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Sample records for chemical composition chemical

  1. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  2. Chemical composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. W.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical composition of Mars is estimated from the cosmochemical model of Ganapathy and Anders (1974) with additional petrological and geophysical constraints. The model assumes that planets and chondrites underwent the same fractionation processes in the solar nebula, and constraints are imposed by the abundance of the heat-producing elements, U, Th and K, the volatile-rich component and the high density of the mantle. Global abundances of 83 elements are presented, and it is noted that the mantle is an iron-rich garnet wehrlite, nearly identical to the bulk moon composition of Morgan at al. (1978) and that the core is sulfur poor (3.5% S). The comparison of model compositions for the earth, Venus, Mars, the moon and a eucrite parent body suggests that volatile depletion correlates mainly with size rather than with radial distance from the sun.

  3. Chemical Compositions of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckrone, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In 1835, in a famously inaccurate forecast, the French philosopher Auguste Comte wrote of stars that, `We understand the possibility of determining their shapes, their distances, their sizes and their movements; whereas we would never know how to study by any means their chemical composition…'. At the close of the 20th century the accurate measurement of the abundances of the chemical elements in...

  4. Method of forming a chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-10-09

    A method of forming a chemical composition such as a chemical hydride is described and which includes the steps of selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of hydrogen; and exposing the selected composition to an amount of ionizing radiation to encourage the changing of the chemical bonds of the selected composition, and chemically reacting the selected composition with the source of hydrogen to facilitate the formation of a chemical hydride.

  5. The Chemical Composition of Honey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Honey is a supersaturated sugar solution, created by bees, and used by human beings as a sweetener. However, honey is more than just a supersaturated sugar solution; it also contains acids, minerals, vitamins, and amino acids in varying quantities. In this article, we will briefly explore the chemical composition of honey. (Contains 2 figures and…

  6. Chemical recycling of scrap composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald E.; Salas, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    There are no well-developed technologies for recycling composite materials other than grinding to produce fillers. New approaches are needed to reclaim these valuable resources. Chemical or tertiary recycling, conversion of polymers into low molecular weight hydrocarbons for reuse as chemicals or fuels, is emerging as the most practical means for obtaining value from waste plastics and composites. Adherent Technologies is exploring a low-temperature catalytic process for recycling plastics and composites. Laboratory results show that all types of plastics, thermosets as well as thermoplastics, can be converted in high yields to valuable hydrocarbon products. This novel catalytic process runs at 200 C, conversion times are rapid, the process is closed and, thus, nonpolluting, and no highly toxic gas or liquid products have been observed so no negative environmental impact will result from its implementation. Tests on reclamation of composite materials show that epoxy, imide, and engineering thermoplastic matrices can be converted to low molecular weight hydrocarbons leaving behind the reinforcing fibers for reuse as composite reinforcements in secondary, lower-performance applications. Chemical recycling is also a means to dispose of sensitive or classified organic materials without incineration and provides a means to eliminate or reduce mixed hazardous wastes containing organic materials.

  7. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  8. Chemical composition of Earth-like planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, M. P.; Thiabaud, A.; Marboeuf, U.; Alibert, Y.; de Elía, G. C.; Guilera, O. M.

    2015-08-01

    Models of planet formation are mainly focused on the accretion and dynamical processes of the planets, neglecting their chemical composition. In this work, we calculate the condensation sequence of the different chemical elements for a low-mass protoplanetary disk around a solar-type star. We incorporate this sequence of chemical elements (refractory and volatile elements) in our semi-analytical model of planet formation which calculates the formation of a planetary system during its gaseous phase. The results of the semi-analytical model (final distributions of embryos and planetesimals) are used as initial conditions to develope N-body simulations that compute the post-oligarchic formation of terrestrial-type planets. The results of our simulations show that the chemical composition of the planets that remain in the habitable zone has similar characteristics to the chemical composition of the Earth. However, differences exist that can be associated to the dynamical environment in which they were formed.

  9. The Chemical Composition of Maple Syrup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Maple syrup is one of several high-sugar liquids that humans consume. However, maple syrup is more than just a concentrated sugar solution. Here, we review the chemical composition of maple syrup. (Contains 4 tables and 1 figure.)

  10. Chemical composition of fat and oil products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fats and oils are an important dietary component, and contribute to the nutritional and sensory quality of foods. This chapter focuses on the chemical composition of fats and oils, and how these compositions affect the functional properties of fats and oils in foods. The focus will remain on the mos...

  11. Chemical composition of cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Observational evidence pertaining to the origin and composition of cometary material is reviewed. Arguments favoring the undifferentiated character of the icy conglomerate are summarized. Theoretical descriptions of the sublimation of a cometary nucleus and the velocity field of the expanding gas are presented and compared with observations. The nature of cometary dust and the atomic abundances of H, C, N, O, and S in the volatile fraction are examined, and data on the dust and volatile fractions are combined to derive elemental abundances. It is shown that O, N, and S in cometary nuclei appear to have essentially cosmic abundances but that both H and C are drastically depleted with respect to the cosmic abundances. The apparent depletion of C by a factor of more than three is discussed. It is suggested that the missing carbon might be hidden in the dust fraction in the form of heavy organic molecules or might have remained in either the primeval solar nebula or interstellar space.

  12. Lunar Skylights and Their Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, J.; Torres, J.; FitzHoward, S.; Luu, E.; Hua, J.; Irby, R.

    2013-12-01

    In 2009, the Japanese orbiter, SELenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) discovered a skylight on the near side of the moon. Skylights are collapsed ceilings of rilles, thought to be caused by moonquakes, meteoroids, or incomplete formation of these lava tube ceilings. Since then, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has discovered two more skylights, also located on the near side of the moon. Previous research has shown that the physical characteristics of known rilles, can be used as indicators of the presence of yet undiscovered rille and lava dome locations across the lunar surface. We hypothesize that skylights have a signature chemical composition that is unique, and can be used to predict the location of additional skylights on the surface of the moon. For this study, we compared chemical composition data of the three mare sites containing skylights with the 21 mare sites without skylights. Using the software JMARS for the Moon, we compiled multiple datasets to measure the concentrations of 13 different chemical compounds including calcium, iron oxide, titanium dioxide, and thorium. We then conducted a two-tailed T-test of the data, which generated probability values for the mean differences across all 13 chemical compounds of the maria sites with skylights and the maria sites without skylights. Our results show that there is no statistical difference in chemical composition across all of the maria sites examined. Therefore, we conclude that chemical composition does not predict or indicate potential skylight locations on the moon. Further research on other skylight characteristics, for example depth and surrounding underground lava channels, may shed light on the relationships between mare and skylights locations. Three Skylight Locations Found on Lunar Surface 100m View of Mare Tranquilitatis Skylight

  13. Chemical compositions of primitive solar system particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Steve R.; Bajt, S.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical studies of micrometeorites are of fundamental importance primarily because atmospheric entry selection effects (such as destruction of friable objects) are less significant than those for conventional meteorites. As a result, particles that have experienced very little postaccretional processing have a significant chance of surviving the Earth encounter and subsequent collection. Thus, chemical analyses of these relatively unaltered micrometeorites may lead to a better understanding of the compositions of the most primitive materials in the solar system and thereby constrain the conditions (physical and chemical) that existed in the early solar nebula. Micrometeorites have been collected from the stratosphere, polar ices, and ocean sediments, but the stratospheric collection is the best source for the most unaltered material because they are small and are not heated to their melting points. Despite the fact that the stratospheric micrometeorites have masses in the nanogram range, a variety of microanalytical techniques have been applied to bulk chemical analyses with part-per-million sensitivity. In some cases, multi-disciplinary studies (e.g., chemistry and mineralogy) have been performed on individual particles. The first-order conclusion is that the chondrite-like particles are chemically similar to carbonaceous chondrites but in detail are distinct from members of the conventional meteorite collection. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the results to date and identify important areas for further study.

  14. Chemical composition of Luna 16 lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Chupakhin, M. S.; Belyayev, Y. I.

    1974-01-01

    Data on the chemical composition of regolith returned by the Luna 16 automatic station and two fragments of basalts from the lower layer of the core are presented. Spark mass spectrometric, primary X-ray spectral, emission spectral, and atomic absorption methods were used in the analysis. The regolith of mare provinces were shown to be a mixture of material of various origins. The source of the material of the mare regolith was principally basalts of the corresponding lunar lava maria. The regolith is genetically related to it. This follows from a comparison of the chemical composition, mineralogical, and petrochemical features of the basesalts and the regolith from the Sea of Fertility, Sea of Tranquillity, and Ocean of Storms, respectively.

  15. Impact of oil on groundwater chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakorenko, N. N.

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the paper is to characterize the chemical composition of groundwater samples from the monitoring wells drilled in the petrol station areas within the vicinity of Tomsk. The level of contamination has increased since many macro - and microcomponent concentrations (such as petroleum products, chlorine, sulphates, carbon dioxide and lead, etc.) in groundwater samples of the present study is higher than that in previous period samples.

  16. Chemical microsensors based on polymer fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessick, Royal F.; Levit, Natalia; Tepper, Gary C.

    2005-05-01

    There is an urgent need for new chemical sensors for defense and security applications. In particular, sensors are required that can provide higher sensitivity and faster response in the field than existing baseline technologies. We have been developing a new solid-state chemical sensor technology based on microscale polymer composite fiber arrays. The fibers consist of an insulating polymer doped with conducting particles and are electrospun directly onto the surface of an interdigitated microelectrode. The concentration of the conducting particles within the fiber is controlled and is near the percolation threshold. Thus, the electrical resistance of the polymer fiber composite is very sensitive to volumetric changes produced in the polymer by vapor absorption. Preliminary results are presented on the fabrication and testing of the new microsensor. The objective is to take advantage of the very high surface to volume ratio, low thermal mass and linear geometry of the composite fibers to produce sensors exhibiting an extremely high vapor sensitivity and rapid response. The simplicity and low cost of a resistance-based chemical microsensor makes this sensing approach an attractive alternative to devices requiring RF electronics or time-of-flight analysis. Potential applications of this technology include battlespace awareness, homeland security, environmental surveillance, medical diagnostics and food process monitoring.

  17. Chemical Composition and Photometry of BE Lyncis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhee; Yushchenko, A. V.; Kim, S.-L.; Jeon, Y.-B.; Kim, Chun-Hwey

    2012-05-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic observation was carried out to find the chemical composition of BE Lyn. The abundances of 25 chemical elements from carbon to neodymium were found. The deficiency of iron appeared to be equal to Δ log N(Fe) = -0.26 ± 0.08 with respect to the solar metallicity, and the abundances of other elements were mainly undersolar. Only nitrogen, sodium, aluminum, and sulfur showed overabundances near 0.2-0.3 dex. The abundance pattern showed no clear signs of accretion or mass transfer events. It is not possible to exclude the classification of BE Lyn as a SX Phe-type star with slightly undersolar abundances of chemical elements. In addition, new differential time-series observations of BE Lyn were secured using V filters, and seven new times of light maximum were identified. We collected 162 times of light maximum from the literature, unpublished data, and an open database, and we proceeded to investigate the pulsational properties of BE Lyn. All five harmonic frequencies were identified using the Fourier decomposition method.

  18. Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Glenn C.; Clark, Benton C.; Knocke, Philip C.; OHara, Bonnie J.; Adams, Larry; Niemann, Hasso B.; Alexander, Merle; Veverka, Joseph; Goldstein, Raymond; Huebner, Walter; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Cometary exploration remains of great importance to virtually all of space science. Because comets are presumed to be remnants of the early solar nebula, they are expected to provide fundamental knowledge as to the origin and development of the solar system as well as to be key to understanding of the source of volatiles and even life itself in the inner solar system. Clearly the time for a detailed study of the composition of these apparent messages from the past has come. A comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, is now being studied as a candidate for the new Discovery program. This mission is a highly-focussed and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission. The C4 mission will concentrate on measurements that will produce an understanding of the composition and physical makeup of a cometary nucleus. The core science goals of the C4 mission are 1) to determine the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of a cometary nucleus and 2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. A related goal is to obtain temporal information about the development of the cometary coma as a function of time and orbital position. The four short-period comets -- Tempel 1, Tempel 2, Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and Wirtanen -which all appear to have acceptable dust production rates, were identified as candidate targets. Mission opportunities have been identified beginning as early as 1998. Tempel I with a launch in 1999, however, remains the baseline comet for studies of and planning the C4 mission. The C4 mission incorporates two science instruments and two engineering instruments in the payload to obtain the desired measurements. The science instruments include an advanced version of the Cometary Ice and Dust Experiment (CIDEX), a mini-CIDEX with a sample collection system, an X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer and a Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatograph, and a simplified version of the Neutral

  19. Chemical composition of selected edible nut seeds.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2006-06-28

    Commercially important edible nut seeds were analyzed for chemical composition and moisture sorption. Moisture (1.47-9.51%), protein (7.50-21.56%), lipid (42.88-66.71%), ash (1.16-3.28%), total soluble sugars (0.55-3.96%), tannins (0.01-0.88%), and phytate (0.15-0.35%) contents varied considerably. Regardless of the seed type, lipids were mainly composed of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (>75% of the total lipids). Fatty acid composition analysis indicated that oleic acid (C18:1) was the main constituent of monounsaturated lipids in all seed samples. With the exception of macadamia, linoleic acid (C18:2) was the major polyunsaturated fatty acid. In the case of walnuts, in addition to linoleic acid (59.79%) linolenic acid (C18:3) also significantly contributed toward the total polyunsaturated lipids. Amino acid composition analyses indicated lysine (Brazil nut, cashew nut, hazelnut, pine nut, and walnut), sulfur amino acids methionine and cysteine (almond), tryptophan (macadamia, pecan), and threonine (peanut) to be the first limiting amino acid as compared to human (2-5 year old) amino acid requirements. The amino acid composition of the seeds was characterized by the dominance of hydrophobic (range = 37.16-44.54%) and acidic (27.95-33.17%) amino acids followed by basic (16.16-21.17%) and hydrophilic (8.48-11.74%) amino acids. Trypsin inhibitory activity, hemagglutinating activity, and proteolytic activity were not detected in the nut seed samples analyzed. Sorption isotherms (Aw range = 0.08-0.97) indicated a narrow range for monolayer water content (11-29 mg/g of dry matter). No visible mold growth was evident on any of the samples stored at Aw < 0.53 and 25 degrees C for 6 months. PMID:16787018

  20. Chemical composition of rainwater in Eastern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanusi, Astrid; Wortham, Henri; Millet, Maurice; Mirabel, Philippe

    Rainwater sampled weekly at nine sites in eastern France from October 1991 to March 1992 has been analysed for major ions (Cl -, NO 3-, SO s2-, NH 4+, Na +, K +, Mg 2+ and Ca 2+), pH and conductivity. The major elements are SO 42- and Cl - for the anions and NH 4+ and Ca 2+ for the cations. The major ion concentrations are higher in urban areas, especially at Colmar (no.2), where rainfall amounts are low. Surprisingly, the acidity is higher at the sites in rural areas [i.e. mean pH of 4.4 for Ban sur Meurthe (no. 7)] and lower in the urban areas [mean pH of 5.0 for Strasbourg (no. 1) and pH of 5.7 for Colmar (no. 2)]. This is probably due to the presence of CaCO 3 in the "loess", which is the major constituent of soils in the upper Rhine valley. The relationship between the chemical composition of rain andair-mass trajectories for four humid weeks which presented only one rain event are also examined.

  1. Fundamental Parameters and Chemical Composition of Arcturus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, I.; Allende Prieto, C.

    2011-12-01

    We derive a self-consistent set of atmospheric parameters and abundances of 17 elements for the red giant star Arcturus: T eff = 4286 ± 30 K, log g = 1.66 ± 0.05, and [Fe/H] = -0.52 ± 0.04. The effective temperature was determined using model atmosphere fits to the observed spectral energy distribution from the blue to the mid-infrared (0.44 to 10 μm). The surface gravity was calculated using the trigonometric parallax of the star and stellar evolution models. A differential abundance analysis relative to the solar spectrum allowed us to derive iron abundances from equivalent width measurements of 37 Fe I and 9 Fe II lines, unblended in the spectra of both Arcturus and the Sun; the [Fe/H] value adopted is derived from Fe I lines. We also determine the mass, radius, and age of Arcturus: M = 1.08 ± 0.06 M ⊙, R = 25.4 ± 0.2 R ⊙, and τ = 7.1+1.5 - 1.2 Gyr. Finally, abundances of the following elements are measured from an equivalent width analysis of atomic features: C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Zn. We find the chemical composition of Arcturus typical of that of a local thick-disk star, consistent with its kinematics.

  2. FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ARCTURUS

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, I.; Allende Prieto, C. E-mail: callende@iac.es

    2011-12-20

    We derive a self-consistent set of atmospheric parameters and abundances of 17 elements for the red giant star Arcturus: T{sub eff} = 4286 {+-} 30 K, log g = 1.66 {+-} 0.05, and [Fe/H] = -0.52 {+-} 0.04. The effective temperature was determined using model atmosphere fits to the observed spectral energy distribution from the blue to the mid-infrared (0.44 to 10 {mu}m). The surface gravity was calculated using the trigonometric parallax of the star and stellar evolution models. A differential abundance analysis relative to the solar spectrum allowed us to derive iron abundances from equivalent width measurements of 37 Fe I and 9 Fe II lines, unblended in the spectra of both Arcturus and the Sun; the [Fe/H] value adopted is derived from Fe I lines. We also determine the mass, radius, and age of Arcturus: M = 1.08 {+-} 0.06 M{sub Sun }, R = 25.4 {+-} 0.2 R{sub Sun }, and {tau} = 7.1{sup +1.5}{sub -1.2} Gyr. Finally, abundances of the following elements are measured from an equivalent width analysis of atomic features: C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Zn. We find the chemical composition of Arcturus typical of that of a local thick-disk star, consistent with its kinematics.

  3. On-line chemical composition analyzer development

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Garrison, A.A.; Muly, E.C.; Moore, C.F.

    1992-02-01

    The energy consumed in distillation processes in the United States represents nearly three percent of the total national energy consumption. If effective control of distillation columns can be accomplished, it has been estimated that it would result in a reduction in the national energy consumption of 0.3%. Real-time control based on mixture composition could achieve these savings. However, the major distillation processes represent diverse applications and at present there does not exist a proven on-line chemical composition sensor technology which can be used to control these diverse processes in real-time. This report presents a summary of the findings of the second phase of a three phase effort undertaken to develop an on-line real-time measurement and control system utilizing Raman spectroscopy. A prototype instrument system has been constructed utilizing a Perkin Elmer 1700 Spectrometer, a diode pumped YAG laser, two three axis positioning systems, a process sample cell land a personal computer. This system has been successfully tested using industrially supplied process samples to establish its performance. Also, continued application development was undertaken during this Phase of the program using both the spontaneous Raman and Surface-enhanced Raman modes of operation. The study was performed for the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, whose mission is to conduct cost-shared R D for new high-risk, high-payoff industrial energy conservation technologies. Although this document contains references to individual manufacturers and their products, the opinions expressed on the products reported do not necessarily reflect the position of the Department of Energy.

  4. Essential Oils, Part III: Chemical Composition.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Anton C; Schmidt, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Data on the chemistry of essential oils which have caused contact allergy are provided. The largest group of chemicals found in essential oils consists of terpenes. The number of identified components usually ranges from 100 to 250, but in some oils (lavender, geranium, rosemary) 450 to 500 chemicals have been found. Many chemicals are present in a large number of oils, up to 98% for β-caryophyllene and 97% for limonene. Chemicals that are important constituents of >20 oils are limonene, linalool, and α-pinene. In many essential oils, there are 2 to 5 components which together constitute over 50% to 60% of the oil. In some oils, however, there is one dominant ingredient, making up more than 50% of the oil, including (E)-anethole in aniseed and star anise oil, carvone in spearmint oil, 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol) in Eucalyptus globulus oil, and (E)-cinnamaldehyde in cassia oil. The most important chemicals in 93 individual oils are specified. PMID:27427817

  5. Honey: Chemical composition, stability and authenticity.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Priscila Missio; Gauche, Cony; Gonzaga, Luciano Valdemiro; Costa, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Fett, Roseane

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this review is to describe the chemical characteristics of compounds present in honey, their stability when heated or stored for long periods of time and the parameters of identity and quality. Therefore, the chemical characteristics of these compounds were examined, such as sugars, proteins, amino acids, enzymes, organic acids, vitamins, minerals, phenolic and volatile compounds present in honey. The stability of these compounds in relation to the chemical reactions that occur by heating or prolonged storage were also discussed, with increased understanding of the behavior regarding the common processing of honey that may compromise its quality. In addition, the identity and quality standards were described, such as sugars, moisture, acidity, ash and electrical conductivity, color, 5-HMF and diastase activity, along with the minimum and maximum limits established by the Codex Alimentarius. PMID:26593496

  6. Chemical compositions of large cluster IDPs

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S.R.

    2006-12-06

    We performed X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy on two large cluster IDPs, which sample the IDP parent body at a mass scale two orders-of-magnitude larger than {approx}10 {micro}m IDPs, allowing proper incorporation of larger mineral grains into the bulk composition of the parent body. We previously determined that {approx}10 {micro}m interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere are enriched in many moderately volatile elements by a factor of {approx}3 over the CI meteorites. However, these IDP measurements provide no direct constraint on the bulk chemical composition of the parent body (or parent bodies) of the IDPs. Collisions are believed to be the major mechanism for dust production by the asteroids, producing dust by surface erosion, cratering and catastrophic disruption. Hypervelocity impact experiments at {approx}5 km/sec, which is the mean collision velocity in the main belt, performed by Flynn and Durda on ordinary chondrite meteorites and the carbonaceous chondrite meteorite Allende show that the 10 {micro}m debris is dominated by matrix material while the debris larger than {approx}25 {micro}m is dominated by chondrule fragments. Thus, if the IDP parent body is similar in structure to the chondritic meteorites, it is likely that the {approx}10 {micro}m IDPs oversample the fine-grained component of the parent body. We have examined the matrix material from the few meteorites that are sufficiently fine-grained to be samples of potential IDP parent bodies. This search has, thus far, not produced a compositional and mineralogical match to either the hydrous or anhydrous IDPs. This result, coupled with our recent mapping of the element distributions, which indicates the enrichment of moderately volatile elements is not due to contamination on their surfaces, suggests the IDPs represent a new type of extraterrestrial material. Nonetheless, the meteorite fragmentation results suggest that compositional measurements on 10 {micro

  7. Chemical Composition of Fresh and Aged Biochars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. T.; Hamdan, R.; Mukherjee, A.; Zimmerman, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    It is possible to manipulate the chemical and physical properties of pyrogenic organic matter ('black carbon' or 'biochar') during its production and tailor its composition for intended environmental management applications. In this study biochars made from grass (Tripsacum floridanum), oak (Quercus lobata), and pine (Pinus taeda) at 250 ºC in air and 400 and 650 ºC under N2 were characterized by solid state 13C-NMR spectroscopy and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry. Among the biochars produced, those originating from pine showed distinct characteristics, with greater amounts of oxygenated aromatic clusters after low temperature combustion and more condensed aromatic clusters after higher temperature pyrolysis. Although a mixture of small and large aromatic clusters occurred across the temperature profile, cluster size increased and functionality decreased with increasing combustion temperature (Figure 1). At medium and high temperatures, aromatic clusters of up to 60- carbon aromatic rings inter-connected with small chains dominated the biochars examined. These structures are intermediate in size between the linearly condensed structures and the predominantly condensed aromatic clusters proposed in earlier studies. Field aging of the pure biochars for 15 months decreased the total acid functional group content as determined by Boehm titration, but solid-state 13C-NMR analyses suggested the creation and transformation of a range of functional groups via leaching, oxidation, and addition of microbially-produced organic matter. Similar trends were observed when the biochars were mixed with soils, suggesting that the same biochar aging processes occurred in the soil environment. These findings demonstrate that biochar transformations occur over time through a multitude of processes that are both biochar and soil type-dependent.

  8. Spectral analysis of four meteors. [chemical compositions and spectral emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    Four meteor spectra are analyzed for chemical composition and radiative processes. The chemical compositions of the Taurid, Geminid, and Perseid meteors were found to be similar to that of a typical stony meteorite. The chemical composition of the sporadic meteor was found to be similar to that of a nickel iron meteorite. The radiation from optical meteors was found to be similar to that of a low temperature gas, except that strong, anomalous ionic radiation is superposed on the neutral radiation in bright, fast meteors.

  9. Ethylene vinylacetate copolymer and nanographite composite as chemical vapour sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepina, Santa; Sakale, Gita; Knite, Maris

    2013-12-01

    Polymer-nanostructured carbon composite as chemical vapour sensor is described, made by the dissolution method of a non-conductive polymer, ethylene vinylacetate copolymer, mixed with conductive nanographite particles (carbon black). Sensor exhibits relative electrical resistance change in chemical vapours, like ethanol and toluene. Since the sensor is relatively cheap, easy to fabricate, it can be used in air quality monitoring and at industries to control hazardous substance concentration in the air, for example, to protect workers from exposure to chemical spills.

  10. WOOD STOVE EMISSIONS: PARTICLE SIZE AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes wood stove particle size and chemical composition data gathered to date. [NOTE: In 1995, EPA estimated that residential wood combustion (RWC), including fireplaces, accounted for a significant fraction of national particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter...

  11. Unraveling the chemical composition of caramel.

    PubMed

    Golon, Agnieszka; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-03-28

    Caramel is one of mankind's best known dietary materials obtained from carbohydrates by heating. Much effort has been expended toward the chemical characterization of the components of caramel but impeded by a lack of suitable analytical techniques sufficiently powerful for providing insight into an extraordinarily complex material. This paper reports the characterization of caramel formed by heating from glucose, fructose, and saccharose using a conceptually novel combination of mass spectrometrical techniques. The analytical strategy employed uses high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) followed by targeted liquid chromatography-tandem MS experiments. Caramel is composed from several thousand compounds formed by a small number of unselective and chemoselective reactions. Caramelization products include oligomers with up to six carbohydrate units formed through unselective glycosidic bond formation, dehydration products of oligomers losing up to a maximum of eight water molecules, hydration products of sugar oligomers, disproportionation products, and colored aromatic products. PMID:22375847

  12. THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF PRAESEPE (M44)

    SciTech Connect

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Roper, Brian W.; Lum, Michael G. E-mail: brianwroper@gmail.com

    2013-09-20

    Star clusters have long been used to illuminate both stellar evolution and Galactic evolution. They also hold clues to the chemical and nucleosynthetic processes throughout the history of the Galaxy. We have taken high signal-to-noise (S/N), high-resolution spectra of 11 solar-type stars in the Praesepe open cluster to determine the chemical abundances of 16 elements: Li, C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Y, and Ba. We have determined Fe from Fe I and Fe II lines and find [Fe/H] = +0.12 ±0.04. We find that Li decreases with temperature due to increasing Li depletion in cooler stars; it matches the Li-temperature pattern found in the Hyades. The [C/Fe] and [O/Fe] abundances are below solar and lower than the field star samples due to the younger age of Praesepe (0.7 Gyr) than the field stars. The alpha-elements, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, have solar ratios with respect to Fe, and are also lower than the field star samples. The Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, track Fe and have solar values. The neutron capture element [Y/Fe] is found to be solar, but [Ba/Fe] is enhanced relative to solar and to the field stars. Three Praesepe giants were studied by Carrera and Pancino; they are apparently enhanced in Na, Mg, and Ba relative to the Praesepe dwarfs. The Na enhancement may indicate proton-capture nucleosynthesis in the Ne → Na cycling with dredge-up into the atmospheres of the red giants.

  13. Chemical and anatomical compositions of coal precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    Four cores of peat from various environments in the Florida Everglades and one from the Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia have been studied with the objective of clarifying the roles of cellulose, lignin and other vascular plant polymers as input to coalification. The peat was first separated by set sieving into a coarse fraction consisting of fragments of plant organs and tissues, and a fine fraction containing an amorphous humic matrix mixed with a minority of disrupted cellular material. Microscopic examination, Curie-point pyrolysis/mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analyses of the data, supplemented by pyrolysis/gas chromatography and PY/GC/MD, revealed substantial differences in the degree of preservation of plant tissues and in chemistry between peats derived from different types of plants. Some ..cap alpha..-cellulose is present in the upper levels of the peats, but the total polysaccharide content decreases markedly with depth, perhaps due in some cases to changes in the source vegetation, but mainly due to selective enzymatic removal of certain monomer units from polymeric lignin, thereby concentrating the structural types remaining (notably structures related to p.coumaryl alcohol). Polymeric aliphatic hydrocarbon structures are present in nearly all samples, but are more abundant at the lower depths. The chemical and morphological differences in peats are likely to be reflected in the coals that may form from them.

  14. The chemical composition of Galactic beat Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtyukh, V.; Lemasle, B.; Chekhonadskikh, F.; Bono, G.; Matsunaga, N.; Yushchenko, A.; Anderson, R. I.; Belik, S.; da Silva, R.; Inno, L.

    2016-08-01

    We determine the metallicity and detailed chemical abundances (α, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements) for the almost complete (18/24) sample of Galactic double mode Cepheids (also called beat Cepheids). Double mode Cepheids are Cepheids that pulsate in two modes simultaneously. We calibrate a new relation between their metallicity and their period ratio P1/P0. This linear relation allows to determine the metallicity of bimodal Cepheids with an accuracy of 0.03 dex in the range of [Fe/H] from +0.2 to -0.5 dex. By extrapolating the relation to Magellanic Clouds beat Cepheids, we provide their metallicity distribution function. Moreover, by using this relation, we also provide the first metallicity estimate for two double-mode F/1O Cepheids located in and beyond the Galactic bulge. Finally, we report the discovery of a super-Lithium rich double mode Cepheid V371 Per which has a Lithium abundance of logA(Li) = 3.54 ± 0.09 dex. Along with V1033 Cyg (which is an ordinary classical Cepheid), it is the second known Cepheid of such type in the Galaxy.

  15. The relationship of argon retentivity and chemical composition of hornblende

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, B.E.; Farrow, C.M. ); Elias, E.M. )

    1988-08-01

    K-Ar ages of 26 hornblende separates from Connemara, western Ireland do not show any correlation with the chemical composition of the hornblendes, including their iron contents. It is suggested that this is the usual pattern as there are only rare reports of compositional control of K-Ar ages.

  16. Cometary coma chemical composition (C4) mission. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Clark, B. C.; Niemann, H. B.; Alexander, M.; Knocke, P. C.; O'Hara, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary missions are of enormous fundamental importance for many different space science disciplines, including exobiology. Comets are presumed relics of the earliest, most primitive material in the solar nebula and are related to the planetesimals. They undoubtedly provided a general enrichment of volatiles to the inner solar system (contributing to atmospheres and oceans) and may have been key to the origin of life. A Discovery class, comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, was selected for further study by NASA earlier this year. The C4 Mission is a highly focused and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission, concentrating exclusively on measurements which will lead to an understanding of the chemical composition and make-up of the cometary nucleus. The scientific goals of the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission are to rendezvous with a short-period comet and (1) to determine the elemental, chemical, and isotopic composition of the nucleus and (2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. Further, it is a goal to obtain preliminary data on the development of the coma (dust and gas composition) as a function of time and orbital position.

  17. Chemical Equilibrium Composition of Aqueous Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-12-30

    MINEQL is a subroutine package to calculate equilibrium composition of an aqueous system, accounting for mass transfer. MINEQL-EIR contains an additional base on enthalpy and heat capacity data and has the option to do calculations at temperatures different from 25 degrees C.

  18. Chemical composition in relation with biomass ash structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holubcik, Michal; Jandacka, Jozef

    2014-08-01

    Biomass combustion can be more complicated like combustion of fossil fuels because it is necessary to solve problems with lower ash melting temperature. It can cause a lot of problems during combustion process. Chemical composition of biomass ash has great impact on sinters and slags creation in ash because it affects structure of heated ash. In this paper was solved relation between chemical composition and structure of heated ash from three types of biomass (spruce wood, miscanthus giganteus and wheat straw). Amount of SiO2, CaO, MgO, Al2O3 and K2O was determined. Structure of heated ash was optically determined after heating to 1000 °C or 1200 °C. Results demonstrated that chemical composition has strong effect on structure and color of heated ash.

  19. Chemical composition of Earth, Venus, and Mercury.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J W; Anders, E

    1980-12-01

    Model compositions of Earth, Venus, and Mercury are calculated from the premise that planets and chondrites underwent four identical fractionation processes in the solar nebula. Because elements of similar properties stay together in these processes, five constraints suffice to define the composition of a planet: mass of the core, abundance of U, and the ratios K/U, Tl/U, and FeO/(FeO + MgO). Complete abundance tables, and normative mineralogies, are given for all three planets. Review of available data shows only a few gross trends for the inner planets: FeO decreases with heliocentric distance, whereas volatiles are depleted and refractories are enriched in the smaller planets. PMID:16592930

  20. Chemical composition of Earth, Venus, and Mercury

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, John W.; Anders, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Model compositions of Earth, Venus, and Mercury are calculated from the premise that planets and chondrites underwent four identical fractionation processes in the solar nebula. Because elements of similar properties stay together in these processes, five constraints suffice to define the composition of a planet: mass of the core, abundance of U, and the ratios K/U, Tl/U, and FeO/(FeO + MgO). Complete abundance tables, and normative mineralogies, are given for all three planets. Review of available data shows only a few gross trends for the inner planets: FeO decreases with heliocentric distance, whereas volatiles are depleted and refractories are enriched in the smaller planets. Images PMID:16592930

  1. Chemical composition of earth, Venus, and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. W.; Anders, E.

    1980-01-01

    Model compositions of the earth, Venus, and Mercury are calculated from the premise that planets and chondrites underwent four identical fractionation processes in the solar nebula. Because elements of similar properties stay together in these processes, five constraints suffice to define the composition of a planet: mass of the core, abundance of U, and the ratios K/U, TI/U, and FeO/(FeO + MgO). Complete abundance tables, and normative mineralogies, are given for all three planets. A review of available data shows only a few gross trends for the inner planets: FeO decreases with heliocentric distance, whereas volatiles are depleted and refractories are enriched in the smaller planets.

  2. Chemical constraints on fly ash glass compositions

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Brindle; Michael J. McCarthy

    2006-12-15

    The major oxide content and mineralogy of 75 European fly ashes were examined, and the major element composition of the glass phase was obtained for each. Correlation of compositional trends with the glass content of the ash was explored. Alkali content was deduced to have a major influence on glass formation, and this in turn could be related to the probable chemistry of clay minerals in the source coals. Maximal glass content corresponded to high aluminum content in the glass, and this is in accordance with the theoretical mechanism of formation of aluminosilicate glasses, in which network-modifying oxides are required to promote tetrahedral coordination of aluminum in glass chain structures. Iron oxide was found to substitute for alkali oxides where the latter were deficient, and some indications of preferred eutectic compositions were found. The work suggests that the proportion of the glass phase in the ash can be predicted from the coal mineralogy and that the utility of a given ash for processing into geopolymers or zeolites is determined by its source. 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Fuel options from microalgae with representative chemical compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, D. A.

    1984-07-01

    Representative species of microalgae are examined with respect to their reported chemical compositions. Each species is analyzed under a variety of culture conditions, with the objective being to characterize an optimum mixture of fuel products (e.g., methane, ethanol, methylester) which should be produced by the particular species. Historically the emphasis has been on the entire algal cell mass. Using the reported chemical composition for the representative species under specific sets of growth conditions, some conclusions can be drawn about the preferred fuel product conversion routes that could be employed. 10 references, 7 figures, 12 tables.

  4. Composition and placement process for oil field chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu, L.A.; Yost, M.E.

    1991-01-22

    This patent describes a process for the continuous release of an oil field chemical within a subterranean hydrocarbon bearing formation or wellbore penetrating such formation. It comprises placing the oil field chemical in a polymeric microcapsule; dispersing such polymeric microcapsules; introducing the wellbore fluid containing the microcapsules into a well bore or subterranean formation through a wellbore; then allowing water and temperature at formation conditions to degrade; continuously releasing the chemical from the degraded microcapsules. This patent describes a composition comprising an oil field chemical incorporated in a polymeric microcapsule comprising the condensation product of hydroxyacetic acid monomer or hydroxyacetic acid co-condensed with up to 15 percent by weight of other hydroxy-, carboxylic acid-, or hydroxycarboxylic acid- containing moieties. The product has a number average molecular weight of from about 200 to about 4000.

  5. Surface chemical composition analysis of heat-treated bamboo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fan-dan; Yu, Yang-lun; Zhang, Ya-mei; Yu, Wen-ji; Gao, Jian-min

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the effect of heat treatment on the chemical composition of bamboo slivers was studied. The chemical properties of the samples were examined by chemical analysis. Results showed a decrease in the contents of holocellulose and α-cellulose, as well as an increase in the contents of lignin and extractives. Changes in the chemical structure of bamboo components were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). FTIR spectroscopy results indicated that hemicellulose contents decrease, whereas lignin contents increase after heat treatment. Ester formation linked to lignin decreased the hygroscopicity of the bamboo samples and consequently improved their dimensional stability and durability. XPS spectroscopy results showed that hemicelluloses and celluloses are relatively more sensitive to the heating process than lignin. As a consequence, hemicellulose and cellulose contents decreased, whereas lignin contents increased during heat treatment. The results obtained in this study provide useful information for the future utilization of heat-treated bamboo.

  6. Aqueous Alteration and Martian Bulk Chemical Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J.; Boynton, W. V.; McLennan, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    The bulk compositions of the terrestrial planets are fundamentally important in testing models for planetary accretion. This is particularly true for the abundances of volatile elements. In the absence of direct samples of the mantle, we must rely on samples of surface materials obtained from orbit (specifically from the Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer, GRS), Martian meteorites, and in situ analyses. Use of these databases requires understanding the processes that formed and modified the igneous rocks composing the crust; aqueous processes are particularly important. Halogens are useful elements for understanding Martian bulk composition and surface aqueous alteration. Here, we focus on Cl, which is an incompatible element during partial melting. Cosmochemically, Cl is a moderately volatile element with a condensation temperature of 948 Kelvin, only slightly below that of K (1006 Kelvin), another incompatible lithophile element. Cl is substantially lost during magma degassing at or near the surface, making it difficult to determine its abundances in the interior through analyses of rocks, leading to an underestimate of Cl abundance in bulk silicate Mars. GRS data for Mars between approximately 52 degrees north and south show that K and Cl are uncorrelated. This is not surprising as they fractionate easily by release of Cl-bearing gases from magmas near the surface and during eruptions, by aqueous alteration of surface materials, and by the large solubility of Cl salts in water. A positive correlation of Cl with H supports the role of water in Cl redistribution. In spite of the lack of correlation between K and Cl, the mean Cl/K ratio is roughly chondritic: 1.5 ±0.1 compared to 1.28 in CI chondrites. However, Cl appears to be enriched at least in the uppermost few tens of cm analyzed by the GRS: Cl correlates with both H and S, but a linear fit to the data shows a positive Cl intercept of about 0.3, which suggests a decoupling of Cl from S and H. Adjusting the

  7. Chemical composition analysis and authentication of whisky.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewska, Paulina; Dymerski, Tomasz; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2015-08-30

    Whisky (whiskey) is one of the most popular spirit-based drinks made from malted or saccharified grains, which should mature for at least 3 years in wooden barrels. High popularity of products usually causes a potential risk of adulteration. Thus authenticity assessment is one of the key elements of food product marketing. Authentication of whisky is based on comparing the composition of this alcohol with other spirit drinks. The present review summarizes all information about the comparison of whisky and other alcoholic beverages, the identification of type of whisky or the assessment of its quality and finally the authentication of whisky. The article also presents the various techniques used for analyzing whisky, such as gas and liquid chromatography with different types of detectors (FID, AED, UV-Vis), electronic nose, atomic absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In some cases the application of chemometric methods is also described, namely PCA, DFA, LDA, ANOVA, SIMCA, PNN, k-NN and CA, as well as preparation techniques such SPME or SPE. PMID:25315338

  8. Major element chemical compositions of chondrules in unequilibrated chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The chemical compositions (except for metals and sulfides in chondrules) of more than 500 chondrules from unequilibrated E, H, L, LL, and C chondrites were measured using a broad beam of an electron-probe microanalyzer. The compositions of chondrules can be represented by various mixtures of normative compositions of olivine, low-Ca pyroxene, plagioclase, and high-Ca pyroxene with minor amounts of spinel, feldspathoid, SiO2-minerals, etc., indicating that the chondrule precursor materials consisted of aggregates of these minerals. The Al, Na, and K contents of most chondrules reflect the compositions of the ternary feldspar (An-Ab-Kf) of the chondrule precursor materials, and chemical types of chondrules (KF, SP, IP, and CP) are defined on the basis of the atomic proportion of Al, Na, and K.

  9. Energetic composites and method of providing chemical energy

    DOEpatents

    Danen, Wayne C.; Martin, Joe A.

    1997-01-01

    A method for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application.

  10. Energetic composites and method of providing chemical energy

    DOEpatents

    Danen, W.C.; Martin, J.A.

    1997-02-25

    A method is described for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application. 3 figs.

  11. Chemical vapor deposited fiber coatings and chemical vapor infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetz, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) were employed to deposit a series of interfacial coatings on SiC and carbon yarn. Molybdenum, tungsten and chromium hexacarbonyls were utilized as precursors in a low temperature (350[degrees]C) MOCVD process to coat SiC yarn with Mo, W and Cr oxycarbides. Annealing studies performed on the MoOC and WOC coated SiC yarns in N[sub 2] to 1,000[degrees]C establish that further decomposition of the oxycarbides occurred, culminating in the formation of the metals. These metals were then found to react with Si to form Mo and W disilicide coatings. In the Cr system, heating in N[sub 2] above 800[degrees]C resulted in the formation of a mixture of carbides and oxides. Convention CVD was also employed to coat SiC and carbon yarn with C, Bn and a new interface designated BC (a carbon-boron alloy). The coated tows were then infiltrated with SiC, TiO[sub 2], SiO[sub 2] and B[sub 4]C by a chemical vapor infiltration process. The B-C coatings were found to provide advantageous interfacial properties over carbon and BN coatings in several different composite systems. The effectiveness of these different coatings to act as a chemically inert barrier layer and their relationship to the degree of interfacial debonding on the mechanical properties of the composites were examined. The effects of thermal stability and strength of the coated fibers and composites were also determined for several difference atmospheres. In addition, a new method for determining the tensile strength of the as-received and coated yarns was also developed. The coated fibers and composites were further characterized by AES, SEM, XPS, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  12. Chemical composition of cottonseed affected by cropping management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed is a valuable raw material for a range of food, animal feed, and industrial (such as adhesives) products. Chemical composition is one of the critical parameters to evaluate cottonseed's quality and potential end use. However, the information on the impacts of cropping management practices...

  13. Computer program determines chemical composition of physical system at equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, S. S.

    1966-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 digital computer program calculates equilibrium composition of complex, multiphase chemical systems. This is a free energy minimization method with solution of the problem reduced to mathematical operations, without concern for the chemistry involved. Also certain thermodynamic properties are determined as byproducts of the main calculations.

  14. Composition and Thermodynamic Properties of Air in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeckel, W E; Weston, Kenneth C

    1958-01-01

    Charts have been prepared relating the thermodynamic properties of air in chemical equilibrium for temperatures to 15,000 degrees k and for pressures 10(-5) to 10 (plus 4) atmospheres. Also included are charts showing the composition of air, the isentropic exponent, and the speed of sound. These charts are based on thermodynamic data calculated by the National Bureau of Standards.

  15. Coma chemical composition at the Abydos landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, A.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G.; Andrews, D.; Barber, S.; Wright, I.

    2015-10-01

    The Ptolemy instrument, onboard the Rosetta Philae Lander, made measurements of the chemical composition of the coma mid-bounce, just after the non-nominal landing on the surface, and subsequently at the Abydos landing site. This presentation will discuss Ptolemy's operations throughout this 45 hour period and the results obtained.

  16. Chemical composition of defatted cottonseed and soy meal products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical composition is critical information for product quality and exploration of new use. Hence defatted cottonseed meals from both glanded (with gossypol) and glandless (without gossypol) cotton seeds were separated into water soluble and insoluble fractions, or water soluble, alkali soluble as ...

  17. Chemical vapor infiltration of non-oxide ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites are enabling new, high temperature structural applications. Chemical vapor infiltration methods for producing these composites are being investigated, with the complexity of filament weaves and deposition chemistry merged with standard heat and mass transport relationships. Silicon carbide- based materials are, by far, the most mature, and are already being used in aerospace applications. This paper addresses the state-of-the-art of the technology and outlines current issues.

  18. Chemical composition and medicinal significance of Fagonia cretica: a review.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Huma; Asif, Saira; Ahmed, Haroon; Al-Kahtani, Hassan A; Hayat, Khizar

    2016-01-01

    Members of the family Zygophyllaceae are distributed in arid areas of the world and are traditionally used against various health insults ranging from skin lesions to lethal cancer. Fagonia cretica Linn. is a plant having novel compounds responsive in diseases that are still considered as incurable or are curable with serious side effects. Researchers, particularly of the Asian region elaborately studied the chemical composition and pharmacological activities of this plant. But further studies are still required to evaluate this plant in clinical trials in order to save humanity from synthetic chemical drugs yet disputed as 'friends or foe'. PMID:25921950

  19. Fast, Contactless Monitoring of the Chemical Composition of Raw Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, O.; Stoyanov, Zh.; Stoyanov, B.; Nadoliisky, M.; Vaseashta, Ashok

    A technique to monitor chemical composition of materials during manufacturing of ceramic products, in particular - of bricks, is investigated. The technique of monitoring is likely to offset environmental pollution and save energy. For this purpose, we use the Surface photo charge effect, which is generated for each solid body interacting with electromagnetic field. The measurement is express and can be performed in-situ in production conditions. The experimental work has shown that different samples of the investigated materials with different compositions produce different signals specific to each sample. For the same material, the signal varies with the change in chemical composition. More specifically, it is shown that for the material from which the bricks are fired, the signal is a function of the percentage of coal sludge. The results indicate that the characterization technique as a viable technique for control of incoming raw materials.

  20. The average chemical composition of the lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkevich, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    The available analytical data from twelve locations on the moon are used to estimate the average amounts of the principal chemical elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, and Fe) in the mare, the terra, and the average lunar surface regolith. These chemical elements comprise about 99% of the atoms on the lunar surface. The relatively small variability in the amounts of these elements at different mare (or terra) sites, and the evidence from the orbital measurements of Apollo 15 and 16, suggest that the lunar surface is much more homogeneous than the surface of the earth. The average chemical composition of the lunar surface may now be known as well as, if not better than, that of the solid part of the earth's surface.

  1. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.; Orsini, Douglas

    2006-04-18

    An apparatus for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution is provided. The apparatus includes an enhanced particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and an enhanced collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical means. Methods for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles are also provided, the method including exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; and flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  2. Chemical Composition of Defatted Cottonseed and Soy Meal Products.

    PubMed

    He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Hailin; Olk, Dan C

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition is critical information for product quality and exploration of new use. Hence defatted cottonseed meals from both glanded (with gossypol) and glandless (without gossypol) cotton seeds were separated into water soluble and insoluble fractions, or water soluble, alkali soluble as well as total protein isolates. The contents of gossypol, total protein and amino acids, fiber and carbohydrates, and selected macro and trace elements in these products were determined and compared with each other and with those of soy meal products. Data reported in this work improved our understanding on the chemical composition of different cottonseed meal products that is helpful for more economical utilization of these products. These data would also provide a basic reference for product standards and quality control when the production of the cottonseed meal products comes to pilot and industrial scales. PMID:26079931

  3. Chemical Composition of Defatted Cottonseed and Soy Meal Products

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Hailin; Olk, Dan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition is critical information for product quality and exploration of new use. Hence defatted cottonseed meals from both glanded (with gossypol) and glandless (without gossypol) cotton seeds were separated into water soluble and insoluble fractions, or water soluble, alkali soluble as well as total protein isolates. The contents of gossypol, total protein and amino acids, fiber and carbohydrates, and selected macro and trace elements in these products were determined and compared with each other and with those of soy meal products. Data reported in this work improved our understanding on the chemical composition of different cottonseed meal products that is helpful for more economical utilization of these products. These data would also provide a basic reference for product standards and quality control when the production of the cottonseed meal products comes to pilot and industrial scales. PMID:26079931

  4. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution are provided. The apparatus includes a modified particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and a collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical methods. The method provided for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles includes exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  5. Measurements of aerosol chemical composition in boreal forest summer conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ńijälä, M.; Junninen, H.; Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Corrigan, A.; Russell, L.; Makkonen, U.; Virkkula, A.; Mäntykenttä, J.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.

    2012-04-01

    Boreal forests are an important biome, covering vast areas of the northern hemisphere and affecting the global climate change via various feedbacks [1]. Despite having relatively few anthropogenic primary aerosol sources, they always contain a non-negligible aerosol population [2]. This study describes aerosol chemical composition measurements using Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (C-ToF AMS, [3]), carried out at a boreal forest area in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The site, Helsinki University SMEAR II measurement station [4], is situated at a homogeneous Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest stand. In addition to the station's permanent aerosol, gas phase and meteorological instruments, during the HUMPPA (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air) campaign in July 2010, a very comprehensive set of atmospheric chemistry measurement instrumentation was provided by the Max Planck Institute for chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University, University of California and the Finnish Meteorological institute. In this study aerosol chemical composition measurements from the campaign are presented. The dominant aerosol chemical species during the campaign were the organics, although periods with elevated amounts of particulate sulfates were also seen. The overall AMS measured particle mass concentrations varied from near zero to 27 μg/m observed during a forest fire smoke episode. The AMS measured aerosol mass loadings were found to agree well with DMPS derived mass concentrations (r2=0.998). The AMS data was also compared with three other aerosol instruments. The Marga instrument [5] was used to provide a quantitative semi-online measurement of inorganic chemical compounds in particle phase. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis was performed on daily filter samples, enabling the identification and quantification of organic aerosol subspecies. Finally an Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (APCI

  6. Chemical composition studies of flint with different origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarina, Liga; Seglins, Valdis; Kostjukovs, Juris; Burlakovs, Juris

    2015-04-01

    Flint is a widely used material in the Stone Age because of its physical characteristics, which makes the material suitable for obtaining tools with sharp working edges. Chert, flint, chalcedony, agate and jasper in composition and several other physical characteristics are very similar. Therefore in archaeology most often they are determined simplified and are not distinguished, but described as flint or chert, denoting only the material in a general sense. However, in-depth studies it is necessary accurately identify the rock type and, in addition, to determine the origin of the flint and the conditions of the formation for the various archaeological research needs. As a typical example can be noted the localization problems in determining whether flint is local, or have emerged in the region through the exchange or by transportation. Flint consists mainly from quartz and mostly it has cryptocrystalline or amorphous structure. In nature it occurs as nodules and interbedded inclusions in sedimentary deposits as a result of digenesis processes when calcium carbonate is replaced with silicia. Bedded chert primarily is accumulations originated from excess alkalinity in the sediments. Flint can also be formed in the crystallization processes of the chemically unstable amorphous silicia. In this context, it should be noted that flint is naturally heterogeneous and very varied material by the physical properties and therefore problematic in many contemporary studies. In the study different origin flint samples from England, Denmark and Latvia were compared after their chemical composition. Flint nodules from Northern Europe chalk cliffs formed as inclusions in interbedded deposits or results of the digenesis and samples of chalcedony saturated dolomite from Latvia formed in hydrothermal processes were analysed using XRD and XRF methods. The obtained data were statistically analysed, identifying major, minor and trace elements and subsequently assessing the chemical

  7. Chemical and isotopic compositions in acid residues from various meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kano, N.; Yamakoshi, K.; Matsuzaki, H.; Nogami, K.

    1993-01-01

    We are planning to carry out systematic isotopic investigations of Ru, Mg, etc., in primordial samples. The investigations will be pursued in the context of a study of the pre-history of the solar system. It is hoped that the study will yield direct evidence for processes of nucleosynthesis in the pre-solar stage and detection of extinct radioactive nuclides. In this paper, we present the results of chemical compositions of acid residues obtained from three types of meteorites: Canyon Diablo (IA), Allende (CV3), and Nuevo Mercuro (H5); and the preliminary results of Ru isotopic compositions.

  8. Public Health Risk Conditioned by Chemical Composition of Ground Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, E.; Osipova, N.; Yankovich, K.; Matveenko, I.

    2016-03-01

    The article studies the public health potential risk originated from water consumption and estimated on the basis of the groundwater chemical composition. We have processed the results of chemical groundwater analysis in different aquifers of Tomsk district (Tomsk Oblast, Russia). More than 8400 samples of chemical groundwater analyses were taken during long-term observation period. Human health risk assessment of exposure to contaminants in drinking water was performed in accordance with the risk assessment guidance for public health concerning chemical pollution of the environment (Russian reference number: 2.1.10.1920-04-M, 2004). Identified potential risks were estimated for consuming water of each aquifer. The comparative analysis of water quality of different aquifers was performed on the basis of the risk coefficient of the total non-carcinogenic effects. The non-carcinogenic risk for the health of the Tomsk district population due to groundwater consumption without prior sanitary treatment was admitted acceptable. A rather similar picture is observed for all aquifers, although deeper aquifers show lower hazard coefficients.

  9. Chemical Composition of Rainwater in Córdoba City, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, M. L.; Asar, M. L.; Ceppi, S.; Bürgesser, R. E.; Avila, E.

    2013-05-01

    Sampling and chemical analysis of rainwater has proved to be a useful technique for studying its chemical composition and provides a greater understanding of local and regional dispersion of pollutants and their potential impacts to ecosystems through deposition processes. Samples of rainwater were collected during 2009-2012, in Córdoba city, Argentina. Two kind of sampling were performed: event-specific and sequential. The objective of the first of these was to determine the chemical concentration of the total rain, while the objective of the second one was to analyze the variability of the chemical concentration during an individual rain event. The total volume of each sample was divided in halves. One half was filtered through 0.45 μm membrane filter. After this, all the samples were reduced by evaporation to a final volume of 10 ml. The non-filtered samples were acidified and digested in accordance to the method 3050B of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for acid digestion of sediments. Multi-elemental standard solutions in different concentrations were prepared by adequate dilutions. Gallium was added as an internal standard in all standard solutions and samples. Exactly 5 μL of these solutions were deposited on acrylic supports. When these droplets were dried, Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence technique was used for determining the chemical elements. Spectra were analyzed with the AXIL package for spectrum analysis. Due to the intrinsic characteristics of the total reflection technique, the background of the measurements is significantly reduced and there are no matrix effects, therefore quantification can be obtained from the linear correlation between fluorescence intensity and the concentration of the element of interest. The elements quantified were S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, and Pb. For all of them a calibration curve was performed in order to quantify their concentrations on the

  10. Development of chemical vapor composites, CVC materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-05

    Industry has a critical need for high-temperature operable ceramic composites that are strong, non-brittle, light weight, and corrosion resistant. Improvements in energy efficiency, reduced emissions and increased productivity can be achieved in many industrial processes with ceramic composites if the reaction temperature and pressure are increased. Ceramic composites offer the potential to meet these material requirements in a variety of industrial applications. However, their use is often restricted by high cost. The Chemical Vapor composite, CVC, process can reduce the high costs and multiple fabrication steps presently required for ceramic fabrication. CVC deposition has the potential to eliminate many difficult processing problems and greatly increase fabrication rates for composites. With CVC, the manufacturing process can control the composites` density, microstructure and composition during growth. The CVC process: can grow or deposit material 100 times faster than conventional techniques; does not require an expensive woven preform to infiltrate; can use high modulus fibers that cannot be woven into a preform; can deposit composites to tolerances of less than 0.025 mm on one surface without further machining.

  11. Chemical composition and temperature structure of Titan's stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.; Bampasidis, G.; Achterberg, R.; Lavvas, P.; Vinatier, S.; Nixon, C.; Jennings, D.; Teanby, N.; Flasar, F. M.; Orton, G.; Romani, P.; Carlson, R.; Guandique, E. A.

    2013-09-01

    We have explored the thermal and chemical composition of Titan's atmosphere by combining Cassini CIRS recordings and the related ground - and space - based observations. The fulfillment of one Titanian year of space observations provides us for the first time with the opportunity to evaluate the relative role of different physical processes in the long term evolution of this complex environment. We find indication for a weakening of the temperature gradient with warming of the stratosphere and cooling of the lower mesosphere. In addition, we infer precise concentrations for the trace gases and their main isotopologues and find that the chemical composition in Titan's stratosphere varies significantly with latitude during the 6 years investigated here, with increased mixing ratios towards the northern latitudes. In particular, we monitor and quantify the amplitu de of a maximum enhancement of several gases observed at northern latitudes up to 50°N around mid-2009, at the time of the NSE. We find that this raise is followed by a rapid decrease in chemical inventory in 2010 probably due to a weakening north polar vortex with reduced lateral mixing across the vortex boundary. By comparing the Cassini/CIRS results from both the limb and the nadir observations with past V1 (1980) and ISO (1997)inferences we find indication for seasonal variations.

  12. Physical Characterization and Steam Chemical Reactivity of Carbon Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, Robert Andrew; Pawelko, Robert James; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2001-05-01

    This report documents experiments and analyses that have been done at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to measure the steam chemical reactivity of two types of carbon fiber composites, NS31 and NB31, proposed for use at the divertor strike points in an ITER-like tokamak. These materials are 3D CFCs constituted by a NOVOLTEX preform and densified by pyrocarbon infiltration and heat treatment. NS31 differs from NB31 in that the final infiltration was done with liquid silicon to reduce the porosity and enhance the thermal conductivity of the CFC. Our approach in this work was twofold: (1) physical characterization measurements of the specimens and (2) measurements of the chemical reactivity of specimens exposed to steam.

  13. Chemical composition of HAL, an isotopically-unusual Allende inclusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, A. M.; Tanaka, T.; Grossman, L.; Lee, T.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    Samples of hibonite, black rim, and portions of friable rim from an unusual Allende inclusion, named HAL, were analyzed by INAA and RNAA for 37 major, minor, and trace elements. An unusually low amount of Ce was found in HAL, although it otherwise was highly enriched in REE compared to C1 chondrites. HAL is also depleted in Sr, Ba, U, V, Ru, Os, and Ir relative to other refractory elements. It is concluded that the distribution of REE between hibonite and rims was established when hibonite and other refractory minerals were removed at slightly different temperatures from a hot, oxidizing gas in which they previously coexisted as separate grains. Possible locations for the chemical and mass dependent isotopic fractionation are considered to be in ejecta from the low temperature helium-burning zone of a supernova and in the locally oxidizing environment generated by evaporation of interstellar grains of near-chondritic chemical composition.

  14. Determining the chemical composition of cloud condensation nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.; Rothert, J.E.; McClure, K.E. ); Alofs, D.J.; Hagen, D.E.; White, D.R.; Hopkins, A.R.; Trueblood, M.B. . Cloud and Aerosol Science Lab.)

    1992-02-01

    This second progress report describes the status of the project one and one-half years after the start. The goal of the project is to develop the instrumentation to collect cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in sufficient amounts to determine their chemical composition, and to survey the CCN composition in different climates through a series of field measurements. Our approach to CCN collection is to first form droplets on the nuclei under simulated cloud humidity conditions, which is the only known method of identifying CCN from the background aerosol. Under cloud chamber conditions, the droplets formed become larger than the surrounding aerosol, and can then be removed by inertial impaction. The residue of the evaporated droplets represents the sample to be chemically analyzed. Two size functions of CCN particles are collected by first forming droplets on the large particles are collected by first forming droplets on the large CCN in a haze chamber at 100% relative humidity, and then activating the remaining CCN at 1% supersaturation in a cloud chamber. The experimental apparatus is a serious flow arrangement consisting of an impactor to remove the large aerosol particles, a haze chamber to form droplets on the remaining larger CCN, another impactor to remove the haze droplets containing the larger CCN particles for chemical analysis, a continuous flow diffusion (CFD) cloud chamber to form droplets on the remaining smaller CCN, and a third impactor to remove the droplets for the small CCN sample. Progress is documented here on the development of each of the major components of the flow system. Chemical results are reported on tests to determine suitable wicking material for the different plates. Results of computer modeling of various impactor flows are discussed.

  15. The chemical composition of precipitated austenite in 9Ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fultz, B.; Kim, J. I.; Kim, Y. H.; Morris, J. W.

    1986-06-01

    Analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy and a novel Mössbauer spectrometry technique were used to measure the chemical composition of austenite particles which precipitate during intercritical tempering of 9Ni steel. Both techniques showed an enrichment of Ni, Mn, Cr, and Si in the austenite. A straightforward analysis involving data on both austenite composition and austenite formation kinetics suggests that the growth of austenite particles is controlled by a 3-dimensional diffusion process. The segregation of solutes to the austenite accounts for much of its stability against the martensitic transformation at low temperatures. Composition inhomogeneities develop in austenite particles after long temperings; the central regions of the particles are lean in solutes and are first to undergo the martensitic transformation. However, changes in solute concentrations of the austenite during long temperings seem too small to account for the large changes in austenite stability. It appears that some of the stability of precipitated austenite must be microstructural in origin.

  16. Chem I Supplement: The Chemical Composition of the Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holum, John R.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the principal chemical substances which occur in most cells. These chemicals are the lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, and nucleic acids. Suggests that the structures of these substances be taught first since structure determines function. (JN)

  17. Chemical composition of dissolved organic matter draining permafrost soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Collin P.; Cory, Rose M.

    2015-10-01

    Northern circumpolar permafrost soils contain roughly twice the amount of carbon stored in the atmosphere today, but the majority of this soil organic carbon is perennially frozen. Climate warming in the arctic is thawing permafrost soils and mobilizing previously frozen dissolved organic matter (DOM) from deeper soil layers to nearby surface waters. Previous studies have reported that ancient DOM draining deeper layers of permafrost soils was more susceptible to degradation by aquatic bacteria compared to modern DOM draining the shallow active layer of permafrost soils, and have suggested that DOM chemical composition may be an important control for the lability of DOM to bacterial degradation. However, the compositional features that distinguish DOM drained from different depths in permafrost soils are poorly characterized. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize the chemical composition of DOM drained from different depths in permafrost soils, and relate these compositional differences to its susceptibility to biological degradation. DOM was leached from the shallow organic mat and the deeper permafrost layer of soils within the Imnavait Creek watershed on the North Slope of Alaska. DOM draining both soil layers was characterized in triplicate by coupling ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry, 13C solid-state NMR, and optical spectroscopy methods with multi-variate statistical analyses. Reproducibility of replicate mass spectra was high, and compositional differences resulting from interfering species or isolation effects were significantly smaller than differences between DOM drained from each soil layer. All analyses indicated that DOM leached from the shallower organic mat contained higher molecular weight, more oxidized, and more unsaturated aromatic species compared to DOM leached from the deeper permafrost layer. Bacterial production rates and bacterial efficiencies were significantly higher for permafrost compared to organic mat DOM

  18. The physical and chemical composition of the lower mantle.

    PubMed

    Bovolo, C Isabella

    2005-12-15

    This article reviews some of the recent advances made within the field of mineral physics. In order to link the observed seismic and density structures of the lower mantle with a particular mineral composition, knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of the candidate materials is required. Determining which compositional model best matches the observed data is difficult because of the wide variety of possible mineral structures and compositions. State-of-the-art experimental and analytical techniques have pushed forward our knowledge of mineral physics, yet certain properties, such as the elastic properties of lower mantle minerals at high pressures and temperatures, are difficult to determine experimentally and remain elusive. Fortunately, computational techniques are now sufficiently advanced to enable the prediction of these properties in a self-consistent manner, but more results are required.A fundamental question is whether or not the upper and lower mantles are mixing. Traditional models that involve chemically separate upper and lower mantles cannot yet be ruled out despite recent conflicting seismological evidence showing that subducting slabs penetrate deep into the lower mantle and that chemically distinct layers are, therefore, unlikely.Recent seismic tomography studies giving three-dimensional models of the seismic wave velocities in the Earth also base their interpretations on the thermodynamic properties of minerals. These studies reveal heterogeneous velocity and density anomalies in the lower mantle, which are difficult to reconcile with mineral physics data. PMID:16286292

  19. Chemical composition of yak colostrum and transient milk.

    PubMed

    Cui, N; Wen, P C; Liang, Q; Liu, H N; Zhang, W B; Wang, P J; Guo, H Y; Ren, F Z

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the changes in the chemical composition of yak colostrum and transient milk. Samples were collected from 12 yaks on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 post-partum (PP). The gross composition, nitrogen fraction distribution, amino acid (AA) profile and fatty acid (FA) profile were analysed. All the components decreased rapidly during the first 3 days except lactose which increased. The ratio of whey protein to casein protein decreased from 46:54 to 17:83 during the first 7 days PP. The content of all the AAs decreased, while the percentages of eight essential AAs in protein of samples increased during the study period. Monounsaturated FAs and polyunsaturated FAs decreased in the first 7 days PP, whereas saturated FAs increased. In conclusion, the changes in chemical composition were remarkable during the first 3 days. The slight variations, happened during the transient period, are not negligible, which also should be taken into account in the development of yak colostrum supplements. PMID:25545664

  20. A bootstrap estimation scheme for chemical compositional data with nondetects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palarea-Albaladejo, J; Martín-Fernández, J.A; Olea, Ricardo A.

    2014-01-01

    The bootstrap method is commonly used to estimate the distribution of estimators and their associated uncertainty when explicit analytic expressions are not available or are difficult to obtain. It has been widely applied in environmental and geochemical studies, where the data generated often represent parts of whole, typically chemical concentrations. This kind of constrained data is generically called compositional data, and they require specialised statistical methods to properly account for their particular covariance structure. On the other hand, it is not unusual in practice that those data contain labels denoting nondetects, that is, concentrations falling below detection limits. Nondetects impede the implementation of the bootstrap and represent an additional source of uncertainty that must be taken into account. In this work, a bootstrap scheme is devised that handles nondetects by adding an imputation step within the resampling process and conveniently propagates their associated uncertainly. In doing so, it considers the constrained relationships between chemical concentrations originated from their compositional nature. Bootstrap estimates using a range of imputation methods, including new stochastic proposals, are compared across scenarios of increasing difficulty. They are formulated to meet compositional principles following the log-ratio approach, and an adjustment is introduced in the multivariate case to deal with nonclosed samples. Results suggest that nondetect bootstrap based on model-based imputation is generally preferable. A robust approach based on isometric log-ratio transformations appears to be particularly suited in this context. Computer routines in the R statistical programming language are provided. 

  1. Dynamics of the chemical composition of rainwater throughout Hurricane Irene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullaugh, K. M.; Willey, J. D.; Kieber, R. J.; Mead, R. N.; Avery, G. B., Jr.

    2013-03-01

    Sequential sampling of rainwater from Hurricane Irene was carried out in Wilmington, NC, USA on 26 and 27 August 2011. Eleven samples were analyzed for pH, major ions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, NH4+), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Hurricane Irene contributed 16% of the total rainwater and 18% of the total chloride wet deposition received in Wilmington NC during all of 2011. This work highlights the main physical factors influencing the chemical composition of tropical storm rainwater: wind speed, wind direction, back trajectory and vertical mixing, time of day and total rain volume. Samples collected early in the storm, when winds blew out of the east, contained dissolved components indicative of marine sources (salts from sea spray and low DOC). The sea-salt components in the samples had two maxima in concentration during the storm the first of which occurred before the volume of rain had sufficiently washed out sea salt from the atmosphere and the second when back trajectories showed large volumes of marine surface air were lifted. As the storm progressed and winds shifted to a westerly direction, the chemical composition of the rainwater became characteristic of terrestrial storms (high DOC and NH4+ and low sea salt). This work demonstrates that tropical storms are not only responsible for significant wet deposition of marine components to land, but terrestrial components can also become entrained in rainwater, which can then be delivered to coastal waters via wet deposition. This study also underscores why analysis of one composite sample can lead to an incomplete interpretation of the factors that influence the chemically divergent analytes in rainwater during extreme weather events.

  2. IR spectroscopic study of the chemical composition of epiphytic lichens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meysurova, A. F.; Khizhnyak, S. D.; Pakhomov, P. M.

    2011-11-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of lichens exposed to pollutants are investigated by means of FTIR spectroscopy. According to model experiments, alkyl nitrates, ammonium salts, amines, and sulfones develop in the lichen thallus through the action of ammonia and nitric and sulfuric acids. Spectroscopic data of modeling experiments enabled nitrogen- and sulfur-containing substances to be identified as the main air pollutants in the vicinity of a pig-breeding complex and information to be obtained on the content of the pollutants and their impact on the lichens.

  3. Chemical feasibility of lithium as a matrix for structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swann, R. T.; Esterling, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The chemical compatibility of lithium with tows of carbon and aramid fibers and silicon carbide and boron monofilaments was investigated by encapsulating the fibers in liquid lithium and also by sintering. The lithium did not readily wet the various fibers. In particular, very little lithium infiltration into the carbon and aramid tows was achieved and the strength of the tows was seriously degraded. The strength of the boron and silicon carbide monofilaments, however, was not affected by the liquid lithium. Therefore lithium is not feasible as a matrix for carbon and aramid fibers, but a composite containing boron or silicon carbide fibers in a lithium matrix may be feasible for specialized applications.

  4. Chemical composition and temperature influence on honey texture properties.

    PubMed

    Oroian, Mircea; Paduret, Sergiu; Amariei, Sonia; Gutt, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the chemical composition and temperatures (20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 °C) influence on the honey texture parameters (hardness, viscosity, adhesion, cohesiveness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness). The honeys analyzed respect the European regulation in terms of moisture content and inverted sugar concentration. The texture parameters are influenced negatively by the moisture content, and positively by the °Brix concentration. The texture parameters modelling have been made using the artificial neural network and the polynomial model. The polynomial model predicted better the texture parameters than the artificial neural network. PMID:26787962

  5. Design of an artificial skin. II. Control of chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Yannas, I V; Burke, J F; Gordon, P L; Huang, C; Rubenstein, R H

    1980-03-01

    Detailed methodology is described for the reproducible preparation of collagen--glycosaminoglycan (GAG) membranes with known chemical composition. These membranes have been used to cover satisfactorily large experimental full-thickness skin wounds in guinea pigs over the past few years. Such membranes have effectively protected these wounds from infection and fluid loss for over 25 days without rejection and without requiring change or other invasive manipulation. When appropriately designed for the purpose, the membranes have also strongly retarded wound contraction and have become replaced by newly synthesized, stable connective tissue. In our work, purified, fully native collagen from two mammalian sources is precipitated from acid dispersion by addition of chondroitin 6-sulfate. The relative amount of GAG in the coprecipitate varies with the amount of GAG added and with the pH. Since coprecipitated GAG is generally eluted from collagen fibers by physiological fluids, control of the chemical composition of membranes is arrived at by crosslinking the collagen--GAG ionic complex with glutaraldehyde, or, alternately, by use of high-temperature vacuum dehydration. Appropriate use of the crosslinking treatment allows separate study of changes in membrane composition due to elution of GAG by extracellular fluid in animal studies from changes in composition due to enzymatic degradation of the grafted or implanted membrane in these studies. Exhaustive in vitro elution studies extending up to 20 days showed that these crosslinking treatments insolubilize in an apparently permanent manner a fraction of the ionically complexed GAG, although it could not be directly confirmed that glutaraldehyde treatment covalently crosslinks GAG to collagen. By contrast, the available evidence suggests strongly that high-temperature vacuum dehydration leads to formation of chemical bonds between collagen and GAG. Procedures are described for control of insolubilized and "free" GAG in

  6. Model atmospheres for cool stars. [varying chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    This report contains an extensive series of model atmospheres for cool stars having a wide range in chemical composition. Model atmospheres (temperature, pressure, density, etc.) are tabulated, along with emergent energy flux distributions, limb darkening, and information on convection for selected models. The models are calculated under the usual assumptions of hydrostatic equilibrium, constancy of total energy flux (including transport both by radiation and convection) and local thermodynamic equilibrium. Some molecular and atomic line opacity is accounted for as a straight mean. While cool star atmospheres are regimes of complicated physical conditions, and these atmospheres are necessarily approximate, they should be useful for a number of kinds of spectral and atmospheric analysis.

  7. Unusual chemical compositions of noctilucent-cloud particle nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemenway, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Two sounding rocket payloads were launched from the ESRO range in Sweden during a noctilucent cloud display. Large numbers of submicron particles were collected, most of which appear to be made up of a high density material coated with a low density material. Typical electron micrographs are shown. Particle chemical compositions have been measured by use of dispersive X-ray analysis equipment attached to an electron microscope and have revealed that most of the high density particle nuclei have atomic weights greater than iron.

  8. Chemical Compositions of Stars in Globular Cluster NGC 2419

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Shimonee; Smecker-Hane, T.; Bosler, T.

    2007-05-01

    We determine the chemical abundances of 19 red giant branch stars in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 2419. Lying at a distance of 84.2 kpc and a galactocentric distance of 91.5 kpc, NGC 2419 is the fourth brightest globular cluster in the Milky Way with a total magnitude of M_V = -9.6 mag, which is significantly brighter than M_V = -7.5 mag, the typical peak of the globular cluster luminosity functions in external galaxies. Our results will give an insight of whether NGC 2419 is in fact a globular cluster or a core of a disrupted galaxy that merged with the Milky Way. We have used IRAF to reduce spectra we have taken with the DEIMOS spectrograph on the the Keck I 10-meter telescope. Using the strengths of the Ca II triplet absorption lines at approximately 8600 Angstrom, we will determine the chemical abundance of each star. If the chemical abundances differ by significantly more than the observational errors would predict then we can conclude the cluster is a remnant of the core of a galaxy that merged with the Milky Way and not a normal globular cluster, because most globular clusters formed quickly from a well mixed gas cloud, and thus their stars have nearly identical ages and chemical compositions. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from a UROP grant to SK and NSF grant AST-0307863 to TSH. These data were obtained at the Keck Observatory, operated by the California Inst. of Technology, Univ. of California and NASA and made possible by generous financial support from the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  9. Chemical composition and health effects of Tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan

    2016-07-15

    Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum) contains a range of nutrients including bioactive carbohydrates and proteins, polyphenols, phytosterols, vitamins, carotenoids, and minerals. The unique composition of Tartary buckwheat contributes to their various health benefits such as anti-oxidative, anti-cancer, anti-hypertension, anti-diabetic, cholesterol-lowering, and cognition-improving. Compared with the more widely cultivated and utilised common buckwheat (F. esculentum), Tartary buckwheat tends to contain higher amounts of certain bioactive components such as rutin, therefore, showing higher efficiency in preventing/treating various disorders. This review summarises the current knowledge of the chemical composition of Tartary buckwheat, and their bio-functions as studied by both in vitro and in vivo models. Tartary buckwheat can be further developed as a sustainable crop for functional food production to improve human health. PMID:26948610

  10. Nanograined WC-Co Composite Powders by Chemical Vapor Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Taegong; Sohn, H. Y.; Han, Gilsoo; Kim, Young-Ugk; Hwang, Kyu Sup; Mena, M.; Fang, Zhigang Z.

    2008-02-01

    Nanograined tungsten carbide (WC) Co composite powders were prepared by a chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) process that has previously been used for preparing the aluminides of titanium and nickel and other metallic and intermetallic powders at the University of Utah. To determine the optimum condition for producing nanograined WC-Co composite powders, the effects of carburization temperature, CH4 to WCl6 ratio, CH4 to H2 ratio, CoCl2 contents, and residence time of WC on the powder composition and particle size were investigated. The reduction and carburization of the vaporized chlorides by CH4-H2 mixtures produced nanograined WC and Co composite powder, which sometimes contained small levels of W2C, W, or the η (Co3W3C) phase. The presence of these incompletely carburized phases can be tolerated because they can be fully carburized during the subsequent sintering process. These phases can also be fully carburized by a separate post-treatment. The products were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). As a result, nanograined WC-Co composite with the particle size less than 30 nm was obtained.

  11. Chemical composition of Titan's lakes and noble gases sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, D.; Mousis, O.; Lunine, J.-I.; Lavvas, P.; Lobo, L.; Ferreira, A.

    2010-04-01

    Titan is one of the most enigmatic objects in the Solar System. The presence of hydrocarbon lakes and even a global ocean have been suspected for decades. The dark features discovered by the CASSINI spacecraft are good candidates for these expected lakes (see McEwen et al. 2005 and Stofan et al. 2007). Their chemical composition has still not been measured but numerical models can give relatively accurate predictions. In the present work, we use the recent model of Titan's lakes chemical composition elaborated by Cordier et al. (2009) in light of the recent Cassini-Huygens measurements in order to investigate the possibility of sequestration of large quantities of noble gases in these liquids. Indeed, the noble gas abundances have been found to be largely in subsolar abundances in the atmosphere of Titan and the origin of this impoverishment is still poorly understood. Our preliminary results show that, under specific circumstances, at least the atmospheric depletion in krypton could be caused by its dissolution in the Titan's surface hydrocarbon liquid phase.

  12. Clouds Composition in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Mbarek, Rostom

    2015-12-01

    Attempts to determine the composition of super-Earth atmospheres have so far been plagued by the presence of clouds. Yet the theoretical framework to understand these clouds is still in its infancy. For the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b, KCl, Na2S, and ZnS have been proposed as condensates that would form under the condition of chemical equilibrium, if the planet’s atmosphere has a bulk composition near solar. Condensation chemistry calculations have not been presented for a wider range of atmospheric bulk composition that is to be expected for super-Earth exoplanets. Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds in atmospheres of varied composition by determining which condensates are likely to form, under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We model super-Earth atmospheres assuming they are formed by degassing of volatiles from a solid planetary core of chondritic material. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temperature range of 350-3,000 K. Clouds should form along the temperature-pressure boundaries where the condensed species appear in our calculations. The super-Earth atmospheres that we study range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both sub-solar and super-solar, thereby spanning a diverse range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Some condensates appear across all of our models. However, the majority of condensed species appear only over specific ranges of H:O and C:O ratios. We find that for GJ 1214b, KCl is the primary cloud-forming condensate at solar composition, in agreement with previous work. However, for oxidizing atmospheres, where H:O is less than unity, K2SO4 clouds form instead. For carbon-rich atmospheres with super-solar C:O ratios, graphite clouds additionally appear. At

  13. Composition and Chemical Variability of Ivoirian Polyalthia oliveri Leaf Oil.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Zana A; Boti, Jean Brice; Ahibo, Coffy Antoine; Bekro, Yves-Alain; Casanova, Joseph; Tomi, Félix; Bighelli, Ange

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition of 45 essential oil samples isolated from the leaves of Polyalthia oliveri harvested in three Ivoirian forests was investigated by GC-FID (retention indices measured on two columns of different polarities), and by (13) C-NMR, following a method developed in our laboratory. In total, 41 components were identified. The content of the main components varied drastically from sample to sample: (E)-β-caryophyllene (1.2 - 50.8%), α-humulene (0.6 - 47.7%), isoguaiene (0 - 27.9%), alloaromadendrene (0 - 24.7%), germacrene B (0 - 18.3%), δ-cadinene (0.4 - 19.3%), and β-selinene (0.2 - 18.5%). The analysis of six oil samples selected in function of their chromatographic profiles is reported in detail. The 45 oil compositions were submitted to hierarchical cluster and principal components analysis, which allowed the distinction of three groups within the oil samples. The compositions of the oils from group I (15 samples) and II (12 samples) were dominated by (E)-β-caryophyllene and α-humulene, respectively. Oil samples of group III (18 samples) needed to be partitioned into four subgroups III.1-III.4 whose compositions were dominated by alloaromadenrene, isoguaiene, germacrene B, and δ-cadinene, respectively. PMID:26916629

  14. Switchgrass biomass and chemical composition for biofuel in eastern Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Madakadze, I.C.; Stewart, K.; Peterson, P.R.; Coulman, B.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1999-08-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is one of several warm-season grasses that have been identified as potential biomass crops in North America. A two-year field study was conducted, on a free-draining sandy clay loam (St. Bernard, Typic Hapludalf), to characterize the growth and evaluate changes in biomass accumulation and composition of switchgrass at Montreal, QC. Three cultivars, Cave-in-Rock, Pathfinder, and Sunburst, were grown in solid stands in a randomized complete block design. Canopy height, dry matter (DM) accumulation and chemical composition were monitored biweekly throughout the growing season. Average maximum canopy heights were 192.5 cm for Cave-in-Rock, 169.9 for Pathfinder, and 177.8 for Sunburst. The respective end-of-season DM yields were 12.2, 11.5, and 10.6 Mg/ha. Biomass production among cultivars appeared to be related to time of maturation. Nitrogen concentration of DM decreased curvilinearly from 25 g/kg at the beginning of the season to 5 g/kg DM at season's end. Both acid-detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral-detergent fiber (NDF) concentrations increased to a maximum early in the season, after which no changes were detected. The average maximum values of ADF and NDF were, respectively, 647.6 and 849.0 g/kg DM for Cave-in-Rock, 669.1 and 865.2 for Pathfinder, and 661.8 and 860.9 for Sunburst. Changes in canopy height, DM accumulation, and chemical composition could all be described by predictive regression equations. These results indicate that switchgrass has potential as a biomass crop in a short-season environment.

  15. Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  16. Chemical vapor composite silicon carbide for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, C. T.; Webb, K.

    2006-06-01

    Components for space telescopes using high quality silicon carbide (SiC) produced via the chemical vapor composite (CVC) process are currently under development. This CVC process is a modification of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and results in a dramatic reduction in residual stress of the SiC deposit. The resultant CVC SiC material has high modulus, high thermal conductivity and can be polished to better than 1nm RMS surface roughness, making it ideal for space telescopes requiring lightweight, stiff and thermally stable components. Moreover, due to its lower intrinsic stress, CVC SiC is much more readily scaled to large sizes and manufactured into the complex geometries needed for the telescope assemblies. Results are presented on the optical figure for a lightweight 15cm CVC SiC mirror demonstrating low wavefront error (<30nm peak-to-valley and <5.1nm rms). Theoretical and experimental modal analysis measured the first four resonant modes of the mirror and found a first modal frequency in the vicinity of 2100 Hz, representing a highly stiff mirror.

  17. Determining the chemical composition of cloud condensation nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.; Rothert, J.E.; McClure, K.E. ); Alofs, D.J.; Hagen, D.E.; Schmitt, J.; White, D.R.; Hopkins, A.R.; Trueblood, M.B. . Cloud and Aerosol Science Lab.)

    1992-12-01

    This third progress report describes the status of our efforts to develop the instrumentation to collect cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in amounts sufficient for chemical analysis. During the fall of 1992 we started collecting filter samples of CCN with the laboratory version of the apparatus at Rolla -MO. The mobile version of the apparatus is in the latter stages of construction. This report includes a fairly rigorous discussion of the operation of the CCN sampling system. A statistical model of the operation of the system is presented to show the ability of the system to collect CCN in the two different size ranges for which we plan to determine the chemical composition. A question is raised by the model results about the operation of one of the virtual impactors. It appears to pass a small percent of particles larger than its cut-point that has the potential of contaminating the smallest CCN sample with larger CCN material. Further tests are necessary, but it may be necessary to redesign that impactor. The appendices of the report show pictures of both the laboratory version and the mobile version of the CCN sampling system. The major hardware has been completed, and the mobile version will be in operation within a few weeks.

  18. XPS analysis of combustion aerosols for chemical composition, surface chemistry, and carbon chemical state.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Randy L; Bryg, Vicky M; Hays, Michael D

    2011-03-15

    Carbonaceous aerosols can vary in elemental content, surface chemistry, and carbon nano-structure. Each of these properties is related to the details of soot formation. Fuel source, combustion process (affecting formation and growth conditions), and postcombustion exhaust where oxidation occurs all contribute to the physical structure and surface chemistry of soot. Traditionally such physical and chemical parameters have been measured separately by various techniques. Presented here is the unified measurement of these characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In the present study, XPS is applied to combustion soot collected from a diesel engine (running biodiesel and pump-grade fuels); jet engine; and institutional, plant, and residential oil-fired boilers. Elemental composition is mapped by a survey scan over a broad energy range. Surface chemistry and carbon nanostructure are quantified by deconvolution of high-resolution scans over the C1s region. This combination of parameters forms a distinct matrix of identifiers for the soots from these sources. PMID:21322576

  19. Photovoltaic Study of Chemically Derived Titanium-Doped Polythiophene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takpire, S. R.; Waghuley, S. A.

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, titanium (Ti)-doped polythiophene (PTh) was synthesized by a chemical route using titanium chloride as oxidant. As-synthesized composites were further used for fabrication of photovoltaic (PV) cells with indium tin oxide/Ti-doped PTh/aluminum architecture. Structural, morphological, and optical analyses of as-synthesized composites were carried out through x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. A broad peak was found in the PL spectra of the composites at around 480 nm, indicating high charge generation efficiency. Different PV parameters of the fabricated PV cells were measured at room temperature under incandescent light of 100 W/m2. The optimized PV cell exhibited short-circuit current ( I sc) and open-circuit voltage ( V oc) on the order of 176 μA and 0.595 V, respectively. The values of I sc and V oc were used to compute the fill factor, which was found to be 0.521. The corresponding power conversion efficiency associated with the optimized cell was found to be 2.41%.

  20. Chemical composition of rainwater in western Amazonia — Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honório, B. A. D.; Horbe, A. M. C.; Seyler, P.

    2010-11-01

    An extensive sample study in western Amazonia, Brazil was performed over the course of one year to i) establish the natural influence of the forest, ii) determine the contribution of the vegetation and fossil fuel burning and iii) detect the geographical and temporal influences on the rainwater composition. Six sampling stations were chosen on two 1000 km-long orthogonal axes. Parintins, Itapiranga, Manaus, Tabatinga were the stations from East to West, and Boa Vista, Manaus, and Apui were the stations from North to South. The results indicate a complex control of the chemical composition of the rainwater and a rather high heterogeneity among the stations. This heterogeneity can be explained by the influence of biogenic, terrestrial dust, agriculture activities and biomass-burning aerosols, and the urban development of Manaus City with its rapid increase in the use of fossil fuel. The isotopic composition of the rainwater indicates that from the north and west sides to the south and east sides, a slight geographical and temporal gradient exists, and more δ180 enriched rainwater tends to be present in the west (Tabatinga) and in the North (Boa Vista). During the dry season a more negative δ180 rainwater was observed in Manaus and Boa Vista stations, as compared to others stations. This observation indicates the more intense evaporative contribution of rainwater as a consequence of a rapid deforestation (savannization) process in the Manaus region.

  1. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    1995-05-01

    This program is designed to develop a Hall-Heroult aluminum smelting cathode with substantially improved properties. The carbon cathodes in current use require significant anode-to-cathode spacing in order to prevent shorting, causing significant electrical inefficiencies. This is due to the non-wettability of carbon by aluminum which causes instability in the cathodic aluminum pad. It is suggested that a fiber reinforced-TiB{sub 2} matrix composite would have the requisite wettability, strength, strain-to-failure, cost, and lifetime to solve this problem. The approach selected to fabricate such a cathode material is chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This program is designed to evaluate potential fiber reinforcements, fabricate test specimens, and test the materials in a static bath and lab-scale Hall cell.

  2. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:25870697

  3. Rapid fabrication of ceramic composite tubes using chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.; Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Matlin, W.M.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramic composite tubes can be fabricated with silicon carbide matrix and Nicalon fiber reinforcement using forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI). The process model GTCVI is used to design the equipment configuration and to identify conditions for rapid, uniform densification. The initial injector and mandrel design produced radial and longitudinal temperature gradients too large for uniform densification. Improved designs have been evaluated with the model. The most favorable approach utilizes a free-standing preform and an insulated water-cooled gas injector. Selected process conditions are based on the temperature limit of the fiber, matrix stoichiometry and reagent utilization efficiency. Model runs for a tube 12 inches long, 4 inches OD and 1/4 inch wall thickness show uniform densification in approximately 15 hours.

  4. Quantification of aerosol chemical composition using continuous single particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, C.-H.; McGuire, M. L.; Godri, K. J.; Slowik, J. G.; Rehbein, P. J. G.; Evans, G. J.

    2011-07-01

    Mass concentrations of sulphate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) were determined from real time single particle data in the size range 0.1-3.0 μm measured by an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) at urban and rural sites in Canada. To quantify chemical species within individual particles measured by an ATOFMS, ion peak intensity of m/z -97 for sulphate, -62 for nitrate, +18 for ammonium, +43 for OC, and +36 for EC were scaled using the number and size distribution data by an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) and a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). Hourly quantified chemical species from ATOFMS single-particle analysis were compared with collocated fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 μm, PM2.5) chemical composition measurements by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) at a rural site, a Gas-Particle Ion Chromatograph (GPIC) at an urban site, and a Sunset Lab field OCEC analyzer at both sites. The highest correlation was found for nitrate, with correlation coefficients (Pearson r) of 0.89 (ATOFMS vs. GPIC) and 0.85 (ATOFMS vs. AMS). ATOFMS mass calibration factors, determined for the urban site, were used to calculate mass concentrations of the major PM2.5 chemical components at the rural site near the US border in southern Ontario. Mass reconstruction using the ATOFMS mass calibration factors agreed very well with the PM2.5 mass concentrations measured by a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM, r = 0.86) at the urban site and a light scattering monitor (DustTrak, r = 0.87) at the rural site. In the urban area nitrate was the largest contributor to PM2.5 mass in the winter, while organics and sulphate contributed ~64 % of the summer PM2.5 in the rural area, suggesting a strong influence of regional/trans-boundary pollution. The mass concentrations of five major species in ten size-resolved particle-types and aerosol acidity of each particle-type were determined for the rural site. On a mass basis

  5. Chemical geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zindler, A.; Hart, S.

    Consideration is given to the following three principal boundary conditions relating to the nature and development of chemical structure in the earth's mantle: (1) inferred scale lengths for mantle chemical heterogeneities, (2) interrelationships of the various isotopic tracers, and (3) the bulk composition of the earth. These boundary conditions are integrated with geophysical constraints in order to evaluate models for the development of the physical and chemical structure of the mantle. Data indicate that: (1) km-size heterogeneities can survive diffusive equilibrium for billions of years; (2) the mantle is chemically heterogeneous on both very small and very large scales; (3) isotopic heterogeneities in the mantle require the existence of four 'end-member' components (DMM, HIMU, EM I, and EM II) and are consistent with the existence of at least two additional components (BSE, PREMA); and (4) primitive undepleted mantle can made up no more than about 55 percent of the total mantle.

  6. Vector diagram of the chemical compositions of tektites and earth lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvasha, L. G.; Gorshkov, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical compositions of tektites and various volcanic glasses, similar in composition to tektites are compared by a petrochemical method. The advantage of the method is that a large number of chemical analyses of igneous rocks can be graphically compared with the help of vectors, plotted in relation to six parameters. These parameters, calculated from ratios of the main oxides given by silicate analysis, reflect the chief characteristics of igneous rock. Material for the study was suppled by data from chemical analysis characterizing tektites of all known locations and data from chemical analyses of obsidians similar in chemical composition to tektites of various petrographical provinces.

  7. Chemical composition of some wild peanut species (Arachis L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Grosso, N R; Nepote, V; Guzmán, C A

    2000-03-01

    Oil, protein, ash, and carbohydrate contents, iodine value, and fatty acid and sterol compositions were studied in seeds of Arachis trinitensis, A. chiquitana, A. kempff-mercadoi, A. diogoi, A. benensis, A. appressipila, A. valida, A. kretschmeri, A. helodes, A. kuhlmannii, A. williamsii, A. sylvestris, A. matiensis, A. pintoi, A. hoehnei, A. villosa, and A. stenosperma. Oil content was greatest in A.stenosperma (mean value = 51.8%). The protein level was higher in A. sylvestris (30.1%) and A. villosa (29.5%). Mean value of oleic acid varied between 30.6% (A. matiensis) and 46.8% (Arachis villosa), and linoleic acid oscillated between 34.1% (A. villosa) and 47.4% (A. appressipila). The better oleic-to-linoleic (O/L) ratio was exhibited by A. villosa (1.38). Some species showed higher concentration of behenic acid. The greatest level of this fatty acid was found in A. matiensis (6.2%). Iodine value was lower in A. valida (99.2). The sterol composition in the different peanut species showed higher concentration of beta-sitosterol (mean values oscillated between 55.7 and 60.2%) followed by campesterol (12.4-16. 5%), stigmasterol (9.7-13.3%), and Delta(5)-avenasterol (9.7-13.4%). The chemical quality and stability of oils (iodine value and O/L ratio) from wild peanut studied in this work are not better than those of cultivated peanut. PMID:10725154

  8. To measure the chemical composition of a Near Earth Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasnault, 0.; Ball, A.; Biele, J.; D'Uston, C.; Forni, O.; Klingelhofer, G.; Maurice, S.; Ulamec, S.

    Introduction. Scenarios for a Near Earth Object (NEO) rendezvous mission were discussed recently in Europe. Such a mission would address scientific questions about the initial conditions and evolutionary history of the solar nebula, as well as mitigation considerations to prevent impact with the Earth. In our opinion the measurement of the elemental composition and the distribution of volatiles in the shallow sub-surface are two of the key observations to be conducted, either from an orbiter or a lander. These measurements are also valuable for documentation (landing site candidates and sample context). This report is limited to the chemical composition, but we assume that remote and/or in-situ observations of physical characteristics, interior, morphology, mineralogy, and organic compounds will also be made as essential complements to achieve the mission scientific objectives. Scientific Interest. The analysis of the bulk composition addresses three fundamental aspects of the scientific mission: (1) the formation of the asteroid or the comet; (2) the evolution of the object; (3) the relation between the parent body and collected meteorites on Earth. Classification of an asteroid/comet can be based on its global composition (abundances of Mg, Si, Fe, Al, Ca, etc. along with its mineralogy), which bears the signature of the feeding zone where it formed. For example the K/U and K/Th ratios seem to increase with distance from the Sun (decreasing temperature). The hydrogen content is another measurable to study the distribution of volatiles in the Solar System. The surface composition is also the result of the degree of evolution of the object and of the interactions with its environment. Building a compositional map of the major elements is necessary to identify and characterize the processes that influenced the asteroid along its history. Finally, knowing the chemical composition will obviously help to relate the parent 1 body to meteorites. Ideally the measurement

  9. Chemical composition of inks of diverse marine molluscs suggests convergent chemical defenses.

    PubMed

    Derby, Charles D; Kicklighter, Cynthia E; Johnson, P M; Zhang, Xu

    2007-05-01

    Some marine molluscs, notably sea hares, cuttlefish, squid, and octopus, release ink when attacked by predators. The sea hare Aplysia californica releases secretions from the ink gland and opaline gland that protect individuals from injury or death from predatory spiny lobsters through a combination of mechanisms that include chemical deterrence, sensory disruption, and phagomimicry. The latter two mechanisms are facilitated by millimolar concentrations of free amino acids (FAA) in sea hare ink and opaline, which stimulate the chemosensory systems of predators, ultimately leading to escape by sea hares. We hypothesize that other inking molluscs use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense. To investigate this, we examined concentrations of 21 FAA and ammonium in the defensive secretions of nine species of inking molluscs: three sea hares (Aplysia californica, Aplysia dactylomela, Aplysia juliana) and six cephalopods (cuttlefish: Sepia officinalis; squid: Loligo pealei, Lolliguncula brevis, Dosidicus gigas; octopus: Octopus vulgaris, Octopus bimaculoides). We found millimolar levels of total FAA and ammonium in these secretions, and the FAA in highest concentration were taurine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, and lysine. Crustaceans and fish, which are major predators of these molluscs, have specific receptor systems for these FAA. Our chemical analysis supports the hypothesis that inking molluscs have the potential to use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense. PMID:17393278

  10. [Chemical composition of deposits on IUD removed from uterus].

    PubMed

    Liu, T Y

    1984-05-01

    An electroprobe is used to analyze the elements and x-ray diffraction technology to determine the crystal structure of deposits on IUDs removed from the uterus, so that the chemical composition of these deposits may be studied. Deposits on a number of copper or stainless steel IUDs are removed and undergo electroprobe analysis, the results of which are compare dwith the results of calcite analysis done using the same method. Several deposit samples are studied using x-ray diffraction technology. The results of the latter study are compared with the results of the x-ray diffraction studies of calcium carbonate and calcite. Both copper and stainless steel IUDs were found to have the same type of deposits, containing traces of cooper, magnesium, potassium, sodium, iron, sulphur, phosphorus, and chlorine. The x-ray diffraction spectrum for these deposits was found to be the same as those of calcium carbonate and calcite (hexagonal crystal). Deposits on stainless steel and copper IUDs were found to be similar to calcite. With the exception of calcium, the other elements are thought to come from amino acid, which is readily combined with calcium carbonate in the uterus. These findings confirm the fact that IUDs cause the presence of more calcium ions in th uterus. 120 copper IUDs place in the uterus from 1 to 7 years and 156 stainless steel IUDs placed in the uterus from 1 month to 19 years were used. The volume of the deposits was so small that electroprobing was the only method which could accurately determine all the chemical elements these deposits contained. PMID:12313205

  11. The chemical composition of Galactic ring nebulae around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, C.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; Morisset, C.; García-Rojas, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present deep spectra of ring nebulae associated with Wolf-Rayet (WR) and O-type stars: NGC 6888, G2.4+1.4, RCW 58, S 308, NGC 7635 and RCW 52. The data have been taken with the 10m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6.5m Clay Telescope. We extract spectra of several apertures in some of the objects. We derive C$^{++}$ and O$^{++}$ abundances from faint recombination lines in NGC 6888 and NGC 7635, permitting to derive their C/H and C/O ratios and estimate the abundance discrepancy factor (ADF) of O$^{++}$. The ADFs are larger than the typical ones of normal HII regions but similar to those found in the ionised gas of star-forming dwarf galaxies. We find that chemical abundances are rather homogeneous in the nebulae where we have spectra of several apertures: NGC 6888, NGC 7635 and G2.4+1.4. We obtain very high values of electron temperature in a peripheral zone of NGC 6888, finding that shock excitation can reproduce its spectral properties. We find that all the objects associated with WR stars show N enrichment. Some of them also show He enrichment and O deficiency as well as a lower Ne/O than expected, this may indicate the strong action of the ON and NeNa cycles. We have compared the chemical composition of NGC 6888, G2.4+1.4, RCW 58 and S 308 with the nucleosynthesis predicted by stellar evolution models of massive stars. We find that non-rotational models of stars of initial masses between 25 and 40 solar masses seem to reproduce the observed abundance ratios of most of the nebulae.

  12. The chemical composition of Galactic ring nebulae around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, C.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; Morisset, C.; García-Rojas, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present deep spectra of ring nebulae associated with Wolf-Rayet (WR) and O-type stars: NGC 6888, G2.4+1.4, RCW 58, S 308, NGC 7635 and RCW 52. The data have been taken with the 10m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6.5m Clay Telescope. We extract spectra of several apertures in some of the objects. We derive C2+ and O2+ abundances from faint recombination lines in NGC 6888 and NGC 7635, permitting to derive their C/H and C/O ratios and estimate the abundance discrepancy factor (ADF) of O2+. The ADFs are larger than the typical ones of normal H II regions but similar to those found in the ionized gas of star-forming dwarf galaxies. We find that chemical abundances are rather homogeneous in the nebulae where we have spectra of several apertures: NGC 6888, NGC 7635 and G2.4+1.4. We obtain very high values of electron temperature in a peripheral zone of NGC 6888, finding that shock excitation can reproduce its spectral properties. We find that all the objects associated with WR stars show N enrichment. Some of them also show He enrichment and O deficiency as well as a lower Ne/O than expected, this may indicate the strong action of the ON and NeNa cycles. We have compared the chemical composition of NGC 6888, G2.4+1.4, RCW 58 and S 308 with the nucleosynthesis predicted by stellar evolution models of massive stars. We find that non-rotational models of stars of initial masses between 25 and 40 M⊙ seem to reproduce the observed abundance ratios of most of the nebulae.

  13. Chemical composition of sedimentary rocks in California and Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Thelma P., (compiler)

    1981-01-01

    A compilation of published chemical analyses of sedimentary rocks of the United States was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1952 to make available scattered data that are needed for a wide range of economic and scientific uses. About 20,000-25,000 chemical analyses of sedimentary rocks in the United States have been published. This report brings together 2,312 of these analyses from California and Hawaii. The samples are arranged by general lithologic characteristics and locality. Indexes of stratigraphy, rock name, commercial uses, and minor elements are provided. The sedimentary rocks are classified into groups and into categories according to the chemical analyses. The groups (A through F2) are defined by a system similar to that proposed by Brian Mason in 1952, in which the main parameters are the three major components of sedimentary rocks: (1) uncombined silica, (2) clay (R203 ? 3Si02 ? nH20), and (3) calcium-magnesium carbonate. The categories are based on the degree of admixture of these three major components with other components, such as sulfate, phos- phate, and iron oxide. Common-rock, mixed-rock, and special-rock categories apply to rocks consisting of 85 percent or more, 50-84 percent, and less than 49 percent, respectively, of the three major components combined. Maps show distribution of sample localities by States; triangular diagrams show the lithologic characteristics and classification groups. Cumulative-frequency curves of each constituent in each classification group of the common-rock and mixed-rock categories are also included. The numerous analyses may not adequately represent the geochemical nature of the rock types and formations of the region because of sampling bias. Maps showing distribution of sample localities indicate that many of the localities are in areas where, for economic or other reasons, special problems attracted interest. Most of the analyzed rocks tended to be fairly simple in composition - mainly mixtures of

  14. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF EXHAUST PARTICLES FROM GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A program was conducted to chemically characterize particulate emissions from a current technology, high population, gas turbine engine. Attention was focused on polynuclear aromatic compounds, phenols, nitrosamines and total organics. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were...

  15. Exploring the chemical composition of water in the Kandalaksha Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazukhina, Svetlana; Masloboev, Vladimir; Chudnenko, Konstantin; Khaitov, Vadim; Maksimova, Victoria; Belkina, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Oil films were noted at the head of the Kandalaksha Bay as far back as in 1971, as soon as the first stage of the oil tank farm had been commissioned (the autumn of 1970). In 1997-1998 there were accidental oil spills posing a real threat to the Kandalaksha Reserve biota. In May 2011, oil spills from the Belomorsk oil tank farm resulted in a local environmental emergency. In this work we have traced the evolution of polluted water by means of hydrogeochemical monitoring and reconstructing the chemical composition of surface and near-bottom water of the Kandalaksha Bay by using physical-chemical modeling (Selector software package, Chudnenko, 2010). The surface and near-bottom water was sampled in the summer of 2012 and 2013 at the following sites: under the numbers 3 (N 67.2.673, E 32.23.753); 4 (N 67.3.349, E 32.28.152); 1 (N 67.5.907, E 32.29.779), and 2 (N 67.6.429, E 32.30.539). The monitored objects and sampling time were sensitive to both the effects of the White Sea water (high tide), fresh water, and water affected by human impact (the oil tank farm). At each site, three samples were taken. The next stage involved reconstructing of the sea water ion composition by modeling within the Al-B-Br-Ar-He-Ne-C-Ca-Cl-F-K-Mg-Mn-N-Na-P-S-Si-Sr-Cu-Zn-H-O-e system, where e is an electron. Modeling of the chemical composition of near-bottom water (site 3) has revealed high contents of carbon dioxide, hydrogen disulphide, hydrocarbonates, and no oxygen (Eh<0). All this suggests a transformation of hydrocarbons that might have got to the sampling area in May 2011, or as the result of constant leakage of petroleum hydrocarbons from the oil tank farm. Sampling at site 4 in 2013 has revealed petroleum hydrocarbons both in surface (0.09 mg/l) and near-bottom (0.1 mg/l) water. Both monitoring and modeling have demonstrated that hydrobionts on areas adjoining the oil tank farm are far from prospering. Monitoring should be accompanied by express analysis of oxidizing conditions

  16. Composite-Material Tanks with Chemically Resistant Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    Lightweight composite-material tanks with chemically resistant liners have been developed for storage of chemically reactive and/or unstable fluids . especially hydrogen peroxide. These tanks are similar, in some respects, to the ones described in gLightweight Composite-Material Tanks for Cryogenic Liquids h (MFS-31379), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 58; however, the present tanks are fabricated by a different procedure and they do not incorporate insulation that would be needed to prevent boil-off of cryogenic fluids. The manufacture of a tank of this type begins with the fabrication of a reusable multisegmented aluminum mandrel in the shape and size of the desired interior volume. One or more segments of the mandrel can be aluminum bosses that will be incorporated into the tank as end fittings. The mandrel is coated with a mold-release material. The mandrel is then heated to a temperature of about 400 F (approximately equal to 200 C) and coated with a thermoplastic liner material to the desired thickness [typically approxiamtely equal to 15 mils (approximately equal to 0.38 mm)] by thermal spraying. In the thermal-spraying process, the liner material in powder form is sprayed and heated to the melting temperature by a propane torch and the molten particles land on the mandrel. The sprayed liner and mandrel are allowed to cool, then the outer surface of the liner is chemically and/or mechanically etched to enhance bonding of a composite overwrap. The etched liner is wrapped with multiple layers of an epoxy resin reinforced with graphite fibers; the wrapping can be done either by manual application of epoxy-impregnated graphite cloth or by winding of epoxy-impregnated filaments. The entire assembly is heated in an autoclave to cure the epoxy. After the curing process, the multisegmented mandrel is disassembled and removed from inside, leaving the finished tank. If the tank is to be used for storing hydrogen peroxide, then the liner material

  17. Long-term chemical composition and temperature variations on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena; Bampasidis, G.; Achterberg, R.; Lavvas, P.; Nixon, C.; Jennings, D. E.; Teanby, N.; Michael, F. F.; Orton, G.; Vinatier, S.; Carlson, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    Nine years after Cassini's Saturn orbit insertion, we look at the evolution of the thermal and chemical composition of Titan’s atmosphere by combining Cassini CIRS recordings and the related ground- and space- based observations. In particular, we use Cassini/CIRS data from 2004-2013 to derive the temperature structure [1,2,7] and the neutral chemistry at latitudes between 50°S and 50°N [2]. The peak in abundance is observed around the northern spring equinox, with a rapid decrease after mid-2009, indicating that the vortex has shrunk. The fulfillment of one Titanian year of space observations provides us for the first time with the opportunity to evaluate the relative role of different physical processes in the long term evolution of this complex environment, as also reported by other studies [8-10]. By comparing V1 (1980), ISO (1997) and Cassini (2010) [2-6] data we find that a return to the 1980 abundance values is achieved for most molecules at all latitudes, indicative of the solar radiation being the dominating energy source at 10 AU, as for the Earth, in agreement with predictions by GCM and photochemical models. The few exceptions set important constraints. We show that wrt V1 the stratospheric chemical composition shows higher values near the northern fall equinox (near 1997) and lower ones at the spring equinox (near 2009). The cause could be spatial changes (due to Titan's inclination) in the energy input to Titan's atmosphere as a driver for changes in the advection patterns, circulation, etc which in turn provide a stronger variability in the latitudinal abundances of photochemical species after some time. References [1] Achterberg R., et al., Icarus, 211, 686-698, 2011. [2] Bampasidis et al., ApJ 760, 144, 8 p., 2012. [3] Coustenis, A., Bézard, B., Icarus,115, 126-140, 1995. [4] Coustenis, A., et al., Icarus, 161, 383-403, 2003. [5] Coustenis, A., et al., Icarus, 189, 35-62, 2007. [6] Coustenis, A., et al., Icarus, 207, 461-476, 2010. [7

  18. Tea tree oil: contact allergy and chemical composition.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Anton C; Schmidt, Erich

    2016-09-01

    In this article, contact allergy to, and the chemical composition of, tea tree oil (TTO) are reviewed. This essential oil is a popular remedy for many skin diseases, and may be used as neat oil or be present in cosmetics, topical pharmaceuticals and household products. Of all essential oils, TTO has caused most (published) allergic reactions since the first cases were reported in 1991. In routine testing, prevalences of positive patch test reactions have ranged from 0.1% to 3.5%. Nearly 100 allergic patients have been described in case reports and case series. The major constituents of commercial TTO are terpinen-4-ol, γ-terpinene, 1,8-cineole, α-terpinene, α-terpineol, p-cymene, and α-pinene. Fresh TTO is a weak to moderate sensitizer, but oxidation increases its allergenic potency. The major sensitizers appear to be ascaridole, terpinolene, α-terpinene, 1,2,4-trihydroxymenthane, α-phellandrene, and limonene. The clinical picture of allergic contact dermatitis caused by TTO depends on the products used. Most reactions are caused by the application of pure oil; cosmetics are the culprits in a minority of cases. Patch testing may be performed with 5% oxidized TTO. Co-reactivity to turpentine oil is frequent, and there is an overrepresentation of reactions to fragrance mix I, Myroxylon pereirae, colophonium, and other essential oils. PMID:27173437

  19. Microbial population, chemical composition and silage fermentation of cassava residues.

    PubMed

    Napasirth, Viengsakoun; Napasirth, Pattaya; Sulinthone, Tue; Phommachanh, Kham; Cai, Yimin

    2015-09-01

    In order to effectively use the cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) residues, including cassava leaves, peel and pulp for livestock diets, the chemical and microbiological composition, silage preparation and the effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants on silage fermentation of cassava residues were studied. These residues contained 10(4) to 10(5) LAB and yeasts, 10(3) to 10(4) coliform bacteria and 10(4) aerobic bacteria in colony forming units (cfu) on a fresh matter (FM) basis. The molds were consistently at or below the detectable level (10(2) cfu of FM) in three kinds of cassava residues. Dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content of cassava residues were 17.50-30.95%, 1.30-16.41% and 25.40-52.90% on a DM basis, respectively. The silage treatments were designed as control silage without additive (CO) or with LAB inoculants Chikuso-1 (CH, Lactobacillus plantarum) and Snow Lacto (SN, Lactobacillus rhamnosus) at a rate of 5 mg/kg of FM basis. All silages were well preserved with a low pH (below 4.0) value and when cassava residues silage treated with inoculants CH and SN improved fermentation quality with a lower pH, butyric acid and higher lactic acid than control silage. PMID:25781881

  20. Chemical composition of biomass generated in the guava tree pruning.

    PubMed

    Camarena-Tello, Julio César; Rocha-Guzmán, Nuria Elizabeth; Gallegos-Infante, José Alberto; González-Laredo, Rubén Francisco; Pedraza-Bucio, Fabiola Eugenia; López-Albarrán, Pablo; Herrera-Bucio, Rafael; Rutiaga-Quiñones, José Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) is a native plant of Central America and is now widely cultivated in many tropical regions of the world for the fruit production. In Mexico, in the guava orchards common practices to control fruit production are: water stress, defoliation and pruning. In this study, we report the chemical composition of the biomass (branches and leaves) generated in the pruning practices. The results ranged as follows: pH (4.98-5.88), soda solubility (39.01-70.49 %), ash (1.87-8.20 %); potassium and calcium were the major inorganic elements in ash. No heavy metals were detected in the studied samples; total solubility (15.21-46.60 %), Runkel lignin (17.77-35.26 %), holocellulose (26.56 -69.49 %), α-cellulose (15.53-35.36 %), hemicelluloses (11.02-34.12 %), tannins in aqueous extracts (3.81-9.06 %), and tannins in ethanolic extracts (3.42-15.24 %). PMID:26417359

  1. Chemical composition and antigenotoxic properties of Lippia alba essential oils

    PubMed Central

    López, Molkary Andrea; Stashenko, Elena E.; Fuentes, Jorge Luis

    2011-01-01

    The present work evaluated the chemical composition and the DNA protective effect of the essential oils (EOs) from Lippia alba against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity. EO constituents were determined by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis. The major compounds encountered being citral (33% geranial and 25% neral), geraniol (7%) and trans-β-caryophyllene (7%) for L. alba specimen COL512077, and carvone (38%), limonene (33%) and bicyclosesquiphellandrene (8%) for the other, COL512078. The genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of EO and the compounds citral, carvone and limonene, were assayed using the SOS Chromotest in Escherichia coli. The EOs were not genotoxic in the SOS chromotest, but one of the major compound (limonene) showed genotoxicity at doses between 97 and 1549 mM. Both EOs protected bacterial cells against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity. Antigenotoxicity in the two L. alba chemotypes was related to the major compounds, citral and carvone, respectively. The results were discussed in relation to the chemopreventive potential of L. alba EOs and its major compounds. PMID:21931523

  2. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB[sub 2] composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A. ); Starr, T.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB[sub 2] cathode surface. The use of TiB[sub 2], however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB[sub 2] is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB[sub 2]. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB[sub 2] from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000[degrees]C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB[sub 2]THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  3. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A.; Starr, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB{sub 2} cathode surface. The use of TiB{sub 2}, however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB{sub 2} is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB{sub 2}. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB{sub 2} from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000{degrees}C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB{sub 2}THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  4. Brazilian kefir: structure, microbial communities and chemical composition

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Karina Teixeira; de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Campos, Cássia Roberta; Dragone, Giuliano; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2011-01-01

    Microbial ecology and chemical composition of Brazilian kefir beverage was performed. The microorganisms associated with Brazilian kefir were investigated using a combination of phenotypic and genotypic methods. A total of 359 microbial isolates were identified. Lactic acid bacteria (60.5%) were the major isolated group identified, followed by yeasts (30.6%) and acetic acid bacteria (8.9%). Lactobacillus paracasei (89 isolates), Lactobacillus parabuchneri (41 isolates), Lactobacillus casei (32 isolates), Lactobacillus kefiri (31 isolates), Lactococcus lactis (24 isolates), Acetobacter lovaniensis (32 isolates), Kluyveromyces lactis (31 isolates), Kazachstania aerobia (23 isolates), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (41 isolates) and Lachancea meyersii (15 isolates) were the microbial species isolated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the microbiota was dominated by bacilli (short and curved long) cells growing in close association with lemon-shaped yeasts cells. During the 24 h of fermentation, the protein content increased, while lactose and fat content decreased. The concentration of lactic acid ranged from 1.4 to 17.4 mg/ml, and that of acetic acid increased from 2.1 to 2.73 mg/ml. The production of ethanol was limited, reaching a final mean value of 0.5 mg/ml. PMID:24031681

  5. Chemical composition of biomass from tall perennial tropical grasses

    SciTech Connect

    Prine, G.M.; Stricker, J.A.; Anderson, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The tall perennial tropical grasses, elephantgrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum.), sugarcane and energycane (Saccharum sp.) and erianthus (Erianthus arundenaceum (Retz) Jesw.) have given very high oven dry biomass yields in Florida and the warm Lower South USA. No good complete analyses of the chemical composition of these grasses for planning potential energy use was available. We sampled treatments of several tall grass demonstrations and experiments containing high-biomass yielding genotypes of the above tall grass crops at several locations in Florida over the two growing seasons, 1992 and 1993. These samples were analyzed for crude protein, NDF, ADF, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and IVDMD or IVOMD. The analysis for the above constituents are reported, along with biomass yields where available, for the tall grass accessions in the various demonstrations and experiments. Particular attention is given to values obtained from the high-yielding tall grasses grown on phosphatic clays in Polk County, FL, the area targeted by a NREL grant to help commercialize bioenergy use from these crops.

  6. Study of Aerosol Chemical Composition Based on Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Austin; Aryal, Rudra

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the variation of aerosol absorption optical properties obtained from the CIMEL Sun-Photometer measurements over three years (2012-2014) at three AERONET sites GSFC; MD Science_Center and Tudor Hill, Bermuda. These sites were chosen based on the availability of data and locations that can receive different types of aerosols from land and ocean. These absorption properties, mainly the aerosol absorption angstrom exponent, were analyzed to examine the corresponding aerosol chemical composition. We observed that the retrieved absorption angstrom exponents over the two sites, GSFC and MD Science Center, are near 1 (the theoretical value for black carbon) and with low single scattering albedo values during summer seasons indicating presence of black carbon. Strong variability of aerosol absorption properties were observed over Tudor Hill and will be analyzed based on the air mass embedded from ocean side and land side. We will also present the seasonal variability of these properties based on long-range air mass sources at these three sites. Brent Holben, NASA GSFC, AERONET, Jon Rodriguez.

  7. Chemical composition of biomass generated in the guava tree pruning

    PubMed Central

    Camarena-Tello, Julio César; Rocha-Guzmán, Nuria Elizabeth; Gallegos-Infante, José Alberto; González-Laredo, Rubén Francisco; Pedraza-Bucio, Fabiola Eugenia; López-Albarrán, Pablo; Herrera-Bucio, Rafael; Rutiaga-Quiñones, José Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) is a native plant of Central America and is now widely cultivated in many tropical regions of the world for the fruit production. In Mexico, in the guava orchards common practices to control fruit production are: water stress, defoliation and pruning. In this study, we report the chemical composition of the biomass (branches and leaves) generated in the pruning practices. The results ranged as follows: pH (4.98-5.88), soda solubility (39.01-70.49 %), ash (1.87-8.20 %); potassium and calcium were the major inorganic elements in ash. No heavy metals were detected in the studied samples; total solubility (15.21-46.60 %), Runkel lignin (17.77-35.26 %), holocellulose (26.56 -69.49 %), α-cellulose (15.53-35.36 %), hemicelluloses (11.02-34.12 %), tannins in aqueous extracts (3.81-9.06 %), and tannins in ethanolic extracts (3.42-15.24 %). PMID:26417359

  8. Calorimetry, chemical composition and in vitro digestibility of oilseeds.

    PubMed

    Ítavo, Luís Carlos Vinhas; Soares, Cláudia Muniz; Ítavo, Camila Celeste Brandão Ferreira; Dias, Alexandre Menezes; Petit, Hélène Veronique; Leal, Eduardo Souza; de Souza, Anderson Dias Vieira

    2015-10-15

    The objective of the study was to determine the quality of sunflower, soybean, crambe, radish forage and physic nut, by measuring chemical composition, in vitro digestibility and kinetics of thermal decomposition processes of mass loss and heat flow. Lipid was inversely correlated with protein of whole seed (R = -0.67), meal (R = -0.95), and press cake (R = -0.78), and positively correlated with the enthalpy (ΔH) of whole seed. Soybean seed and meal presented a high in vitro digestibility but poor energy sources with ΔH averaging 5907.5 J/g and 2570.1J/g for whole seed and meal, respectively. As suggested by the release of heat, measured by ΔH, whole seeds of crambe (6295.1J/g), radish forage (6182.7 J/g), and physic nut (6420.0 J/g) may be potential energy sources for ruminant animals. The thermal analysis provided additional information besides that obtained from the usual wet chemistry and in vitro measurements. PMID:25952861

  9. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae) Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Souza, Lucèia Fàtima; Caputo, Lucia; Inchausti De Barros, Ingrid Bergman; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL) and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g). The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY) expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression. PMID:27598154

  10. Effect of flares on the chemical composition of exoplanets atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venot, O.; Decin, L.

    2015-10-01

    M stars are very abundant in our Galaxy, and very likely harbour the majority of planetary systems. But a particularity of M stars is that they are the most active class of stars. Indeed, they experience stellar variability such as flares. These violent and unpredictable outbursts originate from the photosphere and are caused by magnetic processus. During such an event, the energy emitted by the star can vary by several orders of magnitude for the whole wavelength range. It results in an enhancement of the H# emission and of the continuum. Different studies on the effect of flares on exoplanets have already been conducted [1, 2]. Here we are interested in the effect of a flare on the atmospheric composition of a warm Neptune orbiting around an M star. Using the stellar flux of AD Leo recorded during a flare event [1] and the chemical model of [3], we have studied the impact on the atmosphere. We have also computed the synthetic spectra assuming that such an event occurs during a transit. We will present these results.

  11. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Activities of Broussonetia papyrifera Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Liu, Shao-fang; Zhang, Chu-shu; Yu, Li-na; Bi, Jie; Zhu, Feng; Yang, Qing-li

    2012-01-01

    Fruits of Broussonetia papyrifera from South China were analyzed for their total chemical composition, and antioxidant activities in ethanol and aqueous extracts. In the fruit of this plant, the crude protein, crude fat and carbohydrates was 7.08%, 3.72% and 64.73% of dry weight, respectively. The crude protein, crude fat and carbohydrates were 15.71%, 20.51% and 36.09% of dry weight, respectively. Fatty acid and amino acid composition of the fruit were analyzed. Unsaturated fatty acid concentration was 70.6% of the total fatty acids. The percentage of the essential amino acids (EAAs) was 40.60% of the total amino acids. Furthermore, B. papyrifera fruit are rich in many mineral elements and vitamins. Total phenolic content was assessed using the Folin-Ciocalteau assay, whereas antioxidant activities were assessed by measuring the ability of the two extracts to scavenge DPPH radicals, inhibit peroxidation, and chelate ferric ions. Their reducing power was also assessed. Results indicated that the aqueous extract of B. papyrifera was a more potent reducing agent and radical-scavenger than the ethanol extract. GC–MS analysis of the ethanol extract showed the presence of some acid-containing compounds. The changes in total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity in B. papyrifera from four different regions grown under normal conditions were assessed. The antioxidant activity of different extracts was positively associated with their total phenolic content. These results suggest that the fruit of B. papyrifera could be used in dietary supplement preparations, or as a food additive, for nutritional gain, or to prevent oxidation in food products. PMID:22389678

  12. An investigation into the chemical composition of alternative invertebrate prey.

    PubMed

    Oonincx, D G A B; Dierenfeld, E S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition of eight invertebrate species and evaluate their suitability as alternative prey. The species selected were rusty red cockroaches (Blatta lateralis), six-spotted cockroaches (Eublaberus distanti), Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa), fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), false katydids (Microcentrum rhombifolium), beetles of the mealworm (Tenebrio molitor), and superworm beetles (Zophobas morio), as well as woodlice (Porcellio scaber). Dry matter (DM), crude protein, crude fat, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, ash, macro and trace minerals, vitamins A and E, and carotenoid concentrations were quantified. Significant differences were found between species. Crude protein content ranged from 38 to 76% DM, fat from14 to 54% DM, and ash from 2 to 8% DM. In most species, calcium:phosphorus was low (0.08-0.30:1); however, P. scaber was an exception (12:1) and might prove useful as a dietary source of calcium for insectivores. Vitamin E content was low for most species (6-16 mg/kg DM), except for D. melanogaster and M. rhombifolium (112 and 110 mg/kg DM). The retinol content, as a measure of vitamin A activity, was low in all specimens, but varied greatly among samples (0.670-886 mg/kg DM). The data presented can be used to alter diets to better suit the estimated requirements of insectivores in captivity. Future research on the topic of composition of invertebrate prey species should focus on determination of nutrient differences owing to species, developmental stage, and diet. PMID:21442652

  13. Chemical composition of sediments from White Sea, Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamza, Olga; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Novigatsky, Aleksandr

    2010-05-01

    The White Sea, the only Russian inland sea, is located on the north of outlying districts of the European part of Russia, belongs to Arctic Ocean. Area of water of sea occupies about 90 tousend square kilometers. The sea can be divided into some general parts: neck, funnel, basin and 4 Bays: Dvina Bay, Kandalaksha Bay, Mezen Bay and Onega Bay. The purpose of this work was geochemical mapping of the surface sediments of this area. The main tasks were: compilation data base of element composition of the surface sediments, geochemical mapping of each element, research of the anormal concentration of elements on the surface. To detect the content of chemical elements several methods were used: atomic absorption spectrometry (P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology); neutron activation analysis (Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry), total and organic carbon analysis, photometric method to detection Si, Al, P (P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology). Bulk composition is one of the fundamental characteristics of sediments and bottom deposites of modern basins. Coarse-grained sediments with portion of pelitic component <50% is spread on the shallow area (Kandalaksha Bay), in areas with high hydrodynamic activity of near-bottom water. Under the conditions of their low activity, fine-grained facies are common(>80%). Character of elements distribution correlates with facial distribution of sediments from White Sea. According to litologic description, bottom surface of Dvina Bay is practically everywhere covered by layer of fine-grained sand. In the border area between Dvina Bay and White Sea basin on terraced subwater slope aleurite politic silts are abundant. They tend to exhange down the slope to clay silts. In Onega Bay fractions of non-deposition are observed. They are characterized by wide spread of thin blanket poorgraded sediments, which are likely to be relic. Relief of Kandalakscha Bay bottom is presented as alternation of abyssal fosses (near

  14. Detail Chemical Composition of M33 Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliam, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    I propose to perform the first high-resolution detailed chemical abundance study of globular clusters (GCs) in the Local Group spiral galaxy M33 with Keck HIRES. My integrated-light technique permits detailed chemical abundance measurement (and approximate ages) for old populations at larger distance than ever done before. The basic goal is to accurately define the chemical abundance properties of the M33 GC system, for a comparison with the Milky Way, LMC, SMC and Local Group dwarf galaxies. Abundances of Fe, (alpha)-elements, Na and Al will constrain the relative contributions of Type Ia and Type II SNe and probe ~1 Gyr enrichment timescales. The s-process elements (e.g. Zr, Y, Ba, La), made by AGB stars, will probe timescales of several Gyr. These elements are sensitive to whether chemical enrichment occurred slowly, or in a burst, and whether the enrichment was global, or occurred in disparate systems, such as dwarf galaxies that were later accreted. The project will provide basic information to advance an understanding of chemical enrichment and nucleosynthesis, and galaxy evolution.

  15. Lunar clinopyroxenes: Chemical composition, structural state, and texture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, M.; Bence, A.E.; Dwornik, E.J.; Clark, J.R.; Papike, J.J.

    1970-01-01

    Single-crystal x-ray diffraction, microprobe, optical and electron optical examinations of clinopyroxenes from Apollo 11 lunar samples 10003, 10047, 10050, and 10084 show that generally the crystals are composed of (001) augite-pigeonite intergrowths in varying ratios. Transmission electron micrographs reveal abundant exsolution lamellae, many only 60 A?? thick. In addition to the phase inhomogeneities, primary chemical inhomogeneities are clearly demonstrated. There are reciprocal relationships between calcium and iron and between Ti4+ + 2Al and R2+ + 2Si. Our evidence suggests that a chemically inhomogeneous subcalcic C2/c augite was the only primary pyroxene from which pigeonite later exsolved.

  16. Chemical composition analysis of simulated waste glass T10-G-16A

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.

    2015-08-01

    In this report, SRNL provides chemical composition analyses of a simulated LAW glass designated T10-G-16A.The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component. No issues were identified in reviewing the analytical data.

  17. Floral Scent in Wisteria: Chemical Composition, Emission Pattern and Regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile chemicals emitted from the flowers of Chinese wisteria (Wisteria sinenesis) and Japanese wisteria (W. floribunda) were collected using a dynamic headspace technique and identified by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. About 30 and 22 compounds were detected from Chinese wisteria and Ja...

  18. Characterization of Indian beers: chemical composition and antioxidant potential.

    PubMed

    Pai, Tapasya V; Sawant, Siddhi Y; Ghatak, Arindam A; Chaturvedi, Palak A; Gupte, Arpita M; Desai, Neetin S

    2015-03-01

    Chemical composition, antioxidant potential and corresponding lipid preoxidation of Indian commercial beers were evaluated. The presence of polyphenolic compounds such as tannic acid, gallic acid, catechol, vanillin, caffeic acid, quercetin, p-coumaric acid and rutin was quantified using LC-MS while the organic acids including tartaric, malic, acetic, citric and succinic acids were analysed using HPLC. Beer sample B8 had the greatest concentration of phenolic and flavonoid components (0.620 ± 0.084 mg/mL and 0.379 ± 0.020 mg/mL respectively) among the beer samples studied. The DPPH radical scavenging activity was observed in the range of 68.34 ± 0.85 % to 89.90 ± 0.71 % and ABTS radical cation scavenging activity was in the range of 59.75 ± 0.20 % to 76.22 ± 0.50 %. Percent protection in lipid peroxidation was quantified to be maximum (54.45 ± 3.39 %) in sample B5. Total phenolic content positively correlates with antioxidant assays, DPPH and ABTS (r = 0.35 and r = 0.58 respectively) with p < 0.001 and also with lipid peroxidation (r = 0.04) with p < 0.001. Negative correlation was observed between total flavonoid content with ABTS and lipid peroxidation (r = -0.1 and r = -0.05) respectively. The process of brewing warrants additional research to determine how the concentration of selected phenolic compounds can be increased. PMID:25745209

  19. Brazilian Propolis: Correlation Between Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salomão, Kelly; Pereira, Paulo Roberto S.; Campos, Leila C.; Borba, Cintia M.; Cabello, Pedro H.; Marcucci, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition of ethanol extracts from samples of Brazilian propolis (EEPs) determined by HPLC and their activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebisiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Sporothrix schenckii and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were determined. Based on the predominant botanical origin in the region of samples' collection, the 10 extracts were separated into three groups: A (B. dracunculifolia + Auraucaria spp), B (B. dracunculifolia) and C (Araucaria spp). Analysis by the multiple regression of all the extracts together showed a positive correlation, higher concentrations leading to higher biological effect, of S. aureus with p-coumaric acid (PCUM) and 3-(4-hydroxy-3-(oxo-butenyl)-phenylacrylic acid (DHCA1) and of trypomastigotes of T. cruzi with 3,5-diprenyl-4-hydroxycinnamic acid derivative 4 (DHCA4) and 2,2-dimethyl-6-carboxyethenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (DCBEN). When the same approach was employed for each group, due to the small number of observations, the statistical test gave unreliable results. However, an overall analysis revealed for group A an association of S. aureus with caffeic acid (CAF) and dicaffeoylquinic acid 3 (CAFQ3), of S. pneumoniae with CAFQ3 and monocaffeoylquinic acid 2 (CAFQ2) and of T. cruzi also with CAFQ3. For group B, a higher activity against S. pneumoniae was associated DCBEN and for T. cruzi with CAF. For group C no association was observed between the anitmicrobial effect and any component of the extracts. The present study reinforces the relevance of PCUM and derivatives, especially prenylated ones and also of caffeolyquinic acids, on the biological activity of Brazilian propolis. PMID:18830454

  20. Porosity prediction of calcium phosphate cements based on chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Caroline; Unosson, Johanna; Carlsson, Elin; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2015-07-01

    The porosity of calcium phosphate cements has an impact on several important parameters, such as strength, resorbability and bioactivity. A model to predict the porosity for biomedical cements would hence be a useful tool. At the moment such a model only exists for Portland cements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a first porosity prediction model for calcium phosphate cements. On the basis of chemical reaction, molar weight and density of components, a volume-based model was developed and validated using calcium phosphate cement as model material. 60 mol% β-tricalcium phosphate and 40 mol% monocalcium phosphate monohydrate were mixed with deionized water, at different liquid-to-powder ratios. Samples were set for 24 h at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Thereafter, samples were dried either under vacuum at room temperature for 24 h or in air at 37 °C for 7 days. Porosity and phase composition were determined. It was found that the two drying protocols led to the formation of brushite and monetite, respectively. The model was found to predict well the experimental values and also data reported in the literature for apatite cements, as deduced from the small absolute average residual errors (<2.0%). In conclusion, a theoretical model for porosity prediction was developed and validated for brushite, monetite and apatite cements. The model gives a good estimate of the final porosity and has the potential to be used as a porosity prediction tool in the biomedical cement field. PMID:26169187

  1. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  2. Anisotropy vs chemical composition at ultra-high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, Martin; Waxman, Eli E-mail: eli.waxman@weizmann.ac.il

    2009-11-01

    This paper proposes and discusses a test of the chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays that relies on the anisotropy patterns measured as a function of energy. In particular, we show that if one records an anisotropy signal produced by heavy nuclei of charge Z above an energy E{sub thr}, one should record an even stronger (possibly much stronger) anisotropy at energies >E{sub thr}/Z due to the proton component that is expected to be associated with the sources of the heavy nuclei. This conclusion remains robust with respect to the parameters characterizing the sources and it does not depend at all on the modelling of astrophysical magnetic fields. As a concrete example, we apply this test to the most recent data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. Assuming that the anisotropy reported above 55 EeV is not a statistical accident, and that no significant anisotropy has been observed at energies ∼<10 EeV, we show that the apparent clustering toward Cen A cannot be attributed to heavy nuclei. Similar conclusions are drawn regarding the apparent excess correlation with nearby active galactic nuclei. We then discuss a robust lower bound to the magnetic luminosity that a source must possess in order to be able to accelerate particles of charge Z up to 100 EeV, L{sub B} ∼> 10{sup 45} Z{sup −2} erg/s. Using this bound in conjunction with the above conclusions, we argue that the current PAO data does not support the model of cosmic ray origin in active radio-quiet or even radio-loud galaxies. Finally, we demonstrate that the apparent clustering in the direction of Cen A can be explained by the contribution of the last few gamma-ray bursts or magnetars in the host galaxy thanks to the scattering of the cosmic rays on the magnetized lobes.

  3. Inorganic chemical composition and chemical reactivity of settled dust generated by the World Trade Center building collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Hageman, Philip L.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Ziegler, Thomas L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Theodorakos, Peter M.; Brownfield, Isabelle; Adams, Monique G.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Taggart, Joseph E.; Clark, Roger N.; Wilson, S.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Samples of dust deposited around lower Manhattan by the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center (WTC) collapse have inorganic chemical compositions that result in part from the variable chemical contributions of concrete, gypsum wallboard, glass fibers, window glass, and other materials contained in the buildings. The dust deposits were also modified chemically by variable interactions with rain water or water used in street washing and fire fighting. Chemical leach tests using deionized water as the extraction fluid show the dust samples can be quite alkaline, due primarily to reactions with calcium hydroxide in concrete particles. Calcium and sulfate are the most soluble components in the dust, but many other elements are also readily leached, including metals such as Al, Sb, Mo Cr, Cu, and Zn. Indoor dust samples produce leachates with higher pH, alkalinity, and dissolved solids than outdoor dust samples, suggesting most outdoor dust had reacted with water and atmospheric carbon dioxide prior to sample collection. Leach tests using simulated lung fluids as the extracting fluid suggest that the dust might also be quite reactive in fluids lining the respiratory tract, resulting in dissolution of some particles and possible precipitation of new phases such as phosphates, carbonates, and silicates. Results of these chemical characterization studies can be used by health scientists as they continue to track and interpret health effects resulting from the short-term exposure to the initial dust cloud and the longer-term exposure to dusts resuspended during cleanup.

  4. A study on chemical composition and detection of chemical adulteration in tetra pack milk samples commercially available in Multan.

    PubMed

    Awan, Adeela; Naseer, Misbah; Iqbal, Aasfa; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Rehana; Iqbal, Furhan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the chemical composition of 8 tetra pack milk samples, Olpers (S1), Haleeb (S2), Good milk (S3), Everyday (S4), Milk Pack (S5), Dairy Queen (S6), Dairy Umang (S7), Nurpur (S8) available in local markets and to detect the presence of various chemical adulterants in tetra pack milk samples in Southern Punjab (Pakistan). Density, pH, solid not fat, total solids, lactometer reading, specific gravity and fat contents were analyzed to determine the chemical composition of milk samples. Our results revealed that all the studied parameters had statistically non significant differences (P>0.05) except total fat in milk samples which was significantly different (P=0.03) among the 8 studied milk samples. Presence of a number of chemical adulterants, formalin, cane sugar, starch, glucose, ammonium sulphate, salt, pulverized soap, detergents, skim milk powder, benzoic acid, salicylic acid, borax, boric acid and alkalinity were also detected in milk samples following standard procedures. Results indicated that formalin, cane sugar, glucose, alkalinity and benzoic acid were present in all samples while salt test was positive only for Olper milk. All other studied adulterants were not detected in 8 milk samples under study. % fat was the only significantly different feature among the studied milk quality parameters with S8 containing lowest while S5 having the maximum % fat. PMID:24374447

  5. On the chemical composition of L-chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, C. W.; Dodd, R. T.; Jarosewich, E.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis of Ag, As, Au, Bi, Co, Cs, Ga, In, Rb, Sb, Te, Tl, and Zn and major element data in 14 L4-6 and 3 LL5 chondrites indicates that the L group is unusually variable and may represent at least 2 subgroups differing in formation history. Chemical trends in the S/Fe rich subgroup support textural evidence indicating late loss of a shock formed Fe-Ni-S melt; the S/Fe poor subgroup seemingly reflects nebular fractionation only. Highly mobile In and Zn apparently reflect shock induced loss from L chondrites. However, contrasting chemical trends in several L chondrite sample sets indicate that these meteorites constitute a more irregular sampling of, or more heterogeneous parent material than do carbonaceous or enstatite chondrites. Data for 15 chondrites suggest higher formation temperatures and/or degrees of shock than for LL5 chondrites.

  6. Chemical composition of Nigella sativa Linn: Part 2 Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Akram Khan, M; Afzal, M

    2016-06-01

    The black cumin or Nigella sativa L. seeds have many acclaimed medicinal properties such as bronchodilatory, hypotensive, antibacterial, antifungal, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and immunopotentiating. This review article is an update on the previous article published on Nigella sativa L. in this journal in 1999. It covers the medicinal properties and chemical syntheses of the alkaloids isolated from the seeds of the herb. PMID:27068721

  7. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus; Morton, Douglas M.; Little, Mark G.; Kistler, Ronald; Horodyskyj, Ulyana N.; Leeman, William P.; Agranier, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms. PMID:18362343

  8. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, C.-T.A.; Morton, D.M.; Little, M.G.; Kistler, R.; Horodyskyj, U.N.; Leeman, W.P.; Agranier, A.

    2008-01-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  9. Vegetation change impacts on soil organic carbon chemical composition in subtropical forests.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoping; Meng, Miaojing; Zhang, Jinchi; Chen, Han Y H

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) might strongly affect the global carbon cycle as it controls the SOC decomposition rate. Vegetation change associated with long-term land use changes is known to strongly impact the chemical composition of SOC; however, data on the impacts of vegetation change following disturbance events of short durations and succession that occur frequently in forest ecosystems via diverse management objectives on SOC chemical composition are negligible. Here we examined the impacts of vegetation changes on the chemical composition of SOC by sampling soils of native broad-leaved forests, planted mixed broad-leaved and coniferous forests, and tea gardens in eastern China. We used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify SOC chemical composition. We found that among all components of SOC chemical composition, alkyl carbon (C) and aryl C were more liable to change with vegetation than other SOC components. Soil pH was negatively correlated to the relative abundances of alkyl C and N-alkyl C, and Shannon's index of overstory plant species was positively correlated to the relative abundances of phenolic C and aromaticity. Our results suggest that vegetation changes following short disturbance events and succession may strongly alter SOC chemical composition in forest ecosystems. PMID:27403714

  10. Vegetation change impacts on soil organic carbon chemical composition in subtropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoping; Meng, Miaojing; Zhang, Jinchi; Chen, Han Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) might strongly affect the global carbon cycle as it controls the SOC decomposition rate. Vegetation change associated with long-term land use changes is known to strongly impact the chemical composition of SOC; however, data on the impacts of vegetation change following disturbance events of short durations and succession that occur frequently in forest ecosystems via diverse management objectives on SOC chemical composition are negligible. Here we examined the impacts of vegetation changes on the chemical composition of SOC by sampling soils of native broad-leaved forests, planted mixed broad-leaved and coniferous forests, and tea gardens in eastern China. We used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify SOC chemical composition. We found that among all components of SOC chemical composition, alkyl carbon (C) and aryl C were more liable to change with vegetation than other SOC components. Soil pH was negatively correlated to the relative abundances of alkyl C and N-alkyl C, and Shannon’s index of overstory plant species was positively correlated to the relative abundances of phenolic C and aromaticity. Our results suggest that vegetation changes following short disturbance events and succession may strongly alter SOC chemical composition in forest ecosystems. PMID:27403714

  11. Vegetation change impacts on soil organic carbon chemical composition in subtropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoping; Meng, Miaojing; Zhang, Jinchi; Chen, Han Y. H.

    2016-07-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) might strongly affect the global carbon cycle as it controls the SOC decomposition rate. Vegetation change associated with long-term land use changes is known to strongly impact the chemical composition of SOC; however, data on the impacts of vegetation change following disturbance events of short durations and succession that occur frequently in forest ecosystems via diverse management objectives on SOC chemical composition are negligible. Here we examined the impacts of vegetation changes on the chemical composition of SOC by sampling soils of native broad-leaved forests, planted mixed broad-leaved and coniferous forests, and tea gardens in eastern China. We used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify SOC chemical composition. We found that among all components of SOC chemical composition, alkyl carbon (C) and aryl C were more liable to change with vegetation than other SOC components. Soil pH was negatively correlated to the relative abundances of alkyl C and N-alkyl C, and Shannon’s index of overstory plant species was positively correlated to the relative abundances of phenolic C and aromaticity. Our results suggest that vegetation changes following short disturbance events and succession may strongly alter SOC chemical composition in forest ecosystems.

  12. Origin and Bulk Chemical Compositions of the Inner Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    as β = β 1(θ - θ s})/(θ {1 - θ s). Here θ = μ cT(r)/μ Tc, c means the centre, θ 1 = μ c}T(r{1})/μ_{1 Tc, etc. If the controlling parameters β 1, θ s, θ 1 stay constant, then the contracting cloud sheds gas rings whose mean orbital radii Rn (n=0,1,2, ...) form a closely geometric sequence. The choice β = 0.1253, θ s = 0.00232 and θ 1 = 7.6 θ s leads to the detachment of a family of gas rings whose evolved radii Rn match the observed mean planetary spacings and whose condensate bulk chemical compositions yield densities in accord with the values /lineρunc. The maximum value of pt}/p{gas in the PSC, occurring at radius r = r1, is now only 11.3. The initial mass of the PSC is 1.197M⊙ . The loss of cloud mass during contraction to present solar size results in the orbital expansion of all gas rings and condensate material after ring detachment. Earth's gas ring was shed at 0.917 AU. Details of the gas ring temperatures, mean orbit pressures and condensate compositions are given in the URL below. Notably, Mercury formed at 1632 K and consists mostly of Fe-Ni-Cr-Co-V alloy (mass fraction: 0.670) and gehlenite (0.254). For Venus (911 K), the condensate contains metal alloy (0.326) and MgO-SiO2 (0.575). (Fe-Ni)S (0.087) and tremolite (0.102) first condense at Earth's orbit (674 K). FeO, as fayalite (0.180), first forms at Mars' (459 K). I thank Mr. David Warren [Tasmania], Dr. John D. Anderson [NASA/JPL] and the ARC for support.

  13. Simulation of aerosol chemical compositions in the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrit, Mounir; Kata Sartelet, Karine; Sciare, Jean; Marchand, Nicolas; Pey, Jorge; Sellegri, Karine

    2016-04-01

    This work aims at evaluating the chemical transport model (CTM) Polair3d of the air-quality modelling platform Polyphemus during the ChArMex summer campaigns of 2013, using ground-based measurements performed at ERSA (Cape Corsica, France), and at determining the processes controlling organic aerosol concentrations at ERSA. Simulations are compared to measurements for concentrations of both organic and inorganic species, as well as the ratio of biogenic versus anthropogenic particles, and organic aerosol properties (oxidation state). For inorganics, the concentrations of sulphate, sodium, chloride, ammonium and nitrate are compared to measurements. Non-sea-salt sulphate and ammonium concentrations are well reproduced by the model. However, because of the geographic location of the measurement station at Cape Corsica which undergoes strong wind velocities and sea effects, sea-salt sulphate, sodium, chloride and nitrate concentrations are strongly influenced by the parameterizations used for sea-salt emissions. Different parameterizations are compared and a parameterization is chosen after comparison to sodium measurements. For organics, the concentrations are well modelled when compared to experimental values. Anthropogenic particles are influenced by emission of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC). Measurements allow us to refine the estimation of those emissions, which are currently missing in emission inventories. Although concentrations of biogenic particles are well simulated, the organic chemical compounds are not enough oxidised in the model. The observed oxidation state of organics shows that the oligomerisation of pinonaldehyde was over-estimated in Polyphemus. To improve the oxidation property of organics, the formation of extremely low volatile organic compounds from autoxidation of monoterpenes is added to Polyphemus, using recently published data from chamber experiments. These chemical compounds are highly oxygenated and are formed rapidly, as first

  14. Quantitative mapping of chemical compositions with MRI using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Harbou, Erik; Fabich, Hilary T.; Benning, Martin; Tayler, Alexander B.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Gladden, Lynn F.; Holland, Daniel J.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging method for accelerating the acquisition time of two dimensional concentration maps of different chemical species in mixtures by the use of compressed sensing (CS) is presented. Whilst 2D-concentration maps with a high spatial resolution are prohibitively time-consuming to acquire using full k -space sampling techniques, CS enables the reconstruction of quantitative concentration maps from sub-sampled k -space data. First, the method was tested by reconstructing simulated data. Then, the CS algorithm was used to reconstruct concentration maps of binary mixtures of 1,4-dioxane and cyclooctane in different samples with a field-of-view of 22 mm and a spatial resolution of 344 μm × 344 μm . Spiral based trajectories were used as sampling schemes. For the data acquisition, eight scans with slightly different trajectories were applied resulting in a total acquisition time of about 8 min. In contrast, a conventional chemical shift imaging experiment at the same resolution would require about 17 h. To get quantitative results, a careful weighting of the regularisation parameter (via the L-curve approach) or contrast-enhancing Bregman iterations are applied for the reconstruction of the concentration maps. Both approaches yield relative errors of the concentration map of less than 2 mol-% without any calibration prior to the measurement. The accuracy of the reconstructed concentration maps deteriorates when the reconstruction model is biased by systematic errors such as large inhomogeneities in the static magnetic field. The presented method is a powerful tool for the fast acquisition of concentration maps that can provide valuable information for the investigation of many phenomena in chemical engineering applications.

  15. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J.; Starr, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  16. Variations in chemical composition of Apollo 15 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical analyses of 30 different Apollo 15 mare basalts were examined to evaluate the effects of closure on the pearson moment correlation coefficient. It is shown possible to describe the Apollo 15 mare basalts in terms of an opaque, an olivine/pyroxene, an anorthite, and a KREEP component, if significant correlations are identified using the expected correlations as null values. Using Q-mode cluster analysis and nonlinear mapping, it is possible to recognize three groups of the mare basalts, groups 1 and 2 belonging to the olivine normative basalt cluster and group 3 to the quartz normative cluster.

  17. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.

    1995-08-01

    A two-step forced chemical vapor infiltration process was developed that reduced infiltration times for 4.45 cm dia. by 1.27 cm thick Nicalon{sup +} fiber preforms by two thirds while maintaining final densities near 90 %. In the first stage of the process, micro-voids within fiber bundles in the cloth were uniformly infiltrated throughout the preform. In the second stage, the deposition rate was increased to more rapidly fill the macro-voids between bundles within the cloth and between layers of cloth. By varying the thermal gradient across the preform uniform infiltration rates were maintained and high final densities achieved.

  18. Biomass - chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaly, K.A.

    1982-08-01

    A host of industrial chemicals, specialty items, solvents, plastics, elastomers, fibers and films can be produced from agricultural crops, wood, paper mill wastes, food processing wastes, municipal waste and sewage. Existing chemical processes based on readily renewable plant materials are reviewed. These include ethanol and acetone-butanol fermentations, oilseed chemicals, furfural and cellulosics. (Refs. 16).

  19. Chemical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  20. Growth of multi-component alloy films with controlled graded chemical composition on sub-nanometer scale

    DOEpatents

    Bajt, Sasa; Vernon, Stephen P.

    2005-03-15

    The chemical composition of thin films is modulated during their growth. A computer code has been developed to design specific processes for producing a desired chemical composition for various deposition geometries. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results was achieved.

  1. Chemical composition of the haze in Malaysia 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norela, S.; Saidah, M. S.; Mahmud, M.

    2013-10-01

    A study of the chemical composition of the haze was conducted in two areas: Klang Valley and Malacca in Peninsular Malaysia, from July to September of 2005. The data is based on the reports of the air quality monitoring for particulate matter (PM10), pH of rainwater, anions (NO3-, SO42-, Cl-), cations (NH4+, Na2+, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+), heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Pb, Mn, Cu, Ni) and a meteorology parameter, the wind speed. The monthly concentrations of PM10 for the Klang Valley ranged from 35.90 to 104.46 μg m-3 whilst in Malacca the concentration ranged from 35.80 to 54.30 μg m-3 which was over the permitted level of 50 μg m-3 for the time period of a month as stipulated by the Department of Environment Malaysia (DOE). The pH of rainwater collected in the Klang Valley ranged from 4.26 ± 0.12 to 5.45 ± 0.58, while in Malacca the pH varied from 4.35 ± 0.20 to 5.43 ± 0.12. The mean concentrations for NO3-, SO42-, Cl-, NH4+, Ca2+, Na2+, K+, Mg2+ for three months in the Klang Valley were 46.40 ± 11.16 μeq L-1, 34.84 ± 9.82 μeq L-1, 12.34 ± 4.13 μeq L-1, 29.28 ± 11.02 μeq L-1, 8.92 ± 0.88 μeq L-1, 8.18 ± 1.00 μeq L-1, 2.08 ± 0.34 μeq L-1, 1.38 ± 0.24 μeq L-1, respectively, whilst in Malacca, the mean concentrations were 24.46 ± 6.99 μeq L-1, 28.4 ± 7.24 μeq L-1, 27.32 ± 7.36 μeq L-1, 30.92 ± 1.26 μeq L-1, 4.10 ± 2.56 μeq L-1, 21.44 ± 7.54 μeq L-1, 3.18 ± 1.82 μeq L-1 and 1.54 ± 1.66 μeq L-1, respectively. These values were lower than the non haze period (January to March and April to June) except for the Cl- ion which recorded the highest anion in Malacca. However, the mean values were similar for the period from October to December. The mean concentrations of metals showed that Cu > Ni, whilst in Malacca, in descending order, were Fe > Zn > Cu > Mn > Pb > Ni.

  2. CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS OF KINEMATICALLY SELECTED OUTER HALO STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lan; Zhao Gang; Ishigaki, Miho; Chiba, Masashi; Aoki, Wako E-mail: zhanglan@bao.ac.c E-mail: chiba@astr.tohoku.ac.j

    2009-12-01

    Chemical abundances of 26 metal-poor dwarfs and giants are determined from high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra obtained with the Subaru/High Dispersion Spectrograph. The sample is selected so that most of the objects have outer-halo kinematics. Self-consistent atmospheric parameters were determined by an iterative procedure based on spectroscopic analysis. Abundances of 13 elements, including alpha-elements (Mg, Si, Ca, Ti), odd-Z light elements (Na, Sc), iron-peak elements (Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn), and neutron-capture elements (Y, Ba), are determined by two independent data reduction and local thermodynamic equillibrium analysis procedures, confirming the consistency of the stellar parameters and abundances results. We find a decreasing trend of [alpha/Fe] with increasing [Fe/H] for the range of -3.5< [Fe/H] <-1, as found by Stephens and Boesgaard. [Zn/Fe] values of most objects in our sample are slightly lower than the bulk of halo stars previously studied. These results are discussed as possible chemical properties of the outer halo in the Galaxy.

  3. Chemical Composition of Nebulosities in the Magellanic Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Aller, L. H.; Czyzak, S. J.; Keyes, C. D.; Boeshaar, G.

    1974-01-01

    From photoelectric spectrophotometric data secured at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory we have attempted to derive electron densities and temperatures, ionic concentrations, and chemical abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne, S, and Ar in nebulosities in the Magellanic Clouds. Although 10 distinct nebulosities were observed in the Small Cloud and 20 such objects in the Large Cloud, the most detailed observations were secured only for the brighter objects. Results for 30 Doradus are in harmony with those published previously and recent work by Peimbert and Torres-Peimbert. Nitrogen and heavier elements appear to be less abundant in the Small Cloud than in the Large Cloud, in accordance with the conclusions of Dufour. A comparison with the Orion nebula suggests He, N, Ne, O, and S may all be less abundant in the Megellanic Clouds, although adequate evaluations will require construction of detailed models. For example, if we postulate that the [NII], [OII], and [SII] radiations originate primarily in regions with electron temperatures near 8000°K, while the [OIII], [NeIII], [ArIII], and H radiations are produced primarily in regions with Tε = 10,000° K, the derived chemical abundances in the clouds are enhanced. PMID:16592199

  4. Rapid computation of chemical equilibrium composition - An application to hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. D.; Prabhu, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    A scheme for rapidly computing the chemical equilibrium composition of hydrocarbon combustion products is derived. A set of ten governing equations is reduced to a single equation that is solved by the Newton iteration method. Computation speeds are approximately 80 times faster than the often used free-energy minimization method. The general approach also has application to many other chemical systems.

  5. Chemical Leukoderma.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Vestita, Michelangelo; Romita, Paolo; Filoni, Angela; Foti, Caterina; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Chemical leukoderma, often clinically mimicking idiopathic vitiligo and other congenital and acquired hypopigmentation, is an acquired form of cutaneous pigment loss caused by exposure to a variety of chemicals that act through selective melanocytotoxicity. Most of these chemicals are phenols and aromatic or aliphatic catechols derivatives. These chemicals, however, are harmful for melanocytes in individuals with an individual susceptibility. Nowadays, chemical leukoderma is fairly common, caused by common domestic products. The presence of numerous acquired confetti- or pea-sized macules is clinically characteristic of chemical leukoderma, albeit not diagnostic. Other relevant diagnostic elements are a history of repeated exposure to a known or suspected depigmenting agent at the sites of onset and a macules distribution corresponding to sites of chemical exposure. Spontaneous repigmentation has been reported when the causative agent is avoided; the repigmentation process is perifollicular and gradual, taking place for a variable period of weeks to months. PMID:27172302

  6. The chemical composition of red giants in 47 Tucanae. I. Fundamental parameters and chemical abundance patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thygesen, A. O.; Sbordone, L.; Andrievsky, S.; Korotin, S.; Yong, D.; Zaggia, S.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.; Ventura, P.; D'Antona, F.; Meléndez, J.; D'Ercole, A.

    2014-12-01

    Context. The study of chemical abundance patterns in globular clusters is key importance to constraining the different candidates for intracluster pollution of light elements. Aims: We aim at deriving accurate abundances for a wide range of elements in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) to add new constraints to the pollution scenarios for this particular cluster, expanding the range of previously derived element abundances. Methods: Using tailored 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) atmospheric models, together with a combination of equivalent width measurements, LTE, and NLTE synthesis, we derive stellar parameters and element abundances from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 13 red giant stars near the tip of the RGB. Results: We derive abundances of a total 27 elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Mo, Ru, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy). Departures from LTE were taken into account for Na, Al, and Ba. We find a mean [Fe/H] = -0.78 ± 0.07 and [ α/ Fe ] = 0.34 ± 0.03 in good agreement with previous studies. The remaining elements show good agreement with the literature, but including NLTE for Al has a significant impact on the behavior of this key element. Conclusions: We confirm the presence of an Na-O anti-correlation in 47 Tucanae found by several other works. Our NLTE analysis of Al shifts the [Al/Fe] to lower values, indicating that this may be overestimated in earlier works. No evidence of an intrinsic variation is found in any of the remaining elements. Based on observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory, Chile (Programmes 084.B-0810 and 086.B-0237).Full Tables 2, 5, and 9 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A108Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Quantitative Estimation of Chemical Weathering versus Total Denudation Ratio within Tributaries of Yangtze River Basin Based on Size Dependent Chemical Composition Ratio of River Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboki, Y.; Chao, L.; Tada, R.; Saito, K.; Zheng, H.; Irino, T.; He, M.; Ke, W.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative estimation of chemical weathering rate and evaluation of its controlling factors are critical to understand its role on landscape evolution and carbon cycle on a long time scale. In order to reconstruct the past changes in intensities of chemical weathering and erosion, it is necessary to establish a proxy for chemical versus physical weathering intensities based on chemical composition of sediments. However, the chemical composition of sediments is controlled not only by chemical weathering, but by type of source rock and grain size, too. This study aims to develop a method to quantitatively evaluate the contribution of chemical weathering relative to total denudation in the entire Yangtze River basin based on chemical composition of three different grain size fractions of river sediments. Chemical compositions of three different grain size fractions, and grain size distribution of suspended particles and river bed sediments as well as chemical composition of dissolved materials of water samples are analyzed. The result revealed that suspended particles and river bed sediments are composed of three components, aluminosilicate, quartz, and carbonate. K/Al is smaller in the smallest size fraction. We preliminary interpret that original composition of aluminosilcates within different size fractions of the same sample is the same, and the decrease in K/Al with decreasing grain size would reflect increasing influence of chemical weathering. If correct, K/Al of fine to coarse fraction can be used as an index of chemical weathering intensity. To test this idea, we examined the relationship between K/Al of fine to coarse fraction and the ratio of chemical weathering contribution to total denudation rate based on observational data. The result will be presented and its implication will be discussed.

  8. Preparation and Characterization of Chemically Synthesized Hybrid Composites for Bone Tissue Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raucci, M. G.; Guarino, V.; Ambrosio, L.

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study concerns the development of bioresorbable composite materials for bone repair and regeneration. Hydroxyapatite loaded composites were synthesized by a colloidal non-aqueous chemical precipitation technique at room temperature. This study describes the synthesis and characterization of HA/PCL composite material, in order to verify the interaction between the ceramic and the polymer phases by a morphological investigation.

  9. Comparison of Chemical Composition of Complex Disinfection Byproduct (DBP) Mixtures Produced by Different Treatment Methods - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of the chemical composition of complex DBP mixtures, produced by different drinking water treatment processes, are essential to generate toxicity data required for assessing their risks to humans. For mixture risk assessments, whole mixture toxicology studies generally a...

  10. Comparison of Chemical Composition of Complex Disinfection Byproduct (DBP) Mixtures Produced by Different Treatment Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of the chemical composition of complex DBP mixtures, produced by different drinking water treatment processes, are essential to generate toxicity data required for assessing their risks to humans. For mixture risk assessments, whole mixture toxicology studies generally a...

  11. Does forest fire effect chemical composition of surface water

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, A.T. . Dept. of Geography and Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Chemical Data for stream drainages in Yellowstone National Park area have been examined for trends associated with the 1988 burn. Limited pre-fire data make assessment difficult. Data from the Snake River (at maximum recorded discharge) suggest that TDS decreases, total Nitrogen remains constant and total Phosphorus increases from pre-fire (and very dry conditions) to post-fire (and more normal conditions). To test these apparent trends post-fire data from adjacent valleys (Jones Creek, burned; Crow Creek, unburned) were compared. Each shows a decrease in TDS, similar nearly constant total Nitrogen and an increase in total Phosphorus. Although year to year changes in surface water seem greater from the burned valley, the data from the unburned valley show similar trends. Therefore these data do not clearly distinguish trends resulting solely from the burn.

  12. A New Reference Chemical Composition for TMC-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratier, P.; Majumdar, L.; Ohishi, M.; Roueff, E.; Loison, J. C.; Hickson, K. M.; Wakelam, V.

    2016-08-01

    Recent detections of complex organic molecules in dark clouds have rekindled interest in the astrochemical modeling of these environments. Because of its relative closeness and rich molecular complexity, TMC-1 has been extensively observed to study the chemical processes taking place in dark clouds. We use local thermodynamical equilibrium radiative transfer modeling coupled with a Bayesian statistical method which takes into account outliers to analyze the data from the Nobeyama spectral survey of TMC-1 between 8 and 50 GHz. We compute the abundance relative to molecular hydrogen of 57 molecules, including 19 isotopologues in TMC-1 along with their associated uncertainty. The new results are in general agreement with previous abundance determination from Ohishi & Kaifu and the values reported in the review from Agúndez & Wakelam. However, in some cases, large opacity and low signal to noise effects allow only upper or lower limits to be derived, respectively.

  13. Calculations of the Chemical Composition of the Sacramento Urban Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, I. M.; Cohen, R. C.

    2007-12-01

    Recent measurements within the Sacramento urban plume have provided a detailed benchmark for testing our understanding of tropospheric chemistry. Available measurements include a wide suite of VOC and BVOC, NOy,i, O3, and CO at the source and at a receptor site five hours downwind. Further, the meteorology in the region is extremely regular making it possible to evaluate effects of temperature or day-of-week patterns with a single season of measurements. Here we use a Lagrangian model representing transport from Granite Bay, a suburb at the eastern edge of Sacramento, to the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Station (UC- BFRS). The model represents chemistry based on MCM v3.1 along with mixing and dilution. The model is initiated with concentrations of NOx, peroxynitrates, alkyl and multifunctional nitrates, HNO3, VOCs and O3 based on measurements at the edge of the Sacramento suburban sprawl east of the city. Biogenic VOC emissions throughout the transect are included. The outputs of the model are compared with ozone measurements at Cool three hours downwind, and detailed measurements of VOC, the speciation of the nitrogen oxides and O3 at UC-BFRS, 5 hours downwind of the Sacramento suburbs in the center of the Mountain counties air basin. The comparisons indicate 1) O3 at UC-BFRS and Cool is largely driven by the combination of rural biogenic emissions and urban NOx emissions, 2) that OH is underestimated by standard chemical models, 3) that partitioning of NOy is dominated by peroxy and other multifunctional nitrates that are not represented in standard chemical models and which have a strong impact on how much NO2 is available for ozone production. We also investigate model representation of temperature and weekend/weekday effects.

  14. Influence of the chemical composition on gamma ray attenuation by fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bhandal, G S; Singh, K

    1992-04-01

    The dependence of gamma ray attenuation on the chemical composition of fatty acids is investigated in the energy range from 10(-3) to 10(5) MeV. The mass attenuation coefficients (muF) and effective atomic numbers (Zeff) have been calculated for 27 different fatty acids. They show appreciable variation with the chemical composition of fatty acids in the region of gamma ray energies from 10(-3) to 10(5) MeV. PMID:1314792

  15. A rapid method for the computation of equilibrium chemical composition of air to 15000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Erickson, Wayne D.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid computational method has been developed to determine the chemical composition of equilibrium air to 15000 K. Eleven chemically reacting species, i.e., O2, N2, O, NO, N, NO+, e-, N+, O+, Ar, and Ar+ are included. The method involves combining algebraically seven nonlinear equilibrium equations and four linear elemental mass balance and charge neutrality equations. Computational speeds for determining the equilibrium chemical composition are significantly faster than the often used free energy minimization procedure. Data are also included from which the thermodynamic properties of air can be computed. A listing of the computer program together with a set of sample results are included.

  16. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary. PMID:16296384

  17. Software for analysis of chemical mixtures--composition, occurrence, distribution, and possible toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Jonathon C.; Skach, Kenneth A.; Toccalino, Patricia L.

    2013-01-01

    The composition, occurrence, distribution, and possible toxicity of chemical mixtures in the environment are research concerns of the U.S. Geological Survey and others. The presence of specific chemical mixtures may serve as indicators of natural phenomena or human-caused events. Chemical mixtures may also have ecological, industrial, geochemical, or toxicological effects. Chemical-mixture occurrences vary by analyte composition and concentration. Four related computer programs have been developed by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey for research of chemical-mixture compositions, occurrences, distributions, and possible toxicities. The compositions and occurrences are identified for the user-supplied data, and therefore the resultant counts are constrained by the user’s choices for the selection of chemicals, reporting limits for the analytical methods, spatial coverage, and time span for the data supplied. The distribution of chemical mixtures may be spatial, temporal, and (or) related to some other variable, such as chemical usage. Possible toxicities optionally are estimated from user-supplied benchmark data. The software for the analysis of chemical mixtures described in this report is designed to work with chemical-analysis data files retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System but can also be used with appropriately formatted data from other sources. Installation and usage of the mixture software are documented. This mixture software was designed to function with minimal changes on a variety of computer-operating systems. To obtain the software described herein and other U.S. Geological Survey software, visit http://water.usgs.gov/software/.

  18. The Chemical Composition of Halo Stars on Extreme Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Alex

    1999-04-01

    Presented within is a fine spectroscopic analysis of 11 metal-poor (-2.15<[Fe/H]<-1.00) dwarf stars on orbits that penetrate the outermost regions of the Galactic halo. Abundances for a select group of light metals (Na, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti), Fe-peak nuclides (Cr, Fe, and Ni), and neutron-capture elements (Y and Ba) were calculated using line strengths measured from high-resolution (R~48,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N~110pixel^-1) echelle spectra acquired with the Keck I 10 m telescope and HIRES spectrograph. Ten of the stars have apogalactica, a proxy for stellar birthplace, which stretch between 25 and 90 kpc; however, these ``outer halo'' stars exhibit strikingly uniform abundances. The average, Fe-normalized abundances-<[Mg/Fe]>=+0.23+/-0.09, <[Si/Fe]>=+0.24+/-0.10, <[Ca/Fe]>=+0.22+/-0.07, <[Ti/Fe]>=+0.20+/-0.08, <[Cr/Fe]>=0.02+/-0.07, <[Ni/Fe]>=-0.09+/-0.07, and <[Ba/Fe]>=+0.01+/-0.12-exhibit little intrinsic scatter; moreover, the evolution of individual ratios (as a function of [Fe/H]) is generally consistent with the predictions of galactic chemical evolution models dominated by the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. Only <[Y/Fe]>=-0.13+/-0.21 exhibits a dispersion larger than observational uncertainties, which suggests a different nucleosynthesis site for this element. It has been conjectured that stars on high-energy orbits-either those that penetrate the remote halo or ones with extreme retrograde velocities-were once associated with a cannibalized satellite galaxy. Such stars, as shown here, are indistinguishable from metal-poor dwarfs of the inner Galactic halo. The uniformity of the abundances, regardless of kinematic properties, suggests that physically, spatially, and temporally distinct star-forming regions within (or near) the growing Milky Way experienced grossly similar chemical evolution histories. Implications for galaxy formation scenarios are discussed.

  19. Chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols between Moscow and Vladivostok

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuokka, S.; Teinilä, K.; Saarnio, K.; Aurela, M.; Sillanpää, M.; Hillamo, R.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Vartiainen, E.; Kulmala, M.; Skorokhod, A. I.; Elansky, N. F.; Belikov, I. B.

    2007-05-01

    The TROICA-9 expedition (Trans-Siberian Observations Into the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) was carried out at the Trans-Siberian railway between Moscow and Vladivostok in October 2005. Measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were made from an observatory carriage connected to a passenger train. Black carbon (BC) concentrations in fine particles (PM2.5, aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm) were measured with an aethalometer using a five-minute time resolution. Concentrations of inorganic ions and some organic compounds (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, oxalate and methane sulphonate) were measured continuously by using an on-line system with a 15-min time resolution. In addition, particle volume size distributions were determined for particles in the diameter range 3-850 nm using a 10-min. time resolution. The continuous measurements were completed with 24-h. PM2.5 filter samples which were stored in a refrigerator and later analyzed in chemical laboratory. The analyses included mass concentrations of PM2.5, ions, monosaccharide anhydrides (levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan) and trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, V and Zn). The mass concentrations of PM2.5 varied in the range of 4.3-34.8 μg m-3 with an average of 21.6 μg m-3. Fine particle mass consisted mainly of BC (average 27.6%), SO42- (13.0%), NH4+ (4.1%), and NO3- (1.4%). One of the major constituents was obviously also organic carbon which was not determined. The contribution of BC was high compared with other studies made in Europe and Asia. High concentrations of ions, BC and particle volume were observed between Moscow and roughly 4000 km east of it, as well as close to Vladivostok, primarily due to local anthropogenic sources. In the natural background area between 4000 and 7200 km distance from Moscow, observed concentrations were low, even though there were local particle sources, such as forest fires, that increased occasionally concentrations. The

  20. Chemical microsensors

    DOEpatents

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

  1. The chemical composition of the mild barium star HD 202109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushchenko, A. V.; Gopka, V. F.; Kim, C.; Liang, Y. C.; Musaev, F. A.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We present chemical abundances of the mild barium star HD 202109 (\\zeta Cyg) determined from the analysis of a spectrum obtained by using the 2-m telescope at the Peak Terskol Observatory and a high-resolution spectrometer with R=80 000, signal to noise ratio >100. We also present the atmospheric parameters of the star determined using various methods including iron-line abundance analysis. For line identifications, we use whole-range synthetic spectra computed from Kurucz's database and the latest lists of spectral lines. Among the determined abundances of 51 elements, those of P, S, K, Cu, Zn, Ge, Rb, Sr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, In, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er, Tm, Hf, Os, Ir, Pt, Tl, and Pb were not investigated previously. Assuming that the overabundance pattern of Ba stars is due to binary accretion, the observed abundance pattern of the neutron-capture process elements in HD 202109 can be explained by combining the AGB star nucleosynthesis and the wind accretion scenario. Based on observations obtained at the 2-m telescope of Peak Terskol observatory near Mt. Elbrus, Northern Caucasus, Russia - International Center for Astronomical, Medical and Ecological Research (ICAMER), Ukraine & Russia.

  2. Conical intersection seams in polyenes derived from their chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenov, Artur; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2012-08-01

    The knowledge of conical intersection seams is important to predict and explain the outcome of ultrafast reactions in photochemistry and photobiology. They define the energetic low-lying reachable regions that allow for the ultrafast non-radiative transitions. In complex molecules it is not straightforward to locate them. We present a systematic approach to predict conical intersection seams in multifunctionalized polyenes and their sensitivity to substituent effects. Included are seams that facilitate the photoreaction of interest as well as seams that open competing loss channels. The method is based on the extended two-electron two-orbital method [A. Nenov and R. de Vivie-Riedle, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034304 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3608924. It allows to extract the low-lying regions for non-radiative transitions, which are then divided into small linear segments. Rules of thumb are introduced to find the support points for these segments, which are then used in a linear interpolation scheme for a first estimation of the intersection seams. Quantum chemical optimization of the linear interpolated structures yields the final energetic position. We demonstrate our method for the example of the electrocyclic isomerization of trifluoromethyl-pyrrolylfulgide.

  3. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Delbert J. Eatough; Wenxuan Cui; Jeffery Hull; Robert J. Farber

    2006-12-15

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr daynight samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was {+-} 0.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3} organic material, {+-} 0.3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium sulfate, and {+-} 0.07 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium nitrate. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides sources in the region indicate that the major anthropogenic contributors to light extinction were from the Los Angeles, CA, and Las Vegas, NV, urban areas. Mohave Power Project associated secondary sulfate was a negligible contributor to light extinction. 49 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Chemical composition of precipitation in a Mexican Maya region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, H. A.; Saavedra, M. I. R.; Sánchez, P. A.; Torres, R. J.; Granada, L. M. M.

    The chemical characteristics of wet precipitation in Puerto Morelos, Quintana Roo State, Mexico, were measured from April 1994 to December 1995. Puerto Morelos is located in the Caribbean Mayan coastal region of the Peninsula of Yucatan, and is normally exposed to winds from the Caribbean region. Wetfall was analyzed for pH, conductivity and Cl -, NO 3-, SO 42-, Na +, NH 4+, K +, Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ion concentrations. Volume-weighted mean pH for the whole sampling period was 5.35, although values as low as 4.6 were measured in several rain samples. Concentrations of all species correlated negatively with rain volume. Sea-salt aerosols contributed with most of the Na +, Cl -, Mg 2+, K + and SO 42- found in wet precipitation. The mean [SO 42-excess] was 9.7 μEq l -1, which agrees with the background hemispheric values of ≈10 μEq l -1 reported elsewhere. The mean [NO 3-] was 11.4 μEq l -1, almost four times higher than the background hemispheric value of ≈2.5 μEq l -1 reported elsewhere. However, a major component causing the slight acidity character of rain in Puerto Morelos seems to be H 2SO 4.

  5. Conical intersection seams in polyenes derived from their chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Nenov, Artur; Vivie-Riedle, Regina de

    2012-08-21

    The knowledge of conical intersection seams is important to predict and explain the outcome of ultrafast reactions in photochemistry and photobiology. They define the energetic low-lying reachable regions that allow for the ultrafast non-radiative transitions. In complex molecules it is not straightforward to locate them. We present a systematic approach to predict conical intersection seams in multifunctionalized polyenes and their sensitivity to substituent effects. Included are seams that facilitate the photoreaction of interest as well as seams that open competing loss channels. The method is based on the extended two-electron two-orbital method [A. Nenov and R. de Vivie-Riedle, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034304 (2011)]. It allows to extract the low-lying regions for non-radiative transitions, which are then divided into small linear segments. Rules of thumb are introduced to find the support points for these segments, which are then used in a linear interpolation scheme for a first estimation of the intersection seams. Quantum chemical optimization of the linear interpolated structures yields the final energetic position. We demonstrate our method for the example of the electrocyclic isomerization of trifluoromethyl-pyrrolylfulgide.

  6. The chemical compositions of RR Lyrae type c variable stars

    SciTech Connect

    Govea, Jose; Gomez, Thomas; Sneden, Christopher; Preston, George W. E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu

    2014-02-20

    We present a detailed chemical abundance study of eight RR Lyrae variable stars of subclass c (RRc). The target RRc stars chosen for study exhibit 'Blazhko-effect' period and amplitude modulations to their pulsational cycles. Data for this study were gathered with the echelle spectrograph of the 100 inch du Pont telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Spectra were obtained throughout each star's pulsation cycle. Atmospheric parameters—effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity, and metallicity—were derived at multiple phase points. We found metallicities and element abundance ratios to be constant within observational uncertainties over the pulsational cycles of all stars. Moreover, the α-element and Fe-group abundance ratios with respect to iron are consistent with other horizontal-branch members (RRab, blue and red non-variables). Finally, we have used the [Fe/H] values of these eight RRc stars to anchor the metallicity estimates of a large-sample RRc snapshot spectroscopic study being conducted with the same telescope and instrument combination employed here.

  7. Evaluation of the performance of four chemical transport models in predicting the aerosol chemical composition in Europe in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Marje; Sofiev, Mikhail; Tsyro, Svetlana; Hendriks, Carlijn; Semeena, Valiyaveetil; Vazhappilly Francis, Xavier; Butler, Tim; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Friedrich, Rainer; Hendricks, Johannes; Kong, Xin; Lawrence, Mark; Righi, Mattia; Samaras, Zissis; Sausen, Robert; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Sokhi, Ranjeet

    2016-05-01

    Four regional chemistry transport models were applied to simulate the concentration and composition of particulate matter (PM) in Europe for 2005 with horizontal resolution ~ 20 km. The modelled concentrations were compared with the measurements of PM chemical composition by the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) monitoring network. All models systematically underestimated PM10 and PM2.5 by 10-60 %, depending on the model and the season of the year, when the calculated dry PM mass was compared with the measurements. The average water content at laboratory conditions was estimated between 5 and 20 % for PM2.5 and between 10 and 25 % for PM10. For majority of the PM chemical components, the relative underestimation was smaller than it was for total PM, exceptions being the carbonaceous particles and mineral dust. Some species, such as sea salt and NO3-, were overpredicted by the models. There were notable differences between the models' predictions of the seasonal variations of PM, mainly attributable to different treatments or omission of some source categories and aerosol processes. Benzo(a)pyrene concentrations were overestimated by all the models over the whole year. The study stresses the importance of improving the models' skill in simulating mineral dust and carbonaceous compounds, necessity for high-quality emissions from wildland fires, as well as the need for an explicit consideration of aerosol water content in model-measurement comparison.

  8. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ.

    PubMed

    Eatough, Delbert J; Cui, Wenxuan; Hull, Jeffery; Farber, Robert J

    2006-12-01

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr day-night samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was +/- 0.6 microg/m3 organic material, +/- 0.3 microg/m3 ammonium sulfate, and +/- 0.07 microg/m3 ammonium nitrate. Data were also available on fine particulate crustal material, fine and coarse particulate mass from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments sampling system, and relative humidity (RH), light absorption, particle scattering, and light extinction measurements from Project MOHAVE. An extinction budget was obtained using mass scattering coefficients estimated from particle size distribution data. Literature data were used to estimate the change in the mass scattering coefficients for the measured species as a function of RH and for the absorption of light by elemental carbon. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. During periods of highest light extinction, contributions from fine particulate organic material, sulfate, and light-absorbing carbon dominated the extinction of light by particles. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides

  9. Chemical and sulfur isotopic composition of precipitation in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangxu; Guo, Qingjun; Chen, Tongbin; Lang, Yunchao; Peters, Marc; Tian, Liyan; Zhang, Hanzhi; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-03-01

    China is experiencing serious acid rain contamination, with Beijing among the worst-hit areas. To understand the chemical feature and the origin of inorganic ions in precipitation of Beijing, 128 precipitation samples were collected and analyzed for major water-soluble ions and δ(34)S. The pH values ranged from 3.68 to 7.81 and showed a volume weighted average value (VWA) of 5.02, with a frequency of acid rain of 26.8 %. The VWA value of electrical conductivity (EC) was 68.6 μS/cm, which was nearly 4 times higher than the background value of northern China. Ca(2+) represented the main cation; SO4 (2-) and NO3 (-) were the dominant anion in precipitation. Our study showed that SO4 (2-) and NO3 (-) originated from coal and fossil fuel combustion; Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) were from the continental sources. The δ(34)S value of SO4 (2-) in precipitation ranged from +2.1 to +12.8‰ with an average value of +4.7‰. The δ(34)S value showed a winter maximum and a summer minimum tendency, which was mainly associated with temperature-dependent isotope equilibrium fractionation as well as combustion of coal with relatively positive δ(34)S values in winter. Moreover, the δ(34)S values revealed that atmospheric sulfur in Beijing are mainly correlated to coal burning and traffic emission; coal combustion constituted a significant fraction of the SO4 (2-) in winter precipitation. PMID:26573310

  10. Chemical Peels

    MedlinePlus

    ... the complications or potential side effects of a chemical peel? Temporary or permanent change in skin color, particularly for women on birth control pills, who subsequently become pregnant or have a history of brownish facial ... after having a chemical peel? All peels require some follow-up care: ...

  11. Chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2001-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

  12. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

  13. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  14. Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... agents such as sarin and VX. Many hazardous chemicals are used in industry - for example, chlorine, ammonia, and benzene. Some can be made from everyday items such as household cleaners. Although there are no guarantees of safety during a chemical emergency, you can take actions to protect yourself. ...

  15. [Rapid identification of chemical composition in safflower with UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap].

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-song; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Li, De-feng; Yang, Hong-jun; Liang, Ri-xin

    2015-04-01

    The UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometer was used to explore the chemical compositions in safflower. The rapid separation of the compositions was conducted by the UHPLC, following by high resolution full scan and MS2 scan, under the positive and negative ion mode. The chemical formula of compositions were deduced by full scan data in less than 5, then the potential structures were confirmed by the MS2 data. Forty-nine compounds were detected, of which 26 was identified, and 5 compounds was validated by the standard substances. PMID:26281560

  16. ENERGY SPECTRUM AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ULTRAHIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS FROM SEMI-RELATIVISTIC HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ruoyu; Wang Xiangyu

    2012-02-10

    It has been suggested that hypernova remnants, with a substantial amount of energy in semi-relativistic ejecta, can accelerate intermediate mass or heavy nuclei to ultrahigh energies and provide a sufficient amount of energy in cosmic rays to account for the observed flux. We here calculate the expected energy spectrum and chemical composition of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays from such semi-relativistic hypernovae. With a chemical composition equal to that of the hypernova ejecta and a flat or hard spectrum for cosmic rays at the sources, the spectrum and composition of the propagated cosmic rays observed at the Earth can be compatible with the measurements by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  17. Chemically synthesized lithium peroxide composite cathodes for closed system Li-O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Bhargav, Amruth; Guo, Wei; Fu, Yongzhu

    2016-04-28

    A binder-free lithium peroxide-carbon nanofiber composite cathode was synthesized chemically to be used in a closed system lithium-oxygen battery without external supply of oxygen. This cathode enhances the closed system performance and exhibits good rechargeability with cyclability up to 50 cycles. This composite cathode provides scope for full cell development. PMID:27032704

  18. The Effect of Chemical Functionalization on Mechanical Properties of Nanotube/Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Gates, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the chemical functionalization of a carbon nanotube embedded in a nanotube/polyethylene composite on the bulk elastic properties are presented. Constitutive equations are established for both functionalized and non-functionalized nanotube composites systems by using an equivalent-continuum modeling technique. The elastic properties of both composites systems are predicted for various nanotube lengths, volume fractions, and orientations. The results indicate that for the specific composite material considered in this study, most of the elastic stiffness constants of the functionalized composite are either less than or equal to those of the non-functionalized composite.

  19. Level and Chemical Composition of Cryoglobulins in Schizophrenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoyetsyan, Aren; Boyajyan, Anna; Melkumova, Maya

    The blood samples of 40 schizophrenic patients were tested for the presence of cryoglobulins (Cgs) and composition of Cgs was examined. The elevated levels of type III Cgs, containing complement components, were detected in all study subjects.

  20. Structure and chemical composition of the dentin-enamel junction analyzed by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desoutter, A.; Salehi, H.; Slimani, A.; Marquet, P.; Jacquot, B.; Tassery, H.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-02-01

    The structure and chemical composition of the human dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) was studied using confocal Raman microscopy - a chemical imaging technique. Slices of non-fixed, sound teeth were prepared with an Isomet diamond saw and scanned with Witec Alpha300R system. The combination of different characteristics peaks of phosphate, carbonate and organic matrix (respectively 960, 1072 and 1545 cm-1), generates images representing the chemical composition of the DEJ area. Images are also calculated using peak ratios enabling precise determination of the chemical composition across the DEJ. Then, with two characterized peaks, different pictures are calculated to show the ratio of two components. The images of the spatial distribution of mineral phosphate (960cm-1) to organic matrix (1545 cm-1) ratios, mineral carbonates (1072cm-1) to mineral phosphate ratios; and mineral carbonates to organic matrix ratios were reconstructed. Cross sectional and calculated graphic profile show the variations of the different chemical component ratios through the enamel and the dentin. Phosphate to organic ratio shows an accumulation of organic material under the enamel surface. The cross sectional profile of these pictures shows a high phosphate content compared to enamel in the vicinity of the DEJ. The Confocal Raman imaging technique can be used to further provide full chemical imaging of tooth, particularly of the whole DEJ and to study enamel and dentin decay.

  1. The chemical composition of the Earth: Enstatite chondrite models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javoy, M.; Kaminski, E.; Guyot, F.; Andrault, D.; Sanloup, C.; Moreira, M.; Labrosse, S.; Jambon, A.; Agrinier, P.; Davaille, A.; Jaupart, C.

    2010-05-01

    We propose a new model of Earth's bulk composition based on enstatite chondrites (E-chondrites), the only chondrite group isotopically identical to the Earth. This model allows a quantitative study of accretion and differentiation processes in the early Earth. Conditions for core formation are evaluated using data on silica-iron equilibrium at high pressure and temperature and the exchange budget equation SiO2 + 2Fe = Si + 2FeO, which is the result of IW and Si-SiO2 oxygen buffers' interaction and controls the evolution of mantle fO2. Based on that equation, ranges for the compositions of the Bulk Silicate Earth, the lower mantle and the core are deduced from the compositions of E-chondrites and their constituents. For these ranges of compositions, we show that during core differentiation, the mantle fO2 evolves naturally from ≈ IW-3.2 to IW-1.4 ± 0.1. The model compositions are tightened using geophysical constraints on (1) the amount of light elements in the core, (2) the petrology of the upper and lower mantle and (3) the thermal and convective structure of the lower mantle. Our results indicate that the lower mantle is enriched in Si and Fe, which is consistent with recent geophysical studies, and depleted in highly refractory elements, notably in Uranium and Thorium.

  2. Chemical compositions of the moon, earth, and eucrite parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.

    1977-01-01

    Model compositions of the moon and earth were calculated on the assumption that these planets had experienced chondrite-like nebular fractionation processes. The model correctly predicts the abundance ratios of certain volatile/refractory element pairs (e.g., Cd/Ba, Ga/La, Sn/Th, and Pb/U), the density of the moon, and the major rock types. The model is also used to reconstruct the composition of the parent eucrite body, which resembles the moon except for a lower content of refractory elements.

  3. Unnecessary Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  4. Chemical composition of black rockfish (Sebastes melanops) fillets and byproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black rockfish are important in the near shore fishery of Southeast Alaska. They are the only species among the pelagic shelf rockfishes for which there is a directed fishery in state waters. The purpose of this study was to determine the composition black rockfish fillets and its major processing b...

  5. The Composition of 433 Eros: A Mineralogical-Chemical Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCoy, T. J.; Gaffey, M.; Bell, J. F., III; Boynton, W. V.; Burbine, T. H.; Chapman, C. R.; Cheng, A.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.; Gorenstein, P.

    2001-01-01

    We report on an effort with the Near-Infrared Spectrometer/Multi-Spectral Imager (NIS/MSI) and X-ray/Gamma-ray Spectrometer (XGRS) teams to synthesize our data sets to constrain the relationship between Eros and meteorites; the mineralogy, abundances and compositions of Eros; and the processes that formed Eros. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Essential Oil Composition of Phagnalon sordidum (L.) from Corsica, Chemical Variability and Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Brunel, Marion; Vitrac, Caroline; Costa, Jean; Mzali, Fatima; Vitrac, Xavier; Muselli, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition of Phagnalon sordidum (L.) essential oil was investigated for the first time using gas chromatography and chromatography/mass spectrometry. Seventy-six compounds, which accounted for 87.9% of the total amount, were identified in a collective essential oil of P. sordidum from Corsica. The main essential oil components were (E)-β-caryophyllene (14.4%), β-pinene (11.0%), thymol (9.0%), and hexadecanoic acid (5.3%). The chemical compositions of essential oils from 19 Corsican locations were investigated. The study of the chemical variability using statistical analysis allowed identifying direct correlation between the three populations of P. sordidum widespread in Corsica and the essential oil compositions they produce. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of P. sordidum essential oil was evaluated and it exhibited a notable activity on a large panel of clinically significant microorganisms. PMID:26916729

  7. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

  8. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  9. Effect of interfacial chemical bonding and surface topography on adhesion in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Drzal, L.T.; Sugiura, N.; Hook, D. |

    1994-12-31

    A series of PAN-based IM6 carbon fibers having varying amounts of surface treatment were, pretreated with compounds representing the constituents encountered in epoxy composites to pre-react any groups on the fiber surface before composite fabrication in order to determine the effect of chemical bonding on fiber-matrix adhesion. Chemical bonding was quantified using XPS. Chemical bonding between reactive groups in amine cured epoxy matrices and the surface groups present on IN46 carbon fibers as a result of commercial surface treatments has been detected although the absolute amount of chemical bonding is low (1-3%). It was found that reaction with monofunctional epoxy groups having hydrocarbon functionalities blocked the surface from further reaction and reduced the adhesion that could be attained to its lowest value. Prereaction with difunctional amines had little effect on adhesion when compared to normal composite fabrication procedures. Prereaction with difunctional epoxy groups did enhance adhesion levels over the level attained in normal composite fabrication methods. These results showed that chemical bonding between epoxy and the carbon fiber surface could increases the adhesion between fiber and matrix about 25% while between the amino group and the carbon fiber surface about 15%. Quantitative measurements of the fiber surface microtopography were made with scanning tunneling microscopy. An increase in roughness was detected with increasing surface treatment. It was concluded that surface roughness also accounted for a significant increase in fiber-matrix adhesion.

  10. Factors of the chemical composition of seepage and groundwaters in the intertropical zone (West Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roose, Eric Jean; Lelong, Francois

    1981-12-01

    In connection with a large research programme about the actual dynamics of ferrallitic and ferruginous soils of West Africa, 5000 samples of rainfall, throughfall, runoff, drainage and phreatic waters have been analysed during 4-11 years of field observations. Samples of eight stations, representative of different bioclimatic conditions (sub-Equatorial to pre-Sahelian), have been tested. The analysed parameters are: pH, resistivity, major cations and anions, total organic carbon and nitrogen, phosphorus, silica, aluminium and iron. The results show: (1) The slight influence of the bioclimatic differentiation on the mean chemical composition of the waters: all analysed waters are lightly mineralized (strong resistivity, total chemical charge generally lower than 100 mg/l), with an increasing mineralization from rainfall water to seepage water, at 2 m depth, but decreasing at the water table level (except for Si and Na). (2) The marked variability of the amounts of dissolved chemical species compared to the seasons and the flow volumes. (3) The complexity of phenomena controlling the chemical composition of waters. In the soil layers, this composition would depend principally on biological and biochemical processes, in relation to the activity of organisms but at the level of phreatic waters the chemical composition would rather be controlled by physicochemical conditions (solution-mineral equilibria).

  11. The chemical composition of the Lambda Bootis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baschek, B.; Slettebak, A.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the equivalent widths of 24 ultraviolet lines from IUE spectra of 10 Lambda Bootis or suspected Lambda Bootis stars and 19 normal standard stars of spectral types B8-A7 have been compared with line strengths determined using model atmospheres. Abundance differences are estimated via a differential analysis technique. It is found that the ratio of C, N, and O to the heavier elements Mg to Ni is significantly larger than that for solar composition stars.

  12. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-06-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  13. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-08-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  14. Nextel{trademark}/SiC composites fabricated using forced chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, B.L.; Lowden, R.A.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Schwarz, O.J.

    1993-06-01

    Oxide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated employing the forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process. Composites using Nextel{sup TM} fibers of varying composition were prepared to investigate the effectiveness of each Nextel{sup TM} fiber as a reinforcement for the given matrix. A carbon interface coating was used for the baseline materials, however, alternate interlayers with improved oxidation resistance were also explored Room-temperature flexure strengths of as-fabricated composites and specimens heated in air at 1273 K were measured and compared to results for other SiC-matrix composites.

  15. Model nebulae and determination of the chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Keyes, C D; Czyzak, S J

    1979-04-01

    An analysis of previously presented photoelectric spectrophotometry of HII regions (emission-line diffuse nebulae) in the two Magellanic Clouds is carried out with the aid of theoretical nebular models, which are used primarily as interpolation devices. Some advantages and limitations of such theoretical models are discussed. A comparison of the finally obtained chemical compositions with those found by other observers shows generally a good agreement, suggesting that it is possible to obtain reliable chemical compositions from low excitation gaseous nebulae in our own galaxy as well as in distant stellar systems. PMID:16592633

  16. Model nebulae and determination of the chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Aller, L. H.; Keyes, C. D.; Czyzak, S. J.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of previously presented photoelectric spectrophotometry of HII regions (emission-line diffuse nebulae) in the two Magellanic Clouds is carried out with the aid of theoretical nebular models, which are used primarily as interpolation devices. Some advantages and limitations of such theoretical models are discussed. A comparison of the finally obtained chemical compositions with those found by other observers shows generally a good agreement, suggesting that it is possible to obtain reliable chemical compositions from low excitation gaseous nebulae in our own galaxy as well as in distant stellar systems. PMID:16592633

  17. Chemical composition of primary cosmic rays with IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen

    Ground detector arrays have been used to measure high energy cosmic rays for decades to overcome their very low rate. IceCube is a special case with its 3D deployment and unique location---the South Pole. Although all 86 strings and 81 stations of IceCube were completed in 2011, IceCube began to take data in 2006, after the completion of the first 9 strings. In this thesis, experimental data taken in 2009 with 59 strings are used for composition analysis albeit some techniques are illustrated with the 40-string data. Simulation is essential in the composition work. Simulated data must be compared against the experimental data to find the right mix of cosmic ray components. However, because of limited computing resources and complexities of cosmic rays, the simulation in IceCube is well behind the experiment. The lower and upper bounds of primary energy in simulation for events that go through IceTop and the deep arrays of IceCube are 1014 eV and 1017 eV. However, since IceCube has a threshold energy about several hundred TeV, and an upper limit of 10 18 eV, the full energy range cannot be explored in this thesis. The approach taken to the composition problem in this thesis is a 2D Bayesian unfolding. It takes account of the measured IceTop and InIce energy spectrum and outputs the expected primary energy spectrum of different mass components. Studies of the uncertainties in the results are not complete because of limited simulation and understanding of the new detector and South Pole environment.

  18. Chemical composition of fogwater collected along the California coast

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, D.J.; Waldman, J.M.; Munger, J.W.; Hoffman, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Fogwater collected at both urban and nonurban coastal sites in California ws found to be consistently acidic. Millimolar concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup -/, and fogwater pH values below 3, were observed at sites downwind of the Los Angeles basin. Fogwater composition at remote sites showed evidence of substantial continental and anthropogenic contributions. Acid-neutralizing capacities in coastal air were found to be very low and insufficient to neutralize even small acid inputs. Chloride loss relative to its sea salt contribution was observed at sites furthest from anthropogenic sources.

  19. Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: The Importance of Size, Shape, Chemical Composition, and Valence State in Determining Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnick, Katherine

    Nanoparticles, which are defined as a structure with at least one dimension between 1 and 100 nm, have the potential to be used in a variety of consumer products due to their improved functionality compared to similar particles of larger size. Their small size is associated with increased strength, improved catalytic properties, and increased reactivity; however, their size is also associated with increased toxicity in vitro and in vivo. Numerous toxicological studies have been conducted to determine the properties of nanomaterials that increase their toxicity in order to manufacture new nanomaterials with decreased toxicity. Data indicates that size, shape, chemical composition, and valence state of nanomaterials can dramatically alter their toxicity profile. Therefore, the purpose of this dissertation was to determine how altering the shape, size, and chemical composition of various metal oxide nanoparticles would affect their toxicity. Metal oxides are used in variety of consumer products, from spray-sun screens, to food coloring agents; thus, understanding the toxicity of metal oxides and determining which aspects affect their toxicity may provide safe alternatives nanomaterials for continued use in manufacturing. Tungstate nanoparticles toxicity was assessed in an in vitro model using RAW 264.7 cells. The size, shape, and chemical composition of these nanomaterials were altered and the effect on reactive oxygen species and general cytotoxicity was determined using a variety of techniques. Results demonstrate that shape was important in reactive oxygen species production as wires were able to induce significant reactive oxygen species compared to spheres. Shape, size, and chemical composition did not have much effect on the overall toxicity of these nanoparticles in RAW 264.7 cells over a 72 hour time course, implicating that the base material of the nanoparticles was not toxic in these cells. To further assess how chemical composition can affect toxicity

  20. Chemical composition of Eastern Black Sea aerosol--preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Balcılar, Ilker; Zararsız, Abdullah; Kalaycı, Yakup; Doğan, Güray; Tuncel, Gürdal

    2014-08-01

    Trace element composition of atmospheric particles collected at a high altitude site on the Eastern Black Sea coast of Turkey was investigated to understand atmospheric transport of pollutants to this semi-closed basin. Aerosol samples were collected at a timber-storage area, which is operated by the General Directorate of Forestry. The site is situated at a rural area and is approximately 50 km to the Black Sea coast and 200 km to the Georgia border of Turkey. Coarse (PM2.5-10) and fine (PM2.5) aerosol samples were collected between 2011 and 2013 using a "stacked filter unit". Collected samples were shipped to the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, where Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Ba, Pb were measured by Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence technique (EDXRF). Comparison of measured concentrations of elements with corresponding data generated at other parts of Turkey demonstrated that concentrations of pollution derived elements are higher at Eastern Black Sea than their corresponding concentrations measured at other parts of Turkey, which is attributed to frequent transport of pollutants from north wind sector. Positive matric factorization revealed four factors including three anthropogenic and a crustal factor. Southeastern parts of Turkey, Georgia and Black Sea coast of Ukraine were identified as source regions affecting composition of particles at our site, using trajectory statistics, namely "potential source contribution function" (PSCF). PMID:24373640

  1. AN ESTIMATE OF THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF TITAN's LAKES

    SciTech Connect

    Cordier, Daniel; Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Lavvas, Panayotis; Vuitton, Veronique

    2009-12-20

    Hundreds of radar-dark patches interpreted as lakes have been discovered in the north and south polar regions of Titan. We have estimated the composition of these lakes by using the direct abundance measurements from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe and recent photochemical models based on the vertical temperature profile derived by the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument. Thermodynamic equilibrium is assumed between the atmosphere and the lakes, which are also considered nonideal solutions. We find that the main constituents of the lakes are ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) (approx76%-79%), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) (approx7%-8%), methane (CH{sub 4}) (approx5%-10%), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) (approx2%-3%), butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}) (approx1%), butane (C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) (approx1%), and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) (approx1%). The calculated composition of lakes is then substantially different from what has been expected from models elaborated prior to the exploration of Titan by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft.

  2. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Capacity of Brazilian Passiflora Seed Oils.

    PubMed

    de Santana, Fernanda Carvalho; Shinagawa, Fernanda Branco; Araujo, Elias da Silva; Costa, Ana Maria; Mancini-Filho, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    The seed oils of different varieties of 4 Passiflora species cultivated in Brazil were analyzed and compared regarding their physicochemical parameters, fatty acid composition and the presence of minor components, such as phytosterols, tocopherols, total carotenoids, and phenolic compounds. The antioxidant capacities of the oil extracts were determined using the 2,2'azinobis [3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid] and oxygen radical absorbance capacity methods. The results revealed that all studied Passiflora seed oils possessed similar physicochemical characteristics, except for color, and predominantly contained polyunsaturated fatty acids with a high percentage of linolenic acid (68.75% to 71.54%). Other than the total phytosterol content, the extracted oil from Passiflora setacea BRS Pérola do Cerrado seeds had higher quantities (% times higher than the average of all samples), of carotenoids (44%), phenolic compounds (282%) and vitamin E (215%, 56%, 398%, and 100% for the α-tocopherol, β-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, and δ-tocopherol isomers, respectively). The methanolic extracts from Passiflora setacea BRS Pérola do Cerrado seed oil also showed higher antioxidant activity, which was positively correlated with the total phenolic, δ-tocopherol, and vitamin E contents. For the first time, these results indicate that Passiflora species have strong potential regarding the use of their seeds for oil extraction. Due to their interesting composition, the seed oils may be used as a raw material in manufacturing industries in addition to other widely used vegetable oils. PMID:26512548

  3. Vitrified metal finishing wastes I. Composition, density and chemical durability.

    PubMed

    Bingham, P A; Hand, R J

    2005-03-17

    Durable phosphate glasses were formed by vitrifying waste filter cakes from two metal finishing operations. Some melts formed crystalline components during cooling. Compositional analysis of dried, heat treated and vitrified samples was made using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy and Leco induction furnace combustion analysis. Hydrolytic dissolution, measured by an adapted product consistency test, was reduced by up to 3 orders of magnitude upon heat treatment or vitrification, surpassing the performance of borosilicate glass in some cases. This was attributed to the high levels of iron and zinc in the wastes, which greatly improve the durability of phosphate glasses. One of the wastes arose from a metal phosphating process and was particularly suitable for vitrification due to its high P2O5 content and favourable melting behaviour. The other waste, which arose from a number of processes, was less suitable as it had a low P2O5 content and during heating it emitted harmful corrosive gases and underwent violent reactions. Substantial volume reductions were obtained by heat treatment and vitrification of both wastes. Compositions and performances of some vitrified wastes were comparable with those of glasses which are under consideration for the immobilisation of toxic and nuclear wastes. PMID:15752857

  4. Antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of some essential oils.

    PubMed

    Aridoğan, Buket Cicioğlu; Baydar, Hasan; Kaya, Selçuk; Demirci, Mustafa; Ozbaşar, Demir; Mumcu, Ethem

    2002-12-01

    In this study the composition and antimicrobial properties of essential oils obtained from Origanum onites, Mentha piperita, Juniperus exalsa, Chrysanthemum indicum, Lavandula hybrida, Rosa damascena, Echinophora tenuifolia, Foeniculum vulgare were examined. To evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of these eight aromatic extracts; their in vitro antimicrobial activities were determined by disk diffusion testing, according to the NCCLS criteria. Escherichia coli (ATTC 25922), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATTC 27853 were used as standard test bacterial strains. Origanum onites recorded antimicrobial activity against all test bacteria, and was strongest against Staphylococcus aureus. For Rosa damascena, Mentha piperita and Lavandula hybrida antimicrobial activity was recorded only to Staphylococcus aureus. Juniperus exalsa, and Chrysanthemum indicum exhibited antibacterial activities against both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. We also examined the in vitro antimicrobial activities of some components of the essential oils and found some components with antimicrobial activity. PMID:12510839

  5. The chemical composition of fogs and clouds in Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The major inorganic species in cloud and fog water samples were NH{sub 4}{sup +}, H{sup +}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Concentrations in fog water samples were 1 - 10 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M; pH values ranged from {approx equal} 2 to 6. Nitrate usually exceeded sulfate. Acidity depended on the availability of NH{sub 3} from agricultural operations. Stratus cloudwater had somewhat lower concentrations; pH values were in the range 3-4. The major factors accounting for variation in fog- or cloudwater composition were the preexisting aerosol and gas concentrations and variations in liquid water content. Deposition and entrainment or advection of different air masses were also important during extended cloud or fog episodes. The droplet size dependence of cloudwater composition was investigated on one occasion in an intercepted coastal stratus clouds. Concentrations of S(IV) and CH{sub 2}O in the range 100-1000 {mu}M were observed in fogwater from urban sites in Southern California. Lower concentrations were observed in stratus clouds. The high levels of S(IV) and CH{sub 2}O were attributed to the formation of hydroxymethanesulfonate (HMSA), the S(IV) adduct of CH{sub 2}O. Direct measurements of HMSA in fogwater samples from Bakersfield, CA were made by ion-pairing chromatography. Glyoxal and methyglyoxal were observed at concentrations comparable to CH{sub 2}O in fogwater samples from Riverside, CA and in stratus cloudwater samples from sites along the Santa Barbara Channel.

  6. Nanoscale chemical interaction enhances the physical properties of bioglass composites.

    PubMed

    Ravarian, Roya; Zhong, Xia; Barbeck, Mike; Ghanaati, Shahram; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Murphy, Ciara M; Schindeler, Aaron; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Dehghani, Fariba

    2013-10-22

    Bioglasses are favorable biomaterials for bone tissue engineering; however, their applications are limited due to their brittleness. In addition, the early failure in the interface is a common problem of composites of bioglass and a polymer with high mechanical strength. This effect is due to the phase separation, nonhomogeneous mixture, nonuniform mechanical strength, and different degradation properties of two compounds. To address these issues, in this study a nanoscale interaction between poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and bioactive glass was formed via silane coupling agent (3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MPMA). A monolith was produced at optimum composition from this hybrid by the sol-gel method at 50 °C with a rapid gelation time (<50 min) that possessed superior physicochemical properties compared to pure bioglass and physical mixture. For instance, the Young's modulus of bioglass was decreased 40-fold and the dissolution rate of silica was retarded 1.5-fold by integration of PMMA. Prolonged dissolution of silica fosters bone integration due to the continuous dissolution of bioactive silica. The primary osteoblast cells were well anchored and cell migration was observed on the surface of the hybrid. The in vivo studies in mice demonstrated that the integrity of the hybrids was maintained in subcutaneous implantation. They induced mainly a mononuclear phagocytic tissue reaction with a low level of inflammation, while bioglass provoked a tissue reaction with TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells. These results demonstrated that the presence of a nanoscale interaction between bioglass and PMMA affects the properties of bioglass and broadens its potential applications for bone replacement. PMID:24001050

  7. Chemical and mineral composition of dust and its effect on the dielectric constant

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, S.

    1995-03-01

    Chemical analysis is carried out for dust sample collected from central Sudan and the dust chemical constituents are obtained. The mineral composition of dust are identified by the X-ray diffraction techniques. The mineral quantities are obtained by a technique developed based on the chemical analytical methods. Analyses show that Quartz is the dominant mineral while the SiO{sub 2} is the dominant oxide. A simple model is derived for the dust chemical constituents. This model is used with models for predicting the mixture dielectric constant to estimate the dust dielectric constant; the results of which are seen to be in a good agreement with the measured values. The effects of the different constituents on the dust dielectric constant are studied and results are given.

  8. [Chemical Composition of the Single Particle Aerosol in Winter in Nanning Using SPAMS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-lin; Song, Hong-jun; Chen, Zhi-ming; Huang, Jiong-li; Yang, Jun-chao; Mao, Jing-ying; Li, Hong; Liang, Gui-yun; Mo, Zhao-yu

    2016-02-15

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was performed to characterize the PM2.5 in Nanning from 15 to 24 February 2015. The correlation (R2) between the PM2.5 number concentration and the mass concentration of PM2.5 obtained using SPAMS was 0.76. The particle number concentration could reflect the atmospheric pollution situation to some degree. The Art-2a classification method was used to classify the chemical composition of PM2.5. The results showed that the principal chemical constituents were elemental carbon, organic elements carbon hybrid particles, organic carbon, rich potassium particles, mineral substance, rich sodium particles, second inorganic particles, levoglucosan and other heavy metals. Among them, the composition of elemental carbon was the highest, followed by organic carbon and rich potassium particles. The particle size of 80% of PM2.5 was mainly concentrated in the range of 0.2 microm to 1.0 microm with a peak value occurring at 0. 62 microm. The particle size distribution characteristics of different chemical components were similar. The number concentration of the chemical components in PM2.5 had the same variation tread with the mass concentration of PM2.5 over time. To a certain extent, the change in chemical composition could reflect the instantaneous pollution source. PMID:27363128

  9. Cuticle Structure in Relation to Chemical Composition: Re-assessing the Prevailing Model

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Victoria; Guzmán-Delgado, Paula; Graça, José; Santos, Sara; Gil, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The surface of most aerial plant organs is covered with a cuticle that provides protection against multiple stress factors including dehydration. Interest on the nature of this external layer dates back to the beginning of the 19th century and since then, several studies facilitated a better understanding of cuticular chemical composition and structure. The prevailing undertanding of the cuticle as a lipidic, hydrophobic layer which is independent from the epidermal cell wall underneath stems from the concept developed by Brongniart and von Mohl during the first half of the 19th century. Such early investigations on plant cuticles attempted to link chemical composition and structure with the existing technologies, and have not been directly challenged for decades. Beginning with a historical overview about the development of cuticular studies, this review is aimed at critically assessing the information available on cuticle chemical composition and structure, considering studies performed with cuticles and isolated cuticular chemical components. The concept of the cuticle as a lipid layer independent from the cell wall is subsequently challenged, based on the existing literature, and on new findings pointing toward the cell wall nature of this layer, also providing examples of different leaf cuticle structures. Finally, the need for a re-assessment of the chemical and structural nature of the plant cuticle is highlighted, considering its cell wall nature and variability among organs, species, developmental stages, and biotic and abiotic factors during plant growth. PMID:27066059

  10. The chemical compositions of Galactic disc F and G dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Bacham E.; Tomkin, Jocelyn; Lambert, David L.; Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2003-03-01

    Photospheric abundances are presented for 27 elements from carbon to europium in 181 F and G dwarfs from a differential local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. Stellar effective temperatures (Teff) were adopted from an infrared flux method calibration of Strömgren photometry. Stellar surface gravities (g) were calculated from Hipparcos parallaxes and stellar evolutionary tracks. Adopted Teff and g values are in good agreement with spectroscopic estimates. Stellar ages were determined from evolutionary tracks. Stellar space motions (U, V, W) and a Galactic potential were used to estimate Galactic orbital parameters. These show that the vast majority of the stars belong to the Galactic thin disc. Relative abundances expressed as [X/Fe] generally confirm previously published results. We give results for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, Ce, Nd and Eu. The α elements - O, Mg, Si, Ca and Ti - show [α/Fe] to increase slightly with decreasing [Fe/H]. Heavy elements with dominant contributions at solar metallicity from the s-process show [s/Fe] to decrease slightly with decreasing [Fe/H]. Scatter in [X/Fe] at a fixed [Fe/H] is entirely attributable to the small measurement errors, after excluding the few thick disc stars and the s-process-enriched CH subgiants. Tight limits are set on `cosmic' scatter. If a weak trend with [Fe/H] is taken into account, the composition of a thin disc star expressed as [X/Fe] is independent of the star's age and birthplace for elements contributed in different proportions by massive stars (Type II supernovae), exploding white dwarfs (Type Ia supernovae) and asymptotic red giant branch stars. By combining our sample with various published studies, comparisons between thin and thick disc stars are made. In this composite sample, thick disc stars are primarily identified by their VLSR in the range -40 to -100 km s-1. These are

  11. Chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section.

  12. Chemical and phytochemical compositions of Voandzeia subterranea seeds.

    PubMed

    Marcel, Andzouana; Bienvenu, Mombouli Jean; Attibayeba

    2014-09-01

    The seeds of Voandzeia subterranean (L.) Thouars (Fabaceae), from Congo-Brazzaville were studied for proximate, qualitative and quantitative compositions. Phytochemical screening of various solvent extracts showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides, saponins, steroids, triterpenoids, phenols, anthocyanins and carotenoids. Tannins and anthraquinones were not found. Quantitative analysis showed a high amount of alkaloids (34.40 ±0.2%), flavonoids (4.93 ± 0.17%), saponins (2.20 ± 0.11%) and anthocyanins (1.00 ± 0.12%) in decreasing order. Phenols (0.60 ± 0.12%) and carotenoids had low yields (0.26 ± 0.07%). Proximate analysis of the seeds showed high moisture, carbohydrate and energy content values (49.14, 20.53% and 956.14 kJ 100 g(-1), respectively). The results showed low ash content (3.84%) and the relatively high fat (7.84%) and protein content (18.65%). The mineral analysis revealed that potassium (3.15%) and phosphorus (1.74%) were the most abundant minerals. Calcium (0.35) and magnesium (0.39%), were found in low amounts. Sodium, iron and aluminum were detected in trace quantities (0.01%). Manganese was not detected in the present study. The seeds were found to be important both for their nutrients and non-nutrients which determined the medicinal and nutritional value of the plant. PMID:26031031

  13. Chemical compositions and kinematics of the Hercules stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, P.; Reddy, Bacham E.; Lambert, David L.; Musthafa, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    An abundance analysis is reported of 58-K giants identified by Famaey et al. (2005, A&A, 430, 165) as highly probable members of the Hercules stream selected from stars north of the celestial equator in the Hipparcos catalogue. The giants have compositions spanning the interval [Fe/H] from -0.17 to +0.42 with a mean value of +0.15 and relative elemental abundances [El/Fe] representative of the Galactic thin disc. Selection effects may have biased the selection from the Hipparcos catalogue against the selection of metal-poor stars. Our reconsideration of the recent extensive survey by Bensby et al. of FG dwarfs, including metal-poor stars, provides a [Fe/H] distribution for the Hercules stream, which is similar to that from the 58 giants. It appears that the stream is dominated by metal-rich stars from the thin disc. We discuss suggestions in the literature that the stream includes metal-poor stars from the thick disc.

  14. Chemical composition of the underutilized legume Cassia hirsuta L.

    PubMed

    Vadivel, V; Janardhanan, K

    2000-01-01

    Seven accessions of the underutilized legume, Cassia hirsuta L., seeds collected from seven different agroclimatic regions of Tamil Nadu, India, were analyzed for proximate composition, total proteins, protein fractions, mineral profiles and selected antinutritional factors. Crude protein ranged from 15.52 to 20.74%, crude lipid 3.77-7.04%, crude fiber 4.68-6.92%, ash 3.98-6.42% and carbohydrates 62.45-70.16%. Energy values of the seeds were 1549-1634 kJ/100 g (DM), which are comparable to those of other legumes. Data on seed protein fractions revealed that globulins constituted the bulk of the seed protein as in most legumes. Mineral contents of the seeds showed greater variation. Potassium was the most abundant mineral (1029-1786 mg/100 g), whereas manganese was low (2.1-2.2 mg/100 g). Antinutritional factors such as total free phenolics, tannins, L-DOPA and lectins were analyzed. The results of the study demonstrated that the accessions of C. hirsuta seeds collected from Tamil Nadu, India, could be good sources of some important nutrients for humans. PMID:11086879

  15. Chemical composition of urban airborne particulate matter in Ulaanbaatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Masataka; Matsui, Ichiro; Batdorj, Dashdondog; Jugder, Dulam; Mori, Ikuko; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Takahashi, Katsuyuki

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric pollution caused by airborne particulate matter in the winter season in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia is a very serious problem. However, there is a complete lack of scientific observation data to define the situation prior to any remediation. PM10 and PM2.5 average monthly values obtained by continuous monitoring showed the concentrations of particles of both size categories exceeded 100 μg m-3 during November to February (winter). PM10 particles were sampled with filters in January (i.e. during the heating period) and June (i.e.non-heating period) of 2008 in central Ulaanbaatar. To determine the composition of urban airborne particulate matter we analyzed a range of ionic components, multiple elements including heavy metals, and organic and inorganic carbon (soot). We also measured the stable carbon isotope ratio of the soot. Total carbon (sum of organic carbon and inorganic carbon) accounted for 47% of the mass of the PM10 during the heating period and 33% during the non-heating period, and was the largest component of urban airborne particulate matter in Ulaanbaatar. Stable isotope ratios (δ13C) of soot generated during the heating period (-23.4 ± 0.2‰) approximated the ratios for coal used in Ulaanbaatar (-21.3 to -24.4‰), while the ratios during the non-heating period (-27.1 ± 0.4‰) were clearly different from the coal values. In the heating period, a very high correlation was observed between soot and organic carbon, SO42-, NO3-, F-, Zn, As, and Pb, and we concluded that they were derived from coal combustion along with soot. In addition, the concentrations and their ratios relative to each other of Al, Fe, Ca, K, Na, Mg, and Mn hardly differed between the heating period and the non-heating period, and it was concluded that they were derived from soil dust.

  16. Chemical composition of nuts and seeds sold in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyung Ok; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Choi, Kyung-Soon

    2013-01-01

    Eleven types of nuts and seeds were analyzed to determine their energy (326-733 mg), moisture (1.6-18.3 mg), carbohydrate (8.8-70.9 mg), protein (4.9-30.5 mg), lipid (2.5-69.8 mg), and ash (1.2-5.5 mg) contents per 100 g of sample. Energy content was highest in pine nuts (733 mg/100 g), carbohydrate level was highest in dried figs (70.9 mg/100 g) and protein was highest in peanuts (30.5 mg/100 g). The amino acid compositions of nuts and seeds were characterized by the dominance of hydrophobic (range = 1,348.6-10,284.6 mg), hydrophilic (range = 341.1-3,244.3 mg), acidic (range = 956.1-8,426.5 mg), and basic (range = 408.6-4,738.5 mg) amino acids. Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) were highest in macadamia nuts (81.3%), whereas polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were highest in the walnuts (76.7%). Macadamia nuts did not contain any vitamin E, whereas sunflower seeds contained the highest level (60.3 mg/kg). Iron (Fe) content was highest in pumpkin seeds (95.85 ± 33.01 ppm), zinc (Zn) content was highest in pistachios (67.24 ± 30.25 ppm), copper (Cu) content was greatest in walnuts (25.45 ± 21.51 ppm), and lead (Pb) content was greatest in wheat nuts (25.49 ± 4.64 ppm), significantly (P < 0.05). In conclusion, current commercial nuts and seeds have no safety concerns, although further analysis of Pb contents is necessary to ensure safety. PMID:23610599

  17. Chemical composition of nuts and seeds sold in Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Keun Hee; Shin, Kyung Ok; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Choi, Kyung-Soon

    2013-04-01

    Eleven types of nuts and seeds were analyzed to determine their energy (326-733 mg), moisture (1.6-18.3 mg), carbohydrate (8.8-70.9 mg), protein (4.9-30.5 mg), lipid (2.5-69.8 mg), and ash (1.2-5.5 mg) contents per 100 g of sample. Energy content was highest in pine nuts (733 mg/100 g), carbohydrate level was highest in dried figs (70.9 mg/100 g) and protein was highest in peanuts (30.5 mg/100 g). The amino acid compositions of nuts and seeds were characterized by the dominance of hydrophobic (range = 1,348.6-10,284.6 mg), hydrophilic (range = 341.1-3,244.3 mg), acidic (range = 956.1-8,426.5 mg), and basic (range = 408.6-4,738.5 mg) amino acids. Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) were highest in macadamia nuts (81.3%), whereas polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were highest in the walnuts (76.7%). Macadamia nuts did not contain any vitamin E, whereas sunflower seeds contained the highest level (60.3 mg/kg). Iron (Fe) content was highest in pumpkin seeds (95.85 ± 33.01 ppm), zinc (Zn) content was highest in pistachios (67.24 ± 30.25 ppm), copper (Cu) content was greatest in walnuts (25.45 ± 21.51 ppm), and lead (Pb) content was greatest in wheat nuts (25.49 ± 4.64 ppm), significantly (P < 0.05). In conclusion, current commercial nuts and seeds have no safety concerns, although further analysis of Pb contents is necessary to ensure safety. PMID:23610599

  18. Generation rates and chemical compositions of waste streams in a typical crewed space habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, Theodore; Golub, Morton A.

    1990-01-01

    A judicious compilation of generation rates and chemical compositions of potential waste feed streams in a typical crewed space habitat was made in connection with the waste-management aspect of NASA's Physical/Chemical Closed-Loop Life Support Program. Waste composition definitions are needed for the design of waste-processing technologies involved in closing major life support functions in future long-duration human space missions. Tables of data for the constituents and chemical formulas of the following waste streams are presented and discussed: human urine, feces, hygiene (laundry and shower) water, cleansing agents, trash, humidity condensate, dried sweat, and trace contaminants. Tables of data on dust generation and pH values of the different waste streams are also presented and discussed.

  19. Studies on the chemical composition of kohl stone by X-ray diffractometer.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Pervaiz Habib; Mahmood, Zafar Alam; Sualeh, Mohammad; Zoha, S M S

    2010-01-01

    Use of Kohl (Surma) creates toxicity or protects eye, is one of the most controversial topic of modern medicines. However, modern researches show that kohl forms a thin film on the eye lens thus avoiding the direct contract of harmful UV radiation and glare of sun with lens. Black and shining particles of galena in kohl shield the eyes from glare and reflection of sun and thus protect them from harmful effect of UV radiation emerging from the sun. Based on these findings and other properties of kohl, it was decided to undertake this study to ascertain it's chemical composition and to correlate these properties scientifically. In the present study, kohl stone obtained from Madina (Saudi Arabia) was analyzed to ascertain it's chemical composition. The chemical analysis and X-ray diffractometer results obtained, showed that the main component of kohl stone is galena (PbS). PMID:20067866

  20. Apxs Chemical Composition of the Kimberley Sandstone in Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellert, R.; Boyd, N.; Campbell, J. L.; VanBommel, S.; Thompson, L. M.; Schmidt, M. E.; Berger, J. A.; Clark, B. C.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Yen, A. S.; Fisk, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Kimberley was chosen as a major waypoint of the MSL rover Curiosity on its way to Mount Sharp. APXS data before drilling showed interestingly high K, Fe and Zn. This warranted drilling of the fine-grained sandstone for detailed investigations with SAM and Chemin. With significantly lower Na, Al and higher K, Mg and Fe, the composition of the drill target Windjana is very distinct from the previous ones in the mudstones at Yellowknife Bay. Up to 2000 ppm Br and 4000 ppm Zn post-brush were among the highest measured values in Gale Crater. The excavated fines, stemming from about 6cm, showed lower Br, but even higher Zn. Preliminary Chemin results indicate K-feldspar and magnetite being major mineral phases in Windjana, which is consistent with the pre drill APXS result and derived CIPW norms. Inside the accessible work volume of the arm at the drill site ChemCam exposed a greyish, shinier patch of rock underneath the dust, dubbed Stephen. ChemCam sees a high Mn signal in most of the spots. An APXS integration revealed high MnO as well (~4%), in addition to high Mg, Cl,K,Ni,Zn,Br,Cu,Ge and for the first time an APXS detectable amount of ~300 ppm Co. The surface might reflect a thin surface layer and may underestimate the higher Z elemental concentration since the APXS analysis assumes an infinite sample. Important elemental correlations are likely not impacted. A four spot daytime raster of Stephen before leaving the drill site showed a good correlation of Mn with Zn, Cu and Ni. All spots have 3-3.5% Cl, the highest values measured on Mars so far. While the stratigraphic setting of the Stephen sample is discussed elsewhere, the similarity with Mn deep-sea nodules is striking, e.g. the APXS calibration sample GBW07296. Whatever process formed Stephen, the process of Mn scavenging high Z trace metals from solutions seems to have happened similarly at this site on Mars.

  1. Chemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, Wing-Fai

    2015-09-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One on-going research subject is finding new paths to synthesize species either in the gas-phase or on grain surfaces. Specific formation routes for water or carbon monoxide are discussed in more details. 13th Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  2. Chemical Composition of Different Botanical Origin Honeys Produced by Sicilian Black Honeybees (Apis mellifera ssp. sicula).

    PubMed

    Mannina, Luisa; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Vista, Silvia; Tenore, Gian Carlo; Daglia, Maria

    2015-07-01

    In 2008 a Slow Food Presidium was launched in Sicily (Italy) for an early warning of the risk of extinction of the Sicilian native breed of black honeybee (Apis mellifera L. ssp sicula). Today, the honey produced by these honeybees is the only Sicilian honey produced entirely by the black honeybees. In view of few available data regarding the chemical composition of A. mellifera ssp. sicula honeys, in the present investigation the chemical compositions of sulla honey (Hedysarum coronarium L.) and dill honey (Anethum graveolens L.) were studied with a multimethodological approach, which consists of HPLC-PDA-ESI-MSn and NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, three unifloral honeys (lemon honey (obtained from Citrus limon (L.) Osbeck), orange honey (Citrus arantium L.), and medlar honey (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl)), with known phenol and polyphenol compositions, were studied with NMR spectroscopy to deepen the knowledge about sugar and amino acid compositions. PMID:25730368

  3. Wood Chemical Composition in Species of Cactaceae: The Relationship between Lignification and Stem Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Canché-Escamilla, Gonzalo; Soto-Hernández, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs) and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content) in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous) with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35%) of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level. PMID:25880223

  4. Differences in Chemical Composition of Soil Organic Carbon Resulting From Long-Term Fertilization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zengqiang; Zhao, Bingzi; Wang, Qingyun; Cao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jiabao

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is central to soil fertility. We hypothesize that change in SOC content resulting from various long-term fertilization strategies accompanies the shift in SOC chemical structure. This study examined the effect of fertilization strategies along with the time of fertilizer application on the SOC composition by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The soils (Aquic Inceptisol) subjected to seven fertilizer treatments were collected in 1989, 1999 and 2009, representing 0, 10 and 20 years of fertilization, respectively. The seven fertilizer treatments were (1–3) balanced fertilization with application of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) including organic compost (OM), half organic compost plus half chemical fertilizer (1/2OM), and pure chemical NPK fertilizer (NPK); (4–6) unbalanced chemical fertilization without application of one of the major elements including NP fertilizer (NP), PK fertilizer (PK), and NK fertilizer (NK); and (7) an unamended control (CK). The SOC content in the balanced fertilization treatments were 2.3–52.6% and 9.4–64.6% higher than in the unbalanced fertilization/CK treatments in 1999 and 2009, respectively, indicating significant differences in SOC content with time of fertilizer application between the two treatment groups. There was a significantly greater proportion of O-alkyl C and a lower proportion of aromatic C in the balanced fertilization than in unbalanced fertilization/CK treatments in 1999, but not in 2009, because their proportions in the former treatments approached the latter in 2009. Principal component analysis further showed that the C functional groups from various fertilization strategies tended to become compositionally similar with time. The results suggest that a shift in SOC chemical composition may be firstly dominated by fertilization strategies, followed by fertilization duration. PMID:25884713

  5. Differential effects of conifer and broadleaf litter inputs on soil organic carbon chemical composition through altered soil microbial community composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Shi-Rong; Wang, Jing-Xin; Shi, Zuo-Min; Xu, Jia; Hong, Pi-Zheng; Ming, An-Gang; Yu, Hao-Long; Chen, Lin; Lu, Li-Hua; Cai, Dao-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    A strategic selection of tree species will shift the type and quality of litter input, and subsequently magnitude and composition of the soil organic carbon (SOC) through soil microbial community. We conducted a manipulative experiment in randomized block design with leaf litter inputs of four native subtropical tree species in a Pinus massoniana plantation in southern China and found that the chemical composition of SOC did not differ significantly among treatments until after 28 months of the experiment. Contrasting leaf litter inputs had significant impacts on the amounts of total microbial, Gram-positive bacterial, and actinomycic PLFAs, but not on the amounts of total bacterial, Gram-negative bacterial, and fungal PLFAs. There were significant differences in alkyl/O-alkyl C in soils among the leaf litter input treatments, but no apparent differences in the proportions of chemical compositions (alkyl, O-alkyl, aromatic, and carbonyl C) in SOC. Soil alkyl/O-alkyl C was significantly related to the amounts of total microbial, and Gram-positive bacterial PLFAs, but not to the chemical compositions of leaf litter. Our findings suggest that changes in forest leaf litter inputs could result in changes in chemical stability of SOC through the altered microbial community composition. PMID:27256545

  6. Differential effects of conifer and broadleaf litter inputs on soil organic carbon chemical composition through altered soil microbial community composition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Shi-Rong; Wang, Jing-Xin; Shi, Zuo-Min; Xu, Jia; Hong, Pi-Zheng; Ming, An-Gang; Yu, Hao-Long; Chen, Lin; Lu, Li-Hua; Cai, Dao-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    A strategic selection of tree species will shift the type and quality of litter input, and subsequently magnitude and composition of the soil organic carbon (SOC) through soil microbial community. We conducted a manipulative experiment in randomized block design with leaf litter inputs of four native subtropical tree species in a Pinus massoniana plantation in southern China and found that the chemical composition of SOC did not differ significantly among treatments until after 28 months of the experiment. Contrasting leaf litter inputs had significant impacts on the amounts of total microbial, Gram-positive bacterial, and actinomycic PLFAs, but not on the amounts of total bacterial, Gram-negative bacterial, and fungal PLFAs. There were significant differences in alkyl/O-alkyl C in soils among the leaf litter input treatments, but no apparent differences in the proportions of chemical compositions (alkyl, O-alkyl, aromatic, and carbonyl C) in SOC. Soil alkyl/O-alkyl C was significantly related to the amounts of total microbial, and Gram-positive bacterial PLFAs, but not to the chemical compositions of leaf litter. Our findings suggest that changes in forest leaf litter inputs could result in changes in chemical stability of SOC through the altered microbial community composition. PMID:27256545

  7. Effects of extrusion cooking on the chemical composition and functional properties of dry bean powders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to investigate the impacts of extrusion cooking on the chemical composition and functional properties of bean powders from four bean varieties. The raw bean powders were extruded under eight different conditions, and the extrudates were then dried and ground (particle size = 0.5 mm)...

  8. Atmospheric aerosols: A literature summary of their physical characteristics and chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This report contains a summary of 199 recent references on the characterization of atmospheric aerosols with respect to their composition, sources, size distribution, and time changes, and with particular reference to the chemical elements measured by modern techniques, especially activation analysis.

  9. Global chemical composition of ambient fine particulate matter for exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Philip, Sajeev; Martin, Randall V; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Lo, Jason Wai-Ho; Wang, Yuxuan; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Lin; Kasibhatla, Prasad S; Wang, Siwen; Zhang, Qiang; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Bittman, Shabtai; Macdonald, Douglas J

    2014-11-18

    Epidemiologic and health impact studies are inhibited by the paucity of global, long-term measurements of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter. We inferred PM2.5 chemical composition at 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution for 2004-2008 by combining aerosol optical depth retrieved from the MODIS and MISR satellite instruments, with coincident profile and composition information from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Evaluation of the satellite-model PM2.5 composition data set with North American in situ measurements indicated significant spatial agreement for secondary inorganic aerosol, particulate organic mass, black carbon, mineral dust, and sea salt. We found that global population-weighted PM2.5 concentrations were dominated by particulate organic mass (11.9 ± 7.3 μg/m(3)), secondary inorganic aerosol (11.1 ± 5.0 μg/m(3)), and mineral dust (11.1 ± 7.9 μg/m(3)). Secondary inorganic PM2.5 concentrations exceeded 30 μg/m(3) over East China. Sensitivity simulations suggested that population-weighted ambient PM2.5 from biofuel burning (11 μg/m(3)) could be almost as large as from fossil fuel combustion sources (17 μg/m(3)). These estimates offer information about global population exposure to the chemical components and sources of PM2.5. PMID:25343705

  10. Numerical simulation of the middle atmosphere chemical composition and temperature under changing solar conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zadorozhny, A. M.; Dyominov, I. G.; Tuchkov, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    There are given results of the numerical experiments on modelling the influence of solar activity on chemical composition and temperature of the middle atmosphere. The consideration is made for peculiarities of solar activity impact under different values of antropogenic pollution of the atmosphere with chlorofluorocarbons and other stuff.