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Sample records for chemical oxygen-iodine laser

  1. Scalable chemical oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Adamenkov, A A; Bakshin, V V; Vyskubenko, B A; Efremov, V I; Il'in, S P; Ilyushin, Yurii N; Kolobyanin, Yu V; Kudryashov, E A; Troshkin, M V

    2011-12-31

    The problem of scaling chemical oxygen - iodine lasers (COILs) is discussed. The results of experimental study of a twisted-aerosol singlet oxygen generator meeting the COIL scalability requirements are presented. The energy characteristics of a supersonic COIL with singlet oxygen and iodine mixing in parallel flows are also experimentally studied. The output power of {approx}7.5 kW, corresponding to a specific power of 230 W cm{sup -2}, is achieved. The maximum chemical efficiency of the COIL is {approx}30%.

  2. An experimental study of the chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, N. P.; Karapetian, D. G.; Konoshenko, A. F.; Kriukov, P. G.; Paziuk, V. S.

    The construction of an oxygen-iodine laser with an output power of up to 400 W based on a chemical singlet oxygen generator is reported. The possibility of achieving high outputs using modular design is demonstrated. The possibility of the operation of chemical oxygen-iodine lasers in the pulsed mode is analyzed, and it is shown that, in this mode, such lasers can operate without a low-temperature trap. In addition, the pulsed mode makes it possible to control the lasing pulse length over a wide range. Possible applications of pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine lasers in thermonuclear fusion are briefly discussed.

  3. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser with cryosorption vacuum pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrovec, John

    2000-05-01

    In a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL), chemically prepared, gaseous gain medium at 3-10 Torr pressure is drawn through the laser cavity by vacuum suction. Multiple-stage vacuum pumps such as Roots blowers or steam ejectors are typically used to receive and compress the gas flowing from the laser and exhaust it to the atmosphere. The size and weight of such vacuum pumps present a significant challenge to engineering and packaging a transportable COIL system.

  4. Second harmonic generation of chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Noriaki; Mese, Norimichi; Yoshino, Satoru; Uchiyama, Taro

    1993-05-01

    Intracavity second harmonic generation of chemical oxygen iodine laser utilizing LiB3O5 crystal has been studied. A chemical oxygen iodine laser of which the fundamental maximum output power is 3 W in TEM00 mode with the Cl2 flow rate of 300 mmol/min is used. Obtained total second harmonic power is a maximum of about 6 W. Therefore, we could estimate that the effective extraction efficiency is 200%. It is thought that the latter is above 100% due to the condition that the output coupling for the fundamental beam is not optimum. And applying the result of a fundamental laser power measurement, the internal conversion efficiency is estimated at 0.29%.

  5. Development of a chemical oxygen - iodine laser with production of atomic iodine in a chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Censky, M; Spalek, O; Jirasek, V; Kodymova, J; Jakubec, I

    2009-11-30

    The alternative method of atomic iodine generation for a chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL) in chemical reactions with gaseous reactants is investigated experimentally. The influence of the configuration of iodine atom injection into the laser cavity on the efficiency of the atomic iodine generation and small-signal gain is studied. (lasers)

  6. Application of a telescopic resonator to high-power chemical oxygen-iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Sanichiro; Shimizu, Kouki; Tahil, Hari; Tanaka, Ikuzo . Laser Lab.)

    1994-01-01

    The application of an intraresonator telescope to high-power chemical oxygen-iodine lasers to decrease the output beam divergence is analyzed and demonstrated. A theoretical formula based on the ABCD matrix theory is developed to analyze the characteristics of the telescopic resonator. Calculations are carried out using Galilean type telescopes with magnification factors in the range of two to four, and the high-power chemical oxygen-iodine laser as an analysis model. By locating the telescope at a proper position on the optical axis, the overall telescopic resonator can be conveniently tailored to the hardware of this model laser in a way that the beam divergence and the resonator stability can be improved simultaneously. Experiments are carried out for one of the conditions used in the calculations. Measured divergence angles are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values.

  7. Intracavity second harmonic generation of chemical oxygen iodine laser with a Brewster cut LBO crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Tomohiro; Tezuka, Takeo; Chen, Kuntetsu; Hashimoto, Katsuki; Uchiyama, Taro

    1997-04-01

    Second harmonic generation of chemical oxygen iodine laser was investigated with a Brewster cut LBO crystal. By utilizing a Brewster cut LBO crystal the loss in the resonator can be suppressed. Further, by reducing crystal absorption, the crystal can't be heated and go off phase match or even crack due to thermal stress. We could obtain 16.4 W of second harmonic power and keep out the crystal from being destroyed by the damage of thermal stress.

  8. Advanced technologies in chemical oxygen-iodine lasers for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Nagatomo, Syoji; Takeda, Shuzaburo; Wani, Fumio; Nanri, Kenzo; Fujioka, Tomoo

    1998-05-01

    A new concept of energy network system, `optical power system', was proposed. In this system, optical power is generated at a laser facility and it is distributed to users through optical fiber such as electric power system. The authors have started a feasibility study of this concept based on the latest chemical oxygen-iodine laser technology. 23.4% of chemical efficiency was obtained using nitrogen as buffer gas. Buffer gas cooling remarkably increased chemical efficiency. Liquid-jet type singlet oxygen generator (SOG) and twisted aerosol SOG (TA-SOG) were compared with the same setup. TA-SOG showed good performance especially in the high gas flow velocity range.

  9. Efficient generation in a chemical oxygen - iodine laser with a low buffer-gas flow rate

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N; Safonov, V S; Ufimtsev, N I

    2002-09-30

    The efficient generation in a chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL) with a low buffer-gas flow rate for Mach numbers M {<=} 1 is demonstrated. The maximum output power of the COIL was 415 W for a molecular chlorine flow rate of 20 mmol s{sup -1}, which corresponds to a chemical efficiency {eta}{sub ch} =23%. It is shown that the substitution of the buffer gas CO{sub 2} for N{sub 2} does not cause any significant variation in the dependence of the output power on the degree of dilution of the active medium. (lasers)

  10. Mode locking of a CW supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, S.P.; Helms, C.A.; Copland, R.J.; Rudolph, W.; Truesdell, K.A.; Hager, G.D.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents the results of the first mode-locking experiments on a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). Mode locking has been achieved using an acoustooptic modulator (AOM) and lasing demonstrated on the TEM{sub 00} modes with a small intracavity aperture. A dc magnetic field was used to increase the number of axial modes and a peak power of 2.5 kW has been reached with a pulse width of 2.1 ns at a repetition rate of 43.68 MHz.

  11. On a new method for chemical production of iodine atoms in a chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, A I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2004-11-30

    A new method is proposed for generating iodine atoms in a chemical oxygen-iodine laser. The method is based on a branched chain reaction of dissociation of the alkyl iodide CH{sub 3}I in a medium of singlet oxygen and chlorine. (active media)

  12. Test bed for a high throughput supersonic chemical oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Gaurav; Mainuddin; Rajesh, R; Varshney, A K; Dohare, R K; Kumar, Sanjeev; Singh, V K; Kumar, Ashwani; Verma, Avinash C; Arora, B S; Chaturvedi, M K; Tyagi, R K; Dawar, A L

    2011-05-31

    The paper reports the development of a test bed for a chemical oxygen - iodine laser based on a high throughput jet flow singlet oxygen generator (JSOG). The system provides vertical singlet oxygen extraction followed by horizontal orientation of subsequent subsystems. This design enables the study of flow complexities and engineering aspects of a distributed weight system as an input for mobile and other platform-mounted systems developed for large scale power levels. The system under consideration is modular and consists of twin SOGs, plenum and supersonic nozzle modules, with the active medium produced in the laser cavity. The maximal chlorine flow rate for the laser is {approx}1.5 mole s{sup -1} achieving a typical chemical efficiency of about 18%. (lasers)

  13. Use of basic deuterium peroxide in the chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrovec, John; Yang, Tientsai T.; Copeland, Drew A.

    2000-05-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) uses a reaction of gaseous chorine and aqueous solution of basic oxygen peroxide (BHP) to produce oxygen singlet delta molecules, O2(1(Delta) ). Quenching of O2(1(Delta) ) during its extraction from the BHP solution and quenching of excited atomic iodine I* by water vapor from the O2(1(Delta) ) production process are well-known parasitic effects in COIL. This paper shows that both of these effects can be significantly reduced by replacing the hydrogen 1H1 isotope atoms in BHP by the 1H2 isotope atoms. In addition to restoring laser power lost to parasitic quenching, use of basic deuterium peroxide (BDP) rather than BHP is expected to allow generation of O2(1(Delta) ) at elevated temperature. This approach promises to save refrigerant, reduce the risk of BDP freezing, and delay precipitation of salt form BDP solution. Methods for producing BDP are outlined.

  14. A computational fluid dynamics simulation of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waichman, K.; Rybalkin, V.; Katz, A.; Dahan, Z.; Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2007-05-01

    The dissociation of I II molecules at the optical axis of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was studied via detailed measurements and three dimensional computational fluid dynamics calculations. Comparing the measurements and the calculations enabled critical examination of previously proposed dissociation mechanisms and suggestion of a mechanism consistent with the experimental and theoretical results. The gain, I II dissociation fraction and temperature at the optical axis, calculated using Heidner's model (R.F. Heidner III et al., J. Phys. Chem. 87, 2348 (1983)), are much lower than those measured experimentally. Agreement with the experimental results was reached by using Heidner's model supplemented by Azyazov-Heaven's model (V.N. Azyazov and M.C. Heaven, AIAA J. 44, 1593 (2006)) where I II(A') and vibrationally excited O II(a1Δ) are significant dissociation intermediates.

  15. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser with a cryosorption vacuum pump with different buffer gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingxiu; Fang, Benjie; Sang, Fengting; Geng, Zicai; Li, Yongzhao; JIn, Yuqi

    2015-02-01

    A traditional pressure recovery system is the major obstacle to mobile chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) for its huge volume. A cryosorption vacuum pump was used as the pressure recovery system for different buffer gases. It made COIL become a flexible, quiet and pressure-tight. Experiments were carried out on a verti- COIL, which was designed for N2 and energized by a square-pipe jet singlet oxygen generator (JSOG). The output power with CO2 was 27.3% lower than that with N2, but the zeolite bed showed an adsorption capacity threefold higher for CO2 than for N2 in the continuous operation. The great volume efficiency interested researchers.

  16. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) for the dismantlement of nuclear facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallada, Marc R.; Seiffert, Stephan L.; Walter, Robert F.; Vetrovec, John

    2000-05-01

    The dismantlement of obsolete nuclear facilities is a major challenge for both the US Department of Energy and nuclear power utilities. Recent demonstrations have shown that lasers can be highly effective for size reduction cutting, especially for the efficient storage and recycling of materials. However, the full benefits of lasers can only be realized with high average power beams that can be conveniently delivered, via fiber optics, to remote and/or confined areas. Industrial lasers that can meet these requirements are not available now or for the foreseeable future. However, a military weapon laser, a Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL), which has been demonstrated at over a hundred kilo Watts, could be adapted to meet these needs and enable entirely new industrial applications. An 'industrialized' COIL would enable rapid sectioning of thick and complex structures, such as glove boxes, reactor vessels, and steam generators, accelerating dismantlement schedules and reducing worker hazards. The full advantages of lasers in dismantlement could finally be realized with a portable COIL which is integrated with sophisticated robotics. It could be built and deployed in less than two years, breaking the paradigm of labor-intensive dismantlement operations and cutting processing times and costs dramatically.

  17. COIL--Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser: advances in development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodymova, Jarmila

    2005-09-01

    Advantageous features of Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL) for laser technologies have increased considerably activities of international COIL communities during past ten years. They have been focused on the advanced concepts of hardware designs of the COIL subsystems, and testing and scaling-up of existing laser facilities. Prospective special applications of COIL technology, both civil and military, have received a significant attention and gained concrete aims. The paper is introduced by a brief description of the COIL operation mechanism and key device subsystems. It deals then with presentation of some investigated advanced concepts of singlet oxygen generators, alternative methods for atomic iodine generation, a mixing and ejector nozzle design to downsize a pressure recovery system, and optical resonators for high power COIL systems. The advanced diagnostics and computational modeling are also mentioned as very useful tools for critical insight into the laser kinetics and fluid dynamics, supporting thus the COIL research. The recent progress in the COIL development moves this laser closer to the application projects that are also briefly presented.

  18. Quantitative determination of oxygen yield in a chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Kip R.; Helms, Charles A.; Quillen, Brian; Copland, R. J.

    1998-05-01

    With the advent of the Airborne Laser program, the emphasis of chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) research has shifted toward improving the overall efficiency. A key component of COIL is the singlet-oxygen generator (SOG). To asses the efficiency of the SOG an accurate method of determining the yield of O2((alpha) 1(Delta) g),[O2((alpha) 1(Delta) g)]/[O2(total)] where [O2(total)]equals[O2((alpha) 1(Delta) g)]+[O2(X3(Sigma) g-)], has been developed. Absorption measurements of ground-state oxygen utilizing the magnetic-dipole transition, O2(X3(Sigma) g-) at 763 nm, have been obtained using a diode laser in conjunction with a multiple-pass Herriot-cell on a 10 kW class supersonic SOIL (RADICL). When RADICL is configured with a 0.35' throat, 15' diskpack, and a medium volume transition duct, with a diluent ratio (He:O2) of 3:1, the yield of O2((alpha) 1(Delta) g) in the diagnostic duct is 0.41 +/- 0.02.

  19. Pulsed oxygen-iodine chemical laser initiated by an electrical discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Rongyao; Chen Fang; Song Xueqin; Xu Qingzhou; Huan Changqing; Zhuang Qi; Zhang Cunhao

    1988-08-01

    This paper demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of an electrically initiated, pulsed oxygen-iodine laser which can be initiated efficiently by low energy electrons. By electrical initiation, an O/sub 2/(/sup 1/..delta..)--CH/sub 3/I--N/sub 2/ mixture has been made to lase with an output energy of 130 mJ. The efficiency of the electrical initiation is 350 times higher than that obtained with photo-initiation.

  20. Realization of an advanced nozzle concept for compact chemical oxygen iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Gaurav; Subbarao, P. M. V.; Rajesh, R.; Mainuddin; Tyagi, R. K.; Dawar, A. L.

    2007-04-01

    Conventional supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (SCOIL) are not only low-pressure systems, with cavity pressure of 2-3 Torr and Mach number of approximately 1.5, but also are high-throughput systems with a typical laser power per unit evacuation capacity of nearly 1 J/l, thus demanding high capacity vacuum systems which mainly determine the compactness of the system. These conventional nozzle-based systems usually require a minimum of a two-stage ejector system for realization of atmospheric pressure recovery in a SCOIL. Typically for a 500 W class SCOIL, a first stage requires a motive gas flow (air) of 120 gm/s to entrain a laser gas flow of 3 g/s and is capable of achieving the pressure recovery in the range of 60-80 Torr. On the other hand, the second stage ejector requires 4.5 kg/s of motive gas (air) to achieve atmospheric pressure recovery. An advanced nozzle, also known as ejector nozzle, suitable for a 500 W-class SCOIL employing an active medium flow of nearly 12 g/s, has been developed and used instead of a conventional slit nozzle. The nozzle has been tested in both cold as well as hot run conditions of SCOIL, achieving a typical cavity pressure of nearly 10 Torr, stagnation pressure of approximately 85 Torr and a cavity Mach number of 2.5. The present study details the gas dynamic aspects of this ejector nozzle and highlights its potential as a SCOIL pressure recovery device. This nozzle in conjunction with a diffuser is capable of achieving pressure recovery equivalent to a more cumbersome first stage of the pressure recovery system used in the case of a conventional slit nozzle-based system. Thus, use of this nozzle in place of a conventional slit nozzle can achieve atmospheric discharge using a single stage ejector system, thereby making the pressure recovery system quite compact.

  1. Multiphase reacting flow modeling of singlet oxygen generators for chemical oxygen iodine lasers.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Hewett, Kevin B.; Madden, Timothy J.; Musson, Lawrence Cale

    2008-08-01

    Singlet oxygen generators are multiphase flow chemical reactors used to generate energetic oxygen to be used as a fuel for chemical oxygen iodine lasers. In this paper, a theoretical model of the generator is presented along with its solutions over ranges of parameter space and oxygen maximizing optimizations. The singlet oxygen generator (SOG) is a low-pressure, multiphase flow chemical reactor that is used to produce molecular oxygen in an electronically excited state, i.e. singlet delta oxygen. The primary product of the reactor, the energetic oxygen, is used in a stage immediately succeeding the SOG to dissociate and energize iodine. The gas mixture including the iodine is accelerated to a supersonic speed and lased. Thus the SOG is the fuel generator for the chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL). The COIL has important application for both military purposes--it was developed by the US Air Force in the 1970s--and, as the infrared beam is readily absorbed by metals, industrial cutting and drilling. The SOG appears in various configurations, but the one in focus here is a crossflow droplet generator SOG. A gas consisting of molecular chlorine and a diluent, usually helium, is pumped through a roughly rectangular channel. An aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide and potassium hydroxide is pumped through small holes into the channel and perpendicular to the direction of the gas flow. So doing causes the solution to become aerosolized. Dissociation of the potassium hydroxide draws a proton from the hydrogen peroxide generating an HO{sub 2} radical in the liquid. Chlorine diffuses into the liquid and reacts with the HO{sub 2} ion producing the singlet delta oxygen; some of the oxygen diffuses back into the gas phase. The focus of this work is to generate a predictive multiphase flow model of the SOG in order to optimize its design. The equations solved are the so-called Eulerian-Eulerian form of the multiphase flow Navier-Stokes equations wherein one set of the

  2. Data acquisition and control system with a programmable logic controller (PLC) for a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haijun; Li, Guofu; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi; Wang, Jian; Sang, Fengting; Kang, Yuanfu; Li, Liucheng; Wang, Yuanhu; Tang, Shukai; Yu, Hongliang

    2015-02-01

    A user-friendly data acquisition and control system (DACS) for a pulsed chemical oxygen -iodine laser (PCOIL) has been developed. It is implemented by an industrial control computer,a PLC, and a distributed input/output (I/O) module, as well as the valve and transmitter. The system is capable of handling 200 analogue/digital channels for performing various operations such as on-line acquisition, display, safety measures and control of various valves. These operations are controlled either by control switches configured on a PC while not running or by a pre-determined sequence or timings during the run. The system is capable of real-time acquisition and on-line estimation of important diagnostic parameters for optimization of a PCOIL. The DACS system has been programmed using software programmable logic controller (PLC). Using this DACS, more than 200 runs were given performed successfully.

  3. Mechanism of dark decomposition of iodine donor in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, A I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2002-06-30

    A scheme is proposed that describes the dark decomposition of iodide - the donor of iodine - and the relaxation of singlet oxygen in the chlorine-containing active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL). For typical compositions of the active media of pulsed COILs utilising CH{sub 3}I molecules as iodine donors, a branching chain reaction of the CH{sub 3}I decomposition accompanied by the efficient dissipation of singlet oxygen is shown to develop even at the stage of filling the active volume. In the active media with CF{sub 3}I as the donor, a similar chain reaction is retarded due to the decay of CF{sub 3} radicals upon recombination with oxygen. The validity of this mechanism is confirmed by a rather good agreement between the results of calculations and the available experimental data. The chain decomposition of alkyliodides accompanied by an avalanche production of iodine atoms represents a new way of efficient chemical production of iodine for a COIL. (active media)

  4. Toward understanding the dissociation of I2 in chemical oxygen-iodine lasers: Combined experimental and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waichman, K.; Rybalkin, V.; Katz, A.; Dahan, Z.; Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2007-07-01

    The dissociation of I2 molecules at the optical axis of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was studied via detailed measurements and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics calculations. The measurements, briefly reported in a recent paper [Rybalkin et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 021115 (2006)] and reanalyzed in detail here, revealed that the number N of consumed O2(aΔg1) molecules per dissociated I2 molecule depends on the experimental conditions: it is 4.5±0.4 for typical conditions and I2 densities applied for optimal operation of the COIL but increases at lower I2 densities. Comparing the measurements and the calculations enabled critical examination of previously proposed dissociation mechanisms and suggestion of a mechanism consistent with the experimental and theoretical results obtained in a supersonic COIL for the gain, temperature, I2 dissociation fraction, and N at the optical axis. The suggested mechanism combines the recent scheme of Azyazov and Heaven [AIAA J. 44, 1593 (2006)], where I2(A'Π2u3), I2(AΠ1u3), and O2(aΔg1,v) are significant dissociation intermediates, with the "standard" chain branching mechanism of Heidner III et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 87, 2348 (1983)], involving I(P1/22) and I2(XΣg +1,v).

  5. Dissociation of I II in chemical oxygen-iodine lasers: experiment, modeling, and pre-dissociation by electrical discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, A.; Waichman, K.; Dahan, Z.; Rybalkin, V.; Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2007-06-01

    The dissociation of I II molecules at the optical axis of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was studied via detailed measurements and three dimensional computational fluid dynamics calculations. Comparing the measurements and the calculations enabled critical examination of previously proposed dissociation mechanisms and suggestion of a mechanism consistent with the experimental and theoretical results obtained in a supersonic COIL for the gain, temperature and I II dissociation fraction at the optical axis. The suggested mechanism combines the recent scheme of Azyazov and Heaven (AIAA J. 44, 1593 (2006)), where I II(A' 3Π 2u), I II(A 3Π 1u) and O II(a1Δ g, v) are significant dissociation intermediates, with the "standard" chain branching mechanism of Heidner et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 87, 2348 (1983)), involving I(2P 1/2) and I II(X1Σ + g, v). In addition, we examined a new method for enhancement of the gain and power in a COIL by applying DC corona/glow discharge in the transonic section of the secondary flow in the supersonic nozzle, dissociating I II prior to its mixing with O II(1Δ). The loss of O II(1Δ) consumed for dissociation was thus reduced and the consequent dissociation rate downstream of the discharge increased, resulting in up to 80% power enhancement. The implication of this method for COILs operating beyond the specific conditions reported here is assessed.

  6. Gain and temperature in a slit nozzle supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser with transonic and supersonic injection of iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenwaks, Salman; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Bruins, Esther; Furman, Dov; Rybalkin, Victor; Katz, Arje

    2002-05-01

    Spatial distributions of the gain and temperament across the flow were studied for transonic and supersonic schemes of the iodine injection in a slit nozzle supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser as a function of the iodine and secondary nitrogen flow rate, jet penetration parameter and gas pumping rate. The mixing efficiency for supersonic injection of iodine is found to be much larger than for transonic injection, the maximum values of the gain being approximately 0.65 percent/cm for both injection schemes. Measurements of the gain distribution as a function of the iodine molar flow rate nI2 were carried out. For transonic injection the optimal value of nI2 at the flow centerline is smaller than that at the off axis location. The temperature is distributed homogeneously across the flow, increasing only in the narrow boundary layers near the walls. Opening a leak downstream of the cavity in order to decease the Mach number results in a decrease of the gain and increase of the temperature. The mixing efficiency in this case is much larger than for closed leak.

  7. Optically (solar) pumped oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, O. B.; Zhevlakov, A. P.; Yur'ev, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of theoretical and experimental studies demonstrating the possibility of developing an oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) with direct optical pumping of molecular oxygen involving inter-molecular interaction with charge transfer from donor molecule (buffer gas) to acceptor molecule (oxygen). This interaction lifts degeneracy of the lower energy states of molecular oxygen and increases its absorption cross section in the visible spectral region and the UV Herzberg band, where high quantum yield of singlet oxygen is achieved (QY ˜ 1 and QY ˜ 2, respectively) at the same time. A pulse-periodic optical pump sources with pulse energy of ˜50 kJ, pulse duration of ˜25 μs, and repetition rate of ˜10 Hz, which are synchronized with the mechanism of singlet oxygen generation, are developed. This allows implementation of a pulse-periodic oxygen-iodine laser with an efficiency of ˜25%, optical efficiency of ˜40%, and parameter L/ T ˜ 1/1.5, where T is the thermal energy released in the laser active medium upon generation of energy L. It is demonstrated that, under direct solar pumping of molecular oxygen, the efficiency parameter of the OIL can reach L/ T ˜ 1/0.8 in a wide range of scaling factors.

  8. Kinetic-fluid dynamics modeling of I{sub 2} dissociation in supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Waichman, K.; Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2009-09-15

    The mechanism of I{sub 2} dissociation in supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COILs) is studied applying kinetic-fluid dynamics modeling, where pathways involving the excited species I{sub 2}(X {sup 1}SIGMA{sub g}{sup +},10<=v<25), I{sub 2}(X {sup 1}SIGMA{sub g}{sup +},25<=v<=47), I{sub 2}(A{sup '} {sup 3}PI{sub 2u}), I{sub 2}(A {sup 3}PI{sub 1u}), O{sub 2}(X {sup 3}SIGMA{sub g}{sup -},v), O{sub 2}(a {sup 1}DELTA{sub g},v), O{sub 2}(b {sup 1}SIGMA{sub g}{sup +},v), and I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) as intermediate reactants are included. The gist of the model is adding the first reactant and reducing the contribution of the second as compared to previous models. These changes, recently suggested by Azyazov, et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 104306 (2009)], significantly improve the agreement with the measurements of the gain in a low pressure supersonic COIL for all I{sub 2} flow rates that have been tested in the experiments. In particular, the lack of agreement for high I{sub 2} flow rates, which was encountered in previous models, has been eliminated in the present model. It is suggested that future modeling of the COIL operation should take into account the proposed contribution of the above mentioned reactants.

  9. Development of the electric discharge oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, David L.; Verdeyen, Joseph T.; King, Darren M.; Palla, Andrew D.; Laystrom, Julia K.; Benavides, Gabriel F.; Zimmerman, Joseph W.; Woodard, Brian S.; Solomon, Wayne C.

    2007-05-01

    In the hybrid electric discharge Oxygen-Iodine laser (ElectricOIL), the desired O II(a1Δ) is produced using a low-to-medium pressure electric discharge. The discharge production of atomic oxygen, ozone, and other excited species adds higher levels of complexity to the post-discharge kinetics which are not encountered in a classic purely chemical O II(a1Δ) generation system. Experimental studies over the past six years using electric discharges have demonstrated O II(a) yields greater than 20%, gain, and cw laser power. Several modeling studies have also been performed for ElectricOIL and similar systems. As the development of this type of iodine laser continues, the roles of oxygen atoms and NO/NO II are found to be very significant in both the discharge region and downstream of the discharge region. A series of O II(1Δ) emission, I* emission, O-atom titrations, gain, and O II(1Δ) yield, NO II* emission, and laser power measurements have been taken to explore the complex phenomena that are being observed. As the overall system is better understood improvements are being made in laser power and efficiency.

  10. Numerical study of He/CF{sub 3}I pulsed discharge used to produce iodine atom in chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jiao; Wang Yanhui; Wang Dezhen; Duo Liping; Li Guofu

    2013-04-15

    The pulsed discharge for producing iodine atoms from the alkyl and perfluoroalky iodides (CH{sub 3}I, CF{sub 3}I, etc.) is the most efficient method for achieving the pulse operating mode of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser. In this paper, a one-dimensional fluid model is developed to study the characteristics of pulsed discharge in CF{sub 3}I-He mixture. By solving continuity equation, momentum equation, Poisson equation, Boltzmann equation, and an electric circuit equation, the temporal evolution of discharge current density and various discharge products, especially the atomic iodine, are investigated. The dependence of iodine atom density on discharge parameters is also studied. The results show that iodine atom density increases with the pulsed width and pulsed voltage amplitude. The mixture ratio of CF{sub 3}I and helium plays a more significant role in iodine atom production. For a constant voltage amplitude, there exists an optimal mixture ratio under which the maximum iodine atom concentration is achieved. The bigger the applied voltage amplitude is, the higher partial pressure of CF{sub 3}I is needed to obtain the maximum iodine atom concentration.

  11. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  12. Parameters of an electric-discharge generator of iodine atoms for a chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N; Vorob'ev, M V; Voronov, A I; Kupryaev, Nikolai V; Mikheev, P A; Ufimtsev, N I

    2009-01-31

    Laser-induced fluorescence is used for measuring the concentration of iodine molecules at the output of an electric-discharge generator of atomic iodine. Methyl iodide CH{sub 3}I is used as the donor of atomic iodine. The fraction of iodine extracted from CH{sub 3}I in the generator is {approx}50%. The optimal operation regimes are found in which 80%-90% of iodine contained in the output flow of the generator was in the atomic state. This fraction decreased during the iodine transport due to recombination and was 20%-30% at the place where iodine was injected into the oxygen flow. The fraction of the discharge power spent for dissociation was {approx}3%. (elements of laser setups)

  13. Overview of iodine generation for oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirásek, Vít.

    2012-01-01

    A review of the methods for generation of iodine for oxygen-iodine lasers (OIL) is presented. The chemical and physical methods for production of both atomic (AI) and molecular (MI) iodine have been searched in order to improve the efficiency and/or technology of OILs. These trials were motivated by the estimations that a substantial part of singlet oxygen (SO) could be saved with these methods and the onset of the laser active medium will be accelerated. Vapour of MI can be generated by the evaporation of solid or pressurized liquid I2, or synthesized in situ by the reaction of Cl2 with either HI or CuI2. The chemical methods of generation of AI are based on the substitution of I atom in a molecule of HI or ICl by another halogen atom produced usually chemically. The discharge methods include the dissociation of various iodine compounds (organic iodides, I2, HI) in the RF, MW, DC-pulsed or DC-vortex stabilized discharge. Combined methods use discharge dissociation of molecules (H2, F2) to gain atoms which subsequently react to replace AI from the iodine compound. The chemical methods were quite successful in producing AI (up to the 100% yield), but the enhancement of the laser performance was not reported. The discharge methods had been subsequently improving and are today able to produce up to 0.4 mmol/s of AI at the RF power of 500 W. A substantial enhancement of the discharge- OIL performance (up to 40%) was reported. In the case of Chemical-OIL, the enhancement was reported only under the conditions of a low I2/O2 ratio, where the "standard" I2 dissociation by SO is slow. The small-signal gain up to 0.3 %/cm was achieved on the supersonic COIL using the HI dissociated in the RF discharge. Due to the complicated kinetics of the RI-I-I2-SO system and a strong coupling with the gas flow and mixing, the theoretical description of the problem is difficult. It, however, seems that we can expect the major improvement of the OIL performance for those systems, where

  14. Test bench for studying the outlook for industrial applications of an oxygen-iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Adamenkov, A A; Bakshin, V V; Bogachev, A V; Buryak, E V; Vdovkin, L A; Velikanov, S D; Vyskubenko, B A; Garanin, Sergey G; Gorbacheva, E V; Grigorovich, Sergei V; Il'in, S P; Il'kaev, R I; Ilyushin, Yurii N; Kalashnik, A M; Kolobyanin, Yu V; Leonov, M L; Svischev, V V; Troshkin, M V

    2007-07-31

    We report the development and tests of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser test bench based on a twisted-aerosol-flow singlet-oxygen generator and a supersonic laser model for studying the outlook for industrial applications of this laser. The maximal output power of the laser is {approx}65 kW (the average power is {approx}50 kW), corresponding to a specific output power of {approx}110 W cm{sup -2}. The maximal chemical efficiency is {approx}34%. (letters)

  15. Analytic study of the chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides - atomic iodine donors - in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser: 2. Limiting parameters of the branching chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, Aleksandr I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2009-08-31

    The final stages in the development of a branching chain decomposition reaction of iodide in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) are analysed. Approximate expressions are derived to calculate the limiting parameters of the chain reaction: the final degree of iodide decomposition, the maximum concentration of excited iodine atoms, the time of its achievement, and concentrations of singlet oxygen and iodide at that moment. The limiting parameters, calculated by using these expressions for a typical composition of the active medium of a pulsed COIL, well coincide with the results of numerical calculations. (active media)

  16. Oxygen-iodine ejector laser with a centrifugal bubbling singlet-oxygen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Zagidullin, M V; Nikolaev, V D; Svistun, M I; Khvatov, N A

    2005-10-31

    It is shown that if a supersonic oxygen-iodine ejector laser is fed by singlet oxygen from a centrifugal bubbling generator operating at a centrifugal acceleration of {approx}400g, the laser output power achieves a value 1264 W at a chemical efficiency of 24.6% for an alkaline hydrogen peroxide flow rate of 208 cm{sup 3}s{sup -1} and a specific chlorine load of 1.34 mmol s{sup -1} per square centimetre of the bubble layer. (lasers)

  17. The research of Iodine pool pressure of chemical oxygen-iodine laser in non-equilibrium condition and its automatic control system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Songqing; Qu, Pubo; Ren, Weiyan

    2013-05-01

    In the working process of chemical oxy-iodigenne laser(COIL), the change of iodine pool pressure is complicated. As a result, it causes some mis-judgements, such as the damage of heater and the leakage of iodine steam. Further more, when the heater electric circuit is in a single working status, and after the heater switch is on or off, there exists a buffer time for the stabilization of iodine pool pressure, which is a relatively long time, and the minimum buffer pressure exceeds to 19 torr . Of course, it increases the preparing time for steady operation of laser, and reduces the quality of laser beam. In this paper, we study the iodine pool pressure of COIL in non-equilibrium condition, and analyze the mutation and the serious buffer phenomenon of iodine steam pressure. At the same time, we design an automatic control system for iodine pool pressure, which consists of five modules, such as data collection, automatic control, manual control, heater electric circuit, and the setting and display of pressure. This system uses two kinds of heater electric circuits, in this way, the serious buffer phenomenon of iodine pool pressure is effectively avoided. As a result, the maximal buffer pressure reduces to 4 torr, this makes sure that the iodine steam pressure is suitable for the operation of COIL, which produces a good condition for the steady operation of laser system and an excellent laser output.

  18. Dissociation of molecular iodine in RF discharge for oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirásek, V.; Schmiedberger, J.; Čenský, M.; Kodymová, J.

    2012-04-01

    The dissociation of molecular iodine in 40 MHz-RF discharge was studied experimentally. This generation of atomic iodine is aimed at use in oxygen-iodine lasers. The discharge was ignited in a mixture of I2 + buffer gas fast-flowing through the cylindrical chamber and the discharge products were injected into a supersonic flow of nitrogen. The atomic iodine number density was measured in a low-pressure cavity after mixing with nitrogen and the dissociation fraction was calculated related to the input I2 flow rate. The dissociation fraction of 46.2% was achieved at 0.22 mmol/s of I2 and 7 mmol/s of Ar and RF power of 500 W. Argon and helium were used as a buffer gas; discharge stability and dissociation efficiency were better with argon. At the I2 flow rate corresponding to the operation of a 1 kW chemical oxygen-iodine laser, the dissociation fraction was about 20%. The dissociation efficiency (the fraction of absorbed energy used for the dissociation) significantly decreased with increasing in the specific energy. At a reasonable I2 flow rate (0.32 mmol/s), the maximum achieved efficiency was 8.5% and the corresponding energy cost was 8.9 eV per dissociating of one I2 molecule. The input energy of more than 3 kJ per 1 mmol of I2 is needed for dissociating at least 50% of I2. The obtained dependencies on the gas flow rates infer a good chance for scaling-up of the tested RF discharge generator for the intended application.

  19. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) beam quality predictions using 3D Navier-Stokes (MINT) and wave optics (OCELOT) codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampson, Alan I.; Plummer, David N.; Erkkila, John H.; Crowell, Peter G.; Helms, Charles A.

    1998-05-01

    This paper describes a series of analyses using the 3-d MINT Navier-Stokes and OCELOT wave optics codes to calculate beam quality in a COIL laser cavity. To make this analysis tractable, the problem was broken into two contributions to the medium quality; that associated with microscale disturbances primarily from the transverse iodine injectors, and that associated with the macroscale including boundary layers and shock-like effects. Results for both microscale and macroscale medium quality are presented for the baseline layer operating point in terms of single pass wavefront error. These results show that the microscale optical path difference effects are 1D in nature and of low spatial order. The COIL medium quality is shown to be dominated by macroscale effects; primarily pressure waves generated from flow/boundary layer interactions on the cavity shrouds.

  20. Comparing the efficiency of supersonic oxygen-iodine laser with different mixing designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskubenko, Boris A.; Adamenkov, A. A.; Bakshin, V. V.; Efremov, V. I.; Ilyin, S. P.; Kolobyanin, Yu. V.; Krukovsky, I. M.; Kudryashov, E. A.; Moiseyev, V. B.

    2003-11-01

    The paper presents experimental studies of supersonic oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) using twisted-flow singlet oxygen generator (SOG) over a wide range of the singlet oxygen pressures and the buffer gas flow rates. The experiments used different designs of the nozzle unit and mixing system for singlet oxygen and iodine gas with the carrier gas (such as nitrogen or helium). For a wide range of the key parameters, the study looked at the efficiency of supersonic OIL with variation of the singlet oxygen pressure. The measurements were made for different positions of the iodine injection plane with respect to the critical cross-section (both in the subsonic part of the nozzle and in the supersonic flow). The gas pressure at the nozzle unit entry was varied from 50 to 250 Torr. The total pressure loss have been found for different mixing designs. Experimental curves are given for energy performance and chemical efficiency of the supersonic OIL as a function of the key parameters. Comparison is made between the calculated and experimental data. For the optimum conditions of OIL operation, chemical efficiency of 25-30% has been achieved.

  1. Similarity criteria in calculations of the energy characteristics of a cw oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mezhenin, A V; Azyazov, V N

    2012-12-31

    The calculated and experimental data on the energy efficiency of a cw oxygen - iodine laser (OIL) are analysed based on two similarity criteria, namely, on the ratio of the residence time of the gas mixture in the resonator to the characteristic time of extraction of the energy stored in singlet oxygen td and on the gain-to-loss ratio {Pi}. It is shown that the simplified two-level laser model satisfactorily predicts the output characteristics of OILs with a stable resonator at {tau}{sub d} {<=} 7. Efficient energy extraction from the OIL active medium is achieved in the case of {tau}{sub d} = 5 - 7, {Pi} = 4 - 8. (lasers)

  2. Similarity criteria in calculations of the energy characteristics of a cw oxygen - iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhenin, A. V.; Azyazov, V. N.

    2012-12-01

    The calculated and experimental data on the energy efficiency of a cw oxygen - iodine laser (OIL) are analysed based on two similarity criteria, namely, on the ratio of the residence time of the gas mixture in the resonator to the characteristic time of extraction of the energy stored in singlet oxygen td and on the gain-to-loss ratio Π. It is shown that the simplified two-level laser model satisfactorily predicts the output characteristics of OILs with a stable resonator at τd <= 7. Efficient energy extraction from the OIL active medium is achieved in the case of τd = 5 - 7, Π = 4 - 8.

  3. Singlet oxygen generation in gas discharge for oxygen-iodine laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopaev, D. V.; Braginsky, O. V.; Klopovsky, K. S.; Kovalev, A. S.; Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Popov, N. A.; Rakhimov, A. T.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Vasilieva, A. N.

    2004-09-01

    The possibility of development of effective discharged singlet oxygen (SO) generator (DSOG) for oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) is studied in detail. Researches of kinetics of oxygen atoms and oxygen molecules in the lowest metastable singlet states have been carried out in the different discharges and its afterglow (DC discharges, E-beam controlled discharge and RF discharges) in both CW and pulsed mode in a wide range of conditions (pressures, gas mixtures, energy deposits etc.). The models developed for all the discharges have allowed us to analyze SO generation and loss mechanisms and to find out the key-parameters controlling the highest SO yield. It is shown that in addition to spatial plasma uniformity at low E/N and high specific energy deposit per oxygen molecule, DSOG must be oxygen atom free to avoid fast three-body quenching of SO by atomic oxygen with increasing pressure and thereby to provide pressure scaling (in tens Torrs) for applying to real OIL systems.

  4. Active medium gain study of electric-discharge oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobyanin, Yuriy; Adamenkov, Yuriy; Vyskubenko, Boris; Goryachev, Leonid; Ilyin, Sergey; Kalashnik, Anatoliy; Rakhimova, Tatiana; Rogozhnikov, Georgiy

    2007-05-01

    The paper reports on experimental studies of the active medium gain in supersonic electric-discharge oxygen-iodine laser (DOIL) based on traveling mw discharge. The measurements have included: absolute concentration, yield, and energy efficiency of production of SO in pure oxygen and oxygen-helium mixes at an oxygen partial pressure 3 to 15 Torr. For the gas flow to get rid of atomic oxygen, both heterogeneous mercury oxide coatings of the tube walls and homogeneous additives to the work mix, such as nitrogen oxide, have been used. The active medium of DOIL was formed using a nozzle array of the type of ejector sized as 10*50 mm2. The singlet oxygen-helium mix was supplied through three rows of sonic cylindrical nozzles, while the iodine-carrier gas mix - through two rows of supersonic conical nozzles with a half-opening angle of 10°(arc). The gas-phase iodine was produced in a quartz cell filled with iodine crystals. Room-temperature iodine vapors were picked up with a carrier gas (nitrogen or helium) and thus delivered into the nozzle array. The active medium was investigated by the high-resolution laser diode spectroscopy approach that used the laser type Vortex 6025 purchased from New Focus, Inc. The laser medium gain factor was determined by the intra-cavity approach having a sensitivity about 1*10 -6 cm -1. The static temperature of the medium was determined from the measurements of gain half-width. The gain of the active medium of electric-discharge OIL has been investigated. The DOIL in use was operating on a mix composed as O II:He=1:1 at a total pressure of 6 Torr and flowrate - about 1 mmol/s. With helium as an iodine carrier gas at a flowrate ~3 mmol/s, we have recorded a positive gain in the DOIL medium.

  5. Studies of oxygen-helium discharges for use in electric oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Joseph William

    In recent work, the performance of the Electric Oxygen-Iodine Laser (ElectricOIL), developed in partnership by researchers at the University of Illinois and CU Aerospace, has been greatly improved through systematic study of various components of this new laser technology. One major contribution to the advancement of ElectricOIL technology has been the development of electric discharges capable of producing significant flow rates of the precursor electronically-excited molecular oxygen, O2(a1Delta). O2(a 1Delta) serves as an energy reservoir in the laser system, pumping atomic iodine by near-resonant energy transfer producing gain and laser on the I(2P1/2) → I(2P3/2 ) transition at 1315 nm. Initial experimental work with radio-frequency discharges showed the importance of controlling O-atom flow rates to reduce quenching losses of energy stored in O2(a1Delta), and determined proper selection of the helium diluent ratio and specific power deposition (power per O2 flow rate). Further experimental investigations with transverse capacitive radio-frequency discharges in O2/He/NO mixtures in the pressure range of 1-100 Torr and power range of 0.1-1.2 kW have indicated that O2(a1Delta) production is a strong function of geometry (transverse gap), excitation frequency, and pressure. These parameters along with gas flow mixture dictate the current density at which the discharge operates, and its modal characteristics (normal vs. abnormal, homogeneous vs. inhomogeneous). A key result is that to encourage efficient O2(a1Delta) production these parameters should be selected in order to promote a homogeneous (low current density) discharge. The discharge behavior is characterized using terminal current-voltage-characteristics, microwave interferometer measurements, and plasma emission intensity measurements. Numerous spectroscopic measurements of O2(a1Delta), oxygen atoms, and discharge excited states are made in order to describe the discharge performance dependent on

  6. Oxygen discharge and post-discharge kinetics experiments and modeling for the electric oxygen-iodine laser system.

    PubMed

    Palla, A D; Zimmerman, J W; Woodard, B S; Carroll, D L; Verdeyen, J T; Lim, T C; Solomon, W C

    2007-07-26

    Laser oscillation at 1315 nm on the I(2P1/2)-->I(2P3/2) transition of atomic iodine has been obtained by a near resonant energy transfer from O2(a1Delta) produced using a low-pressure oxygen/helium/nitric oxide discharge. In the electric discharge oxygen-iodine laser (ElectricOIL) the discharge production of atomic oxygen, ozone, and other excited species adds levels of complexity to the singlet oxygen generator (SOG) kinetics which are not encountered in a classic purely chemical O2(a1Delta) generation system. The advanced model BLAZE-IV has been introduced to study the energy-transfer laser system dynamics and kinetics. Levels of singlet oxygen, oxygen atoms, and ozone are measured experimentally and compared with calculations. The new BLAZE-IV model is in reasonable agreement with O3, O atom, and gas temperature measurements but is under-predicting the increase in O2(a1Delta) concentration resulting from the presence of NO in the discharge and under-predicting the O2(b1Sigma) concentrations. A key conclusion is that the removal of oxygen atoms by NOX species leads to a significant increase in O2(a1Delta) concentrations downstream of the discharge in part via a recycling process; however, there are still some important processes related to the NOX discharge kinetics that are missing from the present modeling. Further, the removal of oxygen atoms dramatically inhibits the production of ozone in the downstream kinetics. PMID:17461557

  7. Three-block model of the kinetics of vibrationally excited I{sub 2}(X) molecules in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pichugin, S Yu

    2012-09-30

    A three-block model of the kinetics of vibrationally excited I{sub 2}(X) molecules in the active media of chemical oxygen - iodine lasers is developed. Instead of the system of equations describing a change in the concentrations of I{sub 2}(X, u) (u=0 - 47) molecules, this model uses equations for the total concentrations of iodine molecules belonging to the blocks of vibrational levels with u {<=} 10, u = 11 - 24, and u {>=} 25. Effective deactivation rate constants of I{sub 2}(X, 11 {<=} u {<=} 24) molecules are found for laser media of different compositions. The results of calculations performed using the proposed model agree with experimental data and are close to the parameters calculated previously by using the total system of equations for populations of individual vibrational levels of I{sub 2}(X, u). (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Kinetics and scaling of gain and lasing in a 1-5 kW microwave discharge oxygen iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, Wilson T.; Lee, Seonkyung; Hicks, Adam J.; Konen, Ian M.; Plumb, Emily P.; Oakes, David B.; Davis, Steven J.

    2010-02-01

    Scaling of Electric Oxygen-Iodine Laser (EOIL) systems to higher powers requires extension of electric discharge powers into the kW range and beyond, with high efficiency and singlet oxygen yield. This paper describes the implementation of a moderate-power (1 to 5 kW) microwave discharge at 30 to 70 Torr pressure in a supersonic flow reactor designed for systematic investigations of the scaling of gain and lasing with power and flow conditions. The 2450 MHz microwave discharge is confined near the flow axis by a swirl flow. The discharge effluent, containing active species including O2(a1▵), O(3P), and O3, passes through a 2-D flow duct equipped with a supersonic nozzle and cavity. I2 is injected upstream of the supersonic nozzle. The apparatus is water-cooled, and is modular to permit a variety of inlet, nozzle, and optical configurations. A comprehensive suite of optical emission and absorption diagnostics monitors the absolute concentrations of O2(a), O(3P), O3, I2, I(2P3/2), I(2P1/2), small-signal gain, and temperature in both the subsonic and supersonic flow streams. The experimental results include numerous observations of positive gain and lasing in supersonic flow, and the scaling of gain with a variety of flow and reaction rate conditions. The results are compared with kinetics modeling predictions to highlight key discrepancies as well as areas of agreement. The observed gains are generally lower than the predicted values, due in part to chemical kinetics effects and also due to mixing limitations specific to the reagent injection design. We discuss in detail the observed effects related to O-atom chemistry, and their import for scaling the gain to higher levels. We also will present initial beam quality measurements.

  9. Electrode system for electric-discharge generation of atomic iodine in a repetitively pulsed oxygen - iodine laser with a large active volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Podlesnykh, S V; Firsov, K N

    2010-08-03

    Possibilities for increasing the active medium volume of a chemical oxygen - iodine laser (CCOIL) with a pulsed electric-discharge generation of atomic iodine are studied. The reasons are analysed of the low stability of the transverse self-sustained volume discharge in electrode systems with metal cathodes under the conditions of the electric energy input into gas-discharge plasma that are typical for CCOILs: low pressure of mixtures containing a strongly electronegative component, low voltage of discharge burning, low specific energy depositions, and long duration of the current pulse. An efficient electrode system is elaborated with the cathode based on an anisotropically-resistive material, which resulted in a stable discharge in the mixtures of iodide (CH{sub 3}I, n-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}I, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}I) with oxygen and nitrogen at the specific energy depositions of {approx}5 J L{sup -1}, pressures of 10 - 25 Torr, and mixture volume of 2.5 L. (lasers)

  10. 2D gasdynamic simulation of the kinetics of an oxygen-iodine laser with electric-discharge generation of singlet oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Chukalovsky, A. A.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Klopovsky, K. S.; Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Proshina, O. V.

    2011-03-15

    The kinetic processes occurring in an electric-discharge oxygen-iodine laser are analyzed with the help of a 2D (r, z) gasdynamic model taking into account transport of excited oxygen, singlet oxygen, and radicals from the electric discharge and their mixing with the iodine-containing gas. The main processes affecting the dynamics of the gas temperature and gain are revealed. The simulation results obtained using the 2D model agree well with the experimental data on the mixture gain. A subsonic oxygen-iodine laser in which singlet oxygen is generated by a 350 W transverse RF discharge excited in an oxygen flow at a pressure P = 10 Torr and the discharge tube wall is covered with mercury oxide is simulated. The simulated mixing system is optimized in terms of the flow rate and the degree of preliminary dissociation of the iodine flow. The optimal regime of continuous operation of a subsonic electric-discharge oxygen-iodine laser is found.

  11. Generation of singlet oxygen for an oxygen-iodine laser in a radio-frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Braginskii, O V; Vasil'eva, A N; Klopovskii, K S; Kovalev, A S; Lopaev, D V; Mankelevich, Yu A; Popov, N A; Rakhimov, Aleksandr T; Rakhimova, T V

    2005-01-31

    The generation of singlet oxygen (SO) in a radio-frequency discharge (13.56 MHz) in the gas flow was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The oxygen pressure was varied from 2 to 20 Torr and the energy deposition in gas from 10 to 2000 J mmol{sup -1}. The saturation of the SO concentration with increasing the energy deposition was shown to arise from the three-body process of SO quenching by atomic oxygen. Removing atomic oxygen allowed a 2.5-fold increase in the ultimate SO concentration at the discharge output. For an oxygen pressure of 15 Torr, the SO fraction amounts to 10%. (active media. lasers)

  12. Advances in chemical lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.

    1987-09-25

    High-power chemical lasers thrive in an array of special environments and present many fascinating associated subjects ripe for developmental research. Included are processes to produce the source reactants; supersonic mixing and reacting flow fields; the production and dissipation of multiple vibrational-rotational molecular states; optical gain extraction in complex geometries; media inhomogeneity effects, and waste energy and reaction products removal. Some configurations require wavelength selectivity, special optical components, and coherent cavity or beam combining. In recent years, progress has been made in these areas on behalf of continuous-wave and repetitively pulsed hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers, subsonic and supersonic oxygen-iodine lasers, and potential shorter wavelength chemical lasers based on chemically excited higher electronic states. This paper presents a brief review of the technical approach of some of the technology areas, and the status in achieving practical, integrated high-power chemical lasers.

  13. Electrochemical regeneration of basic hydrogen peroxide for chemical oxygen iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Hano, Masami; Wakita, Syuhei; Uno, Masaharu; Takeda, Shuzaburo

    2005-03-01

    A 3.6M basic hydrogen peroxide solution is electrochemically regenerated. The apparatus was originally developed for electrolytic H2O2 production, generating dilute (<0.2M) BHP for paper manufacturing. To suppress decomposition by various mechanisms, they are identified and quantified. Both caffeine and peracetic acid are found effective to suppress autodecomposition. Theoretical prediction of the current efficiency is made to find an optimum operational condition. A BHP of 3.614M is regenerated to 3.657M with a current efficiency of 67%.

  14. Effect of vibrationally excited I{sub 2}(a{sup 1{Delta}}{sub g}) molecules on the parameters of the active medium of an oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N; Antonov, I O; Pichugin, S Yu; Ufimtsev, N I

    2004-12-31

    A comparison of the experimental and theoretical results shows that quenching of one singlet oxygen molecule leads to the formation of 4.5 vibrational quanta of the I{sub 2} molecule on the average in the active medium of an oxygen-iodine laser. The dependence of threshold yield of singlet oxygen and of the gain on the relative concentration of vibrationally excited I{sub 2}(a{sup 1{Delta}}{sub g}) molecules are studied. The threshold yield of singlet oxygen increases with the relative concentration of vibrationally excited I{sub 2} molecules and may be several percent higher than the value assumed earlier. The gain depends weakly on the relative concentration of vibrationally excited oxygen molecules. (active media)

  15. An experimental research on the mixing process of supersonic oxygen-iodine parallel streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zengqiang; Sang, Fengting; Zhang, Yuelong; Hui, Xiaokang; Xu, Mingxiu; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Weili; Fang, Benjie; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi

    2014-12-01

    The O2(1Δ)/I2 mixing process is one of the most important steps in chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). Based on the chemical fluorescence method (CFM), a diagnostic system was set up to image electronically excited fluorescent I2(B3П0) by means of a high speed camera. An optimized data analysis approach was proposed to analyze the mixing process of supersonic oxygen-iodine parallel streams, employing a set of qualitative and quantitative parameters and a proper percentage boundary threshold of the fluorescence zone. A slit nozzle bank with supersonic parallel streams and a trip tab set for enhancing the mixing process were designed and fabricated. With the diagnostic system and the data analysis approach, the performance of the trip tab set was examined and is demonstrated in this work. With the mixing enhancement, the fluorescence zone area was enlarged 3.75 times. We have studied the mixing process under different flow conditions and demonstrated the mixing properties with different iodine buffer gases, including N2, Ar, He and CO2. It was found that, among the four tested gases, Ar had the best penetration ability, whilst He showed the best free diffusion ability, and both of them could be well used as the buffer gas in our experiments. These experimental results can be useful for designing and optimizing COIL systems.

  16. Chemical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khariton, Y.

    1984-08-01

    The application and the advances of quantum electronics, specifically, of optical quantum generators lasers is reviewed. Materials are cut, their surfaces are machined, chemical transformations of substances are carried out, surgical operations are performed, data are transmitted, three dimensional images are produced and the content of microimpurities, in the atmosphere, are analyzed by use of a beam. Laser technology is used in conducting investigations in the most diverse fields of the natural and technical sciences from controlled thermonuclear fusion to genetics. Many demands are placed on lasers as sources of light energy. The importance of low weight, compactness of the optical generator and the efficiency of energy conversion processes is emphasized.

  17. International Symposium on Gas Flow and Chemical Lasers, 8th, Madrid, Spain, Sept. 10-14, 1990, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Orza, J.M.; Domingo, C.

    1991-01-01

    Papers are presented on current research developments and applications related to high-powered lasers. Recent advances in excimer laser technology, electron-beam-pumped excimer lasers, discharge technology for excimer lasers, and pulsed XeF lasers are examined. Consideration is given to short-wavelength lasers, chemical oxygen iodine lasers, and vibrational chemical lasers. Papers are presented on CO2, CO, N2O lasers, coupled CO2 lasers, laser induced perturbation in pulsed CO2 lasers, construction of sealed-off CO2 lasers, and computer modeling of discharge-excited CO gas flow. Topics discussed include gas-dynamic lasers, discharge and flow effects, matrix and laser optics and laser beam parameters. Laser-matter interactions, laser-induced surface plasma, plasma motion velocity along laser beams and thermocapillary effects are also discussed. Applications of laser technology are examined and high-speed laser welding, welding results, laser ablation, laser steel processing, and numerical modeling of laser-matter interaction in high-intensity laser applications are considered.

  18. Excimer laser chemical problems

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.; Peterson, N.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques need to be developed to maintain XeF and XeCl laser performance over long periods of time without degradation resulting from chemical processes occurring within the laser. The dominant chemical issues include optical damage, corrosions of laser materials, gas contamination, and control of halogen concentration. Each of these issues are discussed and summarized. The methods of minimizing or controlling the chemical processes involved are presented.

  19. Singlet oxygen generator for a solar powered chemically pumped iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of solid phase endoperoxides as a means to produce single-delta oxygen in the gas phase in concentrations useful to chemical oxygen-iodine lasers was investigated. The 1,4 - endoperoxide of ethyl 3- (4-methyl - 1-naphthyl) propanoate was deposited over an indium-oxide layer on a glass plate. Single-delta oxygen was released from the endoperoxide upon heating the organic film by means of an electrical discharge through the conductive indium oxide coating. The evolution of singlet-delta oxygen was determined by measuring the dimol emission signal at 634 nm. Comparison of the measured signal with an analytic model leads to two main conclusions: virtually all the oxygen being evolved is in the singlet-delta state and in the gas phase, and there is no significant quenching other than energy pooling on the time scale of the experiment (approximately 10 msec). The use of solid phase endoperoxide as a singlet-delta oxygen generator for an oxygen-iodine laser appears promising.

  20. Proposal of a defense application for a chemical oxygen laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehisa, K.

    2015-05-01

    Defense application for a chemical oxygen laser (COL) is explained. Although a COL has not yet been successful in lasing, the oscillator was estimated to produce a giant pulse with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ~0.05ms which makes the damage threshold for the mirrors several-order higher than that for a typical solid-state laser with a ~10ns pulse width. Therefore it has a potential to produce MJ class output considering the simple scalability of being a chemical laser. Since within 0.05ms a supersonic aircraft can move only a few centimeters which is roughly equal to the spot size of the focused beam at ~10km away using a large-diameter focusing mirror, a COL has a potential to make a damage to an enemy aircraft by a single shot without beam tracking. But since the extracted beam can propagate up to a few kilometers due to the absorption in the air, it may be suitable to use in space. While a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) can give a pulsed output with a width of ~2 ms using a high-pressure singlet oxygen generator (SOG). Therefore a pulsed COIL may also not require beam tracking if a target aircraft is approaching. Another advantage for these pulsed high-energy lasers (HELs) is that, in case of propagating in cloud or fog, much less energy is required for a laser for aerosol vaporization (LAV) than that of a LAV for a CW HEL. Considerations to use a COL as a directed energy weapon (DEW) in a point defense system are shown.

  1. Optical pumping of the oxygen-iodine laser medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, Marsel V.; Malyshev, Mikhail S.; Azyazov, Valeriy N.; Heaven, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    The kinetics of the processes in an O2/I2/Ar/H2O gas flow that is irradiated simultaneously by light at wavelengths near 500 nm and 1315 nm, is considered. Radiation at 500 nm is used to photodissociate about 1% of the iodine molecules. The radiation at 1315 nm excites atomic iodine to the 2P1/2 state. Singlet oxygen molecules are produced via the energy exchange process I(2P1/2)+O2(X3Σ) → I(2P3/2) + O2(a1Δ), while I(2P1/2)+O2(a1Δ) energy pooling produces b1Σ oxygen. I(2P1/2) and O2(b1Σ) then accelerate the dissociation of I2. This active medium may reach ~40 W/cm-2 at an optical efficiency of 50%.

  2. Partial feedback unstable resonator on small scale supersonic large aperture chemical laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Rui; Li, Lei

    2015-05-01

    There is always a challenge on large aperture medium power laser's resonator design, stable resonator would supports significant higher order transverse modes, folded and telescope stable resonator are too complex and not preferred by engineers, unstable resonator need rather large round trip gain to compensate its high geometric out-coupling, which is difficult for this kind of laser since its gain length is limited due to the power level and large aperture. Partial feedback unstable resonator had been proposed to tackle this difficulty since the early days of laser development, however, the debates of its effect never stopped even with those distinguished optical resonator scientists such as Siegman, Anan'ev, and Weber. Recently integrated partial feedback unstable resonator design had been successfully demonstrated on a medium size chemical oxygen iodine laser. In this paper, we carry this resonator configuration on a small scale discharge driven supersonic nozzle array Hydrogen Fluoride chemical laser, a typical large aperture short gain length device. With magnification equals 4/3, we successfully get ten Watts level ring beam output.

  3. Kinetics of an oxygen - iodine active medium with iodine atoms optically pumped on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Malyshev, M. S.; Azyazov, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetics of the processes occurring in an O2 - I2 - He - H2O gas flow in which photodissociation of molecular iodine at a wavelength close to 500 nm and excitation of atomic iodine on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition by narrow-band radiation near 1315 nm are implemented successively has been analysed. It is shown that implementation of these processes allows one to form an oxygen - iodine medium with a high degree of dissociation of molecular iodine and a relative content of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ) exceeding 10%. Having formed a supersonic gas flow with a temperature ~100 K from this medium, one can reach a small-signal gain of about 10-2 cm-1 on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition in iodine atoms. The specific power per unit flow cross section in the oxygen - iodine laser with this active medium may reach ~100 W cm-2.

  4. Laser Chemical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zare, Richard N.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews applications of laser methods to analytical problems, selecting examples from multiphoton ionization and fluorescence analysis. Indicates that laser methodologies promise to improve dramatically the detection of trace substances embedded in "real" matrices, giving the analyst a most powerful means for determining the composition of…

  5. High energy chemical laser system

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, D.W.; Pearson, R.K.

    1975-12-23

    A high energy chemical laser system is described wherein explosive gaseous mixtures of a reducing agent providing hydrogen isotopes and interhalogen compounds are uniformly ignited by means of an electrical discharge, flash- photolysis or an electron beam. The resulting chemical explosion pumps a lasing chemical species, hydrogen fluoride or deuterium fluoride which is formed in the chemical reaction. The generated lasing pulse has light frequencies in the 3- micron range. Suitable interhalogen compounds include bromine trifluoride (BrF$sub 3$), bromine pentafluoride (BrF$sub 5$), chlorine monofluoride (ClF), chlorine trifluoride (ClF$sub 3$), chlorine pentafluoride (ClF$sub 5$), iodine pentafluoride (IF$sub 5$), and iodine heptafluoride (IF$sub 7$); and suitable reducing agents include hydrogen (H$sub 2$), hydrocarbons such as methane (CH$sub 4$), deuterium (D$sub 2$), and diborane (B$sub 2$H$sub 6$), as well as combinations of the gaseous compound and/or molecular mixtures of the reducing agent.

  6. Chemically-Assisted Pulsed Laser-Ramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kaneko, Tomoki; Tamada, Kazunobu

    2010-10-13

    A preliminary study of a chemically-assisted pulsed laser-ramjet was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in chemically-augmented operation.

  7. (Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  8. Laser Induced Chemical Liquid Phase Deposition (LCLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Nanai, Laszlo; Balint, Agneta M.

    2012-08-17

    Laser induced chemical deposition (LCLD) of metals onto different substrates attracts growing attention during the last decade. Deposition of metals onto the surface of dielectrics and semiconductors with help of laser beam allows the creation of conducting metal of very complex architecture even in 3D. In the processes examined the deposition occurs from solutions containing metal ions and reducing agents. The deposition happens in the region of surface irradiated by laser beam (micro reactors). Physics -chemical reactions driven by laser beam will be discussed for different metal-substrate systems. The electrical, optical, mechanical properties of created interfaces will be demonstrated also including some practical-industrial applications.

  9. Mixing enhancement in chemical lasers. II. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, R.J.

    1987-07-01

    A phenomenological model for reactant mixing in trip nozzle chemical lasers by means of a surface-stretching mechanism is used in conjunction with a two-level laser model to derive scaling laws for numerous features noted in the trip nozzle data. This mixing model is then employed with an aerokinetics code in order to obtain quantitative laser gain predictions. The results yielded by the code are in good agreement with small-signal data. It is determined that trip jet mixing will not increase laser efficiency at low cavity pressures, but will at high cavity pressures result in a doubling of laser power output. 12 references.

  10. Chemical stabilization of laser dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Tad H.

    1987-05-01

    Coumarin laser dyes upon excitation degrade to produce products which absorb at the lasing wavelength. This results in attenuation of dye laser output through interference of stimulated emission. The roles of singlet oxygen and excitation intensity on dye degradation were explored. Singlet oxygen is formed but its reactions with the dye do not appear to be a major cause of dye laser output deterioration. High light intensity results in dye sensitized, solvent oligomerization to yield materials which interfere with dye stimulated emission. 1, 4-Diazabicyclo2,2,2octane (DABCO)inhibits this oligomerization.

  11. Laser Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinespring, Charter D.; Freedman, Andrew

    1990-02-01

    Studies of the thermal and photon-induced surface chemistry of dimethyl cadmium (DMCd) and dimethyl tellurium (DMTe) on GaAs(100) substrates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions have been performed for substrate temperatures in the range of 123 K to 473 K. Results indicate that extremely efficient conversion of admixtures of DMTe and DMCd to CdTe can be obtained using low power (5 - 10 mJ cm-2) 193 nm laser pulses at substrate temperatures of 123 K. Subsequent annealing at 473 K produces an epitaxial film.

  12. Alpha high-power chemical laser program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordi, Anthony J.; Lurie, Henry; Callahan, David W.; Thomson, Matthew

    1993-06-01

    Alpha is a megawatt-class ground demonstration of a hydrogen fluoride, continuous wave, space-based chemical laser. The laser operates in the infrared at 2.8 microns. The basic device consists of a cylindrical combustion chamber that exhausts radially outward through circumferential nozzles into an annular lasing area. An annular ring resonator is used to extract the laser energy from this area. Technical firsts include: (1) use of aluminum combustion chamber/nozzle ring modules, (2) diamond turned, water-cooled optics made of molybdenum for low thermal distortion with good heat transfer, (3) use of uncooled silicon mirrors in a megawatt-class laser system, (4) an optical bench made of aluminum honeycomb, and (5) active controls to adjust alignment of selected mirrors and the optical bench.

  13. Laser-based detection of chemical contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmer, Robert G.; Kelly, James F.; Martin, Steven W.; Mong, Gary M.; Sharpe, Steven W.

    1997-02-01

    The goal of our work is tow fold; 1) develop a portable and rapid laser based air sampler for detection of specific chemical contraband and 2) compile a spectral data base in both the near- and mid-IR of sufficiently high quality to be useful for gas phase spectroscopic identification of chemical contraband. During the synthesis or 'cooking' of many illicit chemical substances, relatively high concentrations of volatile solvents, chemical precursors and byproducts are unavoidably released to the atmosphere. In some instances, the final product may have sufficient vapor pressure to be detectable in the surrounding air. The detection of a single high-value effluent or the simultaneous detection of two or more low-value effluents can be used as reliable indicators of a nearby clandestine cooking operation. The designation of high- versus low-value effluent reflects both the commercial availability and legitimate usage of a specific chemical. This paper will describe PNNL's progress and efforts towards the development of a portable laser based air sampling system for the detection of clandestine manufacturing of methamphetamine. Although our current efforts ar focused on methamphetamine, we see no fundamental limitations on detection of other forms of chemical contraband manufacturing. This also includes the synthesis of certain classes of chemical weapons that have recently been deployed by terrorist groups.

  14. Remote Chemical Detection using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Harper, Warren W.; Gervais, Kevin L.

    2006-02-01

    The Infrared Technologies Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on the science and technology of remote and in-situ chemical sensors for detecting proliferation and countering terrorism. The program is focusing on the infrared detection of gaseous species including chemical warfare agents and gases associated with the production of chemical and nuclear weapons. Several sensors under development are based on miniature infrared quantum cascade (QC) lasers constructed of semiconductor material. The QC laser is unique in that by simply changing the thickness of the semiconductor layers, the laser's wavelength can be changed to target molecular absorption features of specific chemicals. For remote sensing over long optical paths, QC lasers are applied to remote areas using the differential-absorption LIDAR technique. Using a single laser, this technique can easily monitor large areas that would require a large network of point sensors. The original remote sensing configuration, suitable for laboratory applications, consisted of an optical table, laser, beam expander, telescope, mirror, and various supporting electronic and optical components. Recently, PNNL began development of a ruggedized version to conduct experiments in real-world conditions. To reduce the effects of thermal distortion, the system had to be operated from within a large, well insulated, temperature-controlled trailer. The optical breadboard was attached to 4 shock-mounts to reduce shock and vibrational loads to the optical set-up during transport. A custom jacking system using electromechanical actuators was designed to affix the optical table directly to the ground through penetrations in the trailer floor. The jacking system allows remote sensing at longer ranges (up to 5 km) by eliminating jitter caused by wind or personnel movement within the trailer. A computer-controlled gimbal-mounted mirror was added to allow the laser beam to be accurately pointed in both the

  15. Chemically assisted laser ablation ICP mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takafumi

    2003-01-15

    A new laser ablation technique combined with a chemical evaporation reaction has been developed for elemental ratio analysis of solid samples using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS). Using a chemically assisted laser ablation (CIA) technique developed in this study, analytical repeatability of the elemental ratio measurement was successively improved. To evaluate the reliability of the CLA-ICPMS technique, Pb/U isotopic ratios were determined for zircon samples that have previously been analyzed by other techniques. Conventional laser ablation for Pb/U shows a serious elemental fractionation during ablation mainly due to the large difference in elemental volatility between Pb and U. In the case of Pb/U ratio measurement, a Freon R-134a gas (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) was introduced into the laser cell as a fluorination reactant. The Freon gas introduced into the laser cell reacts with the ablated sample U, and refractory U compounds are converted to a volatile U fluoride compound (UF6) under the high-temperature condition at the ablation site. This avoids the redeposition of U around the ablation pits. Although not all the U is reacted with Freon, formation of volatile UF compounds improves the transmission efficiency of U. Typical precision of the 206Pb/238U ratio measurement is 3-5% (2sigma) for NIST SRM 610 and Nancy 91500 zircon standard, and the U-Pb age data obtained here show good agreement within analytical uncertainties with the previously reported values. Since the observed Pb/U ratio for solid samples is relatively insensitive to laser power and ablation time, optimization of ablation conditions or acquisition parameters no longer needs to be performed on a sample-to-sample basis. PMID:12553756

  16. Intense laser beams; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 23, 24, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Richard C. (Editor); Ulrich, Peter B. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Various papers on intense laser beams are presented. Individual topics addressed include: novel methods of copper vapor laser excitation, UCLA IR FEL, lasing characteristics of a large-bore copper vapor laser (CVL), copper density measurement of a large-bore CVL, high-power XeCl excimer laser, solid state direct-drive circuit for pumping gas lasers, united energy model for FELs, intensity and frequency instabilities in double-mode CO2 lasers, comparison of output power stabilities of CO and CO2 lasers, increasing efficiency of sealed-off CO lasers, thermal effects in singlet delta oxygen generation, optical extraction from the chemical oxygen-iodine laser medium, generation and laser diagnostic analysis of bismuth fluoride. Also discussed are: high-Q resonator design for an HF overtone chemical lasers, improved coatings for HF overtone lasers, scaled atmospheric blooming experiment, simulation on producing conjugate field using deformable mirrors, paraxial theory of amplitude correction, potential capabilities of adaptive optical systems in the atmosphere, power beaming research at NASA, system evaluations of laser power beaming options, performance projections for laser beam power to space, independent assessment of laser power beaming options, removal of atmospheric CFCs by lasers, efficiency of vaporization cutting by CVL.

  17. Long pulse chemical laser. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bardon, R.L.; Breidenthal, R.E.; Buonadonna, V.R.

    1989-02-01

    This report covers the technical effort through February, 1989. This effort was directed towards the technology associated with the development of a large scale, long pulse DF-CO{sub 2} chemical laser. Optics damage studies performed under Task 1 assessed damage thresholds for diamond-turned salt windows. Task 2 is a multi-faceted task involving the use of PHOCL-50 for laser gain measurements, LTI experiments, and detector testing by LANL personnel. To support these latter tests, PHOCL-50 was upgraded with Boeing funding to incorporate a full aperture outcoupler that increased its energy output by over a factor of 3, to a full kilojoule. The PHOCL-50 carbon block calorimeter was also recalibrated and compared with the LANL Scientech meter. Cloud clearing studies under Task 3 initially concentrated on delivering a Boeing built Cloud Simulation Facility to LANL, and currently involves design of a Cold Cloud Simulation Facility. A Boeing IRAD funded theoretical study on cold cloud clearing revealed that ice clouds may be easier to clear then warm clouds. Task 4 involves the theoretical and experimental study of flow system design as related to laser beam quality. Present efforts on this task are concentrating on temperature gradients induced by the gas filling process. General support for the LPCL field effort is listed under Task 5, with heavy emphasis on assuring reliable operation of the Boeing built Large Slide Valve and other device related tests. The modification of the PHOCL-50 system for testing long pulse DF (4{mu}m only) chemical laser operation is being done under Task 6.

  18. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Warren W.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-01-30

    Spectroscopic chemical sensing research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing advanced sensors for detecting the production of nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons; use of chemical weapons; or the presence of explosives, firearms, narcotics, or other contraband of significance to homeland security in airports, cargo terminals, public buildings, or other sensitive locations. For most of these missions, the signature chemicals are expected to occur in very low concentrations, and in mixture with ambient air or airborne waste streams that contain large numbers of other species that may interfere with spectroscopic detection, or be mistaken for signatures of illicit activity. PNNL’s emphasis is therefore on developing remote and sampling sensors with extreme sensitivity, and resistance to interferents, or selectivity. PNNL’s research activities include: 1. Identification of signature chemicals and quantification of their spectral characteristics, 2. Identification and development of laser and other technologies that enable breakthroughs in sensitivity and selectivity, 3. Development of promising sensing techniques through experimentation and modeling the physical phenomenology and practical engineering limitations affecting their performance, and 4. Development and testing of data collection methods and analysis algorithms. Close coordination of all aspects of the research is important to ensure that all parts are focused on productive avenues of investigation. Close coordination of experimental development and numerical modeling is particularly important because the theoretical component provides understanding and predictive capability, while the experiments validate calculations and ensure that all phenomena and engineering limitations are considered.

  19. Mid-IR semiconductor lasers for chemical sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    The development of mid-IR semiconductor diode lasers based on type-II interband cascade structures is presented. How these diode lasers can be developed to meet the requirements in chemical sensing applications is discussed.

  20. Laser-based Sensors for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schiffern, John T.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2010-05-10

    Stand-off detection of hazardous materials ensures that the responder is located at a safe distance from the suspected source. Remote detection and identification of hazardous materials can be accomplished using a highly sensitive and portable device, at significant distances downwind from the source or the threat. Optical sensing methods, in particular infrared absorption spectroscopy combined with quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), are highly suited for the detection of chemical substances since they enable rapid detection and are amenable for autonomous operation in a compact and rugged package. This talk will discuss the sensor systems developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and will discuss the progress to reduce the size and power while maintaining sensitivity to enable stand-off detection of multiple chemicals.

  1. Laser-induced destination of hazardous chemicals: A preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, P. F.; Wolf, K. A.

    1982-10-01

    Technical methods that might prove effective in destroying dangerous chemicals before they leave the plant environment and become subject to regulation are studied. Laser infrared multiphoton dissociation, for decomposing deleterious chemical gases is evaluated. The chlorinated ethylenes and the chlorinated ethanes are emphasized. A detailed method for decomposing chlorinated chemicals in the workplace using a relatively inexpensive CO2 laser is discussed. Results show that CO2 laser photodegradation of vinyl chloride, a chlorinated ethylene, is promising.

  2. PHYSICAL EFFECTS OCCURRING DURING GENERATION AND AMPLIFICATION OF LASER RADIATION: Efficient solutions for low-temperature singlet-oxygen generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshin, Valerii I.; Karyshev, V. D.; Katulin, V. A.; Kirilin, A. V.; Kisletsov, A. V.; Konnov, S. A.; Kupriyanov, N. L.; Medvedev, A. M.; Nadezhina, T. N.

    1989-02-01

    Experimental investigations were made of the physicochemical characteristics of the active solutions for a chemical generator in an oxygen-iodine laser. A strong temperature dependence of the viscosity of the solution was observed. The influence of this factor on the operation of the singlet-oxygen generator and the laser is discussed. The cyclic operation of a laser with efficient neutralization of the reagents and the addition of an alkali is simulated. It is shown that hydrogen peroxide may be 50% utilized when the temperature of the solution is no higher than - 30 °C. A method of preparing a solution for an iodine laser with a low freezing point (between - 30 °C and - 40 °C) is developed. It is shown that an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide with a concentration of 25-40% is suitable.

  3. Remote chemical sensing with quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Warren W.; Strasburg, Jana D.

    2004-10-15

    A trailer based sensor system has been developed for remote chemical sensing applications. The sensor uses quantum cascade lasers (QCL) that operate in the long wave infrared. The QCL is operated continuous wave, and its wavelength is both ramped over a molecular absorption feature and frequency modulated. Lock-in techniques are used to recover weak laser return signals. Field experiments have monitored ambient water vapor and small quantities of nitrous oxide, tetrafluoroethane (R134a), and hydrogen sulfide released as atmospheric plumes. Round trip path lengths up to 10 km were obtained using a retro-reflector. Atmospheric turbulence was found to be the dominating noise source. It causes intensity fluctuations in the received power, which can significantly degrade the sensor performance. Unique properties associated with QCLs enabled single beam normalization techniques to be implemented thus reducing the impact that turbulence has on experimental signal to noise. Weighted data averaging was additionally used to increase the signal to noise of data traces. Absorbance sensitivities as low as {approx}1 x 10{sup -4} could be achieved with 5 seconds of data averaging, even under high turbulence conditions.

  4. Remote chemical sensing with quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Warren W.; Strasburg, Jana D.

    2004-09-01

    A trailer based sensor system has been developed for remote chemical sensing applications. The sensor uses quantum cascade lasers (QCL) that operate in the long wave infrared. The QCL is operated continuous wave, and its wavelength is both ramped over a molecular absorption feature and frequency modulated. Lock-in techniques are used to recover weak laser return signals. Field experiments have monitored ambient water vapor and small quantities of nitrous oxide, tetrafluoroethane (R134a), and hydrogen sulfide released as atmospheric plumes. Round trip path lengths up to 10 km were obtained using a retroreflector. Atmospheric turbulence was found to be the dominating noise source. It causes intensity fluctuations in the received power, which can significantly degrade the sensor performance. Unique properties associated with QCLs enabled single beam normalization techniques to be implemented thus reducing the impact that turbulence has on experimental signal to noise. Weighted data averaging was additionally used to increase the signal to noise of data traces. Absorbance sensitivities as low as ~1x10-4 could be achieved with 5 seconds of data averaging, even under high turbulence conditions.

  5. Laser-Beam-Absorption Chemical-Species Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersh, Michael; Goldstein, Neil; Lee, Jamine; Bien, Fritz; Richtsmeier, Steven

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus measures concentration of chemical species in fluid medium (e.g., gaseous industrial process stream). Directs laser beam through medium, and measures intensity of beam after passage through medium. Relative amount of beam power absorbed in medium indicative of concentration of chemical species; laser wavelength chosen to be one at which species of interest absorbs.

  6. Chemically amplified laser direct-writing of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, J. Y.; Ehrlich, D. J.

    Laser microchemical direct writing has important advantages over other techniques for the deposition of thin-film patterns. Disadvantages, however, are lower throughput and the need to suppress competing processes such as gas phase nucleation of particles or substrate damage. Methods for increasing the overall speed of laser direct writing by microchemistry were investigated. A class of laser deposition techniques has emerged in which laser radiation is used only to enhance or to impede the initial nucleation of a thin film. In general, it is convenient to draw a distinction between nucleation barriers due to physical effects and those due to chemical effects. The first type of barrier is derived from surface tension. The laser deposits a pattern of heterogeneous catalyst to initiate a subsequent transformation that is chemically self-sustaining or autocatalytic. Experiments, in which the laser direct writing of patterned thin films of Al is chemically amplified by subsequent selective pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition are summarized.

  7. Chemical imaging sensor and laser beacon.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Arthur H

    2003-05-20

    Design and functional aspects of PANSPEC, a panoramic-imaging chemical vapor sensor (PANSPEC is an abbreviation for infrared panoramic-viewing spectroradiometer), were advanced and its optical system reoptimized accordingly. The PANSPEC model unites camera and fused solid-state interferometer and photopolarimeter subsystems. The camera is an eye of the open atmosphere that collects, collimates, and images ambient infrared radiance from a panoramic field of view (FOV). The passive interferometer rapidly measures an infrared-absorbing (or infrared-emitting) chemical cloud traversing the FOV by means of molecular vibrational spectroscopy. The active photopolarimeter system provides a laser beam beacon. This beam carries identification (feature spectra measured by the interferometer) and heading (detector pixels disclosing these feature spectra) information on the hazardous cloud through a binary encryption of Mueller matrix elements. Interferometer and photopolarimeter share a common configuration of photoelastic modulation optics. PANSPEC was optimized for minimum aberrations and maximum resolution of image. The optimized design was evaluated for tolerances in the shaping and mounting of the optical system, stray light, and ghost images at the focal plane given a modulation transfer function metric. PMID:12777015

  8. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Warren W.; Strasburg, Jana D.; Aker, Pam M.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-01-20

    instrument detection limit. The range of chemicals detectable by FM DIAL has also been extended. Prior to FY03 only water and nitrous oxide (N2O) had been seen. Experiments on extending the tuning range of the quantum cascade laser (QCL) currently used in the experiments demonstrate that many more species are now accessible including H2S, C2F4H2, and CH4. We additionally demonstrated that FM DIAL measurements can be made using short wave infrared (SWIR) telecommunications lasers. While measurements made using these components are noisier because turbulence and particulate matter cause more interference in this spectral region, monitoring in this region enables larger species to be detected simply because these lasers have a greater tuning range. In addition, SWIR monitoring also allows for the detection of second-row hydride species such as HF and HCl, which are important nuclear and CWA proliferation signatures.

  9. Laser-based instrumentation for the detection of chemical agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hartford, A. Jr.; Sander, R.K.; Quigley, G.P.; Radziemski, L.J.; Cremers, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Several laser-based techniques are being evaluated for the remote, point, and surface detection of chemical agents. Among the methods under investigation are optoacoustic spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and synchronous detection of laser-induced fluorescence (SDLIF). Optoacoustic detection has already been shown to be capable of extremely sensitive point detection. Its application to remote sensing of chemical agents is currently being evaluated. Atomic emission from the region of a laser-generated plasma has been used to identify the characteristic elements contained in nerve (P and F) and blister (S and Cl) agents. Employing this LIBS approach, detection of chemical agent simulants dispersed in air and adsorbed on a variety of surfaces has been achieved. Synchronous detection of laser-induced fluorescence provides an attractive alternative to conventional LIF, in that an artificial narrowing of the fluorescence emission is obtained. The application of this technique to chemical agent simulants has been successfully demonstrated. 19 figures.

  10. [Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  11. Laser cutting with chemical reaction assist

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    A method for cutting with a laser beam where an oxygen-hydrocarbon reaction is used to provide auxiliary energy to a metal workpiece to supplement the energy supplied by the laser. Oxygen is supplied to the laser focus point on the workpiece by a nozzle through which the laser beam also passes. A liquid hydrocarbon is supplied by coating the workpiece along the cutting path with the hydrocarbon prior to laser irradiation or by spraying a stream of hydrocarbon through a nozzle aimed at a point on the cutting path which is just ahead of the focus point during irradiation.

  12. Laser cutting with chemical reaction assist

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.

    1992-11-17

    A method is described for cutting with a laser beam where an oxygen-hydrocarbon reaction is used to provide auxiliary energy to a metal workpiece to supplement the energy supplied by the laser. Oxygen is supplied to the laser focus point on the workpiece by a nozzle through which the laser beam also passes. A liquid hydrocarbon is supplied by coating the workpiece along the cutting path with the hydrocarbon prior to laser irradiation or by spraying a stream of hydrocarbon through a nozzle aimed at a point on the cutting path which is just ahead of the focus point during irradiation. 1 figure.

  13. Laser cutting with chemical reaction assist

    SciTech Connect

    Gettemy, D.J.

    1991-04-08

    This invention is comprised of a method for cutting with a laser beam where an oxygen-hydrocarbon reaction is used to provide auxiliary energy to a metal workpiece to supplement the energy supplied by the laser. Oxygen is supplied to the laser focus point on the workpiece by a nozzle through which the laser beam also passes. A liquid hydrocarbon is supplied by coating the workpiece along the cutting path with the hydrocarbon prior to laser irradiation or by spraying a stream of hydrocarbon through a nozzle aimed at a point on the cutting path which is just ahead of the focus point during irradiation.

  14. Laser micromachining of chemically altered polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.

    1998-08-01

    During the last decade laser processing of polymers has become an important field of applied and fundamental research. One of the most promising proposals, to use laser ablation as dry etching technique in photolithography, has not yet become an industrial application. Many disadvantages of laser ablation, compared to conventional photolithography, are the result of the use of standard polymers. These polymers are designed for totally different applications, but are compared to the highly specialized photoresist. A new approach to laser polymer ablation will be described; the development of polymers, specially designed for high resolution laser ablation. These polymers have photolabile groups in the polymer backbone, which decompose upon laser irradiation or standard polymers are modified for ablation at a specific irradiation wavelength. The absorption maximum can be tailored for specific laser emissino lines, e.g. 351, 308 and 248 nm lines of excimer lasers. The authors show that with this approach many problems associated with the application of laser ablation for photolithography can be solved. The mechanism of ablation for these photopolymers is photochemical, whereas for most of the standard polymers this mechanism is photothermal. The photochemical decomposition mechanism results in high resolution ablation with no thermal damage at the edges of the etched structures. In addition there are no redeposited ablation products or surface modifications of the polymer after ablation.

  15. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, N.

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  16. Chemical surface modification of fluorocarbon polymers by excimer laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira

    1996-04-01

    Surface of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) [PTFE] film was modified chemically by an ArF excimer laser-induced reaction in a hydrazine gas atmosphere. The polymer surface modified upon the irradiation of 1000 pulses at 27 mJ cm -2, which was a fairly lower fluence than the ablation threshold for usual polymer films, showed hydrophilicity (contact angle for water: 30°) enough to be metallized by chemical plating. The mechanism for chemical surface modification was investigated by FTIR, XPS, and SIMS analyses. The laser-treated PTFE film was metallized by a chemical plating process. These processes will be used to fabricate printed wiring boards for high frequency electronics.

  17. Mid-infrared laser-spectroscopic sensing of chemical species.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Markus W

    2015-05-01

    This letter reports on mid-infrared laser-based detection and analysis of chemical species. Emphasis is put on broadly tunable laser sources and sensitive detection schemes. Selected examples from our lab illustrate the performance and potential of such systems in various areas including environmental and medical sensing. PMID:26257952

  18. Mid-infrared laser-spectroscopic sensing of chemical species

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Markus W.

    2014-01-01

    This letter reports on mid-infrared laser-based detection and analysis of chemical species. Emphasis is put on broadly tunable laser sources and sensitive detection schemes. Selected examples from our lab illustrate the performance and potential of such systems in various areas including environmental and medical sensing. PMID:26257952

  19. Problems in the development of autonomous mobile laser systems based on a cw chemical DF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, B P; Bashkin, A S; Beznozdrev, V N; Parfen'ev, M V; Pirogov, N A; Semenov, S N

    2003-01-31

    The problems involved in designing autonomous mobile laser systems based on high-power cw chemical DF lasers, whose mass and size parameters would make it possible to install them on various vehicles, are discussed. The need for mobility of such lasers necessitates special attention to be paid to the quest for ways and means of reducing the mass and size of the main laser systems. The optimisation of the parameters of such lasers is studied for various methods of scaling their systems. A complex approach to analysis of the optical scheme of the laser system is developed. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  20. Laser separation of chemically strengthened glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, Anatoli A.; Black, Matthew L.; Scott Glaesemann, G.

    A laser method for separating the strengthened glass and the effect of this process on edge quality and strength are reported. We have shown, for the first time to our knowledge, that developed laser based cutting technique enables clean full separation of the strengthened glass sheets having high level of ion exchange without spontaneous cracking or shattering. Nearly 'flaw-free' edge was achieved after optimization of the laser cutting parameters and after defining of an optimum range of the central tension inside the glass. As a result, high strength of the edge of > 500 MPa is demonstrated for the first time.

  1. Application of laser Doppler velocimeter to chemical vapor laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, Luther R.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Lee, Ja H.; Fletcher, Mark T.; Tabibi, Bagher M.

    1993-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system was used to measure iodide vapor flow fields inside two different-sized tubes. Typical velocity profiles across the laser tubes were obtained with an estimated +/-1 percent bias and +/-0.3 to 0.5 percent random uncertainty in the mean values and +/-2.5 percent random uncertainty in the turbulence-intensity values. Centerline velocities and turbulence intensities for various longitudinal locations ranged from 13 to 17.5 m/sec and 6 to 20 percent, respectively. In view of these findings, the effects of turbulence should be considered for flow field modeling. The LDV system provided calibration data for pressure and mass flow systems used routinely to monitor the research laser gas flow velocity.

  2. CW CO2 Laser Induced Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pola, Joseph

    1989-05-01

    CW CO2 laser driven reactions between sulfur hexafluoride and carbon oxide, carbon suboxide, carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide proceed at subatmospheric pressures and yield fluorinated carbon compounds and sulfur tetrafluoride. CW CO2 laser driven reactions of organic compounds in the presence of energy-conveying sulfur hexafluoride show reaction course different from that normally observed due to elimination of reactor hot surface effects. The examples concern the decomposition of polychlorohydrocarbons, 2-nitropropane, tert.-butylamine, allyl chloride, spirohexane, isobornyl acetate and the oxidation of haloolefins. CW CO2 laser induced fragmentation of 1-methyl-l-silacyclobutanes and 4-silaspiro(3.4)octane in the presence of sulfur hexafluoride is an effective way for preparation and deposition of stable organosilicon polymers.

  3. Project LOCOST: Laser or Chemical Hybrid Orbital Space Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, Alan; Kost, Alicia; Lampshire, Gregory; Larsen, Rob; Monahan, Bob; Wright, Geoff

    1990-01-01

    A potential mission in the late 1990s is the servicing of spacecraft assets located in GEO. The Geosynchronous Operations Support Center (GeoShack) will be supported by a space transfer vehicle based at the Space Station (SS). The vehicle will transport cargo between the SS and the GeoShack. A proposed unmanned, laser or chemical hybrid orbital space transfer vehicle (LOCOST) can be used to efficiently transfer cargo between the two orbits. A preliminary design shows that an unmanned, laser/chemical hybrid vehicle results in the fuel savings needed while still providing fast trip times. The LOCOST vehicle receives a 12 MW laser beam from one Earth orbiting, solar pumped, iodide Laser Power Station (LPS). Two Energy Relay Units (ERU) provide laser beam support during periods of line-of-sight blockage by the Earth. The baseline mission specifies a 13 day round trip transfer time. The ship's configuration consist of an optical train, one hydrogen laser engine, two chemical engines, a 18 m by 29 m box truss, a mission-flexible payload module, and propellant tanks. Overall vehicle dry mass is 8,000 kg. Outbound cargo mass is 20,000 kg, and inbound cargo mass is 6,000 kg. The baseline mission needs 93,000 kg of propellants to complete the scenario. Fully fueled, outbound mission mass is 121,000 kg. A regeneratively cooled, single plasma, laser engine design producing a maximum of 768 N of thrust is utilized along with two traditional chemical engines. The payload module is designed to hold 40,000 kg of cargo, though the baseline mission specifies less. A proposed design of a laser/chemical hybrid vehicle provides a trip time and propellant efficient means to transport cargo from the SS to a GeoShack. Its unique, hybrid propulsion system provides safety through redundancy, allows baseline missions to be efficiently executed, while still allowing for the possibility of larger cargo transfers.

  4. Computationally efficient, rotational nonequilibrium CW chemical laser model

    SciTech Connect

    Sentman, L.H.; Rushmore, W.

    1981-10-01

    The essential fluid dynamic and kinetic phenomena required for a quantitative, computationally efficient, rotational nonequilibrium model of a CW HF chemical laser are identified. It is shown that, in addition to the pumping, collisional deactivation, and rotational relaxation reactions, F-atom wall recombination, the hot pumping reaction, and multiquantum deactivation reactions play a significant role in determining laser performance. Several problems with the HF kinetics package are identified. The effect of various parameters on run time is discussed.

  5. Comparison of Laser Chemical Processing and LaserMicroJet for structuring and cutting silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopman, Sybille; Fell, Andreas; Mayer, Kuno; Mesec, Matthias; Rodofili, Andreas; Kray, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new cutting method for thin silicon solar wafers with liquid-jet-guided lasers (LaserMicroJet®, LMJ, and Laser Chemical Processing, LCP). Several laser systems with different wavelengths were tested to find the optimum laser system and processing parameters in terms of efficient material removal and deep laser cutting. Water and potassium hydroxide were used as carrier liquids to enhance laser ablation. The ablation efficiency was defined as a target parameter and experimentally determined by performing single laser grooves. It is demonstrated that the ablation process of LMJ is mainly affected by silicon melting and then removing by the liquid-jet momentum for single laser grooves. Best result for deep laser grooves is achieved if evaporation dominates the ablation process. Better surface quality referred to laser-induced crystalline damage is presented for a cut wafer with LMJ in comparison to a standard multiwire slurry saw. This shows a great potential of wafering with liquid-jet-guided lasers although no optimal liquid media was used.

  6. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.

    1993-12-01

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  7. Investigation of performance and mechanism for chemical laser propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhiping; Li, Long

    2013-05-01

    Chemical laser propulsion (CLP) is accompanied by the release of chemical energy in the process of laser propulsion, which can improve laser propulsion performance. In this article the propulsion performance of POM propellant under the constraint of a cylindrical tube-type thruster in atmospheric and nitrogen environments, respectively, has been conducted experimentally. The results indicate that the ablation masses of a single pulse under two gas environments are close, but the momentum coupling coefficient Cm and specific impulse Isp in atmospheric environment are higher than that in nitrogen environment, which demonstrates an exothermic reaction occurred between the ablation product and the environment oxygen. To learn the mechanism of CLP the molecular spectra for ablation products of POM propellant in atmospheric and vacuum environments are measured and analyzed, respectively, and it reveals that the final product in a vacuum is CH2O, while the final products are CO2 and H2O in the atmosphere. Then the chemical reaction, composition and chemical energy release have been confirmed in the atmospheric environment. By using Arrhenius finite rate chemical reaction model with the code Fluent the flow field evolution of ablation product was simulated numerically. The results show the intensity of chemical energy release is related to the contact and mixing degree of the ablation product and the oxygen in the atmosphere, mixing more fully, the chemical energy released more intensively.

  8. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of HMX and TATB Laser Ignition Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2004-03-02

    Recent laser ignition experiments on octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-terrazocine (HMX) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) subjected to laser fluxes ranging from 10 to 800 W/cm{sup 2} produced ignition times from seconds to milliseconds. Global chemical kinetic thermal decomposition models for HMX and TATB have been developed to calculate times to thermal explosion for experiments in the seconds to days time frame. These models are applied to the laser ignition experimental data in this paper. Excellent agreement was obtained for TATB, while the calculated ignition times were longer than experiment for HMX at lower laser fluxes. At the temperatures produced in the laser experiments, HMX melts. Melting generally increases condensed phase reaction rates so faster rates were used for three of the HMX reaction rates. This improved agreement with experiments at the lower laser fluxes but yielded very fast ignition at high fluxes. The calculated times to ignition are in reasonable agreement with the laser ignition experiments, and this justifies the use of these models for estimating reaction times at impact and shock ''hot spot'' temperatures.

  9. Laser spectroscopy of chemically reactive species

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ming; Sears, T.J.

    1993-02-01

    We report the observation of stimulated emission pumping spectra in the NCO radical formed in a supersonic free jet expansion by the reaction between photolytically generated CN radicals and O{sub 2}. The spectra give rotationally resolved information on high lying vibrational levels that are difficult or impossible to detect by conventional single photon spectroscopic techniques. These new data provide detailed insight into the Renner-Teller, spin-orbit and Fermi-resonance coupling in the molecule. They also provide a solid basis for future state-selected chemical and dynamical studies involving this important radical species.

  10. A tunable MWIR laser remote sensor for chemical vapor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, Thomas L.; Noblett, Patricia M.; Otting, William D.

    1998-01-01

    The Air Force vision for Global Virtual Presence suggests a need for active remote sensing systems that provide both global coverage and the ability to detect multiple gaseous chemical species at low concentration from a significant standoff distance. The system will need to have acceptable weight, volume, and power characteristics, as well as a long operating lifetime for integration with various surveillance platforms. Laser based remote sensing systems utilizing the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique are promising for long range chemical sensing applications. Recent advancements in pulsed, diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) technology and in tunable optical parametric oscillators (OPO) make broadly tunable laser transmitters possible for the DIAL system. Also the characteristic narrow spectral bandwidth of these laser devices provides high measurement sensitivity and spectral selectivity with the potential to avoid interfering species. Rocketdyne has built and tested a tunable, midwave infrared (MWIR) DIAL system using DPSSL/OPO technology. The key to the system is a novel tuning and line narrowing technology developed for the OPO. The tuning system can quickly adjust to the desired wavelength and precisely locate a narrow spectral feature of interest. Once the spectral feature is located, a rapid dither tuning technique is employed. The laser pulses are tuned ``on'' and ``off'' the spectral resonance of a molecule with precise and repeatable performance as required to make the DIAL measurement. To date, the breadboard system has been tested by measuring methane, ethane, and sulfur dioxide in a calibrated gas cell at a range of 60 meters.

  11. Molecular dispersion spectroscopy – new capabilities in laser chemical sensing

    PubMed Central

    Nikodem, Michal; Wysocki, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic techniques suitable for molecular dispersion sensing enable new applications and strategies in chemical detection. This paper discusses the current state-of-the art and provides an overview of recently developed chirped laser dispersion spectroscopy (CLaDS) based techniques. CLaDS and its derivatives allow for quantitative spectroscopy of trace-gases and enable new capabilities such as extended dynamic range of concentration measurements, high immunity to photodetected intensity fluctuations, or capability of direct processing of spectroscopic signals in optical domain. Several experimental configurations based on quantum cascade lasers and examples of molecular spectroscopic data are presented to demonstrate capabilities of molecular dispersion spectroscopy in the mid-infrared spectral region. PMID:22809459

  12. Kinetic model of continuous-wave flow chemical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z.; X., E.

    1982-02-01

    A kinetic approach to modeling the gain in a chemical wave continuous laser when the lasing frequency is coincident with the center of the line shape is presented. Governing equations are defined for the relaxing behavior of an initially nonequilibrium distribution toward the local equilibrium Boltzmann-Maxwellian distribution. A new gain is introduced which is related to the thermal motion of the molecules and cold-reaction and premixed CW models are discussed. Coincidence of the lasing frequency with the line shape is demonstrated to result in a radiative intensity within the homogeneous broadening limit. The rate model predictions are compared with those of the kinetic model. It is found that when the broadening parameter is less than 0.2 the kinetic model more accurately describes the behavior of the CW chemical laser.

  13. Laser-initiated chemical reactions in carbon suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, T. E.; Diebold, G. J.; Bartels, D. M.; Crowell, R. A.; Chemistry; Brown Univ.

    2002-10-31

    We report on laser-initiated chemical reactions in colloidal carbon suspensions. Irradiation of carbon particles ranging in size from 13 to 75 nm in diameter suspended in water, toluene, and benzene with high power nanosecond, picosecond, and femtosecond laser pulses leads to the formation of a number of gaseous hydrocarbons as well as a series of liquid-phase products. In the product gas above irradiated carbon suspensions in water, H{sub 2} and CO, the main reaction products of the carbon-steam reaction, and numerous hydrocarbons ranging from C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} were detected. Irradiation of particulate carbon in toluene and benzene gave H{sub 2} as the main gas product with small amounts of C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} hydrocarbons. Bibenzyl and biphenyl were found as the main liquid products produced in toluene and benzene suspensions, respectively, but with numerous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smaller concentrations. The amount of products generated by pulsed laser irradiation is shown to depend on particle size and concentration, as well as the laser fluence and pulse width. The chemical reactions reported take place under conditions characterized by extremely high temperatures and pressures of short duration.

  14. Stabilized Quantum Cascade Lasers and Ultrasensitive Chemical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, Matthew S.

    2003-03-01

    Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs) are a relatively new type of semiconductor laser operating in the mid- to long-wave infrared. Being monopolar multilayered quantum well structures, they can be fabricated to operate anywhere in a 3 to 20 micron region. This makes them an ideal choice for infrared chemical sensing, a topic of great interest at present. The broad range of applications of this technology includes everything from environmental sensing to homeland security and the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. In addition to a discussion of these new laser devices, we will show results of resent experiments, including frequency stabilization of QCLs down to a relative frequency of 5.6Hz. In this experiment we use two QCLs locked to two separate optical cavities, and we observe the heterodyne beat. A third control loop (in addition to the two for locking the lasers) is used to remove low frequency noise between the two cavity systems. We also present data from several different cavity-enhanced QCL chemical sensors demonstrating sensitivities down to the mid 10-11/cm/root(Hz).

  15. Mid-infrared spatial filter fabrication using laser chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet D'Aubigny, Christian Y.; Walker, Christopher K.; Golish, Dathon R.

    2004-10-01

    Feedhorns like those commonly used in radio-telescope and radio communication equipment couple very efficiently (>98%) to the fundamental Gaussian mode (TEM00). High order modes are not propagated through a single-mode hollow metallic waveguides. It follows that a back to back feedhorn design joined with a small length of single-mode waveguide can be used as a very high throughput spatial filter. Laser micro machining provides a mean of scaling successful waveguide and quasi-optical components to far and mid infrared wavelengths. A laser micro machining system optimized for THz and far IR applications has been in operation at Steward Observatory for several years and produced devices designed to operate at λ=60μm. A new laser micromachining system capable of producing mid-infrared devices will soon be operational. These proceedings review metallic hollow waveguide spatial filtering theory, feedhorn designs as well as laser chemical etching and the design of a new high-NA UV laser etcher capable of sub-micron resolution to fabricate spatial filters for use in the mid-infrared.

  16. Space-Based Chemical Lasers in strategic defense

    SciTech Connect

    Wildt, D. )

    1992-07-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) has made significant progress in developing Space-Based chemical Laser (SBL) technologies and in studying the SBLs global defense capability. In this mission, a constellation of several orbiting laser platforms provides continuous global defense by intercepting threatening missiles in their boost phase, including short range ballistic missiles (SRBMs). An optional smaller constellation provides defense against launches from the low and midlatitude regions. In addition, SBLs have utility in other important related missions such as surveillance, air defense and discrimination. The hardware necessary to build such a system has been developed to the point where it is mature and ready for demonstration in space. Advances have been made in each of the following major areas of the SBL: laser device; optics/beam control; beam pointing; ATP (acquisition, tracking and pointing); uncooled optics; and laser lethality. Integration of the key laser and beam control technologies is now occurring in the ground-based ALI experiment, and a space demonstration experiment, Star LITE, is in the planning and concept development phase.

  17. Standoff photoacoustic sensing of trace chemicals by laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; Hu, Q.; Liu, H.

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful technique that suitable for trace detection of chemicals and explosives. Normally a high-sensitive microphone or a quartz tuning fork is used to detect the signal in photoacoustic cell. In recent years, laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is proposed to remote-sense photoacoustic signal on various substrates. It is a high-sensitivity sensor with a displacement resolution of <10pm. In this research, the photoacoustic effect of various chemicals is excited by a quantum cascade laser (QCL) with a scanning wavelength range of 6.89μm to 8.5 μm. A home-developed LDV at 1550nm wavelength is applied to detect the vibration signal. After normalize the vibration amplitude with QCL power, the photoacoustic spectrum of various chemicals can be obtained. Different factors that affect the detection accuracy and sensitivity have also been discussed. The results show the potential of the proposed technique for standoff detection of trace chemicals and explosives.

  18. Laser interrogation of surface agents (LISA) for chemical agent reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, N. S.; Chyba, Thomas H.; Richter, Dale A.; Ponsardin, Patrick L.; Armstrong, Wayne T.; Lobb, C. T.; Kelly, Brian T.; Babnick, Robert D.; Sedlacek, Arthur J., III

    2002-06-01

    Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents (LISA) is a new technique which exploits Raman scattering to provide standoff detection and identification of surface-deposited chemical agents. ITT Industries, Advanced Engineering and Sciences Division is developing the LISA technology under a cost-sharing arrangement with the US Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command for incorporation on the Army's future reconnaissance vehicles. A field-engineered prototype LISA-Recon system is being designed to demonstrate on-the- move measurements of chemical contaminants. In this article, we will describe the LISA technique, data form proof-of- concept measurements, the LISA-Recon design, and some of the future realizations envisioned for military sensing applications.

  19. Physical and Chemical Changes of Polystyrene Nanospheres Irradiated with Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, Mohd Ubaidillah; Juremi, Nor Rashidah Md.; Mohamad, Farizan; Wibawa, Pratama Jujur; Agam, Mohd Arif; Ali, Ahmad Hadi

    2011-05-25

    It has been reported that polymer resist such as PMMA (Poly(methyl methacrylate) which is a well known and commonly used polymer resist for fabrication of electronic devices can show zwitter characteristic due to over exposure to electron beam radiation. Overexposed PMMA tend to changes their molecular structure to either become negative or positive resist corresponded to electron beam irradiation doses. These characteristic was due to crosslinking and scissors of the PMMA molecular structures, but till now the understanding of crosslinking and scissors of the polymer resist molecular structure due to electron beam exposure were still unknown to researchers. Previously we have over exposed polystyrene nanospheres to various radiation sources, such as electron beam, solar radiation and laser, which is another compound that can act as polymer resist. We investigated the physical and chemical structures of the irradiated polystyrene nanospheres with FTIR analysis. It is found that the physical and chemical changes of the irradiated polystyrene were found to be corresponded with the radiation dosages. Later, combining Laser irradiation and Reactive Ion Etching manipulation, created a facile technique that we called as LARIEA NSL (Laser and Reactive Ion Etching Assisted Nanosphere Lithography) which can be a facile technique to fabricate controllable carbonaceous nanoparticles for applications such as lithographic mask, catalysts and heavy metal absorbers.

  20. Chemical kinetic performance losses for a hydrogen laser thermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. D.; Dexter, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Projected requirements for efficient, economical, orbit-raising propulsion systems have generated investigations into several potentially high specific impulse, moderate thrust, advanced systems. One of these systems, laser thermal propulsion, utilizes a high temperature plasma as the enthalpy source. The plasma is sustained by a focused laser beam which maintains the plasma temperature at levels near 20,000 K. Since such temperature levels lead to total dissociation and high ionization, the plasma thruster system potentially has a high specific impulse decrement due to recombination losses. The nozzle flow is expected to be sufficiently nonequilibrium to warrant concern over the achievable specific impluse. This investigation was an attempt at evaluation of those losses. The One-Dimensional Kinetics (ODK) option of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) Computer Program was used with a chemical kinetics rate set obtained from available literature to determine the chemical kinetic energy losses for typical plasma thruster conditions. The rates were varied about the nominal accepted values to band the possible losses. Kinetic losses were shown to be highly significant for a laser thermal thruster using hydrogen. A 30 percent reduction in specific impulse is possible simply due to the inability to completely extract the molecular recombination energy.

  1. Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition of nickel and laser cutting in integrated circuit restructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remes, J.; Moilanen, H.; Leppävuori, S.

    1997-01-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of nickel from Ni(CO)4 has been utilised for the restructuring of integrated circuit (IC) interconnections. Nickel lines were deposited on a SiO2 passivated IC to achieve new local interconnections between integrated circuit structures. Depositions were carried out over the pressure range of 0.2 to 2.2 mbar of pure Ni(CO)4 buffered in 0 to 800 mbar He. Argon ion laser wavelengths of 488 and 514.5 nm, laser power of 50-150 mW and a laser scan speed of 80 μm/s were utilised for the deposition. The morphology and chemical contents of the deposited interconnection microstructures was examined by AFM, optical microscopy and LIMA. The resistivity of the deposited lines was found to be close to the nickel bulk resistivity. The utilisation of Nd: YAG and XeCl excimer lasers in the cutting of Al and Mo conductor lines for integrated circuit modification is also described.

  2. Chemical analysis of surgical smoke by infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianella, Michele; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-11-01

    The chemical composition of surgical smoke, a gaseous by-product of some surgical devices—lasers, drills, vessel sealing devices—is of great interest due to the many toxic components that have been found to date. For the first time, surgical smoke samples collected during routine keyhole surgery were analyzed with infrared laser spectroscopy. Traces (ppm range) of methane, ethane, ethylene, carbon monoxide and sevoflurane were detected in the samples which consisted mostly of carbon dioxide and water vapor. Except for the anaesthetic sevoflurane, none of the compounds were present at dangerous concentrations. Negative effects on the health of operation room personnel can be excluded for many toxic compounds found in earlier studies, since their concentrations are below recommended exposure limits.

  3. Space based chemical lasers for ballistic missile defense (BMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griff, N.; Kline, D. C.

    The potential for space-based chemical lasers (SBCLs) for use in ballisitic missile defense is discussed. The requirements for such use are reviewed, and the concept of phasing SBCL modules together on-orbit to obtain very high brightness systems is examined. The application of SBCLs to interactive discrimination is considered, and the readiness of SBCLs with regard to beam control, optics, acquisition/pointing/tracking, rapid retargeting, and coherent beam combination is addressed. The survivability of SBCLs in the context of an entire SDI system is discussed, including possible adversarial responses and design features to increase survivability.

  4. Application of pulsed-uv laser Raman spectroscopy to chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Raman detection limits obtained with a KrF laser excitation source were comparable to those obtained by laser-induced fluorescence and photofragment emission spectroscopy under chemical vapor deposition conditions.

  5. LASERS: Efficient chemical oxygen — iodine laser with a high total pressure of the active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Nikolaev, V. D.; Svistun, M. I.; Khvatov, N. A.; Heiger, G. D.; Madden, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    A new concept of obtaining a high total pressure of the active medium of a chemical oxygen — iodine laser (OIL) is proposed and verified. The nozzle unit of the laser consists of the alternating vertical arrays of cylindrical nozzles to produce high-pressure nitrogen jets, plane slotted nozzles for the flow of O2(1Δ) oxygen, and vertical arrays of cylindrical nozzles to inject the N2 — I2 mixture between the first two streams. For a molar chlorine flow rate of 39.2 mmol s-1, the output power was 700 W and the chemical efficiency was 19.7 %. The combined use of the ejector nozzle unit proposed to obtain the active medium and a super-sonic diffuser allows a significant simplification of the ejection system for the exhaust active medium of the OIL.

  6. Modelling of Laser-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Research is directed at development of a detailed model of mass and heat transfer and chemical reaction in the pyrolysis of silane for the growth of thin amorphous silicon substrates incorporating laser heating of the gas phase above the film. The model will be the basis for evaluation of the relative importances of the decomposition of SiH4 in the vapor phase, mass transfer of the intermediate species, e.g., SiH2, and the evolution of hydrogen gas. Plans are also underway for developing a model for homogeneous nucleation of Si in the vapor phase to model the rate limitations observed at high gas-phase temperatures and high partial pressures of silane. Work was concentrated on an almost one-dimensional model for the coupling of the CO2 laser beam for heat transfer of the vapor phase with simple kinetic models for SiH4 decomposition and subsequent absorption of Si vapor on the substrate. Mass transfer in the vapor phase is assumed to be solely by diffusion. The role of convection in the vapor phase caused by the large changes in density in and around the center of the laser beam will be analyzed to evaluate the potential of microgravity experiments for increasing the uniformity of the film and the deposition rate.

  7. Combustion Research Program: Flame studies, laser diagnostics, and chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Crosley, D.R.

    1992-09-01

    This project has comprised laser flame diagnostic experiments, chemical kinetics measurements, and low pressure flame studies. Collisional quenching has been investigated for several systems: the OH radical, by H{sub 2}0 in low pressure flames; the rotational level dependence for NH, including measurements to J=24; and of NH{sub 2} at room temperature. Transition probability measurements for bands involving v{prime} = 2 and 3 of the A-X system of OH were measured in a flame. Laser-induced fluorescence of vinyl radicals was unsuccessfully attempted. RRKM and transition state theory calculations were performed on the OH + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} reaction, on the t-butyl radical + HX; and transition state theory has been applied to a series of bond scission reactions. OH concentrations were measured quantitatively in low pressure H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} flames, and the ability to determine spatially precise flame temperatures accurately using OH laser-induced fluorescence was studied.

  8. Study of factors influencing the effective delivery of O2(1delta) into the resonator of the oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krukowski, I. M.; Halin, A. L.

    1994-08-01

    Experimental studies have been performed on the processes: chlorine utilization in the bubbler type singlet oxygen generator, the quenching of O2(1(Delta) ) in the OIL path, the propagation of the gas mixture O2 + O2 (1(Delta) ) + H2O throughout forward flow-type water vapor trap.

  9. Laser chemical etching of waveguides and quasi-optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet D'Aubigny, Christian Yann Pierre

    2003-11-01

    The terahertz (THz) frequency domain, located at the frontier of radio and light, is the last unexplored region of the electromagnetic spectrum. As technology becomes available, THz systems are finding applications to fields ranging all the way from astronomical and atmospheric remote sensing to space telecommunications, medical imaging, and security. In Astronomy the THz and far infrared (IR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (λ = 300 to 10 μm) may hold the answers to countless questions regarding the origin and evolution of the Universe, galaxy, star and planet formation. Over the past decade, advances in telescope and detector technology have for the first time made this regime available to astronomers. Near THz frequencies, metallic hollow waveguide structures become so small, (typically much less than a millimeter), that conventional machining becomes extremely difficult, and in many cases, nearly impossible. Laser induced, micro-chemical etching is a promising new technology that can be used to fabricate three dimensional structures many millimeters across with micrometer accuracy. Laser micromachining of silicon possesses a significant edge over more conventional techniques. It does not require the use of masks and is not confined to crystal planes. A non-contact process, it eliminates tool wear and vibration problems associated with classical milling machines. At the University of Arizona we have constructed the first such laser micromachining system optimized for the fabrication of THz and far IR waveguide and quasi-optical components. The system can machine structures up to 50 mm in diameter, down to a few microns accuracy in a few minutes and with a remarkable surface finish. A variety of THz devices have been fabricated using this technique, their design, fabrication, assembly and theoretical performance is described in the chapters that follow.

  10. Laser-based instrumentation for detection of chemical-warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, G.P.; Radziemski, L.J.; Sander, R.K.; Hartford, A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Several laser-based techniques are being developed for remote, point, and surface contamination detection of chemical warfare agents. These techniques include optoacoustic spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and synchronous detection of laser-induced fluorescence. Detection limits in the part-per-million to part-per-billion regime have been demonstrated.

  11. Application of a locally optimized control theory to pump dump laser-driven chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuki, Y.; Yahata, Y.; Kono, H.; Fujimura, Y.

    1998-05-01

    A locally optimized control theory is developed. This theory is applied to pump-dump laser-driven chemical reactions via an electronically excited state. The results show that the theory can design the pulse shapes for chemical reactions with high quantum yields in strong laser intensity regimes in which perturbative treatments break down.

  12. Innovative Laser Techniques in Chemical Kinetics: A Pedagogical Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalenko, Laurie J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    Considers two types of laser applications in kinetics. Explores short laser pulses to prepare a reactant in a known state and a continuous laser as a probe to monitor specific species in a reaction. Describes how lasers work and provides several examples of kinetic reactions. (ML)

  13. Modeling chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanov, S. V.; Gornushkin, I. B.

    2015-11-01

    Under the assumption of local thermal equilibrium, a numerical algorithm is proposed to find the equation of state for laser-induced plasmas (LIPs) in which chemical reactions are permitted in addition to ionization processes. The Coulomb interaction in plasma is accounted for by the Debye-Hückel method. The algorithm is used to calculate the equation of state for LIPs containing carbon, silicon, nitrogen, and argon. The equilibrium reaction constants are calculated using the latest experimental and ab initio data of spectroscopic constants for the molecules {N}_2, {C}_2, {Si}_2, {CN}, {SiN}, {SiC} and their ions. The algorithm is incorporated into a fluid dynamic numerical model based on the Navier-Stokes equations describing an expansion of LIP plumes into an ambient gas. The dynamics of LIP plumes obtained by the ablation of SiC, solid silicon, or solid carbon in an ambient gas containing {N}_2 and Ar is simulated to study formation of molecules and molecular ions.

  14. Laser applications to chemical analysis: an introduction by the feature editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, Jay B.; Ramsey, J. Michael; Lucht, Robert P.

    1995-06-01

    This issue of Applied Optics features papers on the application of laser technology to chemical analysis. Many of the contributions, although not all, result from papers presented at the Fourth OSA Topical Meeting on Laser Applications to Chemical Analysis, which was held at Jackson Hole, Wyoming, March, 1994. This successful meeting, with nearly one hundred participants, continued the tradition of earlier LACA meetings to focus on the optical science of laser-based measurements of temperature and trace chemical assays in a wide variety of practical applications.

  15. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Optical strength of mirrors on fluorite substrates subjected to cw radiation from a chemical CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, V. A.; Rukhin, V. B.

    1994-02-01

    Optimisation of the energy characteristics of a chemical CO laser revealed damage to the optical resonator mirrors. Estimates indicated that when the power density of the incident cw laser radiation was 2-2.5 kW cm-2 the induced thermoelastic stresses could reach the damage threshold of mirrors on fluorite substrates.

  16. Fast Infrared Chemical Imaging with a Quantum Cascade Laser

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm–1) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues. PMID:25474546

  17. Optimization of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser for Chemical Sensing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Cannon, Bret D.; Schiffern, John T.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2010-03-01

    We describe and characterize an external cavity quantum cascade laser designed for detection of multiple airborne chemicals, and used with a compact astigmatic Herriott cell for sensing of acetone and hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Laser Applications to Chemical, Security, and Environmental Analysis: introduction to the feature issue

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizler, Andreas; Fried, Alan; Gord, James R

    2007-07-01

    This Applied Optics feature issue on Laser Applications to Chemical, Security,and Environmental Analysis (LACSEA) highlights papers presented at theLACSEA 2006 Tenth Topical Meeting sponsored by the Optical Society ofAmerica.

  19. Laser-induced chemical liquid phase deposition of copper from aqueous solutions without reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kochemirovsky, V A; Tumkin, I I; Logunov, L S; Safonov, S V; Menchikov, Leonid G

    2012-08-31

    Laser-induced chemical liquid phase deposition of copper without a traditional reducing agent has been used for the first time to obtain conductive patterns on a dielectric surface having a reducing ability. It is shown that phenol-formaldehyde binder of the dielectric (glass fibre) can successfully play the role of a reducing agent in this process. The resulting copper sediments have low electrical resistance and good topology. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasmas)

  20. Time and wavelength domain algorithms for chemical analysis by laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, David L.; Gillespie, James B.

    1992-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is a promising technique for laser radar applications. Laser radar using LIF has already been applied to algae blooms and oil slicks. Laser radar using LIF has great potential for remote chemical analysis because LIF spectra are extremely sensitive to chemical composition. However, most samples in the real world contain mixtures of fluorescing components, not merely individual components. Multicomponent analysis of laser radar returns from mixtures is often difficult because LIF spectra from solids and liquids are very broad and devoid of line structure. Therefore, algorithms for interpreting LIF spectra from laser radar returns must be able to analyze spectra that overlap in multicomponent systems. This paper analyzes the possibility of using factor analysis-rank annihilation (FARA) to analyze emission-time matrices (ETM) from laser radar returns instead of excitation-emission matrices (EEM). The authors here define ETM as matrices where the rows (or columns) are emission spectra at fixed times and the columns (or rows) are temporal profiles for fixed emission wavelengths. Laser radar usually uses pulsed lasers for ranging purposes, which are suitable for measuring temporal profiles. Laser radar targets are hard instead of diffuse; that is, a definite surface emits the fluorescence instead of an extended volume. A hard target would not broaden the temporal profiles as would a diffuse target. Both fluorescence lifetimes and emission spectra are sensitive to chemical composition. Therefore, temporal profiles can be used instead of excitation spectra in FARA analysis of laser radar returns. The resulting laser radar returns would be ETM instead of EEM.

  1. Ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Vassilia; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2011-02-01

    Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to identify the spatial resolution limitations and assess the minimal detectable mass restrictions in laser-ablation based chemical analysis. The atomic emission of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) dopants in transparent dielectric Mica matrices was studied, to find that both these elements could be detected from 450 nm diameter ablation craters, full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). Under optimal conditions, mass as low as 220 ag was measured, demonstrating the feasibility of using laser-ablation based chemical analysis to achieve high spatial resolution elemental analysis in real-time and at atmospheric pressure conditions.

  2. Localized planarization of optical damage using laser-based chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Elhadj, Selim; Guss, Gabe M.; Sridharan, Arun; Nielsen, Norman D.; Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Lee, Daeho; Grigoropoulos, Costas

    2013-11-01

    We present a method to repair damaged optics using laser-based chemical vapor deposition (L-CVD). A CO2 laser is used to heat damaged silica regions and polymerize a gas precursor to form SiO2. Measured deposition rates and morphologies agree well with finite element modeling of a two-phase reaction. Along with optimizing deposition rates and morphology, we also show that the deposited silica is structurally identical to high-grade silica substrate and possesses high UV laser damage thresholds. Successful application of such a method could reduce processing costs, extend optic lifetime, and lead to more damage resistant laser optics used in high power applications.

  3. Simulation of a two-frequency cw chemical HF-HBr laser

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, B P; Katorgin, B I; Stepanov, A A

    2008-10-31

    An autonomous cw chemical HF-HBr laser emitting simultaneously at {approx}2.7 {mu}m (HF molecules) and {approx}4.2 {mu}m (HBr molecules) is studied numerically by using complete Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that the output power of the HBr laser per unit area of the nozzle array can achieve {approx}20 W cm{sup -2} for the laser region length {approx}20 cm. The relation between the radiation intensities emitted by HF and HBr molecules is controlled by diluting the secondary fuel by bromine. (lasers)

  4. A Topics Course on Chemical Application of Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, William F.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a topics course offered at the University of New Mexico entitled "Lasers in Chemistry," which is designed for beginning graduate students and advanced undergraduates in all areas of chemistry. (CS)

  5. Laser-machined components for microanalytical and chemical separation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dean W.; Martin, Peter M.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    1998-10-01

    Excimer lasers have proven to be powerful tools for machining polymeric components used in microanalytical and microchemical separation devices. We report the use of laser machining methods to produce microfluidic channels and liquid/liquid contact membranes for a number of devices fabricated at our laboratory. Microchannels 50- to 100- micrometers -wide have been produced directly in bulk polycarbonate chips using a direct-write laser micromachining system. Wider microchannels have been produced by laser machining paths through sheets of polyimide film, then sandwiching the patterned piece between solid chips of polycarbonate stock. A comparison of direct-write and mask machining processes used to produce some of the microfluidic features is made. Examples of microanalytical devices produced using these methods are presented. Included are microdialysis units used to remove electrolytes from liquid samples and electrophoretic separation devices, both used for extremely low volume samples intended for mass spectrometric analysis. A multilayered microfluidic device designed to analyze low volume groundwater samples for hazardous metals and a fluidics motherboard are also described. Laser machining processes have also been explored for producing polymeric membranes suitable for use in liquid/liquid contactors used for removal of soluble hazardous components from waste streams. A step-and-repeat mask machining process was used to produce 0.5 X 8 cm membranes in 25- and 50-micrometers -thick polyimide. Pore diameters produced using this method were five and ten micrometers. The laser machined membranes were sputter coated with PTFE prior to use to improve fluid breakthrough characteristics.

  6. IR LASER BASED CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR THE COOPERATIVE MONITORING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A Whitaker

    2005-08-08

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the device properties of the quantum cascade laser (QCL), a type of laser invented at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies in the device physics research lab of Dr. Federico Capasso and more specifically to determine the remote sensing capability of this device. The PI and Stevens Institute of Technology collaborated with Dr. Capasso and Bell Laboratories to carry out this research project. The QCL is a unique laser source capable of generating laser radiation in the middle-infrared spectral region that overlaps the most important molecular absorption bands. With appropriate modulation techniques it is possible to use the laser to measure the concentration of many molecules of interest to the remote sensing community. In addition, the mid-IR emission wavelength is well suited to atmospheric transmission as mid-IR experiences much less scattering due to dust and fog. At the onset of this project little was known about several key device performance parameters of this family of lasers and the NNSA supported research enabled them to determine values of several of these characteristics.

  7. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  8. CO2 laser scribe of chemically strengthened glass with high surface compressive stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghua; Vaddi, Butchi R.

    2011-03-01

    Chemically strengthened glass is finding increasing use in handheld, IT and TV cover glass applications. Chemically strengthened glass, particularly with high (>600MPa) compressive stress (CS) and deeper depth of layer (DOL), enable to retain higher strength after damage than non-strengthened glass when its surface is abraded. Corning Gorilla® Glass has particularly proven to be advantageous over competition in this attribute. However, due to high compressive stress (CS) and Central Tension (CT) cutting ion-exchanged glass is extremely difficult and often unmanageable where ever the applications require dicing the chemically strengthened mother glass into smaller parts. We at Corning have developed a CO2 laser scribe and break method (LSB) to separate a single chemically strengthened glass sheet into plurality of devices. Furthermore, CO2 laser scribe and break method enables debris-free separation of glass with high edge strength due to its mirror-like edge finish. We have investigated laser scribe and break of chemically strengthened glass with surface compressive stress greater than 600 MPa. In this paper we present the results of CO2 scribe and break method and underlying laser scribing mechanisms. We demonstrated cross-scribe repetitively on GEN 2 size chemically strengthened glass substrates. Specimens for edge strength measurements of different thickness and CS/DOL glass were prepared using the laser scribe and break technique. The specimens were tested using the standard 4-point bend method and the results are presented.

  9. Preparation of γ-Al2O3 films by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Ito, Akihiko; Goto, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    γ- and α-Al2O3 films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using CO2, Nd:YAG, and InGaAs lasers to investigate the effects of varying the laser wavelength and deposition conditions on the phase composition and microstructure. The CO2 laser was found to mostly produce α-Al2O3 films, whereas the Nd:YAG and InGaAs lasers produced γ-Al2O3 films when used at a high total pressure. γ-Al2O3 films had a cauliflower-like structure, while the α-Al2O3 films had a dense and columnar structure. Of the three lasers, it was the Nd:YAG laser that interacted most with intermediate gas species. This promoted γ-Al2O3 nucleation in the gas phase at high total pressure, which explains the cauliflower-like structure of nanoparticles observed.

  10. Zeeman laser interferometry for detection and chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    Zeeman interferometry has a number of applications for ultrasensitive detection and chemical analysis, including refractive index detection, micro-thermometry, thermooptic spectroscopy, and light scattering.

  11. Small molecule ambient mass spectrometry imaging by infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Galhena, Asiri S; Harris, Glenn A; Nyadong, Leonard; Murray, Kermit K; Fernández, Facundo M

    2010-03-15

    Presented here is a novel ambient ion source termed infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI). IR-LAMICI integrates IR laser ablation and direct analysis in real time (DART)-type metastable-induced chemical ionization for open air mass spectrometry (MS) ionization. The ion generation in the IR-LAMICI source is a two step process. First, IR laser pulses impinge the sample surface ablating surface material. Second, a portion of ablated material reacts with the metastable reactive plume facilitating gas-phase chemical ionization of analyte molecules generating protonated or deprotonated species in positive and negative ion modes, respectively. The successful coupling of IR-laser ablation with metastable-induced chemical ionization resulted in an ambient plasma-based spatially resolved small molecule imaging platform for mass spectrometry (MS). The analytical capabilities of IR-LAMICI are explored by imaging pharmaceutical tablets, screening counterfeit drugs, and probing algal tissue surfaces for natural products. The resolution of a chemical image is determined by the crater size produced with each laser pulse but not by the size of the metastable gas jet. The detection limits for an active pharmaceutical ingredient (acetaminophen) using the IR-LAMICI source is calculated to be low picograms. Furthermore, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic simulations showed improvements in the IR-LAMICI ion source are possible. PMID:20155978

  12. Chemical-ionization visible and ultraviolet gas lasers: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions or Penning ionization reactions are used to produce population inversions between electronic states of molecular ions which should result in stimulated emission in ultraviolet and visible regions. Such lasers could be used in study of short-lived reaction intermediates, crystal structure and scattering, and photolysis.

  13. Effects of pressure ratio on population inversion in a DF chemical laser with concurrent lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Sung; Baek, Seung Wook

    2005-04-01

    A numerical simulation is presented for investigating the effects of pressure ratio of D2 injector to supersonic nozzle on the population inversion in the DF chemical laser cavity, while a lasing concurrently takes place. The chemical laser is generally used for the industrial process and manufacturing as well as the military weapon system, which requires high power characteristic of laser system rather than the others. The population inversion is absolutely needed to generate the laser beam and is non-equilibrium process. The laser beam is generated between the mirrors in the cavity and it is important to obtain stronger population inversion and more uniform distribution of the excited molecules in the laser cavity in order to produce high-power laser beam with good quality. In this study, these phenomena are investigated by means of analyzing the distributions of the DF excited molecules and the F atom used as an oxidant, while simultaneously estimating the maximum small signal and saturated gains and power in the DF chemical laser cavity. For the numerical solution, a fully conservative implicit method and a second order total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme are used with the finite-volume method (FVM). An 11-species (including DF molecules in various excited states of energies), 32-step chemistry model is adopted for the chemical reaction of the DF chemical laser system. The results are discussed by comparison with two D2 injector pressure cases; 192 and 388.64 torr. Major results reveal that in the resonator, stronger population inversions occur in the all transitions except DF(1)-DF(0), when the D2 injection pressure is lower. But, the higher D2 injection pressure provides a favorable condition for DF(1)-DF(0) transition to generate the higher power laser beam. In other words, as the pressure of D2 injector increases, the maximum small signal gain in the v transition, which is in charge of generating most of laser power, becomes higher. Therefore, the

  14. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S; Phillips, Mark C

    2014-03-18

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  15. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-01-12

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  16. Numerical modeling of arc plasma generator for chemical laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagar, Vidya; Ravikant, Chhaya; Singhal, Gaurav; Mittal, Alok P.

    2012-05-01

    The results of the numerical modeling of arc discharge phenomenon relevant to hydrogen fluoride/deuterium fluoride (HF/DF) laser applications are given. The overall mechanics of arc discharge phenomena on the basis of numerical modeling employing the commercial code COMSOL is discussed. The equations for a 2D axisymmetric, weakly compressible, laminar flow with heat transfer and the coupled hydrodynamic and electromagnetic equations are solved using the SIMPLE algorithm. The variations in the material properties, temperature, and velocity due to the generated arc are studied. A comparison of the results obtained with those from the studies available in the literature validates the computational data. Since each designed plasma arc tunnel is unique in itself and specific in application, this would enable one to alter arc discharge parameters to optimize a specific laser.

  17. Laser treatment of alumina surface with chemically distinct carbide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, Bekir S.; Ali, Haider

    2014-12-01

    Laser treatment of pre-prepared alumina tile surface with a carbon film containing a mixture of 3 wt% TiC and 3 wt% B4C hard particles was conducted. Morphological and metallurgical changes at the laser treated surface were examined using optical and electron scanning microscopes, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Microhardness and fracture toughness of the treated surface were measured together with indentation tests. Residual stress generated at the surface region was determined from the X-ray diffraction data. It was found that TiC and B4C hard particles cause micro-crack formation in the vicinity of hard particles on the surface. This behavior is attributed to the differences between the thermal expansion coefficients of these particles. The laser treated surface is composed of a dense layer with fine sized grains and columnar structures formed below the dense layer. The presence of hard particles enhances the microhardness and lowers the fracture toughness of the surface. The formation of nitride compounds (AlN and AlON) contributes to volume shrinkage in the dense layer. Residual stress formed in the surface region is compressive.

  18. Ultrasensitive standoff chemical sensing based on nonlinear multi-photon laser wave-mixing spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregerson, Marc; Hetu, Marcel; Iwabuchi, Manna; Jimenez, Jorge; Warren, Ashley; Tong, William G.

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear multi-photon laser wave mixing is presented as an ultrasensitive optical detection method for chem/bio agents in thin films and gas- and liquid-phase samples. Laser wave mixing is an unusually sensitive optical absorption-based detection method that offers significant inherent advantages including excellent sensitivity, small sample requirements, short optical path lengths, high spatial resolution, high spectral resolution and standoff remote detection capability. Wave mixing can detect trace amounts of chemicals even when using micrometer-thin samples, and hence, it can be conveniently interfaced to fibers, microarrays, microfluidic systems, lab-on-a-chip, capillary electrophoresis and other capillary- or fiber-based chemical separation systems. The wave-mixing signal is generated instantaneously as the two input laser beams intersect inside the analyte of interest. Laser excitation wavelengths can be tuned to detect multiple chemicals in their native form since wave mixing can detect both fluorescing and non-fluorescing samples at parts-pertrillion or better detection sensitivity levels. The wave-mixing signal is a laser-like coherent beam, and hence, it allows reliable and effective remote sensing of chemicals. Sensitive wave-mixing detectors offer many potential applications including sensitive detection of biomarkers, early detection of diseases, sensitive monitoring of environmental samples, and reliable detection of hazardous chem/bio agents with a standoff detection capability.

  19. About possibilities of clearing near-Earth space from dangerous debris by a spaceborne laser system with an autonomous cw chemical HF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Avdeev, A V; Bashkin, A S; Katorgin, Boris I; Parfen'ev, M V

    2011-07-31

    The possibility of clearing hazardous near-Earth space debris using a spaceborne laser station with a large autonomous cw chemical HF laser is substantiated and the requirements to its characteristics (i.e., power and divergence of laser radiation, pulse duration in the repetitively pulsed regime, repetition rate and total time of laser action on space debris, necessary to remove them from the orbits of the protected spacecrafts) are determined. The possibility of launching the proposed spaceborne laser station to the orbit with the help of a 'Proton-M' carrier rocket is considered. (laser applications)

  20. Sub-nanometrically resolved chemical mappings of quantum-cascade laser active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantzas, Konstantinos; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Patriarche, Gilles; Largeau, Ludovic; Mauguin, Olivia; Pegolotti, Giulia; Vasanelli, Angela; Calvar, Ariane; Amanti, Maria; Sirtori, Carlo; Sagnes, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    A procedure that produces sub-nanometrically resolved chemical mappings of MOCVD-grown InGaAs/InAlAs/InP quantum cascade lasers is presented. The chemical mappings reveal that, although the structure is lattice-matched to InP, the InAlAs barriers do not attain the nominal aluminum content—48%—and are, in fact, InGaAlAs quaternaries. This information is used to adjust the aluminum precursor flow and fine-tune the composition of the barriers, resulting in a significant improvement of the fabricated lasers.

  1. LDRD final report on high power broadly tunable Mid-IR quantum cascade lasers for improved chemical species detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Hudgens, James J.; Fuller, Charles T.; Samora, Sally; Klem, John Frederick; Young, Erik W.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of our project was to examine a novel quantum cascade laser design that should inherently increase the output power of the laser while simultaneously providing a broad tuning range. Such a laser source enables multiple chemical species identification with a single laser and/or very broad frequency coverage with a small number of different lasers, thus reducing the size and cost of laser based chemical detection systems. In our design concept, the discrete states in quantum cascade lasers are replaced by minibands made of multiple closely spaced electron levels. To facilitate the arduous task of designing miniband-to-miniband quantum cascade lasers, we developed a program that works in conjunction with our existing modeling software to completely automate the design process. Laser designs were grown, characterized, and iterated. The details of the automated design program and the measurement results are summarized in this report.

  2. Concepts of risk assesment of complex chemical mixtures in laser pyrolysis fumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Lothar W.; Meier, Thomas H.

    1996-01-01

    Laser-tissue interaction may generate by energy absorption a complex mixture of gaseous, volatile, semi-volatile and particular substances. At the time about 150 different components are known from IR-laser interaction with different organ tissues like liver, fat, muscle and skin. The laser-tissue interaction process thereby is dominated by heating processes, which is confirmed by the similarity of formed chemical products in comparison with conventional cooking processes for food preparation. With the identified chemical substances and relative amounts in backmind a walk along the think path of risk assessment with special reference to pyrolysis products is given. The main way of intake of pyrolysis products is the inhalative one, which results from the fine aerosols formed and the high spreading energy out of the irradiated source. The liberated amounts of irritative chemicals as (unsaturated) aldehydes, heterocycles of bad odor and possibly cancerogenic acting substances relates to some (mu) g/g of laser vaporized tissue. With regard to this exposure level in a hypothetic one cubic meter volume the occupational limit settings are far away. Even indoor air exposure levels are in nearly all cases underwent, for the content of bad smelling substances forces an effective ventilation. Up to now no laser typical chemical substance could be identified, which was not elsewhere known by frying or baking processes of meat, food or familiar. Starting with the GRAS concept of 1957 the process of risk assessment by modified food products and new ingredients is still improofing. The same process of risk assessment is governing the laser pyrolysis products of mammalian tissues. By use of sufficient suction around the laser tissue source the odor problems as well as the toxicological problems could be solved.

  3. PPLN laser-based system for chemical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludowise, Peter D.; Ottesen, David K.; Kulp, Thomas J.; Goers, Uta-Barbara; Celina, M.; Armstrong, K.; Allendorf, Sarah W.

    1999-10-01

    An infrared-imaging instrument is being developed to provide in situ qualitative and quantitative assessment of hydrocarbon contaminants on metallic surfaces for cleaning verification. A continuous-wave infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO), based on the quasi-phasematched material periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN), is interfaced with an InSb focal plane array camera to perform fast, non-invasive analysis by reflectance spectroscopy. The period range of the designed fan-out PPLN crystal determines the range of the output wavelength of the light source. It is able to scan hundreds of wavenumbers positioned in the range of 2820 - 3250 cm-1, which is sufficient to detect functional groups of common organic compounds (-CH, -OH, and -NH). The capability of the instrument has been demonstrated in a preliminary investigation of reflectance measurements for hydrocarbon solvents (methanol and d-limonene) on an aluminum surface. A substantial difference in absorption is obtained for the two solvents at two different laser-illumination wavelengths, thus permitting hydrocarbon detection and molecular species differentiation. Preliminary reflectance spectra of a mixture of aliphatic hydrocarbon lubricants and drawing agents on an aluminum panel are also presented. The relative thickness of the hydrocarbon thin film is determined by the intensity ratio of images acquired at two different laser illumination frequencies.

  4. Selective wet chemical etching of metallic thin films designed by laser interference metallurgy (LIMET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catrin, Rodolphe; Gachot, Carsten; Marchand, Günter; Schmid, Ulrich; Mücklich, Frank

    2009-05-01

    The physical and chemical behaviour of materials is strongly correlated with their microstructure. Therefore, much effort is invested in the advanced microstructural design of metallic thin films. Laser Interference Metallurgy (LIMET) is used to locally tune the grain architecture of metallic thin films from the nanoto the microscale. This means a defined size and orientation of the grains with lateral periodicity, by interfering on the sample surface two or more laser beams of a high power nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser. This technique enables the local nucleation and crystallization of amorphous or nanocrystalline metallic thin films, thus combining nano- and microcrystalline regions ordered in periodic line- or lattice-like arrangements in a composite architecture. After having locally modified the microstructure of e-beam evaporated Pt and Au thin films by laser irradiation a wet chemical etching procedure was induced in hot aqua regia. Doing so, a selective etching is achieved without using conventional lithography. Due to the laser-induced recrystallization in periodic structures, these microcrystalline zones of specific oriented grains show a higher resistance against the wet chemical etchant than the as-deposited, nanocrystalline areas, which are completely removed down to the substrate. Therefore, this procedure may have the potential to be an alternative, low cost approach to conventional lithographic techniques and provides a novel method for a straight-forward patterning of metallic thin films.

  5. Optical far- and near-field femtosecond laser ablation of Si for nanoscale chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zormpa, Vasileia; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2010-02-02

    Extending spatial resolution in laser-based chemical analysis to the nanoscale becomes increasingly important as nanoscience and nanotechnology develop. Implementation of femtosecond laser pulses arises as a basic strategy for increasing resolution since it is associated with spatially localized material damage. In this work we study femtosecond laser far- and near-field processing of silicon (Si) at two distinct wavelengths (400 and 800 nm), for nanoscale chemical analysis. By tightly focusing femtosecond laser beams in the far-field we were able to produce sub-micrometer craters. In order to further reduce the crater size, similar experiments were performed in the near-field through sub-wavelength apertures, resulting to the formation of sub-30 nm craters. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was used for chemical analysis with a goal to identify the minimum crater size from which spectral emission could be measured. Emission from sub-micrometer craters (full-with-at-half-maximum) was possible, which are among the smallest ever reported for femtosecond LIBS.

  6. Chemical Changes Associated with Increased Acid Resistance of Er:YAG Laser Irradiated Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Olea-Mejía, Oscar Fernando; García-Fabila, María Magdalena; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura Emma; Sánchez-Flores, Ignacio; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background. An increase in the acid resistance of dental enamel, as well as morphological and structural changes produced by Er:YAG laser irradiation, has been reported. Purpose. To evaluate the chemical changes associated with acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser. Methods. Forty-eight enamel samples were divided into 4 groups (n = 12). Group I (control); Groups II, III, and IV were irradiated with Er:YAG at 100 mJ (12.7 J/cm2), 200 mJ (25.5 J/cm2), and 300 mJ (38.2 J/cm2), respectively. Results. There were significant differences in composition of irradiated groups (with the exception of chlorine) and in the amount of calcium released. Conclusions. Chemical changes associated with an increase in acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser showed a clear postirradiation pattern characterized by a decrease in C at.% and an increase in O, P, and Ca at.% and no changes in Cl at.%. An increased Ca/P ratio after Er:YAG laser irradiation was associated with the use of higher laser energy densities. Chemical changes produced by acid dissolution showed a similar trend among experimental groups. Stable or increased Ca/P ratio after acid dissolution was observed in the irradiated groups, with reduction of Ca released into the acid solution. PMID:24600327

  7. Laser chemical vapor deposition of Cu and Ni in integrated circuit repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppaevuori, Seppo; Remes, Janne; Moilanen, Hannu

    1996-09-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of nickel from Ni(CO)4 and copper from Cu(hfac)tmvs was utilized in the restructuring of an integrated circuit (IC) interconnection. Nickel and copper lines were deposited on passivated ICs by using a focused Ar+ laser beam to achieve new local rewirings on the chip. Nickel line depositions were carried out over the pressure range of 0.2 to 2.2 mbar of Ni(CO)4 buffered in 200 - 800 mbar He. The typical laser beam scan speed was 24 micrometers per second for both metals. The Cu(hfac)tmvs precursor gas partial pressure was 0.3 mbar buffered in 10 mbar He or H2 and typical laser scan speed was 24 micrometers per second. The morphology and chemical contents of the deposited interconnection microstructures was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), optical microscopy and laser ionization mass analysis (LIMA). The LIMA analysis indicated that the deposited copper surface was contaminated but the contamination level decreased when the layer was depth profiled. The deposited Ni lines were found to be pure Ni with only traces of carbon contamination. The utilization of XeCl excimer laser in the cutting of Al and Mo conductor lines and passivation contact via opening for IC modification is also described. LCVD method was successful in numerous different IC failure inspection and circuit modification cases.

  8. Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry: Sensitive and Quantitative Chemical Depth Profiling of Solid Materials.

    PubMed

    Riedo, Andreas; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Neuland, Maike B; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Direct quantitative and sensitive chemical analysis of solid materials with high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction is of high importance in various fields of analytical research, ranging from in situ space research to the semiconductor industry. Accurate knowledge of the chemical composition of solid materials allows a better understanding of physical and chemical processes that formed/altered the material and allows e.g. to further improve these processes. So far, state-of-the-art techniques such as SIMS, LA-ICP-MS or GD-MS have been applied for chemical analyses in these fields of research. In this report we review the current measurement capability and the applicability of our Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (instrument name LMS) for the chemical analysis of solids with high spatial resolution. The most recent chemical analyses conducted on various solid materials, including e.g. alloys, fossils and meteorites are discussed. PMID:27131112

  9. Overview of the SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative) Program in short wavelength chemical lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced chemical lasers promise to be effective space-based weapons against responsive threats. In this program, we are developing both CW and pulsed concepts for achieving this goal. Certain approaches may also be appropriate as ground-based weapons and fusion drivers. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  10. Synchronization: from pendulum clocks to chaotic lasers and chemical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Michael; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2003-05-01

    Many natural and human-made nonlinear oscillators exhibit the ability to adjust their rhythms due to weak interaction: two lasers, being coupled, start to generate with a common frequency; cardiac pacemaker cells fire simultaneously; violinists in an orchestra play in unison. Such coordination of rhythms is a manifestation of a fundamental nonlinear phenomenon--synchronization. Discovered in the 17th century by Christiaan Huygens, it was observed in physics, chemistry, biology and even social behaviour, and found practical applications in engineering and medicine. The notion of synchronization has been recently extended to cover the adjustment of rhythms in chaotic systems, large ensembles of oscillating units, rotating objects, continuous media, etc. In spite of essential progress in theoretical and experimental studies, synchronization remains a challenging problem of nonlinear sciences.

  11. Laser/Plasma/Chemical-Vapor Deposition Of Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George C.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed process for deposition of diamond films includes combination of plasma induced in hydrocarbon feed gas by microwave radiation and irradiation of plasma and substrate by lasers. Deposition of graphite suppressed. Reaction chamber irradiated at wavelength favoring polymerization of CH2 radical into powders filtered out of gas. CH3 radicals, having desired sp3 configuration, remains in gas to serve as precursors for deposition. Feed gas selected to favor formation of CH3 radicals; candidates include CH4, C2H4, C2H2, and C2H6. Plasma produced by applying sufficient power at frequency of 2.45 GHz and adjusting density of gas to obtain electron kinetic energies around 100 eV in low-pressure, low-temperature regime.

  12. Combustion Research Program: Flame studies, laser diagnostics, and chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Crosley, D.R.

    1991-01-22

    We have made a detailed study of the care that must be taken to correctly measure OH radical concentrations in flames. A large part of these studies has concerned collisional quenching of hydride radical species (OH, NH, and NH{sub 2}), in particular the dependence upon rotational level and collision velocity (temperature). The results on OH and NH have shown unique and interesting behavior from the viewpoint of fundamental molecular dynamics, pointing to quenching often governed by collisions on an anisotropic, attractive surface, whereas NH{sub 2} quenching appears to depend on state-mixing considerations, not dynamic control. This state-specific behavior of these small, theoretically tractable hydrides has direct ramifications for quantitative flame diagnostics. Our other effort in the diagnostic area has been repeated but unsuccessful searches for laser induced fluorescence in the vinyl radical.

  13. Generation of cavitation luminescence by laser-induced exothermic chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jung Park, Han; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2013-08-14

    Absorption of high power laser radiation by aqueous carbon suspensions is known to result in the formation of highly compressed bubbles of hydrogen and carbon monoxide through the endothermic carbon-steam reaction. The bubbles expand rapidly, overreaching their equilibrium diameter, and then collapse tens to hundreds of microseconds after formation to give a flash of radiation. Here we report on the effects of laser-initiated exothermic chemical reaction on cavitation luminescence. Experiments with hydrogen peroxide added to colloidal carbon suspensions show that both the time of the light flash following the laser pulse and the intensity of luminescence increase with hydrogen peroxide concentration, indicating that large, highly energetic gas bubbles are produced. Additional experiments with colloidal carbon suspensions show the effects of high pressure on the luminescent intensity and its time of appearance following firing of the laser.

  14. Laser spectroscopy of chemically reactive species. [NCO radical

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ming; Sears, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    We report the observation of stimulated emission pumping spectra in the NCO radical formed in a supersonic free jet expansion by the reaction between photolytically generated CN radicals and O[sub 2]. The spectra give rotationally resolved information on high lying vibrational levels that are difficult or impossible to detect by conventional single photon spectroscopic techniques. These new data provide detailed insight into the Renner-Teller, spin-orbit and Fermi-resonance coupling in the molecule. They also provide a solid basis for future state-selected chemical and dynamical studies involving this important radical species.

  15. Feasibility study of a novel pressure recovery system for CO2-COIL based on chemical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingwei; Jin, Yuqi; Geng, Zicai; Li, Yongzhao; Zhang, Yuelong; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    A chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is an electronic transition, low pressure, high throughput system. The use of this laser demands a suitable pressure recovery system. This paper proposed a novel pressure recovery system based on chemical absorption and the feasibility for COIL with CO2 as buffer gas (CO2-COIL) was investigated. The novel pressure recovery system works by chemisorbing the CO2-COIL effluents into two fixed-beds maintained at initial temperature of around 293-323K. Compared with the cryosorption system for N2-COIL based on physical absorption, the novel chemisorptions based pressure recovery system has a simpler logistics and a shorter run-to-run preparation time. Two kinds of solid chemo-sorbents were designed and synthesized. One was used for chemisorbing the oxidizing gases such as O2 ,Cl2 and I2, another was used for chemisorbing the acidic gas such as CO2. The capacities of the two sorbents were measured to be 3.12 mmol(O2)/g and 3.84 mmol (CO2) /g, respectively. It indicated that the synthesized sorbents could effectively chemosorb the CO2-COIL effluents. Secondly, analog test equipment was set up and used to study the feasibility of the novel pressure recovery system used for CO2-COIL. The test results showed that the novel pressure recovery system could maintain the pressure under 6 Torr for tens seconds under the continuous gas flow. It showed that the novel pressure recovery system for CO2-COIL based on chemical absorption is feasible.

  16. Chemical characterization of aerosol particles by laser Raman spectroscopy. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, K.H.

    1999-12-01

    The importance of aerosol particles in many branches of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, combustion, interfacial science, and material processing, has been steadily growing during the past decades. One of the unique properties of these particles is the very high surface-to-volume ratios, thus making them readily serve as centers for gas-phase condensation and heterogeneous reactions. These particles must be characterized by size, shape, physical state, and chemical composition. Traditionally, optical elastic scattering has been applied to obtain the physical properties of these particle (e.g., particle size, size distribution, and particle density). These physical properties are particularly important in atmospheric science as they govern the distribution and transport of atmospheric aerosols.

  17. Chemical and microstructural transformations in lithium iron phosphate battery electrodes following pulsed laser exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutey, Adrian H. A.; Fiorini, Maurizio; Fortunato, Alessandro; Ascari, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    Multi-layer lithium iron phosphate (LFP) battery electrodes are exposed to nanosecond pulsed laser radiation of wavelength 1064 nm. Test parameters are chosen to achieve characteristic interaction types ranging from partial incision of the active coating layers only to complete penetration of the electrodes with high visual cut quality. Raman spectroscopy is performed on unexposed regions and at points approaching each incision, highlighting changes in chemical composition and microstructure in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Thermogravimetric analysis is performed on the unexposed electrode active materials to distinguish the development of compositional changes under conditions of slow heating below the melting and sublimation temperatures. A brief theoretical description of the physical phenomena taking place during laser exposure is provided in terms of direct ablation during each laser pulse and vaporization or thermal degradation due to conductive heat transfer on a much longer time-scale, with characteristics of the HAZ reported in terms of these changes. For all laser exposures carried out in the study, chemical and microstructural changes are limited to the visible HAZ. Some degree of oxidation and LFP olivine phase degradation is observed in the cathode, while the polycrystalline graphite structure becomes less ordered in the anode. Where complete penetration is achieved, melting of the cathode active layer and combustion of the anode active layer take place near the cut edge due to thermal conduction from the metallic conductive layers. The presented results provide insight into the effects of laser processing on LFP electrode integrity.

  18. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  19. Personnel protection equipment for use with laser chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, I.D.; Roepke, J.

    1984-08-01

    The NASA White Sands Test facility (WSTF) recently built the fluid distribution system for the Army's High Energy Laser System Test Facility (HELSTF). As part of the effort, WSTF personnel were required to activate the fluorine system. To insure adequate personnel protection during the fluorine system activation, a project was undertaken to evaluate and qualify personnel protection equipment to be used during the activation (passivation) activity. Previous work in the late 60's and early 70's showed that very few materials were totally satisfactory for use with fluorine. Little if any work has been done to measure the degree of protection afforded against either fluorine gas or hydrofluoric acid (HF), the principal residual reactive material. Two general types of tests were conducted to evaluate materials. These were (1) fluorine and HF gas permeation tests, and (2) high-velocity fluorine gas-impingement tests. The gas permeation tests were designed to exposure one side of the material to the gas at concentrations of up to 27% F2 or 1.5% HF in designed to expose one side of the material to the gas at concentrations of up to 27% F2 or 1.5% HF in GN2 with a gas purge on the opposite side leading to the detection system. The tests showed that all of the materials tested which included ILC Dover Chloropel, glove materials - Neoprene, Viton, leather, butyl rubber, face shield materials, etc., where neither permeated by HF at a 1200 ppm level nor by F2 in GN2 at concentrations as high as 27% by volume. The gas-impingement tests were designed to represent a high-pressure gas leak or the cracking of a B-nut on a system containing residual fluorine gas.

  20. Duration of an intense laser pulse can determine the breakage of multiple chemical bonds.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinhua; Lötstedt, Erik; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Control over the breakage of a certain chemical bond in a molecule by an ultrashort laser pulse has been considered for decades. With the availability of intense non-resonant laser fields it became possible to pre-determine femtosecond to picosecond molecular bond breakage dynamics by controlled distortions of the electronic molecular system on sub-femtosecond time scales using field-sensitive processes such as strong-field ionization or excitation. So far, all successful demonstrations in this area considered only fragmentation reactions, where only one bond is broken and the molecule is split into merely two moieties. Here, using ethylene (C2H4) as an example, we experimentally investigate whether complex fragmentation reactions that involve the breakage of more than one chemical bond can be influenced by parameters of an ultrashort intense laser pulse. We show that the dynamics of removing three electrons by strong-field ionization determines the ratio of fragmentation of the molecular trication into two respectively three moieties. We observe a relative increase of two-body fragmentations with the laser pulse duration by almost an order of magnitude. Supported by quantum chemical simulations we explain our experimental results by the interplay between the dynamics of electron removal and nuclear motion. PMID:26271602

  1. Duration of an intense laser pulse can determine the breakage of multiple chemical bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinhua; Lötstedt, Erik; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Control over the breakage of a certain chemical bond in a molecule by an ultrashort laser pulse has been considered for decades. With the availability of intense non-resonant laser fields it became possible to pre-determine femtosecond to picosecond molecular bond breakage dynamics by controlled distortions of the electronic molecular system on sub-femtosecond time scales using field-sensitive processes such as strong-field ionization or excitation. So far, all successful demonstrations in this area considered only fragmentation reactions, where only one bond is broken and the molecule is split into merely two moieties. Here, using ethylene (C2H4) as an example, we experimentally investigate whether complex fragmentation reactions that involve the breakage of more than one chemical bond can be influenced by parameters of an ultrashort intense laser pulse. We show that the dynamics of removing three electrons by strong-field ionization determines the ratio of fragmentation of the molecular trication into two respectively three moieties. We observe a relative increase of two-body fragmentations with the laser pulse duration by almost an order of magnitude. Supported by quantum chemical simulations we explain our experimental results by the interplay between the dynamics of electron removal and nuclear motion.

  2. Chemical imaging of latent fingerprints by mass spectrometry based on laser activated electron tunneling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-01

    Identification of endogenous and exogenous chemicals contained in latent fingerprints is important for forensic science in order to acquire evidence of criminal identities and contacts with specific chemicals. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for such applications without any derivatization or fluorescent tags. Among these techniques, MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) provides small beam size but has interferences with MALDI matrix materials, which cause ion suppressions as well as limited spatial resolution resulting from uneven distribution of MALDI matrix crystals with different sizes. LAET (Laser Activated Electron Tunneling) described in this work offers capabilities for chemical imaging through electron-directed soft ionization. A special film of semiconductors has been designed for collection of fingerprints. Nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were compressed on a conductive metal substrate (Al or Cu sticky tape) under 10 MPa pressure. Resultant uniform thin films provide tight and shining surfaces on which fingers are impressed. Irradiation of ultraviolet laser pulses (355 nm) on the thin film instantly generates photoelectrons that can be captured by adsorbed organic molecules and subsequently cause electron-directed ionization and fragmentation. Imaging of latent fingerprints is achieved by visualization of the spatial distribution of these molecular ions and structural information-rich fragment ions. Atomic electron emission together with finely tuned laser beam size improve spatial resolution. With the LAET technique, imaging analysis not only can identify physical shapes but also reveal endogenous metabolites present in females and males, detect contacts with prohibited substances, and resolve overlapped latent fingerprints. PMID:25647159

  3. Physics of a ballistic missile defense - The chemical laser boost-phase defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Crockett L.

    1988-01-01

    The basic physics involved in proposals to use a chemical laser based on satellites for a boost-phase defense are investigated. After a brief consideration of simple physical conditions for the defense, a calculation of an equation for the number of satellites needed for the defense is made along with some typical values of this for possible future conditions for the defense. Basic energy and power requirements for the defense are determined. A sumary is made of probable minimum conditions that must be achieved for laser power, targeting accuracy, number of satellites, and total sources for power needed.

  4. Preparation and analysis of chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating formed by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Sureshbabu, S; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphates yield better functionality in the human body for a variety of metallic implant devices including orthopaedic and dental prostheses. In the present study chemically and hence functionally gradient bioceramic coating was obtained by pulsed laser deposition method. Calcium phosphate bioactive ceramic coatings based on hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were deposited over titanium substrate to produce gradation in physico-chemical characteristics and in vitro dissolution behaviour. Sintered targets of HA and α-TCP were deposited in a multi target laser deposition system. The obtained deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used to estimate the in vitro dissolution behaviour of coatings. The variation in mechanical property of the gradient layer was evaluated through scratch test and micro-indentation hardness. The bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of HA layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with simulated body fluid. It could be inferred that chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating can be produced by laser deposition of multiple sintered targets with variable chemical composition. PMID:22105226

  5. An intra-cavity device with a discharge-drived CW DF chemical laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Baozhu; Liu, Wenguang; Zhou, Qiong; Yuan, Shengfu; Lu, Qisheng

    2015-05-01

    The performance parameters of reflecting mirrors such as absorption coefficient or thermal distortion determine the beam quality of the output laser, so the quality of mirrors is one of the most important factors affecting the capability of the whole laser system. At the present time, there was obviously insufficient in test methods for the mirrors performance. The reflection coefficient, absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient of mirrors could be measured by a lot of test methods such as cavity ring-down method, photothermal deflection method, surface thermal lens method and laser calorimetry. But these methods could not test under high power density radiation. So the test data and results could not indicate the real performance in a real laser system exactly. Testing in a real laser system would be expensive and time consuming. Therefore, the test sequence and data would not be sufficient to analyze and realize the performance of mirrors. To examine the performance of mirrors under high power density radiation, the working principle of intra-cavity was introduced in this paper. Utilizing an output mirror with a low output coupling ratio, an intra-cavity could produce high-power density laser in the resonant cavity on the basis of a relatively small scale of gain medium, and the consumption and cost were very low relatively. Based on a discharge-drived CW DF chemical laser, an intra-cavity device was established. A laser beam of 3kw/cm2 was achieved in the resonant cavity. Two pieces of 22.5 degree mirrors and two pieces of 45 degree mirrors could be tested simultaneously. Absorption coefficient and thermal distortion were measured by calorimetry and Hartmann wavefront sensor respectively. This device was simple, convenient, low-maintenance, and could work for a long time. The test results would provide support for process improvement of mirrors.

  6. Portable IR dye laser optofluidic microresonator as a temperature and chemical sensor.

    PubMed

    Lahoz, F; Martín, I R; Gil-Rostra, J; Oliva-Ramirez, M; Yubero, F; Gonzalez-Elipe, A R

    2016-06-27

    A compact and portable optofluidic microresonator has been fabricated and characterized. It is based on a Fabry-Perot microcavity consisting essentially of two tailored dichroic Bragg mirrors prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering deposition. The microresonator has been filled with an ethanol solution of Nile-Blue dye. Infrared laser emission has been measured with a pump threshold as low as 0.12 MW/cm2 and an external energy conversion efficiency of 41%. The application of the device as a temperature and a chemical sensor is demonstrated. Small temperature variations as well as small amount of water concentrations in the liquid laser medium are detected as a shift of the resonant laser modes. PMID:27410592

  7. Chemical taggant detection and analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Steven H.; Almirall, Jose R

    2008-11-01

    A commercially available chemical identification taggant that imparts a unique elemental fingerprint to any object and can be analytically distinguished from billions of possible combinations has been developed. The liquid tag is easily applied and, once dry, can be removed and analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to determine the combination of elements present in the sample. The current study investigates the use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as an alternative, and perhaps more practical, analysis scheme to LA-ICP-MS for this taggant. LIBS provides excellent discrimination potential, sensitivity, and repeatability of analysis for up to 17 rare-earth elements using a Nd:YAG 266 nm or 1064 nm laser and an intensified CCD detector.

  8. Chemical changes accompanying facet degradation of AlGaAs quantum well lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houle, F. A.; Neiman, D. L.; Tang, W. C.; Rosen, H. J.

    1992-11-01

    Detailed measurements are reported using high-resolution scanning Auger microscopy of the chemical state of uncoated quantum well (QW) laser facets after brief and intermediate operating times. Analyses or uncoated facets which have suffered catastrophic optical damage (COD) under various operating conditions are described. The data show clearly that initial facet compositions are variable and far from ideal. After operation for as little as 2-10 min, the composition of the facet regions of the active/graded index and cladding layer change markedly, but no single type of change can be linked to COD. In particular, facet oxidation is not uniform or extensive, and facets which suffer COD are not necessarily more oxidized than those which have not. Composition changes are not limited to the facet surface, indicating that elemental redistribution during laser operation is very fast. These results suggest that the process of facet degradation plays a complex role in laser degradation.

  9. ZnO-coated SMS structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, X. Y.; Huang, J.; Xiao, H.; Yang, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    A zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated single mode-multimode-single mode fiber (SMS) structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser has been developed as a chemical sensor. Response to relative humidity (RH) and ethanol volatilization was evaluated by tracking the wavelength shifts of the output laser line in different moisture environments and ethanol solutions, respectively. For humidity sensing a linear response with a measurement range of 4-96% RH, and a sensitivity of 0.06 nm per %RH were obtained. As for ethanol volatilization sensing obvious wavelength blue shift was observed for the sensor immersed in 50% and 62% ethanol solution, while no variation could be detected in pure ethanol solution (purity larger than 97%). With the advantages of low cost, ease of fabrication and sensitive response, ZnO-coated SMS interrogated with a fiber ring laser was demonstrated to be an effective sensor for humidity and ethanol volatilization sensing.

  10. Time evolution studies of laser induced chemical changes in InAs nanowire using Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Suparna; Aggarwal, R.; Kumari Gupta, Vandna; Ingale, Alka

    2014-07-07

    We report the study of time evolution of chemical changes on the surface of an InAs nanowire (NW) on laser irradiation in different power density regime, using Raman spectroscopy for a time span of 8–16 min. Mixture of metastable oxides like InAsO{sub 4,} As{sub 2}O{sub 3} are formed upon oxidation, which are reflected as sharp Raman peaks at ∼240–254 and 180–200 cm{sup −1}. Evidence of removal of arsenic layer by layer is also observed at higher power density. Position controlled laser induced chemical modification on a nanometer scale, without changing the core of the NW, can be useful for NW based device fabrication.

  11. Chemical analysis of human urinary and renal calculi by Raman laser fiber-optics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Nguyen T. D.; Phat, Darith; Plaza, Pascal; Daudon, Michel; Dao, Nguyen Q.

    1991-11-01

    The Raman laser fiberoptics (RLFO) method using Raman spectroscopy for determination of chemical composition and optical fibers allowing multiplex, in situ, and remote possibilities, enabled chemical analysis of various human urinary and renal calculi. Raman spectra of about 40 constituents (synthetic or natural) in the authors''s possession and its 437 various binary and ternary mixtures are recorded using 1.06 micrometers radiation of a Nd:YAG laser and a FT Raman interferometer. These spectra--most of them are fluorescence free--constituted the calculi library. In the presence of urine, unknown stones can then be identified by RLFO method using an automatic computer procedure (at the present time, the Bruker IR search program is used). The results obtained for the identification of the stones are satisfactory. Major constituents of a complex calculus (

  12. Optical properties and surface structure comparison of tooth whitening using four laser systems and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Koranda, Pavel; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Housova, Devana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kokta, Milan R.

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of various laser techniques for bleaching teeth in office vital whitening. Hydrogen peroxide (30% concentration) and carbamide peroxide (10% solution) were used for chemical activation of bleaching process. Extracted non-carcious upper central incisors were exposed to laser radiation. Four different laser systems (Nd:YAG laser SHG, wavelength 0.53 μm, CTE:YAG laser, wavelength 2.7 μm, Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1.06 μm, and alexandrite laser, wavelength 0.75 μm) were applied to accelerate the speed of the process. The end of chemical exposition was verified by the change of bleaching agent color. The color change was determined by stereomicroscope (Nikon SMZ 2T, Japan), the quality of surface structure was checked by scanning electron microscope Joel, Japan). The speed of bleaching rnaged from 630 s (chemical methods only) to 250-340 s (chemicals + alexandrite laser radiation). The Alexandrite laser application was considered an elective process to decrease the time of bleaching without modifying the surface.

  13. Chemical vapor synthesis of nanocrystalline perovskites using laser flash evaporation of low volatility solid precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterer, Markus; Srdic, Vladimir V.; Djenadic, Ruzica; Kompch, Alexander; Weirich, Thomas E.

    2007-12-01

    One key requirement for the production of multinary oxide films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or nanocrystalline multinary oxides particles by chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) is the availability of precursors with high vapor pressure. This is especially the case for CVS where much higher production rates are required compared to thin films prepared by CVD. However, elements, which form low valent cations such as alkaline earth metals, are typically only available as solid precursors of low volatility, e.g., in form of β-diketonates. This study describes laser flash evaporation as precursor delivery method for CVS of nanocrystalline perovskites. Laser flash evaporation exploits the nonequilibrium evaporation of solid metal organic precursors of low vapor pressure by absorption of the infrared radiation of a CO2 laser. It is shown that stoichiometric, nanocrystalline particles consisting of SrZrO3 and SrTiO3 can be formed from corresponding mixtures of β-diketonates which are evaporated nonselectively and with high rates by laser flash evaporation.

  14. Chemical vapor synthesis of nanocrystalline perovskites using laser flash evaporation of low volatility solid precursors.

    PubMed

    Winterer, Markus; Srdic, Vladimir V; Djenadic, Ruzica; Kompch, Alexander; Weirich, Thomas E

    2007-12-01

    One key requirement for the production of multinary oxide films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or nanocrystalline multinary oxides particles by chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) is the availability of precursors with high vapor pressure. This is especially the case for CVS where much higher production rates are required compared to thin films prepared by CVD. However, elements, which form low valent cations such as alkaline earth metals, are typically only available as solid precursors of low volatility, e.g., in form of beta-diketonates. This study describes laser flash evaporation as precursor delivery method for CVS of nanocrystalline perovskites. Laser flash evaporation exploits the nonequilibrium evaporation of solid metal organic precursors of low vapor pressure by absorption of the infrared radiation of a CO(2) laser. It is shown that stoichiometric, nanocrystalline particles consisting of SrZrO(3) and SrTiO(3) can be formed from corresponding mixtures of beta-diketonates which are evaporated nonselectively and with high rates by laser flash evaporation. PMID:18163736

  15. Nanosecond laser textured superhydrophobic metallic surfaces and their chemical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Duong V.; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    This work demonstrates superhydrophobic behavior on nanosecond laser patterned copper and brass surfaces. Compared with ultrafast laser systems previously used for such texturing, infrared nanosecond fiber lasers offer a lower cost and more robust system combined with potentially much higher processing rates. The wettability of the textured surfaces develops from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity over time when exposed to ambient conditions. The change in the wetting property is attributed to the partial deoxidation of oxides on the surface induced during laser texturing. Textures exhibiting steady state contact angles of up to ∼152° with contact angle hysteresis of around 3-4° have been achieved. Interestingly, the superhydrobobic surfaces have the self-cleaning ability and have potential for chemical sensing applications. The principle of these novel chemical sensors is based on the change in contact angle with the concentration of methanol in a solution. To demonstrate the principle of operation of such a sensor, it is found that the contact angle of methanol solution on the superhydrophobic surfaces exponentially decays with increasing concentration. A significant reduction, of 128°, in contact angle on superhydrophobic brass is observed, which is one order of magnitude greater than that for the untreated surface (12°), when percent composition of methanol reaches to 28%.

  16. Ultrahigh-spatial-resolution chemical and magnetic imaging by laser-based photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, Toshiyuki Kotani, Yoshinori; Shin, Shik

    2015-02-15

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new chemical and magnetic imaging system, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with a continuous-wave deep-ultraviolet laser. Threshold photoemission is sensitive to the chemical and magnetic structures of the surface of materials. The spatial resolution of PEEM is limited by space charging when using pulsed photon sources as well as aberrations in the electron optics. We show that the use of a continuous-wave laser enabled us to overcome such a limit by suppressing the space-charge effect, allowing us to obtain a resolution of approximately 2.6 nm. With this system, we demonstrated the imaging of surface reconstruction domains on Si(001) by linear dichroism with normal incidence of the laser beam. We also succeeded in magnetic imaging of thin films with the use of magnetic circular dichroism near the Fermi level. The unique features of the ultraviolet laser will give us fast switching of the incident angles and polarizations of the photon source, which will be useful for the characterization of antiferromagnetic materials as well as ferromagnetic materials.

  17. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Haniam, P.; Kunsombat, C.; Chiangga, S.; Songsasen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  18. Synthesis of cobalt oxides thin films fractal structures by laser chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Haniam, P; Kunsombat, C; Chiangga, S; Songsasen, A

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  19. Active coherent laser spectrometer for remote detection and identification of chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2012-10-01

    Currently, there exists a capability gap for the remote detection and identification of threat chemicals. We report here on the development of an Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS) operating in the thermal infrared and capable of multi-species stand-off detection of chemicals at sub ppm.m levels. A bench top prototype of the instrument has been developed using distributed feedback mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers as spectroscopic sources. The instrument provides active eye-safe illumination of a topographic target and subsequent spectroscopic analysis through optical heterodyne detection of the diffuse backscattered field. Chemical selectivity is provided by the combination of the narrow laser spectral bandwidth (typically < 2 MHz) and frequency tunability that allows the recording of the full absorption spectrum of any species within the instrument line of sight. Stand-off detection at distances up to 12 m has been demonstrated on light molecules such as H2O, CH4 and N2O. A physical model of the stand-off detection scenario including ro-vibrational molecular absorption parameters was used in conjunction with a fitting algorithm to retrieve quantitative mixing ratio information on multiple absorbers.

  20. Chemical Laser Phase Conjugation Technology (CLPCT). Final report, 10 July 1985-9 November 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Schnurr, A.D.; Meisenholder, S.; Quon, S.; Betts, J.; Doyle, J.

    1986-11-30

    The final report for the Chemical Laser Phase Conjugation Technology (CLPCT) project presents the detailed design for an experimental facility for use in future phase-conjugation experiments, which will be conducted under a separate project. The objective of the CLPCT program was to design a facility that (1) is compatible with the use of an existing 50-liter repetitively HF pulsed chemical laser (RPCL) device and (2) would allow design flexibility/growth potential for other more-complex experiments. The detailed design of the facility for the HF Conjugation experiment is described. Phase conjugation is developed by the nonlinear optical process wherein the high energy HF chemical laser beam is focused within a stimulated Brillioun scattering (SBS) cell which is filled with xenon at 40 atmospheres. The experimental facility consists of the oscillator subsystem, RPCL subsystem, diagnostics subsystem and phase-conjugation subsystem. The detailed design of each subsystem is described. In addition, the conceptual is described. A flowing SBS cell was developed for this experiment.

  1. On the role of chemical reactions in initiating ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate)

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2007-05-15

    The role of chemical reactions is investigated versus the thermal and mechanical processes occurring in a polymer substrate during irradiation by a laser pulse and subsequent ablation. Molecular dynamics simulations with an embedded Monte Carlo based reaction scheme were used to study ultraviolet ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate) at 157 nm. We discuss the onset of ablation, the mechanisms leading to ablation, and the role of stress relaxation of the polymer matrix during ablation. Laser induced heating and chemical decomposition of the polymer substrate are considered as ablation pathways. It is shown that heating the substrate can set off ablation via mechanical failure of the material only for very short laser pulses. For longer pulses, the mechanism of ejection is thermally driven limited by the critical number of bonds broken in the substrate. Alternatively, if the photon energy goes towards direct bond breaking, it initiates chemical reactions, polymer unzipping, and formation of gaseous products, leading to a nearly complete decomposition of the top layers of substrates. The ejection of small molecules has a hollowing out effect on the weakly connected substrates which can lead to lift-off of larger chunks. Excessive pressure buildup upon the creation of gaseous molecules does not lead to enhanced yield. The larger clusters are thermally ejected, and an entrainment of larger polymer fragments in gaseous molecules is not observed.

  2. Laser-based standoff detection of surface-bound explosive chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, David L.; Smith, Gregory P.; Oser, Harald

    2010-04-01

    Avoiding or minimizing potential damage from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) such as suicide, roadside, or vehicle bombs requires that the explosive device be detected and neutralized outside its effective blast radius. Only a few seconds may be available to both identify the device as hazardous and implement a response. As discussed in a study by the National Research Council, current technology is still far from capable of meeting these objectives. Conventional nitrocarbon explosive chemicals have very low vapor pressures, and any vapors are easily dispersed in air. Many pointdetection approaches rely on collecting trace solid residues from dust particles or surfaces. Practical approaches for standoff detection are yet to be developed. For the past 5 years, SRI International has been working toward development of a novel scheme for standoff detection of explosive chemicals that uses infrared (IR) laser evaporation of surfacebound explosive followed by ultraviolet (UV) laser photofragmentation of the explosive chemical vapor, and then UV laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of nitric oxide. This method offers the potential of long standoff range (up to 100 m or more), high sensitivity (vaporized solid), simplicity (no spectrometer or library of reference spectra), and selectivity (only nitrocompounds).

  3. Ambient diode laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry of nonvolatile chemicals.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Schilling, Michael; Ahlmann, Norman; Michels, Antje; Hayen, Heiko; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F; Franzke, Joachim

    2013-03-19

    In this work, the combined use of desorption by a continuous wave near-infrared diode laser and ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge-based probe (laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry (LD-DBDI-MS)) is presented as an ambient ionization method for the mass spectrometric detection of nonvolatile chemicals on surfaces. A separation of desorption and ionization processes could be verified. The use of the diode laser is motivated by its low cost, ease of use, and small size. To achieve an efficient desorption, the glass substrates are coated at the back side with a black point (target point, where the sample is deposited) in order to absorb the energy offered by the diode laser radiation. Subsequent ionization is accomplished by a helium plasmajet generated in the dielectric barrier discharge source. Examples on the application of this approach are shown in both positive and negative ionization modes. A wide variety of multiclass species with low vapor pressure were tested including pesticides, pharmaceuticals and explosives (reserpine, roxithromycin, propazine, prochloraz, spinosad, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, enrofloxacin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, spinosad, cyclo-1,3,5,7-tetramethylene tetranitrate (HMX), and cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene trinitramine (RDX)). A comparative evaluation revealed that the use of the laser is advantageous, compared to just heating the substrate surface. PMID:23419061

  4. Toward the realization of a compact chemical sensor platform using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Marcus, Logan S.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2015-05-01

    The Army is investigating several spectroscopic techniques (e.g., infrared spectroscopy) that could allow for an adaptable sensor platform. Traditionally, chemical sensing platforms have been hampered by the opposing concerns of increasing sensor capability while maintaining a minimal package size. Current sensors, although reasonably sized, are geared to more classical chemical threats, and the ability to expand their capabilities to a broader range of emerging threats is uncertain. Recently, photoacoustic spectroscopy, employed in a sensor format, has shown enormous potential to address these ever-changing threats, while maintaining a compact sensor design. In order to realize the advantage of photoacoustic sensor miniaturization, light sources of comparable size are required. Recent research has employed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell designs. The continuous tuning capability of QCLs over a broad wavelength range in the mid-infrared spectral region greatly expands the number of compounds that can be identified. Results have demonstrated that utilizing a tunable QCL with a MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell produces favorable detection limits (ppb levels) for chemical targets (e.g., dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), vinyl acetate, 1,4-dioxane). Although our chemical sensing research has benefitted from the broad tuning capabilities of QCLs, the limitations of these sources must be considered. Current commercially available tunable systems are still expensive and obviously geared more toward laboratory operation, not fielding. Although the laser element itself is quite small, the packaging, power supply, and controller remain logistical burdens. Additionally, operational features such as continuous wave (CW) modulation and laser output powers while maintaining wide tunability are not yet ideal for a variety of sensing applications. In this paper, we will discuss our continuing evaluation of QCL technology as it matures

  5. On the possibility of simultaneous emission of an autonomous cw HF-DF chemical laser in two spectral ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkin, A S; Gurov, L V; Katorgin, B I; Petrova, S N; Polinovsky, D V

    2008-05-31

    The efficiencies of different fuel compositions used in the combustion chamber of an autonomous cw chemical HF-DF laser for obtaining high specific energy parameters during simultaneous lasing in HF and DF molecules in two spectral ranges are theoretically analysed. It is shown that mirrors with the reflectance above 99% in these spectral ranges can be manufactured in principle. (lasers)

  6. Effect of surface topography in the generation of chemical maps by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Quintas, I.; Piñon, V.; Mateo, M. P.; Nicolas, G.

    2012-09-01

    The development of technologically advanced materials is propelling the improvement of surface analytical techniques. In particular, the composition and hence the properties of most of these new materials are spatial dependent. Between the techniques able to provide chemical spatial information, laser-induced plasma spectroscopy known also as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a very promising analytical technique. During the last decade, LIBS was successfully applied to the analysis of surfaces and the generation of chemical maps of heterogeneous materials. In the LIBS analysis, several experimental factors including surface topography must be taken into account. In this work, the influence of surface roughness in LIBS signal during the point analysis and acquisition of chemical maps was studied. For this purpose, samples of stainless steel with different surface finishes were prepared and analyzed by LIBS. In order to characterize the different surfaces, confocal microscopy images were obtained. Afterwards, both topographic and spectroscopic information were combined to show the relationship between them. Additionally, in order to reveal the effect of surface topography in the acquisition of chemical maps, a three dimensional analysis of a sample exhibiting two different finishes was carried out.

  7. Photo-vibrational spectroscopy of solid and liquid chemicals using laser Doppler vibrometer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi; Lim, Jacob Song Kiat; Liu, Huan; Fu, Yu

    2016-08-22

    Photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy is an established technique for trace detection of chemicals and explosives. However, prior sample preparation is required and the analysis is conducted in a sealed space with a high-sensitivity microphone or a piezo sensor coupled with a lock-in amplifier, limiting the technique to applications in a laboratory environment. Due to the aforementioned requirements, traditionally this technique may not be suitable for defense and security applications where the detection of explosives or hazardous chemicals is required in an open environment at a safe standoff distance. In this study, chemicals in various forms (membrane, powder and liquid) were excited by an intensity-modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL), while a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer was applied to detect the vibration signal resulting from the photocoustic/photothermal effect. The photo-vibrational spectrum obtained by scanning the QCL's wavelength in MIR range, coincides well with the corresponding spectrum obtained using typical FTIR equipment. The experiment demonstrated that the LDV is a capable sensor for applications in photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy, with potential to enable the detection of chemicals in open environment at safe standoff distance. PMID:27557194

  8. Sensing signatures mediated by chemical structure of molecular solids in laser-induced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2015-03-01

    Laser ablation of organic compounds has been investigated for almost 30 years now, either in the framework of pulse laser deposition for the assembling of new materials or in the context of chemical sensing. Various monitoring techniques such as atomic and molecular fluorescence, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and optical emission spectroscopy have been used for plasma diagnostics in an attempt to understand the spectral signature and potential origin of gas-phase ions and fragments from organic plasmas. Photochemical and photophysical processes occurring within these systems are generally much more complex than those suggested by observation of optical emission features. Together with laser ablation parameters, the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules seem to be closely tied to the observed phenomena. The present manuscript, for the first time, discusses the role of molecular structure in the optical emission of organic plasmas. Factors altering the electronic distribution within the organic molecule have been found to have a direct impact on its ensuing optical emissions. The electron structure of an organic molecule, resulting from the presence, nature, and position of its atoms, governs the breakage of the molecule and, as a result, determines the extent of atomization and fragmentation that has proved to directly impact the emissions of CN radicals and C2 dimers. Particular properties of the molecule respond more positively depending on the laser irradiation wavelength, thereby redirecting the ablation process through photochemical or photothermal decomposition pathways. It is of paramount significance for chemical identification purposes how, despite the large energy stored and dissipated by the plasma and the considerable number of transient species formed, the emissions observed never lose sight of the original molecule. PMID:25668318

  9. Laser and chemical surface modifications of titanium grade 2 for medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwaśniak, P.; Pura, J.; Zwolińska, M.; Wieciński, P.; Skarżyński, H.; Olszewski, L.; Marczak, J.; Garbacz, H.; Kurzydłowski, K. J.

    2015-05-01

    The article presents combined, chemical and physical approach to titanium surface functionalization designed for biomedical applications. The topography modification has been obtained by employing the double laser beam interference technique and chemical etching. In the outcome, clean and smooth Ti surface as well as periodic striated topography with the roughness range from nano- to micrometers were created. The obtained structures were characterized in terms of shape, roughness, chemical composition, mechanical properties and microstructures. In order to achieve all information, numerous of research methods have been used: scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical profilometry and microhardness measurements. Demonstrated methodology can be used as an effective tool for manufacturing controlled surface structures improving the bone-implants interactions.

  10. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  11. A Model for Incorporating Chemical Reactions in Mesoscale Modeling of Laser Ablation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Barbara J.; Yingling, Yaroslava G.

    2004-03-01

    We have developed a methodology for including effects of chemical reactions in coarse-grained computer simulations such as those that use the united atom or bead and spring approximations. The new coarse-grained chemical reaction model (CGCRM) adopts the philosophy of kinetic Monte Carlo approaches and includes a probabilistic element to predicting when reactions occur, thus obviating the need for a chemically correct interaction potential. The CGCRM uses known chemical reactions along with their probabilities and exothermicities for a specific material in order to assess the effect of chemical reactions on a physical process of interest. The reaction event in the simulation is implemented by removing the reactant molecules from the simulation and replacing them with product molecules. The position of the product molecules is carefully adjusted to make sure that the total energy change of the system corresponds to the reaction exothermicity. The CGCR model was initially implemented in simulations of laser irradiation at fluences such that there is ablation or massive removal of material. The initial reaction is photon cleavage of a chemical bond thus creating two radicals that can undergo subsequent abstraction and radical-radical recombination reactions. The talk will discuss application of the model to photoablation of PMMA. Y. G. Yingling, L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, J. Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, 145, 173-181 (2001); Y. G. Yingling and B. J. Garrison, Chem. Phys. Lett., 364, 237-243 (2002).

  12. Chemical reactions at metallic and metal/semiconductor interfaces stimulated by pulsed laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, E. J.; Caudano, R.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer Al/Sb thin films have been evaporated on GaSb single crystals in ultra-high vacuum and pulsed-laser irradiated in-situ above the energy density threshold for surface melting. Superficial and interfacial chemical reactions have been characterized in-situ by Auger electron spectroscopy; and later, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiling, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical reaction between the Al and Sb films is considered as a model reaction for laser-assisted synthesis of high-purity intermetallic compounds. The observation of a strong interfacial reaction between the melted film and the substrate is also a subject of great concern for optical data recording and laser alloying of ohmic contacts on semiconductors. We show that a suitable choice of the substrate and adding a low surface tension element into the metallic film can improve its stability during melting, and prevent inhomogeneous reaction and formation of holes, cracks and particles. Finally, other solutions are suggested to improve the control of these reactions.

  13. Estimation of risks by chemicals produced during laser pyrolysis of tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Lothar W.; Spleiss, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Use of laser systems in minimal invasive surgery results in formation of laser aerosol with volatile organic compounds of possible health risk. By use of currently identified chemical substances an overview on possibly associated risks to human health is given. The class of the different identified alkylnitriles seem to be a laser specific toxicological problem. Other groups of chemicals belong to the Maillard reaction type, the fatty acid pyrolysis type, or even the thermally activated chemolysis. In relation to the available different threshold limit values the possible exposure ranges of identified substances are discussed. A rough estimation results in an exposure range of less than 1/100 for almost all substances with given human threshold limit values without regard of possible interactions. For most identified alkylnitriles, alkenes, and heterocycles no threshold limit values are given for lack of, until now, practical purposes. Pyrolysis of anaesthetized organs with isoflurane gave no hints for additional pyrolysis products by fragment interactions with resulting VOCs. Measurements of pyrolysis gases resulted in detection of small amounts of NO additionally with NO2 formation at plasma status.

  14. Laser studies of chemical dynamics at the gas-solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanagh, Richard R.; King, David S.

    The DOE funded research program Laser Studies of Chemical Dynamics at the Gas-Solid Interface has taken a detailed, microscopic view of molecules desorbed from surfaces in order to gain an understanding of energy flow and interaction potentials and how these control chemical reactivity at interfaces. Successful completion of these experiments required technical expertise both in surface science and laser-based molecular dynamics, a collaborative situation that exists in the NIST center for Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. During the three year period covered by this progress report, our goal was to use state-resolved techniques to examine a single chemisorption system in detail, and to observe how changes in the interaction potential or method of surface excitation are manifest in the desorption dynamics. The system chosen was NO/Pt(111). Studies were undertaken in which the effects on the NO-Pt interaction potential of coadsorbates--both weakly (CO) and strongly (NH(sub 3)) interacting-- could be examined. In addition, attempts were to be made to study non- equilibrium dynamics by using pulsed laser heating.

  15. Chemical reactions of excited nitrogen atoms for short wavelength chemical lasers. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-15

    Accomplishments of this program include the following: (1) Scalable, chemical generation of oxygen atoms by reaction of fluorine atoms and water vapor. (2) Production of nitrogen atom densities of 1 {times} 10{sup 1}5 cm{sup {minus}3} with 5% electrical efficiency by injecting trace amounts of fluorine into microwave discharged nitrogen. (3) Production of cyanide radicals by reaction of high densities of N atoms with cyanogen. (4) Production of carbon atoms by reaction of nitrogen atoms with cyanogen or with fluorine atoms and hydrogen cyanide. (5) Confirmation that the reaction of carbon atoms and carbonyl sulfide produces CS(a{sup 3} {Pi}{sub r}), as predicted by conservation of electron spin and orbital angular momenta and as proposed by others under another SWCL program. (6) Production of cyanide radicals by injection of cyanogen halides into active nitrogen and use as spectroscopic calibration source. (7) Demonstration that sodium atoms react with cyanogen chloride, bromide and iodide and with cyanuric trifluoride to produce cyanide radicals. (8) Demonstration of the potential utility of the fluorine atom plus ammonia reaction system in the production of NF(b{sup l}{Sigma}{sup +}) via N({sup 2}D) + F{sub 2}.

  16. Laser induced and controlled chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Anton; Strydom, Christien A; Uys, Hermann; Botha, Lourens R

    2011-11-28

    Bimolecular chemical reaction control of gaseous CO and H(2) at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, without any catalyst, using shaped femtosecond laser pulses is presented. High intensity laser radiation applied to a reaction cell facilitates non-resonant bond breakage and the formation of a range of ions, which can then react to form new products. Stable reaction products are measured after irradiation of a reaction cell, using time of flight mass spectroscopy. Bond formation of C-O, C-C, and C-H bonds is demonstrated as CO(2)(+), C(2)H(2)(+), CH(+), and CH(3)(+) were observed in the time of flight mass spectrum of the product gas, analyzed after irradiation. The formation of CO(2) is shown to be dependent on laser intensity, irradiation time, and on the presence of H(2) in the reaction cell. Using negatively chirped laser pulses more C-O bond formation takes place as compared to more C-C bond formation for unchirped pulses. PMID:22128931

  17. Laser induced and controlled chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Plessis, Anton; Strydom, Christien A.; Uys, Hermann; Botha, Lourens R.

    2011-11-01

    Bimolecular chemical reaction control of gaseous CO and H2 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, without any catalyst, using shaped femtosecond laser pulses is presented. High intensity laser radiation applied to a reaction cell facilitates non-resonant bond breakage and the formation of a range of ions, which can then react to form new products. Stable reaction products are measured after irradiation of a reaction cell, using time of flight mass spectroscopy. Bond formation of C-O, C-C, and C-H bonds is demonstrated as CO2+, C2H2+, CH+, and CH3+ were observed in the time of flight mass spectrum of the product gas, analyzed after irradiation. The formation of CO2 is shown to be dependent on laser intensity, irradiation time, and on the presence of H2 in the reaction cell. Using negatively chirped laser pulses more C-O bond formation takes place as compared to more C-C bond formation for unchirped pulses.

  18. Latest developments toward the demonstration of a KW-class EOIL laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alan E.

    2008-05-01

    The electric oxygen iodine laser (EOIL) offers a vastly more practical, implementable, and safer alternative to its predecessor, the chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL), particularly for airborne or other mobile military applications. Despite its promise and after 25 years effort, numerous laboratories around the world have not succeeded in providing the known basic physical requirements needed to electrically convert O2 into O2(a1Δ) with the fractional yields and efficiencies needed to make a practical laser. Hence, as of this date, the world record power generated from an EOIL device is only 6.5 watts. In this paper, a 30% conversion from O2 into O2(a1Δ) operating at substantial oxygen mass flow rates (0.090 moles O2/sec at 50 torr) and 40% electrical efficiency is reported. The O2(a1Δ) flow stream being produced carries 2400 watts. Gain measurements are currently in progress, to be followed shortly by power extraction. Current conditions imply that initial power extraction could push beyond 1 KW. Efforts to date have failed to generate substantial laser power because critical criteria have not been met. In order to achieve good O2(a1Δ) fractional yield, it is normally mandatory to impart on the order of 100 KJ/mole O2 while efficiently removing the waste heat energy from the generator so that less than a few hundred degrees Kelvin rise occurs due to gas heating. The generator must be excited by an electric field on the order of 10 Td. This is far below glow potential; hence, a fully externally sustained plasma generation technique is required. Ionization is supplied by means of applying short (tens of nanosecond) pulses to the O2(a1Δ) generator at 50,000 PPS, which are on the order of ten times breakdown potential. This enables a quasi-steady adjustable DC current to flow through the generator, being conducted by application of a DC, 10 to 14 Td pump E-field. This field is independently tunable. The result is that up to 180 KJ/mole O2 gets imparted to the

  19. IR and UV laser-induced chemical vapor deposition: Chemical mechanism for a-Si:H and Cr (O,C) film formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    The characteristic features of laser-induced chemical vapor deposition in the parallel and perpendicular laser beam/surface configurations are discussed. Low temperature chemical processing with directed and spatially localized energy deposition in the system is investigated. Results obtained for the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films in the parallel configuration employing CO 2 and KrFlasers and SiH 4 and Si 2H 6 as precursors are presented. As a second example, the growth of oxygen- and carbon-containing chromium films Cr(O,C) from chromium hexacarbonyl as the precursor using cw and pulse uv lasers is discussed. The chemical pathways leasing to film formation are investigated in detail.

  20. Study on the surface chemical properties of UV excimer laser irradiated polyamide by XPS, ToF-SIMS and CFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Joanne; Chan, Kwong; Sin, Kwan Moon; Lau, Kai Shui

    2003-01-01

    Polyamide (nylon 6) was irradiated by a pulsed ultraviolet (UV) excimer laser with a fluence below its ablation threshold. Chemical modifications on laser treated nylon were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (Tof-SIMS) and chemical force microscopy (CFM). XPS study provides information about changes in chemical composition and the chemical-state of atom types on the fiber surface. The high sensitivity of ToF-SIMS to the topmost layers was used to detect crosslinking after the laser treatment. Gold-coated AFM tips modified with COOH terminated self-assembled alkanethiol monolayers (SAMs) were used to measure adhesion forces on the untreated and laser treated samples. XPS results revealed that the irradiated samples have higher oxygen content than prior to laser irradiation. Tof-SIMS analysis illustrated that carbonyl groups in nylon 6 decrease significantly but hydroxyl groups increase after low-fluence laser irradiation. The adhesion force measurements by CFM showed spatial distribution of hydroxyl groups on nylon 6 after the laser treatment.

  1. Laser nanolithography and chemical metalization for the manufacturing of 3D metallic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonavičius, Tomas; RekštytÄ--, Sima; Žukauskas, Albertas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2014-03-01

    We present a developed method based on direct laser writing (DLW) and chemical metallization (CM) for microfabrication of three-dimensional (3D) metallic structures. Such approach enables manufacturing of free­-form electro conductive interconnects which can be used in integrated electric circuits such micro-opto-electro mechanical systems (MOEMS). The proposed technique employing ultrafast high repetition rate laser enables efficient fabrication of 3D microstructures on dielectric as well as conductive substrates. The produced polymer links out of organic-inorganic composite matrix after CM serve as interconnects of separate metallic contacts, their dimensions are: height 15μm, width 5μm, length 35-45 μm and could provide 300 nΩm resistivity measured in a macroscopic way. This proves the techniques potential for creating integrated 3D electric circuits at microscale.

  2. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-03-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  3. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-05-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  4. Chemical speciation in laser-desorption and impact-induced vapor in minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, A. H.; Dundas, C. M.; Ahrens, T. J.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2002-12-01

    Knowledge of the chemical species in vapors produced by hypervelocity impact on spacecraft impact detectors as well as planetary surfaces have applications ranging from determination of the composition of cosmic dust to the effects on atmospheres and climates of large impactors. Direct study of resulting atomic, molecular and ionic species is best accomplished via mass spectrometry. Pulsed laser desorption can be used to approximate small impacts on solid surfaces. We conducted pulsed laser desorption-ionization experiments using two different instruments: (1) a Caltech-built Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TOFMS) similar to that on board the Cassini spacecraft and (2) a commercial Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization TOFMS made by Applied Biosystems (Model, Voyager-DE Pro). Minerals included in this study were calcite, dolomite, gypsum, anhydrite, olivine, kamacite, brucite, serpentine, and pyrrhotite. We collected only positive ions. A nitrogen laser (337 nm wavelength, 4 μsec pulse width, and 300 mJ) with power density ranging from 1.0x107 to 1.3x109 W/cm2 induced vaporization and ionization. The results can be summarized as: (1) from kamacite and pyrrhotite, only 54Fe+, 56Fe+, 57Fe+ (both kamacite and pyrrhotite) and 58Ni+, 60Ni+ (kamacite only) as well as contamination ions such as 23Na+ and 39K+, 41K+were observed; (2) Ca-containing minerals (calcite, dolomite, gypsum and anhydrite) produced vapors containing 40Ca+ ions, and, at higher laser power, both 40Ca+ as well as CaO+ ions; (3) Mg-containing minerals (dolomite, olivine, brucite and serpentine) produced vapors containing MgO+ ion; (4) for all hydrous minerals, neither H+ nor H3O+ were observed in the vapor; (5) in the vapors of silicate minerals (olivine and serpentine), SiO+ was observed only from serpentine but not from olivine.

  5. Supersonic jet/multiphoton ionization spectrometry of chemical species resulting from thermal decomposition and laser ablation of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozumi, Masami; Murata, Yoshiaki; Cheng-Huang Lin, Imasaka, Totaro

    1995-04-01

    The chemical species resulting from thermal decomposition and laser ablation of polymers are measured by excitation/fluorescence and multiphoton ionization/mass spectrometries after supersonic jet expansion for rotational cooling to simply the optical spectrum. The signal of minor chemical species occurred is strongly enhanced by resonant excitation and multiphoton ionization, and even the isomer can be clearly differentiated. For example, p-cresol occurred by thermal decomposition of polycarbonate is detected selectively by mass-selected resonant multiphoton ionization spectrometry. Various chemical species occurred by laser ablation of even a polystyrene foam are also measured by this technique.

  6. Diesel combustion: an integrated view combining laser diagnostics, chemical kinetics, and empirical validation

    SciTech Connect

    Akinyami, O C; Dec, J E; Durrett, R P; Flynn, P F; Hunter, G L; Loye, A O; Westbrook, C

    1999-02-01

    This paper proposes a structure for the diesel combustion process based on a combination of previously published and new results. Processes are analyzed with proven chemical kinetic models and validated with data from production-like direct injection diesel engines. The analysis provides new insight into the ignition and particulate formation processes, which combined with laser diagnostics, delineates the two-stage nature of combustion in diesel engines. Data are presented to quantify events occurring during the ignition and initial combustion processes that form soot precursors. A framework is also proposed for understanding the heat release and emission formation processes.

  7. Schottky diodes and ohmic contacts formed by thermally assisted photolytic laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braichotte, D.; van den Bergh, H.

    Thermally assisted photolytic laser chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of platinum on n-doped gallium arsenide, a two-phase hybrid scheme for the production of Schottky diodes, is discussed. The low temperature photolytic deposits of the initial slow phase contain a nonnegligible fraction of organic ligand material and tend to be amorphous. In the second phase, light absorption of the photolytically deposited metal causes a temperature rise which facilitates the removal of ligand material from the deposit, and which is sufficient for fast pyrolytic LCVD. Measurements of the influence of light intensity, in addition to metalorganic and inert gas pressure, on the deposition rates in both phases are obtained.

  8. Fabrication of highly ultramicroporous carbon nanofoams by SF6-catalyzed laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Shuhara, Ai; Kondo, Atsushi; Utsumi, Shigenori; Tanaka, Hideki; Ohba, Tomonori; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Kunimitsu; Vallejos-Burgos, Fernando; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) method for preparing nanocarbons with the aid of SF6. This method would offer advantages for the production of aggregates of nanoscale foams (nanofoams) at high rates. Pyrolysis of the as-grown nanofoams induced the high surface area (1120 m2 g-1) and significantly enhanced the adsorption of supercritical H2 (16.6 mg g-1 at 77 K and 0.1 MPa). We also showed that the pyrolized nanofoams have highly ultramicroporous structures. The pyrolized nanofoams would be superior to highly microporous nanocarbons for the adsorption of supercritical gases.

  9. Initiation with an electron beam of chemical reactions of interest for visible wavelength lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittier, J. S.; Cool, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of the first results obtained with a new shock tube-electron beam facility designed to provide a versatile means for the systematic search for laser operation among several candidate metal atom-oxidizer systems. According to the current experimental approach, metal atoms are obtained in the vapor phase by the dissociation of metal compounds. A shock tube is employed to provide a short duration flow through an array of 29 supersonic flow-mixing nozzles. A high energy electron accelerator is used for the rapid initiation of chemical reaction in a mixed flow of encapsulated metal and oxidizer.

  10. Nonequilibrium population of the first vibrational level of O{sub 2}({sup 1{Sigma}}) molecules in O{sub 2} - O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) - H{sub 2}O gas flow at the output of chemical singlet-oxygen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Zagidullin, M V

    2010-11-13

    The concentrations of electron-excited particles have been determined by measuring the absolute spectral irradiance in the range of 600 - 800 nm of O{sub 2} - O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) - H{sub 2}O gas mixture at the output of a chemical singlet-oxygen generator (SOG). A nonequilibrium population of the first vibrational level of O{sub 2}({sup 1{Sigma}}) molecules has been clearly observed and found to depend on the water vapour content. In correspondence with the results of these measurements and according to the analysis of kinetics processes in the O{sub 2} - O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) - H{sub 2}O mixture, the maximum number of vibrational quanta generated in the O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) + O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) {yields} O{sub 2}({sup 1{Sigma}}) + O{sub 2}({sup 3{Sigma}}) reaction is 0.05 {+-} 0.03. It is concluded that the vibrational population of O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) at the output of the SOG used in a chemical oxygen-iodine laser is close to thermal equilibrium value. (active media)

  11. All-in-fiber optofluidic sensor fabricated by femtosecond laser assisted chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lei; Huang, Jie; Lan, Xinwei; Wang, Hanzheng; Jiang, Lan; Xiao, Hai

    2014-04-15

    An all-in-fiber prototype optofluidic device was fabricated by femtosecond laser irradiation and subsequent selective chemical wet etching. Horizontal and vertical microchannels can be flexibly created into an optical fiber to form a fluidic cavity with inlets/outlets. The fluidic cavity also functions as an optical Fabry-Perot cavity in which the filled liquid can be probed. The assembly-free microdevice exhibited a fringe visibility of 20 dB and was demonstrated for measurement of the refractive index of the filling liquids. The proposed all-in-fiber optofluidic micro device is attractive for chemical and biomedical sensing because it is flexible in design, simple to fabricate, mechanically robust, and miniaturized in size. PMID:24978992

  12. Laser-based mass spectrometry for in situ chemical composition analysis of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Samira; Neuland, Maike B.; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in space research. The chemical composition of planetary surface material is a key scientific question on every space mission to a planet, moon or asteroid. Chemical composition measurements of rocky material on the surface are of great importance to understand the origin and evolution of the planetary body.[1] A miniature laser ablation/ionisation reflectron- type time-of-flight mass spectrometer (instrument name LMS) was designed and built at the University of Bern for planetary research.[2] Despite its small size and light weight, the LMS instrument still maintains the same capabilities as large laboratory systems, which makes it suitable for its application on planetary space missions.[3-5] The high dynamic range of about eight orders of magnitude, high lateral (μm-level) and vertical (sub-nm level) resolution and high detection sensitivity for almost all elements (10 ppb, atomic fraction) make LMS a versatile instrument for various applications. LMS is a suitable instrument for in situ measurements of elemental and isotope composition with high precision and accuracy. Measurements of Pb- isotope abundances can be used for dating of planetary material. Measurements of bio-relevant elements allow searching for past or present life on a planetary surface. The high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction, is of considerable interest, e.g. for analysis of inhomogeneous, extraterrestrial samples as well as weathering processes of planetary material. References [1] P. Wurz, D. Abplanalp, M. Tulej, M. Iakovleva, V.A. Fernandes, A. Chumikov, and G. Managadze, "Mass Spectrometric Analysis in Planetary Science: Investigation of the Surface and the Atmosphere", Sol. Sys. Res., 2012, 46, 408. [2] U. Rohner, J.A. Whitby, P. Wurz, "A miniature laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer for in situ planetary exploration" Meas. Sci. Tch., 2003, 14, 2159. [3] M. Tulej, A. Riedo, M.B. Neuland, S

  13. Chemical models for simulating single-walled nanotube production in arc vaporization and laser ablation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical kinetic models for the nucleation and growth of clusters and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) growth are developed for numerical simulations of the production of SWNTs. Two models that involve evaporation and condensation of carbon and metal catalysts, a full model involving all carbon clusters up to C80, and a reduced model are discussed. The full model is based on a fullerene model, but nickel and carbon/nickel cluster reactions are added to form SWNTs from soot and fullerenes. The full model has a large number of species--so large that to incorporate them into a flow field computation for simulating laser ablation and arc processes requires that they be simplified. The model is reduced by defining large clusters that represent many various sized clusters. Comparisons are given between these models for cases that may be applicable to arc and laser ablation production. Solutions to the system of chemical rate equations of these models for a ramped temperature profile show that production of various species, including SWNTs, agree to within about 50% for a fast ramp, and within 10% for a slower temperature decay time.

  14. Noninvasive Facial Rejuvenation. Part 3: Physician-Directed-Lasers, Chemical Peels, and Other Noninvasive Modalities.

    PubMed

    Meaike, Jesse D; Agrawal, Nikhil; Chang, Daniel; Lee, Edward I; Nigro, Marjory G

    2016-08-01

    A proper knowledge of noninvasive facial rejuvenation is integral to the practice of a cosmetic surgeon. Noninvasive facial rejuvenation can be divided into patient- versus physician-directed modalities. Patient-directed facial rejuvenation combines the use of facial products such as sunscreen, moisturizers, retinoids, α-hydroxy acids, and various antioxidants to both maintain youthful skin and rejuvenate damaged skin. Physicians may recommend and often prescribe certain products, but patients are in control with this type of facial rejuvenation. On the other hand, physician-directed facial rejuvenation entails modalities that require direct physician involvement, such as neuromodulators, filler injections, laser resurfacing, microdermabrasion, and chemical peels. With the successful integration of each of these modalities, a complete facial regimen can be established and patient satisfaction can be maximized. This article is the last in a three-part series describing noninvasive facial rejuvenation. Here the authors review the mechanism, indications, and possible complications of lasers, chemical peels, and other commonly used noninvasive modalities. PMID:27478423

  15. Chemical and explosive detection with long-wave infrared laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Yang, Clayton S.; Brown, Ei E.; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe H.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Conventional laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) mostly uses silicon-based detectors and measures the atomic emission in the UV-Vis-NIR (UVN) region of the spectrum. It can be used to detect the elements in the sample under test, such as the presence of lead in the solder for electronics during RoHS compliance verification. This wavelength region, however, does not provide sufficient information on the bonding between the elements, because the molecular vibration modes emit at longer wavelength region. Measuring long-wave infrared spectrum (LWIR) in a LIBS setup can instead reveal molecular composition of the sample, which is the information sought in applications including chemical and explosive detection and identification. This paper will present the work and results from the collaboration of several institutions to develop the methods of LWIR LIBS for chemical/explosive/pharmaceutical material detection/identification, such as DMMP and RDX, as fast as using a single excitation laser pulse. In our latest LIBS setup, both UVN and LWIR spectra can be collected at the same time, allowing more accurate detection and identification of materials.

  16. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  17. Bioactive Ti metal analogous to human cancellous bone: Fabrication by selective laser melting and chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Deepak K; Fukuda, A; Matsushita, T; Takemoto, M; Fujibayashi, S; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    2011-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a useful technique for preparing three-dimensional porous bodies with complicated internal structures directly from titanium (Ti) powders without any intermediate processing steps, with the products being expected to be useful as a bone substitute. In this study the necessary SLM processing conditions to obtain a dense product, such as the laser power, scanning speed, and hatching pattern, were investigated using a Ti powder of less than 45 μm particle size. The results show that a fully dense plate thinner than 1.8 mm was obtained when the laser power to scanning speed ratio was greater than 0.5 and the hatch spacing was less than the laser diameter, with a 30 μm thick powder layer. Porous Ti metals with structures analogous to human cancellous bone were fabricated and the compressive strength measured. The compressive strength was in the range 35-120 MPa when the porosity was in the range 75-55%. Porous Ti metals fabricated by SLM were heat-treated at 1300 °C for 1h in an argon gas atmosphere to smooth the surface. Such prepared specimens were subjected to NaOH, HCl, and heat treatment to provide bioactivity. Field emission scanning electron micrographs showed that fine networks of titanium oxide were formed over the whole surface of the porous body. These treated porous bodies formed bone-like apatite on their surfaces in a simulated body fluid within 3 days. In vivo studies showed that new bone penetrated into the pores and directly bonded to the walls within 12 weeks after implantation into the femur of Japanese white rabbits. The percentage bone affinity indices of the chemical- and heat-treated porous bodies were significantly higher than that of untreated implants. PMID:20883832

  18. Chemical-Assisted Femtosecond Laser Writing of Lab-in-Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Moez

    fringe contrast and peak resolution beyond that available with FPIs and offer a significant theoretical improvement in refractometer sensitivity. The advanced laser processes optimized here may provide a new base for photonics, microfluidics, and optofluidics fabrication in a LIF platform with multiplexed functionality and rapid prototyping capabilities of fully integrable 3D optofluidic systems. The proposed LIF devices define new micro-systems for temperature, strain, pressure, refractive index, and bend strain sensing that may find application in the acoustic, aerospace, automotive, biological, chemical, civil, or medical fields.

  19. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  20. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  1. Morphology and chemical composition analysis on multi-pulsed CO2 laser ablation of HgCdTe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei; Guo, Jin; Shao, Jun-feng; Wang, Ting-feng

    2013-09-01

    In order to study deeply damage mechanism of HgCdTe crystal irradiated by multi-pulsed CO2 laser and obtain the characteristics of surface morphological and chemical composition changes. Firstly, Irradiation effect experiment is conducted on the Hg0.826Cd0.174Te crystal by pulsed CO2 laser, which has a pulse width of 200ns and repetition frequency ranges from 1 Hz to 100 kHz. Then morphological and chemical composition changes of Hg0.826Cd0.174Te crystal is measured by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and damage threshold is obtained by morphology method. Finally, the impact of laser power density on morphological and chemical composition changes is analyzed. The research results show that: damage threshold of Hg0.826Cd0.174Te crystal which is irradiated by multi-pulsed CO2 laser is 950 W/cm2. The crystal surface melting phenomenon is very obvious, the obvious crack which is caused by thermal stress is not found in the surface, and a large number of bulges and pits are taken shape in the laser ablation zone. Chemical composition changes of the crystal are obvious, and a lot of O element is found in the laser ablation zone. With the increase of laser irradiation power, the content of Hg element decrease rapidly, the content of Cd, Te and O element raise by degrees, and chemical composition changes of the crystal are more and more obvious. When the irradiation power density is 1.8kW/cm2, the surface becomes smooth in the ablation zone due to the impact of laser impulse force, and the content of the chemical compositions is that Hg accounts for 0.23%, Cd accounts for 21.38%, Te accounts for 26.27%, and O accounts for 52.12%. The conclusions of the study have a reference value for the Hg0.826Cd0.174Tecrystal in the application of making infrared detector and pulsed CO2 laser in the aspect of laser processing.

  2. High rate, large area laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition of nickel from nickel carbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paserin, Vlad

    High-power diode lasers (HPDL) are being increasingly used in industrial applications. Deposition of nickel from nickel carbonyl (Ni(CO)4 ) precursor by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied with emphasis on achieving high deposition rates. An HPDL system was used to provide a novel energy source facilitating a simple and compact design of the energy delivery system. Nickel deposits on complex, 3-dimensional polyurethane foam substrates were prepared and characterized. The resulting "nickel foam" represents a novel material of high porosity (>95% by volume) finding uses, among others, in the production of rechargeable battery and fuel cell electrodes and as a specialty high-temperature filtration medium. Deposition rates up to ˜19 mum/min were achieved by optimizing the gas precursor flow pattern and energy delivery to the substrate surface using a 480W diode laser. Factors affecting the transition from purely heterogeneous decomposition to a combined hetero- and homogeneous decomposition of nickel carbonyl were studied. High quality, uniform 3-D deposits produced at a rate more than ten times higher than in commercial processes were obtained by careful balance of mass transport (gas flow) and energy delivery (laser power). Cross-flow of the gases through the porous substrate was found to be essential in facilitating mass transport and for obtaining uniform deposits at high rates. When controlling the process in a transient regime (near the onset of homogenous decomposition), unique morphology features formed as part of the deposits, including textured surface with pyramid-shape crystallites, spherical and non-spherical particles and filaments. Operating the laser in a pulsed mode produced smooth, nano-crystalline deposits with sub-100 nm grains. The effect of H2S, a commonly used additive in nickel carbonyl CVD, was studied using both polyurethane and nickel foam substrates. H2S was shown to improve the substrate coverage and deposit

  3. Examination of the laser-induced variations in the chemical etch rate of a photosensitive glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voges, Melanie; Beversdorff, Manfred; Willert, Chris; Krain, Hartmut

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have reported that the chemical etch rate of a commercial photosensitive glass ceramic (FoturanTM, Schott Corp., Germany) in dilute hydrofluoric acid is strongly dependent on the incident laser irradiance during patterning at λ=266 nm and λ=355 nm. To help elucidate the underlying chemical and physical processes associated with the laser-induced variations in the chemical etch rate, several complimentary techniques were employed at various stages of the UV laser exposure and thermal treatment. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to identify the crystalline phases that are formed in Foturan following laser irradiation and annealing, and monitor the crystalline content as a function of laser irradiance at λ=266 nm and λ=355 nm. The XRD results indicate the nucleation of lithium metasilicate (Li2SiO3) crystals as the exclusive phase following laser irradiation and thermal treatment at temperatures not exceeding 605 °C. The XRD studies also show that the Li2SiO3 density increases with increasing laser irradiance and saturates at high laser irradiance. For our thermal treatment protocol, the average Li2SiO3 crystal diameters are 117.0±10.0 nm and 91.2±5.8 nm for λ=266 nm and λ=355 nm, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was utilized to examine the microscopic structural features of the lithium metasilicate crystals. The TEM results reveal that the growth of lithium metasilicate crystals proceeds dendritically, and produces Li2SiO3 crystals that are ˜700 1000 nm in length for saturation exposures. Optical transmission spectroscopy (OTS) was used to study the growth of metallic silver clusters that act as nucleation sites for the Li2SiO3 crystalline phase. The OTS results show that the (Ag0)x cluster concentration has a dependence on incident laser irradiance that is similar to the etch rate ratios and Li2SiO3 concentration. A comparison between the XRD and optical transmission results and our prior etch rate

  4. In situ chemical imaging of lithiated tungsten using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong; Wu, Xingwei; Zhang, Chenfei; Ding, Hongbin; Hu, Jiansheng; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2014-09-01

    Lithium conditioning can significantly improve the plasma confinement of EAST tokamak by reducing the amount of hydrogen and impurities recycled from the wall, but the details of this mechanism and approaches that reduce the concentrations of hydrogen and impurities recycle still remain unclear. In this paper, we studied lithiated tungsten via a cascaded-arc plasma simulator. An in situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) diagnostic system has been developed to chemically image the three-dimensional distribution of lithium and impurities on the surface of lithiated tungsten co-deposition layer for the first time. The results indicate that lithium has a strong ability to draw hydrogen and oxygen. The impurity components from the co-deposition processes present more intensity on the surface of co-deposition layer. This work improves the understanding of lithiated tungsten mechanism and is useful for using LIBS as a wall-diagnostic technique for EAST.

  5. Gas phase versus surface contributions to photolytic laser chemical vapor deposition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braichotte, D.; van den Bergh, H.

    1988-04-01

    The rate of cw photolytic laser chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of platinum is measured for λ≈350 nm as a function of the light intensity and the metalorganic vapor pressure. The growth of the metal films is studied in situ and in real time by monitoring their optical transmission. At low intensities the transmitted light decreases monotonically with time, and the LCVD process is photolytic with its rate limiting step in the surface adlayer. At higher intensities we observe two distinct time domains: Relatively slow initial photolytic deposition with its rate limiting step in the gas phase, which is followed by much faster pyrolytic LCVD. An improved method for distinguishing between adlayer and gas-phase limiting processes is demonstrated. These observations are confirmed by studying the photolytic deposition rates while varying the thickness of the adlayer.

  6. Ar+ and CuBr laser-assisted chemical bleaching of teeth: estimation of whiteness degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, S.; Todorovska, Roumyana; Gizbrecht, Alexander I.; Raychev, L.; Petrov, Lyubomir P.

    2003-11-01

    In this work the results of adaptation of impartial methods for color determination aimed at developing of techniques for estimation of human teeth whiteness degree, sufficiently handy for common use in clinical practice are presented. For approbation and by the way of illustration of the techniques, standards of teeth colors were used as well as model and naturally discolored human teeth treated by two bleaching chemical compositions activated by three light sources each: Ar+ and CuBr lasers, and a standard halogen photopolymerization lamp. Typical reflection and fluorescence spectra of some samples are presented; the samples colors were estimated by a standard computer processing in RGB and B coordinates. The results of the applied spectral and colorimetric techniques are in a good agreement with those of the standard computer processing of the corresponding digital photographs and complies with the visually estimated degree of the teeth whiteness judged according to the standard reference scale commonly used in the aesthetic dentistry.

  7. Spherical silicon-shell photonic band gap structures fabricated by laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Yang, Z. Y.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-02-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition was applied in fabricating three-dimensional (3D) spherical-shell photonic band gap (PBG) structures by depositing silicon shells covering silica particles, which had been self-assembled into 3D colloidal crystals. The colloidal crystals of self-assembled silica particles were formed on silicon substrates using the isothermal heating evaporation approach. A continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (1064nm wavelength) was used to deposit silicon shells by thermally decomposing disilane gas. Periodic silicon-shell/silica-particle PBG structures were obtained. By removing the silica particles enclosed in the silicon shells using hydrofluoric acid, hollow spherical silicon-shell arrays were produced. This technique is capable of fabricating structures with complete photonic band gaps, which is predicted by simulations with the plane wave method. The techniques developed in this study have the potential to flexibly engineer the positions of the PBGs by varying both the silica particle size and the silicon-shell thickness. Ellipsometry was used to investigate the specific photonic band gaps for both structures.

  8. Theoretical analysis of dynamic chemical imaging with lasers using high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Van-Hoang Le; Anh-Thu Le; Xie Ruihua; Lin, C. D.

    2007-07-15

    We report theoretical investigations of the tomographic procedure suggested by Itatani et al. [Nature (London) 432, 867 (2004)] for reconstructing highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) using high-order harmonic generation (HHG). Due to the limited range of harmonics from the plateau region, we found that even under the most favorable assumptions, it is still very difficult to obtain accurate HOMO wave functions using the tomographic procedure, but the symmetry of the HOMOs and the internuclear separation between the atoms can be accurately extracted, especially when lasers of longer wavelengths are used to generate the HHG. Since the tomographic procedure relies on approximating the continuum wave functions in the recombination process by plane waves, the method can no longer be applied upon the improvement of the theory. For future chemical imaging with lasers, we suggest that one may want to focus on how to extract the positions of atoms in molecules instead, by developing an iterative method such that the theoretically calculated macroscopic HHG spectra can best fit the experimental HHG data.

  9. Probing Physical and Chemical Properties of Laser Shocked Materials using Ultrafast Dynamic Ellipsometry and Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Nhan

    2013-06-01

    Ultrafast laser techniques allow resolution of shock induced physics and chemistry picoseconds behind the shock front. In this presentation, the 350 ps sustained laser-generated shocks will be shown to combine with ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry to measure the shock state and transient absorption to measure the molecular electronic response to shock loading. Experimental data will be presented on shocked explosive crystals and liquids. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry was used to measure the shock and particle velocity as well as the shocked refractive index. Transient absorption spectra of RDX and simple molecular liquids in the spectral region from 440 to 780 nm were measured to map out shock reactivity during the first 350 ps, over shock stress states from 7 to 20 GPa. Additionally, nonlinear spectroscopic probes will be demonstrated to offer the potential to measure even more details of the molecular shock response, such as evolution of chemical species and vibrational temperature. Preliminary results of shocked phenylacetylene obtained using vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and the capability of femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (FSRS) data to measure the nonequilibrium time evolution of mode specific vibrational temperatures on picosecond time scales will be discussed.

  10. Chemical, morphological and chromatic behavior of mural paintings under Er:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striova, J.; Camaiti, M.; Castellucci, E. M.; Sansonetti, A.

    2011-08-01

    Several pigments (malachite CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, azurite 2CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, yellow ochre (goethite α-FeOOH, gypsum CaSO4ṡ2H2O), St. John's white CaCO3 formed from slaked lime) and respective mural paintings specimens were subjected to the free-running Er:YAG laser radiation in order to study their damage thresholds, in a broad range of laser fluences, both in dry and wet conditions. The specimens' damage thresholds were evaluated by spectroscopic methods, colorimetric measurements and microscopic observation. The pigments containing -OH groups were found to be more sensitive than St. John's white; hence the most sensitive paint layers in dry conditions are those containing malachite, azurite (both 1.3 J/cm2) and yellow ochre (2.5 J/cm2) as compared to the ones containing St. John's white (15.2 J/cm2). The presence of wetting agents (w.a.) attenuated the pigments chemical alteration. The damage thresholds of all the paint layers, in presence of w.a., were found to be around 2.5 J/cm2. The alteration was caused by thermo-mechanical damage and by binding medium ablation of a fresco and a secco prepared specimens, respectively.