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Sample records for chemical vapor infiltration

  1. Microwave assisted chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this program is to develop a new process for the fabrication of ceramic matrix composites by chemical vapor infiltration. This period has been devoted in part to the exploration of material systems suitable for MACVI processing. A number of potential processing schemes are possible using combinations of absorbing and transparent material as composite components. This includes the use of an absorbing preform (nicalon fiber) combined with a transparent matrix (silicon nitride). Composites 5 cm in diameter by 1 cm. thick have been fabricated to densities of 65% theoretical. Processing times for these materials are under 20 hours. Higher densities will require additional microwave power now possible with the new reactor. The most effective MACVI scheme will involve the use of a transparent fiber with an absorbing matrix. The hot spot will be initiated by appropriate treatment of the central region of the preform. To this end alumna fibers with pretreatments to control thermal gradients has been explored. Nextel 610 fibers have been effectively pretreated carbon coating resulting in preferential heating in the interior of the preform. Possible matrix materials include siliconized silicon carbide, doped silicon carbide, alumna and zirconia. A patent for MACVI has been issued 10/19/93.

  2. Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.; Barbero, R.S.

    1992-12-31

    Chemical vapor infiltration in carbon fiber bundles is studied under isothermal conditions over the temperature range 1000--1090 C at a nominal pressure of 300 Torr. Pyrolytic decomposition of methane is used in the infiltration experiments with carbon weight gain data obtained continuously from thermogravimetric analysis. The sensitivity of the infiltration dynamics to initial yarn porosity and to spatial variations in fiber positioning are explored. Results indicate that small changes in initial porosity can have significant impact on the weight gain above the solid phase percolation threshold.

  3. Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.; Barbero, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration in carbon fiber bundles is studied under isothermal conditions over the temperature range 1000--1090 C at a nominal pressure of 300 Torr. Pyrolytic decomposition of methane is used in the infiltration experiments with carbon weight gain data obtained continuously from thermogravimetric analysis. The sensitivity of the infiltration dynamics to initial yarn porosity and to spatial variations in fiber positioning are explored. Results indicate that small changes in initial porosity can have significant impact on the weight gain above the solid phase percolation threshold.

  4. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.

    1995-08-01

    A two-step forced chemical vapor infiltration process was developed that reduced infiltration times for 4.45 cm dia. by 1.27 cm thick Nicalon{sup +} fiber preforms by two thirds while maintaining final densities near 90 %. In the first stage of the process, micro-voids within fiber bundles in the cloth were uniformly infiltrated throughout the preform. In the second stage, the deposition rate was increased to more rapidly fill the macro-voids between bundles within the cloth and between layers of cloth. By varying the thermal gradient across the preform uniform infiltration rates were maintained and high final densities achieved.

  5. Chemical vapor infiltration of non-oxide ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites are enabling new, high temperature structural applications. Chemical vapor infiltration methods for producing these composites are being investigated, with the complexity of filament weaves and deposition chemistry merged with standard heat and mass transport relationships. Silicon carbide- based materials are, by far, the most mature, and are already being used in aerospace applications. This paper addresses the state-of-the-art of the technology and outlines current issues.

  6. Optimization of bundle infiltration in the forced chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.

    1995-10-01

    A two-step forced-flow, thermal-gradient, chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) was proposed to reduced processing time while maintaining uniformly high densities. GTCVI, a finite-volume computer code developed specifically for the FCVI process was used to model thermal gradient effects on processing time and density. An optimum thermal gradient was determined and used to process material with uniformly infiltrated bundles.

  7. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J.; Starr, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  8. Advances in modeling of chemical vapor infiltration for tube fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.

    1998-04-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) can be used for fabrication of tube-shaped components of ceramic matrix composites. Recent experimental work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes process and materials development studies using a small tube reactor. Use of FCVI for this geometry involves significant changes in fixturing as compared to disk-shaped preforms previously fabricated. The authors have used their computer model of the CVI process to simulate tube densification and to identify process modifications that will decrease processing time. This report presents recent model developments and applications.

  9. Chemical vapor deposited fiber coatings and chemical vapor infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetz, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) were employed to deposit a series of interfacial coatings on SiC and carbon yarn. Molybdenum, tungsten and chromium hexacarbonyls were utilized as precursors in a low temperature (350[degrees]C) MOCVD process to coat SiC yarn with Mo, W and Cr oxycarbides. Annealing studies performed on the MoOC and WOC coated SiC yarns in N[sub 2] to 1,000[degrees]C establish that further decomposition of the oxycarbides occurred, culminating in the formation of the metals. These metals were then found to react with Si to form Mo and W disilicide coatings. In the Cr system, heating in N[sub 2] above 800[degrees]C resulted in the formation of a mixture of carbides and oxides. Convention CVD was also employed to coat SiC and carbon yarn with C, Bn and a new interface designated BC (a carbon-boron alloy). The coated tows were then infiltrated with SiC, TiO[sub 2], SiO[sub 2] and B[sub 4]C by a chemical vapor infiltration process. The B-C coatings were found to provide advantageous interfacial properties over carbon and BN coatings in several different composite systems. The effectiveness of these different coatings to act as a chemically inert barrier layer and their relationship to the degree of interfacial debonding on the mechanical properties of the composites were examined. The effects of thermal stability and strength of the coated fibers and composites were also determined for several difference atmospheres. In addition, a new method for determining the tensile strength of the as-received and coated yarns was also developed. The coated fibers and composites were further characterized by AES, SEM, XPS, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  10. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    1995-05-01

    This program is designed to develop a Hall-Heroult aluminum smelting cathode with substantially improved properties. The carbon cathodes in current use require significant anode-to-cathode spacing in order to prevent shorting, causing significant electrical inefficiencies. This is due to the non-wettability of carbon by aluminum which causes instability in the cathodic aluminum pad. It is suggested that a fiber reinforced-TiB{sub 2} matrix composite would have the requisite wettability, strength, strain-to-failure, cost, and lifetime to solve this problem. The approach selected to fabricate such a cathode material is chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This program is designed to evaluate potential fiber reinforcements, fabricate test specimens, and test the materials in a static bath and lab-scale Hall cell.

  11. Rapid fabrication of ceramic composite tubes using chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.; Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Matlin, W.M.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramic composite tubes can be fabricated with silicon carbide matrix and Nicalon fiber reinforcement using forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI). The process model GTCVI is used to design the equipment configuration and to identify conditions for rapid, uniform densification. The initial injector and mandrel design produced radial and longitudinal temperature gradients too large for uniform densification. Improved designs have been evaluated with the model. The most favorable approach utilizes a free-standing preform and an insulated water-cooled gas injector. Selected process conditions are based on the temperature limit of the fiber, matrix stoichiometry and reagent utilization efficiency. Model runs for a tube 12 inches long, 4 inches OD and 1/4 inch wall thickness show uniform densification in approximately 15 hours.

  12. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  13. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB[sub 2] composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A. ); Starr, T.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB[sub 2] cathode surface. The use of TiB[sub 2], however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB[sub 2] is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB[sub 2]. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB[sub 2] from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000[degrees]C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB[sub 2]THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  14. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A.; Starr, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB{sub 2} cathode surface. The use of TiB{sub 2}, however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB{sub 2} is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB{sub 2}. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB{sub 2} from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000{degrees}C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB{sub 2}THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  15. Modeling of forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Smith, A.W.

    1992-09-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) has proven to be a successful technique for fabrication of ceramic matrix composites. It is particularly attractive for thick components which cannot be fabricated using the conventional, isothermal method (ICVI). Although it offers processing times that are at least an order of magnitude shorter than ICVI, FCVI has not been used to fabricate parts of complex geometry and is perceived by some to be unsuitable for such components. The major concern Is that selection and control of the flow pattern and thermal profile for optimum infiltration can be a difficult and costly exercise. In order to reduce this effort, we are developing a computer model for FCVI that simulates the densification process for given component geometry, reactor configuration and operating parameters. Used by a process engineer, this model can dramatically reduce the experimental effort needed to obtain uniform densification. A one-dimensional process model, described in a previous interim report, has demonstrated good agreement with experimental results in predicting overall densification time and density uniformity during processing and the effect of various fiber architectures and operating parameters on these process issues. This model is fundamentally unsuitable for more complex geometries, however, and extension to two- and three-dimensions is necessary. This interim report summarizes our progress since the previous interim report toward development of a ``finite volume`` model for FCVI.

  16. Modeling of forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Smith, A.W. )

    1992-09-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) has proven to be a successful technique for fabrication of ceramic matrix composites. It is particularly attractive for thick components which cannot be fabricated using the conventional, isothermal method (ICVI). Although it offers processing times that are at least an order of magnitude shorter than ICVI, FCVI has not been used to fabricate parts of complex geometry and is perceived by some to be unsuitable for such components. The major concern Is that selection and control of the flow pattern and thermal profile for optimum infiltration can be a difficult and costly exercise. In order to reduce this effort, we are developing a computer model for FCVI that simulates the densification process for given component geometry, reactor configuration and operating parameters. Used by a process engineer, this model can dramatically reduce the experimental effort needed to obtain uniform densification. A one-dimensional process model, described in a previous interim report, has demonstrated good agreement with experimental results in predicting overall densification time and density uniformity during processing and the effect of various fiber architectures and operating parameters on these process issues. This model is fundamentally unsuitable for more complex geometries, however, and extension to two- and three-dimensions is necessary. This interim report summarizes our progress since the previous interim report toward development of a finite volume'' model for FCVI.

  17. Properties of chemical vapor infiltration diamond deposited in a diamond powder matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Tallant, D.R.; Hills, C.R.; Staley, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors have developed two techniques: electrophoretic deposition and screen printing, to form nonmined diamond powder precursors on substrates. They then densify these precursors in a hot filament assisted reactor. Analysis indicated that a hot filament assisted chemical vapor infiltration process forms intergranular diamond deposits with properties that are to some degree different from predominantly hot-filament-assisted CVD material.

  18. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-06-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  19. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-08-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  20. Simulates the Forced-Flow Chemical Vapor Infiltration in Steady State

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-12-12

    GTCVI is a finite volume model for steady-state simulation of forced-flow chemical vapor infiltration in either Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates. The model solves energy and momentum balances simultaneously over a given domain discretized into an array of finite volume elements. The species balances and deposition rates are determined after the energy and momentum balances converge. Density-dependent preform properties are included in the model. Transient average density, backpressure, temperature gradient, and average radial deposition rates canmore » be summarized. Optimal infiltration conditions can be found by varying temperature, flow, and reactant concentration.« less

  1. Modeling of chemical vapor infiltration for ceramic composites reinforced with layered, woven fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Gui-Yung; Mccoy, Benjamin J.

    1991-01-01

    A homogeneous model is developed for the chemical vapor infiltration by one-dimensional diffusion into a system of layered plies consisting of woven tows containing bundles of filaments. The model predictions of the amount of deposition and the porosity of the sample as a function of time are compared with the predictions of a recent nonhomogeneous model with aligned holes formed by the weave. The nonhomogeneous model allows for diffusion through the aligned holes, into the spaces between plies, and into the gaps around filaments; i.e., three diffusion equations apply. Relative to the nonhomogeneous results, the homogeneous model underestimates the amount of deposition, since the absence of holes and spaces allows earlier occlusion of gaps around filaments and restricts the vapor infiltration.

  2. The preparation and economics of silicon carbide matrix composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Y.G.; Stinton, D.P.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a number of processing techniques that are currently in use for the development and production of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composite materials. The limited number of available processing routes are compared with respect to the resulting material properties. As it appears the Chemical Vapor Infiltration technique is one of the most extensively developed methods. During the last decade, at least five different modifications of the isobaric isothermal CVI principle have been developed; each route having its own benefits. CVI techniques have now been developed to the extent that industrial commercialization is being realized. Projected cost aspects of the various CVI manufacturing techniques have been examined and compared.

  3. Nextel{trademark}/SiC composites fabricated using forced chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, B.L.; Lowden, R.A.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Schwarz, O.J.

    1993-06-01

    Oxide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated employing the forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process. Composites using Nextel{sup TM} fibers of varying composition were prepared to investigate the effectiveness of each Nextel{sup TM} fiber as a reinforcement for the given matrix. A carbon interface coating was used for the baseline materials, however, alternate interlayers with improved oxidation resistance were also explored Room-temperature flexure strengths of as-fabricated composites and specimens heated in air at 1273 K were measured and compared to results for other SiC-matrix composites.

  4. Finite volume model for forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Smith, A.W.

    1991-03-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) has proven to be a successfully technique for fabrication of ceramic matrix composites. It is particularly attractive for thick components which cannot be fabricated using the conventional, isothermal method (ICVI). Although it offers processing times that are at least an order of magnitude shorter than ICVI, FCVI has not been used to fabricate parts of complex geometry and is perceived by many to be unsuitable for such components. The major concern is that selection and control of the flow pattern and thermal profile for optimum infiltration can be a difficult and costly exercise. In order to reduce this effort, we are developing a computer model for FCVI that simulates the densification process for given component geometry, reactor configuration and operating parameters. Used by a process engineer, this model can dramatically reduce the experimental effort needed to obtain uniform densification.

  5. Thermal expansion of laminated, woven, continuous ceramic fiber/chemical-vapor-infiltrated silicon carbide matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Bradt, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal expansions of three two-dimensional laminate, continuous fiber/chemical-vapor-infiltrated silicon carbide matrix composites reinforced with either FP-Alumina (alumina), Nextel (mullite), or Nicalon (Si-C-O-N) fibers are reported. Experimental thermal expansion coefficients parallel to a primary fiber orientation were comparable to values calculated by the conventional rule-of-mixtures formula, except for the alumina fiber composite. Hysteresis effects were also observed during repeated thermal cycling of that composite. Those features were attributed to reoccurring fiber/matrix separation related to the micromechanical stresses generated during temperature changes and caused by the large thermal expansion mismatch between the alumina fibers and the silicon carbide matrix.

  6. Finite-volume model for chemical vapor infiltration incorporating radiant heat transfer. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.W.; Starr, T.L.

    1995-05-01

    Most finite-volume thermal models account for the diffusion and convection of heat and may include volume heating. However, for certain simulation geometries, a large percentage of heat flux is due to thermal radiation. In this paper a finite-volume computational procedure for the simulation of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation in three dimensional complex enclosures is developed. The radiant heat transfer is included as a source term in each volume element which is derived by Monte Carlo ray tracing from all possible radiating and absorbing faces. The importance of radiative heat transfer is illustrated in the modeling of chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of tubes. The temperature profile through the tube preform matches experimental measurements only when radiation is included. An alternative, empirical approach using an {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} thermal conductivity for the gas space can match the initial temperature profile but does not match temperature changes that occur during preform densification.

  7. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} fibrous composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    1997-04-01

    This program is designed to develop a Hall-Heroult aluminum smelting cathode with substantially improved properties. The carbon cathodes in current use require significant anode-to-cathode spacing in order to prevent shorting, causing significant electrical inefficiencies. This is due to the non-wettability of carbon by aluminum which causes instability in the cathodic aluminum pad. It is suggested that a fiber reinforced-TiB{sub 2} matrix composite would have the requisite wettability, strength, strain-to-failure, cost, and lifetime to solve this problem. The approach selected to fabricate such a cathode material is chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This process produces high purity matrix TiB{sub 2} without damaging the relatively fragile fibers. The program is designed to evaluate potential fiber reinforcements, fabricate test specimens, and scale the process to provide demonstration components.

  8. Forced chemical vapor infiltration of tubular geometries: Modeling, design, and scale-up

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M.

    1995-06-01

    In advanced indirectly fired coal combustion systems and externally fired combined cycle concepts, ceramic heat exchangers are required to transfer heat from the hot combustion gases to the clean air that drives the gas turbines. For high efficiencies, the temperature of the turbine inlet needs to exceed 1100{degrees}C and preferably be about 1260{degrees}C. The heat exchangers will operate under pressure and experience thermal and mechanical stresses during heating and cooling, and some transients will be severe under upset conditions. Silicon carbide-matrix composites are promising for such applications because of their high strength at elevated temperature, light weight, thermal and mechanical resistance, damage tolerance, and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Fiber-reinforced composite tubes of several fiber architectures were fabricated by forced chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) and characterized. Unfortunately, long times ({approximately}150 hours) were required to thoroughly density the tubes. An objective of the current investigation was to optimize the forced CVI process so that composite tubes could be fabricated in much shorter times. To aid in such optimization, a computer code which models the CVI process was used to identify critical process parameters. Finally, successful demonstration of the utility of composite tubes for these applications will require the testing of near-full scale components. As a result a new infiltration system was designed and constructed to prepare 10-cm diameter tubes, and is described in this report.

  9. Expedient Respiratory and Physical Protection: Does a Wet Towel Work to Prevent Chemical Warfare Agent Vapor Infiltration?

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, J.H.

    2002-08-30

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of expedient protection strategies to reduce exposure to vapors from chemical warfare agents. This includes an examination of the physical and the psychological effectiveness of measures such as using a wet towel to seal a door jam against the infiltration of chemicals while sheltering in place or to provide expedient respiratory protection. Respiratory protection for civilians has never been considered a viable option for population protection in the CSEPP. Problems of storage, ability to effectively don respirators, and questionable fit have been primary factors in rejecting this option. Expedient respiratory protection seems to offer little benefits for population protection for chemical agent vapors. Furthermore, using wet towels as a vapor barrier at the bottom of a door should be discouraged. The wetted towel provides no vapor filtration and its effectiveness in infiltration reduction is unknown. Taping the bottom of the door will still likely provide greater infiltration reduction and is recommended as the current method for use in sheltering.

  10. Structure and properties of braided sleeve preforms for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1998-04-01

    In all composites the properties and structure of the reinforcement strongly influence the performance of the material. For some composites, however, the reinforcement also affects the fabrication process itself exerting an additional, second order influence on performance. This is the case for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabrication of ceramic matrix composites. In this process the matrix forms progressively as a solid deposit, first onto the fiber surfaces, then onto the previous layer of deposit, ultimately growing to fill the inter-fiber porosity. The transport of reactants to the surfaces and the evolved morphology of the matrix depend on the initial reinforcement structure. This structure can vary greatly and is controlled by such factors as fiber size and cross-section, the number of filaments and amount of twist per tow or yarn, and the weave or braid architecture. Often the choice of reinforcement is based on mechanical performance analysis or on the cost and availability of the material or on the temperature stability of the fiber. Given this choice, the composite densification process--CVI--must be optimized to attain a successful material. Ceramic fiber in the form of cylindrical braided sleeve is an attractive choice for fabrication of tube-form ceramic matrix composites. Multiple, concentric layers of sleeve can be placed over a tubular mandrel, compressed and fixed with a binder to form a freestanding tube preform. This fiber architecture is different than that created by layup of plain weave cloth--the material used in most previous CVI development. This report presents the results of the investigation of CVI densification of braided sleeve preforms and the evolution of their structure and transport properties during processing.

  11. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Zhan Jun; Yang, Ying Chao; Li, Kai Yuan; Tao, Xin Yong; Eres, Gyula; Howe, Jane Y; Zhang, Li Tong; Li, Xiao Dong; Pan, Zhengwei

    2011-01-01

    Owing to their exceptional stiffness and strength1 4, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have long been considered to be an ideal reinforcement for light-weight, high-strength, and high-temperature-resistant ceramic matrix composites (CMCs)5 10. However, the research and development in CNT-reinforced CMCs have been greatly hindered due to the challenges related to manufacturing including poor dispersion, damages during dispersion, surface modification, densification and sintering, weak tube/matrix interfaces, and agglomeration of tubes at the matrix grain boundaries5,11. Here we report the fabrication of high-quality aligned CNT/SiC composites by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), a technique that is being widely used to fabricate commercial continuous-filament CMCs12 15. Using the CVI technique most of the challenges previously encountered in the fabrication of CNT composites were readily overcome. Nanotube pullouts, an important toughening mechanism for CMCs, were consistently observed on all fractured CNT/SiC samples. Indeed, three-point bending tests conducted on individual CNT/SiC nanowires (diameters: 50 200 nm) using an atomic force microscope show that the CNT-reinforced SiC nanowires are about an order of magnitude tougher than the bulk SiC. The tube/matrix interface is so intimate and the SiC matrix is so dense that a ~50-nm-thick SiC coating can effectively protect the inside nanotubes from being oxidized at 1600 C in air. The CVI method may be extended to produce nanotube composites from a variety of matrix

  12. Rapid processing of carbon-carbon composites by forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidyaraman, S.; Lackey, W.J.; Agrawal, P.K.; Freeman, G.B.; Langman, M.D.

    1995-10-01

    Carbon fiber-carbon matrix composites were fabricated using the forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process. Preforms were prepared by stacking 40 layers of plain weave carbon cloth in a graphite holder. The preforms were infiltrated using propylene, propane, and methane. The present work showed that the FCVI process is well suited for fabricating carbon-carbon composites; without optimization of the process, the authors have achieved uniform and thorough densification. Composites with porosities as low as 7% were fabricated in 8--12 h. The highest deposition rate obtained in the present study was {approximately}3 {micro}m/h which is more than an order of magnitude faster than the typical value of 0.1--0.25 {micro}m/h for the isothermal process. It was also found that the use of propylene and propane as reagents resulted in faster infiltration compared to methane.

  13. Chemical-vapor-infiltrated silicon nitride, boron nitride, and silicon carbide matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ventri, R.D.; Galasso, F.S. )

    1990-07-01

    This paper reports composites of carbon/chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, carbon/CVD BN, mullite/CVD SiC, and SiC yarn/CVD SiC prepared to determine if there were inherent toughness in these systems. The matrices were deposited at high enough temperatures to ensure that they were crystalline, which should make them more stable at high temperatures. The fiber-matrix bonding in the C/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite appeared to be too strong; the layers of BN in the matrix of the C/BN were too weakly bonded; and the mullite/SiC composite was not as tough as the SiC/SiC composites. Only the SiC yarn/CVD SiC composite exhibited both strength and toughness.

  14. Strength distribution of reinforcing fibers in a Nicalon fiber/chemically vapor infiltrated silicon carbide matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Bradt, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The strength distribution of fibers within a two-dimensional laminate ceramic/ceramic composite consisting of an eight harness satin weave of Nicalon continuous fiber within a chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix was determined from analysis of the fracture mirrors of the fibers. Comparison of the fiber strengths and the Weibull moduli with those for Nicalon fibers prior to incorporation into composites suggests that possible fiber damage may occur either during the weaving or during another stage of the composite manufacture. Observations also indicate that it is the higher-strength fibers which experience the greatest extent of fiber pullout and thus make a larger contribution to the overall composite toughness than do the weaker fibers.

  15. Growth mechanism of thin films of yttria-stabilized zirconia by chemical vapor infiltration using NiO-ceria substrate as oxygen source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Okada, Koji; Mineshige, Atsushi

    The deposition of yttria-stabilized zirconia films on a NiO-ceria substrate by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) using ZrCl 4 and YCl 3 as metal sources and NiO-ceria as oxygen source was studied. The resultant films were cubic YSZ with a Y 2O 3 content of 3.7-4.2 mol%, and were transparent and strong. A NiO content of NiO-ceria above 60 mol% increases the growth rate of the YSZ film from about 5 to 25 μm over 2 h, indicating that chemical vapor deposition (CVD) occurred in addition to electrochemical vapor deposition (EVD), whereas NiO contents below 60 mol% does not affect the growth rate, indicating that only electrochemical vapor deposition occurred. The growth mechanism of the YSZ film is determined and a YSZ thin film is successfully fabricated on NiO-ceria to improve mechanical strength.

  16. A novel procedure to obtain nanocrystalline diamond/porous silicon composite by chemical vapor deposition/infiltration processes.

    PubMed

    Miranda, C R B; Azevedo, A F; Baldan, M R; Beloto, A F; Ferreira, N G

    2009-06-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films were formed on porous silicon (PS) substrate by Chemical Vapor Deposition/Infiltration (CVD/CVI) process using a hot filament reactor. This innovative procedure is determinant to grow a controlled three-dimensional diamond structure with diamond grains formation in the pores, covering uniformly the different growth planes. In this CVI process, a piece of reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) was used, under de PS substrate, as an additional solid source of hydrocarbon that ensures the production of pertinent carbon growth species directly on PS and into its pores. PS substrates were obtained by anodization etching process of n-type silicon wafer in a hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution containing acetonitrile (CH3CN) which result in an uniform and well controlled porous distribution and size when compared with the usual ethanol solution. Depositions were performed using Ar-H2-CH4 where the methane concentration varied from 0 up to 1.0 vol%, to analyze the influence of RVC use as an additional carbon source on growth mechanism. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Field Emission Gun (FEG) were used to investigate PS and NCD film morphology. SEM images of NCD showed faceted nanograins with average size from 5 to 16 nm and uniform surface texture covering all the supports among the pores resulting in an apparent micro honeycomb structure. Raman spectra confirmed the existence of sp2-bonded carbon at the grain boundaries. The spectra showed a peak that may be deconvoluted in two components at 1332 cm(-1) (diamond) and 1345 cm(-1) (D band). Two shoulders at 1150 and 1490 cm(-1) also appear and are assigned to transpolyacetylene (TPA) segments at the grain boundaries of NCD surfaces. In addition, X-ray diffraction analyses of all films presented characteristic diamond diffraction peaks corresponding to (111), (220) and (311). PMID:19504935

  17. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  1. Microwave and RF assisted chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.; Barbero, R.S.

    1995-05-01

    Work during this reporting period has focused on the development of a CVI technique for rapid production of carbon/carbon and alumina composite systems. The focus of the alumina effort is towards porous materials for membrane supports and hot gas filtration. Industrial interest in these applications include companies such as: Dow, Westinghouse, Amoco and DuPont. Applications for the carbon materials are numerous and include: brakes, sporting goods, biomedical materials, flaps and seals for thrust control, after burner nozzles, turbine engine flaps and rotors. This effort will focus on aircraft brakes. A collaboration is underway with Hitco a major producer of carbon/carbon materials.

  2. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  4. Comparison of precursor infiltration into polymer thin films via atomic layer deposition and sequential vapor infiltration using in-situ quartz crystal microgravimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Padbury, Richard P.; Jur, Jesse S.

    2014-07-01

    Previous research exploring inorganic materials nucleation behavior on polymers via atomic layer deposition indicates the formation of hybrid organic–inorganic materials that form within the subsurface of the polymer. This has inspired adaptations to the process, such as sequential vapor infiltration, which enhances the diffusion of organometallic precursors into the subsurface of the polymer to promote the formation of a hybrid organic–inorganic coating. This work highlights the fundamental difference in mass uptake behavior between atomic layer deposition and sequential vapor infiltration using in-situ methods. In particular, in-situ quartz crystal microgravimetry is used to compare the mass uptake behavior of trimethyl aluminum in poly(butylene terephthalate) and polyamide-6 polymer thin films. The importance of trimethyl aluminum diffusion into the polymer subsurface and the subsequent chemical reactions with polymer functional groups are discussed.

  5. Sensitivity of porous silicon rugate filters for chemical vapor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, M. S.; Sailor, M. J.; Fukami, K.; Sakka, T.; Ogata, Y. H.

    2008-04-01

    The characteristics of chemical vapor sensors constructed from porous Si rugate filters are examined. The peak position of the resonant wavelength exhibits a redshift response upon exposure to ethanol vapors. The filter response scales with the vapor partial pressure; the concentration level is estimated based on theoretical calculations. The formation of two stacked rugate filters with similar index contrast but different periodicities is used to test the extent of liquid infiltration into each individual filter. The penetration length of the condensate is found to be comparable to the thickness of the filter; in a 11.3-μm-thick filter, a steady-state response is achieved in 4min.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Casey, Alton W.

    1982-01-01

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200.degree. C.; and impinging a gas containing in a flowing atmosphere of air N.sub.2, SiCl.sub.4, and AlCl.sub.3 on the surface.

  7. Thickness limitations in carbon nanotube reinforced silicon nitride coatings synthesized by vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Eres, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration is a convenient method for synthesizing carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced ceramic coatings. The thickness over which infiltration is relatively uniform is limited by gas phase diffusion in the pore structure. These effects were investigated in two types of silicon nitride matrix composites. With CNTs that were distributed uniformly on the substrate surface dense coatings were limited to thicknesses of several microns. With dual structured CNT arrays produced by photolithography coatings up to 400 gm thick were obtained with minimal residual porosity. Gas transport into these dual structured materials was facilitated by creating micron sized channels between "CNT pillars" (i.e. each pillar consisted of a large number of individual CNTs). The experimental results are consistent with basic comparisons between the rates of gas diffusion and silicon nitride growth in porous structures. This analysis also provides a general insight into optimizing infiltration conditions during the fabrication of thick CNT-reinforced composite coatings. (C) 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Atmospheric pressure synthesis of photoluminescent hybrid materials by sequential organometallic vapor infiltration into polyethylene terephthalate fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Akyildiz, Halil I.; Mousa, Moataz Bellah M.; Jur, Jesse S.

    2015-01-28

    Exposing a polymer to sequential organometallic vapor infiltration (SVI) under low pressure conditions can significantly modify the polymer's chemical, mechanical, and optical properties. We demonstrate that SVI of trimethylaluminum into polyethylene terephthalate (PET) can also proceed readily at atmospheric pressure, and at 60 °C the extent of reaction determined by mass uptake is independent of pressure between 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr. At 120 °C, however, the mass gain is 50% larger at 2.5 Torr relative to that at 760 Torr, indicating that the precursor diffusion in the chamber and fiber matrix decreases at higher source pressure. Mass gain decreases, in general, as the SVI process temperature increases both at 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr attributed to the faster reaction kinetics forming a barrier layer, which prevents further diffusion of the reactive species. The resulting PET/Al-O{sub x} product shows high photoluminescence compared to untreated fibers. A physical mask on the polymer during infiltration at 760 Torr is replicated in the underlying polymer, producing an image in the polymer that is visible under UV illumination. Because of the reduced precursor diffusivity during exposure at 760 Torr, the image shows improved resolution compared to SVI performed under typical 2.5 Torr conditions.

  9. Photoluminescence Mechanism and Photocatalytic Activity of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Materials Formed by Sequential Vapor Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Akyildiz, Halil I; Stano, Kelly L; Roberts, Adam T; Everitt, Henry O; Jur, Jesse S

    2016-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials formed by sequential vapor infiltration (SVI) of trimethylaluminum into polyester fibers are demonstrated, and the photoluminescence of the fibers is evaluated using a combined UV-vis and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy approach. The optical activity of the modified fibers depends on infiltration thermal processing conditions and is attributed to the reaction mechanisms taking place at different temperatures. At low temperatures a single excitation band and dual emission bands are observed, while, at high temperatures, two distinct absorption bands and one emission band are observed, suggesting that the physical and chemical structure of the resulting hybrid material depends on the SVI temperature. Along with enhancing the photoluminescence intensity of the PET fibers, the internal quantum efficiency also increased to 5-fold from ∼4-5% to ∼24%. SVI processing also improved the photocatalytic activity of the fibers, as demonstrated by photodeposition of Ag and Au metal particles out of an aqueous metal salt solution onto fiber surfaces via UVA light exposure. Toward applications in flexible electronics, well-defined patterning of the metallic materials is achieved by using light masking and focused laser rastering approaches. PMID:27063955

  10. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    SciTech Connect

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  11. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  12. Low-pressure, chemical vapor deposition polysilicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, B. D.; Crotty, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    The low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of polycrystalline silicon was investigted. The physical system was described, as was the controlling process parameters and requirements for producing films for use as an integral portion of the solar cell contact system.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  14. Numerical modeling tools for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J.; Childs, Edward P.

    1992-01-01

    Development of general numerical simulation tools for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was the objective of this study. Physical models of important CVD phenomena were developed and implemented into the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The resulting software can address general geometries as well as the most important phenomena occurring with CVD reactors: fluid flow patterns, temperature and chemical species distribution, gas phase and surface deposition. The physical models are documented which are available and examples are provided of CVD simulation capabilities.

  15. The chemical vapor synthesis of inorganic nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Hong Yong; Ryu, Taegong; Choi, Jin Won; Hwang, Kyu Sup; Han, Gilsoo; Choi, Young Joon; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2007-12-01

    Chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) is a process for making fine solid particles by the vapor-phase chemical reactions of precursors. At the University of Utah, this process has been applied to the synthesis of the aluminides of titanium and nickel, other metallic and intermetallic powders, and subsequently aluminum nanopowder and WC-Co nanocomposite powder. This work has demonstrated that it is possible to prepare fine particles of 5-200 nm size by CVS. Further, it has been shown that this technique has a unique capability to produce uniformly mixed powders of different solids. This is possible because the reactants are perfectly mixed in the gas phase. More recently, the CVS process has been carried out in a plasma reactor. This system has shown considerable promise for many applications as a method of producing nanosized powders.

  16. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  17. Making Ceramic Fibers By Chemical Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revankar, Vithal V. S.; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1994-01-01

    Research and development of fabrication techniques for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ceramic fibers presented in two reports. Fibers of SiC, TiB2, TiC, B4C, and CrB2 intended for use as reinforcements in metal-matrix composite materials. CVD offers important advantages over other processes: fibers purer and stronger and processed at temperatures below melting points of constituent materials.

  18. Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport is discussed. The operating characteristics of the purification process, including factors affecting the rate, purification efficiency and photovoltaic quality of the refined silicon were studied. The casting of large alloy plates was accomplished. A larger research scale reactor is characterized, and it is shown that a refined silicon product yields solar cells with near state of the art conversion efficiencies.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOEpatents

    Berkman, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  20. Chemical Vapor Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus

    The generation of nanoparticles in the gas phase by Chemical Vapor Synthesis (CVS) may be described from the point of view of chemical engineering as a sequence of unit operations among which reactant delivery, reaction energy input, and product separation are key processes which determine the product characteristics and quality required by the applications of nanoparticles and powders. In case of CVS, the volatility of the reactants (precursors) may severely limit the possible type of products as well as the production rate. It is shown that these limits can be lifted by use of a laser flash evaporator which also enables the use of precursor mixtures for the production of complex oxides as shown for Co-doped ZnO and the pulsed operation to influence powder characteristics. The mode in which energy is supplied to the particle synthesis reactor has also substantial influence on particle and powder characteristics as is shown for TiO2 using different time-temperatureprofiles.

  1. Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Larkin, David J.; Matus, Lawrence G.; Petit, Jeremy B.

    1993-01-01

    Large single-crystal SiC boules from which wafers of large area cut now being produced commerically. Availability of wafers opens door for development of SiC semiconductor devices. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process produces thin single-crystal SiC films on SiC wafers. Essential step in sequence of steps used to fabricate semiconductor devices. Further development required for specific devices. Some potential high-temperature applications include sensors and control electronics for advanced turbine engines and automobile engines, power electronics for electromechanical actuators for advanced aircraft and for space power systems, and equipment used in drilling of deep wells. High-frequency applications include communication systems, high-speed computers, and microwave power transistors. High-radiation applications include sensors and controls for nuclear reactors.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  4. Characterization of Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jesser, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations to develop a more complete understanding of the reactive fluid dynamics of chemical vapor deposition were conducted. In the experimental phases of the effort, a horizontal CVD reactor configuration was used for the growth of InP at UVA and for laser velocimetry measurements of the flow fields in the reactor at LaRC. This horizontal reactor configuration was developed for the growth of III-V semiconductors and has been used by our research group in the past to study the deposition of both GaAs and InP. While the ultimate resolution of many of the heat and mass transport issues will require access to a reduced-gravity environment, the series of groundbased research makes direct contributions to this area while attempting to answer the design questions for future experiments of how low must gravity be reduced and for how long must this gravity level be maintained to make the necessary measurements. It is hoped that the terrestrial experiments will be useful for the design of future microgravity experiments which likely will be designed to employ a core set of measurements for applications in the microgravity environment such as HOLOC, the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility, or the Schlieren photography, the Laser Imaging Velocimetry and the Laser Doppler Velocimetry instruments under development for the Advanced Fluids Experiment Module.

  5. Development of chemical vapor composites, CVC materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-05

    Industry has a critical need for high-temperature operable ceramic composites that are strong, non-brittle, light weight, and corrosion resistant. Improvements in energy efficiency, reduced emissions and increased productivity can be achieved in many industrial processes with ceramic composites if the reaction temperature and pressure are increased. Ceramic composites offer the potential to meet these material requirements in a variety of industrial applications. However, their use is often restricted by high cost. The Chemical Vapor composite, CVC, process can reduce the high costs and multiple fabrication steps presently required for ceramic fabrication. CVC deposition has the potential to eliminate many difficult processing problems and greatly increase fabrication rates for composites. With CVC, the manufacturing process can control the composites` density, microstructure and composition during growth. The CVC process: can grow or deposit material 100 times faster than conventional techniques; does not require an expensive woven preform to infiltrate; can use high modulus fibers that cannot be woven into a preform; can deposit composites to tolerances of less than 0.025 mm on one surface without further machining.

  6. Water quality impacts on infiltration rates and using chemical transport models as management tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of low quality waters for irrigation requires improved tools for managing soil salinity, and increased knowledge of chemical effects on infiltration, plant ion uptake, and impact to ground and surface water. Impacts of irrigation water with SAR (sodium adsorption ratio) 2,4,6,8 and l0 on infiltr...

  7. Preventing Chemical-Vapor Deposition In Selected Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, Joseph T.; Goela, Jitendra Singh; Pickering, Michael A.; Taylor, Raymond L.

    1991-01-01

    Method for prevention of chemical-vapor deposition of material in selected areas developed. Gas shroud isolates specific area from rest of deposition system. Inert gas flowing from beneath substrate prevents deposition between substrate and outer ring. Method extremely successful in selective deposition of SiC in chemical-vapor-deposition reactor. Used in deposition of SiC mirror blanks in Large Mirror Substrate and Lidar Mirror programs. Critical element in overall chemical-vapor-deposition process for producing large, lightweight mirrors.

  8. Multiphase Reactive Transport modeling of Stable Isotope Fractionation of Infiltrating Unsaturated Zone Pore Water and Vapor Using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, Michael J.; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-08-28

    Numerical simulations of transport and isotope fractionation provide a method to quantitatively interpret vadose zone pore water stable isotope depth profiles based on soil properties, climatic conditions, and infiltration. We incorporate the temperature-dependent equilibration of stable isotopic species between water and water vapor, and their differing diffusive transport properties into the thermodynamic database of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. These simulations are used to illustrate the evolution of stable isotope profiles in semiarid regions where recharge during wet seasons disturbs the drying profile traditionally associated with vadose zone pore waters. Alternating wet and dry seasons lead to annual fluctuations in moisture content, capillary pressure, and stable isotope compositions in the vadose zone. Periodic infiltration models capture the effects of seasonal increases in precipitation and predict stable isotope profiles that are distinct from those observed under drying (zero infiltration) conditions. After infiltration, evaporation causes a shift to higher 18O and D values, which are preserved in the deeper pore waters. The magnitude of the isotopic composition shift preserved in deep vadose zone pore waters varies inversely with the rate of infiltration.

  9. Worker Protection from Chemical Vapors: Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.J.

    2007-07-01

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank head-spaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns, risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits (OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors. (authors)

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of copper films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgharkar, Narendra Shamkant

    We have studied the kinetics of copper chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for interconnect metallization using hydrogen (Hsb2) reduction of the Cu(hfac)sb2 (copper(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate) precursor. Steady-state deposition rates were measured using a hot-wall microbalance reactor. For base case conditions of 2 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C, a growth rate of 0.5 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 10 nm minsp{-1}) is observed. Reaction order experiments suggest that the deposition rate passes through a maximum at partial pressure of 2 Torr of Cu(hfac)sb2. The deposition rate has an overall half-order dependence on Hsb2 partial pressure. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expression is used to describe the observed kinetic dependencies on Cu(hfac)sb2, Hsb2, and H(hfac). Based on the rate expression a mechanism is proposed in which the overall rate is determined by the surface reaction of adsorbed Cu(hfac)sb2 and H species. Additionally, the role of alcohols in enhancing the deposition rate has been investigated. Addition of isopropanol results in a six fold enhancement to yield a deposition rate of 3.3 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}) at 5 Torr of isopropanol, 0.4 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C. Ethanol and methanol give lower enhancements of 1.75 and 1.1 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1}, respectively. A mechanism based on the ordering of the aqueous pKsba values of the alcohols is proposed to explain the observed results. Lastly, we have built a warm-wall Pedestal reactor apparatus to demonstrate copper CVD on TiN/Si substrates. The apparatus includes a liquid injection system for transport of isopropanol-diluted precursor solutions. At optimized conditions of precursor and substrate pre-treatments, we have deposited uniform films of copper on TiN/Si substrates at an average deposition rate of 3.0 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}).

  11. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon from Silane Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praturi, A. K.; Lutwack, R.; Hsu, G.

    1977-01-01

    The four basic elements in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane are analytically treated from a kinetic standpoint. These elements are mass transport of silane, pyrolysis of silane, nucleation of silicon, and silicon crystal growth. Rate expressions that describe the various steps involved in the chemical vapor deposition of silicon were derived from elementary principles. Applications of the rate expressions for modeling and simulation of the silicon CVD are discussed.

  12. Differentiation of vapor mixture with chemical sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulki; Jung, Youngmo; Moon, Hi Gyu; Lee, Ji Eun; Shin, Bum Ju; Lim, Chaehyun; Choi, Jaebin; Seo, Minah; Kim, Jae Hun; Jun, Seong Chan; Kim, Sang Kyung; Kang, Chong Yun; Lee, Taikjin; Lee, Seok

    2015-07-01

    Arrays of partially selective chemical sensors have been the focus of extensive research over the past decades because of their potential for widespread application in ambient air monitoring, health and safety, and biomedical diagnostics. Especially, vapor sensor arrays based on functionalized nanomaterials have shown great promise with their high sensitivity by dimensionality and outstanding electronic properties. Here, we introduce experiments where individual vapors and mixtures of them are examined by different chemical sensor arrays. The collected data from those sensor arrays are further analyzed by a principal component analysis (PCA) and targeted vapors are recognized based on prepared database.

  13. Fabrication of full-scale fiber reinforced hot-gas filters by chemical vapor deposition. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.G.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of this program was to develop and fabricate an initial set of ceramic fiber reinforced, ceramic matrix composite, hot gas candle filters for testing in a simulated pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) environment. Four full-scale ceramic fiber reinforced candle filters were fabricated in a multi step process. The substrate was filament wound using Nextel{trademark} 312 yarn and then coated with silicon carbide by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to form a ceramic composite shape that provides the candle`s structural shape, toughness, and strength. Filter layer material was applied over the surface and then bonded with silicon carbide in a chemical vapor infiltration, CVI, step.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene single crystals.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Tour, James M

    2014-04-15

    As a two-dimensional (2D) sp(2)-bonded carbon allotrope, graphene has attracted enormous interest over the past decade due to its unique properties, such as ultrahigh electron mobility, uniform broadband optical absorption and high tensile strength. In the initial research, graphene was isolated from natural graphite, and limited to small sizes and low yields. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have emerged as an important method for the scalable production of large-size and high-quality graphene for various applications. However, CVD-derived graphene is polycrystalline and demonstrates degraded properties induced by grain boundaries. Thus, the next critical step of graphene growth relies on the synthesis of large graphene single crystals. In this Account, we first discuss graphene grain boundaries and their influence on graphene's properties. Mechanical and electrical behaviors of CVD-derived polycrystalline graphene are greatly reduced when compared to that of exfoliated graphene. We then review four representative pathways of pretreating Cu substrates to make millimeter-sized monolayer graphene grains: electrochemical polishing and high-pressure annealing of Cu substrate, adding of additional Cu enclosures, melting and resolidfying Cu substrates, and oxygen-rich Cu substrates. Due to these pretreatments, the nucleation site density on Cu substrates is greatly reduced, resulting in hexagonal-shaped graphene grains that show increased grain domain size and comparable electrical properties as to exfoliated graphene. Also, the properties of graphene can be engineered by its shape, thickness and spatial structure. Thus, we further discuss recently developed methods of making graphene grains with special spatial structures, including snowflakes, six-lobed flowers, pyramids and hexagonal graphene onion rings. The fundamental growth mechanism and practical applications of these well-shaped graphene structures should be interesting topics and

  15. Flexible Electronics: High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    On page 5939, J. V. Badding and co-workers describe the unrolling of a flexible hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell, deposited by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-pressure deposition process is represented by the molecules of silane infiltrating the small voids between the rolled up substrate, facilitating plasma-free deposition over a very large area. The high-pressure approach is expected to also find application for 3D nanoarchitectures. PMID:27442970

  16. Synthetic Graphene Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition on Copper Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting Fung; Shen, Tian; Cao, Helin; Jauregui, Luis A.; Wu, Wei; Yu, Qingkai; Newell, David; Chen, Yong P.

    2013-04-01

    The discovery of graphene, a single layer of covalently bonded carbon atoms, has attracted intense interest. Initial studies using mechanically exfoliated graphene unveiled its remarkable electronic, mechanical and thermal properties. There has been a growing need and rapid development in large-area deposition of graphene film and its applications. Chemical vapor deposition on copper has emerged as one of the most promising methods in obtaining large-scale graphene films with quality comparable to exfoliated graphene. In this paper, we review the synthesis and characterizations of graphene grown on copper foil substrates by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. We also discuss potential applications of such large-scale synthetic graphene.

  17. Fluid infiltration into fault zones: Chemical, isotopic, and mechanical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrich, R.

    1986-01-01

    Fluid infiltration into fault zones and their deeper-level counterparts, brittle-ductile shear zones, is examined in diverse tectonic environments. In the 2.7 Ga Abitibi greenstone belt, major tectonic discontinuities, with lateral extents of hundreds of kilometres initiated as listric normal faults accommodating rift extension and acted as sites for komatiite extrusion and locally intense metasomatism. During reverse motion on the structures, accommodating shortening of the belt, these transcrustal faults were utilised as a conduit for the ascent of trondhjemitic magmas from the base of the crust and of alkaline magmas from the asthenosphere and for the discharge of thousands of cubic kilometres of hydrothermal fluids. Such fluids were characterised by δ18O=+6±2, δD=-50±20, δ13C=-4±4, and temperatures of 270 to 450°C, probably derived from devolatilisation of crustal rocks undergoing prograde metamorphism. Hydrothermal fluids were more radiogenic (87Sr/86Sr=0.7010 to 0.7040) and possessed higher μ than did contemporaneous mantle, komatiites or tholeiites, and thus carried a contribution from older sialic basement. A provinciality of87Sr/86Sr and δ13C is evident, signifying that fault plumbing sampled lower crust which was heterogeneous at the scale of tens of kilometres. Mineralised faults possess enrichments of large ion lithophile (LIL), LIL elements, including K, Rb, Ba, Cs, B, and CO2, and rare elements, such as Au, Ag, As, Sb, Se, Te, Bi, and W. Fluids were characterised by XCO 2≈0.1, neutral to slightly acidic pH, low salinity ≤3 wt-%, K/Na=0.1, they carried minor CH4, CO, and N2, and they underwent transient effervescence of CO2 during decompression. Clastic sediments occupy graben developed at fault flexures. The40Ar/39Ar release spectra indicate that fault rocks experienced episodic disturbance on time scales of hundreds of millions of years. At the Grenville front, translation was accommodated along two mylonite zones and an intervening

  18. A novel chemically selective siloxane polymer for chemical vapor sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jia; Jiang, Yadong; Du, Xiaosong; Bi, Juan

    2010-10-01

    A new hydrogen-bond acidic carbosiloxane polymer for quartz crystal microbalance sensors (QCMs) application was synthesized via O-alkylation, Claisen rearrange, hydrosilylation reaction and functionalized the polysiloxane with trifluoroacetone groups (TFA). The trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane was characterized by FT-IR and 1HNMR. And this novel siloxane polymer was coated onto AT-cut 8 MHz QCM sensors to investigate its gas sensitive responses to the organophosphorus nerve agent stimulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor as well as other interfering organic vapors. The research work indicated that frequency shifts of the trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane based QCM sensor to the DMMP vapor were completely linear, and with a regression coefficient of 0.9973 in the concentration range of 10-60 ppm. In addition, the sensitivity of the fabricated QCM sensors to DMMP was up to 10.64 Hz/ ppm, and much higher than the other interfering vapors, limits of detection (LODs) of the QCM sensors was 0.28 ppm, thus high selectivity to DMMP was demonstrated in this work.

  19. Vaporization of a mixed precursors in chemical vapor deposition for YBCO films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Gang; Meng, Guangyao; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1995-01-01

    Single phase YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films with T(c) values around 90 K are readily obtained by using a single source chemical vapor deposition technique with a normal precursor mass transport. The quality of the films is controlled by adjusting the carrier gas flow rate and the precursor feed rate.

  20. Chemical-vapor deposition of silicon from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Lutwack, R.; Praturi, A. K.

    1979-01-01

    Report lists tables of standard free-energy change, equilibrium constant, and heat of reaction for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane over temperature range of 100 to 1000 K. Data indicates silicon CVD may be a commercially economical process for production of silicon for solar arrays and other applications.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits including the wafer carrier and loading from a receiving air track into automatic furnaces and unloading on to a sending air track is discussed. Passivation using electron beam deposited quartz is also considered.

  2. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P M.; Kleimeyer, J; Rowland, Brad; Gardner, Patrick J.

    2003-04-21

    Quantitative high resolution (0.1 cm -1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L).

  3. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  4. Chemiluminescence chemical detection of vapors and device

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.E.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.

    1995-07-10

    A solid phase chemical sensor includes a polymer film which has a chemiluminescent reagent immobilized therein. The polymer film and chemiluminescent reagent are chosen to significantly enhance the selectivity of the sensor to the analyte in the gaseous phase to which the sensor is exposed. The sensor is then positioned so that, when exposed to the gaseous mixture, any chemiluminescence generated will be detected by a photomultiplier tube or other photoelectric device, such as a photodiode. The sensor is particularly useful in the detection of O2, N2H4, SO2, NO2, and halogenated hydrocarbons.

  5. Fabrication of a multifunctional carbon nanotube "cotton" yarn by the direct chemical vapor deposition spinning process.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiao-Hua; Li, Ya-Li; Feng, Jian-Min; Kang, Yan-Ru; Han, Shuai-Shuai

    2012-09-21

    A continuous cotton-like carbon nanotube fiber yarn, consisting of multiple threads of high purity double walled carbon nanotubes, was fabricated in a horizontal CVD gas flow reactor with water vapor densification by the direct chemical vapor deposition spinning process. The water vapor interaction leads to homogeneous shrinking of the CNT sock-like assembly in the gas flow. This allows well controlled continuous winding of the dense thread inside the reactor. The CNT yarn is quite thick (1-3 mm), has a highly porous structure (99%) while being mechanically strong and electrically conductive. The water vapor interaction leads to homogeneous oxidation of the CNTs, offering the yarn oxygen-functionalized surfaces. The unique structure and surface of the CNT yarn provide it multiple processing advantages and properties. It can be mechanically engineered into a dense yarn, infiltrated with polymers to form a composite and mixed with other yarns to form a blend, as demonstrated in this research. Therefore, this CNT yarn can be used as a "basic yarn" for various CNT based structural and functional applications. PMID:22864939

  6. Modelling of Laser-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Research is directed at development of a detailed model of mass and heat transfer and chemical reaction in the pyrolysis of silane for the growth of thin amorphous silicon substrates incorporating laser heating of the gas phase above the film. The model will be the basis for evaluation of the relative importances of the decomposition of SiH4 in the vapor phase, mass transfer of the intermediate species, e.g., SiH2, and the evolution of hydrogen gas. Plans are also underway for developing a model for homogeneous nucleation of Si in the vapor phase to model the rate limitations observed at high gas-phase temperatures and high partial pressures of silane. Work was concentrated on an almost one-dimensional model for the coupling of the CO2 laser beam for heat transfer of the vapor phase with simple kinetic models for SiH4 decomposition and subsequent absorption of Si vapor on the substrate. Mass transfer in the vapor phase is assumed to be solely by diffusion. The role of convection in the vapor phase caused by the large changes in density in and around the center of the laser beam will be analyzed to evaluate the potential of microgravity experiments for increasing the uniformity of the film and the deposition rate.

  7. Solvent-assisted dewetting during chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xichong; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2009-10-01

    This study examines the use of a nonreactive solvent vapor, tert-butanol, during initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) to promote polymer film dewetting. iCVD is a solventless technique to grow polymer thin films directly from gas phase feeds. Using a custom-built axisymmetric hot-zone reactor, smooth poly(methyl methacrylate) films are grown from methyl methacrylate (MMA) and tert-butyl peroxide (TBPO). When solvent vapor is used, nonequilibrium dewetted structures comprising of randomly distributed polymer droplets are observed. The length scale of observed topographies, determined using power spectral density (PSD) analysis, ranges from 5 to 100 microm and is influenced by deposition conditions, especially the carrier gas and solvent vapor flow rates. The use of a carrier gas leads to faster deposition rates and suppresses thin film dewetting. The use of solvent vapor promotes dewetting and leads to larger length scales of the dewetted features. Control over lateral length scale is demonstrated by preparation of hierarchal "bump on bump" topographies. Vapor-induced dewetting is demonstrated on silicon wafer substrate with a native oxide layer and also on hydrophobically modified substrate prepared using silane coupling. Autophobic dewetting of PMMA from SiOx/Si during iCVD is attributed to a thin film instability driven by both long-range van der Waals forces and short-range polar interactions. PMID:19670895

  8. Effect of vapor-phase oxygen on chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, Tomo-o.; Saiki, Koichiro

    2015-03-01

    To obtain a large-area single-crystal graphene, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on Cu is considered the most promising. Recently, the surface oxygen on Cu has been found to suppress the nucleation of graphene. However, the effect of oxygen in the vapor phase was not elucidated sufficiently. Here, we investigate the effect of O2 partial pressure (PO2) on the CVD growth of graphene using radiation-mode optical microscopy. The nucleation density of graphene decreases monotonically with PO2, while its growth rate reaches a maximum at a certain pressure. Our results indicate that PO2 is an important parameter to optimize in the CVD growth of graphene.

  9. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  11. Structure and formation kinetics of MoSi{sub 2} composites formed by reactive vapor infiltration process

    SciTech Connect

    Hillig, W.B.; Broglio, M.; Ramakrishnan, R.M.; Patibandla, N.

    1995-10-01

    Reactive Vapor Infiltration is a convenient new process for producing high purity MoSi{sub 2} matrix composites by reacting compacted mixed Mo + MoSi{sub 2} powders ranging from 0 to 80 wt. % MoSi{sub 2} with H{sub 2} + SiCl{sub 4} vapors at temperatures from 1,000 to 1,400 C. Consideration must be taken of the volumetric increase that accompanies this conversion. The kinetics of the advance of the MoSi{sub 2} growth layer and the gravimetric uptake are given as a function of temperature and the composition. The parabolic growth rate constant was independent of composition at least up to 30% MoSi{sub 2} composition, but then showed a strong, linear increase with increasing MoSi{sub 2} content. There appeared to be a leveling off of rate above 70% MoSi{sub 2}. The corresponding gravimetric rate constant was relatively insensitive to the starting MoSi{sub 2} content. This behavior is at variance with a simple one-dimensional diffusive growth model. Possible reasons for this variance are offered.

  12. Temperature and exposure dependence of hybrid organic-inorganic layer formation by sequential vapor infiltration into polymer fibers.

    PubMed

    Akyildiz, Halil I; Padbury, Richard P; Parsons, Gregory N; Jur, Jesse S

    2012-11-01

    The characteristic processing behavior for growth of a conformal nanoscale hybrid organic-inorganic modification to polyamide 6 (PA6) by sequential vapor infiltration (SVI) is demonstrated. The SVI process is a materials growth technique by which exposure of organometallic vapors to a polymeric material promotes the formation of a hybrid organic-inorganic modification at the near surface region of the polymer. This work investigates the SVI exposure temperature and cycling times of sequential exposures of trimethylaluminum (TMA) on PA6 fiber mats. The result of TMA exposure is the preferential subsurface organic-inorganic growth by diffusion into the polymer and reaction with the carbonyl in PA6. Mass gain, infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analysis indicate enhanced materials growth and uniformity at lower processing temperatures. The inverse relationship between mass gain and exposure temperature is explained by the formation of a hybrid layer that prevents the diffusion of TMA into the polymer to react with the PA6 upon subsequent exposure cycles. As few as 10 SVI exposure cycles are observed to saturate the growth, yielding a modified thickness of ∼75 nm and mass increase of ∼14 wt %. Removal of the inherent PA6 moisture content reduces the mass gain by ∼4 wt % at low temperature exposures. The ability to understand the characteristic growth process is critical for the development of the hybrid materials fabrication and modification techniques. PMID:23050951

  13. Chemical vapor deposition coating of fibers using microwave application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Hoover, Gordon (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition coating is carried out in a cylindrical cavity. The fibers are heated by a microwave source that is uses a TM0N0 mode, where O is an integer, and produces a field that depends substantially only on radius. The fibers are observed to determine their heating, and their position can be adjusted. Once the fibers are uniformly heated, a CVD reagent is added to process the fibers.

  14. Growth of zinc oxide by chemical vapor transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Makoto; Eto, Toshiaki; Wang, JiFeng; Masa, Yoshihiko; Isshiki, Minoru

    2005-04-01

    ZnO crystal growth by chemical vapor transport (CVT) is carried out using carbon as a transport agent. Under the optimum ΔT and growth temperature, a single crystal was grown. The carbon contamination is not detected by SIMS measurements and all the crystals are orange-red colored. It is claimed that the orange-red color is attributed to the shift of stoichiometry to zinc rich atmosphere.

  15. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  16. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition modeling: An assessment of current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1991-01-01

    The shortcomings of earlier approaches that assumed thermochemical equilibrium and used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) phase diagrams are pointed out. Significant advancements in predictive capabilities due to recent computational developments, especially those for deposition rates controlled by gas phase mass transport, are demonstrated. The importance of using the proper boundary conditions is stressed, and the availability and reliability of gas phase and surface chemical kinetic information are emphasized as the most limiting factors. Future directions for CVD are proposed on the basis of current needs for efficient and effective progress in CVD process design and optimization.

  18. Fabrication of commercial-scale fiber-reinforced hot-gas filters by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.R.

    1992-11-01

    Goal was to fabricate a filter for removing particulates from hot gases; principal applications would be in advanced utility processes such as pressurized fluidized bed combustion or coal gasification combined cycle systems. Filters were made in two steps: make a ceramic fiber preform and coat it with SiC by chemical vapor infiltration (CVD). The most promising construction was felt/filament wound. Light, tough ceramic composite filters can be made; reinforcement by continuous fibers is needed to avoid brittleness. Direct metal to filter contact does not damage the top which simplifies installation. However, much of the filter surface of felt/filament wound structures is closed over by the CVD coating, and the surface is rough and subject to delamination. Recommendations are given for improving the filters.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of conformal, functional, and responsive polymer films.

    PubMed

    Alf, Mahriah E; Asatekin, Ayse; Barr, Miles C; Baxamusa, Salmaan H; Chelawat, Hitesh; Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde; Petruczok, Christy D; Sreenivasan, Ramaswamy; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Trujillo, Nathan J; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Xu, Jingjing; Gleason, Karen K

    2010-05-11

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization utilizes the delivery of vapor-phase monomers to form chemically well-defined polymeric films directly on the surface of a substrate. CVD polymers are desirable as conformal surface modification layers exhibiting strong retention of organic functional groups, and, in some cases, are responsive to external stimuli. Traditional wet-chemical chain- and step-growth mechanisms guide the development of new heterogeneous CVD polymerization techniques. Commonality with inorganic CVD methods facilitates the fabrication of hybrid devices. CVD polymers bridge microfabrication technology with chemical, biological, and nanoparticle systems and assembly. Robust interfaces can be achieved through covalent grafting enabling high-resolution (60 nm) patterning, even on flexible substrates. Utilizing only low-energy input to drive selective chemistry, modest vacuum, and room-temperature substrates, CVD polymerization is compatible with thermally sensitive substrates, such as paper, textiles, and plastics. CVD methods are particularly valuable for insoluble and infusible films, including fluoropolymers, electrically conductive polymers, and controllably crosslinked networks and for the potential to reduce environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with solvents. Quantitative models aid the development of large-area and roll-to-roll CVD polymer reactors. Relevant background, fundamental principles, and selected applications are reviewed. PMID:20544886

  20. Model for the Vaporization of Mixed Organometallic Compounds in the Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Temperature Superconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Guangyao; Zhou, Gang; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1993-01-01

    A model of the vaporization and mass transport of mixed organometallics from a single source for thin film metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is presented. A stoichiometric gas phase can be obtained from a mixture of the organometallics in the desired mole ratios, in spite of differences in the volatilities of the individual compounds. Proper film composition and growth rates are obtained by controlling the velocity of a carriage containing the organometallics through the heating zone of a vaporizer.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition modeling for high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    The formalism for the accurate modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes has matured based on the well established principles of transport phenomena and chemical kinetics in the gas phase and on surfaces. The utility and limitations of such models are discussed in practical applications for high temperature structural materials. Attention is drawn to the complexities and uncertainties in chemical kinetics. Traditional approaches based on only equilibrium thermochemistry and/or transport phenomena are defended as useful tools, within their validity, for engineering purposes. The role of modeling is discussed within the context of establishing the link between CVD process parameters and material microstructures/properties. It is argued that CVD modeling is an essential part of designing CVD equipment and controlling/optimizing CVD processes for the production and/or coating of high performance structural materials.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper at reduced temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Eric M.; Willner, Bruce I.; Hwang, Jeonghyun; Sun, Shangzhu; Spencer, Michael; Salagaj, Tom; Mitchel, William C.; Sbrockey, Nick; Tompa, Gary S.

    2012-09-01

    A preliminary study on reduced temperature chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper substrates was performed. Graphene's exceptional mechanical strength, very high electrical and thermal conductivity, and stability at atomic layer thicknesses, generates potential for a broad range of applications, from nanodevices to transparent conductor to chemical sensor. Of the techniques demonstrated for graphene formation, chemical vapor deposition is the sole process suitable for manufacturing large area films. While large area film deposition of graphene has been shown on metal substrates, this process has been limited to high temperatures, 900-1000C, which increases the cost of production and limits methods of integrating the graphene with other material structures. In this work, CVD of graphene on copper foil was attempted over a range of temperatures (650 - 950C) on substrates as large as 5 x 15 cm in a horizontal tube reactor. Depositions were performed using both CVD and upstream Plasma-Enhanced CVD (PECVD), and the results are compared for both techniques. Quality of graphene films deposited with and without plasma enhancement was characterized by micro Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous semiconductor films. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Rocheleau, R.E.

    1984-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from higher order silanes has been studied for fabricating amorphous hydrogenated silicon thin-film solar cells. Intrinsic and doped a-Si:H films were deposited in a reduced-pressure, tubular-flow reactor, using disilane feed-gas. Conditions for depositing intrinsic films at growth rates up to 10 A/s were identified. Electrical and optical properties, including dark conductivity, photoconductivity, activation energy, optical absorption, band-gap and sub-band-gap absorption properties of CVD intrinsic material were characterized. Parameter space for depositing intrinsic and doped films, suitable for device analysis, was identified.

  4. Unusual thermopower of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Youngwoo; Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August; Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong; Woo Park, Yung

    2014-01-13

    We report on thermopower (TEP) and resistance measurements of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Unlike the conventional resistance of pristine graphene, the gate-dependent TEP shows a large electron-hole asymmetry. This can be accounted for by inhomogeneity of the CVD-graphene where individual graphene regions contribute with different TEPs. At the high magnetic field and low temperature, the TEP has large fluctuations near the Dirac point associated with the disorder in the CVD-graphene. TEP measurements reveal additional characteristics of CVD-graphene, which are difficult to obtain from the measurement of resistance alone.

  5. Fundamental studies of chemical vapor deposition diamond growth processes

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.; Heatherly, L.

    1991-01-01

    We are developing laser spectroscopic techniques to foster a fundamental understanding of diamond film growth by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several spectroscopic techniques are under investigation to identify intermediate species present in the bulk reactor volume, the thin active volume immediately above the growing film, and the actual growing surface. Such a comprehensive examination of the overall deposition process is necessary because a combination of gas phase and surface chemistry is probably operating. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) techniques have been emphasized. A growth rector that permits through-the-substrate gas sampling for REMPI/time-of-flight mass spectroscopy has been developed. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Unusual thermopower of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Youngwoo; Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong; Woo Park, Yung; Yurgens, August

    2014-01-01

    We report on thermopower (TEP) and resistance measurements of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Unlike the conventional resistance of pristine graphene, the gate-dependent TEP shows a large electron-hole asymmetry. This can be accounted for by inhomogeneity of the CVD-graphene where individual graphene regions contribute with different TEPs. At the high magnetic field and low temperature, the TEP has large fluctuations near the Dirac point associated with the disorder in the CVD-graphene. TEP measurements reveal additional characteristics of CVD-graphene, which are difficult to obtain from the measurement of resistance alone.

  7. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  8. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide mirrors for extreme ultraviolet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Osantowski, John F.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Saha, Timo T.; Wright, Geraldine A.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Fleetwood, Charles M.; Madison, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in optical coating and materials technology have made possible the development of instruments with substantially improved efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). For example, the development of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC mirrors provides an opportunity to extend the range of normal-incidence instruments dow to 60 nm. CVD SiC is a highly polishable material yielding low- scattering surfaces. High UV reflectivity and desirable mechanical and thermal properties make CVD SiC an attractive mirror and/or coating material for EUV applications. The EUV performance of SiC mirrors, as well as some strengths and problem areas, is discussed.

  9. Damping mechanisms in chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Goldsby, Jon C.

    1993-01-01

    Evaluating the damping of reinforcement fibers is important for understanding their microstructures and the vibrational response of their structural composites. In this study the damping capacities of two types of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers were measured from -200 C to as high as 800 C. Measurements were made at frequencies in the range 50 to 15000 Hz on single cantilevered fibers. At least four sources were identified which contribute to fiber damping, the most significant being thermoelastic damping and grain boundary sliding. The mechanisms controlling all sources and their potential influence on fiber and composite performance are discussed.

  10. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of multiwalled carbon nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Kristopher; Cruden, Brett A.; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.; Delzeit, Lance

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to grow vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanofibers (MWNFs). The graphite basal planes in these nanofibers are not parallel as in nanotubes; instead they exhibit a small angle resembling a stacked cone arrangement. A parametric study with varying process parameters such as growth temperature, feedstock composition, and substrate power has been conducted, and these parameters are found to influence the growth rate, diameter, and morphology. The well-aligned MWNFs are suitable for fabricating electrode systems in sensor and device development.

  11. Chemical Vapor Deposited Zinc Sulfide. SPIE Press Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Tustison, Randal W.

    2013-04-22

    Zinc sulfide has shown unequaled utility for infrared windows that require a combination of long-wavelength infrared transparency, mechanical durability, and elevated-temperature performance. This book reviews the physical properties of chemical vapor deposited ZnS and their relationship to the CVD process that produced them. An in-depth look at the material microstructure is included, along with a discussion of the material's optical properties. Finally, because the CVD process itself is central to the development of this material, a brief history is presented.

  12. Spectroscopic Observation of Chemical Interaction Between Impact-induced Vapor Clouds and the Ambient Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugita, S.; Heineck, J. T.; Schultz, P. H.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical reactions within impact-induced vapor clouds were observed in laboratory experiments using a spectroscopic method. The results indicate that projectile-derived carbon-rich vapor reacts intensively with atmospheric nitrogen.

  13. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon from disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaert, R.J.; Russell, T.W.F.; Klein, M.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Rocheleau, R.E.; Baron, B.N. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1989-10-01

    The authors describe hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited at growth rates of 1 to 30 A/s by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane source gas at 24 torr total pressure in a tubular reactor. The effects of substrate temperature and gas holding time (flow rate) on film growth rate and effluent gas composition were measured at temperatures ranging from 360{sup 0} to 485{sup 0}C and gas holding times from 3 to 62s. Effluent gases determined by gas chromatography included silane, disilane and other higher order silanes. A chemical reaction engineering model, based on a silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion gas phase reaction network and film growth from both SiH/sub 2/ and high molecular weight silicon species, Si/sub n/H/sub 2n/, was developed. The model predictions were in good agreement with experimentally determined growth rates and effluent gas compositions.

  15. Condensable chemical vapors for sterilization of freeze dryers.

    PubMed

    Bardat, A; Schmitthaeusler, R; Renzi, E

    1996-01-01

    Sterilization of freeze dryers is usually performed by subjecting them to saturated steam under pressure by steam (121 degrees C, 2 bar a., 30 minutes). In order to avoid such stressful conditions, another process was designed on the basis of a strong oxidizing mixture of condensable chemical vapors, consisting of ozone and hydrogen peroxide in acidic conditions. This process works at sub-zero temperatures up to 30 degrees C and under negative pressure. 10(6), inoculum of standard biological indicators as well as wild types of bioburden were easely sterilized from 2 minutes up to 10 minutes. Other parameters were studied, in order to optimize the main process conditions: temperature, pressure, concentration of chemicals, type of micro-organisms and their environmental surroundings. PMID:8935775

  16. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic silicon carbide. Patent Application

    SciTech Connect

    Addamiano, A.

    1985-07-02

    This invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide crystals. More specifically, this invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). One object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of cubic SiC for high temperature electronic devices. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of highly pure, single crystal cubic SiC that is duplicable. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of large-area single-crystal wafers of cubic SiC. These and other objects of the present invention can be achieved by a method for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic Silicon Carbide (SiC) comprising the steps of etching silicon substrated having one mechanically polished face; depositing a thin buffer layer of cubic SiC formed by reaction between a heated Si substrate and a H2-C3H8 gas mixuture; and depositing SiC on the buffer layer at high temperature using H2+C3HY+SiH4 mixture.

  17. Chemical vapor composite silicon carbide for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, C. T.; Webb, K.

    2006-06-01

    Components for space telescopes using high quality silicon carbide (SiC) produced via the chemical vapor composite (CVC) process are currently under development. This CVC process is a modification of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and results in a dramatic reduction in residual stress of the SiC deposit. The resultant CVC SiC material has high modulus, high thermal conductivity and can be polished to better than 1nm RMS surface roughness, making it ideal for space telescopes requiring lightweight, stiff and thermally stable components. Moreover, due to its lower intrinsic stress, CVC SiC is much more readily scaled to large sizes and manufactured into the complex geometries needed for the telescope assemblies. Results are presented on the optical figure for a lightweight 15cm CVC SiC mirror demonstrating low wavefront error (<30nm peak-to-valley and <5.1nm rms). Theoretical and experimental modal analysis measured the first four resonant modes of the mirror and found a first modal frequency in the vicinity of 2100 Hz, representing a highly stiff mirror.

  18. Minefield edge detection using a novel chemical vapor sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Mark E.; Sikes, John

    2003-09-01

    Nomadics has developed a novel sensing technology that detects the chemical signature of explosives emanating from buried landmines. Canines have demonstrated the ability to detect these signatures, but use of canines for this task presents a number of logistical and physical limitations that can be overcome by use of chemical sensors. Nomadics is the exclusive licensee of novel amplifying fluorescent polymer materials developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). These materials enable detection of ultra-trace concentrations of nitroaromatic compounds such as TNT, the most commonly utilized explosive in the production of landmines. When vapors of nitroaromatics are presented to the sensor, the fluorescent polymers emit light at a greatly reduced intensity, a property that enables rapid detection of trace quantities of explosives using relatively low-cost electronics and optics. Studies performed by Jenkins et al suggest that the chemical signature of a landmine is heterogeneous and can be dispersed a significant distance from the location of the mine. Because the signature is not highly localized and is not characterized by a well-defined concentration gradient, the sensor may have difficulty indicating the exact position of a mine, especially in high-density minefields. Conversely, if the chemical signature extends some distance from the mine position, the sensor may have utility in detecting the edges of minefields. In combat scenarios, this will allow commanders to select safe paths for personnel and vehicles. This paper will present the latest findings related to minefield edge detection at several test sites.

  19. Modeling of InP metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Linda R.; Clark, Ivan O.; Kui, J.; Jesser, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of InP by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in a horizontal reactor is being modeled with a commercially available computational fluid dynamics modeling code. The mathematical treatment of the MOCVD process has four primary areas of concern: 1) transport phenomena, 2) chemistry, 3) boundary conditions, and 4) numerical solution methods. The transport processes involved in CVD are described by conservation of total mass, momentum, energy, and atomic species. Momentum conservation is described by a generalized form of the Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid and laminar flow. The effect of Soret diffusion on the transport of particular chemical species and on the predicted deposition rate is examined. Both gas-phase and surface chemical reactions are employed in the model. Boundary conditions are specified at the inlet and walls of the reactor for temperature, fluid flow and chemical species. The coupled set of equations described above is solved by a finite difference method over a nonuniform rectilinear grid in both two and three dimensions. The results of the 2-D computational model is presented for gravity levels of zero- and one-g. The predicted growth rates at one-g are compared to measured growth rates on fused silica substrates.

  20. Nanograined WC-Co Composite Powders by Chemical Vapor Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Taegong; Sohn, H. Y.; Han, Gilsoo; Kim, Young-Ugk; Hwang, Kyu Sup; Mena, M.; Fang, Zhigang Z.

    2008-02-01

    Nanograined tungsten carbide (WC) Co composite powders were prepared by a chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) process that has previously been used for preparing the aluminides of titanium and nickel and other metallic and intermetallic powders at the University of Utah. To determine the optimum condition for producing nanograined WC-Co composite powders, the effects of carburization temperature, CH4 to WCl6 ratio, CH4 to H2 ratio, CoCl2 contents, and residence time of WC on the powder composition and particle size were investigated. The reduction and carburization of the vaporized chlorides by CH4-H2 mixtures produced nanograined WC and Co composite powder, which sometimes contained small levels of W2C, W, or the η (Co3W3C) phase. The presence of these incompletely carburized phases can be tolerated because they can be fully carburized during the subsequent sintering process. These phases can also be fully carburized by a separate post-treatment. The products were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). As a result, nanograined WC-Co composite with the particle size less than 30 nm was obtained.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition coatings for oxidation protection of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Robinson, J. C.; Clark, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the oxidation protection afforded to Ti-14Al-21Nb and Ti-14Al-23Nb-2V titanium aluminides and Ti-17Mo-3Al-3Nb titanium alloy by aluminum-boron-silicon and boron-silicon coatings are presented. These coatings are applied by a combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The former is for the application of aluminum, and the latter is for codeposition of boron and silicon. Coating thickness is in the range of 2 to 7 microns, and coating weights are 0.6 to 2.0 mg/sq cm. Oxidation testing was performed in air at temperatures to 1255 K in both static and hypersonic flow environments. The degree of oxidation protection provided by the coatings is determined from weight change measurements made during the testing and post test compositional analyses. Temperature-dependent total normal emittance data are also presented for four coating/substrate combinations. Both types of coatings provided excellent oxidation protection for the exposure conditions of this investigation. Total normal emittances were greater than 0.80 in all cases.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Aaron; Bett, Dominic; Cunningham, Monisha; Sen, Sudip

    2015-04-01

    Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) is a process used to deposit thin films from a gas state (vapor) to a solid state on a substrate. Recent study from the X-ray diffraction spectra of SnO2 films deposited as a function of RF power apparently indicates that RF power is playing a stabilizing role and hence in the better deposition. The results show that the RF power results in smoother morphology, improved crystallinity, and lower sheet resistance value in the PECVD process. The PECVD processing allows deposition at lower temperatures, which is often critical in the manufacture of semiconductors. In this talk we will address two aspects of the problem, first to develop a model to study the mechanism of how the PECVD is effected by the RF power, and second to actually simulate the effect of RF power on PECVD. As the PECVD is a very important component of the plasma processing technology with many applications in the semiconductor technology and surface science, the research proposed here has the prospect to revolutionize the plasma processing technology through the stabilizing role of the RF power.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis F.B. Jr.; Delahoy, A.E.

    1985-07-15

    Deposition conditions and film properties for a variety of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and silicon-carbon films produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are discussed. Deposition gases include monosilane, disilane, trisilane, and acetylene. Two types of optically wide band-gap p layers are obtained. One of these window p layers (without carbon) has been extensively tested in photovoltaic devices. Remarkably, this p layer can be deposited between about 200 to 300 /sup 0/C. A typical open circuit voltage in an all CVD p-i-n device is 0.70--0.72 V, and in a hybrid device where the i and n layers are deposited by glow discharge, 0.8--0.83 V.

  4. Textures and morphologies of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L.; Horton, L.L.; Specht, E.D.; Begun, G.M. ); Wang, Z.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The textures, surface morphologies, structural perfection, and properties of diamond films grown by activated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) vary greatly with the growth conditions. The evolution of two commonly observed polycrystalline morphologies, which give rise to <110> textures, will be described as well as the development of four films grown to produce <100>, <111>, and near <100>'' textures with various combinations of growth facets. These films were grown to test models of texture development. Films free of twins, microtwins, and stacking faults are deposited when only (100) facets are permitted to grow. In polycrystalline materials, special conditions must be met to avoid the formation of planar defects at the peripheries of individual crystallites. The planar defects grow from (111) or mixed microfaceted surfaces. Twinning plays an important role in growth of (111) faceted surfaces. The films have been characterized with Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and optical methods. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Radio-frequency plasma chemical vapor deposition growth of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Duane E.; Dillon, Rodney O.; Woollam, John A.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at 13.56 MHz has been used to produce diamond particles in two different inductively coupled systems with a mixture of methane and hydrogen. The effect of a diamondlike carbon (DLC) overcoating on silicon, niobium, and stainless-steel substrates has been investigated and in the case of silicon has been found to enhance particle formation as compared to uncoated polished silicon. In addition the use of carbon monoxide in hydrogen has been found to produce well-defined individual faceted particles as well as polycrystalline films on quartz and DLC coated silicon substrates. Plasma CVD is a competitive approach to production of diamond films. It has the advantage over microwave systems of being easily scaled to large volume and high power.

  6. Chemical vapor synthesis and characterization of aluminum nanopowder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Won; Sohn, Hong Yong; Choi, Young Joon; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    Aluminum is a component in many promising hydrogen storage materials such as aluminum hydride and complex aluminum hydrides. In this research, Al and TiAl 3-containing Al nanopowders were prepared by a chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) process using Mg as the reducing agent. XRD and EDS results indicated that the produced powder was composed of Al or Al with TiAl 3. The shape of the powder was spherical with the average size in the range of 10-50 nm measured by SEM, TEM, BET and ZetaPALS compared with the typically larger than 100 nm for commercially available fine Al powders. In addition, the effects of the operating conditions such as Ar flow rate, precursor feed rate and reaction temperature on the properties of the product powder were investigated.

  7. Chemical vapor deposition growth of patterned graphene on copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Humberto; Wang, Bei; Zhu, J.

    2010-03-01

    Graphene possesses unique electronic properties and application potentials. However, the synthesis of high-quality, single-layer graphene on large scale remains challenging. Mechanical exfoliation from graphite crystals yields graphene of the highest quality but in an uncontrolled and non-scalable way. Epitaxial growth on SiC has made significant advances in large-scale synthesis, although the cost is relatively high. Very recently, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is used to grow graphene on Ni and Cu surfaces and has also produced large-area graphene of reasonably high quality. Cracks and ripples, however, present considerable challenges to the CVD growth and transfer process. We report the CVD growth of single-layer graphene on patterned, micron-size copper templates. Raman spectra of the films show low D-band and relatively narrow 2D peak, suggesting high quality. We present and discuss the transport properties of graphene films transferred onto an insulating substrate.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition fluid flow simulation modelling tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullister, Edward T.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate numerical simulation of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes requires a general purpose computational fluid dynamics package combined with specialized capabilities for high temperature chemistry. In this report, we describe the implementation of these specialized capabilities in the spectral element code NEKTON. The thermal expansion of the gases involved is shown to be accurately approximated by the low Mach number perturbation expansion of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The radiative heat transfer between multiple interacting radiating surfaces is shown to be tractable using the method of Gebhart. The disparate rates of reaction and diffusion in CVD processes are calculated via a point-implicit time integration scheme. We demonstrate the use above capabilities on prototypical CVD applications.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of low reflective cobalt (II) oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin-Chalhoub, Eliane; Duguet, Thomas; Samélor, Diane; Debieu, Olivier; Ungureanu, Elisabeta; Vahlas, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Low reflective CoO coatings are processed by chemical vapor deposition from Co2(CO)8 at temperatures between 120 °C and 190 °C without additional oxygen source. The optical reflectivity in the visible and near infrared regions stems from 2 to 35% depending on deposition temperature. The combination of specific microstructural features of the coatings, namely a fractal "cauliflower" morphology and a grain size distribution more or less covering the near UV and IR wavelength ranges enhance light scattering and gives rise to a low reflectivity. In addition, the columnar morphology results in a density gradient in the vertical direction that we interpret as a refractive index gradient lowering reflectivity further down. The coating formed at 180 °C shows the lowest average reflectivity (2.9%), and presents an interesting deep black diffuse aspect.

  10. Synthesis of large-size graphene by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruizhe; Ding, Yao; Gan, Lin; Luo, Zhengtang

    2015-09-01

    The requirement for long-range structure coherence and property uniformity for graphene-based electronics are crucial for their applications in electronics. Here, we briefly review our recent progress on synthesis of large-size graphene by seeded growth method. We demonstrate a seeded growth method which allows us to reduce the nucleation density in early stage of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) leading to the production of low density of graphene grains and consequently achieve grain size of sub-centimeter. We further demonstrate that we can amplify the graphene grain size by limiting the second seeded growth only from the graphene seed edges. Moreover, we demonstrate that similar method can be used for the preparation of large-grain bilayer graphene flakes.

  11. Chemical Vapor Deposition at High Pressure in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, Sonya; Bachmann, Klaus; LeSure, Stacie; Sukidi, Nkadi; Wang, Fuchao

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an evaluation of critical requirements of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) at elevated pressure for a channel flow reactor in a microgravity environment. The objective of using high pressure is to maintain single-phase surface composition for materials that have high thermal decomposition pressure at their optimum growth temperature. Access to microgravity is needed to maintain conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for process analysis. Based on ground based observations we present an optimized reactor design for OMCVD at high pressure and reduced gravity. Also, we discuss non-intrusive real-time optical monitoring of flow dynamics coupled to homogeneous gas phase reactions, transport and surface processes. While suborbital flights may suffice for studies of initial stages of heteroepitaxy experiments in space are essential for a complete evaluation of steady-state growth.

  12. Optics applications of chemical vapor deposited beta-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goela, Jitendra S.; Pickering, Michael A.

    1997-09-01

    The fabrication process, properties and optics applications of transparent and opaque chemical vapor deposited (CVD) (beta) -SiC are reviewed. CVD-SiC is produced by the pyrolysis of methyltrichlorosilane, in excess H2, in a low-pressure CVD reactor. The CVD process has been successfully scaled to produce monolithic SiC parts of diameter up to 1.5-m and thickness 2.5-cm. The characterization of CVD-SiC for important physical, optical, mechanical and thermal properties indicates that it is a superior material for optics applications. Important properties of CVD-SiC are compared with those of the other candidate mirror and window materials. The applications of CVD-SiC for lightweight optics, x-ray telescopes, optical buffers, lens molds, optical standards and windows and domes are discussed in detail.

  13. Chemical vapor deposited {beta}-SiC for optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goela, J.S.; Pikcering, M.A.; Taylor, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The fabrication, properties and optics applications of transparent and opaque Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) {beta}-SiC are reviewed. CVD-SiC is fabricated by the pyrolysis of methyltrichlorosilane, in excess H{sub 2}, in a low-pressure CVD reactor. The CVD process has been successfully scaled to produce monolithic SiC parts of diameter up to 1.5 m and thickness 2.5 cm. The characterization of CVD-SiC for important physical, optical, mechanical and thermal properties indicate that it is a superior material for optics applications. CVD-SiC properties are compared with those of the other candidate mirror and window materials. SiC process/property relationships are discussed, emphasizing the differences in process conditions, microstructure, and properties between transparent and opaque CVD-SiC.

  14. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Auger, M.; Sarin, V.K.

    1996-08-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{circ}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}-SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  15. Strain relaxation in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Troppenz, Gerald V. Gluba, Marc A.; Kraft, Marco; Rappich, Jörg; Nickel, Norbert H.

    2013-12-07

    The growth of single layer graphene by chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Cu substrates induces large internal biaxial compressive strain due to thermal expansion mismatch. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the strain relaxation during and after the transfer process from Cu foil to SiO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the growth of graphene results in a pronounced ripple structure on the Cu substrate that is indicative of strain relaxation of about 0.76% during the cooling from the growth temperature. Removing graphene from the Cu substrates and transferring it to SiO{sub 2} results in a shift of the 2D phonon line by 27 cm{sup −1} to lower frequencies. This translates into additional strain relaxation. The influence of the processing steps, used etching solution and solvents on strain, is investigated.

  16. Development and study of chemical vapor deposited tantalum base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, G. H.; Bryant, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    A technique for the chemical vapor deposition of alloys was developed. The process, termed pulsing, involves the periodic injection of reactant gases into a previously-evacuated reaction chamber where they blanket the substrate almost instantaneously. Formation of alternating layers of the alloy components and subsequent homogenization allows the formation of an alloy of uniform composition with the composition being determined by the duration and relative numbers of the various cycles. The technique has been utilized to produce dense alloys of uniform thickness and composition (Ta- 10 wt % W) by depositing alternating layers of Ta and W by the hydrogen reduction of TaCl5 and WCl6. A similar attempt to deposit a Ta - 8 wt % W - 2 wt% Hf alloy was unsuccessful because of the difficulty in reducing HfCl4 at temperatures below those at which gas phase nucleation of Ta and W occurred.

  17. Creep of chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The creep, thermal expansion, and elastic modulus properties for chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers were measured between 1000 and 1500 C. Creep strain was observed to increase logarithmically with time, monotonically with temperature, and linearly with tensile stress up to 600 MPa. The controlling activation energy was 480 + or - 20 kJ/mole. Thermal pretreatments near 1200 and 1450 C were found to significantly reduce fiber creep. These results coupled with creep recovery observations indicate that below 1400 C fiber creep is anelastic with neglible plastic component. This allowed a simple predictive method to be developed for describing fiber total deformation as a function of time, temperature, and stress. Mechanistic analysis of the property data suggests that fiber creep is the result of beta-SiC grain boundary sliding controlled by a small percent of free silicon in the grain boundaries.

  18. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  19. Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochrane, J. C.; Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) could improve numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been made in investigating the growth mechanism of MWCNT to synthesize high quality MWCNT. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used for MWCNT synthesis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) are useful methods for analyzing the structure, morphology and composition of MWCNT. Temperature and pressure are two important growth parameters for fabricating carbon nanotubes. In MWCNT growth by CVD, the plasma assisted method is normally used for low temperature growth. However a high temperature environment is required for thermal CVD. A systematic study of temperature and pressure-dependence is very helpful to understanding MWCNT growth. Transition metal particles are commonly used as catalysis in carbon nanotube growth. It is also interesting to know how temperature and pressure affect the interface of carbon species and catalyst particles

  20. Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Thin Film Magnets

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Joel S.; Pokhodnya, Kostyantyn I.

    2003-12-09

    A thin-film magnet formed from a gas-phase reaction of tetracyanoetheylene (TCNE) OR (TCNQ), 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-P-quinodimethane, and a vanadium-containing compound such as vanadium hexcarbonyl (V(CO).sub.6) and bis(benzene)vanalium (V(C.sub.6 H.sub.6).sub.2) and a process of forming a magnetic thin film upon at least one substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a process temperature not exceeding approximately 90.degree. C. and in the absence of a solvent. The magnetic thin film is particularly suitable for being disposed upon rigid or flexible substrates at temperatures in the range of 40.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The present invention exhibits air-stable characteristics and qualities and is particularly suitable for providing being disposed upon a wide variety of substrates.

  1. Chemical and Magnetic Order in Vapor-Deposited Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Peter Wiliam

    1995-01-01

    A stochastic Monte Carlo model of vapor deposition and growth of a crystalline, binary, A_3 B metallic alloy with a negative energy of mixing has been developed which incorporates deposition and surface diffusion in a physically correct manner and allows the simulation of deposition rates that are experimentally realizable. The effects of deposition rate and growth temperature on the development of short range order (SRO) in vapor-deposited films have been examined using this model. SRO in the simulated films increases with growth temperature up to the point at which the temperature corresponds to the energy of mixing, but we see no corresponding development of anisotropic SRO (preferential ordering of A-B pairs along the growth direction). Epitaxial (100) and (111) CoPt_3 films have been deposited over a range of growth temperatures from -50^circ C to 800^circC. Curie temperature (T_{rm c}) and saturation magnetization are dramatically enhanced in those films grown near 400^circ C over the values expected for the chemically homogeneous alloy. Magnetization data indicates that the high T _{rm c} films are inhomogeneous. These phenomena are interpreted as evidence of a previously unobserved magnetically driven miscibility gap in the Co-Pt phase diagram. Films grown near 400^circ C exhibit large uniaxial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy that cannot be accounted for by strain. The observed anisotropy coincides with the chemical phase separation and it seems likely that these two phenomena are related. Long range order (LRO) in the as-deposited films peaks at a growth temperature of 630^circC and then decreases with decreasing growth temperature. The decrease in LRO is either due to kinetic frustration or to competition from magnetically induced Co clustering. Theoretical phase diagrams based on the appropriate Blume-Emery-Griffiths Hamiltonian suggest the latter.

  2. Direct synthesis of large area graphene on insulating substrate by gallium vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Katsuhisa Hiyama, Takaki; Kuwajima, Tomoya; Fujita, Jun-ichi; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Hirukawa, Ayaka; Kano, Emi; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2015-03-02

    A single layer of graphene with dimensions of 20 mm × 20 mm was grown directly on an insulating substrate by chemical vapor deposition using Ga vapor catalysts. The graphene layer showed highly homogeneous crystal quality over a large area on the insulating substrate. The crystal quality of the graphene was measured by Raman spectroscopy and was found to improve with increasing Ga vapor density on the reaction area. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the synthesized graphene had a perfect atomic-scale crystal structure within its grains, which ranged in size from 50 nm to 200 nm.

  3. Graphene-Based Chemical Vapor Sensors for Electronic Nose Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallon, Eric C.

    An electronic nose (e-nose) is a biologically inspired device designed to mimic the operation of the olfactory system. The e-nose utilizes a chemical sensor array consisting of broadly responsive vapor sensors, whose combined response produces a unique pattern for a given compound or mixture. The sensor array is inspired by the biological function of the receptor neurons found in the human olfactory system, which are inherently cross-reactive and respond to many different compounds. The use of an e-nose is an attractive approach to predict unknown odors and is used in many fields for quantitative and qualitative analysis. If properly designed, an e-nose has the potential to adapt to new odors it was not originally designed for through laboratory training and algorithm updates. This would eliminate the lengthy and costly R&D costs associated with materiel and product development. Although e-nose technology has been around for over two decades, much research is still being undertaken in order to find new and more diverse types of sensors. Graphene is a single-layer, 2D material comprised of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, with extraordinary electrical, mechanical, thermal and optical properties due to its 2D, sp2-bonded structure. Graphene has much potential as a chemical sensing material due to its 2D structure, which provides a surface entirely exposed to its surrounding environment. In this configuration, every carbon atom in graphene is a surface atom, providing the greatest possible surface area per unit volume, so that electron transport is highly sensitive to adsorbed molecular species. Graphene has gained much attention since its discovery in 2004, but has not been realized in many commercial electronics. It has the potential to be a revolutionary material for use in chemical sensors due to its excellent conductivity, large surface area, low noise, and versatile surface for functionalization. In this work, graphene is incorporated into a

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon films from disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaert, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous silicon films for fabrication of solar cells have been deposited by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/) using a tubular flow reactor. A mathematical description for the CVD reactor was developed and solved by a numerical procedure. The proposed chemical reaction network for the model is based on silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion in the gas phase and film growth from SiH/sub 2/ and silicon polymers (Si/sub n/N/sub 2n/, n approx. 10). Estimates of the rate constants have been obtained for trisilane decomposition, silicon polymer formation, and polymer dehydrogenation. The silane unimolecular decomposition rate constants were corrected for pressure effects. The model behavior is compared to the experimental results over the range of conditions: reactor temperature (360 to 485/sup 0/C), pressures (2 to 48 torr), and gas holding time (1 to 70 s). Within the above range of conditions, film growth rate varies from 0.01 to 30 A/s. Results indicate that silicon polymers are the main film precursors for gas holding times greater than 3 s. Film growth by silylene only becomes important at short holding times, large inert gas dilution, and positions near the beginning of the reactor hot zone.

  5. Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reye, John T.; McFadden, Lisa S.; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    With the rise of environmental awareness and the renewed importance of environmentally friendly processes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has targeted surface pre-treatment processes based on chromates. Indeed, this process has been subject to regulations under the Clean Water Act as well as other environmental initiatives, and there is today a marked movement to phase the process out in the near future. Therefore, there is a clear need for new advances in coating technology that could provide practical options for replacing present industrial practices. Depending on the final application, such coatings might be required to be resistant to corrosion, act as chemically resistant coatings, or both. This research examined a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) mechanism to deposit uniform conversion coatings onto aluminum alloy substrates. Robust protocols based on solutions of aryl phosphate ester and multi-oxide conversion coating (submicron) films were successfully grown onto the aluminum alloy samples. These films were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary results indicate the potential of this technology to replace aqueous-based chromate processes.

  6. Correlation of chemical evaporation rate with vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Donald; van Wesenbeeck, Ian

    2014-09-01

    A new one-parameter correlation is developed for the evaporation rate (ER) of chemicals as a function of molar mass (M) and vapor pressure (P) that is simpler than existing correlations. It applies only to liquid surfaces that are unaffected by the underlying solid substrate as occurs in the standard ASTM evaporation rate test and to quiescent liquid pools. The relationship has a sounder theoretical basis than previous correlations because ER is correctly correlated with PM rather than P alone. The inclusion of M increases the slope of previous log ER versus log P regressions to a value close to 1.0 and yields a simpler one-parameter correlation, namely, ER (μg m(-1) h(-1)) = 1464P (Pa) × M (g mol(-1)). Applications are discussed for the screening level assessment and ranking of chemicals for evaporation rate, such as pesticides, fumigants, and hydrocarbon carrier fluids used in pesticide formulations, liquid consumer products used indoors, and accidental spills of liquids. The mechanistic significance of the single parameter as a mass-transfer coefficient or velocity is discussed. PMID:25105222

  7. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  8. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  9. A model of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Kee, R.J. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper presents a model describing the interacting gas phase and surface chemistry present during the steady-state chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon carbide (SiC). In this work, the authors treat the case of steady-state deposition of SiC from silane (SiH{sub 4}) and propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) mixtures in hydrogen carrier gas at one atmosphere pressure. Epitaxial deposition is assumed to occur on a pre-existing epitaxial silicon carbide crystal. Pyrolysis of SiH{sub 4} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} is modeled by 83 elementary gas-phase reactions. A set of 36 reactions of gas- phase species with the surface is used to simulate the deposition process. Rates for the gas/surface reactions were obtained from experimental measurements of sticking coefficients in the literature and theoretical estimates. The authors' results represent the first simulation of a silicon carbide deposition process that includes detailed description of both the gas phase and surface reactions. The chemical reaction mechanism is also combined with a model of a rotating disk reactor (RDR), which is a convenient way to study the interaction of chemical reactions with fluid mechanics. Transport of species from the gas to the surface is accounted for using multicomponent transport properties. Predictions of deposition rates as a function of susceptor temperature, disk rotation rate, and reactant partial pressure are presented. In addition, velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles normal to the heated disk for 41 gas-phase species are determined using reactor conditions typical of epitaxial silicon carbide deposition on silicon substrates.

  10. Graphene by one-step chemical vapor deposition from ferrocene vapors: Properties and electrochemical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilatos, George; Perdikaki, Anna V.; Sapalidis, Andreas; Pappas, George S.; Giannakopoulou, Tatiana; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Xenogiannopoulou, Evangelia; Boukos, Nikos; Dimoulas, Athanasios; Trapalis, Christos; Kanellopoulos, Nick K.; Karanikolos, Georgios N.

    2016-02-01

    Growth of few-layer graphene using ferrocene as precursor by chemical vapor deposition is reported. The growth did not involve any additional carbon or catalyst source or external hydrocarbon gases. Parametric investigation was performed using different conditions, namely, varying growth temperature from 600 to1000 °C, and growth duration from 5 min to 3 h, as well as using fast quenching or gradual cooling after the thermal treatment, in order to examine the effect on the quality of the produced graphene. The growth took place on silicon wafers and resulted, under optimal conditions, in formation of graphene with 2-3 layers and high graphitic quality, as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy, with characteristic full width at half maximum of the 2D band of 49.46 cm-1, and I2D/IG and ID/IG intensity ratios of 1.15 and 0.26, respectively. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to further evaluate graphene characteristics and enlighten growth mechanism. Electrochemical evaluation of the developed material was performed using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements.

  11. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-01

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  12. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  13. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma or thermally enhanced low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond films is an exciting development with many challenging fundamental problems. The early stages of nucleation is relevant to the initial growth rate and the perfection and morphology of the deposit. To isolate one of the factors that influence nucleation, we have studied the effect of surface topography on the nucleation process. Our earlier work has shown preferential nucleation on sharp convex features and we have proposed several possible reasons for this behavior, including dangling bonds at the convex features. In our recent work, we have extended our investigation to include a novel patterning of silicon substrates used to pattern silicon solar cells. The results are consistent with our earlier observations that the majority of nucleation events occur on protruding surface features. In an effort to establish whether dangling bonds at the protruding surfaces may be responsible for the selective nucleation, we have evaluated the dangling bond concentration using electron spin resonance. We have carried out deposition under nominally identical surface topography, but with different concentrations of dangling bonds at or near the surface. The results of this study indicate that dangling bonds play a minor role in enhancing nucleation, in contrast to a substantial role played by special surface topographical features. In the course of the past year, we have submitted four manuscripts for publication and have made six presentations.

  14. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkov, V. I.; Kucherova, O. V.; Bogdanov, S. A.; Zubkova, A. V.; Butler, J. E.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, A. V.; Vikharev, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120-150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10-13 down to 2 × 10-17 cm2 was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (˜2 × 10-20 cm2). At T > Troom in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  15. nanowires by solid-source chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ning; Wang, Fengyun; Yang, Zaixing; Yip, SenPo; Dong, Guofa; Lin, Hao; Fang, Ming; Hung, TakFu; Ho, Johnny C.

    2014-07-01

    Growing Ga2O3 dielectric materials at a moderately low temperature is important for the further development of high-mobility III-V semiconductor-based nanoelectronics. Here, β-Ga2O3 nanowires are successfully synthesized at a relatively low temperature of 610°C by solid-source chemical vapor deposition employing GaAs powders as the source material, which is in a distinct contrast to the typical synthesis temperature of above 1,000°C as reported by other methods. In this work, the prepared β-Ga2O3 nanowires are mainly composed of Ga and O elements with an atomic ratio of approximately 2:3. Importantly, they are highly crystalline in the monoclinic structure with varied growth orientations in low-index planes. The bandgap of the β-Ga2O3 nanowires is determined to be 251 nm (approximately 4.94 eV), in good accordance with the literature. Also, electrical characterization reveals that the individual nanowire has a resistivity of up to 8.5 × 107 Ω cm, when fabricated in the configuration of parallel arrays, further indicating the promise of growing these highly insulating Ga2O3 materials in this III-V nanowire-compatible growth condition.

  16. Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Organic Magnet, Vanadium Tetracyanoethylene.

    PubMed

    Harberts, Megan; Lu, Yu; Yu, Howard; Epstein, Arthur J; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of organic materials has yielded devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) which have advantages not found in traditional materials, including low cost and mechanical flexibility. In a similar vein, it would be advantageous to expand the use of organics into high frequency electronics and spin-based electronics. This work presents a synthetic process for the growth of thin films of the room temperature organic ferrimagnet, vanadium tetracyanoethylene (V[TCNE]x, x~2) by low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The thin film is grown at <60 °C, and can accommodate a wide variety of substrates including, but not limited to, silicon, glass, Teflon and flexible substrates. The conformal deposition is conducive to pre-patterned and three-dimensional structures as well. Additionally this technique can yield films with thicknesses ranging from 30 nm to several microns. Recent progress in optimization of film growth creates a film whose qualities, such as higher Curie temperature (600 K), improved magnetic homogeneity, and narrow ferromagnetic resonance line-width (1.5 G) show promise for a variety of applications in spintronics and microwave electronics. PMID:26168285

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of high T sub c superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. W.; Engelhardt, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The results are reported of an investigation into the synthesis and properties of high temperature superconducting materials. A chemical vapor deposition apparatus was designed and built which is suitable for the preparation of multicomponent metal films This apparatus was used to prepare a series of high T sub c A-15 structure superconducting films in the binary system Nb-Ge. The effect on T sub c of a variety of substrate materials was investigated. An extensive series of ternary alloys were also prepared. Conditions allowing the brittle high T sub c (approximately 18 K) A-15 structure superconductor Nb3A1 to be prepared in a low T sub c but ductile form were found. Some of the ways that the ductile (bcc) form can be cold worked or machined are described. Measurements of rate of transformation of cold worked bcc material to the high T sub c A-15 structure with low temperature annealing are given. Preliminary measurements indicate that this material has attractive high field critical current densities.

  18. Residual metallic contamination of transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene.

    PubMed

    Lupina, Grzegorz; Kitzmann, Julia; Costina, Ioan; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Vaziri, Sam; Östling, Mikael; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Kataria, Satender; Gahoi, Amit; Lemme, Max C; Ruhl, Guenther; Zoth, Guenther; Luxenhofer, Oliver; Mehr, Wolfgang

    2015-05-26

    Integration of graphene with Si microelectronics is very appealing by offering a potentially broad range of new functionalities. New materials to be integrated with the Si platform must conform to stringent purity standards. Here, we investigate graphene layers grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition and transferred to silicon wafers by wet etching and electrochemical delamination methods with respect to residual submonolayer metallic contaminations. Regardless of the transfer method and associated cleaning scheme, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and total reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements indicate that the graphene sheets are contaminated with residual metals (copper, iron) with a concentration exceeding 10(13) atoms/cm(2). These metal impurities appear to be partially mobile upon thermal treatment, as shown by depth profiling and reduction of the minority charge carrier diffusion length in the silicon substrate. As residual metallic impurities can significantly alter electronic and electrochemical properties of graphene and can severely impede the process of integration with silicon microelectronics, these results reveal that further progress in synthesis, handling, and cleaning of graphene is required to advance electronic and optoelectronic applications. PMID:25853630

  19. Charged impurity-induced scatterings in chemical vapor deposited graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Yang; Tang, Chiu-Chun; Ling, D. C.; Li, L. J.; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the effects of defect scatterings on the electric transport properties of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene by measuring the carrier density dependence of the magneto-conductivity. To clarify the dominant scattering mechanism, we perform extensive measurements on large-area samples with different mobility to exclude the edge effect. We analyze our data with the major scattering mechanisms such as short-range static scatters, short-range screened Coulomb disorders, and weak-localization (WL). We establish that the charged impurities are the predominant scatters because there is a strong correlation between the mobility and the charge impurity density. Near the charge neutral point (CNP), the electron-hole puddles that are induced by the charged impurities enhance the inter-valley scattering, which is favorable for WL observations. Away from the CNP, the charged-impurity-induced scattering is weak because of the effective screening by the charge carriers. As a result, the local static structural defects govern the charge transport. Our findings provide compelling evidence for understanding the scattering mechanisms in graphene and pave the way for the improvement of fabrication techniques to achieve high-quality CVD graphene.

  20. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu; Charlie Johnson, A. T.

    2013-11-15

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  1. Model of carrier dynamics in chemical vapor deposition diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Borchi, Emilio; Lagomarsino, Stefano; Mersi, Stefano; Sciortino, Silvio

    2005-03-01

    We propose a quantitative model of electronic transport on the basis of a conductivity characterization of diamond-based sensors exposed to {beta} radiation. Some of the investigated samples have been irradiated with neutron up to a fluence of 2x10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}. Radiation-induced current measurements have been performed to study the trapping and recombination of deep defect levels in the diamond band gap. We present a quantitative analysis of the passivation of deep traps and the release of carriers during thermal fading between consecutive exposures. We determine the density of trap states per unit volume and per unit energy and their capture cross sections. We also evaluate the modification of these parameters after neutron irradiation. Our analysis gives the cross sections of the traps involved in our measurements with an accuracy of 20-50%, which is far better than that attainable with thermal spectroscopy. Our results on the capture cross section of the recombination centers agree with relevant works presented in literature on natural IIa diamond. We propose that some defects are of the same nature in chemical vapor deposition diamond, but their concentration is far lower in the state-of-the-art material. We also study a modification of the trap level distribution after neutron irradiation. Finally we propose a rationale for the improvement obtained in recent years in the performances of top quality polycrystalline diamond sensors.

  2. Thirty Gigahertz Optoelectronic Mixing in Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Alberto; Mzali, Sana; Mazellier, Jean-Paul; Bezencenet, Odile; Larat, Christian; Molin, Stephanie; Morvan, Loïc; Legagneux, Pierre; Dolfi, Daniel; Dlubak, Bruno; Seneor, Pierre; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia

    2016-05-11

    The remarkable properties of graphene, such as broadband optical absorption, high carrier mobility, and short photogenerated carrier lifetime, are particularly attractive for high-frequency optoelectronic devices operating at 1.55 μm telecom wavelength. Moreover, the possibility to transfer graphene on a silicon substrate using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible process opens the ability to integrate electronics and optics on a single cost-effective chip. Here, we report an optoelectronic mixer based on chemical vapor-deposited graphene transferred on an oxidized silicon substrate. Our device consists in a coplanar waveguide that integrates a graphene channel, passivated with an atomic layer-deposited Al2O3 film. With this new structure, 30 GHz optoelectronic mixing in commercially available graphene is demonstrated for the first time. In particular, using a 30 GHz intensity-modulated optical signal and a 29.9 GHz electrical signal, we show frequency downconversion to 100 MHz. These results open promising perspectives in the domain of optoelectronics for radar and radio-communication systems. PMID:27043922

  3. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Zubkov, V. I. Kucherova, O. V.; Zubkova, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, A. V.; Bogdanov, S. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Butler, J. E.

    2015-10-14

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120–150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10{sup −13} down to 2 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (∼2 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}). At T > T{sub room} in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  4. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica flims, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of mesoporous graphene nanoballs for supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Soo; Kim, Sun-I; Yoon, Jong-Chul; Jang, Ji-Hyun

    2013-07-23

    A mass-producible mesoporous graphene nanoball (MGB) was fabricated via a precursor-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique for supercapacitor application. Polystyrene balls and reduced iron created under high temperature and a hydrogen gas environment provide a solid carbon source and a catalyst for graphene growth during the precursor-assisted CVD process, respectively. Carboxylic acid and sulfonic acid functionalization of the polystyrene ball facilitates homogeneous dispersion of the hydrophobic polymer template in the metal precursor solution, thus, resulting in a MGB with a uniform number of graphene layers. The MGB is shown to have a specific surface area of 508 m(2)/g and is mesoporous with a mean mesopore diameter of 4.27 nm. Mesopores are generated by the removal of agglomerated iron domains, permeating down through the soft polystyrene spheres and providing the surface for subsequent graphene growth during the heating process in a hydrogen environment. This technique requires only drop-casting of the precursor/polystyrene solution, allowing for mass-production of multilayer MGBs. The supercapacitor fabricated by the use of the MGB as an electrode demonstrates a specific capacitance of 206 F/g and more than 96% retention of capacitance after 10,000 cycles. The outstanding characteristics of the MGB as an electrode for supercapacitors verify the strong potential for use in energy-related areas. PMID:23782238

  6. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Charlie Johnson, A. T.; Manyala, Ncholu

    2013-11-01

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called "inverted wedding cake" stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  7. Properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, F.B. Jr.; Gordon, R.G.; Paul, W.; Yacobi, B.G.

    1984-06-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from mixtures of silane, disilane, trisilane, and higher polysilanes in hydrogen carrier gas at 1 atm total pressure, at substrate temperatures from 420--530 /sup 0/C. Experimental parameters are explained and properties as a function of these parameters are shown. The measurements include hydrogen content (by IR), optical, electrical, and photovoltaic properties of the material. In most respects, the CVD material closely resembles the a-Si:H usually prepared by glow discharge. The following differences have been noted: (1) the CVD a-Si:H shows no IR absorption at 840--850 cm/sup -1/, which is consistent with the expected better thermal stability of the CVD material because of the much higher substrate temperatures in the CVD process than in the glow discharge process. (2) The band gap of CVD a-Si:H is lower by about 0.1 eV than glow discharge a-Si:H of the same hydrogen content. Thus, the band gap of CVD a-Si:H is better matched to the solar spectrum than is glow discharge a-Si:H. (3) All three IR absorption bands due to hydrogen are about 20% narrower in the CVD a-Si:H, suggesting a simpler structure. (4) The temperature dependence of the dark conductivity of CVD a-Si:H fits a curve for a single activation energy, in contrast to the more complicated temperature dependence often found in glow discharge a-Si:H, in which two different activation energies are seen at high and low temperatures. This suggests that the conduction mechanism is also simpler in the CVD a-Si:H.

  8. Review of chemical vapor deposition of graphene and related applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Luyao; Zhou, Chongwu

    2013-10-15

    Since its debut in 2004, graphene has attracted enormous interest because of its unique properties. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has emerged as an important method for the preparation and production of graphene for various applications since the method was first reported in 2008/2009. In this Account, we review graphene CVD on various metal substrates with an emphasis on Ni and Cu. In addition, we discuss important and representative applications of graphene formed by CVD, including as flexible transparent conductors for organic photovoltaic cells and in field effect transistors. Growth on polycrystalline Ni films leads to both monolayer and few-layer graphene with multiple layers because of the grain boundaries on Ni films. We can greatly increase the percentage of monolayer graphene by using single-crystalline Ni(111) substrates, which have smooth surface and no grain boundaries. Due to the extremely low solubility of carbon in Cu, Cu has emerged as an even better catalyst for the growth of monolayer graphene with a high percentage of single layers. The growth of graphene on Cu is a surface reaction. As a result, only one layer of graphene can form on a Cu surface, in contrast with Ni, where more than one layer can form through carbon segregation and precipitation. We also describe a method for transferring graphene sheets from the metal using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). CVD graphene has electronic properties that are potentially valuable in a number of applications. For example, few-layer graphene grown on Ni can function as flexible transparent conductive electrodes for organic photovoltaic cells. In addition, because we can synthesize large-grain graphene on Cu foil, such large-grain graphene has electronic properties suitable for use in field effect transistors. PMID:23480816

  9. Single crystal diamond detectors grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuvè, C.; Angelone, M.; Bellini, V.; Balducci, A.; Donato, M. G.; Faggio, G.; Marinelli, M.; Messina, G.; Milani, E.; Morgada, M. E.; Pillon, M.; Potenza, R.; Pucella, G.; Russo, G.; Santangelo, S.; Scoccia, M.; Sutera, C.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2007-01-01

    The detection properties of heteropitaxial (polycrystalline, pCVD) and homoepitaxial (single crystal, scCVD) diamond films grown by microwave chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the Laboratories of Roma "Tor Vergata" University are reported. The pCVD diamond detectors were tested with α-particles from different sources and 12C ions produced by 15 MV Tandem accelerator at Southern National Laboratories (LNS) in Catania (Italy). pCVDs were also used to monitor 14 MeV neutrons produced by the D-T plasma at Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, U.K. The limit of pCVDs is the poor energy resolution. To overcome this problem, we developed scCVD diamonds using the same reactor parameters that optimized pCVD diamonds. scCVD were grown on a low cost (1 0 0) HPHT single crystal substrate. A detector 110 μm thick was tested under α-particles and under 14 MeV neutron irradiation. The charge collection efficiency spectrum measured under irradiation with a triple α-particle source shows three clearly resolved peaks, with an energy resolution of about 1.1%. The measured spectra under neutron irradiation show a well separated C(n,α0)9Be12 reaction peak with an energy spread of 0.5 MeV for 14.8 MeV neutrons and 0.3 MeV for 14.1 MeV neutrons, which are fully compatible with the energy spread of the incident neutron beams.

  10. Forced chemical vapor infiltration of tubular geometries: Modeling, design, and scale-up

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M.; Starr, T.L.; Curtain, W.A.

    1995-10-01

    The development of thick-walled, tubular ceramic composites has involved investigations of different fiber architectures and fixturing to obtain optimal densification and mechanical properties. The current efforts entail modeling of the densification process in order to increase densification uniformity and decrease processing time. In addition, the process is being scaled to produce components with a 10 cm outer diameter.

  11. Chemical reaction between water vapor and stressed glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soga, N.; Okamoto, T.; Hanada, T.; Kunugi, M.

    1979-01-01

    The crack velocity in soda-lime silicate glass was determined at room temperature at water-vapor pressures of 10 to 0.04 torr using the double torsion technique. A precracked glass specimen (70 x 16 x 1.6 mm) was placed in a vacuum chamber containing a four-point bending test apparatus. The plotted experimental results show that the crack propagation curve in water agrees fairly well with that of Wiederhorn (1967). Attention is given to the effect of water vapor pressure on crack velocity at K(I) = 550,000 N/m to the 3/2 power, with (Wiederhorn's data) or without N2 present. The plotted results reveal that the present crack velocity is about two orders of magnitude higher than that of Wiederhorn at high water-vapor conditions, but the difference decreases as the water-vapor concentration diminishes or the crack velocity slows down.

  12. Chemical vapor discrimination using a compact and low-power array of piezoresistive microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Loui, Albert; Ratto, Timothy V; Wilson, Thomas S; McCall, Scott K; Mukerjee, Erik V; Love, Adam H; Hart, Bradley R

    2008-05-01

    A compact and low-power microcantilever-based sensor array has been developed and used to detect various chemical vapor analytes. In contrast to earlier micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) array sensors, this device uses the static deflection of piezoresistive cantilevers due to the swelling of glassy polyolefin coatings during sorption of chemical vapors. To maximize the sensor response to a variety of chemical analytes, the polymers are selected based on their Hildebrand solubility parameters to span a wide range of chemical properties. We utilize a novel microcontact spotting method to reproducibly coat a single side of each cantilever in the array with the polymers. To demonstrate the utility of the sensor array we have reproducibly detected 11 chemical vapors, representing a breadth of chemical properties, in real time and over a wide range of vapor concentrations. We also report the detection of the chemical warfare agents (CWAs) VX and sulfur mustard (HD), representing the first published report of CWA vapor detection by a polymer-based, cantilever sensor array. Comparisons of the theoretical polymer/vapor partition coefficient to the experimental cantilever deflection responses show that, while general trends can be reasonably predicted, a simple linear relationship does not exist. PMID:18427681

  13. Application of pulsed-uv laser Raman spectroscopy to chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Raman detection limits obtained with a KrF laser excitation source were comparable to those obtained by laser-induced fluorescence and photofragment emission spectroscopy under chemical vapor deposition conditions.

  14. Melt Infiltration and the Thermal-Chemical Corrosion of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, C.; Holtzman, B. K.; Roy, M.; Gaherty, J. B.; Plank, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the corrosion of the base of the lithosphere by heat and water transport facilitated by infiltrating melt. The origin of the rapid drop in seismic velocity observed near the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) in many locations across the globe is thought to arise from either melt accumulation or a transition from dry lithosphere to hydrated asthenosphere. However, these two hypotheses are difficult to decouple; water lowers the peridotite solidus and melt will transport water due to its incompatibility with the crystalline matrix. To investigate the chemical and thermal evolution of the LAB, we construct forward models of the two-phase system describing 1D mass, momentum and energy conservation in melt and solid phases, including volatile transport and using a water-dependent solidus. In addition to 1D models, 2D models are used to investigate how both geometric and dynamic pressure-driven melt focusing may influence LAB topography. Using relationships between thermodynamic variables and elastic properties we predict seismic velocities and attenuation measurements that are compared directly to EarthScope measurements in the western U.S.. In addition to geophysical observations, the evolution of water content and accumulation zone depth are compared to observed equilibration depth and water contents of magmas from localities in the Basin and Range and the western margin of the Colorado Plateau. Preliminary modeling results in 1D show that in an open system where solid material upwells continuously beneath the LAB, water concentration in the melt increases at the upper boundary of the partially molten zone where crystallization occurs. This leads to a potential feedback wherein the increasing water content locally hydrates the base of the lithosphere, lowering its solidus, and generating melt that can migrate to shallower depths.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition of fluorine-doped zinc oxide

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kramer, Keith; Liang, Haifan

    2000-06-06

    Fims of fluorine-doped zinc oxide are deposited from vaporized precursor compounds comprising a chelate of a dialkylzinc, such as an amine chelate, an oxygen source, and a fluorine source. The coatings are highly electrically conductive, transparent to visible light, reflective to infrared radiation, absorbing to ultraviolet light, and free of carbon impurity.

  16. Magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide via chemically and mechanically modified fluids.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Sivan; Romanofsky, Henry J; Giannechini, Lucca J; Jacobs, Stephen D; Lambropoulos, John C

    2016-02-20

    We describe the anisotropy in the material removal rate (MRR) of the polycrystalline, chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS). We define the polycrystalline anisotropy via microhardness and chemical erosion tests for four crystallographic orientations of ZnS: (100), (110), (111), and (311). Anisotropy in the MRR was studied under magnetorheological finishing (MRF) conditions. Three chemically and mechanically modified magnetorheological (MR) fluids at pH values of 4, 5, and 6 were used to test the MRR variations among the four single-crystal planes. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with pH 5 and pH 6 MR fluids, variations were found in the MRR among the four single-crystal planes and surface artifacts were observed on the polycrystalline material. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with the modified MR fluid at pH 4, however, minimal variation was observed in the MRR among the four orientations and a reduction in surface artifacts was achieved on the polycrystalline material. PMID:26906603

  17. Magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide via chemically and mechanically modified fluids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Salzman, Sivan; Romanofsky, Henry J.; Giannechini, Lucca J.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Lambropoulos, John C.

    2016-02-19

    In this study, we describe the anisotropy in the material removal rate (MRR) of the polycrystalline, chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS).We define the polycrystalline anisotropy via microhardness and chemical erosion tests for four crystallographic orientations of ZnS: (100), (110), (111), and (311). Anisotropy in the MRR was studied under magnetorheological finishing (MRF) conditions. Three chemically and mechanically modified magnetorheological (MR) fluids at pH values of 4, 5, and 6 were used to test the MRR variations among the four single-crystal planes. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with pH 5 and pH 6MR fluids, variations were found inmore » the MRR among the four single-crystal planes and surface artifacts were observed on the polycrystalline material. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with the modified MR fluid at pH 4, however, minimal variation was observed in the MRR among the four orientations and a reduction in surface artifacts was achieved on the polycrystalline material.« less

  18. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs. PMID:26215887

  19. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs. PMID:26215887

  20. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs.

  1. Mathematical Analysis and Optimization of Infiltration Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H.-C.; Gottlieb, D.; Marion, M.; Sheldon, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A variety of infiltration techniques can be used to fabricate solid materials, particularly composites. In general these processes can be described with at least one time dependent partial differential equation describing the evolution of the solid phase, coupled to one or more partial differential equations describing mass transport through a porous structure. This paper presents a detailed mathematical analysis of a relatively simple set of equations which is used to describe chemical vapor infiltration. The results demonstrate that the process is controlled by only two parameters, alpha and beta. The optimization problem associated with minimizing the infiltration time is also considered. Allowing alpha and beta to vary with time leads to significant reductions in the infiltration time, compared with the conventional case where alpha and beta are treated as constants.

  2. Si Passivation and Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Nitride: Final Technical Report, March 18, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, H. A.

    2007-11-01

    This report investigated chemical and physical methods for Si surface passivation for application in crystalline Si and thin Si film photovoltaic devices. Overall, our efforts during the project were focused in three areas: i) synthesis of silicon nitride thin films with high hydrogen content by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition; ii) investigation of the role of hydrogen passivation of defects in crystalline Si and Si solar cells by out diffusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride films; iii) investigation of the growth kinetics and passivation of hydrogenated polycrystalline. Silicon nitride films were grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and film properties have been characterized as a function of SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It was demonstrated that hot-wire chemical vapor deposition leads to growth of SiNx films with controllable stoichiometry and hydrogen.

  3. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  4. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of gallium nitride on sacrificial substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenwick, William Edward

    GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) face several challenges if the technology is to continue to make a significant impact in general illumination, and on technology that has become known as solid state lighting (SSL). Two of the most pressing challenges for the continued penetration of SSL into traditional lighting applications are efficacy and total lumens from the device, and their related cost. The development of alternative substrate technologies is a promising avenue toward addressing both of these challenges, as both GaN-based device technology and the associated metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technology are already relatively mature technologies with a well-understood cost base. Zinc oxide (ZnO) and silicon (Si) are among the most promising alternative substrates for GaN epitaxy. These substrates offer the ability to access both higher efficacy and lumen devices (ZnO) at a much reduced cost. This work focuses on the development of MOCVD growth processes to yield high quality GaN-based materials and devices on both ZnO and Si. ZnO is a promising substrate for growth of low defect-density GaN because of its similar lattice constant and thermal expansion coefficient. The major hurdles for GaN growth on ZnO are the instability of the substrate in a hydrogen atmosphere, which is typical of nitride growth conditions, and the inter-diffusion of zinc and oxygen from the substrate into the GaN-based epitaxial layer. A process was developed for the MOCVD growth of GaN and InxGa 1-xN on ZnO that attempted to address these issues. The structural and optical properties of these films were studied using various techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the growth of wurtzite GaN on ZnO, and room-temperature photoluminescence (RT-PL) showed near band-edge luminescence from the GaN and InxGa1-xN layers. However, high zinc and oxygen concentrations due to interdiffusion near the ZnO substrate remained an issue; therefore, the diffusion of zinc and oxygen

  5. A model for chemical and isotopic fractionation in the lunar regolith by impact vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Up until now there has been no complete model of chemical and isotopic fractionation effects which could occur in the lunar regolith as a result of hypervelocity impact vaporization. Previous work on the outlines for such a model are extended and show that impact vaporization could be an efficient mechanism for producing heavy isotope enrichments. Rough qualitative predictions based on the model show a general similarity to the observations on lunar samples.

  6. Controlled VLS Growth of Indium, Gallium and Tin Oxide Nanowiresvia Chemical Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.C.; Aloni, S.; McCready, D.E.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    2006-03-13

    We utilized a vapor-liquid-solid growth technique to synthesize indium oxide, gallium oxide, and tin oxide nanowires using chemical vapor transport with gold nanoparticles as the catalyst. Using identical growth parameters we were able to synthesize single crystal nanowires typically 40-100 nm diameter and more than 10-100 microns long. The products were characterized by means of XRD, SEM and HRTEM. All the wires were grown under the same growth conditions with growth rates inversely proportional to the source metal vapor pressure. Initial experiments show that different transparent oxide nanowires can be grown simultaneously on a single substrate with potential application for multi-component gas sensors.

  7. Application of laser Doppler velocimeter to chemical vapor laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, Luther R.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Lee, Ja H.; Fletcher, Mark T.; Tabibi, Bagher M.

    1993-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system was used to measure iodide vapor flow fields inside two different-sized tubes. Typical velocity profiles across the laser tubes were obtained with an estimated +/-1 percent bias and +/-0.3 to 0.5 percent random uncertainty in the mean values and +/-2.5 percent random uncertainty in the turbulence-intensity values. Centerline velocities and turbulence intensities for various longitudinal locations ranged from 13 to 17.5 m/sec and 6 to 20 percent, respectively. In view of these findings, the effects of turbulence should be considered for flow field modeling. The LDV system provided calibration data for pressure and mass flow systems used routinely to monitor the research laser gas flow velocity.

  8. Method and apparatus for detection of chemical vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Caja, Josip

    2007-05-15

    The present invention is a gas detector and method for using the gas detector for detecting and identifying volatile organic and/or volatile inorganic substances present in unknown vapors in an environment. The gas detector comprises a sensing means and a detecting means for detecting electrical capacitance variance of the sensing means and for further identifying the volatile organic and volatile inorganic substances. The sensing means comprises at least one sensing unit and a sensing material allocated therein the sensing unit. The sensing material is an ionic liquid which is exposed to the environment and is capable of dissolving a quantity of said volatile substance upon exposure thereto. The sensing means constitutes an electrochemical capacitor and the detecting means is in electrical communication with the sensing means.

  9. A new whole-body vapor exposure chamber for protection performance research on chemical protective ensembles.

    PubMed

    Duncan, E J Scott; Dickson, Eva F Gudgin

    2003-01-01

    A chemical vapor exposure chamber was designed to permit the study of whole-body vapor exposure of individuals wearing full protective clothing and equipment systems. A methodology also was developed to quantify the vapor protection performance of chemical protective ensembles (CPE) under safe and validated laboratory procedures. The principal research objectives were to (1) provide a methodology to accurately assess the performance of CPE and equipment under different environmental and chemical vapor challenge conditions; (2) quantify the vapor protection on a per body region basis; (3) have a systems level tool to aid in the research and development of more effective CPE for use in chemical biological environments; and (4) have a safe and reliable means of qualifying new CPE on the basis of vapor protection. Although designed for the evaluation of military-style protective equipment, the procedures apply equally to other styles of CPE used by civilian agencies such as firefighters, police, and hazmat units. The chamber and methodology were specifically designed to examine the vapor protection performance of clothing ensembles, including the details of protection variation over the body. A variety of exposure conditions appropriate to indoor and outdoor scenarios are possible, including the effects of wind, temperature, and relative humidity. Protection performance results from a number of individuals wearing typical military-style CPE are presented. These results demonstrate that there is no such thing as a unique protection performance level obtained for a given CPE. Rather, the individual and the ensemble interact differently in each situation, resulting in a protection performance distribution for individuals, and for groups of wearers, even under a standardized set of exposure conditions. PMID:12688845

  10. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

    1994-09-13

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

  11. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Tracy, C. Edwin; King, David E.; Stanley, James T.

    1994-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

  12. Methyl isocyanate liquid and vapor permeation through selected respirator diaphragms and chemical protective clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Berardinelli, S.P.; Moyer, E.S.

    1987-04-01

    Initially, a study was undertaken to evaluate selected chemical protective clothing suitable for use by emergency response personnel confronted with methyl isocyanate (MIC). Twenty-two chemical protective clothing materials were tested against liquid methyl isocyanate. Chemical permeation breakthrough times for these clothing materials demonstrate that only one of these garments can be considered as a candidate material against liquid MIC. In a subsequent study, three chemical protective clothing materials were evaluated against approximately 800 ppm MIC vapor. Chemical permeation breakthrough times demonstrate that these materials can be considered candidate materials. A final study tested self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) diaphragms. Four SCBA diaphragms were tested and all experienced rapid breakthrough when exposed to liquid MIC. Next, three SCBA diaphragms were exposed to approximately 800 ppm MIC vapor. The data demonstrate that the SCBA should be worn inside a total encapsulating suit.

  13. Selected area chemical vapor deposition of thin films for conductometric microelectronic chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majoo, Sanjeev

    Recent advances in microelectronics and silicon processing have been exploited to fabricate miniaturized chemical sensors. Although the capability of chemical sensing technology has grown steadily, it has been outpaced by the increasing demands for more reliable, inexpensive, and selective sensors. The diversity of applications requires the deployment of different sensing materials that have rich interfacial chemistry. However, several promising sensor materials are often incompatible with silicon micromachining and their deposition requires complicated masking steps. The new approach described here is to first micromachine a generic, instrumented, conductometric, microelectronic sensor platform that is fully functional except for the front-end sensing element. This generic platform contains a thin dielectric membrane, an integrated boron-doped silicon heater, and conductance electrodes. The membrane has low thermal mass and excellent thermal isolation. A proprietary selected-area chemical vapor deposition (SACVD) process in a cold-wall reactor at low pressures was then used to achieve maskless, self-lithographic deposition of thin films. The temperature-programmable integrated microheater initiates localized thermal decomposition/reaction of suitable CVD precursors confined to a small heated area (500 mum in diameter), and this creates the active sensing element. Platinum and titania (TiOsb2) films were deposited from pyrolysis of organometallic precursors, tetrakistrifluorophosphine platinum Pt(PFsb3)sb4 and titanium tetraisopropoxide Ti(OCH(CHsb3)sb2rbrack sb4, respectively. Deposition of gold metal films from chlorotriethylphosphine gold (Csb2Hsb5)sb3PAuCl precursor was also attempted but without success. The conductance electrodes permit in situ monitoring of film growth. The as-deposited films were characterized in situ by conductance measurements and optical microscopy and ex situ by electron microscopy and spectroscopy methods. Devices equipped with

  14. Reduced chemical warfare agent sorption in polyurethane-painted surfaces via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of perfluoroalkanes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Durke, Erin M

    2015-04-01

    Perfluoralkalation via plasma chemical vapor deposition has been used to improve hydrophobicity of surfaces. We have investigated this technique to improve the resistance of commercial polyurethane coatings to chemicals, such as chemical warfare agents. The reported results indicate the surface treatment minimizes the spread of agent droplets and the sorption of agent into the coating. The improvement in resistance is likely due to reduction of the coating's surface free energy via fluorine incorporation, but may also have contributing effects from surface morphology changes. The data indicates that plasma-based surface modifications may have utility in improving chemical resistance of commercial coatings. PMID:25775244

  15. Effect of irrigation with treated wastewater on soil chemical properties and infiltration rate.

    PubMed

    Bedbabis, Saida; Ben Rouina, Béchir; Boukhris, Makki; Ferrara, Giuseppe

    2014-01-15

    In Tunisia, water scarcity is one of the major constraints for agricultural activities. The reuse of treated wastewater (TWW) in agriculture can be a sustainable solution to face water scarcity. The research was conducted for a period of four years in an olive orchard planted on a sandy soil and subjected to irrigation treatments: a) rain-fed conditions (RF), as control b) well water (WW) and c) treated wastewater (TWW). In WW and TWW treatments, an annual amount of 5000 m(3) ha(-1) of water was supplied to the orchard. Soil samples were collected at the beginning of the study and after four years for each treatment. The main soil properties such as electrical conductivity (EC), pH, soluble cations, chloride (Cl(-)), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), organic matter (OM) as well as the infiltration rate were investigated. After four years, either a significant decrease of pH and infiltration rate or a significant increase of OM, SAR and EC were observed in the soil subjected to treated wastewater treatment. PMID:24361727

  16. Chemical-vapor deposition of complex oxides: materials and process development

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, R.

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) part of the Advanced Materials Laboratory (AML). The demand for higher performance and lower cost in electronics is driving the need for advanced materials and consequent process integration. Ceramic thin-film technology is becoming more important in the manufacture of microelectronic devices, photovoltaics, optoelectronics, magneto-optics, sensors, microwave, and radio frequency communication devices, and high-Tc superconducting tapes. A flexible processing approach for potential large-scale manufacturing of novel electronic ceramic thin films is desirable. Current thin- film deposition technologies based on physical vapor-deposition techniques are limited in scale potential and have limited control of processing parameters. The lack of control over multiple process parameters inhibits the versatility and reproducibility of the physical vapor deposition processes applied to complex oxides. Chemical vapor deposition is emerging as a viable approach for large- scale manufacturing of electronic materials. Specifically, the ability to control more processing parameters with chemical vapor deposition than with other processing techniques provides the reliability and material property reproducibility required by manufacturing. This project sought to investigate the chemical vapor deposition of complex oxides.

  17. Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.

    2003-07-24

    Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

  18. Physico-chemical mechanism for the vapors sensitivity of photoluminescent InP quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosposito, P.; De Angelis, R.; De Matteis, F.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T.; Zhang, H.; Casalboni, M.

    2016-03-01

    InP/InGaP surface quantum dots are interesting materials for optical chemical sensors since they present an intense emission at room temperature, whose intensity changes rapidly and reversibly depending on the composition of the environmental atmosphere. We present here their emission properties by time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy investigation and we discuss the physico-chemical mechanism behind their sensitivity to the surrounding atmosphere. Photoluminescence transients in inert atmosphere (N2) and in solvent vapours of methanol, clorophorm, acetone and water were measured. The presence of vapors of clorophorm, acetone and water showed a very weak effect on the transient times, while an increase of up to 15% of the decay time was observed for methanol vapour exposure. On the basis of the vapor molecule nature (polarity, proticity, steric hindrance, etc.) and of the interaction of the vapor molecules with the quantum dots surface a sensing mechanism involving quantum dots non-radiative surface states is proposed.

  19. Silicon epitaxy using tetrasilane at low temperatures in ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazbun, Ramsey; Hart, John; Hickey, Ryan; Ghosh, Ayana; Fernando, Nalin; Zollner, Stefan; Adam, Thomas N.; Kolodzey, James

    2016-06-01

    The deposition of silicon using tetrasilane as a vapor precursor is described for an ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition tool. The growth rates and morphology of the Si epitaxial layers over a range of temperatures and pressures are presented. The layers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Atomic Force Microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Based on this characterization, high quality single crystal silicon epitaxy was observed. Tetrasilane was found to produce higher growth rates relative to lower order silanes, with the ability to deposit crystalline Si at low temperatures (T=400 °C), with significant amorphous growth and reactivity measured as low as 325 °C, indicating the suitability of tetrasilane for low temperature chemical vapor deposition such as for SiGeSn alloys.

  20. Chemical hazards present in liquids and vapors of electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, Christoph; Paschke, Meike; Kruschinski, Svetlana; Henkler, Frank; Hahn, Jürgen; Luch, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Electronic (e-)cigarettes have emerged in recent years as putative alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. These products do not contain typical carcinogens that are present in tobacco smoke, due to the lack of combustion. However, besides nicotine, hazards can also arise from other constituents of liquids, such as solvents, flavors, additives and contaminants. In this study, we have analyzed 28 liquids of seven manufacturers purchased in Germany. We confirm the presence of a wide range of flavors to enhance palatability. Although glycerol and propylene glycol were detected in all samples, these solvents had been replaced by ethylene glycol as dominant compound in five products. Ethylene glycol is associated with markedly enhanced toxicological hazards when compared to conventionally used glycerol and propylene glycol. Additional additives, such as coumarin and acetamide, that raise concerns for human health were detected in certain samples. Ten out of 28 products had been declared "free-of-nicotine" by the manufacturer. Among these ten, seven liquids were identified containing nicotine in the range of 0.1-15 µg/ml. This suggests that "carry over" of ingredients may occur during the production of cartridges. We have further analyzed the formation of carbonylic compounds in one widely distributed nicotine-free brand. Significant amounts of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and propionaldehyde were only found at 150 °C by headspace GC-MS analysis. In addition, an enhanced formation of aldehydes was found in defined puff fractions, using an adopted machine smoking protocol. However, this effect was delayed and only observed during the last third of the smoking procedure. In the emissions of these fractions, which represent up to 40 % of total vapor volume, similar levels of formaldehyde were detected when compared to conventional tobacco cigarettes. By contrast, carbonylic compounds were hardly detectable in earlier collected fractions. Our data demonstrate the

  1. Development of a Computational Chemical Vapor Deposition Model: Applications to Indium Nitride and Dicyanovinylaniline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    A computational chemical vapor deposition (CVD) model is presented, that couples chemical reaction mechanisms with fluid dynamic simulations for vapor deposition experiments. The chemical properties of the systems under investigation are evaluated using quantum, molecular and statistical mechanics models. The fluid dynamic computations are performed using the CFD-ACE program, which can simulate multispecies transport, heat and mass transfer, gas phase chemistry, chemistry of adsorbed species, pulsed reactant flow and variable gravity conditions. Two experimental setups are being studied, in order to fabricate films of: (a) indium nitride (InN) from the gas or surface phase reaction of trimethylindium and ammonia; and (b) 4-(1,1)dicyanovinyl-dimethylaminoaniline (DCVA) by vapor deposition. Modeling of these setups requires knowledge of three groups of properties: thermodynamic properties (heat capacity), transport properties (diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity), and kinetic properties (rate constants for all possible elementary chemical reactions). These properties are evaluated using computational methods whenever experimental data is not available for the species or for the elementary reactions. The chemical vapor deposition model is applied to InN and DCVA. Several possible InN mechanisms are proposed and analyzed. The CVD model simulations of InN show that the deposition rate of InN is more efficient when pulsing chemistry is used under conditions of high pressure and microgravity. An analysis of the chemical properties of DCVA show that DCVA dimers may form under certain conditions of physical vapor transport. CVD simulations of the DCVA system suggest that deposition of the DCVA dimer may play a small role in the film and crystal growth processes.

  2. VAPOR SAMPLING DEVICE FOR INTERFACE WITH MICROTOX ASSAY FOR SCREENING TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A time-integrated sampling system interfaced with a toxicity-based assay is reported for monitoring volatile toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the fill solvent accumulated each of 17 TICs from the vapor...

  3. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors. PMID:27174318

  4. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  5. Dopant gas effect on silicon chemical vapor depositions: A surface potential model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is proposed to consistently explain the known dopant gas effects on silicon chemical vapor deposition. This model predicts that the effects of the same dopant gases on the diamond deposition rate using methane and carbon tetrachloride should be opposite and similar to those of silane, respectively. Available data are in agreement with this prediction.

  6. Miscellaneous chemical basin treatability study: an analysis of passive soil vapor extraction wells (PSVE)

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B.; Rossabi, J.

    1997-12-01

    A passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) treatability study at the Miscellaneous Chemical Basin (MCB) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been progressing since September 1996. The results to date on the treatability study of the PSVE system indicate that the technology is performing well.

  7. VAPORIZATION TECHNIQUE TO MEASURE MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN THE AMES/'SALOMELLA' ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the research was to develop and characterize a sensitive test method to detect mutagenic activity of volatile liquid organic chemicals (i.e., volatiles) in the Ames/Salmonella assay. A Tedlar bag vaporization technique was developed which increased contact time bet...

  8. All-Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwaniczko, E.; Wang, Q.; Xu, Y.; Nelson, B. P.; Mahan, A. H.; Crandall, R. S.; Branz, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) nip solar cells have been fabricated with all doped and undoped a-Si:H layers deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total deposition time of all layers, except the top ITO-contact, is less than 4 minutes.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of W-Si-N and W-B-N

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth Lynn; Smith, Paul M.; Custer, Jonathan S.; Jones, Ronald V.; Nicolet, Marc-A.; Madar, Roland; Bernard, Claude

    1999-01-01

    A method of depositing a ternary, refractory based thin film on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition employing precursor sources of tungsten comprising WF.sub.6, either silicon or boron, and nitrogen. The result is a W--Si--N or W--B--N thin film useful for diffusion barrier and micromachining applications.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of W-Si-N and W-B-N

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Roherty-Osmun, E.L.; Smith, P.M.; Custer, J.S.; Jones, R.V.; Nicolet, M.; Madar, R.; Bernard, C.

    1999-06-29

    A method of depositing a ternary, refractory based thin film on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition employing precursor sources of tungsten comprising WF[sub 6], either silicon or boron, and nitrogen. The result is a W-Si-N or W-B-N thin film useful for diffusion barrier and micromachining applications. 10 figs.

  11. A kinetic and equilibrium analysis of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition on monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical kinetics of atmospheric pressure silicon carbide (SiC) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from dilute silane and propane source gases in hydrogen is numerically analyzed in a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for CVD on monofilaments. The chemical composition of the SiC deposit is assessed both from the calculated total fluxes of carbon and silicon and from chemical equilibrium considerations for the prevailing temperatures and species concentrations at and along the filament surface. The effects of gas and surface chemistry on the evolution of major gas phase species are considered in the analysis.

  12. Vertically aligned peptide nanostructures using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Vasudev, Milana C; Koerner, Hilmar; Singh, Kristi M; Partlow, Benjamin P; Kaplan, David L; Gazit, Ehud; Bunning, Timothy J; Naik, Rajesh R

    2014-02-10

    In this study, we utilize plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for the deposition of nanostructures composed of diphenylalanine. PECVD is a solvent-free approach and allows sublimation of the peptide to form dense, uniform arrays of peptide nanostructures on a variety of substrates. The PECVD deposited d-diphenylalanine nanostructures have a range of chemical and physical properties depending on the specific discharge parameters used during the deposition process. PMID:24400716

  13. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of titanium dioxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmer, David Christopher

    1998-12-01

    The continued drive to decrease the size and increase the speed of micro-electronic Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) devices is hampered by some of the properties of the SiOsb2 gate dielectric. This research has focused on the CVD of TiOsb2 thin films to replace SiOsb2 as the gate dielectric in MOS capacitors and transistors. The relationship of CVD parameters and post-deposition anneal treatments to the physical and electrical properties of thin films of TiOsb2 has been studied. Structural and electrical characterization of TiOsb2 films grown from the CVD precursors tetraisopropoxotitanium (IV) (TTIP) and TTIP plus Hsb2O is described in Chapter 3. Both types of deposition produced stoichiometric TiOsb2 films comprised of polycrystalline anatase, but the interface properties were dramatically degraded when water vapor was added. Films grown with TTIP in the presence of Hsb2O contained greater than 50% more hydrogen than films grown using only TTIP and the hydrogen content of films deposited in both wet and dry TTIP environments decreased sharply with a post deposition Osb2 anneal. A significant thickness variation of the dielectric constant was observed which could be explained by an interfacial oxide and the finite accumulation thickness. Fabricated TiOsb2 capacitors exhibited electrically equivalent SiOsb2 gate dielectric thicknesses and leakage current densities as low as 38, and 1×10sp{-8} Amp/cmsp2 respectively. Chapter 4 discusses the low temperature CVD of crystalline TiOsb2 thin films deposited using the precursor tetranitratotitanium (IV), TNT, which produces crystalline TiOsb2 films of the anatase phase in UHV-CVD at temperatures as low as 184sp°C. Fabricated TiOsb2 capacitors exhibited electrically equivalent SiOsb2 gate dielectric thicknesses and leakage current densities as low as 17, and 1×10sp{-8} Amp/cmsp2 respectively. Chapter 5 describes the results of a comparison of physical and electrical properties between TiOsb2 films grown via LPCVD using

  14. A tunable MWIR laser remote sensor for chemical vapor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, Thomas L.; Noblett, Patricia M.; Otting, William D.

    1998-01-01

    The Air Force vision for Global Virtual Presence suggests a need for active remote sensing systems that provide both global coverage and the ability to detect multiple gaseous chemical species at low concentration from a significant standoff distance. The system will need to have acceptable weight, volume, and power characteristics, as well as a long operating lifetime for integration with various surveillance platforms. Laser based remote sensing systems utilizing the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique are promising for long range chemical sensing applications. Recent advancements in pulsed, diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) technology and in tunable optical parametric oscillators (OPO) make broadly tunable laser transmitters possible for the DIAL system. Also the characteristic narrow spectral bandwidth of these laser devices provides high measurement sensitivity and spectral selectivity with the potential to avoid interfering species. Rocketdyne has built and tested a tunable, midwave infrared (MWIR) DIAL system using DPSSL/OPO technology. The key to the system is a novel tuning and line narrowing technology developed for the OPO. The tuning system can quickly adjust to the desired wavelength and precisely locate a narrow spectral feature of interest. Once the spectral feature is located, a rapid dither tuning technique is employed. The laser pulses are tuned ``on'' and ``off'' the spectral resonance of a molecule with precise and repeatable performance as required to make the DIAL measurement. To date, the breadboard system has been tested by measuring methane, ethane, and sulfur dioxide in a calibrated gas cell at a range of 60 meters.

  15. Oxidation of Chemically-Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao N.

    1998-01-01

    Chemically-vapor-deposited silicon carbide (CVD SiC) was oxidized in carbon dioxide (CO2) at temperatures of 1200-1400 C for times between 96 and 500 h at several gas flow rates. Oxidation weight gains were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and were found to be very small and independent of temperature. Possible rate limiting kinetic mechanisms are discussed. Passive oxidation of SiC by CO2 is negligible compared to the rates measured for other oxidants that are also found in combustion environments, oxygen and water vapor.

  16. Relationship between the evaporation rate and vapor pressure of moderately and highly volatile chemicals.

    PubMed

    van Wesenbeeck, Ian; Driver, Jeffrey; Ross, John

    2008-04-01

    Volatilization of chemicals can be an important form of dissipation in the environment. Rates of evaporative losses from plant and soil surfaces are useful for estimating the potential for food-related dietary residues and operator and bystander exposure, and can be used as source functions for screening models that predict off-site movement of volatile materials. A regression of evaporation on vapor pressure from three datasets containing 82 pesticidal active ingredients and co-formulants, ranging in vapor pressure from 0.0001 to >30,000 Pa was developed for this purpose with a regression correlation coefficient of 0.98. PMID:18344074

  17. Stack growth of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Mohamed, Norani Muti

    2015-04-01

    The Letter reports another approach to grow vertically aligned millimeter length multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) using chemical vapor deposition technique. In this stack growth, the first grown MWCNT layer is observe to have been lift-off from the substrate surface by the newly grown underneath layer as a result of the diffusion of iron catalyst and carbon source through the first layer. The first grown layer acts as a permeable membrane allowing the catalyst vapor and carbon to reach the bottom layer and the top surface of the substrate, resulting in the growth of another layer of MWCNT underneath it.

  18. Alcohol vapor sensing by cadmium-doped zinc oxide thick films based chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zargar, R. A.; Arora, M.; Chackrabarti, S.; Ahmad, S.; Kumar, J.; Hafiz, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles were derived by simple chemical co-precipitation route using zinc acetate dihydrate and cadmium acetate dihydrate as precursor materials. The thick films were casted from chemical co-precipitation route prepared nanoparticles by economic facile screen printing method. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the film were characterized relevant to alcohol vapor sensing application by powder XRD, SEM, UV-VIS and DC conductivity techniques. The response and sensitivity of alcohol (ethanol) vapor sensor are obtained from the recovery curves at optimum working temperature range from 20∘C to 50∘C. The result shows that maximum sensitivity of the sensor is observed at 25∘C operating temperature. On varying alcohol vapor concentration, minor variation in resistance has been observed. The sensing mechanism of sensor has been described in terms of physical adsorption and chemical absorption of alcohol vapors on cadmium-doped zinc oxide film surface and inside film lattice network through weak hydrogen bonding, respectively.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of atomically thin materials for membrane dialysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidambi, Piran; Mok, Alexander; Jang, Doojoon; Boutilier, Michael; Wang, Luda; Karnik, Rohit; Microfluidics; Nanofluidics Research Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Atomically thin 2D materials like graphene and h-BN represent a new class of membranes materials. They offer the possibility of minimum theoretical membrane transport resistance along with the opportunity to tune pore sizes at the nanometer scale. Chemical vapor deposition has emerged as the preferable route towards scalable, cost effective synthesis of 2D materials. Here we show selective molecular transport through sub-nanometer diameter pores in graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition processes. A combination of pressure driven and diffusive transport measurements shows evidence for size selective transport behavior which can be used for separation by dialysis for applications such as desalting of biomolecular or chemical solutions. Principal Investigator

  20. Effects of growth pressure on morphology of ZnO nanostructures by chemical vapor transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Eadi Sunil; Kim, Sungjin; Song, Jung-Hoon; Hong, Soon-Ku

    2016-08-01

    The effect of growth pressure on the morphology of the ZnO nanostructures in chemical vapor transport by using Zn powder and oxygen as source materials has been investigated. Highly uniform aligned ZnO nanorods or multifaceted tripod structures were grown depending on the growth pressure. The mechanism governing the morphology change was explained by the relative concentration of Zn vapor and supersaturation based on experimental observations. It was concluded that heterogeneous nucleation on the substrate is enhanced at low growth pressure, while homogeneous nucleation from vapor phase is enhanced at high growth pressure. The difference resulted in different morphology of ZnO nanostructures. ZnO nanorods grown at optimized condition were used for the fabrication of gas sensor for the detection of H2 gas.

  1. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  2. Diagnostic for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Etch Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's requirements for the rapid development and validation of future generation electronic devices as well as associated materials and processes, enabling technologies ion the processing of semiconductor materials arising from understanding etch chemistries are being developed through a research collaboration between Stanford University and NASA-Ames Research Center, Although a great deal of laboratory-scale research has been performed on many of materials processing plasmas, little is known about the gas-phase and surface chemical reactions that are critical in many etch and deposition processes, and how these reactions are influenced by the variation in operating conditions. In addition, many plasma-based processes suffer from stability and reliability problems leading to a compromise in performance and a potentially increased cost for the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Such a lack of understanding has hindered the development of process models that can aid in the scaling and improvement of plasma etch and deposition systems. The research described involves the study of plasmas used in semiconductor processes. An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source in place of the standard upper electrode assembly of the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) radio-frequency (RF) Reference Cell is used to investigate the discharge characteristics and chemistries. This ICP source generates plasmas with higher electron densities (approximately 10(exp 12)/cu cm) and lower operating pressures (approximately 7 mTorr) than obtainable with the original parallel-plate version of the GEC Cell. This expanded operating regime is more relevant to new generations of industrial plasma systems being used by the microelectronics industry. The motivation for this study is to develop an understanding of the physical phenomena involved in plasma processing and to measure much needed fundamental parameters, such as gas-phase and surface reaction rates. species

  3. Hydrological, chemical and isotopic budgets of Lake Chad: a quantitative assessment of evaporation, transpiration and infiltration fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchez, C.; Goncalves, J.; Deschamps, P.; Vallet-Coulomb, C.; Hamelin, B.; Doumnang, J.-C.; Sylvestre, F.

    2015-10-01

    In the Sahelian belt, Lake Chad is a key water body for 13 million people who live on its resources. It experiences, however, substantial and frequent surface changes. Located at the center of one of the largest endorheic basins in the world, its waters remain surprisingly fresh. Its low salinity has been attributed to a low infiltration flow whose value remains poorly constrained. Understanding the lake's hydrological behavior in response to climate variability requires a better constraint of the factors that control its water and chemical balance. Based on the three-pool conceptualization of Lake Chad proposed by J. C. Bader, J. Lemoalle, and M. Leblanc (Bader et al., 2011), this study aims to quantify the total water outflow from the lake, the respective proportions of evaporation (E), transpiration (T) and infiltration (I), and the associated uncertainties. A Bayesian inversion method based on lake-level data was used, leading to total water loss estimates in each pool (ETI). Sodium and stable isotope mass balances were then used to separate total water losses into E, T and I components. Despite the scarcity of representative data available on the lake, the combination of these two geochemical tracers is relevant to assess the relative contribution of these three outflows involved in the control of the hydrological budget. Mean evapotranspiration rates were estimated at 2070 ± 100 and 2270 ± 100 mm yr-1 for the southern and northern pools respectively. Infiltration represents between 100 and 300 mm yr-1 but most of the water is evapotranspirated in the first few kilometers from the shorelines and does not efficiently recharge the Quaternary aquifer. Transpiration is shown to be significant, around 300 mm yr-1 and reaches 500 mm yr-1 in the vegetated zone of the archipelagos. Hydrological and chemical simulations reproduce the marked hydrological change between the normal lake state that occurred before 1972 and the small lake state after 1972 when the lake

  4. Hydrological, chemical, and isotopic budgets of Lake Chad: a quantitative assessment of evaporation, transpiration and infiltration fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchez, Camille; Goncalves, Julio; Deschamps, Pierre; Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Hamelin, Bruno; Doumnang, Jean-Claude; Sylvestre, Florence

    2016-04-01

    In the Sahelian belt, Lake Chad is a key water body for 13 million people, who live on its resources. It experiences, however, substantial and frequent surface changes. Located at the centre of one of the largest endorheic basins in the world, its waters remain surprisingly fresh. Its low salinity has been attributed to a low infiltration flow whose value remains poorly constrained. Understanding the lake's hydrological behaviour in response to climate variability requires a better constraint of the factors that control its water and chemical balance. Based on the three-pool conceptualization of Lake Chad proposed by Bader et al. (2011), this study aims to quantify the total water outflow from the lake, the respective proportions of evaporation (E), transpiration (T), and infiltration (I), and the associated uncertainties. A Bayesian inversion method based on lake-level data was used, leading to total water loss estimates in each pool (E + T + I = ETI). Sodium and stable isotope mass balances were then used to separate total water losses into E, T, and I components. Despite the scarcity of representative data available on the lake, the combination of these two geochemical tracers is relevant to assess the relative contribution of these three outflows involved in the control of the hydrological budget. Mean evapotranspiration rates were estimated at 2070 ± 100 and 2270 ± 100 mm yr-1 for the southern and northern pools, respectively. Infiltration represents between 100 and 300 mm yr-1 but most of the water is evapotranspirated in the first few kilometres from the shorelines and does not efficiently recharge the Quaternary aquifer. Transpiration is shown to be significant, around 300 mm yr-1 and reaches 500 mm yr-1 in the vegetated zone of the archipelagos. Hydrological and chemical simulations reproduce the marked hydrological change between the normal lake state that occurred before 1972 and the small lake state after 1972 when the lake surface shrunk to a one

  5. Mechanical and piezoresistive properties of thin silicon films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, J.; Gualdino, A.; Lemke, B.; Paul, O.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical and piezoresistance characterization of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) and radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using substrate temperatures between 100 and 250 °C. The microtensile technique is used to determine film properties such as Young's modulus, fracture strength and Weibull parameters, and linear and quadratic piezoresistance coefficients obtained at large applied stresses. The 95%-confidence interval for the elastic constant of the films characterized, 85.9 ± 0.3 GPa, does not depend significantly on the deposition method or on film structure. In contrast, mean fracture strength values range between 256 ± 8 MPa and 600 ± 32 MPa: nanocrystalline layers are slightly stronger than their amorphous counterparts and a pronounced increase in strength is observed for films deposited using HWCVD when compared to those grown by PECVD. Extracted Weibull moduli are below 10. In terms of piezoresistance, n-doped radio-frequency nanocrystalline silicon films deposited at 250 °C present longitudinal piezoresistive coefficients as large as -(2.57 ± 0.03) × 10-10 Pa-1 with marginally nonlinear response. Such values approach those of crystalline silicon and of polysilicon layers deposited at much higher temperatures.

  6. Chemical vapor synthesis of nanocrystalline perovskites using laser flash evaporation of low volatility solid precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterer, Markus; Srdic, Vladimir V.; Djenadic, Ruzica; Kompch, Alexander; Weirich, Thomas E.

    2007-12-01

    One key requirement for the production of multinary oxide films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or nanocrystalline multinary oxides particles by chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) is the availability of precursors with high vapor pressure. This is especially the case for CVS where much higher production rates are required compared to thin films prepared by CVD. However, elements, which form low valent cations such as alkaline earth metals, are typically only available as solid precursors of low volatility, e.g., in form of β-diketonates. This study describes laser flash evaporation as precursor delivery method for CVS of nanocrystalline perovskites. Laser flash evaporation exploits the nonequilibrium evaporation of solid metal organic precursors of low vapor pressure by absorption of the infrared radiation of a CO2 laser. It is shown that stoichiometric, nanocrystalline particles consisting of SrZrO3 and SrTiO3 can be formed from corresponding mixtures of β-diketonates which are evaporated nonselectively and with high rates by laser flash evaporation.

  7. Chemical vapor synthesis of nanocrystalline perovskites using laser flash evaporation of low volatility solid precursors.

    PubMed

    Winterer, Markus; Srdic, Vladimir V; Djenadic, Ruzica; Kompch, Alexander; Weirich, Thomas E

    2007-12-01

    One key requirement for the production of multinary oxide films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or nanocrystalline multinary oxides particles by chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) is the availability of precursors with high vapor pressure. This is especially the case for CVS where much higher production rates are required compared to thin films prepared by CVD. However, elements, which form low valent cations such as alkaline earth metals, are typically only available as solid precursors of low volatility, e.g., in form of beta-diketonates. This study describes laser flash evaporation as precursor delivery method for CVS of nanocrystalline perovskites. Laser flash evaporation exploits the nonequilibrium evaporation of solid metal organic precursors of low vapor pressure by absorption of the infrared radiation of a CO(2) laser. It is shown that stoichiometric, nanocrystalline particles consisting of SrZrO(3) and SrTiO(3) can be formed from corresponding mixtures of beta-diketonates which are evaporated nonselectively and with high rates by laser flash evaporation. PMID:18163736

  8. Investigations of chemical vapor deposition of GaN using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.; Stephenson, G. B.; Eastman, J. A.; Munkholm, A.; Auciello, O.; Murty, M. V. R.; Fini, P.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.

    2000-05-25

    The authors apply synchrotron x-ray analysis techniques to probe the surface structure of GaN films during synthesis by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Their approach is to observe the evolution of surface structure and morphology in real time using grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS). This technique combines the ability of x-rays to penetrate the chemical vapor deposition environment for in situ measurements, with the sensitivity of GIXS to atomic scale structure. In this paper they present examples from some of their studies of growth modes and surface evolution as a function of process conditions that illustrate the capabilities of synchrotron x-ray analysis during MOCVD growth. They focus on studies of the homoepitaxial growth mode, island coarsening dynamics, and effects of impurities.

  9. Detection and characterization of chemical vapor fugitive emissions by nonlinear optimal estimation: theory and simulation.

    PubMed

    Gittins, Christopher M

    2009-08-10

    This paper addresses detection and characterization of chemical vapor fugitive emissions in a nonscattering atmosphere by processing of remotely-sensed long-wavelength infrared spectra. The analysis approach integrates a parameterized signal model based on the radiative transfer equation with a statistical model for the infrared background. The maximum likelihood model parameter values are defined as those that maximize a Bayesian posterior probability and are estimated using a Gauss-Newton algorithm. For algorithm performance evaluation we simulate observation of fugitive emissions by augmenting plume-free measured spectra with synthetic plume signatures. As plumes become optically thick, the Gauss-Newton algorithm yields significantly more accurate estimates of chemical vapor column density and significantly more favorable plume detection statistics than clutter-matched-filter-based and adaptive-subspace-detector-based plume characterization and detection. PMID:19668269

  10. Process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Caputo, Anthony J.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for preparing fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of a fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  11. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harris Kagan; K.K. Gan; Richard Kass

    2009-03-31

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2013, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  12. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer Wallny

    2012-10-15

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2010, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2015, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed and operational in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  13. Thin Films of Gallium Arsenide and Gallium Aluminum Arsenide by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Look, Edward Gene Lun

    Low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LPMOCVD) of thin films of gallium arsenide (GaAs) and gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) was performed in a horizontal cold wall chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor. The organometallic (group III) sources were triethylgallium (TEGa) and triethylaluminum (TEAl), used in conjunction with arsine (AsH_3) as the group V source. It was found that growth parameters such as growth temperature, pressure, source flow rates and temperatures have a profound effect on the film quality and composition. Depending on the particular combination of conditions, both the surface and overall morphologies may be affected. The films were nondestructively analyzed by Raman and photoreflectance spectroscopies, x-ray diffraction and rocking curve studies, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Hall measurements and film thicknesses were determined with a step profilometer.

  14. Chemically enhanced mixed region vapor stripping of TCE-contaminated saturated peat and silty clay soils

    SciTech Connect

    West, O.R.; Cameron, P.A.; Lucero, A.J.; Koran, L.J. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct further testing of MRVS, chemically enhanced with calcium oxide conditioning, on field- contaminated soils collected from beneath the NASA Michoud Rinsewater Impoundment. In this study, residual soil VOC levels as a function of vapor stripping time were measured to quantify VOC removal rates. Physical and chemical soil parameters expected to affect MRVS efficiency were measures. The effects of varying the calcium oxide loadings as well as varying the vapor stripping flow rates on VOC removal were also evaluated. The results of this study will be used to determine whether acceptable removals can be achieved within reasonable treatment times, remediation costs being directly proportional to the latter. The purpose of this report is to document the experimental results of this study, as well as to address issues that were raised after completion of the previous Michoud treatability work.

  15. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  16. Synthesis of boron-doped graphene monolayers using the sole solid feedstock by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Zhou, Yu; Wu, Di; Liao, Lei; Zhao, Shuli; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2013-04-22

    Substitutionally boron-doped monolayer graphene film is grown on a large scale by using a sole phenylboronic acid as the source in a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition system. The B-doped graphene film is a homogeneous monolayer with high crystalline quality, which exhibits a stable p-type doping behavior with a considerably high room-temperature carrier mobility of about 800 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) . PMID:23463717

  17. Fabrication of lightweight ceramic mirrors by means of a chemical vapor deposition process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goela, Jitendra S. (Inventor); Taylor, Raymond L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process to fabricate lightweigth ceramic mirrors, and in particular, silicon/silicon carbide mirrors, involves three chemical vapor deposition steps: one to produce the mirror faceplate, the second to form the lightweight backstructure which is deposited integral to the faceplate, and the third and final step which results in the deposition of a layer of optical grade material, for example, silicon, onto the front surface of the faceplate. The mirror figure and finish are fabricated into this latter material.

  18. GaN Stress Evolution During Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.; Floro, J.A.; Han, J.; Hearne, S.; Hunter, J.; Tsong, I.

    1998-10-14

    The evolution of stress in gallium nitride films on sapphire has been measured in real- time during metal organic chemical vapor deposition. In spite of the 161%0 compressive lattice mismatch of GaN to sapphire, we find that GaN consistently grows in tension at 1050"C. Furthermore, in-situ stress monitoring indicates that there is no measurable relaxation of the tensile growth stress during annealing or thermal cycling.

  19. High index of refraction films for dielectric mirrors prepared by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    A wide variety of metal oxides with high index of refraction can be prepared by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition. We present some recent optical and laser damage results on oxide films prepared by MOCVD which could be used in a multilayer structure for highly reflecting (HR) dielectric mirror applications. The method of preparation affects both optical properties and laser damage threshold. 10 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Low temperature growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheol Jin; Son, Kwon Hee; Park, Jeunghee; Yoo, Jae Eun; Huh, Yoon; Lee, Jeong Yong

    2001-04-01

    Vertically well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are grown on Fe-deposited silicon oxide substrate at 550°C by thermal chemical vapor deposition of C 2H 2 gas. We employed two-stage heating technique that the reactants heated at 850°C in the first zone flow into the second zone maintained at 550°C for CNT growth. The CNTs have bamboo structure, closed tip, and defective graphite sheets.

  1. Growth model of bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheol Jin; Park, Jeunghee

    2000-11-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were grown on iron-deposited silicon oxide substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition of acetylene. The carbon nanotubes have no encapsulated iron particles at the closed tip and a bamboo structure in which the curvature of compartment layers is directed to the tip. A base growth model is suggested for the bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes grown under our experimental conditions.

  2. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  3. Electrochromic properties of molybdenum trioxide thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Toshiro; Kanagawa, Tetsuya

    1995-05-01

    Electrochromic molybdenum trioxide thin films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The source material was molybdenum carbonyl. Amorphous molybdenum trioxide thin films were produced at a substrate temperature 300 C. Reduction and oxidation of the films in a 0.3M LiClO{sub 4} propylene carbonate solution caused desirable changes in optical absorption. Coulometry indicated that the coloration efficiency was 25.8 cm{sup 2}/C.

  4. InAs/GaSb superlattices fabricated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, R. V.; Nevedomskii, V. N.; Pushnyi, B. V.; Bert, N. A.; Mizerov, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of fabricating InAs/GaSb strained-layer superlattices by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition has been experimentally demonstrated. The results of transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy investigations showed that the obtained structures comprise an InAs?GaSb superlattice on a GaSb substrate consisting of 2-nm-thick InAs and 3.3-nm-thick GaSb layers.

  5. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Large-Sized Hexagonal WSe₂ Crystals on Dielectric Substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianyi; Liu, Bo; Liu, Yanpeng; Tang, Wei; Nai, Chang Tai; Li, Linjun; Zheng, Jian; Gao, Libo; Zheng, Yi; Shin, Hyun Suk; Jeong, Hu Young; Loh, Kian Ping

    2015-11-01

    High-quality large-sized hexagoal WSe2 crystals can be grown on dielectric substrates using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition in the presence of hydrogen gas. These hexagonal crystals (lateral width >160 um) have a carrier mobility of 100 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and a photoresponsivity of ≈1100 mA W(-1), which is comparable to that of exfoliated flakes. PMID:26414106

  6. Metal-oxide-semiconductor characteristics of chemical vapor deposited cubic-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibahara, K.; Nishino, S.; Matsunami, H.

    1984-11-01

    Thermal oxidation of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) cubic-SiC and fabrication of MOS diodes using a thermal oxide film were carried out. The thermal oxide was found to be SiO2 by Auger electron spectroscopic analysis. Capacitance-voltage curves of MOS diodes measured under the dark condition showed deep depletion characteristics. Inversion characteristics were observed under the illuminated condition for the first time.

  7. A new doping method using metalorganics in chemical vapor deposition of 6H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Sakuma, E.; Misawa, S.; Gonda, S.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum doping was performed using triethylaluminum as the dopant in chemical vapor deposition of 6H-silicon carbide (SiC). Measurements on the electrical and cathodoluminescent properties of the epilayers indicate that the doping concentration of aluminum can be easily controlled by the flow rate of metalorganics. Electroluminescence was also observed for the pn junctions prepared by the successive growth of a nondoped n layer and a p layer doped with aluminum using metalorganics.

  8. Monolayer Graphene Growth on Ni(111) by Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Batzill, M.; Sutter, P.; Addou, R.; Dahal, A.

    2012-01-09

    In contrast to the commonly employed high temperature chemical vapor deposition growth that leads to multilayer graphene formation by carbon segregation from the bulk, we demonstrate that below 600 C graphene can be grown in a self-limiting monolayer growth process. Optimum growth is achieved at {approx}550 C. Above this temperature, carbon diffusion into the bulk is limiting the surface growth rate, while at temperatures below {approx}500 C a competing surface carbide phase impedes graphene formation.

  9. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Haniam, P.; Kunsombat, C.; Chiangga, S.; Songsasen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  10. Synthesis of cobalt oxides thin films fractal structures by laser chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Haniam, P; Kunsombat, C; Chiangga, S; Songsasen, A

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354