, A; Palmisani, J; Tutino, M

    2014-12-01

    In the South of Italy, it is common for farmers to burn pruning waste from olive trees in spring. In order to evaluate the impact of the biomass burning source on the physical and chemical characteristics of the particulate matter (PM) emitted by these fires, a PM monitoring campaign was carried out in an olive grove. Daily PM10 samples were collected for 1 week, when there were no open fires, and when biomass was being burned, and at two different distances from the fires. Moreover, an optical particle counter and a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) analyzer were used to measure the high time-resolved dimensional distribution of particles emitted and total PAHs concentrations, respectively. Chemical analysis of PM10 samples identified organic and inorganic components such as PAHs, ions, elements, and carbonaceous fractions (OC, EC). Analysis of the collected data showed the usefulness of organic and inorganic tracer species and of PAH diagnostic ratios for interpreting the impact of biomass fires on PM levels and on its chemical composition. Finally, high time-resolved monitoring of particle numbers and PAH concentrations was performed before, during, and after biomass burning, and these concentrations were seen to be very dependent on factors such as weather conditions, combustion efficiency, and temperature (smoldering versus flaming conditions), and moisture content of the wood burned. PMID:24310905

  20. Chemically treated kindling and process

    SciTech Connect

    Earlywine, R.T.

    1984-10-09

    A chemically treated kindling and process for the production thereof wherein the kindling is comprised of a pressed mixture of wood fibers, alum, and cornstarch, and is saturated with a prepared composition comprising a plurality of chemically distinct compositions, each of the compositions containing a different predetermined amount of refined petroleum wax and refined oil.

  1. Thermodynamic Modeling of the Chemical Composition of Calcine at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Frazee; J. D. Christian

    2004-02-01

    To send calcine produced at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Yucca Mountain Project for disposal, characterization information will be required. To sample calcine from its existing storage location would require extensive personnel exposure. Sufficient analyses of the chemical composition of the calcine would be extremely difficult and very expensive. In support of characterization development, the chemical composition of calcine from Bin 3 of Calcine Solid Storage Facility II was thermodynamic modeled. This calcine was produced in the Waste Calcination Facility during its second processing campaign, operating with indirect heating at 400 C and 0.744 bar (0.734 atm) during processing of aluminum high-level liquid waste (first cycle extraction raffinate from reprocessing aluminum-clad fuels) from tanks WM-180 and -182 from December 27, 1966 through August 26, 1967. The current modeling effort documents the input compositional data (liquid feed and calciner off-gas) for Batches 300 - 620 and a methodology for estimating the calcine chemical composition. The results, along with assumptions and limitations of the thermodynamic calculations, will serve as a basis for benchmarking subsequent calculations. This will be done by comparing the predictions against extensive analytical results that are currently being obtained on representative samples of the modeled calcine. A commercial free-energy minimization program and database, HSC 5.1, was used to perform the thermodynamic calculations. Currently available experimental data and process information on the calcine were used to make judgments about specific phases and compounds to include and eliminate in the thermodynamic calculations. Some off-gas species were eliminated based on kinetics restrictions evidenced by experimental data and other estimates, and some calcine components and off-gas compounds were eliminated as improbable species (unreliable thermodynamic data). The current Yucca Mountain Project level of concern is 0.1 wt % of individual cations in the waste package. Chemical composition of the individual calcine components was calculated down to 0.02 mol % and 0.09 wt % of metal components of the calcine. The results reproduce closely existing experimental information on calcine chemical and phase composition. This paper discusses specific conditions accepted for the final calculations. The major calcine components, exceeding 0.15 mol % and 0.65 wt %, are: amorphous Al2O3 (85.30 mol %, 81.20 wt %); amorphous NaNO3 (8.23 mol %, 6.53 wt %); dolomite – CaMg 0.9235 (CO3)1.9235 (1.66 mol %, 2.75 wt %); amorphous HgO (0.99 mol %, 2.00 wt %); CaSO4 (0.64 mol %, 0.82 wt %); amorphous KNO3 (0.63 mol %, 0.59 wt %); amorphous Al4B2O9 (0.54 mol %, 1.37 wt %); and amorphous Al18B4O33 (0.16 mol %, 1.57 wt %). Na is present 99.8 % as NaNO3, 99.9 % of K is present as KNO3, and 53 % NOx is NO2(g), showing that the kinetics limiting effects have been empirically accounted for in the modeling. Approximately 87 % of the mercury is in calcine.

  2. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND PCT DATA FOR THE INITIAL SET OF HANFORD ENHANCED WASTE LOADING GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2014-06-02

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test results for 20 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation ranges of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. Two components of the study glasses, fluorine and silver, were not measured since each of these species would have required the use of an additional preparation method and their measured values were likely to be near or below analytical detection limits. Some of the glasses were difficult to prepare for chemical analysis. A sodium peroxide fusion dissolution method was successful in completely dissolving the glasses. Components present in the glasses in minor concentrations can be difficult to measure using this dissolution method due to dilution requirements. The use of a lithium metaborate preparation method for the minor components (planned for use since it is typically successful in digesting Defense Waste Processing Facility HLW glasses) resulted in an unacceptable amount of undissolved solids remaining in the sample solutions. An acid dissolution method was used instead, which provided more thorough dissolution of the glasses, although a small amount of undissolved material remained for some of the study glasses. The undissolved material was analyzed to determine those components of the glasses that did not fully dissolve. These components (e.g., calcium and chromium) were present in sufficient quantities to be reported from the measurements resulting from the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method, which did not leave undissolved material. Overall, the analyses resulted in sums of oxides that ranged from about 98 to 101.5 wt % for the study glasses, indicating excellent recovery of all the components in the chemical composition analyses. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions indicated that, in general, the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations. Exceptions were Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and P{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The measured values for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were somewhat low when compared to the targeted values for all of the study glasses targeting Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations above 0.5 wt %. Many of the measured MgO and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} values were below the targeted values for those glasses that contained these components. Two of the study glasses exhibited differences from the targeted compositions that may indicate a batching error. Glasses EWG-HAI-Centroid-2 and EWG-OL-1672 had measured values for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} that were lower than the targeted values, and measured values for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} that were higher than the targeted values. Glass EWG-HAI-Centroid-2 also had a measured value for Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} that was lower than the targeted value. A review of the PCT data, including standards and blanks, revealed no issues with the performance of the tests. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Comparisons of the normalized PCT results for both the quenched and Canister Centerline Cooled versions of the study glasses are made with the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass for reference.

  3. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of honeybee (Apis mellifera ligustica) propolis from subtropical eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Carmelina Flavia; Simpson, Jack Bruce; Powell, Daniel; Brooks, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Propolis is a material manufactured by bees and contains beeswax, bee salivary secretions and plant resins. Propolis preparations have been used for millennia by humans in food, cosmetics and medicines due to its antibacterial effects. Within the hive, propolis plays an important role in bees' health, with much of its bioactivity largely dependent on the plant resins the bees select for its production. Few chemical studies are available on the chemistry of propolis produced by Australian honeybees (Apis mellifera, Apidae). This study aimed to determine the chemical composition as well as in vitro antimicrobial effects of propolis harvested from honeybees in subtropical eastern Australia. Honeybee propolis was produced using plastic frames and multiple beehives in two subtropical sites in eastern Australia. Methanolic extracts of propolis were analysed by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and high-resolution mass spectrometry (ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-UV-high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HR-MS/MS)) and by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The resulting chemical data were dereplicated for compound characterisation. The two crude extracts in abs. ethanol were tested in vitro by the agar diffusion and broth dilution methods, using a phenol standard solution as the positive control and abs. ethanol as the negative control. Chemical constituents were identified to be pentacyclic triterpenoids and C-prenylated flavonoids, including Abyssinoflavanone VII, Propolin C and Nymphaeol C. The two propolis crude extracts showed bactericidal effects at the minimal inhibitory concentrations of 0.37-2.04 mg mL(-1) against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. However, the extracts were inactive against Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231. The antistaphylococcal potential of propolis was discussed, also in relation to honeybees' health, as it warrants further investigations on the social and individual immunities of Australian honeybees. PMID:26521267

  4. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of honeybee ( Apis mellifera ligustica) propolis from subtropical eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, Carmelina Flavia; Simpson, Jack Bruce; Powell, Daniel; Brooks, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Propolis is a material manufactured by bees and contains beeswax, bee salivary secretions and plant resins. Propolis preparations have been used for millennia by humans in food, cosmetics and medicines due to its antibacterial effects. Within the hive, propolis plays an important role in bees' health, with much of its bioactivity largely dependent on the plant resins the bees select for its production. Few chemical studies are available on the chemistry of propolis produced by Australian honeybees ( Apis mellifera, Apidae). This study aimed to determine the chemical composition as well as in vitro antimicrobial effects of propolis harvested from honeybees in subtropical eastern Australia. Honeybee propolis was produced using plastic frames and multiple beehives in two subtropical sites in eastern Australia. Methanolic extracts of propolis were analysed by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and high-resolution mass spectrometry (ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-UV-high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HR-MS/MS)) and by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The resulting chemical data were dereplicated for compound characterisation. The two crude extracts in abs. ethanol were tested in vitro by the agar diffusion and broth dilution methods, using a phenol standard solution as the positive control and abs. ethanol as the negative control. Chemical constituents were identified to be pentacyclic triterpenoids and C-prenylated flavonoids, including Abyssinoflavanone VII, Propolin C and Nymphaeol C. The two propolis crude extracts showed bactericidal effects at the minimal inhibitory concentrations of 0.37-2.04 mg mL-1 against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. However, the extracts were inactive against Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231. The antistaphylococcal potential of propolis was discussed, also in relation to honeybees' health, as it warrants further investigations on the social and individual immunities of Australian honeybees.

  5. Chemical Evolution of Galaxies

    E-print Network

    B. E. J. Pagel

    2000-08-24

    Chemical evolution of galaxies brings together ideas on stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis with theories of galaxy formation, star formation and galaxy evolution, with all their associated uncertainties. In a new perspective brought about by the Hubble Deep Field and follow-up investigations of global star formation rates, diffuse background etc., it has become necessary to consider the chemical composition of dark baryonic matter as well as that of visible matter in galaxies.

  6. Effect of the Chemical Composition on The Pyroplastic Deformation of Sanitaryware Porcelain Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye?im Tunçel, Derya; Kerim Kara, Mustafa; Özel, Emel

    2011-10-01

    Pyroplastic deformation is the bending of a ceramic specimen caused by gravity during heat treatment. It can be defined as the loss of shape of product during its firing. Pyroplastic deformation is related to properties of liquid phases formed during firing. Therefore, the effect of the chemical composition on the pyroplastic deformation of sanitaryware porcelain was investigated in this study. Systematical compositional arrangements were made according to different combinations of (SiO2/Al2O3) and (Na2O/K2O) ratios by using Seger formula approach. Pyroplastic deformation behaviour of compositions within a controlled firing regime was investigated by using fleximeter. The bodies were also prepared in a special form by slip casting method at laboratory scale in order to determine the pyroplastic deformation of the samples. The experimental results showed that a definite combination at SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of 5 and Na2O/K2O ratio of 4 give the lowest pyroplastic deformation in the porcelain body formulations. The pyroplastic deformation value of this composition was determined as 25 mm which is 44% lower than that of the standard composition (45 mm).

  7. QCD Dirac Spectrum at Finite Chemical Potential: Anomalous Effective Action, Berry Phase and Composite Fermions

    E-print Network

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2015-01-01

    We show that the QCD Dirac spectrum at finite chemical potential using a 2-matrix model in the spontaneously broken phase, is amenable to a generic 2-dimensional effective action on a curved eigenvalue manifold. The eigenvalues form a droplet with strong screening and non-linear plasmons. The droplet is threaded by a magnetic vortex which is at the origin of a Berry phase. The adiabatic transport in the droplet maps onto the one in the fractional quantum Hall effect, suggesting that composite fermions at half filling are Dirac particles. We use this observation to argue for two novel anomalous effects in the edge transport of composite fermions, and conversely on a novel contribution to the QCD quark condensate in a rotating frame.

  8. Photothermal method for in situ microanalysis of the chemical composition of coal samples

    DOEpatents

    Amer, N.M.

    1983-10-25

    Successive minute regions along a scan path on a coal sample are individually analyzed, at a series of different depths if desired, to determine chemical composition including the locations, sizes and distributions of different maceral inclusions. A sequence of infrared light pulses of progressively changing wavelengths is directed into each minute region and a probe light beam is directed along the sample surface adjacent the region. Infrared wavelengths at which strong absorption occurs in the region are identified by detecting the resulting deflections of the probe beam caused by thermally induced index of refraction changes in the air or other medium adjacent the region. The detected peak absorption wavelengths are correlated with known characteristic peak absorption wavelengths of specific coal constituents to identify the composition of each such minute region of the sample. The method enables rapid, convenient and non-destructive analyses of coal specimens to facilitate mining, processing and utilization of coals. 2 figures.

  9. Effect of chemical composition on the shock response of Zr-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. D.; Wang, F.; Laws, K. J.; Eakins, D.; Chapman, D. J.; Hazell, P. J.; Ferry, M.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    Plate impact experiments were conducted on Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMG) with nominal compositions of Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 and Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38. Velocity interferometry was used to measure the free surface velocity (FSV) histories. These measurements allowed calculation of the Hugoniot elastic limits and onset stresses of fracture (i.e. spall strength) for each alloy. The soft recovered specimens were fully characterized by means of optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The characterization results aided to assess the effect of chemical composition on the microstructural evolution, i.e. phase changes or crystallization, within the BMGs during shock loading. These changes were then correlated to the differences in strength and ductility on the nominally brittle amorphous BMGs. The most significant results from this study will be presented. State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology.

  10. Chemical taxonomy of the hinge-ligament proteins of bivalves according to their amino acid compositions.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Y; Tamiya, N

    1987-01-01

    The proteins in the hinge ligaments of molluscan bivalves were subjected to chemotaxonomic studies according to their amino acid compositions. The hinge-ligament protein is a new class of structure proteins, and this is the first attempt to introduce chemical taxonomy into the systematics of bivalves. The hinge-ligament proteins from morphologically close species, namely mactra (superfamily Mactracea) or scallop (family Pectinidae) species, showed high intraspecific homology in their compositions. On the other hand, inconsistent results were obtained with two types of ligament proteins in pearl oyster species (genus Pinctada). The results of our chemotaxonomic analyses were sometimes in good agreement with the morphological classifications and sometimes inconsistent, implying a complicated phylogenetic relationship among the species. PMID:3593265

  11. On the Morphology and Chemical Composition of the HR 4796A Debris Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Stark, Christopher C.; Weinberger, Alycia; Debes, John H.; Hinz, Philip M.; Close, Laird; Chen, Christine; Smith, Paul S.; Males, Jared R.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Puglisi, Alfio; Follette, Katherine B.; Morzinski, Katie; Wu, Ya-Lin; Briguglio, Runa; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Riccardi, Armando; Schneider, Glenn; Xompero, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We present resolved images of the HR 4796A debris disk using the Magellan adaptive optics system paired with Clio-2 and VisAO. We detect the disk at 0.77 micrometers, 0.91 micrometers, 0.99 micrometers, 2.15 micrometers, 3.1 micrometers, 3.3 micrometers, and 3.8 micrometers. We find that the deprojected center of the ring is offset from the star by 4.76 +/- 1.6 AU and that the deprojected eccentricity is 0.06 +/- 0.02, in general agreement with previous studies. We find that the average width of the ring is 14(+3/-2)% (11.1(+2.4/-1.6) AU), also comparable to previous measurements. Combining our new scattered light data with archival Hubble Space Telescope images at approximately 0.5-2 micrometers, along with previously unpublished Spitzer/MIPS thermal emission data and all other literature thermal data, we set out to constrain the chemical composition of the dust grains. After testing 19 individual root compositions and more than 8400 unique mixtures of these compositions, we find that good fits to the scattered light alone and thermal emission alone are discrepant, suggesting that caution should be exercised if fitting to only one or the other. When we fit to both data sets simultaneously, we find that silicates and organics are generally the most favored, while large abundances of water ice are usually not favored. These results suggest the HR 4796A dust grains are similar to interstellar dust and solar system comets, though improved modeling is necessary to place better constraints on the exact chemical composition of the dust.

  12. ON THE MORPHOLOGY AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF THE HR 4796A DEBRIS DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Weinberger, Alycia; Stark, Christopher C.; Debes, John H.; Chen, Christine; Hinz, Philip M.; Close, Laird; Smith, Paul S.; Males, Jared R.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Follette, Katherine B.; Morzinski, Katie; Wu, Ya-Lin; Schneider, Glenn; Puglisi, Alfio; Briguglio, Runa; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco

    2015-01-10

    We present resolved images of the HR 4796A debris disk using the Magellan adaptive optics system paired with Clio-2 and VisAO. We detect the disk at 0.77 ?m, 0.91 ?m, 0.99 ?m, 2.15 ?m, 3.1 ?m, 3.3 ?m, and 3.8 ?m. We find that the deprojected center of the ring is offset from the star by 4.76 ± 1.6 AU and that the deprojected eccentricity is 0.06 ± 0.02, in general agreement with previous studies. We find that the average width of the ring is 14{sub ?2}{sup +3}% (11.1{sub ?1.6}{sup +2.4} AU), also comparable to previous measurements. Combining our new scattered light data with archival Hubble Space Telescope images at ?0.5-2 ?m, along with previously unpublished Spitzer/MIPS thermal emission data and all other literature thermal data, we set out to constrain the chemical composition of the dust grains. After testing 19 individual root compositions and more than 8400 unique mixtures of these compositions, we find that good fits to the scattered light alone and thermal emission alone are discrepant, suggesting that caution should be exercised if fitting to only one or the other. When we fit to both data sets simultaneously, we find that silicates and organics are generally the most favored, while large abundances of water ice are usually not favored. These results suggest the HR 4796A dust grains are similar to interstellar dust and solar system comets, though improved modeling is necessary to place better constraints on the exact chemical composition of the dust.

  13. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  14. Growth, chemical composition and soil properties of Tipuana speciosa (Benth.) Kuntze seedlings irrigated with sewage effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Hayssam M.; Khamis, Mohamed H.; Hassan, Fatma A.

    2012-06-01

    This study was carried out at a greenhouse of Sabahia Horticulture Research Station, Alexandria, Egypt, to study the effect of sewage effluent on the growth and chemical composition of Tipuana speciosa (Benth.) Kuntze seedlings as well as on soil properties for three stages. The irrigation treatments were primary-treated wastewater and secondary-treated wastewater, in addition to tap water as control. Therefore, the treated wastewater was taken from oxidation ponds of New Borg El-Arab City. Results of these study revealed that the primary effluent treatment explored the highest significant values for vegetative growth and biomass, compared to the other treatments. In addition, the higher significant concentration and uptake of chemical composition in different plant parts were obtained from the primary effluent treatment during the three stages of irrigation. It was found that the concentration of heavy metals in either plant or soil was below as compared to the world-recommended levels. These findings suggested that the use of sewage effluent in irrigating T. speciosa seedlings grown in calcareous soil was beneficial for the improvement of soil properties and production of timber trees, and also important for the safe manner of disposal of wastewater.

  15. Effect of different preservation processes on chemical composition and fatty acid profile of anchovy (Engraulis anchoita).

    PubMed

    Czerner, Marina; Agustinelli, Silvina P; Guccione, Silvana; Yeannes, María I

    2015-12-01

    The effects of salting-ripening, canning and marinating processes on chemical composition and fatty acid profile of anchovy (Engraulis anchoita) were evaluated (p?=?0.01), with emphasis on long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Fresh anchovy showed a high proportion of PUFAs (?45?g/100?g total lipid) with an eicosapentaenoic (EPA)?+?docosahexaenoic (DHA) content of 27.08?g/100?g total lipid. The salting-ripening process led to the largest changes in the chemical composition and the fatty acid profile, which resulted in a reduction of ?70% on the total EPA and DHA contents (g/100?g edible portion). Contrary, canned and marinated anchovy presented a fatty acid profile similar to that of fresh anchovy. The use of vegetable oil as covering liquid led to final products with increased ?-6 PUFAs content. Despite the modifications observed, the total amount of essential EPA and DHA fatty acids provided by these products remained high compared with values reported in literature for other foods. PMID:26576657

  16. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil from leaves of Algerian Melissa officinalis L.

    PubMed Central

    Abdellatif, Fahima; Boudjella, Hadjira; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Hassani, Aicha

    2014-01-01

    The essential oil obtained from leaves of Melissa officinalis L. (Family of Lamiaceae) growing in Algeria, was investigated for its chemical composition and in vitro antimicrobial activity. The chemical composition was determined by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC/MS and GC-FID. Sixty-three compounds were identified in the essential oil, representing 94.10 % of the total oil and the yields were 0.34 %. The major component was geranial (44.20 %). Other predominant components were neral (30.20 %) and citronellal (6.30 %). The in vitro antimicrobial activity was determined by paper disk agar diffusion testing and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using 7 bacteria (3 Gram-positive and 4 Gram-negative), 2 yeasts and 3 fungi. The results showed that the essential oil presented high antimicrobial activity against all microorganisms targeted mainly against five human pathogenic bacteria, one yeast Candida albicans and two phytopathogenic fungi tested. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranged from 1.00 to 5.00 µL/mL. PMID:26417300

  17. The influence of chemical composition of commercial lemon essential oils on the growth of Candida strains.

    PubMed

    Bia?o?, M; Krzy?ko-?upicka, T; Kosza?kowska, M; Wieczorek, P P

    2014-02-01

    Candida yeasts are saprophytes naturally present in the environment and forming colonies on human mucous membranes and skin. They are opportunistic fungi that cause severe and even fatal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Several essential oils, including eucalyptus, pine, cinnamon and lemon, have been shown to be effective against Candida strains. This study addresses the chemical composition of some commercial lemon essential oils and their antifungal potential against selected Candida yeast strains. Antifungal potential and minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for six commercial lemon essential oils against five Candida yeast strains (Candida albicans 31, Candida tropicalis 32, Candida glabrata 33, Candida glabrata 35 and Candida glabrata 38). On the basis of the GCMS analysis, it was found that the tested lemon essential oils had different chemical compositions, but mostly, they contained almost exclusively terpenes and oxygenated terpenes. The tests show that antifungal potential of lemon essential oils against Candida yeast strains was related to the high content of monoterpenoids and the type of Candida strains. From six tested commercial oils, only four (ETJA, Vera-Nord, Avicenna-Oil and Aromatic Art) shows antifungal potential against three Candida species (C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata). Vera-Nord and Avicenna-Oil show the best activity and effectively inhibit the growth of the C. albicans strain across the full range of the concentrations used. Our study characterises lemon essential oils, which could be used as very effective natural remedies against candidiasis caused by C. albicans. PMID:24436010

  18. Dissolution of cerium(IV)-lanthanide(III) oxides: Comparative effect of chemical composition, temperature, and acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Horlait, D.; Clavier, N.; Szenknect, S.; Dacheux, N.; Dubois, V.

    2012-03-15

    The dissolution of Ce{sub 1-x}Ln{sub x}O{sub 2-x/2} solid solutions was undertaken in various acid media in order to evaluate the effects of several physicochemical parameters such as chemical composition, temperature, and acidity on the reaction kinetics. The normalized dissolution rates (R{sub L,0}) were found to be strongly modified by the trivalent lanthanide incorporation rate, due to the presence of oxygen vacancies decreasing the samples cohesion. Conversely, the nature of the trivalent cation considered only weakly impacted the R{sub L,0} values. The dependence of the normalized dissolution rates on the temperature then appeared to be of the same order of magnitude than that of chemical composition. Moreover, it allowed determining the corresponding activation energy (E{sub A} ? 60-85 kJ.mol{sup -1}) which accounts for a dissolution driven by surface-controlled reactions. A similar conclusion was made regarding the acidity of the solution: the partial order related to (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) reaching about 0.7. Finally, the prevailing effect of the incorporation of aliovalent cations in the fluorite-type CeO{sub 2} matrix on the dissolution kinetics precluded the observation of slight effects such as those linked to the complexing agents or to the crystal structure of the samples. (authors)

  19. Chemical Compositions and Antimicrobial Activities of Ocimum sanctum L. Essential Oils at Different Harvest Stages

    PubMed Central

    Saharkhiz, Mohammad Jamal; Kamyab, Amir Alam; Kazerani, Narges Khatoon; Zomorodian, Kamiar; Pakshir, Keyvan; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Essential Oils (EOs) possess antibacterial properties and represent a natural source to treat infections and prevent food spoilage. Their chemical composition might be affected by the environmental condition and the developmental growth stages of the plant. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the variations in chemical compositions and antimicrobial activities of the EOs of Ocimum sanctum L. at different stages of harvesting. Materials and Methods: The oils constituents were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The effects of three different harvest stages of O. sanctum EOs against most common causes of food-borne were evaluated by broth micro-dilution method as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results: The analysis of the EOs indicated that eugenol was the major compound of the EOs at all developmental stages which reached its maximum level at the second stage. The results showed that the tested EOs exhibited antimicrobial activities against all of the examined pathogens at concentrations of 0.125-32 µL/mL, except Pseudomonas aeruginosa which was only inhibited by high concentrations of the floral budding and full flowering EOs. EO distilled from the second developmental growth stage (floral budding) of O. sanctum exhibited the strongest antibacterial activities against the food borne bacteria. Conclusions: Considering the wide range of antimicrobial activities of the examined EOs, they might have the potential to be used to manage infectious diseases or extend the shelf life of food products. PMID:25763132

  20. Variation of the glass transition temperature with rigidity and chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2006-05-01

    The effects of flexibility and chemical composition in the variation of the glass transition temperature are obtained by using the Lindemann criteria, which relates melting temperature with atomic vibrations, and rigidity theory. Using this criteria and that floppy modes produce an excess of vibrational states at low frequencies which enhance in a considerable way the average quadratic displacement, we show that the consequence is a modified glass transition temperature. This approach allows us to obtain in a simple way the empirically modified Gibbs-DiMarzio law, which has been widely used in chalcogenide glasses to fit the changes in the glass transition temperature with the chemical composition. The method predicts that the constant that appears in the law depends upon the ratio of two characteristic frequencies (or temperatures). This constant is estimated for the Se1-x-y(GeyAs1-y)x glass by using the experimental density of vibrational states, and the result shows a good agreement with the experimental fit from glass transition temperature variation.

  1. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of essential oils and solvent extracts of Ptychotis verticillata from Morocco.

    PubMed

    El Ouariachi, El Mokhtar; Tomi, Pierre; Bouyanzer, Abdelhamid; Hammouti, Belkheir; Desjobert, Jean-Marie; Costa, Jean; Paolini, Julien

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical composition of the essential oil and extracts of Ptychotis verticillata. The antioxidative activities of this species were also evaluated to suggest it as a new potential source of natural antioxidants. Analysis of the chemical composition of P. verticillata essential oil from Morocco was carried out using GC and GC-MS. The oil was dominated by phenolic compounds (48.0%) with carvacrol (44.6%) and thymol (3.4%) as the main compounds. Plant phenolics constitute one of the major groups of components that act as primary antioxidant free radical terminators. The amounts of total phenolics and flavonoids in the solvent extracts (diethyl ether and ethyl acetate) were determined spectrometrically. Furthermore, the antioxidant activities of the essential oil and extracts were determined using a DPPH test system. The DPPH scavenging activity of extracts increased in the order ethyl acetate>ascorbic acid>diethyl ether>essential oil. Finally, a relationship was observed between the antioxidant activity potential and total phenolic and flavonoid levels of the extract. PMID:21093522

  2. Chemical composition analysis, antioxidant and antibacterial activity evaluation of essential oil of Atalantia monophylla Correa

    PubMed Central

    Thirugnanasampandan, Ramaraj; Gunasekar, Ramya; Gogulramnath, Madhusudhanan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atalantia monophylla Correa. a small tree belongs to the family Rutaceae. It is distributed throughout India and in Tamil Nadu the species is commonly seen in foothills of dry vegetation. Objective: The aim was to hydrodistillate and analyze the chemical composition of essential oil from the fresh leaves of A. monophylla Correa. collected in two different seasons (December, 2013 and May, 2014) and to evaluate antioxidant and antibacterial activities of isolated essential oil. Materials and Methods: Chemical composition of isolated essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Antioxidant activity of oil was assessed using five different antioxidant test systems. Antibacterial activity of oil was tested against six pathogenic bacteria by broth dilution method. Results: Essential oil obtained from the leaves collected during May, 2014 had shown more compounds. Antioxidant activity of oil was moderate when compared with positive control. Minimum inhibitory concentration value of oil was ranges between 139.32 ± 0.001 and 541.11 ± 0.003 µg/mL against all the tested bacteria. Conclusion: Result clearly indicates essential oil collected during May, 2014 showed more bioactive compounds. PMID:26109788

  3. Variations in Depth and Chemical Composition of Groundwater During an Interval in Intermittent Water Delivery.

    PubMed

    Yongjin, Chen; Weihong, Li; Jiazhen, Liu; Ming, Lu; Mengchen, Xu; Shengliang, Liu

    2015-08-01

    Based on monitoring data collected from 2006 to 2009 at the lower reaches of the Tarim River, tempo-spatial variations in groundwater depth and chemistry during an approximately 3-year interval of intermittent water delivery were studied. Results indicate that as the groundwater depth increased at the upper sector of the river's lower reaches from March 2007 to September 2009, so too did the main chemical composition of groundwater. Groundwater depth at the intermediate sector also increased, but major ions in groundwater declined. The groundwater depth at the lower sector started to decrease in August 2008, and the concentrations of main ions in the groundwater generally rose and fell along with the variations in groundwater depth. The groundwater depth and chemistry in the monitoring wells located at a distance from the aqueduct expressed complex changes at different sections. For instance, at the section near the Daxihaizi Reservoir Section B, groundwater depth increased gradually, but chemical composition changed little. In contrast, the groundwater depth of monitoring wells far from the Daxihaizi Reservoir (Section I) decreased and salt content in the groundwater increased. In sectors at a moderate distance from the reservoir, groundwater depth decreased and concentrations of main ions significantly increased. PMID:26237687

  4. Chemical, isotopic, and gas compositions of selected thermal springs in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, William C.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-seven thermal springs in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah were sampled for detailed chemical and isotopic analysis. The springs issue sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, or sodium mixed-anion waters of near neutral (6.2) to alkaline (9.2) pH. High concentrations of fluoride, more than 8 milligrams per liter, occur in Arizona in waters from Gillard Hot Springs, Castle Hot Springs, and the unnamed spring of Eagle Creek, and in New Mexico from springs along the Gila River. Deuterium compositions of the thermal waters cover the same range as those expected for meteoric waters in the respective areas. The chemical compositions of the thermal waters indicate that Thermo Hot Springs in Utah and Gillard Hot Springs in Arizona represent hydrothermal systems which are at temperatures higher than 125 deg C. Estimates of subsurface temperature based on the quartz and Na-K-Ca geothermometer differ by up to 60 deg C for Monroe, Joseph, Red Hill, and Crater hot springs in Utah. Similar conflicting estimates of aquifer temperature occur for Verde Hot Springs, the springs near Clifton and Coolidge Dam, in Arizona; and the warm springs near San Ysidro, Radium Hot Springs, and San Francisco Hot Springs, in New Mexico. Such disparities could result from mixing, precipitation of calcium carbonate, or perhaps appreciable concentrations of magnesium. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Effects of aerosol sources and chemical compositions on cloud drop sizes and glaciation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipori, Assaf; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tirosh, Ofir; Teutsch, Nadya; Erel, Yigal

    2015-09-01

    The effect of aerosols on cloud properties, such as its droplet sizes and its glaciation temperatures, depends on their compositions and concentrations. In order to examine these effects, we collected rain samples in northern Israel during five winters (2008-2011 and 2013) and determined their chemical composition, which was later used to identify the aerosols' sources. By combining the chemical data with satellite-retrieved cloud properties, we linked the aerosol types, sources, and concentrations with the cloud glaciation temperatures (Tg). The presence of dust increased Tg from -26°C to -12°C already at relatively low dust concentrations. This result is in agreement with the conventional wisdom that desert dust serves as good ice nuclei (INs). With higher dust concentrations, Tg saturated at -12°C, even though cloud droplet sizes decreased as a result of the cloud condensation nucleating (CCN) activity of the dust. Marine air masses also encouraged freezing, but in this case, freezing was enhanced by the larger cloud droplet sizes in the air masses (caused by low CCN concentrations) and not by IN concentrations or by aerosol type. An increased fraction of anthropogenic aerosols in marine air masses caused a decrease in Tg, indicating that these aerosols served as poor IN. Anthropogenic aerosols reduced cloud droplet sizes, which further decreased Tg. Our results could be useful in climate models for aerosol-cloud interactions, as we investigated the effects of aerosols of different sources on cloud properties. Such parameterization can simplify these models substantially.

  6. On the binary helium star DY Centauri: chemical composition and evolutionary state

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Gajendra; Rao, N. Kameswara; Jeffery, C. Simon; Lambert, David L. E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2014-10-01

    DY Cen has shown a steady fading of its visual light by about one magnitude in the last 40 yr, suggesting a secular increase in its effective temperature. We have conducted non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and LTE abundance analyses to determine the star's effective temperature, surface gravity, and chemical composition using high-resolution spectra obtained over two decades. The derived stellar parameters for three epochs suggest that DY Cen has evolved at a constant luminosity and has become hotter by about 5000 K in 23 yr. We show that the derived abundances remain unchanged for the three epochs. The derived abundances of the key elements, including F and Ne, are as observed for the extreme helium stars resulting from a merger of a He white dwarf with a C-O white dwarf. Thus DY Cen by chemical composition appears to also be a product of a merger of two white dwarfs. This appearance seems to be at odds with the recent suggestion that DY Cen is a single-lined spectroscopic binary.

  7. Chemical composition of ground water in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, 1971-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.V.; McKinley, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Fifteen wells in the Yucca Mountain area of southern Nevada have been sampled for chemical analysis. Samples were obtained by pumping water from the entire well bore (composite sample), and, in three instances, by pumping from one or more isolated intervals within a well bore. Sodium is the most abundant cation , and biocarbonate is the most abundant anion in all water samples. Samples from the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer penetrated by well UE-25p 1 contain higher relative concentrations of calcium and magnesium than samples from overlying volcanic tuffs. Values of the stable isotope concentrations of oxygen and hydrogen are relatively negative (light) and have deuterium excess values ranging from +5 to +10. The distribution of uncorrected radiocarbon ages of tuffaceous groundwater from samples within one kilometer of the exploratory block ranges from 12,000 to 18,500 years before present. Variation in the inorganic, stable, and radioactive isotope composition of samples indicates a significant degree of lateral and vertical chemical inhomogeneity in groundwater of the Yucca Mountain area. (USGS)

  8. Bioactive properties and chemical composition of six walnut (Juglans regia L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José Alberto; Oliveira, Ivo; Sousa, Anabela; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Bento, Albino; Estevinho, Letícia

    2008-06-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant potential and antimicrobial activity were studied in six walnuts (Juglans regia L.) cultivars (cv. Franquette, Lara, Marbot, Mayette, Mellanaise and Parisienne) produced in Portugal. Concerning their chemical composition the main constituent of fruits was fat ranging from 78.83% to 82.14%, being the nutritional value around 720kcal per 100g of fruits. Linoleic acid was the major fatty acid reaching the maximum value of 60.30% (cv. Lara) followed by oleic, linolenic and palmitic acids. The aqueous extracts of walnut cultivars were investigated by the reducing power assay, the scavenging effect on DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radicals and beta-carotene linoleate model system. All the walnut extracts exhibited antioxidant capacity in a concentration-dependent manner being the lowest EC(50) values obtained with extracts of cv. Parisienne. Their antimicrobial capacity was also checked against gram positive (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and fungi (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans), revealing activity against the different tested microorganisms. PMID:18334279

  9. Chemical Engineering Rate Processes

    E-print Network

    Fenster, Sam

    Chemical Engineering · Rate Processes Physical Chemical Biochemical · Example - pharmacokinetics ocw.mit.edu #12;The historical chemical engineer · Chemistry + Mechanical design of equipment chemical engineer today · Electronics · Pharmaceuticals · Environment - Air, Energy and Water

  10. Chemical Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    As a preliminary study on the effects of chemical aging of polymer materials MERL and TRI have examined two polymeric materials that are typically used for offshore umbilical applications. These two materials were Tefzel, a copolymer of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene, and Coflon, polyvinylidene fluoride. The Coflon specimens were cut from pipe sections and exposed to H2S at various temperatures and pressures. One of these specimens was tested for methane permeation, and another for H2S permeation. The Tefzel specimens were cut from .05 mm sheet stock material and were exposed to methanol at elevated temperature and pressure. One of these specimens was exposed to methanol permeation for 2 days at 100 C and 2500 psi. An additional specimen was exposed to liquid methanol for 3 days at 150 C and 15 Bar. Virgin specimens of each material were similarly prepared and tested.

  11. Comparison of the chemical compositions and nutritive values of various pumpkin (Cucurbitaceae) species and parts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Young-Nam; Choi, Changsun

    2012-01-01

    Pumpkins have considerable variation in nutrient contents depending on the cultivation environment, species, or part. In this study, the general chemical compositions and some bioactive components, such as tocopherols, carotenoids, and ?-sitosterol, were analyzed in three major species of pumpkin (Cucurbitaceae pepo, C. moschata, and C. maxima) grown in Korea and also in three parts (peel, flesh, and seed) of each pumpkin species. C. maxima had significantly more carbohydrate, protein, fat, and fiber than C. pepo or C. moschata (P < 0.05). The moisture content as well as the amino acid and arginine contents in all parts of the pumpkin was highest in C. pepo. The major fatty acids in the seeds were palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids. C. pepo and C. moschata seeds had significantly more ?-tocopherol than C. maxima, whose seeds had the highest ?-carotene content. C. pepo seeds had significantly more ?-sitosterol than the others. Nutrient compositions differed considerably among the pumpkin species and parts. These results will be useful in updating the nutrient compositions of pumpkin in the Korean food composition database. Additional analyses of various pumpkins grown in different years and in different areas of Korea are needed. PMID:22413037

  12. Silica-titania composite aerogel photocatalysts by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zu, Guoqing; Shen, Jun; Wang, Wenqin; Zou, Liping; Lian, Ya; Zhang, Zhihua

    2015-03-11

    Silica-titania composite aerogels were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds. This novel deposition process was based on chemisorption of partially hydrolyzed titanium alkoxides from solution onto silica nanoparticle surfaces and subsequent hydrolysis and condensation to afford titania nanoparticles on the silica surface. The titania is homogeneously distributed in the silica-titania composite aerogels, and the titania content can be effectively controlled by regulating the deposition cycles. The resultant composite aerogel with 15 deposition cycles possessed a high specific surface area (SSA) of 425 m(2)/g, a small particle size of 5-14 nm, and a large pore volume and pore size of 2.41 cm(3)/g and 18.1 nm, respectively, after heat treatment at 600 °C and showed high photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation of methylene blue under UV-light irradiation. Its photocatalytic activity highly depends on the deposition cycles and heat treatment. The combination of small particle size, high SSA, and enhanced crystallinity after heat treatment at 600 °C contributes to the excellent photocatalytic property of the silica-titania composite aerogel. The higher SSAs compared to those of the reported titania aerogels (<200 m(2)/g at 600 °C) at high temperatures combined with the simple method makes the silica-titania aerogels promising candidates as photocatalysts. PMID:25664480

  13. All year round chemical composition of aerosol reaching the inner Antarctic Plateau (Dome C - East Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udisti, R.; Becagli, S.; Castellano, E.; Cerri, O.; Marino, F.; Morganti, A.; Nava, S.; Rugi, F.; Severi, M.; Traversi, R.

    2009-04-01

    Since 2005, continuous, all-year-round aerosol sampling was carried out at Dome C (Central East Antarctica, 3233 m a.s.l., about 1100 km far from the coast-line), in the framework of Station Concordia project. Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected in summer and winter period by using different low- and medium-volume systems, including pre-selected cut-off samplers (with PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 heads) and multi-stage (Andersen 8-stage and Dekati 4-stage) impactors. Sampling resolution and volume range from 1 day to 1 month and from 2.3 to 12 m3/h respectively. Aerosol study at Dome C aims to improve our knowledge on present day source intensity, transport efficiency and pathways (including stratosphere-to-troposphere interchanges) of particles reaching internal sites of Antarctica and to understand size- and chemical-fractionation effects occurring during the transport (by comparison with coastal aerosol composition). Besides, more information on atmosphere-snow interaction, including depositional and post depositional processes, as well as the effect of sublimation/condensation processes on snow surface, improves the reconstruction of past atmosphere composition from EPICA-DC deep ice core, drilled in the same site. Here we report some results of the chemical composition of the Antarctic background aerosol reaching Dome C, pointing out the seasonal pattern and the temporal trend of some ionic components used as tracers of sea spray, marine biogenic and crustal emissions. The atmospheric load in the summer is more than one order of magnitude lower than that measured in coastal sites and chemical composition is dominated by secondary aerosol, mainly originated by biological marine activity (S-cycle), and distributed in the finest aerosol fractions. H2SO4 from oxidation of biogenic DMS is the main component, while the contribution of HNO3 to the ionic budget is difficult to evaluate because of the re-emission into the atmosphere from the filter surface (acidic deposition). The ionic load was even lower in winter, when secondary biogenic aerosol decreases and larger particles from primary source (especially from sea spray) prevail. Sea spray plays a significant role in winter and spring aerosol, when more frequent and effective transport events from marine areas around Antarctica occur. In the same transport conditions, even relatively large dust content (as revealed by Ca2+ concentration) is measured in the Dome C aerosol. Longer observations performed with higher temporal resolutions, yield greater information about the relationship between atmospheric circulation patterns and the load and chemical composition of atmospheric aerosol reaching DC in different seasons. Fractionating effects leading to a reduction of sulphate/sodium ratio (used as marker of "frost flower" source) seem generally do not affect in a significant way the winter aerosol composition, even if few negative values of non-sea salt sulphate were calculated along the whole analyzed period. This evidence could show that sea spray aerosol from frost flower can reach the inner Antarctic plateau when particular transport processes occurs.

  14. Antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of the essential oils of Portuguese Foeniculum vulgare fruits.

    PubMed

    Mota, Ana S; Martins, M Rosário; Arantes, Sílvia; Lopes, Violeta R; Bettencourt, Eliseu; Pombal, Sofia; Gomes, Arlindo C; Silva, Lúcia A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from fruits of six fennel accessions collected from wild populations occurring in the centre and south of Portugal. Composition of essential oils was established by Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The obtained yields of the essential oils were found to vary greatly in the range of 1.1 to 2.9% (v/w) and the chemical composition varied with the region of collection. A total of 16 compounds were identified. The main compounds were fenchone (16.9 - 34.7%), estragole (2.5 - 66.0%) and trans-anethole (7.9 - 77.7%). The percentages of these three main compounds were used to determine the relationship between the different oil samples and to group them into four different chemotypes: anethole/fenchone; anethole; estragole and anethole/estragole. Antifungal activity of essential oils was evaluated against six food spoilage fungi: Aspergillus niger, A. japonicus, A. oryzae, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizophus oryzae and R. stolonifer. Antibacterial activity was assessed against three Gram-positive strains: Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228 and S. aureus ATCC 28213; and against six Gram-negative strains: Escherichia coli ATCC 25922; Morganella morganii LFG 08; Proteus mirabilis LFG 04; Salmonella enteritidis LFG 05; S. entiritidis serovar typhimurium LFG 06 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 by the disc diffusion agar method; the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined using the broth macro-dilution method. The MIC values varied from 62.5 (E. coli ATCC 25922) to 2000 µmL (P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853). PMID:25973507

  15. Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"

    E-print Network

    Meetings Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators" is scarcely older than for one or two dozen people grew to include nearly a hundred. Chemical accelerators is a name sug- gested by one of us for devices that produce beams of chemically interesting species at relative kinetic

  16. Transport-induced shifts in condensate dew-point and composition in multicomponent systems with chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Partial heterogeneous condensation phenomena in multicomponent reacting systems are analyzed taking into consideration the chemical element transport phenomena. It is demonstrated that the dew-point surface temperature in chemically reactive systems is not a purely thermodynamic quantity, but is influenced by the multicomponent diffusion and Soret-mass diffusion phenomena. Several distinct dew-points are shown to exist in such systems and, as a result of transport constraints, the 'sharp' locus between two chemically distinct condensates is systematically moved to a difference mainstream composition.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon composite thin films for porous low-k dielectrics

    E-print Network

    Ross, April Denise, 1977-

    2005-01-01

    Pulsed plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has produced organosilicon thin films with the potential use as low dielectric constant interconnect materials in microelectronic circuits. Both diethylsilane and ...

  18. Chemical Composition of Gas-Phase Oxidation Products from Biogenic Sources in the Southeast US during SOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Massoli, P.; Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, L. R.; Mohr, C.; Brophy, P.; Murschell, T.; Hu, W.; Canagaratna, M.; Krechmer, J.; Junninen, H.; Hakala, J. P.; Day, D. A.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Ortega, A. M.; Kimmel, J.; Cubison, M.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Thornton, J. A.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Farmer, D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Reduced species emitted to the atmosphere are chemically transformed by atmospheric oxidants. The measurement of the large number of resulting oxidized compounds is crucial to understand and quantify these transformation processes. We analyzed datasets from four high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometers (HRToF-CIMS) during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in June and July 2013 at the Alabama Supersite in the Southeast U.S. These datasets allow specification and quantification of the multiple gas-phase compounds produced by chemical oxidation. The mass spectrometers used different reagent ions, nitrate (NO3-), acetate (CH3COO-), and iodide (I-). In this study, we will present the chemical composition of isoprene and terpene oxidation products as measured by the different techniques. When comparing the concentration and composition at different conditions (e.g., time of day, NOx levels, aerosol loading, RH), differences in gas-phase composition provide indications of both the changes in chemical processing arising from the different conditions as well as different sensitivities of the reagent ions. We will discuss these differences in terms of bulk chemical parameters such as carbon oxidation state, carbon number and oxygen-to-carbon ratio.

  19. Chemical composition and insecticidal activity of plant essential oils from Benin against Anopheles gambiae (Giles)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance in sub-Saharan Africa and especially in Benin is a major public health issue hindering the control of the malaria vectors. Each Anopheles species has developed a resistance to one or several classes of the insecticides currently in use in the field. Therefore, it is urgent to find alternative compounds to conquer the vector. In this study, the efficacies of essential oils of nine plant species, which are traditionally used to avoid mosquito bites in Benin, were investigated. Methods Essential oils of nine plant species were extracted by hydrodistillation, and their chemical compositions were identified by GC-MS. These oils were tested on susceptible “kisumu” and resistant “ladji-Cotonou” strains of Anopheles gambiae, following WHO test procedures for insecticide resistance monitoring in malaria vector mosquitoes. Results Different chemical compositions were obtained from the essential oils of the plant species. The major constituents identified were as follows: neral and geranial for Cymbopogon citratus, Z-carveol, E-p-mentha-1(7),8-dien-2-ol and E-p-mentha-2,8-dienol for Cymbopogon giganteus, piperitone for Cymbopogon schoenanthus, citronellal and citronellol for Eucalyptus citriodora, p-cymene, caryophyllene oxide and spathulenol for Eucalyptus tereticornis, 3-tetradecanone for Cochlospermum tinctorium and Cochlospermum planchonii, methyl salicylate for Securidaca longepedunculata and ascaridole for Chenopodium ambrosioides. The diagnostic dose was 0.77% for C. citratus, 2.80% for E. tereticornis, 3.37% for E. citriodora, 4.26% for C. ambrosioides, 5.48% for C. schoenanthus and 7.36% for C. giganteus. The highest diagnostic doses were obtained with S. longepedunculata (9.84%), C. tinctorium (11.56%) and C. planchonii (15.22%), compared to permethrin 0.75%. A. gambiae cotonou, which is resistant to pyrethroids, showed significant tolerance to essential oils from C. tinctorium and S. longepedunculata as expected but was highly susceptible to all the other essential oils at the diagnostic dose. Conclusions C. citratus, E. tereticornis, E. citriodora, C. ambrosioides and C. schoenanthus are potential promising plant sources for alternative compounds to pyrethroids, for the control of the Anopheles malaria vector in Benin. The efficacy of their essential oils is possibly based on their chemical compositions in which major and/or minor compounds have reported insecticidal activities on various pests and disease vectors such as Anopheles. PMID:24298981

  20. Controls on the chemical and isotopic compositions of urban stormwater in a semiarid zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaf, L.; Nativ, R.; Shain, D.; Hassan, M.; Geyer, S.

    2003-04-01

    The temporal variations in the chemical and isotopic compositions of urban stormwater under different land uses, and their dependence on physical parameters such as precipitation intensity, stormwater discharge, cumulative stormwater volumes and the size of the drainage area, were investigated in the coastal city of Ashdod, Israel. During 2000/2001 and 2001/2002, 39 stormwater events were intensively monitored for precipitation distribution and intensity at three stations across the city and for stormwater discharge at seven stations draining 85% of the city area. Thirty nine and 202 precipitation samples were collected and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions, respectively as were 149 stormwater samples, collected from the drains during 10 of the 39 events. Because the stormwater stations drained areas of different sizes and land uses, their impact on the stormwater chemistry could be evaluated. Land use had only a minor effect on the concentrations of major ions and trace elements. Conversely, the concentrations and variety of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds were significantly higher in stormwater generated in the industrial area than in that draining from residential areas. Ion and trace-metal concentrations were very low (below drinking-water standards) in 97% of the stormwater samples collected from all drains. Stormwater concentrations were higher in stations draining a larger area, thereby linking concentrations to the length of stormwater flowpaths. A first-flush effect was documented on both a seasonal and an event basis for both ions and trace elements. The high concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria exceeded the drinking-water standards and displayed a random pattern. The isotopic ratios of oxygen and hydrogen in the stormwater suggest very little exposure to the atmosphere, resulting in very limited fractionation. The presence of fecal coliforms, ammonium in some samples, and specific ratios of oxygen and nitrogen isotopes, suggest that although the sewer and stormwater=collection systems are separated, wastewater, possibly from overflowing sewers, contributed to the drained stormwater. The chemical composition of stormwater collected from the residential areas in the city of Ashdod suggests that this water can be reused with little treatment (e.g. filtering and chlorination).

  1. Chemical composition profiles during alkaline flooding at different temperatures and extended residence times

    SciTech Connect

    Aflaki, R.; Handy, L.L.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate whether or not caustic sweeps the major portion of the reservoir efficiently during an alkaline flood process. It was also the objective of this work to study the state of final equilibrium during a caustic flood through determination of the pH and chemical composition profiles along the porous medium. For this purpose, a long porous medium which provided extended residence times was required. It was necessary to set up the porous medium such that the changes in the pH and chemical composition of the solution could be monitored. Four Berea sandstone cores (8 in. length and1 in. diameter) placed in series provided the desired length and the opportunity for sampling in-between cores. This enabled establishment of pH and chemical composition profiles. The experiments were run at, temperatures up.to 180[degrees]C, and the flow rates varied from 4.8 to 0.2 ft/day. The samples were analyzed for pH and for Si and Al concentrations.The results show that caustic consumption is insignificant for temperatures up to 100[degrees]C. Above 100[degrees]C consumption increases and is accompanied by a significant decrease in pH. The sharp decline in pH also coincides with a sharp decline in concentration of silica in solution. The results also show that alumina is removed from the solution and solubility of alumina ultimately reaches zero. Sharp silica and pH declines take place even in the absence of any alumina in solution. As a result, removal of silica from solution is attributed to the irreversible caustic/rock interaction. This interaction is in the form of chemisorption reactions in which silica is adsorbed onto the rock surface consuming hydroxyl ion. Once these reactions were satisfied, caustic breakthrough occurs at a high pH. However, significant pore volumes of caustic must be injected for completion of the chemisorption.

  2. Chemical composition profiles during alkaline flooding at different temperatures and extended residence times

    SciTech Connect

    Aflaki, R.; Handy, L.L.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate whether or not caustic sweeps the major portion of the reservoir efficiently during an alkaline flood process. It was also the objective of this work to study the state of final equilibrium during a caustic flood through determination of the pH and chemical composition profiles along the porous medium. For this purpose, a long porous medium which provided extended residence times was required. It was necessary to set up the porous medium such that the changes in the pH and chemical composition of the solution could be monitored. Four Berea sandstone cores (8 in. length and1 in. diameter) placed in series provided the desired length and the opportunity for sampling in-between cores. This enabled establishment of pH and chemical composition profiles. The experiments were run at, temperatures up.to 180{degrees}C, and the flow rates varied from 4.8 to 0.2 ft/day. The samples were analyzed for pH and for Si and Al concentrations.The results show that caustic consumption is insignificant for temperatures up to 100{degrees}C. Above 100{degrees}C consumption increases and is accompanied by a significant decrease in pH. The sharp decline in pH also coincides with a sharp decline in concentration of silica in solution. The results also show that alumina is removed from the solution and solubility of alumina ultimately reaches zero. Sharp silica and pH declines take place even in the absence of any alumina in solution. As a result, removal of silica from solution is attributed to the irreversible caustic/rock interaction. This interaction is in the form of chemisorption reactions in which silica is adsorbed onto the rock surface consuming hydroxyl ion. Once these reactions were satisfied, caustic breakthrough occurs at a high pH. However, significant pore volumes of caustic must be injected for completion of the chemisorption.

  3. Chemical composition of snow in the northern Sierra Nevada and other areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feth, John Henry Frederick; Rogers, S.M.; Roberson, Charles Elmer

    1964-01-01

    Melting snow provides a large part of the water used throughout the western conterminous United States for agriculture, industry, and domestic supply. It is an active agent in chemical weathering, supplies moisture for forest growth, and sustains fish and wildlife. Despite its importance, virtually nothing has been known of the chemical character of snow in the western mountains until the present study. Analysis of more than 100 samples, most from the northern Sierra Nevada, but some from Utah, Denver, Colo., and scattered points, shows that melted snow is a dilute solution containing measurable amounts of some or all of the inorganic constituents commonly found in natural water. There are significant regional differences in chemical composition; the progressive increase in calcium content with increasing distance eastward from the west slope of the Sierra Nevada is the most pronounced. The chemical character of individual snowfalls is variable. Some show predominant influence of oceanic salt; others show strong effects of mineralization from continental sources, probably largely dust. Silica and boron were found in about half the samples analyzed for these constituents; precipitation is seldom analyzed for these substances. Results of the chemical analyses for major constituents in snow samples are summarized in the following table. The median and mean values for individual constituents are derived from 41-78 samples of Sierra Nevada snow, 6-18 samples of Utah snow, and 6-17 samples of Denver, Colo., snow. [Table] The sodium, chloride, and perhaps boron found in snow are probably incorporated in moisture-laden air masses as they move over the Pacific Ocean. Silica, although abundant in the silicate-mineral nuclei found in some snowflakes, may be derived in soluble form largely from dust. Calcium, magnesium, and some bicarbonate are probably added by dust of continental origin. The sources of the other constituents remain unknown. When snowmelt comes in contact with the lithosphere, the earlier diversity of chemical type largely disappears. The melt water rapidly increases its content of dissolved solids and becomes calcium magnesium bicarbonate in type. Silica, whose concentration increases more than tenfold, shows the largest gain; calcium and bicarbonate contents also increase markedly. Most of the additional mineral matter is from soft and weathered rock; bicarbonate, however, is largely from the soil atmosphere: Investigators, some reporting as much as a century ago, concentrated attention largely on nitrogen compounds and seldom reported other consituents except chloride and sulfate. The Northern European precipitation-sampling network provides the most comprehensive collection of data on precipitation chemistry, but it does not segregate snow from other forms of precipitation. The present study establishes with confidence the chemical character of snow in the Sierra Nevada, and suggests that the dissolved-solids content of precipitation increases with increasing distance inland from the Pacific Coast.

  4. Particulate matter concentration and chemical composition in the metro system of Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Perrino, C; Marcovecchio, F; Tofful, L; Canepari, S

    2015-06-01

    Air quality at the main station of the metro system of Rome (Termini hub) has been characterized by the point of view of particulate matter (PM) concentration and chemical composition. Indoor air in different environments (underground train platform and shopping center, metro carriages with and without air conditioning system) has been studied and compared with outdoor air at a nearby urban site. Air quality at the railway station, located outdoor at surface level, has been also considered for comparison. PM chemical characterization included ions, elemental carbon, organic carbon, macro-elements, and the bio-accessible and residual fractions of micro- and trace elements. Train platform and carriages without air conditioning resulted to be the most polluted environments, with indoor/outdoor ratio up to two orders of magnitude for many components. PM mass concentration was determined on filter membranes by the gravimetric procedure as well as from the optical particle counter (OPC) number concentration measurements. The OPC results, taken with the original calibration factor, were below 40 % of the value obtained by the gravimetric measurements. Only a chemical and morphological characterization of the collected dust could lead to a reconciliation of the results yielded by the two methods. Macro-components were used to estimate the strength of the main macro-sources. The most significant contribution is confirmed to derive from wheels, rails, and brakes abrasion; from soil re-suspension (over 50 % at the subway platform); and from organics (about 25 %). The increase in the concentration of elements was mostly due to the residual fraction, but also the bio-accessible fraction showed a remarkable enrichment, particularly in the case of Ba, Zn, Cd, and Ni. PMID:25586611

  5. The puzzling chemical composition of GJ 436B'S atmosphere: Influence of tidal heating on the chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Agúndez, Marcelino; Selsis, Franck; Venot, Olivia; Iro, Nicolas

    2014-02-01

    The dissipation of the tidal energy deposited on eccentric planets may induce a heating of the planet that affects its atmospheric thermal structure. Here we study the influence of tidal heating on the atmospheric composition of the eccentric (e = 0.16) 'hot Neptune' GJ 436b, for which inconclusive chemical abundances are retrieved from multiwavelength photometric observations carried out during primary transit and secondary eclipse. We build up a one-dimensional model of GJ 436b's atmosphere in the vertical direction and compute the pressure-temperature and molecular abundances profiles for various plausible internal temperatures of the planet (up to 560 K) and metallicities (from solar to 100 times solar), using a radiative-convective model and a chemical model which includes thermochemical kinetics, vertical mixing, and photochemistry. We find that the CO/CH{sub 4} abundance ratio increases with metallicity and tidal heating, and ranges from 1/20 to 1000 within the ranges of metallicity and internal temperature explored. Water vapor locks most of the oxygen and reaches a very high abundance, whatever the metallicity and internal temperature of the planet. The CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O abundance ratio increases dramatically with metallicity, and takes values between 10{sup –5}-10{sup –4} with solar elemental abundances and ?0.1 for a metallicity 100 times solar. None of the atmospheric models based on solid physical and chemical grounds provide a fully satisfactory agreement with available observational data, although the comparison of calculated spectra and observations seems to point to models with a high metallicity and efficient tidal heating, in which high CO/CH{sub 4} abundance ratios and warm temperatures in the dayside atmosphere are favored.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of the effective density and chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Matthew T; Shields, Laura G; Prather, Kimberly A

    2007-02-15

    Simultaneous measurements of the effective density and chemical composition of individual ambient particles were made in Riverside, California by coupling a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) with an ultrafine aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (UF-ATOFMS). In the summer, chemically diverse particle types (i.e., aged-OC, vanadium-OC-sulfate-nitrate, biomass) all had similar effective densities when measured during the same time period. This result suggests that during the summer study the majority of particle mass for the different particle types was dominated by secondary species (OC, sulfates, nitrates) of the same density, while only a small fraction of the total particle mass is accounted for by the primary particle cores. Also shown herein, the effective density is a dynamic characteristic of the Riverside, CA ambient aerosol, changing by as much as 40% within 16 h. During the summer measurement period, changes in the ambient atmospheric water content correlated with changes in the measured effective densities which ranged from approximately 1.0 to 1.5 g x cm(-3). This correlation is potentially due to evaporation of water from particles in the aerodynamic lens. In contrast, in the fall during a Santa Ana meteorological event, ambient particles with a mobility diameter of 450 nm showed three distinct effective densities, each related to a chemically unique particle class. Particles with effective densities of approximately 0.27 g x cm(-3), 0.87 g x cm(-3), and 0.93 g x cm(-3) were composed mostly of elemental carbon, lubricating oil, and aged organic carbon, respectively. It is interesting to contrast the seasonal differences where in the summer, particle density and mass were determined by high amounts of secondary species, whereas in the fall, relatively clean and dry Santa Ana conditions resulted in freshly emitted particles which retained their distinct source chemistries and densities. PMID:17593734

  7. Morphology and Chemical composition of Atmospheric Particles over Semi-Arid region (Jaipur, Rajasthan) of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Agnihotri, R.; Yadav, P.; Singh, S.; Tawale, J. S.; Rashmi, R.; Prasad, M.; Arya, B. C.; Mishra, N.

    2012-12-01

    Uncertainties associated with the radiative forcing of atmospheric dust particles is highest, owing to lack of region-specific dust morphology (particle shape, size) and mineralogy (chemical composition) database, needed for modeling their optical properties (Mishra and Tripathi, 2008). To fill this gap for the Indian region, we collected atmospheric particles (with aerodynamic size <5um, PM5 and a few bulk particles; TSP) from seven sites of Jaipur and nearby locales (semi-arid region, in the vicinity of Thar Desert of Rajasthan) at varying altitude, during late winters of ca. 2012. PM5 particles were collected on Teflon filters (for bulk chemical analyses), while pure Tin substrates (~1×1 mm2) were used for investigating individual particle morphology. Using Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with Energy Dispersive X ray (SEM-EDX) facility at NPL, images of individual particles were recorded and the morphological parameters (e.g. Aspect ratio; AR, Circulatory parameter; CIR.) were retrieved following Okada et al. (2001), whereas chemical compositions of individual particles were determined by EDX and bulk samples by X ray fluorescence (XRF). The geometrical size distributions of atmospheric particles were generated for each site. Based on NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology, USA) morphology database, the site-specific individual particle shapes reveal predominance of "Layered" (calcite and quartz rich), "Angular" structures (quartz rich) and "Flattened" particles over all the sites. Particles were found to be highly non-spherical with irregular shapes (CIR varying from 1 to 0.22 with median value ~0.76; AR varying from 1 to 5.4 with median value ~1.64). Noteworthy to mention, that unit values of AR and CIR represent spherical particles. Chemical analyses of PM5 particles revealed dominance of crustal elements e.g. Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, in general. Particles over Kukas Hill (27.027° N, 75.919° E; ~800 MAGL) showed highest Fe mass fractions (~43%), i.e. a key element (in form of hematite; Fe2O3) for solar (visible) energy absorption and thus heating the atmosphere. The retrieved morphological parameters help to construct particle shape and number size distribution that are highly useful to reduce the uncertainty in radiative forcing of dust particles appreciably when combined with particle chemical composition as suggested by Kalashnikova and Sokolik (2004). References : Mishra, S. K., and S. N. Tripathi (2008), Modeling optical properties of mineral dust over the Indian Desert, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D23201, 19 PP., doi:10.1029/2008JD010048. Okada, K., J. Heintzenberg, K. Kai, and Y. Qin (2001), Shape of atmospheric mineral particles collected in three Chinese arid-regions, Geophys. Res. Lett., 28, 3123-3126 Kalashnikova OV, Sokolik IN. (2004) Modeling the radiative properties of nonspherical soil-derived mineral aerosols, J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer, 87, 137-66.

  8. Chemical composition and insecticidal activity of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil from Cuba and Brazil against housefly.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Zeneida Teixeira; Sánchez, Félix Fernández; dos Santos, Arith Ramos; Amaral, Ana Claudia Fernandes; Ferreira, José Luiz Pinto; Escalona-Arranz, Julio César; Queiroz, Margareth Maria de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus collected from Brazil and Cuba was tested to a chemical characterization and then was tested on the post-embryonic development of Musca domestica. The chemical composition analysis by GC-MS of the oils from Brazil/Cuba allowed the identification of 13 and 12 major constituents respectively; nine of them common to both. In the both oils, the main components were the isomers geranial and neral, which together form the compound citral. This corresponds to a total of 97.92%/Brazil and 97.69%/Cuba of the compounds identified. The monoterpene myrcene, observed only in the sample of Cuba, presented a large relative abundance (6.52%). The essential oil of C. citratus (Brazil/Cuba) was dissolved in DMSO and tested at concentrations of 5, 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100% and citral was prepared by mixing 16.8 mg with 960 µL DMSO. Both essential oils and monoterpene citral were applied topically to newly-hatched larvae (1µL/larva). The results showed a lethal concentration (LC50) of 4.25 and 3.24% for the Brazilian and Cuban essential oils, respectively. Mortalities of larval and newly-hatched larvae to adult periods were dose-dependent for the two both oils as for monoterpene citral, reaching 90%. Both essential oils and citral caused morphological changes in adult specimens. PMID:25909251

  9. The detailed chemical composition of the terrestrial planet host Kepler-10

    E-print Network

    Liu, F; Asplund, M; Ramirez, I; Melendez, J; Gustafsson, B; Howes, L M; Roederer, I U; Lambert, D L; Bensby, T

    2015-01-01

    Chemical abundance studies of the Sun and solar twins have demonstrated that the solar composition of refractory elements is depleted when compared to volatile elements, which could be due to the formation of terrestrial planets. In order to further examine this scenario, we conducted a line-by-line differential chemical abundance analysis of the terrestrial planet host Kepler-10 and fourteen of its stellar twins. Stellar parameters and elemental abundances of Kepler-10 and its stellar twins were obtained with very high precision using a strictly differential analysis of high quality CFHT, HET and Magellan spectra. When compared to the majority of thick disc twins, Kepler-10 shows a depletion in the refractory elements relative to the volatile elements, which could be due to the formation of terrestrial planets in the Kepler-10 system. The average abundance pattern corresponds to ~ 13 Earth masses, while the two known planets in Kepler-10 system have a combined ~ 20 Earth masses. For two of the eight thick di...

  10. Anatomy, Ultrastructure and Chemical Composition of Food Bodies of Hovenia dulcis (Rhamnaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Buono, Rafael Andrade; de Oliveira, Alaíde Braga; Paiva, Elder Antonio Sousa

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Food bodies (FBs) are structures that promote mutualism between plants and ants, which help protect them against herbivores. The present study aims to describe the anatomical organization, ultrastructure and chemical composition of the FBs in Hovenia dulcis, which represent the first structures of this type described in Rhamnaceae. Methods Leaves in various stages of development were collected and fixed for examination under light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Samples of FBs were subjected to chemical analysis using thin-layer chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance of 1H and 13C. Key Results The FBs vary from globose to conical and are restricted to the abaxial leaf surface, having a mixed origin, including epidermis and parenchyma. The FB epidermis is uniseriate, slightly pilose and has a thin cuticle. The epidermal cells are vacuolated and pigments or food reserves are absent. The parenchyma cells of immature FBs have dense cytoplasm showing mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and plastids. Mature FB cells store oils, which are free in the cytosol and occupy a large portion of the cell lumen. In these cells the plastids accumulate starch. Conclusions The lipids present in FBs are glycerin esters characteristic of plant energy reserves. Ants were observed collecting these FBs, which allows us to infer that these structures mediate plant–ant interactions and can help protect the young plants against herbivores, as these structures are prevalent at this developmental stage. PMID:18413656

  11. New chemical determinations of zinc in basalts, and rocks of similar composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rader, L.F.; Swadley, W.C.; Huffman, C., Jr.; Lipp, H.H.

    1963-01-01

    New determinations of zinc in 124 basalts by the chemical method described (Huff-Man et al. 1963) are reported. Average zinc values, in per cent, for basalts from diverse regions are as follows: Idaho, 28 samples, 0.013; Hawaii, 33 samples, 0.010; Connecticut, 27 samples, 0.0090; Oregon, 17 samples, 0.0081; California, 8 samples, 0.0071; and New Mexico, 11 samples, 0.0086; average, all samples, 0.0099 per cent zinc. A plot of differentiation indicator ratios calculated from the conventional rock analyses, CaO/(Na2O + K2O) as the ordinate and SiO2/MgO as the abscissa, was used to select, from different localities, samples essentially the same in chemical composition that were to be used for comparisons of zinc and other minor elements. Zinc correlates with MnO and with total iron as FeO. An inverse relationship found for zinc and manganese is related to the total iron content of the basalts. Thus for a given iron concentration as zinc increases, manganese decreases and vice versa. Ratios of zinc, the common denominator, to 11 other minor elements determined spectro-graphically show correlations with cobalt, gallium, scandium, yttrium, and zirconium. ?? 1963.

  12. The effects of space radiation on a chemically modified graphite-epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, S. M.; Herakovich, C. T.; Sykes, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the space environment on the engineering properties and chemistry of a chemically modified T300/934 graphite-epoxy composite system are characterized. The material was subjected to 1.0 x 10 to the 10th power rads of 1.0 MeV electron irradiation under vacuum to simulate 30 years in geosynchronous earth orbit. Monotonic tension tests were performed at room temperature (75 F/24 C) and elevated temperature (250 F/121 C) on 4-ply unidirectional laminates. From these tests, inplane engineering and strength properties (E sub 1, E sub 2, Nu sub 12, G sub 12, X sub T, Y sub T) were determined. Cyclic tests were also performed to characterize energy dissipation changes due to irradiation and elevated temperature. Large diameter graphite fibers were tested to determine the effects of radiation on their stiffness and strength. No significant changes were observed. Dynamic-mechanical analysis demonstrated that the glass transition temperature was reduced by 50 F(28 C) after irradiation. Thermomechanical analysis showed the occurrence of volatile products generated upon heating of the irradiated material. The chemical modification of the epoxy did not aid in producing a material which was more radiation resistant than the standard T300/934 graphite-epoxy system. Irradiation was found to cause crosslinking and chain scission in the polymer. The latter produced low molecular weight products which plasticize the material at elevated temperatures and cause apparent material stiffening at low stresses at room temperature.

  13. Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Allium roseum L. var. grandiflorum Briq. Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Touihri, Imen; Boukhris, Maher; Marrakchi, Naziha; Luis, José; Hanchi, Belgacem; Kallech-Ziri, Olfa

    2015-01-01

    Allium roseum L. (Alliaceae) endemic mediterranean specie was represented in the North Africa by 12 different taxa. In the present study, chemical composition, antiproliferative, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the essential oil extracted from A. roseum var. grandiflorum Briq. bulbs collected in the North of Tunisia were investigated. Chemical characterization has shown methyl methanethiosulfinate as major sulphurous compounds. A. roseum bulbs essential oil provides interesting antiproliferative activity against two human colonic adenocarcinoma HT29 and CACO2 cell lines in dose-dependent manner with a half-maximal inhibition (IC50) of 4.64 µg/mL and 8.22 µg/mL respectively. The antioxidant activity, as determined by FRAP assay, was 285 µmol equivalent Trolox/g of essential oil. The scavenging effect on DPPH radicals of essential oil was estimated as IC50 values at 156 µg/mL. The inhibition of superoxide anion production in a model of cancer cell lines was significant for both lines HT29 and CACO2 with IC50 of 20.25 µg/mL and 29.12 µg/mL respectively. Allium roseum essential oil exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities with a high effectiveness against Candida albicans given by an MIC value of 0.019 mg/mL. This biological effect appears to be related mainly to the presence of organosulfur compounds. PMID:26179004

  14. Chemical composition measurements of the atmosphere of Jupiter with the Galileo Probe mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Hartle, R. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Owen, T. C.; Spencer, N. W.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo Probe entered the atmosphere of Jupiter on December 7, 1995. Measurements of the chemical and isotopic composition of the Jovian atmosphere were obtained by the mass spectrometer during the descent over the 0.5 to 21 bar pressure region over a time period of approximately 1 hour. The sampling was either of atmospheric gases directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer through capillary leaks or of gas, which had been chemically processed to enhance the sensitivity of the measurement to trace species or noble gases. The analysis of this data set continues to be refined based on supporting laboratory studies on an engineering unit. The mixing ratios of the major constituents of the atmosphere hydrogen and helium have been determined as well as mixing ratios or upper limits for several less abundant species including: methane, water, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, propane, hydrogen sulfide, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. Analysis also suggests the presence of trace levels of other 3 and 4 carbon hydrocarbons, or carbon and nitrogen containing species, phosphine, hydrogen chloride, and of benzene. The data set also allows upper limits to be set for many species of interest which were not detected. Isotope ratios were measured for 3He/4He, D/H, 13C/12C, 20Ne/22Ne, 38Ar/36Ar and for isotopes of both Kr and Xe.

  15. Effect of Chemical Composition on Enthalpy of Evaporation and Equilibrium Vapor Pressure

    E-print Network

    Vladimir Kh. Dobruskin

    2010-04-20

    Proceeding from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, the relation is derived that establishes a correlation between the partial enthalpy of evaporation from binary solutions, concentrations of components, and equilibrium vapor pressures. The difference between enthalpies of evaporation of components from solutions and those from the pure liquids, D(DH), depends on the chemical nature and concentrations, X, of solutions. The effect of concentrations on D(DH) makes different appearances in ideal and non-ideal solutions, although, as a whole, D(DH) increases with the growth of concentration of the second component. A model is introduced, which considers D(DH) as the sum of energetic changes of three sequential stages: passage of molecules from the bulk liquid into the surface layer, exit of the molecules on the outer side of the interface, and the following desorption into the gas phase. In the framework of the model, the main contribution to enthalpy of evaporation comes from the processes in the surface layer. It is suggested that adsorption from solutions, which changes the chemical composition of the surface layer with respect to that of the bulk solution, determines, to great extent, the difference in the forms of the curves D(DH)=f(X) for ideal and non-ideal solutions.

  16. Mumijo Traditional Medicine: Fossil Deposits from Antarctica (Chemical Composition and Beneficial Bioactivity)

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, Anna; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Menna, Marialuisa; Vitalone, Rocco; Schröder, Heinz C.; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2011-01-01

    Mumijo is a widely used traditional medicine, especially in Russia, Altai Mountains, Mongolia, Iran Kasachstan and in Kirgistan. Mumijo preparations have been successfully used for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases; they display immune-stimulating and antiallergic activity as well. In the present study, we investigate the chemical composition and the biomedical potential of a Mumijo(-related) product collected from the Antarctica. The yellow material originates from the snow petrels, Pagodroma nivea. Extensive purification and chemical analysis revealed that the fossil samples are a mixture of glycerol derivatives. In vitro experiments showed that the Mumijo extract caused in cortical neurons a strong neuroprotective effect against the apoptosis-inducing amyloid peptide fragment ?-fragment 25–35 (A?25–35). In addition, the fraction rich in glycerol ethers/wax esters displayed a significant growth-promoting activity in permanent neuronal PC12 cells. It is concluded that this new Mumijo preparation has distinct and marked neuroprotective activity, very likely due to the content of glycerol ether derivatives. PMID:18996940

  17. Dissolution of Th1-xUxO2: Effects of chemical composition and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claparede, Laurent; Tocino, Florent; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Mesbah, Adel; Clavier, Nicolas; Moisy, Philippe; Dacheux, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    The dissolution of Th1-xUxO2 solid solutions was studied by varying independently several parameters such as chemical composition, leachate acidity, leaching temperature, firing temperature, and densification state. The chemical durability of the samples was significantly affected by the uranium mole loading probably due to the oxidation of tetravalent uranium into uranyl during the dissolution process. The influence of nitric acid concentration and temperature also showed that the behavior of Th1-xUxO2 solid solutions with higher uranium incorporation fractions (x = 0.52, 0.75 and 1) differed significantly from that of Th0.84U0.16O2. Strong modifications of the dissolution mechanism occurring at the solid/liquid interface for the higher uranium loadings could explain this difference. It could result in the existence of the fast oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI) at the solid/solution interface then of the detachment of activated complexes formed with U(VI). Furthermore, initial normalized dissolution rate slightly depended on the elimination of crystal defects for firing temperatures below 900 °C but was almost independent of the crystallite size (T ? 900 °C). Finally, dissolution tests on sintered Th0.84U0.16O2 samples showed that RL(Th) values decreased by an order of magnitude when the relative density increased from 79% to 89%.

  18. Chemical composition measurements of the atmosphere of jupiter with the galileo probe mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Hartle, R. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Owen, T. C.; Spencer, N. W.

    The Galileo Probe entered the atmosphere of Jupiter on December 7, 1995. Measurements of the chemical and isotopic composition of the Jovian atmosphere were obtained by the mass spectrometer during the descent over the 0.5 to 21 bar pressure region over a time period of approximately 1 hour. The sampling was either of atmospheric gases directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer through capillary leaks or of gas, which had been chemically processed to enhance the sensitivity of the measurement to trace species or noble gases. The analysis of this data set continues to be refined based on supporting laboratory studies on an engineering unit. The mixing ratios of the major constituents of the atmosphere hydrogen and helium have been determined as well as mixing ratios or upper limits for several less abundant species including: methane, water, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, propane, hydrogen sulfide, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. Analysis also suggests the presence of trace levels of other 3 and 4 carbon hydrocarbons, or carbon and nitrogen containing species, phosphine, hydrogen chloride, and of benzene. The data set also allows upper limits to be set for many species of interest which were not detected. Isotope ratios were measured for ^3He/^4He, D/H, ^13C/^12C, ^20Ne/^22Ne, ^38Ar/^36Ar and for isotopes of both Kr and Xe.

  19. Chemical composition of ferromanganese crusts in the world ocean: a review and comprehensive database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, Frank T.; Lane-Bostwick, Candice M.

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive database of chemical and mineralogical properties for ferromanganese crusts collected throughout the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and has been assembled from published and unpublished sources which provide collection and analytical information for these samples. These crusts, their chemical compositions and natural distribution, have been a topic of interest to scientific research, as well as to industrial and military applications. Unlike abyssal ferromanganese nodules, which form in areas of low disturbance and high sediment accumulation, crusts have been found to contain three to five times more cobalt than these nodules, and can be found on harder, steeper substrates which can be too steep for permanent sediment accumulation. They have also been documented on seamounts and plateaus within the U.S. exclusive economic zone in both Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, and these are therefore of strategic importance to the United States Government, as well as to civilian mining and metallurgical industries. The data tables provided in this report have been digitized and previously uploaded to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Geophysical Data Center in 1991 for online distribution, and were provided in plain text format. The 2014 update to the original U.S. Geological Survey open-file report published in 1989 provides these data tables in a slightly reformatted version to make them easier to ingest into geographic information system software, converted to shapefiles, and have completed metadata written and associated with them.

  20. Spatial distributions of ultrafine particles and their behavior and chemical composition in relation to roadside sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Shinji; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    2011-11-01

    Vertical and horizontal distributions of the chemical components of ultrafine particles (UFP; <0.1 ?m) in relation to roadside sources were investigated by using a newly developed PM 0.1 collection system with a UFP impactor filter (50% cut-off, 0.1 ?m; air flow rate, 40.0 L min -1). UFP were measured at a suburban roadside, at two background sites in Saitama (summer 2007 and winter 2008), and at two levels on a high-rise building in Tokyo (summer and winter 2005). The results from the high-rise building showed that ultrafine elemental carbon from vehicle exhaust can reach the upper atmosphere regardless of season because of the high diffusivity of UFP. The total concentrations of the carbonaceous and ionic components at all sites except the roadside site in summer were mostly within the same range. Therefore, UFP diffuse both vertically and horizontally, and its chemical components are distributed uniformly. The UFP composition in summer reflected not only the vehicle exhaust contribution but also photochemical formation, especially at the low-elevation sites, where the samplers were installed several meters above ground level. The results also showed that ionic components contributed to increases in the UFP levels.

  1. Hygroscopic properties of the Paris urban aerosol in relation to its chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamilli, K. A.; Poulain, L.; Held, A.; Nowak, A.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol hygroscopic growth factors and chemical properties were measured as part of the MEGAPOLI "Megacities Plume Case Study" at the urban site Laboratoire d'Hygiène de la Ville de Paris (LHVP) in the city center of Paris from June to August 2009, and from January to February 2010. Descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DGF) were derived in the diameter range from 25 to 350 nm at relative humidities of 30, 55, 75, and 90% by applying the summation method on humidified and dry aerosol size distributions measured simultaneously with a humidified differential mobility particle sizer (HDMPS) and a twin differential mobility particle sizer (TDMPS). For 90% relative humidity, the DGF varied from 1.06 to 1.46 in summer, and from 1.06 to 1.66 in winter. Temporal variations in the observed mean DGF could be well explained with a simple growth model based on the aerosol chemical composition measured by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) and black carbon photometry (MAAP). In particular, good agreement was observed when sulfate was the predominant inorganic factor. A clear overestimation of the predicted growth factor was found when the nitrate mass concentration exceeded values of 10 ?g m-3, e.g., during winter.

  2. Chemical composition of essential oils from four Vietnamese species of piper (piperaceae).

    PubMed

    Hieu, Le D; Thang, Tran D; Hoi, Tran M; Ogunwande, Isiaka A

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils from four Piper species, Piper retrofractum Vahl., P. boehmeriaefolium (Miq.) C. DC., P. sarmentosum Roxb., and P. maclurei Merr., were analysed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Nineteen to sixty-four compounds representing 92.0%-98.4% of the total contents were identified in the oil samples. The major constituents identified in P. retrofractum leaf oil were benzyl benzoate (14.4%), myrcene (14.4%), bicycloelemene (9.9%), bicyclogermacrene (7.0%) and ?-caryophyllene (5.3%). On the other hand, the main constituents of P. boehmeriaefolium were ?-copaene (28.3%), ?-pinene (7.4%) and 1, 8-cineole (5.7%). P. sarmentosum showed a very different chemical profile characterized mainly by aromatic compounds and devoid of monoterpene hydrocarbons. The major constituents were benzyl benzoate (49.1%), benzyl alcohol (17.9%), 2-hydroxy-benzoic acid phenylmethyl ester (10.0%) and 2-butenyl-benzene (7.9%). The leaf of P. maclurei was characterized by higher amount of (E)-cinnamic acid (37.4%) and (E)-nerolidol (19.4%). Moreover, (Z)-9-octadecanoic acid methyl ester (28.0%), (E)-cinnamyl acetate (17.2%), phytol (12.2%) and (E)-cinnamaldehyde (8.8%) were the major compounds identified in the stem oil. PMID:24712088

  3. Compositional Analysis of Ternary and Binary Chemical Mixtures by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering at Trace Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Mengjing; Huang, Yu; Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2015-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering has been proven a powerful means in the fast detection and recognition of chemicals at trace levels, while quantitative analysis especially the compositional analysis of trace chemical mixtures remains a challenge. We report here a "triangle-rule" based on the principal component analysis (PCA) of surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra, to calculate the composition of individual component of ternary chemical mixtures at trace levels, which can be simplified into the "balance-rule" for binary mixtures. We demonstrated the validity of the triangle-rule and balance-rule in estimating the composition of ternary and binary mixtures of methyl orange, methylene blue, and crystal violet with different molecular structures, and the validity for ternary and binary mixtures of three isomers of monochlorobiphenyl with very similar molecular structures. This idea might be also applicable to mixtures of more components at the trace levels.

  4. Compositional Analysis of Ternary and Binary Chemical Mixtures by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering at Trace Levels.

    PubMed

    Hou, Mengjing; Huang, Yu; Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2015-12-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering has been proven a powerful means in the fast detection and recognition of chemicals at trace levels, while quantitative analysis especially the compositional analysis of trace chemical mixtures remains a challenge. We report here a "triangle-rule" based on the principal component analysis (PCA) of surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra, to calculate the composition of individual component of ternary chemical mixtures at trace levels, which can be simplified into the "balance-rule" for binary mixtures. We demonstrated the validity of the triangle-rule and balance-rule in estimating the composition of ternary and binary mixtures of methyl orange, methylene blue, and crystal violet with different molecular structures, and the validity for ternary and binary mixtures of three isomers of monochlorobiphenyl with very similar molecular structures. This idea might be also applicable to mixtures of more components at the trace levels. PMID:26553483

  5. PIXE and GC-MS investigation for the determination of the chemical composition of Syrian Cuminum cyminum L.

    PubMed

    Rihawy, M S; Bakraji, E H; Odeh, A

    2014-04-01

    The chemical composition and concentration of Syrian cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) were investigated. The particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analytical technique was used to analyze a wide range of elements from Mg to Sr. The advantages and disadvantages of the PIXE technique in plant material elemental analysis are discussed. A high level of iron was detected in the cumin samples, clarifying the possible contribution of cumin to maintaining the immune system. The contribution of the elements in cumin seeds to the dietary recommended intakes (DRI) of elements was evaluated. Additionally, GC-MS measurements were performed to determine the chemical composition of cumin essential oil. Twenty-one components were identified, and cuminaldehyde, ?-terpinene, o-cymene, limonene and ?-pinene were determined to be the major constituents. A correlation between the chemical composition of cumin seeds and their use as a traditional remedy is proposed. PMID:24507878

  6. Chemical Composition of Comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin): Another "Atypical" Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibb, Erika; Bonev, Boncho P.; Villanueva, Geronimo; DiSanti, Michael; Mumma, Michael; Sudholt, Emily; Radeva, Yana

    2012-01-01

    We measured the volatile chemical composition of comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin) on three dates from 2009 January 30 to February 1 using NIRSPEC, the high-resolution ([lambda]/[Delta][lambda] [approximately] 25,000), long-slit echelle spectrograph at Keck 2. We sampled nine primary (parent) volatile species (H2O, C2H6, CH3OH, H2CO, CH4, HCN, C2H2, NH3, CO) and two product species (OH* and NH2). We also report upper limits for HDO and CH3D. C/2007 N3 (Lulin) displayed an unusual composition when compared to other comets. Based on comets measured to date, CH4 and C2H6 exhibited "normal" abundances relative to water, CO and HCN were only moderately depleted, C2H2 and H2CO were more severely depleted, and CH3OH was significantly enriched. Comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin) is another important and unusual addition to the growing population of comets with measured parent volatile compositions, illustrating that these studies have not yet reached the level where new observations simply add another sample to a population with well-established statistics.

  7. A model for studying the composition and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Turco, Richard P.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    1994-01-01

    We developed polynomial expressions for the temperature dependence of the mean binary and water activity coefficients for H2SO4 and HNO3 solutions. These activities were used in an equilibrium model to predict the composition of stratospheric aerosols under a wide range of environmental conditions. For typical concentrations of H2O, H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, HBr, HF, and HOCl in the lower stratosphere, the aerosol composition is estimated as a function of the local temperature and the ambient relative humidity. For temperatures below 200 K, our results indicate that (1) HNO3 contributes a significant mass fraction to stratospheric aerosols, and (2) HCl solubility is considerably affected by HNO3 dissolution into sulfate aerosols. We also show that, in volcanically disturbed periods, changes in stratospheric aerosol composition can significantly alter the microphysics that leads to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The effects caused by HNO3 dissolution on the physical and chemical properties of stratospheric aerosols are discussed.

  8. Formation of anodic layers on InAs (111)III. Study of the chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Valisheva, N. A. Tereshchenko, O. E.; Prosvirin, I. P.; Kalinkin, A. V.; Goljashov, V. A.; Levtzova, T. A.; Bukhtiyarov, V. I.

    2012-04-15

    The chemical composition of {approx}20-nm-thick anodic layers grown on InAs (111)III in alkaline and acid electrolytes containing or not containing NH{sub 4}F is studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is shown that the composition of fluorinated layers is controlled by the relation between the concentrations of fluorine and hydroxide ions in the electrolyte and by diffusion processes in the growing layer. Fluorine accumulates at the (anodic layer)/InAs interface. Oxidation of InAs in an acid electrolyte with a low oxygen content and a high NH{sub 4}F content brings about the formation of anodic layers with a high content of fluorine and elemental arsenic and the formation of an oxygen-free InF{sub x}/InAs interface. Fluorinated layers grown in an alkaline electrolyte with a high content of O{sup 2-} and/or OH{sup -} groups contain approximately three times less fluorine and consist of indium and arsenic oxyfluorides. No distinction between the compositions of the layers grown in both types of fluorine-free electrolytes is established.

  9. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF COMET C/2007 N3 (LULIN): ANOTHER ''ATYPICAL'' COMET

    SciTech Connect

    Gibb, Erika L.; Sudholt, Emily; Bonev, Boncho P.; Villanueva, Geronimo; Radeva, Yana; DiSanti, Michael A.; Mumma, Michael J.

    2012-05-10

    We measured the volatile chemical composition of comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin) on three dates from 2009 January 30 to February 1 using NIRSPEC, the high-resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} Almost-Equal-To 25,000), long-slit echelle spectrograph at Keck 2. We sampled nine primary (parent) volatile species (H{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 4}, HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, CO) and two product species (OH* and NH{sub 2}). We also report upper limits for HDO and CH{sub 3}D. C/2007 N3 (Lulin) displayed an unusual composition when compared to other comets. Based on comets measured to date, CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} exhibited 'normal' abundances relative to water, CO and HCN were only moderately depleted, C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO were more severely depleted, and CH{sub 3}OH was significantly enriched. Comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin) is another important and unusual addition to the growing population of comets with measured parent volatile compositions, illustrating that these studies have not yet reached the level where new observations simply add another sample to a population with well-established statistics.

  10. Effect of season on the chemical composition and nutritional quality of the edible crab Cancer pagurus.

    PubMed

    Barrento, Sara; Marques, António; Teixeira, Bárbara; Anacleto, Patrícia; Vaz-Pires, Paulo; Nunes, Maria Leonor

    2009-11-25

    Cancer pagurus is most appreciated in southern Europe for its muscle and brown meat content. In Portugal, consumption occurs mostly in summer and at Christmas. In this study the seasonal nutritional quality of edible tissues of female and male C. pagurus was determined. Tissue composition was affected by season and sex. All tissues had a well-balanced essential amino acid composition. Muscle and gonads of females had n-3/n-6 ratios in the range of the usual recommended values, and all tissues had PUFA/SFA above the recommended level. Autumn was the season with the highest brown meat yield, total essential amino acids (muscle), taurine (all tissues), EPA (male gonads), and n-3/n-6 ratio (gonads). However, it was also the season with the highest fat content and cholesterol concentration in ovaries. Therefore, people with restricted diets should moderate the consumption of ovaries in autumn. The remaining tissues pose no risks with respect to their proximate chemical composition. PMID:19845352

  11. A model for studying the composition and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tabazadeh, A.; Turco, R.P.; Jacobson, M.Z.

    1994-06-01

    We developed polynomial expressions for the temperature dependence of the mean binary and water activity coefficients for H2SO4 and HNO3 solutions. These activities were used in an equilibrium model to predict the composition of stratospheric aerosols under a wide range of environmental conditions. For typical concentrations of H2O, H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, HBr, HF, and HOCl in the lower stratosphere, the aerosol composition is estimated as a function of the local temperature and the ambient relative humidity. For temperatures below 200 K, our results indicate that (1) HNO3 contributes a significant mass fraction to stratospheric aerosols, and (2) HCl solubility is considerably affected by HNO3 dissolution into sulfate aerosols. We also show that, in volcanically disturbed periods, changes in stratospheric aerosol composition can significantly alter the microphysics that leads to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The effects caused by HNO3 dissolution on the physical and chemical properties of stratospheric aerosols are discussed.

  12. The chemical composition of the sun from helioseismic and solar neutrino data

    SciTech Connect

    Villante, Francesco L.; Serenelli, Aldo M.; Delahaye, Franck; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2014-05-20

    We perform a quantitative analysis of the solar composition problem by using a statistical approach that allows us to combine the information provided by helioseismic and solar neutrino data in an effective way. We include in our analysis the helioseismic determinations of the surface helium abundance and of the depth of the convective envelope, the measurements of the {sup 7}Be and {sup 8}B neutrino fluxes, and the sound speed profile inferred from helioseismic frequencies. We provide all the ingredients to describe how these quantities depend on the solar surface composition, different from the initial and internal composition due to the effects of diffusion and nuclear reactions, and to evaluate the (correlated) uncertainties in solar model predictions. We include error sources that are not traditionally considered such as those from inversion of helioseismic data. We, then, apply the proposed approach to infer the chemical composition of the Sun. Our result is that the opacity profile of the Sun is well constrained by the solar observational properties. In the context of a two-parameter analysis in which elements are grouped as volatiles (i.e., C, N, O, and Ne) and refractories (i.e., Mg, Si, S, and Fe), the optimal surface composition is found by increasing the abundance of volatiles by (45 ± 4)% and that of refractories by (19 ± 3)% with respect to the values provided by Asplund et al. (2009, ARA and A, 47, 481). This corresponds to the abundances ?{sub O} = 8.85 ± 0.01 and ?{sub Fe} = 7.52 ± 0.01, which are consistent at the ?1? level with those provided by Grevesse and Sauval (1998, SSRv, 85, 161). As an additional result of our analysis, we show that the best fit to the observational data is obtained with values of input parameters of the standard solar models (radiative opacities, gravitational settling rate, and the astrophysical factors S {sub 34} and S {sub 17}) that differ at the ?1? level from those presently adopted.

  13. Chemical Composition of the Epicuticular and Intracuticular Wax Layers on Adaxial Sides of Rosa canina Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Buschhaus, Christopher; Herz, Hubert; Jetter, Reinhard

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The waxy cuticle is the first point of contact for many herbivorous and pathogenic organisms on rose plants. Previous studies have reported the average composition of the combined wax extract from both sides of rose leaves. Recently, the compositions of the waxes on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces of Rosa canina leaves were determined separately. In this paper, a first report is made on the compositions of the epicuticular and intracuticular wax layers of Rosa canina leaves. The methods described enable the determination of which compounds are truly available at the surface for plant–organism interactions. METHOD An adhesive was used to mechanically strip the epicuticular wax from the adaxial leaf surface and the removal was visually confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. After the epicuticular wax had been removed, the intracuticular wax was then isolated using standard chemical extraction. Gas chromatography, flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry were used to identify and quantify compounds in the separated wax mixtures. Key Results The epicuticular wax contained higher concentrations of alkanes and alkyl esters but lower concentrations of primary alcohols and alkenols when compared to the intracuticular wax. In addition, the average chain lengths of these compound classes were higher in the epicuticular wax. Secondary alcohols were found only in the epicuticular layer while triterpenoids were restricted mainly to the intracuticular wax. Conclusions A gradient exists between the composition of the epi- and intracuticular wax layers of Rosa canina leaves. This gradient may result from polarity differences, in part caused by differences in chain lengths. The outer wax layer accessible to the phyllosphere showed a unique composition of wax compounds. The ecological consequences from such a gradient may now be probed. PMID:17933845

  14. [Chemical composition and chromaticity characteristic of Jilan glaze of Ming and Qing official kilns].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun-ming; Zhang, Mao-lin; Li, Qi-jiang; Wu, Juan; Quan, Kui-shan; Cao, Jian-wen

    2012-08-01

    Color glazes of Ming and Qing official kilns are excellent representatives of the famous ancient Chinese porcelains. The study of official ware with Jilan glaze has been an important topic. But it made slow progress due to the rarity of samples with strict production management and using system. The recipes, chemical composition and chromaticity characteristic of the Jilan samples excavated from official kilns in the Ming and Qing dynasties were first discussed by systematical testing with the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and color difference meter. The results showed that the porcelain stone content in Jilan bodies of official kiln in the Ming dynasty is higher than the samples of the Qing dynasty. The manganese content in Jilan glazes of the Ming dynasty is higher than that in the Qing dynasty, while the glaze ash addition and the lightness value in the glaze are opposite. PMID:23156793

  15. Chemical composition and antioxidant activities of the essential oil from Nandina domestica fruits.

    PubMed

    Bi, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Guang-Qi; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhong-Kang; Lv, Yong-Zhan; Fang, Ling

    2016-02-01

    The chemical composition and antioxidant activities of the essential oil from Nandina domestica fruits were studied for the first time. Twenty-two compounds, representing 82.79% of the oil, were identified from the oil. The major compounds were 3-hexen-1-ol (12.9%), linalool (12.3%), 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol (9.9%), oleic acid (8.0%), furfural (5.8%) and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (5.7%). The antioxidant activities of the oil were evaluated using reducing power, metal chelating ability and scavenging capacity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS) and superoxide anion free radical. The oil exhibited significant antioxidant activities. PMID:26199150

  16. TGA-DTA and chemical composition study of raw material of Bikaner region for electrical porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tak, S. K.; Shekhawat, M. S.; Mangal, R.

    2013-06-01

    Porcelains are vitrified and a fine grained ceramic product, used either glazed or unglazed and is often manufactured from a tri-axial body mix of clays, quartz and alkaline feldspar. Physical properties associated with porcelain include those of permeability, high strength, hardness, glassiness, durability, whiteness, translucence, resonance, brittleness, high resistance to the passage of electricity, high resistance to thermal shock and high elasticity[1,2]. Porcelain insulators are made from three raw materials; clay; feldspar and quartz. For porcelain manufacture the clay is categorized in two groups; ball clay and kaolin, each of which plays an important role, either in the preparation of the product or in the properties of the finished products. The following research highlights the importance that suits these materials for their contributions to the final properties of the product. Keeping this view a TGA-DTA and chemical composition of these raw materials were observed and these materials are found suitable for production of Electrical Porcelain.

  17. [Chemical composition of fresh bee pollen collected in the Misintá páramo from the Venezuelan Andes].

    PubMed

    Vit, Patricia; Santiago, B

    2008-12-01

    Venezuelan bee pollen has not been characterized, and marketing is not regulated. Pollen is consumed for apitherapeutical purposes for its nutritional and medicinal properties. This product of the hive is the most popular after honey; therefore it is necessary to characterize and to value it to initiate a database to support the proposal of a norm for bee pollen quality control. Samples of bee pollen collected by bees in the Misintá páramo of Mérida state were characterized accoridng to the chemical composition (moisture, ash, fat, pH, proteins) of four color fractions (yellow, orange, ochre, green). Yellow pollen was the most frequent fraction, with 2.18 g ash/100 g, 5.37 g ether extract/100 g, 14.88 g moisture/100 g, and 37.32 g proteins/100 g. PMID:19368304

  18. Chemical composition and biological activities of the essential oils from two Pereskia species grown in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, Lucéia Fatima; De Barros, Ingrid Bergman Inchausti; Mancini, Emilia; De Martino, Laura; Scandolera, Elia; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils of Pereskia aculeata Mill. and P. grandifolia Haw. (Cactaceae), grown in Brazil, was studied by means of GC and GC-MS. In all, 37 compounds were identified, 30 for P. aculeata and 15 for P. grandifolia. Oxygenated diterpenes are the main constituents, both in the oil ofP. grandifolia (55.5%) and in that ofP. aculeata (29.4%). The essential oils were evaluated for their in vitro phytotoxic activity against germination and initial radicle growth of Raphanus sativus L., Sinapis arvensis L., and Phalaris canariensis L. seeds. The essential oil of P. grandifolia, at all doses tested, significantly inhibited the radicle elongation of R. sativus. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of the essential oils was assayed against ten bacterial strains. The essential oils showed weak inhibitory activity against the Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25632490

  19. GEANT 4 simulation of the Helios cosmic ray telescope E6: Feasibility of chemical composition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, J.; Heber, B.; Hörlöck, M.; Kühl, P.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2015-08-01

    In October 2011, ESA announced the selection of Solar Orbiter as one of the Cosmic Vision M missions. It's launch is foreseen in 2018. Therefore it is worthwhile to revisit the energetic particle measurements together with the solar wind and magnetic field data from Helios in light of better theoretical understanding and advanced analysis and modelling techniques developed during the past 20 years. In this contribution we will present a GEANT 4 simulation of the response function of the Helios E6 experiment, that measured electrons in the energy range from a few 100 keV to above 10 MeV, ions from 1 MeV/nucleon to above 50 MeV/nucleon, and its application to the data analysis with respect to the chemical composition of the Galactic Cosmic Rays.

  20. Chemical composition of the tiger's milk mushroom, Lignosus rhinocerotis (Cooke) Ryvarden, from different developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Lau, Beng Fye; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2013-05-22

    The chemical composition of the tiger's milk mushroom (Lignosus rhinocerotis) from different developmental stages, i.e., the fruit body, sclerotium, and mycelium, was investigated for the first time. The fruit body and sclerotium of L. rhinocerotis were rich in carbohydrates and dietary fibers but low in fat. Protein levels in L. rhinocerotis were moderate, and all essential amino acids, except tryptophan, were present. The mycelium contained high levels of potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, riboflavin, and niacin and appreciable amounts of essential fatty acids. The results indicated that the sclerotium of L. rhinocerotis that was used in ethnomedicine was not superior to the fruit body and mycelium with regard to the nutritional content and bioactive constituents. Our findings provide some insights into the selection of appropriate mushroom part(s) of L. rhinocerotis and proper cultivation techniques for the development of new nutraceuticals or dietary supplements. PMID:23597270

  1. Chemical composition and biological activities of the essential oil from Anredera cordifolia grown in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, Lucéia Fátima; de Barros, Ingrid Bergman Inchausti; Mancini, Emilia; De Martino, Laura; Scandolera, Elia; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2014-07-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oil of Anredera cordifolia (Ten.) Steenis (Basellaceae), grown in Brazil, was studied by means of GC and GC-MS analysis. In all, 19 compounds were identified, accounting for 91.6% of the total oil; hydrocarbons were the main constituents (67.7%). The essential oil was evaluated for its in vitro potential phytotoxic activity against germination and initial radicle growth of Raphanus sativus L., Sinapis arvensis L., and Phalaris canariensis L. seeds. At 1.25 microg/mL and 0.625 microg/mL, the oil significantly promoted the germination of S. arvensis. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was assayed against ten bacterial strains. The essential oil showed a weak inhibitory activity against the Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25230514

  2. Chemical composition and antimicrobial evaluation of the essential oils of Bocageopsis pleiosperma Maas.

    PubMed

    Soares, Elzalina R; da Silva, Felipe M A; de Almeida, Richardson A; de Lima, Bruna R; Koolen, Hector H F; Lourenço, Caroline C; Salvador, Marcos J; Flach, Adriana; da Costa, Luiz Antonio M A; de Souza, Antonia Q L; Pinheiro, Maria L B; de Souza, Afonso D L

    2015-01-01

    Essential oils from the leaves, twigs and barks of Bocageopsis pleiosperma Maas were obtained by using hydrodistillation and analysed by using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Several compounds (51) were detected and identified, being ?-bisabolene the main component in all aerial parts of the plant, with higher concentration in the leaves (55.77%), followed by barks (38.53%) and twigs (34.37%). In order to increase the biological knowledge about the essential oil of Bocageopsis species, antimicrobial activities were evaluated against the microorganisms Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Candida tropicalis, Candida dubliniensis, Candida glabrata and Candida albicans. The essential oil obtained from the barks exhibited a moderate effect against S. epidermidis ATCC 1228 (MIC = 250 ?g/mL), while the other oils did not exhibit antimicrobial activity. These results represent the first report about the chemical composition of B. pleiosperma and the first antimicrobial evaluation with a Bocageopsis species. PMID:25562370

  3. Antioxidant activity and chemical composition of three Tunisian Cistus: Cistus monspeliensis, Cistus villosus and Cistus libanotis.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Marcello; Toniolo, Chiara; Venditti, Alessandro; Bruno, Maurizio; Ben Jemia, Mariem

    2015-02-01

    The chemical composition of three rockrose Cistus species, Cistus monspeliensis, Cistus libanotis and Cistus villosus, collected in Tunisia, was studied by HPTLC, focusing on the terpenes and phenols constituents. Diterpenes of Cistus are important as the main constituents of the leaf sticky aromatic resin, known as labdanum, which are highly appreciated in perfumery. Polyphenols in the methanolic extracts of each species were identified, quantified as total and as flavonoids and tannins, and tested for antioxidant activity. Diterpenes were evident in C. libanotis and C. monspeliensis, whereas they were practically absent in C. villosus; C. libanotis had higher phenolic amount, whereas antioxidant activities were important, but different according to the following tests: DPPH radical scavenging, conversion of the Fe(3+/)ferricyanide complex and inhibition of ?-carotene bleaching. The reported data confirm the validity of utilisation of Cistus sp. in marketed herbal products, as well as the relevant presence of diterpenes in species actually not used for labdanum production. PMID:25116860

  4. Spectral Analysis by XANES Reveals that GPNMB Influences the Chemical Composition of Intact Melanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    T Haraszti; C Trantow; A Hedberg-Buenz; M Grunze; M Anderson

    2011-12-31

    GPNMB is a unique melanosomal protein. Unlike many melanosomal proteins, GPNMB has not been associated with any forms of albinism, and it is unclear whether GPNMB has any direct influence on melanosomes. Here, melanosomes from congenic strains of C57BL/6J mice mutant for Gpnmb are compared to strain-matched controls using standard transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis (XANES). Whereas electron microscopy did not detect any ultrastructural changes in melanosomes lacking functional GPNMB, XANES uncovered multiple spectral phenotypes. These results directly demonstrate that GPNMB influences the chemical composition of melanosomes and more broadly illustrate the potential for using genetic approaches in combination with nano-imaging technologies to study organelle biology.

  5. Formation of Lipid-Based Nanodiscs and Their Dependence of Temperature and Chemical Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Yang, Yongkun; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2012-02-01

    Phospholipid mixtures composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (sodium salt)(DPPG) and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (ammonium salt) (PEGylated DSPE) and cholestrol were found to form nanodiscs (bicelles) in both non-ionic and phosphate buffer solutions . The structure of the aggregates is resolved using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering. The effects of temperature and chemical composition (e.g., PEGylated DSPE and cholesterol) on the structural variation and polydispersity will be discussed in this presentation. These nanodiscs have the potential of serving as a model delivery carrier for hydrophobic molecules for their biological compatibility and capability of incorporating with targeting molecules.

  6. Stable isotope and chemical compositions of European and Australasian ciders as a guide to authenticity.

    PubMed

    Carter, James F; Yates, Hans S A; Tinggi, Ujang

    2015-01-28

    This paper presents a data set derived from the analysis of bottled and canned ciders that may be used for comparison with suspected counterfeit or substitute products. Isotopic analysis of the solid residues from ciders (predominantly sugar) provided a means to determine the addition of C4 plant sugars. The added sugars were found to comprise cane sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, glucose, or combinations. The majority of ciders from Australia and New Zealand were found to contain significant amounts of added sugar, which provided a limited means to distinguish these ciders from European ciders. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the whole ciders (predominantly water) were shown to be controlled by two factors, the water available to the parent plant and evaporation. Analysis of data derived from both isotopic and chemical analysis of ciders provided a means to discriminate between regions and countries of manufacture. PMID:25536876

  7. How Soil Organic Matter Composition Controls Hexachlorobenzene-Soil-Interactions: Adsorption Isotherms and Quantum Chemical Modelling

    E-print Network

    Ahmed, Ashour; Kühn, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Hazardous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) interact in soil with the soil organic matter (SOM) but this interaction is insufficiently understood at the molecular level. We investigated the adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on soil samples with systematically modified SOM. These samples included the original soil, the soil modified by adding a hot water extract (HWE) fraction (soil+3 HWE and soil+6 HWE), and the pyrolyzed soil. The SOM contents increased in the order pyrolyzed soil soil soil+3 HWE soil+6 HWE. For the latter three samples this order was also valid for the HCB adsorption. The pyrolyzed soil adsorbed more HCB than the other samples at low initial concentrations, but at higher concentrations the HCB adsorption became weaker than in the samples with HWE addition. This adsorption behaviour combined with the differences in the chemical composition between the soil samples suggested that alkylated aromatic, phenol, and lignin monomer compounds contributed most to the HC...

  8. General method and thermodynamic tables for computation of equilibrium composition and temperature of chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Vearl N; Gordon, Sanford; Morrell, Virginia E

    1951-01-01

    A rapidly convergent successive approximation process is described that simultaneously determines both composition and temperature resulting from a chemical reaction. This method is suitable for use with any set of reactants over the complete range of mixture ratios as long as the products of reaction are ideal gases. An approximate treatment of limited amounts of liquids and solids is also included. This method is particularly suited to problems having a large number of products of reaction and to problems that require determination of such properties as specific heat or velocity of sound of a dissociating mixture. The method presented is applicable to a wide variety of problems that include (1) combustion at constant pressure or volume; and (2) isentropic expansion to an assigned pressure, temperature, or Mach number. Tables of thermodynamic functions needed with this method are included for 42 substances for convenience in numerical computations.

  9. Chemical composition, antifungal and antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Chamaecyparis nootkatensis from Spain.

    PubMed

    Palá-Paúl, Jesús; Usano-Alemany, Jaime; Granda, Elena; Soria, Ana-Cristina

    2009-07-01

    The chemical composition of the oil of Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (D. Don) Spach. has been analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 34 compounds were identified representing more than 90% of the total oil. The oil was richer in monoterpenes than in sesquiterpenes, the major constituents being limonene (53.2%), 6-3-carene (21.0%) and a-pinene (12.2%). The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the oil were also tested against Candida albicans, Bacillus subtilis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella sp. and Serratia marcescens. Only two of these, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans, were sensitive to the treatment, inhibition zones of 11 and 14 mm diameter being obtained, respectively. As far as we know, this is the first report of the antifungal and antibacterial activity of this species. PMID:19731613

  10. Thermal history, chemical composition and relationship of comets to the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Leschine, S. B.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1980-01-01

    The role of thermal processes in determining the chemical composition of comets is considered, and implications of possible cometary constituents for the origin and evolution of life on earth are discussed. It is shown that the inclusion of short-lived Al-26 from a nearby supernova explosion into cometary nuclei could lead to comets with surfaces cool enough to retain H2O and interiors warm enough for thermal processing to occur, with the production of complex organic molecules such as amino acids and nucleic acid bases. It is thus suggested that comets may have played a part in seeding the primitive earth with biological polymers capable of self-replication or of evolving towards that capability, and may even be responsible for the subsequent introduction of organic material capable of infecting already existing cells.

  11. Acaricidal activity and chemical composition of the essential oil from three Piper species.

    PubMed

    de B F Ferraz, Alexandre; Balbino, João Marcio; Zini, Claudia Alcaraz; Ribeiro, Vera Lucia S; Bordignon, Sérgio A L; von Poser, Gilsane

    2010-06-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of the aerial parts of Piper amalago, Piper mikanianum, and Piper xylosteoides was elucidated by gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry analyses. P. mikanianum and P. xylosteoides essential oils presented phenylpropanoids as their main compounds (67.89% and 48.53%, respectively) whereas P. amalago was rich in monoterpene and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (84.95%). The essential oils obtained were investigated for their effect on newly hatched larvae of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The essential oil of P. mikanianum (LC(50) 2.33 microL/mL) was more active than that of P. xylosteoides (LC(50) 6.15 microL/mL) against the larvae, while the oil of P. amalago was inactive. These results suggest that phenylpropanoids, mainly apiol and safrole, are responsible for the acaricidal activity. PMID:20428889

  12. Chemical composition of selected core samples, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Knobel, L.L.; Cecil, L.D.; Wood, T.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report presents chemical compositions determined from 84 subsamples and 5 quality-assurance split subsamples of basalt core from the eastern Snake River Plain. The 84 subsamples were collected at selected depths from 5 coreholes located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. This report was jointly prepared by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company and the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. Ten major elements and as many as 32 trace elements were determined for each subsample either by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, or by both methods. Descriptive statistics for each element were calculated and tabulated by analytical method for each corehole.

  13. Electrophysiological responses of Atta sexdens rubropilosa workers to essential oils of eucalyptus and its chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Batista-Pereira, Luciane G; Fernandes, João B; da Silva, M Fátima G E; Vieira, Paulo C; Bueno, Odair C; Corrêa, Arlene G

    2006-01-01

    The leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa Forel, 1908 is the most harmful of the Eucalyptus pests, causing severe losses in wood production through defoliation. Various strategies have been tried and effort spent on the development of methods to control this pest, however no practical and environmentally acceptable one currently exists. In this work the chemical composition of the essential oil of seven Eucalyptus species was identified and the selectivity and sensitivity of antennal receptors of A. sexdens rubropilosa workers to the volatile compounds were determined using the electroantennographic technique (EAG and GC-EAD). Analysis by GC-EAD showed in E. cloesiana and E. maculata, respectively, seventeen and sixteen terpenes that elicited responses in ant workers' antennae, indicating the potential role of the essential oils as allelochemicals that determine the choice of the foraging material. PMID:17137124

  14. Chemical composition, main sources and temporal variability of PM1 aerosols in southern African grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiitta, P.; Vakkari, V.; Croteau, P.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Josipovic, M.; Venter, A. D.; Jaars, K.; Pienaar, J. J.; Ng, N. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kokkola, H.; Kulmala, M.; Laaksonen, A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Laakso, L.

    2014-02-01

    Southern Africa is a significant source region of atmospheric pollution, yet long-term data on pollutant concentrations and properties from this region are rather limited. A recently established atmospheric measurement station in South Africa, Welgegund, is strategically situated to capture regional background concentrations, as well as emissions from the major source regions in the interior of South Africa. We measured non-refractive submicron aerosols (NR-PM1) and black carbon over a one year period in Welgegund, and investigated the seasonal and diurnal patterns of aerosol concentration levels, chemical composition, acidity and oxidation level. Based on air mass back trajectories, four distinct source regions were determined for NR-PM1. Supporting data utilised in our analysis included particle number size distributions, aerosol absorption, trace gas concentrations, meteorological variables and the flux of carbon dioxide.

  15. Chemical composition and size distribution of secondary organic aerosol formed from the photooxidation of isoprene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianyun; Zhang, Weijun; Wang, Zhenya; Zhao, Weixiong; Tao, Ling; Yang, Xibin

    2009-01-01

    Photooxidation of isoprene leads to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this study, the chemical composition of SOA formed from OH-initiated photooxidation of isoprene has been investigated with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and a home-made aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Sampling particles generated in a home-made smog chamber. The size distribution of SOA particles was detected by a TSI 3321 aerodynamic particle size spectrometer in real time. Results showed that SOA created by isoprene photooxidation was predominantly in the form of fine particles, which have diameters less than 2.5 microm. The obtained mass spectra of individual particles show that products of the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene contain methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, formaldehyde, and some other hydroxycarbonyls. The possible reaction mechanisms leading to these products were also discussed. PMID:20108685

  16. Chemical composition of vegetation along urbanisation gradients in two European cities.

    PubMed

    Sæbø, A; Hanslin, H M; Torp, T; Lierhagen, S; Gawronska, H; Dzierzanowski, K; Gawronski, S

    2015-03-01

    Accumulation of particulate matter (PM) and metals on leaves of three deciduous woody species was studied along urbanisation gradients in Stavanger and Warsaw. Differences between rural and urban sites explained most of the observed variation in leaf chemistry, followed by differences between regions. Highest leaf accumulation of elements was found in Warsaw, but also composition of elements differed between the cities. Overall, species showed similar patterns of element accumulation, but differed in accumulation of specific elements. These differences could in part be explained by differences in epicuticular waxes and PM accumulation. Expected source of elements and their chemical characteristics did not explain the observed accumulation patterns. A better differentiation between elements taken up from soil and air would be required for his. Species specific accumulation of elements has to be taken into consideration using leaf samples for biomonitoring. PMID:25590129

  17. Consequences of the accretion of planetary matter on the chemical composition of the stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vauclair, S.; Vauclair, G.

    2014-12-01

    The question of the possible modification of the abundances observed at the surface of stars in case of accretion of planetary matter has been debated for several years. Here we present some recent studies on this subject. At the beginning of the stars' life on the main sequence, contrary to what was assumed in the past, heavy matter accretion cannot lead to any overabundance of heavy elements because of the double-diffusive instability induced by the inversion of the mean molecular weight. This instability leads to partial extra-mixing which, in some cases, may induce lithium destruction. On the other hand, helium settling leads to stabilizing ?-gradients inside the stars during stellar evolution, so that heavy matter accretion can modify the observed chemical composition as long as the global ?-gradient does not become unstable.

  18. Phytotoxic Activity and Chemical Composition of Aqueous Volatile Fractions from Eucalyptus Species

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinbiao; An, Min; Wu, Hanwen; Liu, De Li; Stanton, Rex

    2014-01-01

    The essential oils from four Eucalyptus species (E. spathulata, E. salubris, E. brockwayii and E. dundasii) have been previously confirmed to have stronger inhibitory effects on germination and seedling growth of silverleaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav.). The aqueous volatile fractions (AVFs) were the water soluble volatile fractions produced together with the essential oils (water insoluble fractions) during the steam distillation process. The aim of this study was to further assess the phytotoxicity of AVFs from the four Eucalyptus species and their chemical composition. The fresh leaves of the four Eucalyptus species were used for the extraction of AVFs. The AVFs were tested for their phytotoxic effects on the perennial weed, silverleaf nightshade under laboratory conditions. The chemical compositions of the AVFs were determined by gas chromatograph–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our results showed that the AVFs had strong inhibition on the germination and seedling growth of silverleaf nightshade. The inhibition index increased with the increasing concentrations of AVFs. The inhibitory effects of the AVFs varied between different Eucalyptus species. The AVF from E. salubris demonstrated the highest inhibitory activity on the weed tested, with complete inhibition on germination and seedling growth at a concentration of 75%. The GC-MS analysis revealed that 1,8-cineole, isopentyl isovalerate, isomenthol, pinocarvone, trans-pinocarveol, alpha-terpineol and globulol were the main compounds in the AVFs. These results indicated that all AVFs tested had differential inhibition on the germination and seedling growth of silverleaf nightshade, which could be due to the joint effects of compounds present in the AVFs as these compounds were present in different quantities and ratio between Eucalyptus species. PMID:24681490

  19. Five Groups of Red Giants with Distinct Chemical Composition in the Globular Cluster NGC 2808

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretta, Eugenio

    2015-09-01

    The chemical composition of multiple populations in the massive globular cluster (GC) NGC 2808 is addressed with the homogeneous abundance reanalysis of 140 red giant branch stars. UVES spectra for 31 stars and GIRAFFE spectra for the other giants were analyzed with the same procedures used for about 2500 giants in 23 GCs in our FLAMES survey, deriving abundances of Fe, O, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Sc, Cr, Mn, and Ni. Iron, elements from ? capture, and those in the Fe group do not show intrinsic scatter. On our UVES scale, the metallicity of NGC 2808 is [Fe/H] =\\-1.129+/- 0.005+/- 0.034 (± statistical ± systematic error) with ? = 0.030 (31 stars). The main features related to proton-capture elements are retrieved, but the improved statistics and the smaller associated internal errors allow us to uncover five distinct groups of stars along the Na-O anticorrelation. We observe large depletions in Mg, anticorrelated with enhancements of Na and also Si, suggestive of unusually high temperatures for proton captures. About 14% of our sample is formed by giants with solar or subsolar [Mg/Fe] ratios. Using the [Na/Mg] ratios, we confirm the presence of five populations with different chemical compositions that we call P1, P2, I1, I2, and E in order of decreasing Mg and increasing Na abundances. Statistical tests show that the mean ratios in any pair of groups cannot be extracted from the same parent distribution. The overlap with the five populations recently detected from UV photometry is good but not perfect, confirming that more distinct components probably exist in this complex GC. Based on data collected at the ESO telescopes under program 072.D-0507 and during the FLAMES Science Verification program.

  20. Chemical Composition of Wildland and Agricultural Biomass Burning Particles Measured Downwind During BBOP Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, E.; Onasch, T. B.; Shilling, J.; Pekour, M. S.; Kleinman, L. I.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP), a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored study, measured wildland fires in the Pacific Northwest and prescribed agricultural burns in the Central Southeastern US from the DOE Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft platform over a four month period in 2013. The chemical composition of the emitted particulate emissions were characterized using an Aerodyne Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) and will be presented in the context of the fire location and source. The SP-AMS was operated with both laser and resistively heated tungsten vaporizers, alternatively turning the laser vaporizer on and off. With the laser vaporizer off, the instrument operated as a standard HR-AMS. Under these sampling conditions, the non-refractory chemical composition of the biomass burning particles will be characterized as a function of the fuel type burned and the observed modified combustion efficiency and observed changes during downwind transport. Specific attention will focus on the level of oxidation (i.e., O:C, H:C, and OM:OC ratios), anhydrosugar, and aromatic content. With the laser vaporizer on, the SP-AMS was also sensitive to the refractory black carbon content, in addition to the non-refractory components, and will be presented within the context of technique-specific collection efficiencies. Under these sampling conditions, addition information on the mass of black carbon, the OM/BC ratio, and the RBC(coat-to-core) ratio will be examined, with a focus on correlating with the simultaneous optical measurements.

  1. Chemical composition, crystal size and lattice structural changes after incorporation of strontium into biomimetic apatite.

    PubMed

    Li, Z Y; Lam, W M; Yang, C; Xu, B; Ni, G X; Abbah, S A; Cheung, K M C; Luk, K D K; Lu, W W

    2007-03-01

    Recently, strontium (Sr) as ranelate compound has become increasingly popular in the treatment of osteoporosis. However, the lattice structure of bone crystal after Sr incorporation is yet to be extensively reported. In this study, we synthesized strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) with different Sr content (0.3%, 1.5% and 15% Sr-HA in mole ratio) to simulate bone crystals incorporated with Sr. The changes in chemical composition and lattice structure of apetite after synthetic incorporation of Sr were evaluated to gain insight into bone crystal changes after incorporation of Sr. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns revealed that 0.3% and 1.5% Sr-HA exhibited single phase spectrum, which was similar to that of HA. However, 15% Sr-HA induced the incorporation of HPO4(2-) and more CO3(2-), the crystallinity reduced dramatically. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the crystal length and width of 0.3% and 1.5% Sr-HA increased slightly. Meanwhile, the length and width distribution were broadened and the aspect ratio decreased from 10.68+/-4.00 to 7.28+/-2.80. The crystal size and crystallinity of 15% Sr-HA dropped rapidly, which may suggest that the fundamental crystal structure is changed. The findings from this work indicate that current clinical dosage which usually results in Sr incorporation of below 1.5% may not change chemical composition and lattice structure of bone, while it will broaden the bone crystal size distribution and strengthen the bone. PMID:17140655

  2. Chemical composition of the giant red sea cucumber, Parastichopus californicus, commercially harvested in Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, Peter J; Oliveira, Alexandra CM; Demir, Necla; Smiley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Giant red sea cucumbers, Parastichopus californicus, are commercially harvested in the U.S. Pacific Northwest; however, the nutritional and chemical properties of its edible muscle bands and body wall have not been fully elucidated. In particular are the fatty acid profiles of P. californicus tissues, which have not been documented. Sea cucumbers were delivered live and muscle bands and body wall freeze dried, vacuum packed, and stored at –30°C until analyzed. Proximate composition of freeze-dried tissues varied greatly with muscle bands being composed of 68% protein, 12% ash, 9% carbohydrate, and 5% lipids, while the body wall was composed of 47% protein, 26% ash, 15% carbohydrate, and 8% lipids. The hydroxyproline, proline, and glycine contents of the body wall were much higher than those in muscle bands, consistent with the larger amount of connective tissue. Calcium, magnesium, sodium, and iron contents were higher in the body wall than those in muscle bands, whereas the opposite was observed for zinc content. Total long-chain n-3 fatty acid contents were 19% and 32% of total fatty acids in body wall and muscle bands, respectively. Muscle bands had higher content of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) than body wall at 22.6% and 12.3%, respectively. High content of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) was recorded in both body wall (7.1%) and muscle bands (9.9%). Overall, the fatty acid profiles of body wall and muscle bands of P. californicus resemble those described for other species; however, the distribution and occurrence of certain fatty acids is unique to P. californicus, being representative of the fatty acid composition of temperate-polar marine organisms. The chemical characterization of freeze-dried edible tissues from P. californicus demonstrated that these products have valuable nutritional properties. The body wall, a food product of lower market value than muscle bands, could be better utilized for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:24804015

  3. Controls on the chemical and isotopic compositions of urban stormwater in a semiarid zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaf, L.; Nativ, R.; Shain, D.; Hassan, M.; Geyer, S.

    2004-07-01

    The temporal variations in the chemical and isotopic compositions of urban stormwater under different land uses, and their dependence on physical parameters such as precipitation intensity, stormwater discharge, cumulative stormwater volumes and the size of the drainage area, were investigated in the coastal city of Ashdod, Israel. During 2000/2001 and 2001/2002, 46 stormwater events were intensively monitored for precipitation distribution and intensity at three stations across the city, and for stormwater discharge at seven stations draining 85% of the city area. Sixty-eight and 202 precipitation samples were collected and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions, respectively, as were 186 stormwater samples, collected from the drains during 15 of the 46 events. Land use had only a minor effect on the concentrations of major ions and trace elements. Conversely, the concentrations and variety of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds were significantly higher in stormwater generated in the industrial area than in that draining from residential areas. Ion and trace-metal concentrations were very low (below drinking-water standards) in 97% of the stormwater samples collected from all drains. Stormwater concentrations were higher at stations draining a larger area, thereby linking concentrations to the length of the stormwater flow paths. A first-flush effect was documented on both a seasonal and event basis for both ions and trace elements. The high concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria exceeded the drinking-water standards and displayed a random pattern. The isotopic ratios of oxygen and hydrogen in the stormwater suggest very little exposure to the atmosphere, resulting in very limited fractionation. The presence of fecal coliforms, ammonium in some samples, and specific ratios of oxygen and nitrogen isotopes, suggest that although the sewer and stormwater-collection systems are separated, wastewater, possibly from overflowing sewers, contributed to the drained stormwater.

  4. Chemical composition of the giant red sea cucumber, Parastichopus californicus, commercially harvested in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Peter J; Oliveira, Alexandra Cm; Demir, Necla; Smiley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Giant red sea cucumbers, Parastichopus californicus, are commercially harvested in the U.S. Pacific Northwest; however, the nutritional and chemical properties of its edible muscle bands and body wall have not been fully elucidated. In particular are the fatty acid profiles of P. californicus tissues, which have not been documented. Sea cucumbers were delivered live and muscle bands and body wall freeze dried, vacuum packed, and stored at -30°C until analyzed. Proximate composition of freeze-dried tissues varied greatly with muscle bands being composed of 68% protein, 12% ash, 9% carbohydrate, and 5% lipids, while the body wall was composed of 47% protein, 26% ash, 15% carbohydrate, and 8% lipids. The hydroxyproline, proline, and glycine contents of the body wall were much higher than those in muscle bands, consistent with the larger amount of connective tissue. Calcium, magnesium, sodium, and iron contents were higher in the body wall than those in muscle bands, whereas the opposite was observed for zinc content. Total long-chain n-3 fatty acid contents were 19% and 32% of total fatty acids in body wall and muscle bands, respectively. Muscle bands had higher content of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) than body wall at 22.6% and 12.3%, respectively. High content of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) was recorded in both body wall (7.1%) and muscle bands (9.9%). Overall, the fatty acid profiles of body wall and muscle bands of P. californicus resemble those described for other species; however, the distribution and occurrence of certain fatty acids is unique to P. californicus, being representative of the fatty acid composition of temperate-polar marine organisms. The chemical characterization of freeze-dried edible tissues from P. californicus demonstrated that these products have valuable nutritional properties. The body wall, a food product of lower market value than muscle bands, could be better utilized for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:24804015

  5. Chemical composition and RT[sub NDT] determinations for Midland weld WF-70

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Swain, R.L.; Miller, M.K. )

    1992-12-01

    The Heavy-Section Steal Irradiation Program Tenth Irradiation Series has the objective to investigate the affects of radiation on the fracture toughness of the low-upper-shelf submerged-arc welds (B W designation WF-70) in the reactor pressure vessel of the canceled Midland Unit 1 nuclear plant. This report discusses determination of variations in chemical composition And reference temperature (RT[sub NDT]) throughout the welds. Specimens were machined from different sections and through thickness locations in both the beltline and nozzle course welds. The nil-ductility transition temperatures ranged from [minus]40 to [minus]60[degrees]C ([minus]40 and [minus]76[degrees]F) while the RT[sub NDT]S, controlled by the Charpy behavior, varied from [minus]20 to 37[degrees]C ([minus]4 to 99[degrees]F). The upper-shelf energies varied from 77 to 108 J (57 to 80 ft-lb). The combined data revealed a mean 41-J (30-ft-lb) temperature of [minus]8[degrees]C (17[degrees]F) with a mean upper-shelf energy of 88 J (65 ft-lb). The copper contents range from 0.21 to 0.34 wt % in the beltline weld and from 0.37 to 0.46 wt % in the nozzle course weld. Atom probe field ion microscope analyses indicated substantial depletion of copper in the matrix but no evidence of copper clustering. Statistical analyses of the Charpy and chemical composition results as well as interpretation of the ASME procedures for RT[sub NDT] determination are discussed.

  6. High-resolution chemical composition of geothermal scalings from Hungary: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boch, Ronny; Dietzel, Martin; Deák, József; Leis, Albrecht; Mindszenty, Andrea; Demeny, Attila

    2015-04-01

    Geothermal fluids originating from several hundreds to thousands meters depth mostly hold a high potential for secondary mineral precipitation (scaling) due to high total dissolved solid contents at elevated temperature and pressure conditions. The precipitation of e.g. carbonates, sulfates, sulfides, and silica has shown to cause severe problems in geothermal heat and electric power production, when clogging of drill-holes, downhole pumps, pipes and heat exchangers occurs (e.g. deep geothermal doublet systems). Ongoing scaling reduces the efficiency in energy extraction and might even question the abandonment of installations in worst cases. In an attempt to study scaling processes both temporally and spatially we collected mineral precipitates from selected sites in Hungary (Bükfürdo, Szechenyi, Szentes, Igal, Hajduszoboszlo). The samples of up to 8 cm thickness were recovered from different positions of the geothermal systems and precipitated from waters of various temperatures (40-120 °C) and variable overall chemical composition. Most of these scalings show fine lamination patterns representing mineral deposition from weeks up to 45 years at our study sites. Solid-fluid interaction over time captured in the samples are investigated applying high-resolution analytical techniques such as laser-ablation mass-spectrometry and electron microprobe, micromill-sampling for stable isotope analysis, and micro-XRD combined with hydrogeochemical modeling. A detailed investigation of the processes determining the formation and growth of precipitates can help to elucidate the short-term versus long-term geothermal performance with regard to anthropogenic and natural reservoir and production dynamics. Changes in fluid chemistry, temperature, pressure, pH, degassing rate (CO2) and flow rate are reflected by the mineralogical, chemical and isotopic composition of the precipitates. Consequently, this high-resolution approach is intended as a contribution to decipher the environmental conditions during the formation of the investigated scalings and to increase our knowledge on retarding and preventive measures of scaling for geothermal applications.

  7. Chemical composition and enzymatic digestibility of sugarcane clones selected for varied lignin content

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The recalcitrance of lignocellulosic materials is a major limitation for their conversion into fermentable sugars. Lignin depletion in new cultivars or transgenic plants has been identified as a way to diminish this recalcitrance. In this study, we assessed the success of a sugarcane breeding program in selecting sugarcane plants with low lignin content, and report the chemical composition and agronomic characteristics of eleven experimental hybrids and two reference samples. The enzymatic digestion of untreated and chemically delignified samples was evaluated to advance the performance of the sugarcane residue (bagasse) in cellulosic-ethanol production processes. Results The ranges for the percentages of glucan, hemicellulose, lignin, and extractive (based on oven-dry biomass) of the experimental hybrids and reference samples were 38% to 43%, 25% to 32%, 17% to 24%, and 1.6% to 7.5%, respectively. The samples with the smallest amounts of lignin did not produce the largest amounts of total polysaccharides. Instead, a variable increase in the mass of a number of components, including extractives, seemed to compensate for the reduction in lignin content. Hydroxycinnamic acids accounted for a significant part of the aromatic compounds in the samples, with p-coumaric acid predominating, whereas ferulic acid was present only in low amounts. Hydroxycinnamic acids with ester linkage to the hemicelluloses varied from 2.3% to 3.6%. The percentage of total hydroxycinnamic acids (including the fraction linked to lignin through ether linkages) varied from 5.0% to 9.2%, and correlated to some extent with the lignin content. These clones released up to 31% of glucose after 72 hours of digestion with commercial cellulases, whereas chemically delignified samples led to cellulose conversion values of more than 80%. However, plants with lower lignin content required less delignification to reach higher efficiencies of cellulose conversion during the enzymatic treatment. Conclusion Some of the experimental sugarcane hybrids did have the combined characteristics of high biomass and high sucrose production with low lignin content. Conversion of glucan to glucose by commercial cellulases was increased in the samples with low lignin content. Chemical delignification further increased the cellulose conversion to values of more than 80%. Thus, plants with lower lignin content required less delignification to reach higher efficiencies of cellulose conversion during the enzymatic treatment. PMID:22145819

  8. Surface structure, composition, and polarity of indium nitride grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    E-print Network

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition have been studied. Atomic hydrogen cleaning produced and heterostructures--which can be accomplished by low- pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition MOCVD --the- rium vapor pressure of nitrogen during growth. This requires different approaches in growing structures

  9. Chemical composition, functional and sensory characteristics of wheat-taro composite flours and biscuits.

    PubMed

    Himeda, Makhlouf; Njintang Yanou, Nicolas; Fombang, Edith; Facho, Balaam; Kitissou, Pierre; Mbofung, Carl M F; Scher, Joel

    2014-09-01

    The physicochemical, alveographic and sensory characteristics of precooked taro-wheat composite flours and their biscuits were investigated. A 2x7 factorial design consisting of two varieties of taro flour (Red Ibo Ngaoundere, RIN, and egg-like varieties) and 7 levels of wheat substitutions (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 %) was used for this purpose. It was observed that water absorption capacity (range 95-152 g/100 g), water solubility index (range 18.8-29.5 g/100 g) and swelling capacity (range 125.4-204.6 mL/100 g) of composite flours significantly (p?composite taro-wheat dough exhibited elasticity indices acceptable for the production of baking products, whereas at all levels of taro substitution, the composite biscuits samples were either acceptable as or better (5-10 % substitution with RIN flour) than 100 % wheat biscuit. PMID:25190844

  10. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1993-07-06

    Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  11. Primary and secondary particles chemical composition of marine emissions from Mediterranean seawaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anna, Barbara; Meme, Aurelie; Rmili, Badr; Pey, Jorge; Marchand, Nicolas; Schwier, Allison; Sellegri, Karine; Charriere, Bruno; Sempere, Richard; Mas, Sebastien; Parin, David

    2015-04-01

    Marine emissions are among the largest source of both primary particles and do highly contribute secondary organic aerosols (SOA) at a global scale. Whereas physical processes control the primary production of marine aerosols, biological activity is responsible for most of the organic fraction released from marine sources, potentially transformed into SOA when exposed to atmospheric oxidants. The Mediterranean atmosphere displays important concentrations of SOA, especially in summer, when atmospheric oxidants and photochemical activity are at their maximum. The origin of these elevated concentrations of SOA remain unclear. Here we present the results from a mesocosms study in a remote location in Corsica and a chamber study (using fresh sea water from Western Mediterranean) as part of the Source of marine Aerosol particles in the Mediterranean atmosphere (SAM) project. The mesocosm study was conducted at the Oceanographic and Marine Station STARESO (Corsica) in May 2013. One mesocosm was used as a control (with no enrichment) and the other two were enriched with nitrate and phosphate respecting Redfield ratio (N:P = 16) in order to produce a bloom of biological activity. Physical and chemical properties of the enclosed water samples together with their surrounding atmosphere were monitored during 20 days by a multi-instrumental high-time resolution set-up. In parallel, numerous additional measurements were conducted including water temperature, incident light, pH, conductivity, chemical and biological analyses, fluorescence of chlorophyll, dissolved oxygen concentration. The chamber studies were performed in a Teflon chamber of 1. 5m3 that accommodates a pyrex-container for the fresh sea-water samples. After injection of sea-water in the pyrex-container, the system is allowed to stabilize to 20-30 minutes, then it was exposed to 60-100ppbv of ozone and/or UV-A irradiation. Aerosol concentrations and their physical characteristics were followed by means of Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers; clusters concentration was monitored using a Particle Size Magnifyer (PSM); the gas-phase composition of volatile organic compounds was determined by using Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer and cartridges. Aerosol chemical composition was investigated using High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, filters analysis and TEM-EDX microscopy. Results evidence a complex nature of the primary emitted aerosol which is not clearly associated to the biological bloom (ex. cholrophyll), VOCs emission was observed during high biological activity periods. Formation of new particles was observed in the chamber and seemed to be related to iodine species (in the absence of any macroalgea population).

  12. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    DOEpatents

    Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wendt, Kraig M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  13. The Regional Patterns of Chemical Composition in the Otolith Core of Larval Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, M. Y.; Geffen, A. J.; Nash, R. D. M.; Clemmesen, C.

    2012-04-01

    The elemental composition of fish otoliths can record the environmental information because once a trace element is deposited in the otolith; it presents a permanent record of the environmental conditions experienced by the fish at a particular time. The elemental signature of the otolith nucleus, the area lying within the first annual growth ring, is likely to be characteristic of the nursery areas of the species, and could be used as biological tracer for tracking origin and dispersal. However, ocean acidification may alter otolith growth and element incorporation, and it is important to establish baseline information about the sources of variation - both biotic and abiotic. The objectives of this study, as part of the wider CalMarO network, is to examine the regional differences in the otolith cores of selected fish species, contrast these differences with those measured between these same species in areas where their larvae co-exist and to find out the maternal effect to the chemical composition during the first forming of otoliths. The laboratory and field experiments were included to produce otolith material reflecting the maternal and regional patterns. Otolith composition was measured using laser-ablation ICPMS. For clarifying the regional patterns, juveniles from six locations and seven spawning groups along the west of the British Isles and larvae from the North Sea were sampled to distinguish the origin of spawning herring. There are three main nursery-ground groups, the Irish Sea, Scottish sea lochs and the Minch, contributing to the spawning herring in the west of the British Isles according to the otolith elemental composition data. However, the spawning origin of the North Sea herring larvae was still unclear. The otolith concentrations of Li, Na, Mg, Mn, Cu, Ru and Sr were significantly different among nursery-ground populations. Together with length-at-age data, at least two nursery-ground groups contributed to each spawning population. The juveniles from western Irish Sea and the Stanton Bank contributed most to the spawning populations. The otolith signature (without length-at-age information) indicated that the North Sea larvae contributed mostly to the spawning herring from the Dingle and the Cape Wrath. The results suggested that there might be different current systems, which drove the larval dispersal both northward and southward from the spawning ground to the North Sea. Although there might be mixtures and interconnections among the west coast herrings, which resulted in the similar otolith chemical signals, the otolith chemical composition still provided useful information of regional differences for tracing back the origin of spawning populations. The detailed current system may be needed to provide more inference for the larval dispersal and the linkage between nursery-ground and spawning populations. * present address: Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, R.O.C.

  14. Extra-red transneptunian objects and Centaurs: Composition and chemical history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Ore, C. M.; Barucci, M. A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Emery, J. P.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a systematic analysis of the surface composition of ten of the reddest transneptunian objects (TNOs). The goal of the analysis is to determine the current chemical compositions of these extra-red objects and investigate possible paths of chemical evolution since formation. The sample consists of six objects from the classical and resonant populations, one detached object, and three Centaurs. The classical and resonant objects are expected to be similar to each other in composition, while the surfaces of the three Centaurs could have been significantly modified as their orbits evolved. Furthermore, Brown et al. (Brown, M.E., Schaller, E.L., & Fraser, W.C., 2011. A Hypothesis for the Color Diversity of the Kuiper Belt. ApJL, 739, L60) propose that objects with red color are rich in methanol. The available data consist of broad-band photometric measurements in the wavelength range between 0.3 and 4.5 ? m. The photometric measurements are scaled to the albedo at 0.55 ? m to yield an approximation of the spectral shape of each object that is then compared to a library of synthetic spectra of mixtures of materials known to be present on the surfaces of TNOs. Errors as well as phase-angle differences are taken into account as part of the fitting uncertainty. For each object, we obtain a range of compositions that match their spectral distribution within the estimated errors. This yields the likelihood for the various materials to be present on the surface as well as a rough measure of the uncertainty of the estimate. All objects show presence of methanol and/or methane on their surface, supporting the Brown et al. (2011) hypothesis. To further analyze our results, ices are grouped into 'stable' (H_2O), 'partially stable' (CH_3OH, CO_2), and 'volatile' (CH_4, CO, N_2). Our results show some difference in the amount of 'volatile' and 'partially stable' ices among the classical and resonant objects. A trend in the sense of less ice present on closer and smaller objects is apparent, possibly related to the objects' ability to retain those ices and to the ices available in the solar nebula at those distances at the time of formation. Pholus, one of the Centaurs, exhibits a lower abundance of 'volatile' ices and enhancement of organic and carbonaceous material with respect to the other Centaurs. Since Centaurs are believed to originate from TNOs captured into fairly short-lived orbits closer to the Sun, our findings are consistent with the idea that Pholus has recently lost to sublimation some of its 'volatile' ice reservoir, exposing more of its native organic material. A similar behavior is visible for the classical and resonant objects, although the trend is very weak when the carbonaceous material is not taken into account. This hints at the possibility that irradiation weathering might be acting on the closer objects, actively transforming red organic into dark carbonaceous material. More distant objects, on the other hand, might still be pristine in their composition, suggesting that their organic component might have originated in the early stages of their accretion to planetesimals or even before as chemical changes in the solar nebula.

  15. Thermo-chemical constraints on the interior structure and composition of the lunar mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, Oleg L.; Kronrod, Victor A.; Kronrod, Ekaterina V.

    2014-10-01

    Based on a self-consistent thermodynamic-geophysical approach, we convert the recent seismic models of the lunar mantle to the temperature-depth profiles using Gibbs free energy minimization and petrological constraints in the Na2O-TiO2-CaO-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system. Our calculations are unable to explain the reasonable distribution of temperature for a single homogeneous composition throughout the entire lunar mantle with concentrations of CaO and Al2O3 in the range of 2-6.5%, and FeO content between 8.5% and 13%. The results lend support to the chemically stratified lunar mantle with a change in composition from predominantly pyroxenite upper mantle depleted in Ca and Al to predominantly fertile lower mantle enriched in Ca and Al with larger amounts of garnet. Such a zoned structure places significant constraints on any theory of lunar origin. Unlike the Earth’s mantle, compositional effects play a dominant role in determining the lunar mantle temperatures of the same observational model. Seismically derived temperatures allow us to constrain thermal structure of the lunar mantle and estimate the upper mantle heat flow (3.8-4.7 mW m-2), which is not consistent with that found from the Apollo heat flow and thorium abundance measurements. Lower mantle temperatures are well below the probable solidus condition and can be evaluated at the level of 1420-1550 °C at the core-mantle boundary without requiring a melt layer. We find that regardless of the composition, the positive S-wave velocity gradient in the lunar mantle leads to a negative temperature gradient, which has no physical basis. The resulting temperature profiles provide an effective independent tool that allows us to discriminate between the available seismic and petrological models.

  16. The General Laws of Chemical Elements Composition Dynamics in the Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzh, Vyacheslav D.

    2013-04-01

    The key point of investigation of the specificity of the biosphere elemental composition formation is determination of patterns of redistribution of elemental average concentrations among various phases, like solid - liquid ( the lithosphere - the hydrosphere), which occurs as a result of a global continuous processing of inert matter by living substances. Our task here is to investigate this process in the system "lithosphere - hydrosphere" in view of the integrated involvement of living material in it. This process is most active in biogeochemical barriers, i.e. in places of "the life condensation" and runs under a nonlinear regularity that has been unknown before. It is established that this process results in a general relative increase in concentrations of chemical elements in the solid phase in proportion as their prevalence in the environment is reduced. This process running in various natural systems has practically the same parameter of nonlinearity (v) approximately equal to 0.7. For proto-lithosphere -"living material" - soil v = 0.75. For river - "living material" - ocean v = 0.67. For the contemporary factual awareness level these estimations of nonlinearity indices are practically negligible. Hence, it is for the first time that the existence of a universal constant of nonlinearity of elemental composition evolution in the biosphere has been proved and its quantitative evaluation has been made. REFERENCES 1. Korzh V.D. 1974. Some general laws governing the turnover of substance within the ocean-atmosphere-continent-ocean cycle. // Journal de Recherches Atmospheriques. Vol. 8. P. 653-660. 2. Korzh V.D. 2008. The general laws in the formation of the elemental composition of the Hydrosphere and Biosphere.// J. Ecologica, Vol. XV, P. 13-21. 3. Korzh V.D. 2012. Determination of general laws of elemental composition in Hydrosphere // Water: chemistry & ecology, Journal of water science and its practical application. # 1, P.56-62.

  17. Dissolved organic matter in Lake Superior: insights into the effects of extraction methods on chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Minor, Elizabeth C

    2015-10-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aquatic systems plays many biogeochemical roles, acting as a sunscreen, a food source, a trace metal chelator, and a photosensitizer. The efficiency of DOM in these roles is, in part, a function of its composition, which is difficult to determine due to its heterogeneity and the difficulty in isolating representative portions for subsequent molecular level analyses. In this study, the performance of two major types of solid phase extraction (SPE) resins (C18 vs. polymeric SDVB) in disk format (C18 disk vs. SDB-XC disk) was studied using DOM from Lake Superior, the earth's largest lake by area. The performance of the two SPE disks and their influences on the molecular chemical composition of the extracted retentates were studied with UV-vis spectrometry and negative-ion electrospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS). We found that SDB-XC disks outperformed C18 disks in the isolation of DOM in terms of both higher recovery and less fractionation relative to the initial DOM composition. Extracts of the same samples obtained with the different resins shared 70% of molecular formulae. Compounds exclusive to the SDB-XC extractions exhibited similar compound distributions to those of the shared formulae but were enriched in N, P, and S and more aromatic. The C18 exclusive compounds had somewhat higher H/C ratios and contained a large proportion of compounds with oxygen and nitrogen (CHON). Cluster analysis and principle component analysis confirmed that sample location was the main driver of the composition of extracted samples but showed some fractionation of the samples based upon the type of resin. PMID:26350791

  18. A Statistical Approach for Judging Stability of Whole Mixture Chemical Composition over Time for Highly Complex Disinfection By-Product Mixtures from EPA's Four Lab Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical characterization of complex mixtures and assessment of stability over time of the characterized chemicals is crucial both to characterize exposure and to use data from one mixture as a surrogate for other similar mixtures. The chemical composition of test mixtures can va...

  19. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes

    E-print Network

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes 2013-2014 1. Chemical engineering students must complete not included in the required chemical engineering curriculum. All technical electives are subject to approval be in chemical engineering. 2. Chemical engineering students must complete a minimum of 18 credits in the Social

  20. Interactive effects of chemical and biological controls on food-web composition in saline prairie lakes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Salinity is restricting habitatability for many biota in prairie lakes due to limited physiological abilities to cope with increasing osmotic stress. Yet, it remains unclear how salinity effects vary among major taxonomic groups and what role other environmental parameters play in shaping food-web composition. To answer these questions, we sampled fish, zooplankton and littoral macroinvertebrates in 20 prairie lakes (Saskatchewan, Canada) characterized by large gradients in water chemistry and lake morphometry. We showed that salinity thresholds differed among major taxonomic groups, as most fishes were absent above salinities of 2 g L-1, while littoral macroinvertebrates were ubiquitous. Zooplankton occurred over the whole salinity range, but changed taxonomic composition as salinity increased. Subsequently, the complexity of fish community (diversity) was associated with large changes in invertebrate communities. The directional changes in invertebrate communities to smaller taxa indicated that complex fish assemblages resulted in higher predation pressure. Most likely, as the complexity of fish community decreased, controls of invertebrate assemblages shifted from predation to competition and ultimately to productivity in hypersaline lakes. Surprisingly, invertebrate predators did not thrive in the absence of fishes in these systems. Furthermore, the here identified salinity threshold for fishes was too low to be a result of osmotic stress. Hence, winterkill was likely an important factor eliminating fishes in low salinity lakes that had high productivity and shallow water depth. Ultimately, while salinity was crucial, intricate combinations of chemical and biological mechanisms also played a major role in controlling the assemblages of major taxonomic groups in prairie lakes. PMID:23186395

  1. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol from toluene: changes in chemical composition, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K. M.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx under different oxidizing conditions. The effects of the oxidizing condition on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility, and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state (OSc), and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased during photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSc ranged from -0.29 to 0.16 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have a significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.

  2. Chemical and isotopic composition of water from thermal and mineral springs of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

    1982-02-01

    Waters from the thermal springs of Washington range in chemical composition from dilute Na-HCO/sub 3/ to moderately saline CO/sub 2/-charged Na-HCO/sub 3/-Cl type waters. St. Martin's Hot Spring which discharges a slightly saline Na-Cl water, is the notable exception. The dilute Na-HCO/sub 3/ waters are generally associated with granitic intrusions; the warm to hot CO/sub 2/-charged waters issue on or near the large stratovolcanoes. The dilute waters have oxygen-isotopic compositions that indicate relatively little water-rock exchange. The CO/sub 2/-charged waters are usually more enriched in oxygen-18 due to more extensive water-rock reaction. The carbon-13 in the CO/sub 2/-charged thermal waters is more depleted (-10 to -12 %) than in the cold CO/sub 2/-charged soda springs (-2 to -8%) which are also scattered throughout the Cascades. The hot and cold CO/sub 2/-charged waters are supersaturated with respect to CaCO/sub 3/, but only the hot springs are actively depositing CaCO/sub 3/. Baker, Gamma, Sulphur, and Ohanapecosh hot springs seem to be associated with thermal aquifers of more than 100/sup 0/C. As these springs occur as individual springs or in small clusters, the respective aquifers are probably of restricted size.

  3. Aroma chemical composition of red wines from different price categories and its relationship to quality.

    PubMed

    Juan, Felipe San; Cacho, Juan; Ferreira, Vicente; Escudero, Ana

    2012-05-23

    The aroma chemical composition of three sets of Spanish red wines belonging to three different price categories was studied by using an array of gas chromatographic methods. Significant differences were found in the levels of 72 aroma compounds. Expensive wines are richest in wood-related compounds, ethyl phenols, cysteinil-derived mercaptans, volatile sulfur compounds, ethyl esters of branched acids, methional, and phenylacetaldehyde and are poorest in linear and branched fatty acids, fusel alcohols, terpenols, norisoprenoids, fusel alcohol acetates, and ethyl esters of the linear fatty acids; inexpensive wines show exactly the opposite profile, being richest in E-2-nonenal, E-2-hexenal, Z-3-hexenol, acetoin, and ethyl lactate. Satisfactory models relating quality to odorant composition could be built exclusively for expensive and medium-price wines but not for the lower-price sample set in which in-mouth attributes had to be included. The models for quality reveal a common structure, but they are characteristic of a given sample set. PMID:22480297

  4. Chemical Composition Analysis, Antimicrobial Activity and Cytotoxicity Screening of Moss Extracts (Moss Phytochemistry).

    PubMed

    Klavina, Laura; Springe, Gunta; Nikolajeva, Vizma; Martsinkevich, Illia; Nakurte, Ilva; Dzabijeva, Diana; Steinberga, Iveta

    2015-01-01

    Mosses have been neglected as a study subject for a long time. Recent research shows that mosses contain remarkable and unique substances with high biological activity. The aim of this study, accordingly, was to analyze the composition of mosses and to screen their antimicrobial and anticancer activity. The total concentration of polyphenols and carbohydrates, the amount of dry residue and the radical scavenging activity were determined for a preliminary evaluation of the chemical composition of moss extracts. In order to analyze and identify the substances present in mosses, two types of extrahents (chloroform, ethanol) and the GC/MS and LC-TOF-MS methods were used. The antimicrobial activity was tested on four bacteria strains, and the anticancer activity on six cancer cell lines. The obtained results show the presence of a high number of primary (fatty acids and amino acids), but mainly secondary metabolites in moss extracts-including, sterols, terpenoids, polyphenols and others-and a high activity with respect to the studied test organisms. PMID:26393559

  5. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol from toluene: changes in chemical composition, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K. M.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-07-24

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx under different oxidizing conditions. The effects of the oxidizing condition on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility, and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state (OSc), and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased duringmore »photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSc ranged from -0.29 to 0.16 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have a significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  6. Chemical composition and biological activities of Tunisian Cupressus arizonica Greene essential oils.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amri; Mancini, Emilia; De Martino, Laura; Hamrouni, Lamia; Hanana, Mohsen; Jamoussi, Bassem; Gargouri, Samia; Scognamiglio, Mariarosa; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation of leaves, stems, and female cones of Cupressus arizonica Greene, grown in Tunisia, was studied by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. Altogether, 62 compounds were identified, 62 in the leaf oil, 19 in the cone oil, and 24 in the stem oil. The cone and stem oils were mainly composed by monoterpene hydrocarbons (96.6 and 85.2%, resp.). In the leaf oil, the total sesquiterpene fraction constituted 36.1% and that of the monoterpene hydrocarbons 33.8% of the total oil composition. The three oils were evaluated for their in vitro herbicidal activity by determining their influence on the germination and the shoot and root growth of the four weed species Sinapis arvensis L., Lolium rigidum Gaudin, Trifolium campestre Schreb., and Phalaris canariensis L. At the highest doses tested (0.8 and 1.0?mg/ml), the leaf essential oil inhibited either totally or almost completely the seed germination and the shoot and root growth of S. arvensis and T. campestre. The oils were also tested for their antifungal activity; however, their effects on the fungal growth were statistically not significant. PMID:24443435

  7. Variance in the chemical composition of dry beans determined from UV spectral fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Harnly, James M; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial A; Luthria, Devanand L

    2009-10-14

    Nine varieties of dry beans representing five market classes were grown in three locations (Maryland, Michigan, and Nebraska), and subsamples were collected for each variety (row composites from each plot). Aqueous methanol extracts of ground beans were analyzed in triplicate by UV spectrophotometry. Analysis of variance-principal component analysis was used to quantify the relative variance arising from location, variety, between rows of plants, and analytical uncertainty and to test the significance of differences in the chemical composition. Statistically significant differences were observed between all three locations, between all nine varieties, and between rows for each variety. PCA score plots placed the nine varieties in four categories that corresponded with known taxonomic groupings: (1) black beans (cv. Jaguar and cv. T-39), (2) pinto beans (cv. Buster and cv. Othello), (3) small red beans (cv. Merlot), and (4) great northern (cv. Matterhorn and cv. Weihing) and navy (cv. Seahawk and cv. Vista) beans. The relative plant-to-plant variance, estimated from the between row variance, was 71-79% for 25-40 plants per row. PMID:19731933

  8. Lipid complex effect on fatty acid profile and chemical composition of cow milk and cheese.

    PubMed

    Bodkowski, R; Czy?, K; Kupczy?ski, R; Patkowska-Soko?a, B; Nowakowski, P; Wiliczkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of administration of lipid complex (LC) on cow milk and cheese characteristics was studied. Lipid complex was elaborated based on grapeseed oil with synthesized conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and Atlantic mackerel oil enriched in n-3 fatty acids. The 4-wk experiment was conducted on 30 Polish Holstein Friesian cows. The experimental group cow diet was supplemented with 400 g/d of LC (containing 38% CLA, and eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid in a relative amount of 36.5%) on a humic-mineral carrier. The chemical composition and fatty acid profile of milk and rennet cheese from raw fresh milk were analyzed. Lipid complex supplementation of the total mixed ration had no effect on milk yield and milk composition, except fat content, which decreased from 4.6 to 4.1%, a 10.9% decrease. Milk from cows treated with LC had greater relative amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly polyunsaturated fatty acids, and lesser relative amounts of saturated fatty acids. Lipid complex addition changed milk fat fatty acid profile: C18:2 cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 isomer (CLA) contents increased by 278 and 233%, respectively, as did eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6) contents. Milk fat fatty acid profile changes were correlated with the modifications in rennet cheese fatty acid profile. Lipid complex supplementation of dairy cows produced considerable changes in the biological value of milk and cheese fat. PMID:26506539

  9. Studies on Chemical Composition, Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Five Thymus vulgaris L. Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Emilia; Senatore, Federica; Del Monte, Donato; De Martino, Laura; Grulova, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Mariarosa; Snoussi, Mejdi; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing the essential oil composition, total phenolic content, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Thymus vulgaris collected in five different area of the Campania Region, Southern Italy. The chemical composition of the essential oils was studied by GC-flame ionization detector (FID) and GC/MS; the biological activities were evaluated through determination of MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and evaluation of antioxidant activity. In total, 134 compounds were identified. The oils were mainly composed of phenolic compounds, and all oils belonged to the chemotype thymol. The antimicrobial activity of the five oils was assayed against ten bacterial strains. The oils showed different inhibitory activity against some Gram-positive pathogens. The total phenol content in the essential oils ranged from 77.6-165.1 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g. The results reported here may help to shed light on the complex chemotaxonomy of the genus Thymus. These oils could be used in many fields as natural preservatives of food and as nutraceuticals. PMID:26140436

  10. Chemical and isotopic composition of water from thermal springs and mineral springs of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, William C.

    1982-01-01

    Water from thermal springs of Washington range in chemical composition from dilute NaHC03, to moderately saline C02-charged NaHC03-Cl waters. St. Martin 's Hot Spring which discharges a slightly saline NaCl water, is the notable exception. Mineral springs generally discharge a moderately saline C02-charged NaHC03-Cl water. The dilute Na-HC03 waters are generally associated with granite. The warm to hot waters charged with C02 issue on or near the large stratovolcanoes and many of the mineral springs also occur near the large volcanoes. The dilute waters have oxygen isotopic compositions which indicate relatively little water-rock exchange. The C02-charged waters are usually more enriched in oxygen-18 due to more extensive water-rock reaction. Carbon-13 in the C02-charged thermal waters is more depleted (-10 to -12 permil) than in the cold C02-charged soda springs (-2 to -8 permil) which are also scattered throughout the Cascades. The hot and cold C02-charged waters are supersaturated with respect to CaC03, but only the hot springs are actively depositing CaC03. Baker, Gamma, Sulphur , and Ohanapecosh seem to be associated with thermal aquifers of more than 100C. (USGS)

  11. Chemical Compositional, Biological, and Safety Studies of a Novel Maple Syrup Derived Extract for Nutraceutical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Maple syrup has nutraceutical potential given the macronutrients (carbohydrates, primarily sucrose), micronutrients (minerals and vitamins), and phytochemicals (primarily phenolics) found in this natural sweetener. We conducted compositional (ash, fiber, carbohydrates, minerals, amino acids, organic acids, vitamins, phytochemicals), in vitro biological, and in vivo safety (animal toxicity) studies on maple syrup extracts (MSX-1 and MSX-2) derived from two declassified maple syrup samples. Along with macronutrient and micronutrient quantification, thirty-three phytochemicals were identified (by HPLC-DAD), and nine phytochemicals, including two new compounds, were isolated and identified (by NMR) from MSX. At doses of up to 1000 mg/kg/day, MSX was well tolerated with no signs of overt toxicity in rats. MSX showed antioxidant (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay) and anti-inflammatory (in RAW 264.7 macrophages) effects and inhibited glucose consumption (by HepG2 cells) in vitro. Thus, MSX should be further investigated for potential nutraceutical applications given its similarity in chemical composition to pure maple syrup. PMID:24983789

  12. Photothermal method for in situ microanalysis of the chemical composition of coal samples

    DOEpatents

    Amer, Nabil M. (Berkeley, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Successive minute regions (13) along a scan path on a coal sample (11) are individually analyzed, at a series of different depths if desired, to determine chemical composition including the locations, sizes and distributions of different maceral inclusions (12). A sequence of infrared light pulses (17) of progressively changing wavelengths is directed into each minute region (13) and a probe light beam (22) is directed along the sample surface (21) adjacent the region (13). Infrared wavelengths at which strong absorption occurs in the region (13) are identified by detecting the resulting deflections (.phi.) of the probe beam (22) caused by thermally induced index of refraction changes in the air or other medium (19) adjacent the region (13). The detected peak absorption wavelengths are correlated with known characteristic peak absorption wavelengths of specific coal constituents to identify the composition of each such minute region (13) of the sample (11). The method enables rapid, convenient and non-destructive analyses of coal specimens to facilitate mining, processing and utilization of coals.

  13. Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Aerosols Above a Pristine South East Asian Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, N. H.; Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; Coe, H.; Hamilton, J.; Chen, Q.; Martin, S.; Trembath, J.

    2009-04-01

    The tropics emit a huge amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the Earth's atmosphere. The processes by which these gases are oxidised to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are currently not well understood or quantified. Intensive field measurements were carried out as part of the Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes (OP3) and the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) projects around pristine rainforest in Malaysian Borneo. This is the first campaign of its type in a South East Asian rainforest. We present detailed organic aerosol composition measurements made using an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) at Bukit Atur, a Global Atmosphere Watch site located in the Danum Valley Conservation Area. This is a state-of-the-art field deployable instrument that can provide real time composition, mass loading and aerodynamic particle sizing information. In addition, the mass spectral resolution is sufficient to perform an analysis of the elemental composition of the organic species present. Other tools such as positive matrix factorisation (PMF) have been used to help assess the relative source contributions to the organic aerosol. A suite of supporting aerosol and gas phase measurements were made, including size resolved number concentration measurements with Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS), as well as absorption measurements made with a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP). The ground site data are compared with Aerodyne Compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) measurements made on the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft. Airborne measurements were made above pristine rainforest surrounding the Danum Valley site, as well as nearby oil palm agricultural sites and palm oil rendering plants. Airborne hygroscopicity was measured using a Droplet Measurement Technology Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (DMT CCN counter) in conjunction with a constant pressure inlet. The aerosols' chemical origins have been further investigated by comparing these spectra to chamber experiments, mass spectral libraries and data from comparable experiments in other locations. These data are also being analysed in conjunction with offline techniques applied to samples collected using filters and a Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler (PILS). Methods used include liquid chromatography and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time of flight mass spectrometry. These techniques provide a more detailed chemical characterisation of the SOA and water soluble organic carbon, allowing direct links back to gas phase precursors. In conjunction with the field measurements, a programme of chamber experiments is being carried out at Manchester as part of the ACES project. This will generate comparable SOA under controlled conditions and subjecting them to similar analysis.

  14. Some Chemical Compositional Changes in Miscanthus and White Oak Sawdust Samples During Torrefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright; J. Richard Hess

    2012-10-01

    Torrefaction tests on miscanthus and white oak sawdust were carried out in a bubbling sand bed reactor to see the effect of temperature and residence time on the chemical composition. Process conditions for miscanthus and white oak saw dust are 250–350°C and 30–120 minutes, and 220 and 270°C and 30 minutes, respectively. Composition of the torrefied samples studied includes moisture content and moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and volatiles. Torrefaction at 250°C and a residence time of 30 minutes resulted in a significant decrease in moisture—about 82.68%—but the other components, C, H, N, S, and V, changed only marginally. Increasing the torrefaction temperature to 350°C and residence time to 120 minutes further reduced the moisture to a final value of 0.54% (a 93.2% reduction compared to the original) and also resulted in a significant decrease in the other components, H, N, and V, by 58.29%, 14.28%, and 70.45%, respectively. The carbon content at 350°C and 120 minutes increased by about 4% and sulfur values were below detection limits. The H/C ratio decreased with an increase in torrefaction temperature, where a minimum value of 0.6 was observed at 350°C and 120 minutes. The regression equations developed with respect to torrefaction temperature and times have adequately described the changes in chemical composition based on r2 value. The surface plots developed based on the regression equations indicate that torrefaction temperatures of 300–350°C and residence times of 30–120 minutes can help increase carbon content to >49.4% and reduce moisture, nitrogen, volatile, and the H/C ratio from 1.13 to 0.6 %, 0.27 to 0.23 %, 79 to 23 %, and 1.3 to 0.6%, respectively. Torrefaction studies on white oak sawdust (woody biomass) at 220 and 270°C for 30 minutes indicated a similar trend where moisture, volatiles, hydrogen, and nitrogen decreased with increased torrefaction temperature from initial values of 8.53%, 80.75%, 5.91% and 0.17% to 1.79%, 66.31%, 4.67%, 0.16%, respectively; carbon content increased from 50.28 to 53.10%.

  15. Impact of apatite chemical composition on (U-Th)/He thermochronometry: An atomistic point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbongo Djimbi, Duval; Gautheron, Cécile; Roques, Jérôme; Tassan-Got, Laurent; Gerin, Chloé; Simoni, Eric

    2015-10-01

    The quantification of the different parameters influencing He diffusion in apatite is an important issue for the interpretation of (U-Th)/He thermochronometric ages. Key issues include understanding the role of chemical composition and the mechanism modifying diffusivity by radiation damage, both requiring a realistic description at the atomic level. In this contribution, we restrict ourselves on the influence of the chemical composition especially on the effect of Cl-atoms on the He diffusion in the damage-free apatite crystal. For this purpose, a multi-scale theoretical diffusion study has been conducted using periodic Density Functional Theory calculations for two different apatite compositions (pure fluorine apatite and apatite with one chlorine and 3 fluorine atoms per cell called Cl0.25-apatite) representative of damage-free crystals. Different He insertion sites and diffusion pathways are first investigated. The Density Functional Theory approach coupled to the Nudged Elastic Band method is used to determine the energy barriers between the insertion sites. A statistical method, based on Transition State Theory, is used to compute the jump rate between sites and the different results are used as output for a 3D random walk simulation, which determines the diffusion trajectories and the diffusion coefficients. The calculated diffusion coefficients for pure F-apatite exhibit a slightly anisotropic behavior with an activation energy Ea = 95.5 kJ/mol and a frequency factor D0 = 1.9 × 10-3 cm2/s along the c axis; Ea = 106.1 kJ/mol and D0 = 4.1 × 10-3 cm2/s in the plane orthogonal to c. Closure temperatures for a 60 ?m grain radius and 10 °C/Ma cooling rate range from 33 to 36 °C and depend on crystal geometry for a given grain size. Surprisingly, even though He diffusion is strongly blocked across the Cl atoms in Cl0.25-apatite, where Ea is significantly higher (166.7 kJ/mol), He atoms can still diffuse along the c axis through workaround pathways. Closure temperatures are dependent on the Cl content in the crystal lattice and can be ?12 °C higher for Cl0.25-apatite than for F-apatite. These results show that various Cl contents lead to a more He retentive diffusivity in addition to their impact on damage-annealing rate. The results of this study are in good agreement with experimental results and demonstrate that a proper Density Functional Theory treatment allows to characterize He diffusion in damage-free apatite. This opens new avenues to a reliable method of quantifying rare gas diffusion in mineral structures.

  16. All-year-round aerosol chemical composition at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udisti, Roberto; Becagli, Silvia; Frosini, Daniele; Galli, Gaia; Ghedini, Costanza; Rugi, Francesco; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita

    2010-05-01

    Since 2005, continuous, all-year-round aerosol sampling was carried out at Dome C (Central East Antarctica, 3233 m a.s.l., about 1100 km far from the coastline), in the framework of "Station Concordia" project, an Italian PNRA - French IPEV joint program. Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected in summer and winter periods by using different low- and medium-volume systems, including pre-selected cut-off samplers (with PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 cut-off heads) and multi-stage (Andersen 8-stage and Dekati 4-stage) impactors. Sampling resolution and volumes ranged from 1 day to 1 month and from 2.3 to 12 m3/h, respectively. Aerosol study at Dome C is expected improving our knowledge on present-day source intensity, transport efficiency and pathways (including stratosphere-troposphere interchanges) of particles reaching internal sites of Antarctica. Besides, more detailed information on atmosphere-snow interactions, including depositional and post-depositional processes, as well as the effect of sublimation/condensation processes on snow surface, will be used for improving the reconstruction of past atmosphere composition from ice core chemical stratigraphies (EPICA Dome C ice core). Here we report major results from the chemical composition of the Antarctic background aerosol reaching Dome C, pointing out the seasonal pattern and the temporal trend of some ionic components used as tracers of sea spray, marine biogenic and crustal emissions. Oxidised sulfur compounds are assumed to affect the climate system by influencing the Earth's radiative budget, both directly (solar light scattering) and indirectly (acting as cloud condensation nuclei). Among these compounds, methanesulphonic acid (MSA) and H2SO4 (arising from the atmospheric oxidation of phytoplanktonic dimethylsulphide - DMS), are considered the best tracers of marine productivity. Their use as reliable markers of oceanic biogenic emissions is hindered by poorly known mechanisms (temperature and photochemistry induced) controlling the MSA-H2SO4 ratio from DMS. Since, in summer, DMS in route toward central Antarctica is subjected to larger atmospheric concentrations of OH (and/or BrO) radical, lower temperatures and lower humidity, all conditions promoting the preferential H2SO4 formation, non-sea-salt sulphate is assumed to be the most reliable biogenic marker at Dome C. A further insight from ice-core stratigraphies is concerning the sea salt sodium (ssNa) content in snow precipitation as a reliable marker of sea-ice extent, via frost-flower formation at the pack-ice seasonal growth. This interpretation faces with the classical view that consider higher sea-spray production as caused by an increase in zonal wind intensity. Sea spray originated from frost flowers can be distinguished from sea spray coming from bulk sea-water by the lower sulphate/sodium ratio (caused by mirabilite - Na2SO4 10H20 - precipitation occurring when sea-ice temperature falls below -8°C). High resolution aerosol measurement can allow to identify different sea-spray sources and quantify frost flowers contribution to the annual ssNa budget. Finally, dust recorded in ice cores can be used as a valuable proxy for changes in hydrological cycles in the dust source areas and transport processes (pathways and scavenging). The geochemical characterization of dust in the present-day aerosol, compared with chemical composition of soils collected in South America and Australia, allows identifying the major dust source area (South America) and reconstructing pathways of atmospheric circulation. South America role in feeding dust aerosol at Dome C was supported also by comparing aerosol composition with satellite observations (dust plumes on the source sites) and back-trajectory analysis (air masses reaching Antarctica) during massive dust-storm events.

  17. Chemical Ecology: Chemical Communication in Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, William F.

    1983-01-01

    Substances that deliver chemical messages between same/different species are called semiochemicals. Surveyed are three types of semiochemicals (pheromones, allomones, and kairomones), types of organisms involved, and specific chemicals used to carry the various kinds of messages. (JN)

  18. Direct aerosol chemical composition measurements to evaluate the physicochemical differences between controlled sea spray aerosol generation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. B.; Zhao, D. F.; Ruppel, M. J.; Laskina, O.; Grandquist, J. R.; Modini, R. L.; Stokes, M. D.; Russell, L. M.; Bertram, T. H.; Grassian, V. H.; Deane, G. B.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Controlled laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of sea spray aerosol (SSA) must be under-pinned by a physically and chemically accurate representation of the bubble-mediated production of nascent SSA particles. Bubble bursting is sensitive to the physico-chemical properties of seawater. For a sample of seawater, any important differences in the SSA production mechanism are projected into the composition of the aerosol particles produced. Using direct chemical measurements of SSA at the single-particle level, this study presents an intercomparison of three laboratory-based, bubble-mediated SSA production schemes: gas forced through submerged sintered glass filters ("frits"), a pulsed plunging-waterfall apparatus, and breaking waves in a wave channel filled with natural seawater. The size-resolved chemical composition of SSA particles produced by breaking waves is more similar to particles produced by the plunging waterfall than those produced by sintered glass filters. Aerosol generated by disintegrating foam produced by sintered glass filters contained a larger fraction of organic-enriched particles and a different size-resolved elemental composition, especially in the 0.8-2 ?m dry diameter range. Interestingly, chemical differences between the methods only emerged when the particles were chemically analyzed at the single-particle level as a function of size; averaging the elemental composition of all particles across all sizes masked the differences between the SSA samples. When dried, SSA generated by the sintered glass filters had the highest fraction of particles with spherical morphology compared to the more cubic structure expected for pure NaCl particles produced when the particle contains relatively little organic carbon. In addition to an intercomparison of three SSA production methods, the role of the episodic or "pulsed" nature of the waterfall method on SSA composition was under-taken. In organic-enriched seawater, the continuous operation of the plunging waterfall resulted in the accumulation of surface foam and an over-expression of organic matter in SSA particles compared to those produced by a pulsed plunging waterfall. Throughout this set of experiments, comparative differences in the SSA number size distribution were coincident with differences in aerosol particle composition, indicating that the production mechanism of SSA exerts important controls on both the physical and chemical properties of the resulting aerosol with respect to both the internal and external mixing state of particles. This study provides insight into the inextricable physicochemical differences between each of the bubble-mediated SSA generation mechanisms tested and the aerosol particles that they produce, and also serves as a guideline for future laboratory studies of SSA particles.

  19. Equilibria in Chemical Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-01-01

    SOLGASMIX-PV calculates equilibrium relationships in complex chemical systems. Chemical equilibrium calculations involve finding the system composition, within certain constraints, which contains the minimum free energy. The constraints are the preservation of the masses of each element present and either constant pressure or volume. SOLGASMIX-PV can calculate equilibria in systems containing a gaseous phase, condensed phase solutions, and condensed phases of invariant and variable stoichiometry. Either a constant total gas volume or a constant total pressuremore »can be assumed. Unit activities for condensed phases and ideality for solutions are assumed, although nonideal systems can be handled provided activity coefficient relationships are available.« less

  20. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils from Cleome spinosa.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Megil J; Porter, Roy B R; Williams, Lawrence A D; Rainford, Lois

    2010-08-01

    Five different essential oil extractions of the aerial parts of Cleome spinosa Jacq. were examined. The oils obtained by hydrodistillation of the whole aerial parts, aerial parts without flowers (fruit, leaves and stem), flowers, fruits and leaves have been examined by GC-FID and GC-MS. The chemical profiles of the oils reveal the dominance of oxygenated sesqui- and diterpenes, with the exception of the fruit oil, which contained a high content of fatty acids. The most abundant compounds from the whole aerial parts were (Z)-phytol (31.3%), integerrimine (5.5%) and incensole (4.0%). The major compounds from the aerial portion without flowers were caryophyllene oxide (10.5%), (-)-spathulenol (7.5%) and Z-phytol (6.9%). In the flower oil, the main components were 7-alpha-hydroxy manool (23.8%), incensole (9.2%) and sclareol (8.7%). The chief constituents in the fruit oil were tetradecanoic acid (40.6%), (Z)-phytol (6.58%) and sclareol (4.5%). In the leaf oil, (Z)-phytol (19.5%), 7-alpha-hydroxy manool (6.8%) and caryophyllene oxide (4.36%) were the predominant compounds. Antimicrobial activity of the oil obtained from the whole aerial part was evaluated against nine microbial strains using a filter paper disc-diffusion method. The volatile oil showed moderate action against seven of the eight bacteria strains used, with significant inhibitory activity against Streptococcus pyogenes Group A when compared with the standard antibiotics, ampicillin and gentamicin. The fungus, Candida albicans was less sensitive to the essential oil. The oils showed moderate insecticidal activity against Cylas formicarius elegantalus, but possessed no antioxidant activity as indicated by the DPPH method. This represents the first report on the chemical composition of the essential oils from C. spinosa found in Jamaica and the in vitro antioxidant, insecticidal and antimicrobial potential of the oil from the aerial parts. PMID:20839641

  1. Chemical composition of rainwater in the Yulong Snow Mountain region, Southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hewen; He, Yuanqing; Lu, Xi Xi; Shen, Jie; Du, Jiankuo; Zhang, Tao; Pu, Tao; Xin, Huijuan; Chang, Li

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated the chemical composition of rainwater samples in the Mt. Yulong region, southeastern Tibetan Plateau. A total of 176 rainwater samples were collected from Lijiang City and Ganhaizi Basin in the study area. All samples were analyzed for total dissolved solids (TDS), conductivity, pH, major cations (Na+, K+, NH4+, Ca2 +, Mg2 +) and anions (F-, SO42 -, Cl-, NO3-). The daily rainwater pH values ranged from 4.55 to 7.43, with an average value of 5.95 for the region. High values of pH were attributed to the neutralization by natural alkaline of local dust particles with rich CaCO3. The average total dissolved solid was 5.27 mg/L, and the EC ranged between 2.14 and 57.2 ?s cm- 1 with an average value of 11.5 ?s cm- 1. These parameters indicated low chemical concentrations in the rainwater. The major ions showed relatively high Ca2 +, SO42 -, and NH4+ concentrations, accounting for 40%, 25%, and 16% of the total ion mass, respectively. Linear regression analysis confirmed that the rainwater pH was mainly controlled by the species of SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+ and Ca2 +. Factor component analysis applied to the studied variables indicated that the extracted three components accounted for 90% of the total variance for Ganhaizi Basin, and the extracted two components accounted for 73% of the total variance for Lijiang City. The study identified association of the three ion groups: Ca2 +, Mg2 +, K+ and F-, related to the origins of crustal sources; NH4+, SO42 - and NO3- associated with local anthropogenic activities (agriculture, biomass burning, vehicle emissions), and Cl- and part of Na+ related to the contribution of sea salts from long-range atmospheric transport.

  2. Chemical composition and source signature of spring aerosol in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae C.; Lee, Meehye; Chun, Youngsin; Kim, Jiyoung; Oh, Sungnam

    2001-08-01

    The measurement of atmospheric aerosol was made in Seoul during the spring of 1998. The objective of this study was to investigate the chemical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol with an emphasis on the effect of Asian dust. Total suspended particles (TSP) and particles smaller than 10 ?m (PM10) were collected during March-May 1998. For PM10, water-soluble ions and trace elements were analyzed: NO3-, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Fe, Mn, Cr, Co, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb. All data were sorted into three groups on the basis of the intensity of Asian dust observed in Seoul: nondust, regular dust, and heavy dust. Chemical characteristics of aerosol were distinct for the heavy dust incidence compared to the other two cases. The average mass concentration of TSP and PM10 increased substantially during the heavy dust period. For water-soluble ions, concentrations of SO42- and NO3- were the lowest, whereas Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations were remarkably enhanced. Concentrations and mass fraction of crustal elements such as Na, Mg, Ca, Fe, and Mn were highly elevated, but those of pollution-derived heavy metals were appreciably decreased. Enrichment ratios of metallic components indicated that soil dust was the primary source of spring aerosols over Seoul. This was also confirmed by factor analysis. Trajectory analysis provided a convincing evidence for the air mass coming from the Asian desert areas, which are the source region of mineral dust. In contrast, the anthropogenic influence was more pronounced for the regular dust period: concentrations of heavy metals, NO3-, and SO42- were the highest. It could be associated with the transport of air mass over the industrialized regions of China, which is demonstrated by backward trajectory analysis. The result of factor analysis with high factor loadings in SO42- and NO3- implied the considerable influence of industrial emission on the composition of all spring aerosols over Korea.

  3. Chemical composition and sources of organic aerosols over London from the ClearfLo 2012 campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finessi, Emanuela; Holmes, Rachel; Hopkins, James; Lee, James; Harrison, Roy; Hamilton, Jacqueline

    2014-05-01

    Air quality in urban areas represents a major public health issue with around one third of the European population concentrated in cities and numbers expected to increase at global scale, particularly in developing countries. Particulate matter (PM) represents a primary threat for human health as numerous studies have confirmed the association between increased levels of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases with the exposure to PM. Despite considerable efforts made in improving air quality and progressively stricter emissions regulations, the PM concentrations have not changed much over the past decades for reasons that remain unclear, and highlight that studies on PM source apportionment are required for the formulation of effective policy. We investigated the chemical composition of organic aerosol (OA) collected during two intensive field campaigns held in winter and summer 2012 in the frame of the project Clean air for London (http://www.clearflo.ac.uk/). PM samples were collected both at a city background site (North Kensington) and at a rural site 50 km southeast of London (Detling) with 8 to 24 hours sampling schedule and analysed using off-line methods. Thermal-optical analysis was used to quantify OC-EC components while a suite of soft ionization mass spectrometric techniques was deployed for detailed chemical characterization. Liquid chromatography mass Spectrometry (LC-MSn) was mostly used for the simultaneous detection and quantification of various tracers for both primary and secondary OA sources. Well-established markers for wood burning primary OA like levoglucosan and azelaic acid were quantified together with various classes of nitroaromatics including methyl-nitrocatechols that are potential tracers for wood burning secondary OA. In addition, oxidation products of biogenic VOCs such as isoprene and monoterpenes were also quantified for both seasons and sites. A non-negligible contribution from biogenic SOA to urban OA was found in summertime measurements. It is hoped that these data will provide an insight into the sources and chemical processing of organic aerosol in London and help to evaluate the effects of this megacity on the surrounding areas.

  4. Chemical composition and larvicidal activity of essential oil from Mentha spicata (Linn.) against three mosquito species.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, M; Sivakumar, R; Rajeswari, M; Yogalakshmi, K

    2012-05-01

    Mosquitoes are blood-feeding insects and serve as the most important vectors for spreading human diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, dengue fever, and filariasis. The continued use of synthetic insecticides has resulted in resistance in mosquitoes. Synthetic insecticides are toxic and affect the environment by contaminating soil, water, and air, and then natural products may be an alternative to synthetic insecticides because they are effective, biodegradable, eco-friendly, and safe to environment. Botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. Mentha spicata, an edible and medicinal plant, is chiefly distributed in Southeast Asia and South Asia. In the present study, the toxicity of mosquito larvicidal activity of leaf essential oil (EO) and their major chemical constituents from Mentha spicata against Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Anopheles stephensi. The chemical composition of the leaf EO was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). GC-MS revealed that the EO of M. spicata contained 18 compounds. The major chemical components identified were carvone (48.60%), cis-carveol (21.30%), and limonene (11.30%). The EO had a significant toxic effect against early third-stage larvae of C. quinquefasciatus, A. aegypti, and A. stephensi with LC(50) values of 62.62, 56.08, and 49.71 ppm and LC(90) values of 118.70, 110.28, and 100.99 ppm, respectively. The three major pure constituents extracted from the M. spicata leaf EO were also tested individually against three mosquito larvae. The LC(50) values of carvone, cis-carveol, and limonene appeared to be most effective against A. stephensi (LC(50) 19.33, 28.50, and 8.83 ppm) followed by A. aegypti (LC(50) 23.69, 32.88, and 12.01 ppm), and C. quinquefasciatus (LC(50) 25.47, 35.20, and 14.07 ppm). The results could be useful in search for newer, safer, and more effective natural larvicidal agents against C. quinquefasciatus, A. aegypti, and A. stephensi. PMID:22139403

  5. The Chemical Engineer in the Chemical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabicky, Jacob

    1986-01-01

    Describes a course for third- or fourth-year chemical engineering students designed to acquaint them with the chemical industry. The course deals with productivity, characteristics of the chemical industry, sources of information, industrial intelligence, research and development, patent law, technology transfer, and quality control. (TW)

  6. BULK CHEMICAL AND ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF SPINEL-, HIBONITE-RICH SPHERULES: CLUES TO THEIR ORIGIN. S. B. Simon1

    E-print Network

    BULK CHEMICAL AND ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF SPINEL-, HIBONITE-RICH SPHERULES: CLUES TO THEIR ORIGIN.uchicago.edu) Introduction: Melilite-free, spinel-, hibonite- bearing spherules, a major type of refractory inclusion in CM2 hibonite and before spinel, and that hibonite should react completely with the gas to form spinel. Despite

  7. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76...

  8. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76...

  9. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76...

  10. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76...

  11. Chemically anchored NiOxcarbon composite fibers for Li-ion batteries with long cycle-life and

    E-print Network

    Cao, Guozhong

    Ox nanoparticles are anchored on N-doped carbon fibers by chemical bonds with controlled concentration of NiOx, and the fibers interweave into hierarchical structured networks. It is demonstrated that these NiOx nanoparticlesO­gra- phene commonly began with nickel salts and graphene oxide, and the resultant NiO­graphene composites

  12. Chemical Composition of Gas-Phase Organic Carbon Emissions from Motor Vehicles and Implications for Ozone Production

    E-print Network

    Goldstein, Allen

    -based, single vehicle dynamometer testing, and on-road measurements in roadway tunnels.3-12 Emission factorsChemical Composition of Gas-Phase Organic Carbon Emissions from Motor Vehicles and Implications States § Aerosol Dynamics Inc., Berkeley, California 94710, United States Aerodyne Research, Inc

  13. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy reveals a convergence of the chemical composition in methanogenic archaea from a Siberian permafrost-affected soil.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Paloma; Hermelink, Antje; Lasch, Peter; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; König, Nicole; Burckhardt, Oliver; Wagner, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Methanogenic archaea are widespread anaerobic microorganisms responsible for the production of biogenic methane. Several new species of psychrotolerant methanogenic archaea were recently isolated from a permafrost-affected soil in the Lena Delta (Siberia, Russia), showing an exceptional resistance against desiccation, osmotic stress, low temperatures, starvation, UV and ionizing radiation when compared to methanogens from non-permafrost environments. To gain a deeper insight into the differences observed in their resistance, we described the chemical composition of methanogenic strains from permafrost and non-permafrost environments using confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRM). CRM is a powerful tool for microbial identification and provides fingerprint-like information about the chemical composition of the cells. Our results show that the chemical composition of methanogens from permafrost-affected soils presents a high homology and is remarkably different from strains inhabiting non-permafrost environments. In addition, we performed a phylogenetic reconstruction of the studied strains based on the functional gene mcrA to prove the different evolutionary relationship of the permafrost strains. We conclude that the permafrost methanogenic strains show a convergent chemical composition regardless of their genotype. This fact is likely to be the consequence of a complex adaptive process to the Siberian permafrost environment and might be the reason underlying their resistant nature. PMID:26499486

  14. The impact of horizontal transport on the chemical composition in the tropopause region: lightning NOx and streamers

    E-print Network

    The impact of horizontal transport on the chemical composition in the tropopause region: lightning of the region of the extra-tropical tropopause is influenced by chemistry and transport processes of either their importance for the ozone budget in the tropopause region. First, the transport and chemistry of nitrogen

  15. Targeting and impacts of AgI cloud seeding based on rain chemical composition and cloud top phase characterization

    E-print Network

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Targeting and impacts of AgI cloud seeding based on rain chemical composition and cloud top phase seeding enhanced rainfall in Northern Israel. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Cloud seeding Silver iodide (AgI) Rain chemistry Satellite images 1. Introduction Cloud seeding with AgI has

  16. Effect of wheat forage maturity and preservation method on forage chemical composition and performance of growing calves fed mixed diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three 2.4-ha wheat (Triticum aestivum L) fields were used to test the effects of maturity at harvest (boot vs dough) and preservation method (hay vs silage) on forage yield, chemical composition, and animal performance when fed in mixed diets. Forages were incorporated into 4 diets in a 2 x 2 factor...

  17. Chemical composition of five commercial gynostemma pentaphyllum samples and their radical scavenging, antiproliferative, and anti-inflammatory properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five Gynostemma pentaphyllum (GP) samples were investigated: their chemical composition and their antioxidant, antiproliferative, and anti-inflammatory effects were compared. Extracts (50% acetone, 75% ethanol, and 100% ethanol) of the five GP samples (GP1-5) differed in their total phenolic, sapon...

  18. Deposition of silicon carbide using the chemical vapor composites process: Process characterization and comparison with RASSPVDN model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Hurt, R.H.; Yang, N. ); Reagan, P.; Robbins, M. )

    1993-07-01

    In this work, we explore the use of the chemical vapor composites (CVC) process to increase the rates of silicon carbide (SiC) growth on graphite substrates. Large SiC seed particles are used that deposit by gravity-driven sedimentation. The results show that addition of large ([ital d][sub [ital p

  19. The effect of local sources on particle size and chemical composition and their role in aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portin, H.; Leskinen, A.; Hao, L.; Kortelainen, A.; Miettinen, P.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Komppula, M.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of local pollutant sources and particle chemical composition on aerosol-cloud interactions were investigated by measuring cloud interstitial and total aerosol size distributions, particle chemical composition and hygroscopic growth factors and cloud droplet size distributions on an observation tower, with a special focus on comparing clean air masses with those affected by local sources. The polluted air masses contained more particles than the clean air masses in all size classes, excluding the accumulation mode. This was caused by cloud processing, which was also observed for the polluted air but to a lesser extent. Some, mostly minor, differences in the particle chemical composition between the air masses were observed. The average size and number concentration of activating particles were quite similar for both air masses, producing average droplet populations with only minor distinctions. As a case study, a long cloud event was analyzed in detail regarding emissions from local sources, including a paper mill and a heating plant. Clear differences in the total and accumulation mode particle concentrations, particle hygroscopicity and chemical composition during the cloud event were observed. Particularly, larger particles, higher hygroscopicities and elevated amounts of inorganic constituents, especially SO4, were linked with the pollutant plumes. In the air masses affected by traffic and domestic wood combustion, a bimodal particle hygroscopicity distribution was observed, indicating externally mixed aerosol. The variable conditions during the event had a clear impact on cloud droplet formation.

  20. Chemical Composition of Micrometer-Sized Filaments in an Aragonite Host by a Miniature Laser Ablation/Ionization Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tulej, Marek; Neubeck, Anna; Ivarsson, Magnus; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B; Meyer, Stefan; Wurz, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Detection of extraterrestrial life is an ongoing goal in space exploration, and there is a need for advanced instruments and methods for the detection of signatures of life based on chemical and isotopic composition. Here, we present the first investigation of chemical composition of putative microfossils in natural samples using a miniature laser ablation/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LMS). The studies were conducted with high lateral (?15??m) and vertical (?20-200?nm) resolution. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the instrument performance on micrometer-sized samples both in terms of isotope abundance and element composition. The following objectives had to be achieved: (1) Consider the detection and calculation of single stable isotope ratios in natural rock samples with techniques compatible with their employment of space instrumentation for biomarker detection in future planetary missions. (2) Achieve a highly accurate chemical compositional map of rock samples with embedded structures at the micrometer scale in which the rock matrix is easily distinguished from the micrometer structures. Our results indicate that chemical mapping of strongly heterogeneous rock samples can be obtained with a high accuracy, whereas the requirements for isotope ratios need to be improved to reach sufficiently large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). PMID:26247475

  1. Chemical composition of rainwater in a karstic agricultural area, Southwest China: The impact of urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qixin; Han, Guilin; Tao, Faxiang; Tang, Yang

    2012-07-01

    The chemical composition of rainwater has been studied in a karstic agricultural area, Southwest China. Rainwater pH and major ions were measured in samples collected from the town of Puding, Guizhou province, during the rainy season, between March and October 2008. The pH of samples varied between 4.6 and 7.1, with a volume-weighted mean (VWM) of 5.4. These relatively high-pH values do not signify a lack of acid components in the precipitation; instead, they demonstrate neutralization of acidity. Ca2+ and NH4+ were the dominant cations in the rainwater, with VWM concentrations of 156 and 33 ?eq/L, respectively. SO42- was the predominant anion, with a VWM concentration of 152 ?eq/L, followed by NO3- (17 ?eq/L). Our results show that most of the acidity in the collected samples was neutralized by Ca2+-rich alkaline soil dusts. We compared our findings with other areas of China that experience acid rain. The concentration of ions in Puding rainwater generally exceeded that reported in southern China but was lower than in northern China. This is probably due to karst rock desertification, which could provide the atmosphere with a source of alkaline dust. From back-trajectory analysis, correlation studies, and a comparison of major ion composition with other selected sites worldwide, we conclude that the rainwater ion composition of Puding is more significantly influenced by terrestrial and anthropogenic sources (mainly due to industrial and traffic emissions in surrounding large cities), rather than by marine sources.

  2. CHEMICAL SAFETY ALERTS-

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Safety Alerts are short publications which explain specific hazards that have become evident through chemical accident investigation efforts. EPA has produced over a dozen Alerts to date. This year's Alert: Managing Chemical Reactivity Hazards

  3. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng (Irvine, CA); Sui, Guodong (Los Angeles, CA); Elizarov, Arkadij (Valley Village, CA); Kolb, Hartmuth C. (Playa del Rey, CA); Huang, Jiang (San Jose, CA); Heath, James R. (South Pasadena, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Los Angeles, CA); Quake, Stephen R. (Stanford, CA); Tseng, Hsian-rong (Los Angeles, CA); Wyatt, Paul (Tipperary, IE); Daridon, Antoine (Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH)

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  4. Z .Marine Chemistry 64 1999 229252 The chemical composition of shallow-water hydrothermal fluids

    E-print Network

    Pichler, Thomas

    water along the inner shelf that contains a Z .patchy distribution of coral­algal reefs. Two types in varying proportions. A two- or possibly three-step process controls fluid evolution and final Z .chemical

  5. Aqueous fluid composition in CI chondritic materials: Chemical equilibrium assessments in closed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.

    2012-08-01

    Solids of nearly solar composition have interacted with aqueous fluids on carbonaceous asteroids, icy moons, and trans-neptunian objects. These processes altered mineralogy of accreted materials together with compositions of aqueous and gaseous phases. We evaluated chemistry of aqueous solutions coexisted with CI-type chondritic solids through calculations of chemical equilibria in closed water-rock-gas systems at different compositions of initial fluids, water/rock mass ratios (0.1-1000), temperatures (<350 °C), and pressures (<2 kbars). The calculations show that fluid compositions are mainly affected by solubilities of solids, the speciation of chlorine in initial water-rock mixtures, and the occurrence of Na-bearing secondary minerals such as saponite. The major species in modeled alkaline solutions are Na+, Cl-, CO32-,HCO3-, K+, OH-, H2, and CO2. Aqueous species of Mg, Fe, Ca, Mn, Al, Ni, Cr, S, and P are not abundant in these fluids owing to low solubility of corresponding solids. Typical NaCl type alkaline fluids coexist with saponite-bearing mineralogy that usually present in aqueously altered chondrites. A common occurrence of these fluids is consistent with the composition of grains emitted from Enceladus. Na-rich fluids with abundant CO32-,HCO3-, and OH- anions coexist with secondary mineralogy depleted in Na. The Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 type fluids could form via accretion of cometary ices. NaOH type fluids form in reduced environments and may locally occur on parent bodies of CR carbonaceous chondrites. Supposed melting of accreted HCl-bearing ices leads to early acidic fluids enriched in Mg, Fe and other metals, consistent with signs of low-pH alteration in chondrites. Neutralization of these solutions leads to alkaline Na-rich fluids. Sulfate species have negligible concentrations in closed systems, which remain reduced, especially at elevated pressures created by forming H2 gas. Hydrogen, CO2, and H2O dominate in the gaseous phase, though the abundance of methane cannot be fairly estimated.

  6. Chemical Management System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-10-30

    CMS provides an inventory of all chemicals on order or being held in the laboratory, to provide a specific location for all chemical containers, to ensure that health and safety regulatory codes are being upheld, and to provide PNNL staff with hazardous chemical information to better manage their inventories. CMS is comprised of five major modules: 1) chemical purchasing, 2) chemical inventory, 3) chemical names, properties, and hazard groups, 4) reporting, and 5) system administration.

  7. Aerosol optical properties measured on board the Ronald H. Brown during ACE-Asia as a function of aerosol chemical composition and

    E-print Network

    chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 0365 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Troposphere

  8. Effect of rotation, site, and clone on the chemical composition of Populus hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Blanckenhorn, P.R.; Bowersox, T.W.; Kuklewski, K.M.; Stimely, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical content values were determined for three Populus clones grown on two dissimilar sites by component (wood, bark, and wood/bark specimens), tissue age (1-, 2- and 4-year-old), and rotation. The chemical content values obtained included extractives, holocellulose, ..alpha..-cellulose, and lignin. In general, analysis of the data for the wood, bark, and wood/bark specimens indicated that: 1) wood was high in holocellulose and ..alpha..-cellulose content compared to bark, 2) bark was high in lignin and extractive content values compared to wood, and 3) wood/bark chemical content values were between the values for the wood and bark specimens. The chemical content data were analyzed to identify: 1) significant differences between rotations by component (wood, bark and wood/bark) for a given age, clone, and site, and 2) significant differences between sites for four-year-old wood, bark and wood/bark specimens of a given rotation, and clone. Statistical analyses indicated that significant differences existed among clones, sites, ages, and rotations. Within the wood, bark and wood/bark specimens, tissue age, rotation, and site influenced the chemical content values more than the parentage. Potential chemical yields derived from the three Populus hybrid clones investigated will depend on component, age, rotation, and site with limited parentage effects.

  9. Chemical composition of strata of the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, J.R.; Grauch, R.I.; Siems, D.F.; Tysdal, R.G.; Johnson, E.A.; Zielinski, R.A.; Desborough, G.A.; Knudsen, A.; Gunter, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    This study, one in a series, reports bulk chemical composition of rock samples collected from a core, referred to as Measured Section J, drilled at a site that subsequently was developed into the Enoch Valley phosphate mine in southeastern Idaho. The core is continuous and cuts through the entire thickness of the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Phosphoria Formation. The steeply dipping Meade Peak extends from 182 to 495 feet below the ground surface, which is the greatest below-ground depth of rock that has been sampled to date. The core was drilled before the start of mining, and the rocks consequently have not been exposed to the atmosphere or surficial weathering processes or fractured as a result of mining as are the rocks from other described sections. Hence, this section of the Meade Peak in the core is the least altered section of this member sampled in this series of studies. The channel-sampled rocks from Section J form a set of contiguous intervals across the entire thickness of the Meade Peak. These channel samples characterize?in ascending order?the lower phosphate ore, interlayered middle waste shale, upper phosphate ore, and upper waste shale units of the member. The Section J channel-sample suite includes 3 composite samples of the uppermost 7 feet of the Grandeur Tongue of the Permian Park City Formation, a dolomitic unit that directly underlies the Meade Peak. It also includes an analysis of a 0.1 foot section of chert directly overlying the Meade Peak. The concentrations of the chemical elements in the channel samples are compared with those of Measured Sections Aand B that were obtained from the same mine. In addition to the channel samples, 85 rock samples were selected from the core to address specific geochemical questions that resulted from examination of the core. For example, several of these samples correspond to cored rock that had unusual concentrations of various elements that were determined using a hand-held, x-ray fluorescence instrument. Other individual samples consist of several samples taken within a short interval of the core that leads to an abrupt change in lithology. Overall, the rocks from Measured Section J exhibit the least alteration from interaction with ground water compared with rocks from any of the measured sections that have been described in our previous studies.

  10. Polymeric inserts differing in their chemical composition as substrates for dendritic cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Roch, Toralf; Kratz, Karl; Ma, Nan; Lendlein, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) contribute to immunity by presenting antigens to T cells and shape the immune response by the secretion of cytokines. Due to their immune stimulatory potential DC-based therapies are promising approaches to overcome tolerance e.g. against tumors. In order to enforce the immunogenicity of DCs, they have to be matured and activated in vitro, which requires an appropriate cell culture substrate, supporting their survival expansion and activation.Since most cell culture devices are not optimized for DC growth, it is hypothesized that polymers with certain physicochemical properties can positively influence the DC cultures. With the aim to evaluate the effects that polymers with different chemical compositions have on the survival, the activation status, and the cytokine/chemokine secretion profile of DC, their interaction with polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), poly(ether imide) (PEI), and poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (PSAN)-based cell culture inserts was investigated. By using this insert system, which fits exactly into 24 well cell culture plates, effects induced from the culture dish material can be excluded. The viability of untreated DC after incubation with the different inserts was not influenced by the different inserts, whereas LPS-activated DC showed an increased survival after cultivation on PC, PS, and PSAN compared to tissue culture polystyrene (TCP). The activation status of DC estimated by the expression of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression was not altered by the different inserts in untreated DC but slightly reduced when LPS-activated DC were cultivated on PC, PS, PSAN, and PEI compared to TCP. For each polymeric cell culture insert a distinct cytokine profile could be observed.Since inserts with different chemical compositions of the inserts did not substantially alter the behavior of DC all insert systems could be considered as alternative substrate. The observed increased survival on some polymers, which showed in contrast to TCP a hydrophobic surface, could be beneficial for certain applications such as T cell expansion and activation. PMID:26444616

  11. Variation of chemical composition in Australasian tektites from different localities in Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amare, Kassa; Koeberl, Christian

    2006-01-01

    One hundred and thirteen Australasian tektites from Vietnam (Hanoi, Vinh, Dalat, and Saigon areas) were analyzed for their major and trace element contents. The tektites are either of splash form or Muong Nong-type. The splash-form tektites have SiO2 contents ranging from 69.7 to 76.8 wt%, whereas Muong Nong-type tektites, which are considerably larger than splash-form tektites and have a blocky and chunky appearance, have slightly higher silica contents in the range of 74-81 wt%. Major-element relationships, such as FeO versus major oxides, Na2O versus K2O, and oxide ratio plots, were used to distinguish the different groups of the tektites. In addition, correlation coefficients have been calculated for each tektite group of this study. Many chemical similarities are noted between Hanoi and Vinh tektites from the north of Vietnam, except that the Hanoi tektites contain higher contents of CaO than Vinh; the higher content of CaO might be due to some carbonate parent material. Both Dalat and Saigon tektites have nearly similar composition, whereas the bulk chemistries of the tektites from Hanoi and Vinh appear different from those of Saigon and Dalat. There are differences, especially in the lower CaO and Na2O and higher MgO, FeO, for the tektites of Dalat and Saigon in comparison to that of Hanoi tektites. Furthermore, the Dalat and Saigon tektites show enrichments by factors of 3 and 2 for the Ni and Cr contents, respectively, compared to those of Hanoi and Vinh. The difference in chemistry between the North Vietnam tektites (Hanoi, Vinh) to that of South Vietnam tektites (Saigon, Dalat) of this study indicate that the parent material was heterogeneous and possibly mixing between different source rocks took place. Muong Nong-type tektites are enriched in the volatile elements such as Br, Zn, As, and Sb compared to the average splash-form tektites of this study. The chemical compositions of the average splash-form and Muong Nong-type tektites of this study closely resemble published data for average splash-form and Muong Nong-type indochinites, indicating that they have the same source. The trace element ratios Ba/Rb (2.7), Th/U (5.2), Th/Sc (1.3), Th/Sm (2.2), and the rare earth element (REE) abundances of this study show close similarities to those of average upper continental crust.

  12. Chemical inhomogeneities and pulsation

    E-print Network

    S. Turcotte

    2001-11-08

    Major improvements in models of chemically peculiar stars have been achieved in the past few years. With these new models it has been possible to test quantitatively some of the processes involved in the formation of abundance anomalies and their effect on stellar structure. The models of metallic A (Am) stars have shown that a much deeper mixing has to be present to account for observed abundance anomalies. This has implications on their variability, which these models also reproduce qualitatively. These models also have implications for other chemically inhomogeneous stars such as HgMn B stars which are not known to be variable and lambda Bootis stars which can be. The study of the variability of chemically inhomogeneous stars can provide unique information on the dynamic processes occurring in many types of stars in addition to modeling of the evolution of their surface composition.

  13. Frost flowers growing in the Arctic ocean-atmosphere-sea ice-snow interface: 1. Chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Thomas A.; Domine, Florent; Barret, Manuel; Anastasio, Cort; Beine, Harry J.; Bottenheim, Jan; Grannas, Amanda; Houdier, Stephan; Netcheva, Stoyka; Rowland, Glenn; Staebler, Ralf; Steffen, Alexandra

    2012-07-01

    Frost flowers, intricate featherlike crystals that grow on refreezing sea ice leads, have been implicated in lower atmospheric chemical reactions. Few studies have presented chemical composition information for frost flowers over time and many of the chemical species commonly associated with Polar tropospheric reactions have never been reported for frost flowers. We undertook this study on the sea ice north of Barrow, Alaska to quantify the major ion, stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope, alkalinity, light absorbance by soluble species, organochlorine, and aldehyde composition of seawater, brine, and frost flowers. For many of these chemical species we present the first measurements from brine or frost flowers. Results show that major ion and alkalinity concentrations, stable isotope values, and major chromophore (NO3- and H2O2) concentrations are controlled by fractionation from seawater and brine. The presence of these chemical species in present and future sea ice scenarios is somewhat predictable. However, aldehydes, organochlorine compounds, light absorbing species, and mercury (part 2 of this research and Sherman et al. (2012)) are deposited to frost flowers through less predictable processes that probably involve the atmosphere as a source. The present and future concentrations of these constituents in frost flowers may not be easily incorporated into future sea ice or lower atmospheric chemistry scenarios. Thinning of Arctic sea ice will likely present more open sea ice leads where young ice, brine, and frost flowers form. How these changing ice conditions will affect the interactions between ice, brine, frost flowers and the lower atmosphere is unknown.

  14. Effects of Exposure to Methyl Parathion on Egg Hatchability and Eggshell Chemical Composition in Podocnemis expansa (Testudines, Podocnemididae).

    PubMed

    Valdes, Sady Alexis Chavauty; Vieira, Lucélia Gonçalves; Ferreira, Caio Henrique; Mendonça, Juliana Dos Santos; Ribeiro, Priscilla Rosa Queiroz; Fernandes, Evandro de Abreu; Santos, André Luiz Quagliatto

    2015-04-01

    Eggshell evaluation may serve as an indicator of the effect of substances released in the environment, which may change eggshell shape, size, structure, and/or chemical composition. Additionally, exposure may interfere with hatching rates in contaminated eggs. The objective of this study was to better understand how exposure to the insecticide methyl parathion interferes with chemical changes in eggshells of Podocnemis expansa throughout their artificial incubation, as well as with egg hatchability. A total of 343 P. expansa eggs were collected in a natural reproduction area for the species. These eggs were transferred to and artificially incubated in the Wild Animal Teaching and Research Laboratory at Universidade Federal de Uberlândia. On the first day of artificial incubation, 0, 35, 350, and 3500 ppb of methyl parathion were incorporated to the substrate. Eggs were collected every three days for chemical analysis of eggshells. Hatchability was evaluated as the number of hatchlings in each treatment, for the eggs that were not used in the chemical analysis. Student's T-test was used for data on eggshell chemical composition, and the Binomial Test for Two Proportions was used in the hatchability analysis, at a 5% significance level. It was observed that the incorporation of methyl parathion to the substrate on the first day of artificial incubation of P. expansa eggs reduced the levels of total fat in the shells throughout their incubation, besides reducing egg hatchability. PMID:25826061

  15. Chemical and Physical Properties of Atmospheric Aerosols (a) A Case Study in the Unique Properties of Agricultural Aerosols (b) The Role of Chemical Composition in Ice Nucleation during the Arctic Spring 

    E-print Network

    Moon, Seong-Gi

    2011-08-08

    and the nearby community. Detailed chemical composition of aircraft-sampled particles collected during ISDAC was studied. Filter samples were collected under a variety of conditions in and out of mixed phase and ice clouds in the Arctic. Specifically, particles...

  16. Nature's chemicals and synthetic chemicals: Comparative toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, B.N.; Profet, M.; Gold, L.S. )

    1990-10-01

    The toxicology of synthetic chemicals is compared to that of natural chemicals, which represent the vast bulk of the chemicals to which humans are exposed. It is argued that animals have a broad array of inducible general defenses to combat the changing array of toxic chemicals in plant food (nature's pesticides) and that these defenses are effective against both natural and synthetic toxins. Synthetic toxins such as dioxin are compared to natural chemicals, such as indole carbinol (in broccoli) and ethanol. Trade-offs between synthetic and natural pesticides are discussed. The finding that in high-dose tests, a high proportion of both natural and synthetic chemicals are carcinogens, mutagens, teratogens, and clastogens (30-50{percent} for each group) undermines current regulatory efforts to protect public health from synthetic chemicals based on these tests.

  17. Biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon during SAMBBA: impact of chemical composition on radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, William; Allan, James; Flynn, Michael; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Hodgson, Amy; Liu, Dantong; O'shea, Sebastian; Bauguitte, Stephane; Szpek, Kate; Langridge, Justin; Johnson, Ben; Haywood, Jim; Longo, Karla; Artaxo, Paulo; Coe, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. Globally, biomass burning aerosols are thought to exert a small warming effect but with the uncertainty being 4 times greater than the central estimate. On regional scales, the impact is substantially greater, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, both in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated in the Cerrado. This led to significant differences in aerosol chemical composition, particularly in terms of the BC content, with BC being enhanced in the Cerrado region compared with the Rainforest environment. This was reflected in the single scattering albedo of the regional smoke haze, with values of 0.9 observed in the Rainforest environments compared with a value of 0.8 in the Cerrado region. This contrast results in a net cooling and warming respectively in terms of the aerosol direct radiative effect. BC-containing particles were found to be rapidly coated in the near-field, while the organic aerosol component was observed to oxidise rapidly upon advection and dilution downwind of major smoke plumes. Significant differences in the coating thickness of the BC-containing particles were observed when comparing the Rainforest and Cerrado environments. Such properties have important implications for the life cycle and formation of particulate material, as well as their optical and radiative properties. The results presented enhance our knowledge of biomass burning aerosol in a sensitive region of the globe, where relatively few measurement campaigns have taken place previously.

  18. Wildfire Ash: Chemical Composition, Ash-Soil Interactions and Environmental Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Anna; Hamzi, Seham; Wittenberg, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Of the five classical factors of soil formation, climate, parent material, topography, time, organisms, and recently recognized human activity, it is the latter factor which discretely includes fire and post-burn impact. However, it is considered that soil undergoing fire just experience a temporary removal of the top organic horizon, thus slightly modified and often labeled as 'temporarily disturbed' soil or soil 'under restoration/rehabilitation'. In fact the suggested seventh factor, post-burned produced ash, can act both dependently and independently of the other soil forming factors (Levin et al., 2013; Certini 2013). They are interdependent in cases where ash influences occur on time scales similar to 'natural' soil formation (Keesstra et ai., 2014) such as changes in vegetation. On the other hand, in post-fire areas a strong dependency is expected between soil-water retention mechanism, climate and topography. Wild-land fires exert many changes on the physical, chemical, mineralogical, biological, and morphological properties of soil that, in turn, affect the soil's hydrology and nutrient flux, modifying its ability to support vegetation and resist erosion. The ash produced by forest fires is a complex mixture composed of organic and inorganic particles characterized by vary physical-chemical and morphological properties. The importance of this study is straightforwardly related to the frequency and large-scales wildfires in Mediterranean region. In fact, wildfires are major environmental and land management concern in the world, where the number and severity of wildfires has increased during the past decades (Bodi, 2013). Certini (2013) assumed that cumulatively all of the vegetated land is burned in about 31 years annually affecting 330-430 Mha (over 3% of the Earth's surface) and wide range of land cover types worldwide including forests, peatlands, shrublands and grasslands. Whereas, the fire is identified as an important factor in soil formation, the produced ash has significant and not always constructive pedological, ecological, hydrological and geomorphological effects and impacts (Shakesby, 2011). Abundant scientific information is assembled either from control fires by collecting samples before and after wildfire event, or conducting laboratory experiments exanimating data under truly isolated conditions (Lugassi et al., 2013). However, an integration and synthesis of the knowledge about ash including deeper understanding of inter-correlation between chemical, physical and morphological compounds in open post-burn environment and its possible interactions in soil formation or impact on soil composition are highly needed. The main aim of the presented study was to advance the science of soil-fire relationship by recognizing the remains ash as a new soil-forming factor, on par with the traditionally recognized factors: parent material, topography, time, climate, organisms, and recently recognized human activity as the sixth factor. This research was conducted to develop new methods to assess impacts and quantify the contributions/influences of post-fire products, mainly ash, on soil composition and soil properties in post-burned environment. We conducted several controlled experiments using 40 soil samples (typical Mediterranean Rendzina soil, pH 6.84, a grayish-brown, humus- and free calcium carbonate- rich, intra-zonal). The samples include bare soils and different types and loads of forest litter, were exposed to different temperatures (200° C, 400° C and 600° C) in a muffle furnace for 2 hours (Pereira et al. 2011) as fire temperature plays a key role in determining ash properties. The ash produced at a low temperatures (50% carbon and retains many of the structural characteristics of the parent material. At higher temperatures, the residue ash is greyish, consisted of very fine particles that preserve almost none of the original structural characteristics of the fuel (Woods and Balfour, 2008) creating gradient of layered ash with diverse physicochemical properties. The obtained post-burned soils we

  19. The influence of anti-icing salts on the chemical composition of precipitation in Moscow according to monitoring and modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Irina; Aloyan, Artasch; Arutunan, Vardan; Larin, Igor; Chubarova, Natalia; Yermakov, Alex

    2015-04-01

    The monitoring data and results of analysis of variability of acidity and mineral composition of precipitation, which took place in Moscow in 2012, compared with the previous period are presented. It has been found that the source of chloride anions in precipitation in recent years could be mainly chlorides of anti-icing salts. The origin of the chloride anions (together with chlorides of metal components of these reagents), could be partly obliged to dissolution of the hydrogen chloride. It has been shown that appearance of hydrogen chloride in the atmosphere of Moscow (leading to acid rains) could be the result of heterophase chemical reactions involving anti-icing salts. Preliminary assessment of the impact of these chemicals on the mineral composition and the acidity of precipitation has been presented. Keywords: Acid rain, monitoring of atmospheric precipitation mineral composition, the chloride anions, anti-icing salts.

  20. Versatile Method for Producing 2D and 3D Conductive Biomaterial Composites Using Sequential Chemical and Electrochemical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Severt, Sean Y; Ostrovsky-Snider, Nicholas A; Leger, Janelle M; Murphy, Amanda R

    2015-11-18

    Flexible and conductive biocompatible materials are attractive candidates for a wide range of biomedical applications including implantable electrodes, tissue engineering, and controlled drug delivery. Here, we demonstrate that chemical and electrochemical polymerization techniques can be combined to create highly versatile silk-conducting polymer (silk-CP) composites with enhanced conductivity and electrochemical stability. Interpenetrating silk-CP composites were first generated via in situ deposition of polypyrrole during chemical polymerization of pyrrole. These composites were sufficiently conductive to serve as working electrodes for electropolymerization, which allowed an additional layer of CP to be deposited on the surface. This sequential method was applied to both 2D films and 3D sponge-like silk scaffolds, producing conductive materials with biomimetic architectures. Overall, this two-step technique expanded the range of available polymers and dopants suitable for the synthesis of mechanically robust, biocompatible, and highly conductive silk-based materials. PMID:26544990

  1. Chemical composition of ground water and the locations of permeable zones in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.V.; Robison, J.H.; Blankennagel, R.K.; Ogard, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    Ten wells in the Yucca Mountain area of southern Nevada have been sampled for chemical analysis. Samples were obtained during pumping of water from the entire well bore (composite sample) and in one instance by pumping water from a single isolated interval in well UE-25b number 1. Sodium is the most abundant cation and bicarbonate the most abundant anion in all water samples. Although the general chemical compositions of individual samples are similar, there are significant differences in uncorrected carbon-14 age and in inorganic and stable-isotope composition. Flow surveys of seven wells performed using iodine-131 as a tracer indicate that groundwater production is usually from one or more discrete zones of permeability. (Author 's abstract)

  2. Chemical composition, morphology and optical properties of zinc sulfide coatings deposited by low-energy electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragachev, A. V.; Yarmolenko, M. A.; Rogachev, A. A.; Gorbachev, D. L.; Zhou, Bing

    2014-06-01

    The research determines the features of formation, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties of the coatings deposited by the method, proposed for the first time, of the exposure of mechanical mixture of zinc and sulfur powders to low-energy electron beam evaporation. The findings show that the deposited coatings are characterized by high chemical and structural homogeneity in thickness. The study considers the influence of substrate temperature and thickness of the deposited layer on the morphology and the width of the formed ZnS thin layers band gap. Also was shown the possibility to form ZnS coatings with this method using the mixture of zinc and copper sulfide powders.

  3. [Chemical composition and chromaticity characteristic of purple-gold glaze of Jingdezhen imperial kiln].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun-Ming; Li, Qi-Jiang; Zhang, Mao-Lin; Ding, Yin-Zhong; Cao, Jian-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Jing

    2014-03-01

    Color glaze is one of the four famous traditional ceramics of Jingdezhen, especially for the products from Ming and Qing Dynasties' official kilns which have rich connotation of technology and culture. The chemical composition and chromaticity characteristic of glaze and body of purple-gold glaze samples from Jingdezhen Ming and Qing Dynasties' official kilns were analyzed by energy dispersive X ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and colorimeter. Preliminary study on the composition, formula and chromaticity characteristic of glaze of purple-gold glaze samples of different period was carried out and the intrinsic causes of ifferences were discussed. The result shows that the concentration of magnesium and calcium in purple-gold glaze is different from the other glazes in Jingdezhen in the same time, probably due to the addition of auburn or brown limestone which is rich in magnesium. The purple-gold glaze sample of Ming Dynasty is darker chiefly because the concentration of magnesium and calcium is higher than the sample of Ming Dynasty which led to iron crystal separated, reducing the brightness and glossiness of glaze. In addition, the body of purple-gold glaze samples from Jingdezhen Ming and Qing Dynasties' official kilns has the characteristics of high silicon and low aluminum and the molar ratio of silicon to aluminum of samples from Ming Dynasty to Qing Dynasty declined, showing that the concentration of kaolin of sample's body of Ming dynasty was increased. The result of this experiment fill deficiency in the ceramic science and technology research in our country about purple-gold glaze from Ming and Qing Dynasties' official kilns and provides scientific material for comprehensive understanding of porcelain marking technology and intrinsic value of Jingdezhen official kiln. PMID:25208422

  4. Chemical composition modulates the adverse effects of particles on the mucociliary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Oliveira, Regiani; Pires-Neto, Ruy Camargo; Bustillos, José Oscar Viega; Macchione, Mariangela; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Saldiva, Paulo H. Nascimento; Garcia, Maria Lúcia Bueno

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We compared the adverse effects of two types of real ambient particles; i.e., total suspended particles from an electrostatic precipitator of a steel mill and fine air particles from an urban ambient particulate matter of 2.5 µm, on mucociliary clearance. METHOD: Mucociliary function was quantified by mucociliary transport, ciliary beating frequency and the amount of acid and neutral mucous in epithelial cells through morphometry of frog palate preparations. The palates were immersed in one of the following solutions: total suspended particles (0.1 mg/mL), particulate matter 2.5 µm 0.1 mg/mL (PM0.1) or 3.0 mg/mL (PM3.0) and amphibian Ringer's solution (control). Particle chemical compositions were determined by X-ray fluorescence and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Exposure to total suspended particles and PM3.0 decreased mucociliary transport. Ciliary beating frequency was diminished by total suspended particles at all times during exposure, while particulate matter of 2.5 µm did not elicit changes. Particulate matter of 2.5 µm reduced epithelial mucous and epithelium thickness, while total suspended particles behaved similarly to the control group. Total suspended particles exhibited a predominance of Fe and no organic compounds, while the particulate matter 2.5 µm contained predominant amounts of S, Fe, Si and, to a lesser extent, Cu, Ni, V, Zn and organic compounds. CONCLUSION: Our results showed that different compositions of particles induced different airway epithelial responses, emphasizing that knowledge of their individual characteristics may help to establish policies aimed at controlling air pollution. PMID:26598085

  5. Surface water paleotemperatures and chemical compositions from fluid inclusions in Permian Nippewalla Group halite

    SciTech Connect

    Benison, K.C.

    1996-12-31

    Quantitative climatic data for the Permian have been determined from Nippewalla Group halite. The middle Permian Nippewalla Group of Kansas and Oklahoma consists of several hundred feet of bedded halite, anhydrite, and red beds. Study of core and surface samples suggest that this halite was deposited by ephemeral lakes. Fluid inclusions provide evidence for the geochemistry of these Permian saline lake waters, including temperatures, salinities, and chemical compositions. Primary fluid inclusions are well-preserved in the Nippewalla halite. They are 5 - 30 {mu}m cubic inclusions situated along chevron and cornet growth bands. Most are one phase aqueous inclusions, but some also contain anhydride {open_quote}accidental{close_quotes} crystals. Rare two phase liquid-vapor inclusions may have formed by subaqueous outgassing or trapping of air at the water surface. Fluid inclusion freezing-melting behavior and leachate analyses suggest that Nippewalla halite precipitated from Na-Cl-rich waters with lesser quantities of SO{sub 4}, Mg, K, Al, and Si. This composition may be a product of long-term weathering. Surface water paleotemperatures were determined from one phase aqueous fluid inclusions. Homogenization temperatures range from 32 to 46{degrees}C in primary fluid inclusions and are consistent (within 3{degrees}C) along individual chevrons and cornets. These homogenization temperatures are interpreted to represent maximum surface water temperatures. These fluid inclusion data are significant in addressing global change problems. Temperatures and chemistries in these Permian lake waters agree with some modern shallow saline lake waters and with Permian climate models. This study suggests that this Permian environment was relatively similar to its modern counterparts.

  6. Surface water paleotemperatures and chemical compositions from fluid inclusions in Permian Nippewalla Group halite

    SciTech Connect

    Benison, K.C. )

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative climatic data for the Permian have been determined from Nippewalla Group halite. The middle Permian Nippewalla Group of Kansas and Oklahoma consists of several hundred feet of bedded halite, anhydrite, and red beds. Study of core and surface samples suggest that this halite was deposited by ephemeral lakes. Fluid inclusions provide evidence for the geochemistry of these Permian saline lake waters, including temperatures, salinities, and chemical compositions. Primary fluid inclusions are well-preserved in the Nippewalla halite. They are 5 - 30 [mu]m cubic inclusions situated along chevron and cornet growth bands. Most are one phase aqueous inclusions, but some also contain anhydride [open quote]accidental[close quotes] crystals. Rare two phase liquid-vapor inclusions may have formed by subaqueous outgassing or trapping of air at the water surface. Fluid inclusion freezing-melting behavior and leachate analyses suggest that Nippewalla halite precipitated from Na-Cl-rich waters with lesser quantities of SO[sub 4], Mg, K, Al, and Si. This composition may be a product of long-term weathering. Surface water paleotemperatures were determined from one phase aqueous fluid inclusions. Homogenization temperatures range from 32 to 46[degrees]C in primary fluid inclusions and are consistent (within 3[degrees]C) along individual chevrons and cornets. These homogenization temperatures are interpreted to represent maximum surface water temperatures. These fluid inclusion data are significant in addressing global change problems. Temperatures and chemistries in these Permian lake waters agree with some modern shallow saline lake waters and with Permian climate models. This study suggests that this Permian environment was relatively similar to its modern counterparts.

  7. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity in different tissues of brassica vegetables.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Shiva Ram; Kwak, Jung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate glucosinolate profiles, vitamin C, total phenol, total flavonoid, and free sugar (glucose, fructose, and sucrose) content, fatty acid composition, and antioxidant activity in floret and leaf of six cauliflower and broccoli cultivars. The level of chemical constituents as well as antioxidants significantly varied among crop types, cultivars, and their different parts, in that phytochemicals such as glucosinolate were statistically higher in florets compared with leaves in both broccoli and cauliflower cultivars. In contrast, total flavonoid and free sugar were found at higher levels in the leaf parts. The Asia purple cultivar exhibited statistically higher vitamin C (649.7 mg·100 g-1), total phenol (1345.2 mg·GAE 100 g-1), and total flavonoid (632.7 mg·CE 100 g-1) contents and consequently had the highest antioxidant activity (1.12 mg·mL-1) in its florets, while Baeridom and Bridal had the highest total glucosinolate (9.66 µmol·g-1) and free sugar (318.6 mg·g-1) contents, respectively compared with other cultivars. Likewise, the major fatty acids were palmitic (23.52%-38.42%), linoleic (13.09%-18.97%), and linolenic (26.32%-51.80%) acids, which comprised the highest compositional ratio (more than 50%) of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in most cultivars. Among the antioxidants, total phenol exhibited the most significant positive correlation (r = 0.698 **) with antioxidant activity, followed by vitamin C (r = 0.522 **) and total flavonoid (r = 0.494 **), indicating their significant contributions to total antioxidant activity. PMID:25591122

  8. On-line chemical composition analyzer development. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Garrison, A.A.; Muly, E.C.; Moore, C.F.

    1992-02-01

    The energy consumed in distillation processes in the United States represents nearly three percent of the total national energy consumption. If effective control of distillation columns can be accomplished, it has been estimated that it would result in a reduction in the national energy consumption of 0.3%. Real-time control based on mixture composition could achieve these savings. However, the major distillation processes represent diverse applications and at present there does not exist a proven on-line chemical composition sensor technology which can be used to control these diverse processes in real-time. This report presents a summary of the findings of the second phase of a three phase effort undertaken to develop an on-line real-time measurement and control system utilizing Raman spectroscopy. A prototype instrument system has been constructed utilizing a Perkin Elmer 1700 Spectrometer, a diode pumped YAG laser, two three axis positioning systems, a process sample cell land a personal computer. This system has been successfully tested using industrially supplied process samples to establish its performance. Also, continued application development was undertaken during this Phase of the program using both the spontaneous Raman and Surface-enhanced Raman modes of operation. The study was performed for the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, whose mission is to conduct cost-shared R&D for new high-risk, high-payoff industrial energy conservation technologies. Although this document contains references to individual manufacturers and their products, the opinions expressed on the products reported do not necessarily reflect the position of the Department of Energy.

  9. Chemical and mineralogical compositions of two grains recovered from asteroid Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, M.; Shirai, N.; Sekimoto, S.; Nakamura, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Matsuno, J.; Matsumoto, T.; Tanaka, M.; Abe, M.; Fujimura, A.; Ishibashi, Y.; Karouji, Y.; Mukai, T.; Okada, T.; Uesugi, M.; Yada, T.

    2015-02-01

    Two silicate grains (RB-QD04-0049 and RA-QD02-0064, whose estimated masses are 0.050 ?g and 0.048 ?g, respectively) recovered from the asteroid Itokawa by the Hayabusa spacecraft were studied for their mineralogical characteristics by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and synchrotron X-ray microtomography and further analyzed for their bulk chemical compositions by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). According to X-ray tomography, RB-QD004-0049 is composed of olivine, high-Ca pyroxene, plagioclase, Ca-phosphate, and troilite, whereas RA-QD002-0064 entirely consists of olivine. INAA data are consistent with these mineral compositions except for rare earth elements (REEs). Although the grain RB-QD004-0049 contains measurable REEs, which seems to be consistent with the presence of Ca-phosphate, their abundances are anomalously high. Very low abundance of Co implies less than 0.1 mass% of metals in these two grains by calculation, which is in contrast to the result for the previously analyzed grain RA-QD02-0049 (Ebihara et al., 2011). FeO/Sc ratios of the grains fall within the range of those for ordinary chondrite olivines, implying that these grains are extraterrestrial in origin. FeO/MnO ratios also confirm this conclusion and further suggest that the Hayabusa grains analyzed in this study are similar to material found in LL chondrites rather than CK chondrites although olivines from LL and CK chondrites have similar Fa# (molar% of Fe relative to [Fe+Mg] in olivine) (~30) to those of the Hayabusa grains including the two grains analyzed in this study.

  10. Chemical characteristics, fatty acid composition and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of traditional Greek yogurts.

    PubMed

    Serafeimidou, Amalia; Zlatanos, Spiros; Laskaridis, Kostas; Sagredos, Angelos

    2012-10-15

    Many studies with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) indicate that it has a protective effect against mammary cancer. Because dairy products are the most important dietary sources of CLA, we have investigated the CLA concentrations and additionally the fatty acid profiles and chemical composition of several commercial, traditional, Greek yogurts from different geographical origin. The fat content of yogurts was in the order of goat

  11. Chemical composition of rainwater and dustfall at Bhubaneswar in the east coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, R.; Das, S. N.; Misra, V. N.

    Chemical composition of rainwater and dustfall was studied in two different stations of Bhubaneswar, located in the east coast of India. A wet-only and a bulk collector were placed at Regional Research Laboratory (RRL), a suburban area, during 1995-1997 and in the State Botanical Garden (SBG), a rural forest area, during 1997-1998. Of the rain events, 93% recorded alkaline pH (>5.6) at RRL while at SBG, 57% of the rain events were alkaline and the rest were acidic. Non-sea salt (nss) Ca 2+ and NH 3 were the primary neutralizing agents of rainwater acidity at both the locations. Low concentrations of alkaline constituents in the dustfall are an important finding in this study under Indian conditions. The Cl -/Na + ratio in rainwater at RRL was same as the seawater ratio (1.167) which indicates that sea salt contribution is local to RRL. It may be of indirect marine origin and resuspended locally. Rainwater samples were enriched with nss SO 42-, nss Ca 2+ and nss Mg 2+ at both the sites. Most of the nss SO 42- and NO 3- were of anthropogenic origin, while a part of those might be soil derived.

  12. Wet chemical synthesis of chitosan hydrogel-hydroxyapatite composite membranes for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Madhumathi, K; Shalumon, K T; Rani, V V Divya; Tamura, H; Furuike, T; Selvamurugan, N; Nair, S V; Jayakumar, R

    2009-07-01

    Chitosan, a deacetylated derivative of chitin is a commonly studied biomaterial for tissue-engineering applications due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, low toxicity, antibacterial activity, wound healing ability and haemostatic properties. However, chitosan has poor mechanical strength due to which its applications in orthopedics are limited. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is a natural inorganic component of bone and teeth and has mechanical strength and osteoconductive property. In this work, HAp was deposited on the surface of chitosan hydrogel membranes by a wet chemical synthesis method by alternatively soaking the membranes in CaCl(2) (pH 7.4) and Na(2)HPO(4) solutions for different time intervals. These chitosan hydrogel-HAp membranes were characterized using SEM, AFM, EDS, FT-IR and XRD analyses. MTT assay was done to evaluate the biocompatibility of these membranes using MG-63 osteosarcoma cells. The biocompatibility studies suggest that chitosan hydrogel-HAp composite membranes can be useful for tissue-engineering applications. PMID:19447253

  13. Change in the chemical composition of infalling gas forming a disk around a protostar.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nami; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Kahane, Claudine; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Caux, Emmanuel; Demyk, Karine; Vastel, Charlotte; Coutens, Audrey; Taquet, Vianney; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Aikawa, Yuri; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-03-01

    IRAS?04368+2557 is a solar-type (low-mass) protostar embedded in a protostellar core (L1527) in the Taurus molecular cloud, which is only 140 parsecs away from Earth, making it the closest large star-forming region. The protostellar envelope has a flattened shape with a diameter of a thousand astronomical units (1?AU is the distance from Earth to the Sun), and is infalling and rotating. It also has a protostellar disk with a radius of 90?AU (ref. 6), from which a planetary system is expected to form. The interstellar gas, mainly consisting of hydrogen molecules, undergoes a change in density of about three orders of magnitude as it collapses from the envelope into the disk, while being heated from 10?kelvin to over 100?kelvin in the mid-plane, but it has hitherto not been possible to explore changes in chemical composition associated with this collapse. Here we report that the unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule cyclic-C3H2 resides in the infalling rotating envelope, whereas sulphur monoxide (SO) is enhanced in the transition zone at the radius of the centrifugal barrier (100?±?20?AU), which is the radius at which the kinetic energy of the infalling gas is converted to rotational energy. Such a drastic change in chemistry at the centrifugal barrier was not anticipated, but is probably caused by the discontinuous infalling motion at the centrifugal barrier and local heating processes there. PMID:24522533

  14. Effects of green liquor pretreatment on the chemical composition and enzymatic digestibility of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Gu, Feng; Wang, Wangxia; Jing, Lei; Jin, Yongcan

    2013-12-01

    Green liquor (Na2S+Na2CO3, GL) pretreatment is a proven pathway to improve the enzymatic saccharification for the production of bioethanol. In this work, the effects of GL pretreatment on the chemical composition and enzymatic digestibility of rice straw at various total titratable alkali (TTA) charge and temperature were investigated. The GL pretreatment showed excellent performance in high polysaccharides retention and delignification selectivity. Under the optimized GL pretreatment condition (4% TTA charge, 20% sulfidity and 140°C), 92.5% of glucan, 82.4% of xylan and 81.6% of arabinan in rice straw were recovered with a delignification of 39.4%. The maximum sugar yields of 83.9%, 69.6% and 78.0%, respectively for glucan, xylan and total sugar, were achieved at the same GL pretreatment condition with an enzyme loading of 40 FPU/g-substrate. The results suggested that GL pretreatment is a practicable method for rice straw to enhance enzymatic saccharification for bioethanol production. PMID:24128400

  15. Gymnema sylvestre R. Br., an Indian medicinal herb: traditional uses, chemical composition, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, Giovanni; Romanucci, Valeria; Di Marino, Cinzia; Pisanti, Antonio; Zarrelli, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. is one of the most important medicinal plants that grows in tropical forests in India and South East Asia. Its active ingredients and extracts of leaves and roots are used in traditional medicine to treat various ailments and they are present in the market for pharmaceutical and parapharmaceutical products. Commercial products based on substances of plant origin that are generally connoted as natural have to be subjected to monitoring and evaluation by health authorities for their potential impacts on public health. The monitoring and evaluation of these products are critical because the boundary between a therapeutic action and a functional or healthy activity has not yet been defined in a clear and unambiguous way. Therefore, these products are considered borderline products, and they require careful and rigorous studies, in order to use them as complement and/or even replacement of synthetic drugs that are characterized by side effects and high economic costs. This review explores the traditional uses, chemical composition and biological activity of G. sylvestre extracts, providing a general framework on the most interesting extracts and what are the necessary studies for a complete definition of the range of activities. PMID:25860062

  16. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents. PMID:26170872

  17. Contributions of microstructure and chemical composition to the mechanical properties of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, H.; Amin, N.; Ross, A.; Eidelman, N.; Wang, D. H.; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of microstructural variations and chemical composition to the mechanical properties and apparent flaw sensitivity of dentin were evaluated. Rect-angular beams (N = 80) of the deep and superficial coronal dentin were prepared from virgin 3rd molars; twenty beams of each region were nominally flaw free and the remainder possessed a single “surface flaw” via a Vickers indentation. Mechanical properties were estimated in four-point flexure and examined using Weibull statistics. Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy in Reflectance Mode (FTIR-RM) was used to quantify the relative mineral to collagen ratios. Results showed that the average flexural strength, and strain and energy to fracture of the deep dentin beams were significantly lower (P < 0.005) than for the superficial dentin. While the deep dentin exhibited the highest mineral/collagen ratio and lowest damage tolerance, there was no significant effect of the surface flaws. Weibull analyses suggest that deep dentin possesses a larger distribution of intrinsic flaw sizes that contributes to the location dependence in strength. PMID:21455677

  18. Chemical composition and sources of particle pollution in affluent and poor neighborhoods of Accra, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng; Dionisio, Kathie L.; Verissimo, Thiago G.; Kerr, Americo S.; Coull, Brent; Arku, Raphael E.; Koutrakis, Petros; Spengler, John D.; Hughes, Allison F.; Vallarino, Jose; Agyei-Mensah, Samuel; Ezzati, Majid

    2013-12-01

    The highest levels of air pollution in the world now occur in developing country cities, where air pollution sources differ from high-income countries. We analyzed particulate matter (PM) chemical composition and estimated the contributions of various sources to particle pollution in poor and affluent neighborhoods of Accra, Ghana. Elements from earth’s crust were most abundant during the seasonal Harmattan period between late December and late January when Saharan dust is carried to coastal West Africa. During Harmattan, crustal particles accounted for 55 ?g m-3 (37%) of fine particle (PM2.5) mass and 128 ?g m-3 (42%) of PM10 mass. Outside Harmattan, biomass combustion, which was associated with higher black carbon, potassium, and sulfur, accounted for between 10.6 and 21.3 ?g m-3 of fine particle mass in different neighborhoods, with its contribution largest in the poorest neighborhood. Other sources were sea salt, vehicle emissions, tire and brake wear, road dust, and solid waste burning. Reducing air pollution in African cities requires policies related to energy, transportation and urban planning, and forestry and agriculture, with explicit attention to impacts of each strategy in poor communities. Such cross-sectoral integration requires emphasis on urban environment and urban poverty in the post-2015 Development Agenda.

  19. Effect of different alkali treatments on the chemical composition, physical properties, and microstructure of pidan white.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianwei; Jiang, Aimin; Chen, Mingtsao; Ockerman, Herbert W; Chen, Jiaojiao

    2015-04-01

    Changes in chemical composition, physical property and microstructure of pidan white treated with 4.5 % NaOH or 5.5 % KOH were monitored during pickling up to 4 weeks, and followed by aging for another 2 weeks. As the pickling and ageing times increased, moisture content of pidan white decreased and salt content increased for both (4.5 % NaOH and 5.5 % KOH) treatments (P?

  20. Chemical composition analysis of soybean oligosaccharides and its effect on ATPase activities in hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Li-Jun, Liu; Jian-Jun, Zhu; Bo, Xu; Rui, Li

    2010-03-01

    A water-soluble oligosaccharide was isolated from the water extract of soybean, which is widely grown worldwide due to its nutritional benefits of a full range of amino acids and a high protein content. In this study, we analysed chemical composition of soybean oligosaccharides (SBOS) using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results obtained were compared with the following sugar standards: mannose, galactose, xylose, arabinose, fucose and glucose. Results showed that SBOS was composed of galactose (65.3%), mannose (15.6%), fructose (7.8%) and glucose (8.7%). The pharmacological action of SBOS has been studied in hyperlipidemic rats fed high-fat diet. In hyperlipidemic rats, feeding with SBOS (150 and 300 mg/kg b.w.) exerted a pharmacological effect as assessed by reversal of plasma levels of lactic acid, nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels, and heart Na+-K+-ATPase, Ca2+-ATPase and Mg2+-ATPase activities. These results indicated that SBOS may have beneficial effects on the therapy of some heart diseases, such as coronary artery diseases. PMID:20025901