Science.gov

Sample records for chemistry derived materials

  1. Nanostructured energetic materials derived from sol-gel chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R L; Tillotson, T M; Hrubesh, L W; Gash, A E

    2000-03-15

    Initiation and detonation properties are dramatically affected by an energetic material's microstructural properties. Sol-gel chemistry allows intimacy of mixing to be controlled and dramatically improved over existing methodologies. One material goal is to create very high power energetic materials which also have high energy densities. Using sol-gel chemistry we have made a nanostructured composite energetic material. Here a solid skeleton of fuel, based on resorcinol-formaldehyde, has nanocrystalline ammonium perchlorate, the oxidizer, trapped within its pores. At optimum stoichiometry it has approximately the energy density of HMX. Transmission electron microscopy indicated no ammonium perchlorate crystallites larger than 20 nm while near-edge soft x-ray absorption microscopy showed that nitrogen was uniformly distributed, at least on the scale of less than 80 nm. Small-angle neutron scattering studies were conducted on the material. Those results were consistent with historical ones for this class of nanostructured materials. The average skeletal primary particle size was on the order of 2.7 nm, while the nanocomposite showed the growth of small 1 nm size crystals of ammonium perchlorate with some clustering to form particles greater than 10 nm.

  2. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Using New Combinatorial Chemistry Derived Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Stucky, Galen D.; McFarland, Eric W.

    2004-10-25

    Solar photoelectrochemical water-splitting has long been viewed as one of the “holy grails” of chemistry because of its potential impact as a clean, renewable method of fuel production. Several known photocatalytic semiconductors can be used; however, the fundamental mechanisms of the process remain poorly understood and no known material has the required properties for cost effective hydrogen production. In order to investigate morphological and compositional variations in metal oxides as they relate to opto-electrochemical properties, we have employed a combinatorial methodology using automated, high-throughput, electrochemical synthesis and screening together with conventional solid-state methods. This report discusses a number of novel, high-throughput instruments developed during this project for the expeditious discovery of improved materials for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Also described within this report are results from a variety of materials (primarily tungsten oxide, zinc oxide, molybdenum oxide, copper oxide and titanium dioxide) whose properties were modified and improved by either layering, inter-mixing, or doping with one or more transition metals. Furthermore, the morphologies of certain materials were also modified through the use of structure directing agents (SDA) during synthesis to create mesostructures (features 2-50 nm) that increased surface area and improved rates of hydrogen production.

  3. Plasma chemistry for inorganic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, O.

    1980-01-01

    Practical application of plasma chemistry to the development of inorganic materials using both low temperature and warm plasmas are summarized. Topics cover: the surface nitrification and oxidation of metals; chemical vapor deposition; formation of minute oxide particles; the composition of oxides from chloride vapor; the composition of carbides and nitrides; freezing high temperature phases by plasma arc welding and plasma jet; use of plasma in the development of a substitute for petroleum; the production of silicon for use in solar cell batteries; and insulating the inner surface of nuclear fusion reactor walls.

  4. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  5. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-01-01

    Discusses materials used by dentists to restore teeth after decay has been removed. Shows how dental-material science is an interdisciplinary field in which chemistry plays a major part. Reviews the many developments polymer chemistry has contributed to the field of dental fillings. (CCM)

  6. Freshman Chemistry and Materials at NJIT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzin, Donald R.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary chemistry course at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) in which at least one quarter of the time is devoted to materials science. Includes information on course content, laboratory work, and assessment of student performance on chemistry and materials science topics. (JN)

  7. Strategic thinking in chemistry and materials

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Science and technology challenges facing the Chemistry and Materials program relate to the fundamental problem of addressing the critical needs to improve our understanding of how nuclear weapons function and age, while experiencing increased pressures to compensate for a decreasing technology base. Chemistry and materials expertise is an enabling capability embedded within every aspect of nuclear weapons design, testing, production, surveillance and dismantlement. Requirements to capture an enduring chemistry and materials technology base from throughout the integrated contractor complex have promoted a highly visible obligation on the weapons research and development program. The only successful response to this challenge must come from direct improvements in effectiveness and efficiency accomplished through improved understanding. Strategic thinking has generated the following three overarching focus areas for the chemistry and materials competency: As-built Materials Characterization and Performance; Materials Aging; and, Materials Synthesis and Processing.

  8. Chemistry and Materials Science Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodie, K B; Mailhiot, C; Eaglesham, D; Hartmann-Siantar, C L; Turpin, L S; Allen, P G

    2004-04-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's mission is as clear today as it was in 1952 when the Laboratory was founded--to ensure our country's national security and the safety and reliability of its nuclear deterrent. As a laboratory pursuing applied science in the national interest, we strive to accomplish our mission through excellence in science and technology. We do this while developing and implementing sound and robust business practices in an environment that emphasizes security and ensures our safety and the safety of the community around us. Our mission as a directorate derives directly from the Laboratory's charter. When I accepted the assignment of Associate Director for Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS), I talked to you about the need for strategic balance and excellence in all our endeavors. We also discussed how to take the directorate to the next level. The long-range CMS strategic plan presented here was developed with this purpose in mind. It also aligns with the Lab's institutional long-range science and technology plan and its 10-year facilities and infrastructure site plan. The plan is aimed at ensuring that we fulfill our directorate's two governing principles: (1) delivering on our commitments to Laboratory programs and sponsors, and (2) anticipating change and capitalizing on opportunities through innovation in science and technology. This will require us to attain a new level of creativity, agility, and flexibility as we move forward. Moreover, a new level of engagement in partnerships with other directorates across the Laboratory as well as with universities and other national labs will also be required. The group of managers and staff that I chartered to build a strategic plan identified four organizing themes that define our directorate's work and unite our staff with a set of common goals. The plan presented here explains how we will proceed in each of these four theme areas: (1) Materials properties and performance under extreme

  9. Chemistry and materials science research report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-31

    The research reported here in summary form was conducted under the auspices of Weapons-Supporting Research (WSR) and Institutional Research and Development (IR D). The period covered is the first half of FY90. The results reported here are for work in progress; thus, they may be preliminary, fragmentary, or incomplete. Research in the following areas are briefly described: energetic materials, tritium, high-Tc superconductors, interfaces, adhesion, bonding, fundamental aspects of metal processing, plutonium, synchrotron-radiation-based materials science, photocatalysis on doped aerogels, laser-induced chemistry, laser-produced molecular plasmas, chemistry of defects, dta equipment development, electronic structure study of the thermodynamic and mechanical properties of Al-Li Alloys, and the structure-property link in sub-nanometer materials.

  10. Calcifying tissue regeneration via biomimetic materials chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Green, David W.; Goto, Tazuko K.; Kim, Kye-Seong; Jung, Han-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Materials chemistry is making a fundamental impact in regenerative sciences providing many platforms for tissue development. However, there is a surprising paucity of replacements that accurately mimic the structure and function of the structural fabric of tissues or promote faithful tissue reconstruction. Methodologies in biomimetic materials chemistry have shown promise in replicating morphologies, architectures and functional building blocks of acellular mineralized tissues dentine, enamel and bone or that can be used to fully regenerate them with integrated cell populations. Biomimetic materials chemistry encompasses the two processes of crystal formation and mineralization of crystals into inorganic formations on organic templates. This review will revisit the successes of biomimetics materials chemistry in regenerative medicine, including coccolithophore simulants able to promote in vivo bone formation. In-depth knowledge of biomineralization throughout evolution informs the biomimetic materials chemist of the most effective techniques for regenerative framework construction exemplified via exploitation of liquid crystals (LCs) and complex self-organizing media. Therefore, a new innovative direction would be to create chemical environments that perform reaction–diffusion exchanges as the basis for building complex biomimetic inorganic structures. This has evolved widely in biology, as have LCs, serving as self-organizing templates in pattern formation of structural biomaterials. For instance, a study is highlighted in which artificially fabricated chiral LCs, made from bacteriophages are transformed into a faithful copy of enamel. While chemical-based strategies are highly promising at creating new biomimetic structures there are limits to the degree of complexity that can be generated. Thus, there may be good reason to implement living or artificial cells in ‘morphosynthesis’ of complex inorganic constructs. In the future, cellular construction is

  11. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-11-01

    The chemistry underpinning modern tooth-colored dental fillings is described. Two broad groups of material are covered, the so-called composite resins and the glass-ionomer cements. Composite resins consist of bulky difunctional monomers together with high loadings of powdered inorganic fillers, and they set by addition polymerization. Glass-ionomers consist of aqueous polymeric acids, such as polyacrylic acid, plus basic glass powders. They set by a neutralization reaction, but leave a substantial amount of the glass unreacted, to act as reinforcing filler. Various attempts have been made to combine the attractive properties of these materials, and the different types of hybrids of them are described. The importance of chemistry to this important branch of health care is emphasized.

  12. Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Steve; Engelke, Ray; Manner, Virginia; Chellappa, Raja; Yoo, Choong - Shik

    2011-01-20

    The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

  13. Chemistry and Processing of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G A; Baumann, T F; Hope-Weeks, L J; Vance, A L

    2002-01-18

    Nanostructured materials can be formed through the sol-gel polymerization of inorganic or organic monomer systems. For example, a two step polymerization of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) was developed such that silica aerogels with densities as low as 3 kg/m{sup 3} ({approx} two times the density of air) could be achieved. Organic aerogels based upon resorcinol-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde can also be prepared using the sol-gel process. Materials of this type have received significant attention at LLNL due to their ultrafine cell sizes, continuous porosity, high surface area and low mass density. For both types of aerogels, sol-gel polymerization depends upon the transformation of these monomers into nanometer-sized clusters followed by cross-linking into a 3-dimensional gel network. While sol-gel chemistry provides the opportunity to synthesize new material compositions, it suffers from the inability to separate the process of cluster formation from gelation. This limitation results in structural deficiencies in the gel that impact the physical properties of the aerogel, xerogel or nanocomposite. In order to control the properties of the resultant gel, one should be able to regulate the formation of the clusters and their subsequent cross-linking. Towards this goal, we are utilizing dendrimer chemistry to separate the cluster formation from the gelation so that new nanostructured materials can be produced. Dendrimers are three-dimensional, highly branched macromolecules that are prepared in such a way that their size, shape and surface functionality are readily controlled. The dendrimers will be used as pre-formed clusters of known size that can be cross-linked to form an ordered gel network.

  14. Hazardous Materials Chemistry for the Non-Chemist. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Thomas K.; Enholm, Eric J.

    This book provides a basic introduction for the student to hazardous materials chemistry. Coverage of chemistry, rather than non-chemical hazards, is particularly stressed on a level which the layman can understand. Basic terminology is emphasized at all levels, as are simple chemistry symbols, in order to provide the student with an introductory…

  15. Introduction of Materials Science Through Solid State Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, William M.

    Presented is a report of a program of the American Society for Metals, designed to introduce materials science principles via solid state chemistry into high school chemistry courses. At the time of the inception of this program in the mid-sixties, it was felt that high school students were not being adequately exposed to career opportunities in…

  16. Parametric distributions of regional lake chemistry: Fitted and derived

    SciTech Connect

    Small, M.J.; Sutton, M.C.; Milke, M.W. )

    1988-02-01

    Parametric probability distribution functions are determined for regional lake chemistry in four subregions of the Eastern Lake Survey (ELS) of the US EPA National Surface Water Survey. The subregions are the Adirondacks, northeastern Minnesota, northcentral Wisconsin, and the Southern Blue Ridge Province. ANC data are fit with a three-parameter lognormal distribution, and the distributions of pH and total base cations are derived from physically based relationships estimated for each region. The parametric distribution functions provide very good representations of observed data in each area, with the exception of northcentral Wisconsin, where bimodal ANC and base cation distributions are observed, suggesting the need for a mixture of distributions. The derived distributions of pH allow for interregional comparison, with unimodal pH distributions in unacidified areas and bimodal pH distributions in regions impacted by acid deposition. Future research of regional variations in water chemistry is proposed in the context of the correlation structure of large-scale spatial variations of soil and geologic properties.

  17. Quantum Dots: An Experiment for Physical or Materials Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, L. D.; Arceo, J. F.; Hughes, W. C.; DeGraff, B. A.; Augustine, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for obtaining quantum dots for physical or materials chemistry. This experiment serves to both reinforce the basic concept of quantum confinement and providing a useful bridge between the molecular and solid-state world.

  18. Materials derived from biomass/biodegradable materials.

    PubMed

    Luzier, W D

    1992-02-01

    Interest in biodegradable plastics made from renewable resources has increased significantly in recent years. PHBV (polyhydroxybutyrate-polyhydroxyvalerate) copolymers are good examples of this type of materials. This paper provides an overview of the manufacturing process, properties, biodegradability, and application/commercial issues associated with PHBV copolymers. They are naturally produced by bacteria from agricultural raw materials, and they can be processed to make a variety of useful products, where their biodegradability and naturalness are quite beneficial. PHBV copolymers are still in the first stage of commercialization. But they are presented in this paper as an example of how new technology can help meet society's needs for plastics and a clean environment. PMID:1736301

  19. Chemistry of vaporization of refractory materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilles, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    A discussion is given of the principles of physical chemistry important in vaporization studies, notably the concepts of equilibrium, phase behavior, thermodynamics, solid solution, and kinetics. The important factors influencing equilibrium vaporization phenomena are discussed and illustrated. A proper course of a vaporization study consisting of 9 stages is proposed. The important experimental techniques of Knudsen effusion, Langmuir vaporization and mass spectrometry are discussed. The principles, the factors, the course of a study and the experimental techniques and procedures are illustrated by recent work on the Ti-O system.

  20. Aerogel Derived Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wendell E Rhine, PI; Dong, Wenting; Greg Caggiano, PM

    2010-10-08

    America’s dependence on foreign sources for fuel represents a economic and security threat for the country. These non renewable resources are depleting, and the effects of pollutants from fuels such as oil are reaching a problematic that affects the global community. Solar concentration power (SCP) production systems offer the opportunity to harness one of the United States’ most under utilized natural resources; sunlight. While commercialization of this technology is increasing, in order to become a significant source of electricity production in the United States the costs of deploying and operating SCP plants must be further reduced. Parabolic Trough SCP technologies are close to meeting energy production cost levels that would raise interest in the technology and help accelerate its adoption as a method to produce a significant portion of the Country’s electric power needs. During this program, Aspen Aerogels will develop a transparent aerogel insulation that can replace the costly vacuum insulation systems that are currently used in parabolic trough designs. During the Phase I program, Aspen Aerogels will optimize the optical and thermal properties of aerogel to meet the needs of this application. These properties will be tested, and the results will be used to model the performance of a parabolic trough HCE system which uses this novel material in place of vacuum. During the Phase II program, Aspen Aerogels will scale up this technology. Together with industry partners, Aspen Aerogels will build and test a prototype Heat Collection Element that is insulated with the novel transparent aerogel material. This new device will find use in parabolic trough SCP applications.

  1. Chemistry-Materials Laboratory Project Book, 1979-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Bureau of Vocational-Technical Schools.

    This Chemistry-Materials Laboratory Project Book, assembled through a survey of science instructors in vocational-technical schools in Connecticut, is intended to meet a variety of needs. It can serve as an idea book, with the instructor taking from it as needed and adding or substituting material related to class interests; as a guide book for…

  2. Computer information resources of inorganic chemistry and materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselyova, N. N.; Dudarev, V. A.; Zemskov, V. S.

    2010-02-01

    Information systems used in inorganic chemistry and materials science are considered. The following basic trends in the development of modern information systems in these areas are highlighted: access to information via the Internet, merging of documental and factual databases, involvement of experts in the evaluation of the data reliability, supplementing databases with information analysis tools on the properties of inorganic substances and materials.

  3. Chemistry of electronic ceramic materials. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Chemistry of Electronic Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, P. K.; Roth, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    The conference was held at Jackson Hole, Wyoming from August 17 to 22, 1990, and in an attempt to maximize the development of this rapidly moving, multidisciplinary field, this conference brought together major national and international researchers to bridge the gap between those primarily interested in the pure chemistry of inorganic solids and those interested in the physical and electronic properties of ceramics. With the many major discoveries that have occurred over the last decade, one of the goals of this meeting was to evaluate the current understanding of the chemistry of electronic ceramic materials, and to assess the state of a field that has become one of the most important areas of advanced materials research. The topics covered include: crystal chemistry; dielectric ceramics; low temperature synthesis and characterization; solid state synthesis and characterization; surface chemistry; superconductors; theory and modeling.

  4. Sponge derived bromotyrosines: structural diversity through natural combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Hendrik; Marmann, Andreas; Lin, Wenhan; Proksch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Sponge derived bromotyrosines are a multifaceted class of marine bioactive compounds that are important for the chemical defense of sponges but also for drug discovery programs as well as for technical applications in the field of antifouling constituents. These compounds, which are mainly accumulated by Verongid sponges, exhibit a diverse range of bioactivities including antibiotic, cytotoxic and antifouling effects. In spite of the simple biogenetic building blocks, which consist only of brominated tyrosine and tyramine units, an impressive diversity of different compounds is obtained through different linkages between these precursors and through structural modifications of the side chains and/or aromatic rings resembling strategies that are known from combinatorial chemistry. As examples for bioactive, structurally divergent bromotyrosines psammaplin A, Aplysina alkaloids featuring aerothionin, aeroplysinin-1 and the dienone, and the bastadins, including the synthetically derived hemibastadin congeners, have been selected for this review. Whereas all of these natural products are believed to be involved in the chemical defense of sponges, some of them may also be of particular relevance to drug discovery due to their interaction with specific molecular targets in eukaryotic cells. These targets involve important enzymes and receptors, such as histone deacetylases (HDAC) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), which are inhibited by psammaplin A, as well as ryanodine receptors that are targeted by bastadine type compounds. The hemibastadins such as the synthetically derived dibromohemibastadin are of particular interest due to their antifouling activity. For the latter, a phenoloxidase which catalyzes the bioglue formation needed for firm attachment of fouling organisms to a given substrate was identified as a molecular target. The Aplysina alkaloids finally provide a vivid example for dynamic wound induced bioconversions of natural products that generate highly

  5. Analytical chemistry at the interface between materials science and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Janese Christine

    This work describes several research efforts that lie at the new interfaces between analytical chemistry and other disciplines, namely materials science and biology. In the materials science realm, the search for new materials that may have useful or unique chromatographic properties motivated the synthesis and characterization of electrically conductive sol-gels. In the biology realm, the search for new surface fabrication schemes that would permit or even improve the detection of specific biological reactions motivated the design of miniaturized biological arrays. Collectively, this work represents some of analytical chemistry's newest forays into these disciplines. This dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 is an introductory chapter that provides background information pertinent to several key aspects of the work contained in this dissertation. Chapter 2 describes the synthesis and characterization of electrically conductive sol-gels derived from the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a vanadium alkoxide. Specifically, this chapter describes our attempts to increase the conductivity of vanadium sol-gels by optimizing the acidic and drying conditions used during synthesis. Chapter 3 reports the construction of novel antigenic immunosensing platforms of increased epitope density using Fab'-SH antibody fragments on gold. Here, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thin-layer cell (TLC) and confocal fluorescence spectroscopies, and scanning force microscopy (SFM) are employed to characterize the fragment-substrate interaction, to quantify epitope density, and to demonstrate fragment viability and specificity. Chapter 4 presents a novel method for creating and interrogating double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) microarrays suitable for screening protein:dsDNA interactions. Using the restriction enzyme ECoR1, we demonstrate the ability of the atomic force microscope (AFM) to detect changes in topography that result from the enzymatic cleavage of dsDNA microarrays

  6. Teaching General Chemistry: A Materials Science Companion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Arthur B.; And Others

    Many teachers and other educators have expressed a concern regarding the lack of student interest in many of the traditional science courses. To help rectify this problem a collaborative effort among educators and others concerned has led to the development of instructional materials that are more relevant to the lives of students. This document…

  7. Expandable-graphite-derived graphene for next-generation battery chemistries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Chenxi; Li, Longjun; Qie, Long; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2015-06-01

    Lithium-sulfur and lithium-air batteries offer theoretical energy densities an order of magnitude higher than that of current lithium-ion batteries and are considered as promising candidates as the next-generation battery chemistries. For an efficient use of these new battery chemistries, careful selection of suitable electrode materials/structures is critical. Graphene, a unique two-dimensional nanomaterial, with its superior electronic conductivity, mechanical strength, and flexibility has been successfully applied in battery studies. Graphene, even with imperfect layers, will be of great interest to battery industrial applications if the manufacturing cost is reduced. Herein, we demonstrate the application of low-cost graphene sponge/sheets derived from expandable graphite in both lithium-sulfur and hybrid lithium-air batteries, respectively, as a cathode conductive matrix to accommodate the soluble polysulfides and as a catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction. High utilization of active materials and good cycling stability are realized in lithium-sulfur and hybrid lithium-air batteries by employing this low-cost material, demonstrating its promise for use in next-generation battery chemistries.

  8. The Chemistry of Ultra-Radiopure Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Farmer, Orville T.; Fast, Jim E.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Litke, Kevin E.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miller, Erin A.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.

    2007-11-15

    Ultra-pure materials are needed for the construction of the next generation of ultra-low level radiation detectors. These detectors are used for environmental research as well as rare nuclear decay experiments, e.g. probing the effective mass and character of the neutrino. Unfortunately, radioactive isotopes are found in most construction materials, either primordial isotopes, activation/spallation products from cosmic-ray exposure, or surface deposition of dust or radon progeny. Copper is an ideal candidate material for these applications. High-purity copper is commercially available and, when even greater radiopurity is needed, additional electrochemical purification can be combined with the final construction step, resulting in “electroformed” copper of extreme purity. Copper also offers desirable thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties. To bridge the gap between commercially-available high purity copper and the most stringent requirements of next-generation low-background experiments, a method of additional chemical purification is being developed based on well-known copper electrochemistry. This method is complemented with the co-development of surface cleaning techniques and more sensitive assay for both surface and bulk contamination. Developments in the electroplating of copper, surface cleaning, assay of U and Th in the bulk copper, and residual surface contamination will be discussed relative to goals of less than 1 microBq/kg Th.

  9. Mussel-Inspired Materials: Self-Healing through Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Krogsgaard, Marie; Nue, Vicki; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-01-18

    Improved understanding of the underwater attachment strategy of the blue mussels and other marine organisms has inspired researchers to find new routes to advanced materials. Mussels use polyphenols, such as the catechol-containing amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), to attach to surfaces. Catechols and their analogues can undergo both oxidative covalent cross-linking under alkaline conditions and take part in coordination chemistry. The former has resulted in the widespread use of polydopamine and related materials. The latter is emerging as a tool to make self-healing materials due to the reversible nature of coordination bonds. We review how mussel-inspired materials have been made with a focus on the less developed use of metal coordination and illustrate how this chemistry can be widely to make self-healing materials. PMID:26558881

  10. Design Guidelines for Digital Learning Material for Food Chemistry Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diederen, Julia; Gruppen, Harry; Voragen, Alphons G. J.; Hartog, Rob; Mulder, Martin; Biemans, Harm

    This paper describes the first stage of a 4-year research project on the design, development and use of Web-based digital learning material for food chemistry education. The paper discusses design guidelines, based on principles that were selected from theories on learning and instruction, and illustrates in detail how these guidelines were used…

  11. Chemistry with Inexpensive Materials: Spray Bottles and Plastic Bags.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoltewicz, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Presents eight chemistry activities that are interesting and involve simple, easily available materials. Topics include mystery writing, valentine hearts, flame tests, evaporation race, buoyancy versus mass, determination of relative masses of gases, mole sample container, and cold and hot packs. (DDR)

  12. Chemistry and Materials Science, 1990--1991. [Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Sugihara, T.T.; Bruner, J.M.; McElroy, L.A.

    1991-12-31

    This 2-year (FY 1990-91) contains 49 technical articles in ten sections: research sampler, metals and alloys, energetic materials, chemistry and physics of advanced materials, bonding and reactions at surfaces and interfaces, superconductivity, energy R and D, waste processing and management, characterization and analysis, and facilities and instrumentation. Two more sections list department personnel, their publications etc., consultants, and summary of department budgets. The articles are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  13. Bioinspired Interfaces with Superwettability: From Materials to Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2016-02-17

    Superwettability is a special case of the wetting phenomenon among liquids, gases, and solids. The superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic effect discovered initially has undergone a century of development based on materials science and biomimetics. With the rapid development of research on anti-wetting materials, superoleophobic/superoleophilic surfaces have been fabricated to repel organic liquids besides water. Further studies of underwater superoleophobic/superoleophilic/superaerophobic/superaerophilic materials provide an alternative way to fabricate anti-wetting surfaces rather than lowering the surface energy. Owing to a series of efforts on the studying of extreme wettabilities, a mature superwettability system gradually evolved and has since become a vibrant area of active research, covering topics of superhydrophobicity/superhydrophilicity, superoleophobicity/superoleophilicity in gas or under liquid, superaerophobicity/superaerophilicity under liquid, and combinations of these states. The kinetic study of the superwettability system includes statics and dynamics, while the studied material structures range from traditional two-dimensional materials to three-dimensional, one-dimensional, and zero-dimensional materials. Furthermore, the wetting liquids range from water to oil, aqueous solutions, and ionic liquids, as well as liquid crystals and other types of liquids. The wetting conditions extend over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and other external fields. With the development of this series of research, many new theories and functional interfacial materials have been fabricated, including self-cleaning textiles, oil/water separation systems, and water collection systems, and some of these have already been applied in industry. Moreover, the study of superwettability has also introduced many new phenomena and principles to the field of interfacial chemistry that display its vast potential in both materials and chemistry. The present Perspective aims

  14. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-12-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure-property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon, are discussed. PMID:26568373

  15. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By application specific pretreatments and manufacturing method, lignin can be converted to a variety of value added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogenitites in lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. In this review, lignin manufacturing process, effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of lignin, properties and applications of various lignin derived carbon materials such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films; are discussed.

  16. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon.

  17. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  18. Chemistry and Materials Science 2004 Annual Report, Preview Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, S; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Rennie, G

    2005-05-16

    Thriving from change is a constant element at LLNL. Through our commitment to scientific accomplishments, we have met the challenges posed by our evolving missions in 2004. It is the scientific breakthroughs that substantiate our strategic directions. Investments based on our strategic directions are bearing fruit, as illustrated in this preview of the 2004 Annual Report. We describe how our science is built around a strategic plan with four organizing themes: {sm_bullet} Materials properties and performance under extreme conditions {sm_bullet} Chemistry under extreme conditions and chemical engineering in support of national-security programs {sm_bullet} Science supporting national objectives at the intersection of chemistry, materials science, and biology {sm_bullet} Applied nuclear science for human health and national security We are particularly pleased with achievements within the 'intersection of chemistry, materials science, and biology,' an emerging area of science that may reshape the landscape of our national-security mission. CMS continues to have an unambiguous role both as a technology leader and as a partner for all of the four theme areas. We look forward to expanding the frontiers of science and continuing our partnership with the worldwide scientific community, as we firmly respond to the changing environment with agility and flexibility.

  19. 77 FR 14022 - Guidance for Industry on Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls Information-Fermentation-Derived...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background In the Federal Register of March 14, 2011 (76 FR 13629), FDA published the notice... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Chemistry, Manufacturing, and... entitled ``Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls (CMC) Information-- Fermentation-Derived...

  20. Materials Chemistry and Performance of Silicone-Based Replicating Compounds.

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Mirabal, Alex James; Kalan, Michael; Trujillo, Ana B; Hale, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Replicating compounds are used to cast reproductions of surface features on a variety of materials. Replicas allow for quantitative measurements and recordkeeping on parts that may otherwise be difficult to measure or maintain. In this study, the chemistry and replicating capability of several replicating compounds was investigated. Additionally, the residue remaining on material surfaces upon removal of replicas was quantified. Cleaning practices were tested for several different replicating compounds. For all replicating compounds investigated, a thin silicone residue was left by the replica. For some compounds, additional inorganic species could be identified in the residue. Simple solvent cleaning could remove some residue.

  1. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templatedmore » carbon.« less

  2. Vehicle exhaust treatment using electrical discharge and materials chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkyn, R.G.; Balmer, M.L.; Barlow, S.E.; Orlando, T.M.; Goulette, D.; Hoard, J.

    1997-12-31

    Current 3-way catalytic converters have proven quite effective at removing NO{sub x} from the exhaust of spark ignition vehicles operating near stoichiometric air-to-fuel ratios. However, diesel engines typically operate at very high air-to-fuel ratios. Under such lean burn conditions current catalytic converters are ineffective for NO{sub x} removal. As a result, considerable effort has been made to develop a viable lean NO{sub x} catalyst. Although some materials have been shown to reduce NO{sub x} under lean burn conditions, none exhibit the necessary activity and stability at the high temperatures and humidities found in typical engine exhaust,. As a result, alternative technologies are being explored in an effort to solve the so-called lean NO{sub x} problem. Packed-bed barrier discharge systems are well suited to take advantage of plasma-surface interactions due to the large number of contaminant surface collisions in the bed. The close proximity of the active surface to transient species produced by the plasma may lead to favorable chemistry at considerably lower temperatures than required by thermal catalysts. The authors present data in this paper illustrating that the identity and surface properties of the packing material can alter the discharge-driven chemistry in synthetic leanburn exhaust mixtures. Results using non-porous glass beads as the packing material suggest the limits of NO{sub x} reduction using purely gas phase discharge chemistry. By comparison, encouraging results are reported for several alternative packing materials.

  3. Forensic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  4. Chemistry and properties of blends of acetylene terminated materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to develop new high temperature/high performance structural materials, the chemistry and properties of acetylene-containing materials and their cured resins are under investigation. The objective of this work is to develop materials that are readily processable (i.e., 200-300 C and about 1.4 MPa or less) and possess usable mechanical properties at temperatures as high as 177 C. An acetylene-terminated aspartimide (ATA) was blended with an equal weight of an acetylene-terminated arylene ether (ATAE) oligomer. The blend was subsequently thermally cured to yield a resin which was evaluated in the form of neat resin moldings, adhesive specimens, and laminates. Adhesive specimens and laminates gave good mechanical properties to temperatures as high as 177 C. In addition, preliminary laminate work is presented on the resin from a blend of a new N-methyl substituted ATA and an ATAE.

  5. Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Lemmon, John P.; Imhoff, Carl H.; Graff, Gordon L.; Li, Liyu; Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Chong M.; Xiao, Jie; Xia, Guanguang; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Baskaran, Suresh; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Schwenzer, Birgit

    2013-02-15

    Large-scale electrical energy storage has become more important than ever for reducing fossil energy consumption in transportation and for the widespread deployment of intermittent renewable energy in electric grid. However, significant challenges exist for its applications. Here, the status and challenges are reviewed from the perspective of materials science and materials chemistry in electrochemical energy storage technologies, such as Li-ion batteries, sodium (sulfur and metal halide) batteries, Pb-acid battery, redox flow batteries, and supercapacitors. Perspectives and approaches are introduced for emerging battery designs and new chemistry combinations to reduce the cost of energy storage devices.

  6. Student Use of Web-Based Tutorial Materials and Understanding of Chemistry Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, William; Nakhleh, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the findings of Phase II of our study of student use of web-based tutorial materials for general chemistry and student understanding of chemistry concepts. We have found that students who use the web site valued the aspects of visualization of chemistry concepts and availability of materials online. In our analysis of student…

  7. Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate 2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz De La Rubia, T; Fluss, M J; Rath, K; Rennie, G; Shang, S; Kitrinos, G

    2006-08-08

    In 1952, we began laboratory operations in the barracks building of the Naval Air Station with approximately 50 employees. Today, the Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS) Directorate is a major organization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with more than 500 employees who continue to contribute to our evolving national security mission. For more than half a century, the mission of the Laboratory revolved primarily around nuclear deterrence and associated defense technologies. Today, Livermore supports a broad-based national security mission, and our specialized capabilities increasingly support emerging missions in human health and energy security. In the future, CMS will play a significantly expanded role in science and technology at the intersection of national security, energy and environment, and health. Our world-class workforce will provide the science and technology base for radically innovative materials to our programs and sponsors. Our 2005 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Organized into two major sections-research themes and dynamic teams, this report focuses on achievements arising from earlier investments that address future challenges. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national security mission. Research Themes: (1) Materials Properties and Performance under Extreme Conditions--We are developing ultrahard nanocrystalline metals, exploring the properties of nanotubes when exposed to very high temperatures, and engineering stronger materials to meet future needs for materials that can withstand extreme conditions. (2) Chemistry under Extreme Conditions and Chemical Engineering to Support National-Security Programs--Our recent

  8. Engineering half-Heusler thermoelectric materials using Zintl chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeier, Wolfgang G.; Schmitt, Jennifer; Hautier, Geoffroy; Aydemir, Umut; Gibbs, Zachary M.; Felser, Claudia; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Half-Heusler compounds based on XNiSn and XCoSb (X = Ti, Zr or Hf) have rapidly become important thermoelectric materials for converting waste heat into electricity. In this Review, we provide an overview on the electronic properties of half-Heusler compounds in an attempt to understand their basic structural chemistry and physical properties, and to guide their further development. Half-Heusler compounds can exhibit semiconducting transport behaviour even though they are described as ‘intermetallic’ compounds. Therefore, it is most useful to consider these systems as rigid-band semiconductors within the framework of Zintl (or valence-precise) compounds. These considerations aid our understanding of their properties, such as the bandgap and low hole mobility because of interstitial Ni defects in XNiSn. Understanding the structural and bonding characteristics, including the presence of defects, will help to develop different strategies to improve and design better half-Heusler thermoelectric materials.

  9. Methane as raw material in synthetic chemistry: the final frontier.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Ana; Pérez, Pedro J

    2013-12-01

    In spite of its large availability in natural or shale gas deposits, the use of methane in the chemical industry as feedstock from a synthetic point of view yet constitutes a challenge in modern chemistry. Only the production of the so-called syngas, a mixture of CO and H2 derived from the complete cleavage of the methane molecule, operates at the industrial level. The relevance of methane in the current industry, mainly toward methanol production, is described in this Tutorial. The methanol economy has been already proposed as an alternative to current fuel sources. Methanol synthesis directly from methane would imply the activation of the latter. Toward this end, the different methodologies reported to activate methane with transition metal complexes as well as the few examples of the catalytic functionalization of methane are presented. PMID:23954933

  10. Integrative Chemistry: Advanced functional cellular materials bearing multiscale porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depardieu, M.; Kinadjian, N.; Backov, R.

    2015-07-01

    With this mini review we show through the sol-gel and emulsion-based Integrative Chemistry how it is possible to trigger materials dimensionality and beyond their functionalities when reaching enhanced applications. In here we focus on 3D macrocellular monolithic foams bearing hierarchical porosities and applications thereof. We first depict the general background of emulsions focusing on concentrated ones, acting as soft templates for the design of PolyHIPE foams, HIPE being the acronym of High Internal Phase Emulsions while encompassing both sol-gel and polymer chemistry. Secondly we extend this approach toward the design of hybrid organic-inorganic foams, labeled Organo-Si(HIPE), where photonics and heterogeneous catalysis applications are addressed. In a third section we show how inorganic Si(HIPE) matrices can be employed as sacrificial hard templates for the generation carbonaceous foams, labeled Carbon(HIPE). These foams being conductive we show applications when employed as electrodes for Li-S battery and as hosts for Li(BH4)-based hydrogen storage.

  11. Surface Chemistry and Water Dispersability of Carbon Black Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Burchell, Timothy D

    2006-01-01

    Formulation of water-stable carbon black dispersions is a double-sided task, which requires selection of a proper dispersing agents and matching it with the properties of a specific carbon black. Among other properties that affect water dispersability of carbon blacks (particle size, surface area, and aggregate structure), surface chemistry plays a prime-order role. We have characterized physical and chemical properties of several carbon black materials, and correlated them with the stability of dispersions formed with ionic and non-ionic surfactants. In particular, chemical characterization of surface functional groups on carbon blacks based on potentiometric titration measurements (pKa spectra) provided a comprehensive picture of pH effects on dispersion stability. The results obtained were complemented by information from physical characterization methods, such as XPS and FTIR. The selection of a suitable dispersing agent able to withstand large pH variations will be discussed.

  12. Controlled Chemistry Helium High Temperature Materials Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Richard N. WRight

    2005-08-01

    A system to test aging and environmental effects in flowing helium with impurity content representative of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has been designed and assembled. The system will be used to expose microstructure analysis coupons and mechanical test specimens for up to 5,000 hours in helium containing potentially oxidizing or carburizing impurities controlled to parts per million levels. Impurity levels in the flowing helium are controlled through a feedback mechanism based on gas chromatography measurements of the gas chemistry at the inlet and exit from a high temperature retort containing the test materials. Initial testing will focus on determining the nature and extent of combined aging and environmental effects on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of alloys proposed for structural applications in the NGNP, including Inconel 617 and Haynes 230.

  13. Role of surface chemistry in the ignition of pyrotechnic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Moddeman, W.E.; Collins, L.W.; Wang, P.S.; Wittberg, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    The surface chemistry of fuels has been shown to play a key role in the ignition of pyrotechnic materials. Since these fuels are usually easily oxidized, the surface must provide protection from undesirable oxidation processes such as pyrophoricity while permitting the desirable pyrotechnic reactions. For both titanium and aluminum, these criteria are met by metal oxide coatings which control the accessibility of the fuel to the oxidizer. However, we have shown that the mechanisms through which this control is exerted are substantially different. The ignition of titanium based pyrotechnics seems to be kinetically controlled by the dissolution of the titanium oxide coating to generate a reactive surface for the pyrotechnic reaction. Reactions of aluminum seem to depend on diffusion of aluminum (or oxygen at higher temperatures) through its oxide coating. It was also shown that the accessibility of aluminum can be improved by alloying.

  14. Chemistry and Materials Science Department annual report, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, R.J.; Sugihara, T.T.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W.

    1989-12-31

    This is the first annual report of the Chemistry & Materials Science (C&MS) Department. The principal purpose of this report is to provide a concise summary of our scientific and technical accomplishments for fiscal years 1988 and 1989. The report is also tended to become part of the archival record of the Department`s activities. We plan to publish future editions annually. The activities of the Department can be divided into three broad categories. First, C&MS staff are assigned by the matrix system to work directly in a program. These programmatic assignments typically involve short deadlines and critical time schedules. A second category is longer-term research and development in technologies important to Laboratory programs. The focus and direction of this technology-base work are generally determined by programmatic needs. Finally, the Department manages its own research program, mostly long-range in outlook and basic in orientation. These three categories are not mutually exclusive but form a continuum of technical activities. Representative examples of all three are included in this report. The principal subject matter of this report has been divided into six sections: Innovations in Analysis and Characterization, Advanced Materials, Metallurgical Science and Technology, Surfaces and Interfaces, Energetic Materials and Chemical Synthesis, and Energy-Related Research and Development.

  15. Monitoring the chemistry and materials of the Magma binary-cycle generating plant

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, D.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Pierce, D.D.

    1981-10-01

    This monitoring program includes studies of the following areas: chemistry of the geothermal brine, chemistry of the cooling water, corrosion of materials in both water systems, scale formation, suspended solids in th brine, and methods and instruments to monitor corrosion and chemistry. (MHR)

  16. The Development of Innovative Chemistry Learning Material for Bilingual Senior High School Students in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Situmorang, Manihar; Sitorus, Marham; Hutabarat, Wesly; Situmorang, Zakarias

    2015-01-01

    The development of innovative chemistry learning material for bilingual Senior High School (SHS) students in Indonesia is explained. The study is aimed to obtain an innovative chemistry learning material based on national curriculum in Indonesia to be used as a learning media in the teaching and learning activities. The learning material is…

  17. Explosive Chemistry: Simulating the Chemistry of Energetic Materials at Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, E J; Manaa, M R; Fried, L E

    2003-11-18

    In the brief instant of a high-explosive detonation, the shock wave produces a pressure 500,000 times that of the Earth's atmosphere, the detonation wave travels as fast as 10 kilometers per second, and internal temperatures soar up to 5,500 Kelvin. As the shock propagates through the energetic material, the rapid heating coupled with compression that results in almost 30% volume reduction, initiate complex chemical reactions. A dense, highly reactive supercritical fluid is established behind the propagating detonation front. Energy release from the exothermic chemical reactions serve in turn to drive and sustain the detonation process until complete reactivity is reached. Several experimental results suggest the existence of strong correlations between the applied mechanical stress and shocks, the local heterogeneity and defects (dislocations, vacancies, cracks, impurities, etc.), and the onset of chemical reactions. The reaction chemistry of energetic materials at high pressure and temperature is, therefore, of considerable importance in understanding processes that these materials experience under impact and detonation conditions. Chemical decomposition models are critical ingredients in order to predict, among other things, the measured times to explosion and the conditions for ignition of hot spots, localized regions of highly concentrated energy associated with defects. To date, chemical kinetic rates of condense-phase energetic materials at detonation conditions are virtually non-existent, and basic questions such as: (a) which bond in a given energetic molecule breaks first, and (b) what type of chemical reactions (unimolecular versus bimolecular, etc.) that dominate early in the decomposition process, are still largely unknown.

  18. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science progress report summary of selected research and development topics, FY97

    SciTech Connect

    Newkirk, L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains summaries of research performed in the Chemistry and Materials Science division. Topics include Metals and Ceramics, High Explosives, Organic Synthesis, Instrument Development, and other topics.

  19. Chemistry of zerumbone. 2. Regulation of ring bond cleavage and unique antibacterial activities of zerumbone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, T; Yamamoto, K; Utsumi, R; Takatani, M; Hill, R K; Kawai, Y; Sawada, S; Okamoto, T

    2001-10-01

    Further investigation of the chemistry of the eleven-membered cyclic sesquiterpene, zerumbone, the major component of the wild ginger, Zingiber zerumbet Smith, has revealed a new selective epoxidation process, a further example of a novel Favorskii-initiated double ring contraction, and a regiospecific fragmentation of zerumbone dibromide derivatives. Several zerumbone derivatives were found to be selective inhibitors of the growth of gram-positive bacteria. PMID:11758909

  20. Exploring the Random Phase Approximately for materials chemistry and physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzsinsky, Adrienn

    2015-03-23

    This proposal focuses on improved accuracy for the delicate energy differences of interest in materials chemistry with the fully nonlocal random phase approximation (RPA) in a density functional context. Could RPA or RPA-like approaches become standard methods of first-principles electronic-structure calculation for atoms, molecules, solids, surfaces, and nano-structures? Direct RPA includes the full exact exchange energy and a nonlocal correlation energy from the occupied and unoccupied Kohn-Sham orbitals and orbital energies, with an approximate but universal description of long-range van der Waals attraction. RPA also improves upon simple pair-wise interaction potentials or vdW density functional theory. This improvement is essential to capture accurate energy differences in metals and different phases of semiconductors. The applications in this proposal are challenges for the simpler approximations of Kohn-Sham density functional theory, which are part of the current “standard model” for quantum chemistry and condensed matter physics. Within this project we already applied RPA on different structural phase transitions on semiconductors, metals and molecules. Although RPA predicts accurate structural parameters, RPA has proven not equally accurate in all kinds of structural phase transitions. Therefore a correction to RPA can be necessary in many cases. We are currently implementing and testing a nonempirical, spatially nonlocal, frequency-dependent model for the exchange-correlation kernel in the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation context. This kernel predicts a nearly-exact correlation energy for the electron gas of uniform density. If RPA or RPA-like approaches prove to be reliably accurate, then expected increases in computer power may make them standard in the electronic-structure calculations of the future.

  1. An Introductory Organic Chemistry Review Homework Exercise: Deriving Potential Mechanisms for Glucose Ring Opening in Mutarotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Margaret; Holman, R. W.; Slade, Tyler; Clark, Shelley L. D.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    A unique homework assignment has been designed as a review exercise to be implemented near the end of the one-year undergraduate organic chemistry sequence. Within the framework of the exercise, students derive potential mechanisms for glucose ring opening in the aqueous mutarotation process. In this endeavor, 21 general review principles are…

  2. "Host-guest" chemistry in the synthesis of ordered nonsiliceous mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ying; Yang, Haifeng; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2006-07-01

    On the basis of the consideration of "host-guest" chemistry, the interactions between guest molecules are highlighted in the synthesis of nonsiliceous mesoporous materials by the "soft-template" and "hard-template" approaches. A generalized "acid-base pair" concept is utilized in selecting appropriate guest molecules to prepare highly ordered mesoporous metal oxides, phosphates, and borates with diversified structures. Mesoscopically ordered polymer and carbon frameworks with uniformly large pore sizes are derived from the self-assembly of an organic surfactant with an organic guest. Properly building the guest unit and decorating the host are important in replicating ordered nonsiliceous single-crystal nanoarrays. Outlooks on the potential possibilities for synthesizing ordered mesoporous nonsiliceous materials are presented as well. PMID:16846206

  3. Surface chemistry relevant to material processing for semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Lynne Aiko

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures are the core of many modern integrated circuit (IC) devices. Each material utilized in the different regions of the device has its own unique chemistry. Silicon is the base semiconductor material used in the majority of these devices. With IC device complexity increasing and device dimensions decreasing, understanding material interactions and processing becomes increasingly critical. Hsb2 desorption is the rate-limiting step in silicon growth using silane under low temperature conditions. Activation energies for Hsb2 desorption measured during Si chemical vapor deposition (CVD) versus single-crystal studies are found to be significantly lower. It has been proposed that defect sites on the silicon surface could explain the observed differences. Isothermal Hsb2 desorption studies using laser induced thermal desorption (LITD) techniques have addressed this issue. The growth of low temperature oxides is another relevant issue for fabrication of IC devices. Recent studies using 1,4-disilabutane (DSB) (SiHsb3CHsb2CHsb2SiHsb3) at 100sp°C in ambient Osb2 displayed the successful low temperature growth of silicon dioxide (SiOsb2). However, these studies provided no information about the deposition mechanism. We performed LITD and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies on single-crystal and porous silicon surfaces to examine the adsorption, decomposition, and desorption processes to determine the deposition mechanism. Titanium nitride (TiN) diffusion barriers are necessary in modern metallization structures. Controlled deposition using titanium tetrachloride (TiClsb4) and ammonia (NHsb3) has been demonstrated using atomic layered processing (ALP) techniques. We intended to study the sequential deposition method by monitoring the surface intermediates using LITD techniques. However, formation of a Cl impurity source, ammonium chloride (NHsb4sp+Clsp-), was observed, thereby, limiting our ability for effective studies. Tetrakis

  4. Ferritin Diversity: Mechanistic Studies, Disease Implications, and Materials Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Robert J.

    2011-07-01

    The study of ferritin includes a rich history of discoveries and scientific progress. Initially, the composition of ferritin was determined. Soon, it was shown that ferritin is a spherical, hollow protein. Eventually, over several decades of research, the structure and some function of this interesting protein was elucidated. However, the ferritin field was not completely satisfied. Today, for example, researchers are interested in refining the details of ferritin function, in discovering the role of ferritin in a variety of diseases, and in using ferritin for materials chemistry applications. The work presented in this dissertation highlights the progress that we have made in each of these three areas: (1) Mechanistic studies: The buffer used during horse spleen ferritin iron loading significantly influences the mineralization process and the quantity of iron deposited in ferritin. The ferrihydrite core of ferritin is crystalline and ordered when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of imidazole buffer. On the other hand, when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of MOPS buffer, the ferrihydrite core is less crystalline and less ordered, and a smaller amount of total iron is loaded in ferritin. We also show that iron can be released from the ferritin core in a non-reductive manner. The rate of Fe3+ release from horse spleen ferritin was measured using the Fe3+-specific chelator desferoxamine. We show that iron release occurs by three kinetic events. (2) Disease studies: In order to better understand iron disruption during disease states, we performed in vitro assays that mimicked chronic kidney disease. We tested the hypothesis that elevated levels of serum phosphate interrupted normal iron binding by transferrin and ferritin. Results show that phosphate competes for iron, forming an iron(III)-phosphate complex that is inaccessible to either transferrin or ferritin. Ferritin samples separated from the iron(III)-phosphate complex shows that as the

  5. Applied Biology and Chemistry. Course Materials: Chemistry 111, 112, 113, 114. Seattle Tech Prep Applied Academics Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    This publication contains materials for four courses in Applied Biology/Chemistry in the Applied Academics program at South Seattle Community College. It begins with the article, "Community College Applied Academics: The State of the Art?" (George B. Neff), which describes the characteristics, model, courses, and coordination activity that make up…

  6. Synthesis of Porphyrin, Chlorin and Phthalocyanine Derivatives by Azide-Alkyne Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Acherar, Samir; Colombeau, Ludovic; Frochot, Céline; Vanderesse, Régis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the use of copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) in the synthesis of porphyrin, chlorin and phthalocyanine derivatives for different types of therapeutic applications. The click reaction is a powerful and versatile tool for scientists working on the synthesis of various symmetrically and asymmetrically substituted tetrapyrrolic derivatives. For example, click chemistry is widely used for the elaboration of photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy applications. Other biological applications are also described. PMID:26179994

  7. Bend It, Stretch It, Hammer It, Break It: Materials Chemistry Applied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Grace A.; Retsek, Jennifer; Berber-Jimenez, Lola; Barber, Nicole; Coles, Monica; Fintikakis, Christina; Huigens, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Making chemistry both accessible and interesting to middle and high school students can be difficult. Convincing middle and high school teachers that they will learn something new and applicable from a professional development workshop in chemistry can be equally challenging. This paper describes the use of material science as a means to enhance…

  8. Based on a True Story: Using Movies as Source Material for General Chemistry Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griep, Mark A.; Mikasen, Marjorie L.

    2005-01-01

    The story to improve student enthusiasm for writing reports about the chemistry behind events reported in the news and movies were chosen as the source material. The use of movies in the chemical classroom helps an instructor move the subject of chemistry from abstract, general themes to the personal and subjective arena of human interactions.

  9. Peptidyl Materials Formed Through Click Chemistry Enhanced Coiled-Coil Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    Biologically derived materials offer a level of sophistication synthetically fabricated materials have only attempted to mimic. This level of complexity may be found in materials such as peptides. Implementing new theory and modeling, peptides with the propensity to form coiled-coil (CC) bundles were designed and synthesized. Through the use of this de novo approach, modeling allowed prediction of the feasibility to include non-natural amino acids conducive to click chemistry into the peptide. Amino acids showcasing thiol or alkyne functionalities were considered owing to the ability of these moieties to participate in the thiol-ene and copper click reactions respectively. Once synthesized, the peptides decorated with these clickable motifs were placed in solution and allowed to self-assemble into CC's. CD spectroscopy and DLS experiments confirmed the formation and assembly of CC's. Click reactions were then incited to link the CC assemblies together and form a network with predictable dimensionality and pore size between CC bundles. To incite network formation, click reactions between CC side chain residues and suitably functionalized crosslinkers were implemented. The linking of coiled-coils and material formation were assessed using DLS and TEM.

  10. A Descriptive Analysis of the Chemical Bond Approach, the Chemical Education Material Study, and a Representative Traditional Chemistry Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crilly, Alice Roth

    This study compared three one-year courses in high school chemistry. One of these, entitled Modern Chemistry, represents the "traditional" precollegiate chemistry course. The others are the Chemical Bond Approach (CBA) and the Chemical Education Material Study (CHEM Study). These are the two major revisions in high school chemistry which emerged…

  11. Habitability and Biosignature Preservation in Impact-Derived Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapers, H. M.; Pontefract, A.; Osinski, G. R.; Cannon, K. M.; Mustard, J. F.

    2016-05-01

    Meteorite impacts create environments conducive to microbial colonization. Biosignatures in impact-derived materials have been characterized on Earth. Impact environments comprise candidates for biosignature detection and preservation on Mars.

  12. Development and assessment of green, research-based instructional materials for the general chemistry laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.

    This research entails integrating two novel approaches for enriching student learning in chemistry into the context of the general chemistry laboratory. The first is a pedagogical approach based on research in cognitive science and the second is the green chemistry philosophy. Research has shown that inquiry-based approaches are effective in improving student learning outcomes in general chemistry when used comprehensively in the general chemistry laboratory. Little prior research exists about effects on student learning about green chemistry. A novel experimental protocol called Laboratory Report Templates (LRT) was designed, and three LRT experiments and supplemental materials for the general chemistry laboratory were created utilizing the principles of green chemistry and current research findings on student learning. These experiments were successfully field-tested and implemented in university and high school settings. This work represents an important contribution to science curriculum design because the LRT protocol uniquely motivates development of students' scientific communication skills and has wide potential applicability. A study comparing student learning of chemistry content and experimental design skills following completion of one of the LRT experiments or a traditional experiment on identical chemistry content was conducted. Study results indicate that students who completed the LRT experiment learned significantly more content and experimental skills directly related to the content of the experiment than did students who completed the traditional experiment. This study demonstrates that changing one lab in general chemistry curricula from traditional to research-based has a positive effect on student learning. This finding is important because incremental curricular change is a promising alternative to the wholesale curricular change that has been shown to be effective, because an incremental approach minimizes the most common barriers to change

  13. Chemistry and materials science progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Research is reported in the areas of surface science, fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals, energetic materials, transactinide materials and properties and other indirectly related areas of weapons research.

  14. Overview on the history of organofluorine chemistry from the viewpoint of material industry

    PubMed Central

    Okazoe, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Fluorine (from “le fluor”, meaning “to flow”) is a second row element of Group 17 in the periodic table. When bound to carbon it forms the strongest bond in organic chemistry to give organofluorine compounds. The scientific field treating them, organofluorine chemistry, started before elemental fluorine itself was isolated. Applying the fruits in academia, industrial organofluorine chemistry has developed over 80 years via dramatic changes during World War II. Nowadays, it provides various materials essential for our society. Recently, it utilizes elemental fluorine itself as a reagent for the introduction of fluorine atoms to organic molecules in leading-edge industries. This paper overviews the historical development of organofluorine chemistry especially from the viewpoint of material industry. PMID:19838009

  15. Functional Augmentation of Naturally-Derived Materials for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Ashley B.; Priddy, Lauren B.; Li, Mon-Tzu. A.; Guldberg, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies have utilized a wide spectrum of synthetic and naturally-derived scaffold materials. Synthetic scaffolds are better defined and offer the ability to precisely and reproducibly control their properties, while naturally-derived scaffolds typically have inherent biological and structural properties that may facilitate tissue growth and remodeling. More recently, efforts to design optimized biomaterial scaffolds have blurred the line between these two approaches. Naturally-derived scaffolds can be engineered through the manipulation of intrinsic properties of the pre-existing backbone (e.g., structural properties), as well as the addition of controllable functional components (e.g., biological properties). Chemical and physical processing techniques used to modify structural properties of synthetic scaffolds have been tailored and applied to naturally-derived materials. Such strategies include manipulation of mechanical properties, degradation, and porosity. Furthermore, bio-functional augmentation of natural scaffolds via incorporation of exogenous cells, proteins, peptides, or genes has been shown to enhance functional regeneration over endogenous response to the material itself. Moving forward, the regenerative mode of action of naturally-derived materials requires additional investigation. Elucidating such mechanisms will allow for the determination of critical design parameters to further enhance efficacy and capitalize on the full potential of naturally-derived scaffolds. PMID:25422160

  16. 2012 CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS OF GRAPHITIC CARBON MATERIALS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17-22, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Herbert

    2012-06-22

    This conference will highlight the urgency for research on graphitic carbon materials and gather scientists in physics, chemistry, and engineering to tackle the challenges in this field. The conference will focus on scalable synthesis, characterization, novel physical and electronic properties, structure-properties relationship studies, and new applications of the carbon materials. Contributors

  17. Investigating the Factors That Influence Chemistry Teachers' Use of Curriculum Materials: The Case of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, B.; Wei, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to explore the factors that influenced teachers' adaptations of the curriculum materials of the new senior secondary chemistry curriculum, a standards-based science curriculum, in China. This study was based on the premise that the interaction of the teacher with curriculum materials in a given social context determined what…

  18. Examining Chemistry Teachers' Use of Curriculum Materials: In View of Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Bo; Wei, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to explore how pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of teachers influenced their adaptations of the curriculum materials of the new senior secondary chemistry curriculum, a standards-based science curriculum, in China. This study was based on the premise that the interaction of the teacher with the curriculum materials determines…

  19. Selective Bifunctional Modification of a Non-catenated Metal-Organic Framework Material via 'Click' Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gadzikwa, Tendai; Farha, Omar K.; Malliakas, Christos D.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; NWU

    2009-12-01

    A noncatenated, Zn-based metal-organic framework (MOF) material bearing silyl-protected acetylenes was constructed and postsynthetically modified using 'click' chemistry. Using a solvent-based, selective deprotection strategy, two different organic azides were 'clicked' onto the MOF crystals, resulting in a porous material whose internal and external surfaces are differently functionalized.

  20. Improving the Effectiveness of Organic Chemistry Experiments through Multimedia Teaching Materials for Junior High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Lin, Hui-Chen; Shih, Ru-Chu; Tseng, Kuo-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study aimed to explore the effects of three different forms of the multimedia teaching materials on the achievements and attitudes of junior high school students in a chemistry laboratory context. The three forms of the multimedia teaching materials, static pictures, video, and animation, were employed to teach chemistry…

  1. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, FY 1994. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research include surface science, fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals, energetic materials, etc. The laboratory directed R and D include director`s initiatives, individual projects, and transactinium science studies.

  2. Preparation of Lanthanide-Polymer Composite Material via Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Wen, Guian; Wu, Jiajie; Feng, Jiachun

    2015-10-01

    Covalently attaching lanthanide complexes to the polymer backbone can effectively reduce the clustering of lanthanides and thus become an important strategy to fully unleash their potential. In this Communication, a metal-free click reaction is used for the first time to link a lanthanide complex to the polymer matrix. A diene-bearing copolymer with anthracenylmethyl methacrylate as a monomer and a dienophile-bearing lanthanide complex with 5-maleimido-1,10-phenanthroline as the second ligand are synthesized and coupled together through a Diels-Alder cycloaddition (DA). A comparative investigation demonstrates that the composite material prepared by DA click reaction shows the highest quantum yields in the same lanthanide concentration as compared to materials prepared by widely used "directly doping" and "in situ coordinating lanthanide ions with macromolecular ligand" approaches. This work suggests that the "metal-free" DA click reaction can be a promising tool in the synthesis of high efficient lanthanide functionalized polymeric materials. PMID:26248311

  3. Diverse roles of hydrogen in rhenium carbonyl chemistry: hydrides, dihydrogen complexes, and a formyl derivative.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce; Schaefer, Henry F

    2010-11-01

    Rhenium carbonyl hydride chemistry dates back to the 1959 synthesis of HRe(CO)₅ by Hieber and Braun. The binuclear H₂Re₂(CO)₈ was subsequently synthesized as a stable compound with a central Re₂(μ-H)₂ unit analogous to the B₂(μ-H)₂ unit in diborane. The complete series of HRe(CO)(n) (n = 5, 4, 3) and H₂Re₂(CO)(n) (n = 9, 8, 7, 6) derivatives have now been investigated by density functional theory. In contrast to the corresponding manganese derivatives, all of the triplet rhenium structures are found to lie at relatively high energies compared with the corresponding singlet structures consistent with the higher ligand field splitting of rhenium relative to manganese. The lowest energy HRe(CO)₅ structure is the expected octahedral structure. Low-energy structures for HRe(CO)(n) (n = 4, 3) are singlet structures derived from the octahedral HRe(CO)₅ structure by removal of one or two carbonyl groups. For H₂Re₂(CO)₉ a structure HRe₂(CO)₉(μ-H), with one terminal and one bridging hydrogen atom, lies within 3 kcal/mol of the structure Re₂(CO)₉(η²-H₂), similar to that of Re₂(CO)₁₀. For H₂Re₂(CO)(n) (n = 8, 7, 6) the only low-energy structures are doubly bridged singlet Re₂(μ-H)₂(CO)(n) structures. Higher energy dihydrogen complex structures are also found. PMID:20942474

  4. Chemistry and Materials Science. Progress report, first half, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research are growth, structure, and reactivity of surfaces and thin films; uranium research; physics and processing of metals; energetic materials; etc. The laboratory-directed R and D include director`s initiatives and individual projects, and transactinium institute studies.

  5. Novel types of carborane-carrier hyaluronan derivatives via "click chemistry".

    PubMed

    Di Meo, Chiara; Panza, Luigi; Campo, Federica; Capitani, Donatella; Mannina, Luisa; Banzato, Alessandra; Rondina, Maria; Rosato, Antonio; Crescenzi, Vittorio

    2008-07-01

    Two new HA derivatives bearing carborane rings were synthesized by click chemistry. The optimal conditions were assessed for the preparation of biocompatible boron carriers, potentially suitable for application in BNCT and capable of targeting the CD44 antigen. The new polymeric samples were characterized by means of NMR-spectroscopy techniques that gave degrees of 17 and 8% for HAAACB and HapACB, respectively. Both HAAACB and HApACB turned out to be nontoxic for colorectal, ovarian and bladder tumor cell lines, to disclose a specific interaction with the CD44 antigen as the native hyaluronan moiety, and to deliver boron-atom concentrations largely sufficient for BNCT therapy when accumulated in cancer cells. PMID:18412288

  6. Research on the development of green chemistry technology assessment techniques: a material reutilization case

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seokpyo; Ahn, Kilsoo; Kim, Sungjune; Gong, Sungyong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study presents a methodology that enables a quantitative assessment of green chemistry technologies. Methods The study carries out a quantitative evaluation of a particular case of material reutilization by calculating the level of “greenness” i.e., the level of compliance with the principles of green chemistry that was achieved by implementing a green chemistry technology. Results The results indicate that the greenness level was enhanced by 42% compared to the pre-improvement level, thus demonstrating the economic feasibility of green chemistry. Conclusions The assessment technique established in this study will serve as a useful reference for setting the direction of industry-level and government-level technological R&D and for evaluating newly developed technologies, which can greatly contribute toward gaining a competitive advantage in the global market. PMID:26206363

  7. Toward self-constructing materials: a systems chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2012-12-18

    To design the next generation of so-called "smart" materials, researchers will need to develop chemical systems that respond, adapt, and multitask. Because many of these features occur in living systems, we expect that such advanced artificial systems will be inspired by nature. In particular, these new materials should ultimately combine three key properties of life: metabolism, mutation, and self-replication. In this Account, we discuss our endeavors toward the design of such advanced functional materials. First, we focus on dynamic molecular libraries. These molecular and supramolecular chemical systems are based on mixtures of reversibly interacting molecules that are coupled within networks of thermodynamic equilibria. We will explain how the superimposition of combinatorial networks at different length scales of structural organization can provide valuable hierarchical dynamics for producing complex functional systems. In particular, our experimental results highlight why these libraries are of interest for the design of responsive materials and how their functional properties can be modulated by various chemical and physical stimuli. Then, we introduce examples in which these dynamic combinatorial systems can be coupled to kinetic feedback loops to produce self-replicating pathways that amplify a selected component from the equilibrated libraries. Finally, we discuss the discovery of highly functional self-replicating supramolecular assemblies that can transfer an electric signal in space and time. We show how these wires can be directly incorporated within an electronic nanocircuit by self-organization and functional feedback loops. Because the network topologies act as complex algorithms to process information, we present these systems in this order to provide context for their potential for extending the current generation of responsive materials. We propose a general description for a potential autonomous (self-constructing) material. Such a system

  8. Through the looking glass of a chemistry video game: Evaluating the effects of different MLEs presenting identical content material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Dustin S.

    The primary goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of different media-based learning environments (MLEs) that present identical chemistry content material. This is done with four different MLEs that utilize some or all components of a chemistry-based media-based prototype video game. Examination of general chemistry student volunteers purposefully randomized to one of four different MLEs did not provide evidence that the higher the level of interactivity resulted in a more effective MLE for the chemistry content. Data suggested that the cognitive load to play the chemistry-based video game may impaired the chemistry content being presented and recalled by the students while the students watching the movie of the chemistry-based video game were able to recall the chemistry content more efficiently. Further studies in this area need to address the overall cognitive load of the different MLEs to potentially better determine what the most effective MLE may be for this chemistry content.

  9. Symbolic derivation of material property matrices in finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, H. Q.

    1988-01-01

    The principles and operation of MMAX, a symbolic-computation program which automates the process of generating property matrices for structural materials, are briefly described and illustrated with sample analyses of a rubberlike material and an elastoplastic material. MMAX is written in LISP under the symbolic finite-element generator FINGER and the general symbolic manipulator MACSYMA; it first derives the formulas required by mathematical manipulation, and then translates the formulas into FORTRAN code, adapted to the particular type of machine to be used for the numerical calculations. This approach is shown to combine efficiently the advantages of symbolic and numerical computation for engineering applications.

  10. The Chemistry and Perception of Fluorescent White Textile Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changhai

    Cationic bleach activators (CBA) are precursors to perhydroxyl compounds that, when activated, have higher oxidation potential and potentially improved bleaching performance compared to common oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide. CBAs were first reported in 1997 by Proctor & Gamble Co., and have been further developed at North Carolina State University. To date, an effective low temperature bleaching system has not been developed that offers sufficient economic improvement over existing bleaching systems. The primary purpose of this research was to develop new methods and understand key variables required for achieving enhanced whiteness of textile materials using bleach activators with or without the presence of fluorescence. A new optimized low temperature bleaching system using novel lactam-based bleach activators was developed and the effect of UV content of light sources on the whiteness of fluorescent white textile materials was evaluated. A novel class of bleach activators was synthesized by introducing benzoylcaprolactam group into a stilbene system shown as follows:* While solubility, purification and hydrolytic stability of the compounds were problematic, a new approach to low pH (pH 7-9) and low temperature (50-70°C) bleaching was found using a butyrolactam-based cationic bleach activator, N-[4-(triethylammonio methyl)benzoyl]-butyrolactam chloride (TBBC), using a central composite design (CCD) of experiment. The CCD bleaching experiments showed that cationic bleach activators are less effective with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide in high alkaline solutions. Also a 2FI model predicted the optimized bleaching performance on 100% cotton at near neutral pH and temperatures around 50°C, in which the dosage of TBBC is the most important factor affecting the bleaching performance. This prediction was validated experimentally during bleaching of bamboo and cotton fibers. In addition, this study confirmed the hypothesis that cationic bleach

  11. Organometallic chemistry meets crystal engineering to give responsive crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, A; Pelagatti, P

    2016-01-25

    Dynamically porous crystalline materials have been obtained by engineering organometallic molecules. This feature article deals with organometallic wheel-and-axle compounds, molecules with two relatively bulky groups (wheels) connected by a linear spacer. The wheels are represented by half-sandwich Ru(ii) moieties, while the spacer can be covalent or supramolecular in character. Covalent spacers are obtained using divergent bidentate ligands connecting two [(arene)RuX2] groups. Supramolecular spacers are instead obtained by exploiting the dimerization of COOH or C(O)NH2 groups appended to N-based ligands. A careful choice of ligand functional groups and X ligands leads to the isolation of crystalline materials with remarkable host-guest properties, evidenced by the possibility of reversibly capturing/releasing volatile guests through heterogenous solid-gas reactions. Structural correlations between the crystalline arrangement of the apohost and the host-guest compounds allow us to envisage the structural path followed by the system during the exchange processes. PMID:26673552

  12. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  13. Biologically-Derived Photonic Materials for Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.; Squire, Thomas H.; Lawson, John W.; Gusman, Michael; Lau, K.-H.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Space vehicles entering a planetary atmosphere at high velocity can be subject to substantial radiative heating from the shock layer in addition to the convective heating caused by the flow of hot gas past the vehicle surface. The radiative component can be very high but of a short duration. Approaches to combat this effect include investigation of various materials to reflect the radiation. Photonic materials can be used to reflect radiation. The wavelengths reflected depend on the length scale of the ordered microstructure. Fabricating photonic structures, such as layers, can be time consuming and expensive. We have used a biologically-derived material as the template for forming a high temperature photonic material that could be incorporated into a heatshield thermal protection material.

  14. Click chemistry functionalization improving the wideband optical-limiting performance of fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Wang, Dong; Gao, Hong; Yang, Zhou; Xing, Yan; Cao, Hui; He, Wanli; Wang, Huihui; Gu, Jianming; Hu, Huiying

    2016-03-14

    A novel kind of monodonor-bisacceptor (D-A-A) C60 charge-transfer complex was synthesized by the high-yielding [2+2] click chemistry reaction and the Prato reaction. Both electrochemical and UV-vis spectra studies were carried out and they proved that the side groups of the fullerene derivatives played an important role in the energy gaps, and also affected the third-order non-linear optical response. The experimental investigation on the third-order non-linear optical phenomena of the fullerene derivatives was measured using the Z-scan technique at different wavelengths (532 nm and 1064 nm). All the compounds exhibited very special non-linear optical properties when pumped by 21 ps pulses at 532 nm which suggested that there were two different types of reversible photo-isomerization. The optical-limiting performance has also been studied which proved indirectly the mechanism models of the reversible photo-isomerization. PMID:26899312

  15. Airborne Observations of Urban-Derived Water Vapor and Potential Impacts on Chemistry and Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, O. E.; Shepson, P. B.; Grundman, R. M., II; Stirm, B. H.; Ren, X.; Dickerson, R. R.; Fuentes, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric conditions typical of wintertime, such as lower boundary layer heights and reduced turbulent mixing, provide a unique environment for anthropogenic pollutants to accumulate and react. Wintertime enhancements in water vapor (H2O) have been observed in urban areas, and are thought to result from fossil fuel combustion and urban heat island-induced evaporation. The contribution of urban-derived water vapor to the atmosphere has the potential to locally influence atmospheric chemistry and weather for the urban area and surrounding region due to interactions between H2O and other chemical species, aerosols, and clouds. Airborne observations of urban-derived H2O, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone, and aerosols were conducted from Purdue University's Airborne Laboratory for Atmospheric Research (ALAR) and the University of Maryland's (UMD) Twin Cessna research aircraft during the winter of 2015. Measurements were conducted as part of the collaborative airborne campaign, Wintertime INvestigation of Transport, Emissions, and Reactivity (WINTER), which investigated seasonal trends in anthropogenic emissions and reactivity in the Northeastern United States. ALAR and the UMD aircraft participated in mass balance experiments around Washington D.C.-Baltimore to determine total city emission rates of H2O and other greenhouse gases. Average enhancements in H2O mixing ratio of 0.048%, and up to 0.13%, were observed downwind of the urban centers on ten research flights. In some cases, downwind H2O concentrations clearly track CO2 and NO2 enhancements, suggesting a strong combustion signal. Analysis of Purdue and UMD data collected during the WINTER campaign shows an average urban-derived H2O contribution of 5.3%, and as much as 13%, to the local boundary layer from ten research flights flown in February and March of 2015. In this paper, we discuss the potential chemical and physical implications of these results.

  16. Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate Annual Report 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz de la Rubia, T; Shang, S P; Kitrinos, G A; Fluss, M; Westbrook, C; Rennie, G

    2004-04-21

    Evolving challenges and solid accomplishments define the year 2003 for us. Our scientific breakthroughs validate our strategic directions and reaffirm our critical role in fulfilling the Laboratory's missions. Our growth continues in new research projects and significant new programmatic support. Our mission is clear: to enable the Laboratory to accomplish its primary mission through excellence in the chemical and materials sciences. The directorate's common theme and determination has remained constant: Deliver on our commitments, while anticipating and capitalizing on opportunities through innovation in science and technology. In this, the 2003 Annual Report, we describe how our science is built around a strategic plan with four organizing themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Our strategic plan is synergistic with the Laboratory's Long-Range Science and Technology Plan, which identifies six areas of institutional research and development strategy. This 2003 CMS Annual Report is organized into two major sections: research themes and dynamic teams. The research-theme section addresses challenges, achievements, and new frontiers within each of the four research themes. The dynamic-teams section illustrates the directorate's organizational structure of divisions, centers, and institutes that supports a team environment across disciplinary and institutional boundaries. The research presented gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with the institutional strategy. Our organizational structure offers an environment of collaborative problem-solving opportunities, an environment that attracts and retains the best and the brightest from across the Laboratory and around the world.

  17. Gas turbine materials evaluation program utilizing coal derived gaseous fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. L.; Yates, C. C.; Manning, G. B.; Peterson, R. R.

    1981-03-01

    A gas turbine materials evaluation test facility under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy is described. The objective of the mobile test facility is to obtain dynamic and static test data on the erosion/corrosion characteristics of materials exposed to the hot products of the combustion of coal-derived fuels. The engine being utilized for the tests is the WR 24-7 aircraft turbojet unit reconfigurated to burn coke oven gas. Approximately 100 hours of engine operating time have been logged to date.

  18. Characteristics of and sorption to biochars derived from waste material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Huichao; Kah, Melanie; Sigmund, Gabriel; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    Biochars can exhibit a high sorption potential towards heavy metals and organic contaminants in various environmental matrices (e.g., water, soil). They have therefore been proposed for environmental remediation purposes to sequester contaminants. To date, most studies have focused on the physicochemical and sorption properties of mineral phases poor biochars, which are typically produced from plant residues. Only little knowledge is available for biochars derived from human and animal waste material, which are typically characterized by high mineral contents (e.g., sewage sludge, manure). Using human and animal waste as source material to produce biochars would support the development of attractive combined strategies for waste management and remediation. The potential impact of mineral phases on the physicochemical and sorption properties of biochars requires further studies so that the potential as sorbent material can be evaluated. With this purpose, different source material biochars were produced at 200°C, 350°C and 500°C, to yield a series of biochars representing a range of mineral content. The derived biochars from wood shavings (<1% ash), sewage sludge (50-70% ash) and pig manure (30-60% ash), as well as a commercial biochar derived from grain husks (40% ash), were extensively characterized (e.g., element composition, surface area, porosity, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). The contents of potentially toxic elements (i.e., heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) of all materials were within the guidelines values proposed by the International Biochar Initiative, indicating their suitability for environmental application. Single point sorption coefficients for the model sorbate pyrene were measured to investigate the effect of mineral content, feedstock, pyrolysis temperature, particle size fractions and acid demineralization on sorption behavior. Overall, sorption of pyrene was strong for all materials (4 < Log Kd < 6.5 L

  19. Sol Gel-Derived SBA-16 Mesoporous Material

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M.; Huirache-Acuña, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review current knowledge related to the synthesis and characterization of sol gel-derived SBA-16 mesoporous silicas, as well as a review of the state of the art in this issue, to take stock of knowledge about current and future applications. The ease of the method of preparation, the orderly structure, size and shape of their pores and control, all these achievable through simple changes in the method of synthesis, makes SBA-16 a very versatile material, potentially applicable in many areas of science and molecular engineering of materials. PMID:20957080

  20. Sludge-Derived Biochar for Arsenic(III) Immobilization: Effects of Solution Chemistry on Sorption Behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Zheng, Juan; Zheng, Pingping; Tsang, Daniel C W; Qiu, Rongliang

    2015-07-01

    Recycling sewage sludge by pyrolysis has attracted increasing attention for pollutant removal from wastewater and soils. This study scrutinized As(III) sorption behavior on sludge-derived biochar (SDBC) under different pyrolysis conditions and solution chemistry. The SDBC pyrolyzed at a higher temperature showed a lower As(III) sorption capacity and increasingly nonlinear isotherm due to loss of surface sites and deoxygenation-dehydrogenation. The Langmuir sorption capacity on SDBC (3.08-6.04 mg g) was comparable to other waste-derived sorbents, with the highest As(III) sorption on SDBC pyrolyzed at 400°C for 2 h. The As(III) sorption kinetics best fit with the pseudo-second-order equation, thus suggesting the significance of the availability of surface sites and initial concentration. Sorption of As(III) was faster than that of Cr(VI) but slower than that of Pb(II), which was attributed to their differences in molar volume (correlated to diffusion coefficients) and sorption mechanisms. The X-ray photoelectron spectra revealed an increase of oxide oxygen (O) with a decrease of sorbed water, indicative of ligand exchange with hydroxyl groups on SDBC surfaces. The As(III) sorption was not pH dependent in acidic-neutral range (pH < 8) due to the buffering capacity and surface characteristics of the SDBC; however, sorption was promoted by increasing pH in the alkaline range (pH > 8) because of As(III) speciation in solution. An increasing ionic strength (0.001-0.1 mol L) facilitated As(III) sorption, indicating the predominance of ligand exchange over electrostatic interactions, while high concentrations (0.1 mol L) of competing anions (fluoride, sulfate, carbonate, and phosphate) inhibited As(III) sorption. These results suggest that SDBC is applicable for As(III) immobilization in most environmentally relevant conditions. PMID:26437093

  1. The Abiotic Chemistry of Thiolated Acetate Derivatives and the Origin of Life

    PubMed Central

    Chandru, Kuhan; Gilbert, Alexis; Butch, Christopher; Aono, Masashi; Cleaves, H. James

    2016-01-01

    Thioesters and thioacetic acid (TAA) have been invoked as key reagents for the origin of life as activated forms of acetate analogous to acetyl-CoA. These species could have served as high-energy group-transfer reagents and allowed carbon insertions to form higher molecular weight compounds such as pyruvate. The apparent antiquity of the Wood-Ljungdahl CO2 fixation pathway and its presence in organisms which inhabit hydrothermal (HT) environments has also led to suggestions that there may be a connection between the abiotic chemistry of compounds similar to TAA and the origins of metabolism. These compounds’ apparent chemical simplicity has made their prebiotic availability assumed, however, although the kinetic behavior and thermochemical properties of TAA and analogous esters have been preliminarily explored in other contexts, the geochemical relevance of these compounds merits further evaluation. Therefore, the chemical behavior of the simplest thiolated acetic acid derivatives, TAA and methylthioacetate (MTA) were explored here. Using laboratory measurements, literature data, and thermochemical models, we examine the plausibility of the accumulation of these compounds in various geological settings. Due to the high free energy change of their hydrolysis and corresponding low equilibrium constants, it is unlikely that these species could have accumulated abiotically to any significant extant. PMID:27443234

  2. The Abiotic Chemistry of Thiolated Acetate Derivatives and the Origin of Life.

    PubMed

    Chandru, Kuhan; Gilbert, Alexis; Butch, Christopher; Aono, Masashi; Cleaves, H James

    2016-01-01

    Thioesters and thioacetic acid (TAA) have been invoked as key reagents for the origin of life as activated forms of acetate analogous to acetyl-CoA. These species could have served as high-energy group-transfer reagents and allowed carbon insertions to form higher molecular weight compounds such as pyruvate. The apparent antiquity of the Wood-Ljungdahl CO2 fixation pathway and its presence in organisms which inhabit hydrothermal (HT) environments has also led to suggestions that there may be a connection between the abiotic chemistry of compounds similar to TAA and the origins of metabolism. These compounds' apparent chemical simplicity has made their prebiotic availability assumed, however, although the kinetic behavior and thermochemical properties of TAA and analogous esters have been preliminarily explored in other contexts, the geochemical relevance of these compounds merits further evaluation. Therefore, the chemical behavior of the simplest thiolated acetic acid derivatives, TAA and methylthioacetate (MTA) were explored here. Using laboratory measurements, literature data, and thermochemical models, we examine the plausibility of the accumulation of these compounds in various geological settings. Due to the high free energy change of their hydrolysis and corresponding low equilibrium constants, it is unlikely that these species could have accumulated abiotically to any significant extant. PMID:27443234

  3. The Abiotic Chemistry of Thiolated Acetate Derivatives and the Origin of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandru, Kuhan; Gilbert, Alexis; Butch, Christopher; Aono, Masashi; Cleaves, H. James

    2016-07-01

    Thioesters and thioacetic acid (TAA) have been invoked as key reagents for the origin of life as activated forms of acetate analogous to acetyl-CoA. These species could have served as high-energy group-transfer reagents and allowed carbon insertions to form higher molecular weight compounds such as pyruvate. The apparent antiquity of the Wood-Ljungdahl CO2 fixation pathway and its presence in organisms which inhabit hydrothermal (HT) environments has also led to suggestions that there may be a connection between the abiotic chemistry of compounds similar to TAA and the origins of metabolism. These compounds’ apparent chemical simplicity has made their prebiotic availability assumed, however, although the kinetic behavior and thermochemical properties of TAA and analogous esters have been preliminarily explored in other contexts, the geochemical relevance of these compounds merits further evaluation. Therefore, the chemical behavior of the simplest thiolated acetic acid derivatives, TAA and methylthioacetate (MTA) were explored here. Using laboratory measurements, literature data, and thermochemical models, we examine the plausibility of the accumulation of these compounds in various geological settings. Due to the high free energy change of their hydrolysis and corresponding low equilibrium constants, it is unlikely that these species could have accumulated abiotically to any significant extant.

  4. Click chemistry inspired synthesis and bioevaluation of novel triazolyl derivatives of osthol as potent cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Saleem; Shakeel-u-Rehman; Hussain, Aashiq; Hamid, Abid; Qurishi, Mushtaq A; Koul, Surrinder

    2014-09-12

    A new series of diverse triazoles linked through the hydroxyl group of lactone ring opened osthol (1) were synthesized using click chemistry approach. All the derivatives were subjected to 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-yl)-diphenyl tetrazoliumbromide (MTT) cytotoxicity screening against a panel of seven different human cancer cell lines viz. colon (colo-205), colon (HCT-116), breast (T47D), lung (NCI-H322), lung (A549), prostate (PC-3) and Skin (A-431) to check their cytotoxic potential. Interestingly, among the tested molecules, most of the analogs displayed better cytotoxic activity than the parent osthol (1). Of the synthesized triazoles, compounds 8 showed the best activity with IC50 of 1.3, 4.9, 3.6, 41.0, 35.2, 26.4 and 7.2 μM against colon (Colo-205 and HCT-116), breast (T47D), lung (NCI-H322 and A549), prostate (PC-3) and Skin (A-431) cancer lines respectively. Compound 8 induced potent apoptotic effects in Colo-205 cells. The population of apoptotic cells increased from 11.4% in case of negative control to 24.1% at 25 μM of 8. Compound 8 also induced a remarkable decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΛΨm) leading to apoptosis of cancer cells used. The present study resulted in identification of broad spectrum cytotoxic activity of analogs bearing electron withdrawing substituents, besides the enhanced selective activity of analogs with electron donating moieties. PMID:25062005

  5. Photoinduced development of antibacterial materials derived from isosorbide moiety.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Cedric; Haider, Adnan; Kang, Inn-Kyu; Sangermano, Marco; Abbad-Andalloussi, Samir; Mazeran, Pierre-Emmanuel; Lalevée, Jacques; Renard, Estelle; Langlois, Valérie; Versace, Davy-Louis

    2015-03-01

    A straightforward method for immobilizing in situ generated silver nanoparticles on the surface of a photoactivable isosorbide-derived monomer is developed with the objective to design a functional material having antibacterial properties. The photoinduced thiol-ene mechanism involved in these syntheses is described by the electron spin resonance/spin trapping technique. The resulting materials with or without silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were used as films or as coatings on glass substrate. The surface of the synthesized materials was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and their thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated by dynamic-mechanical thermal tests, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analyses, along with pencil hardness, nanoindentation, and scratch resistance tests. The photoinduced formation of Ag NPs is also confirmed by UV spectrophotometry. Finally, a primary investigation demonstrates the antibacterial properties of the isosorbide-derived material against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, as well as its cytocompatibility toward NIH 3T3 fibroblastic cells. PMID:25633575

  6. New trends in chemistry and materials science in extremely tight space

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Yang; Manaa, M. Riad

    2012-01-26

    Pressure plays a critical role in regulating the structures and properties of materials. Since Percy Bridgeman was recognized by the 1946 Nobel Prize in Physics for his contribution in high-pressure physics, high-pressure research has remained an interdisciplinary scientific frontier with many extraordinary breakthroughs. Over the past decade or so, in particular, high-pressure chemistry and materials research has undergone major advances with the discovery of numerous exotic structures and properties. Furthermore, brand new classes of inorganic materials of unusual stoichiometries and crystal structures, which have a wide range of optical, mechanical, electronic and magnetic properties, have been produced at high pressures.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, and cure chemistry of renewable bis(cyanate) esters derived from 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol.

    PubMed

    Meylemans, Heather A; Harvey, Benjamin G; Reams, Josiah T; Guenthner, Andrew J; Cambrea, Lee R; Groshens, Thomas J; Baldwin, Lawrence C; Garrison, Michael D; Mabry, Joseph M

    2013-03-11

    A series of renewable bis(cyanate) esters have been prepared from bisphenols synthesized by condensation of 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol (creosol) with formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and propionaldehyde. The cyanate esters have been fully characterized by infrared spectroscopy, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. These compounds melt from 88 to 143 °C, while cured resins have glass transition temperatures from 219 to 248 °C, water uptake (96 h, 85 °C immersion) in the range of 2.05-3.21%, and wet glass transition temperatures from 174 to 193 °C. These properties suggest that creosol-derived cyanate esters may be useful for a wide variety of military and commercial applications. The cure chemistry of the cyanate esters has been studied with FTIR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The results show that cyanate esters with more sterically demanding bridging groups cure more slowly, but also more completely than those with a bridging methylene group. In addition to the structural differences, the purity of the cyanate esters has a significant effect on both the cure chemistry and final Tg of the materials. In some cases, post-cure of the resins at 350 °C resulted in significant decomposition and off-gassing, but cure protocols that terminated at 250-300 °C generated void-free resin pucks without degradation. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that cured resins were stable up to 400 °C and then rapidly degraded. TGA/FTIR and mass spectrometry results showed that the resins decomposed to phenols, isocyanic acid, and secondary decomposition products, including CO2. Char yields of cured resins under N2 ranged from 27 to 35%, while char yields in air ranged from 8 to 11%. These data suggest that resins of this type may potentially be recycled to parent phenols, creosol, and other alkylated creosols by pyrolysis in the presence of excess water vapor. The ability to synthesize these high temperature resins from a phenol

  8. Diverse Chemistry of Stable Hydronitrogens, and Implications for Planetary and Materials Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Guang-Rui; Niu, Haiyang; Hu, Chao-Hao; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhou, Huai-Ying

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen hydrides, e.g., ammonia (NH3), hydrazine (N2H4) and hydrazoic acid (HN3), are compounds of great fundamental and applied importance. Their high-pressure behavior is important because of their abundance in giant planets and because of the hopes of discovering high-energy-density materials. Here, we have performed a systematic investigation on the structural stability of N-H system in a pressure range up to 800 GPa through evolutionary structure prediction. Surprisingly, we found that high pressure stabilizes a series of previously unreported compounds with peculiar structural and electronic properties, such as the N4H, N3H, N2H and NH phases composed of nitrogen backbones, the N9H4 phase containing two-dimensional metallic nitrogen planes and novel N8H, NH2, N3H7, NH4 and NH5 molecular phases. Another surprise is that NH3 becomes thermodynamically unstable above ~460 GPa. We found that high-pressure chemistry of hydronitrogens is much more diverse than hydrocarbon chemistry at normal conditions, leading to expectations that N-H-O and N-H-O-S systems under pressure are likely to possess richer chemistry than the known organic chemistry. This, in turn, opens a possibility of nitrogen-based life at high pressure. The predicted phase diagram of the N-H system also provides a reference for synthesis of high-energy-density materials.

  9. Diverse Chemistry of Stable Hydronitrogens, and Implications for Planetary and Materials Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Guang-Rui; Niu, Haiyang; Hu, Chao-Hao; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhou, Huai-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen hydrides, e.g., ammonia (NH3), hydrazine (N2H4) and hydrazoic acid (HN3), are compounds of great fundamental and applied importance. Their high-pressure behavior is important because of their abundance in giant planets and because of the hopes of discovering high-energy-density materials. Here, we have performed a systematic investigation on the structural stability of N-H system in a pressure range up to 800 GPa through evolutionary structure prediction. Surprisingly, we found that high pressure stabilizes a series of previously unreported compounds with peculiar structural and electronic properties, such as the N4H, N3H, N2H and NH phases composed of nitrogen backbones, the N9H4 phase containing two-dimensional metallic nitrogen planes and novel N8H, NH2, N3H7, NH4 and NH5 molecular phases. Another surprise is that NH3 becomes thermodynamically unstable above ~460 GPa. We found that high-pressure chemistry of hydronitrogens is much more diverse than hydrocarbon chemistry at normal conditions, leading to expectations that N-H-O and N-H-O-S systems under pressure are likely to possess richer chemistry than the known organic chemistry. This, in turn, opens a possibility of nitrogen-based life at high pressure. The predicted phase diagram of the N-H system also provides a reference for synthesis of high-energy-density materials. PMID:27193059

  10. Diverse Chemistry of Stable Hydronitrogens, and Implications for Planetary and Materials Sciences.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guang-Rui; Niu, Haiyang; Hu, Chao-Hao; Oganov, Artem R; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhou, Huai-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen hydrides, e.g., ammonia (NH3), hydrazine (N2H4) and hydrazoic acid (HN3), are compounds of great fundamental and applied importance. Their high-pressure behavior is important because of their abundance in giant planets and because of the hopes of discovering high-energy-density materials. Here, we have performed a systematic investigation on the structural stability of N-H system in a pressure range up to 800 GPa through evolutionary structure prediction. Surprisingly, we found that high pressure stabilizes a series of previously unreported compounds with peculiar structural and electronic properties, such as the N4H, N3H, N2H and NH phases composed of nitrogen backbones, the N9H4 phase containing two-dimensional metallic nitrogen planes and novel N8H, NH2, N3H7, NH4 and NH5 molecular phases. Another surprise is that NH3 becomes thermodynamically unstable above ~460 GPa. We found that high-pressure chemistry of hydronitrogens is much more diverse than hydrocarbon chemistry at normal conditions, leading to expectations that N-H-O and N-H-O-S systems under pressure are likely to possess richer chemistry than the known organic chemistry. This, in turn, opens a possibility of nitrogen-based life at high pressure. The predicted phase diagram of the N-H system also provides a reference for synthesis of high-energy-density materials. PMID:27193059

  11. Nonlinear optical transmission of cyanobacteria-derived optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Edward H.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Zhao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Cyanobacteria-derived optical materials for optical limiting applications have been studied in this work. Six samples have been prepared from cyanobacteria including cyanobacteria suspension in water, extracts in water, methanol, and N,N-dimethylformamide, and pyrolyzed cyanobacteria (PCYB) dispersed in dsDNA (sodium salt from salmon testes) solution and sodium dodecyl sulfate solution, respectively. The extracts contain phycocyanin, chlorophyll a, and carotenoids as measured by optical absorption spectroscopy, while the PCYB is a nanostructural composite composed of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoringes, and multilayer graphenes, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. The optical limiting responses of the samples have been measured at 532 and 756 nm. The PCYB in dsDNA solution has the best limiting performance out of all the cyanobacteria-derived samples. It outperforms carbon black suspension standard at 532 nm and is a broadband limiter, which makes it attractive for optical limiting applications.

  12. Holographic recording materials development. [using stilbene, indigo, and thioindigo derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The area of organic cis-trans photoisomerization systems for holographic memory applications was examined. Photochemical studies were made of stilbene, indigo, and thioindigo derivatives in solution and in a variety of polymer matrix materials, to optimize the photorefractive behavior of the chemical system as a whole. Lithium niobate was used to study the writing and reading efficiencies of thick phase holograms. Both phase-wave holograms and Fourier-transform holograms were employed, and a number of reconstruction techniques are discussed. The possibility of using cis-trans photoisomerization of appropriate organic chemicals as the basis for a holographic recording system is confirmed.

  13. Wood-Derived Materials for Green Electronics, Biological Devices, and Energy Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Wei; Ciesielski, Peter N; Fang, Zhiqiang; Zhu, J Y; Henriksson, Gunnar; Himmel, Michael E; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-08-24

    goal of this study is to review the fundamental structures and chemistries of wood and wood-derived materials, which are essential for a wide range of existing and new enabling technologies. The scope of the review covers multiscale materials and assemblies of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin as well as other biomaterials derived from wood, in regard to their major emerging applications. Structure-properties-application relationships will be investigated in detail. Understanding the fundamental properties of these structures is crucial for designing and manufacturing products for emerging applications. Today, a more holistic understanding of the interplay between the structure, chemistry, and performance of wood and wood-derived materials is advancing historical applications of these materials. This new level of understanding also enables a myriad of new and exciting applications, which motivate this review. There are excellent reviews already on the classical topic of woody materials, and some recent reviews also cover new understanding of these materials as well as potential applications. This review will focus on the uniqueness of woody materials for three critical applications: green electronics, biological devices, and energy storage and bioenergy. PMID:27459699

  14. Computational Materials Science and Chemistry: Accelerating Discovery and Innovation through Simulation-Based Engineering and Science

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, George; Glotzer, Sharon; McCurdy, Bill; Roberto, Jim

    2010-07-26

    This report is based on a SC Workshop on Computational Materials Science and Chemistry for Innovation on July 26-27, 2010, to assess the potential of state-of-the-art computer simulations to accelerate understanding and discovery in materials science and chemistry, with a focus on potential impacts in energy technologies and innovation. The urgent demand for new energy technologies has greatly exceeded the capabilities of today's materials and chemical processes. To convert sunlight to fuel, efficiently store energy, or enable a new generation of energy production and utilization technologies requires the development of new materials and processes of unprecedented functionality and performance. New materials and processes are critical pacing elements for progress in advanced energy systems and virtually all industrial technologies. Over the past two decades, the United States has developed and deployed the world's most powerful collection of tools for the synthesis, processing, characterization, and simulation and modeling of materials and chemical systems at the nanoscale, dimensions of a few atoms to a few hundred atoms across. These tools, which include world-leading x-ray and neutron sources, nanoscale science facilities, and high-performance computers, provide an unprecedented view of the atomic-scale structure and dynamics of materials and the molecular-scale basis of chemical processes. For the first time in history, we are able to synthesize, characterize, and model materials and chemical behavior at the length scale where this behavior is controlled. This ability is transformational for the discovery process and, as a result, confers a significant competitive advantage. Perhaps the most spectacular increase in capability has been demonstrated in high performance computing. Over the past decade, computational power has increased by a factor of a million due to advances in hardware and software. This rate of improvement, which shows no sign of abating, has

  15. Tailoring material properties of a nanofibrous extracellular matrix derived hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Todd D.; Lin, Stephen Y.; Christman, Karen L.

    2011-12-01

    In the native tissue, the interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, mechanical stability, and signaling. It has been shown that decellularized ECMs can be processed into injectable formulations, thereby allowing for minimally invasive delivery. Upon injection and increase in temperature, these materials self-assemble into porous gels forming a complex network of fibers with nanoscale structure. In this study we aimed to examine and tailor the material properties of a self-assembling ECM hydrogel derived from porcine myocardial tissue, which was developed as a tissue specific injectable scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The impact of gelation parameters on ECM hydrogels has not previously been explored. We examined how modulating pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration affected the nanoscale architecture, mechanical properties, and gelation kinetics. These material characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy, rheometry, and spectrophotometry, respectively. Since the main component of the myocardial matrix is collagen, many similarities between the ECM hydrogel and collagen gels were observed in terms of the nanofibrous structure and modulation of properties by altering ionic strength. However, variation from collagen gels was noted for the gelation temperature along with varied times and rates of gelation. These discrepancies when compared to collagen are likely due to the presence of other ECM components in the decellularized ECM based hydrogel. These results demonstrate how the material properties of ECM hydrogels could be tailored for future in vitro and in vivo applications.

  16. Graphene-based materials: fabrication and application for adsorption in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Bo; Lu, Qipeng; Qu, Qishu

    2014-10-01

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms densely packed into a honeycomb crystal lattice with unique electronic, chemical, and mechanical properties, is the 2D allotrope of carbon. Owing to the remarkable properties, graphene and graphene-based materials are likely to find potential applications as a sorbent in analytical chemistry. The current review focuses predominantly on the recent development of graphene-based materials and demonstrates their enhanced performance in adsorption of organic compounds, metal ions, and solid phase extraction as well as in separation science since mostly 2012. PMID:25160951

  17. Materials Chemistry of BaFe2As2: A Model Platform for Unconventional Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mandrus, David; Safa-Sefat, Athena; McGuire, Michael A; Sales, Brian C

    2010-01-01

    BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is the parent compound of a family of unconventional superconductors with critical temperatures approaching 40 K. BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is structurally simple, available as high-quality large crystals, can be both hole and electron doped, and is amenable to first-principles electronic structure calculations. BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} has a rich and flexible materials chemistry that makes it an ideal model platform for the study of unconventional superconductivity. The key properties of this family of materials are briefly reviewed.

  18. Phage as a Genetically Modifiable Supramacromolecule in Chemistry, Materials and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Cao, Binrui; Yang, Mingying; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-06-21

    Filamentous bacteriophage (phage) is a genetically modifiable supramacromolecule. It can be pictured as a semiflexible nanofiber (∼900 nm long and ∼8 nm wide) made of a DNA core and a protein shell with the former genetically encoding the latter. Although phage bioengineering and phage display techniques were developed before the 1990s, these techniques have not been widely used for chemistry, materials, and biomedical research from the perspective of supramolecular chemistry until recently. Powered by our expertise in displaying a foreign peptide on its surface through engineering phage DNA, we have employed phage to identify target-specific peptides, construct novel organic-inorganic nanohybrids, develop biomaterials for disease treatment, and generate bioanalytical methods for disease diagnosis. Compared with conventional biomimetic chemistry, phage-based supramolecular chemistry represents a new frontier in chemistry, materials science, and medicine. In this Account, we introduce our recent successful efforts in phage-based supramolecular chemistry, by integrating the unique nanofiber-like phage structure and powerful peptide display techniques into the fields of chemistry, materials science, and medicine: (1) successfully synthesized and assembled silica, hydroxyapatite, and gold nanoparticles using phage templates to form novel functional materials; (2) chemically introduced azo units onto the phage to form photoresponsive functional azo-phage nanofibers via a diazotization reaction between aromatic amino groups and the tyrosine residues genetically displayed on phage surfaces; (3) assembled phage into 2D films for studying the effects of both biochemical (the peptide sequences displayed on the phages) and biophysical (the topographies of the phage films) cues on the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and identified peptides and topographies that can induce their osteogenic

  19. Process for stabilizing the viscosity characteristics of coal derived materials and the stabilized materials obtained thereby

    DOEpatents

    Bronfenbrenner, James C.; Foster, Edward P.; Tewari, Krishna

    1985-01-01

    A process is disclosed for stabilizing the viscosity of coal derived materials such as an SRC product by adding up to 5.0% by weight of a light volatile phenolic viscosity repressor. The viscosity will remain stabilized for a period of time of up to 4 months.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy as a Probe of the Surface Chemistry of Nanostructured Materials.

    PubMed

    Dick, Susan; Konrad, Magdalena P; Lee, Wendy W Y; McCabe, Hannah; McCracken, John N; Rahman, Taifur M D; Stewart, Alan; Xu, Yikai; Bell, Steven E J

    2016-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is now widely used as a rapid and inexpensive tool for chemical/biochemical analysis. The method can give enormous increases in the intensities of the Raman signals of low-concentration molecular targets if they are adsorbed on suitable enhancing substrates, which are typically composed of nanostructured Ag or Au. However, the features of SERS that allow it to be used as a chemical sensor also mean that it can be used as a powerful probe of the surface chemistry of any nanostructured material that can provide SERS enhancement. This is important because it is the surface chemistry that controls how these materials interact with their local environment and, in real applications, this interaction can be more important than more commonly measured properties such as morphology or plasmonic absorption. Here, the opportunity that this approach to SERS provides is illustrated with examples where the surface chemistry is both characterized and controlled in order to create functional nanomaterials. PMID:26822589

  1. Applications of Click Chemistry Reactions to the Synthesis of Functional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accurso, Adrian A.

    This body of work focuses on the production of functional materials using the most reliable carbon-hetoratom bond-forming processes available, which are widely termed "click chemistry" reactions in the literature. This focus on function is enabled by a basis in synthetic chemistry, and where appropriate, brings in techniques from the related fields of materials science and biology to address current needs in those areas. Chapter 1 concerns the in situ production of azide and alkyne-based click chemistry adhesive polymers. Screening of a library of multivalent azides and alkynes was accomplished on a custom-built highthroughput instrument and followed up on a lap-shear testing apparatus. The conductivity of composites made of the adhesive was also explored according to standard methods. The second and third chapters explore the synthesis and function of a family of related [3.3.1]-bicyclononane dichlorides, which we have termed "WCL" electrophiles, and their potential applications for surface functionalization, the synthesis of polycations, and candidate membrane disruptive compounds. The rates of consumption of dichlorides and hydrolysis of model compounds were also explored using NMR, GC-MS, and HPLC-based methods.

  2. Novel chemistries and materials for grid-scale energy storage: Quinones and halogen catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huskinson, Brian Thomas

    In this work I describe various approaches to electrochemical energy storage at the grid-scale. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to energy storage and an overview of the history and development of flow batteries. Chapter 2 describes work on the hydrogen-chlorine regenerative fuel cell, detailing its development and the record-breaking performance of the device. Chapter 3 dives into catalyst materials for such a fuel cell, focusing on ruthenium oxide based alloys to be used as chlorine redox catalysts. Chapter 4 introduces and details the development of a performance model for a hydrogen-bromine cell. Chapter 5 delves into the more recent work I have done, switching to applications of quinone chemistries in flow batteries. It focuses on the pairing of one particular quinone (2,7-anthraquinone disulfonic acid) with bromine, and highlights the promising performance characteristics of a device based on this type of chemistry.

  3. Evolution of Chemistry and Its Effects on the Corrosion of Engineered Barrier Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Darrell; Pan, Yi-Ming; He, Xihua; Yang, Lietai; Pabalan, Roberto

    2007-07-01

    The evolution of environmental conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, may be influenced by several factors, including the temperature and relative humidity within the emplacement drifts and the composition of seepage water. The performance of the waste package and the drip shield may be affected by the evolution of the environmental conditions within the emplacement drifts. In this study, tests evaluated the evolution of environmental conditions on the waste package surfaces and in the surrounding host rock. The tests were designed to (i) simulate the conditions expected within the emplacement drifts; (ii) measure the changes in near-field chemistry; and (iii) determine environmental influence on the performance of the engineered barrier materials. Results of tests conducted in this study indicate the composition of salt deposits was consistent with the initial dilute water chemistry. Salts and possibly concentrated calcium chloride brines may be more aggressive than either neutral or alkaline brines. (authors)

  4. Cytotoxicity of magnetic nanoparticles derived from green chemistry against human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanumandla, Pranitha

    The core-shelled Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been extensively investigated by the researchers due to their diversified applications. Recently, the study on the toxicity of nanomaterials has been drawn increasing attention to reduce or mitigate the environmental hazards and health risk. The objectives of this thesis are three fold: 1) prepare series functionalized Fe3O4 MNPs and optimize the synthesis variables of; 2) characterize their nanostructures using the state-of-the-art instrumental techniques; and 3) evaluate their cytotoxicity by measurement of nitrogen monoxide (NO) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and single oxygen species (SOS) generation. In order to prepare the crystalline Fe3O4 MNPs, a cost-effective and user-friendly wet chemistry (Sol-Gel) method was used. Two Indian medicinal plants were extracted to derive the active chemicals, which were used to functionalize the Fe3O 4 MNPs. The results indicated that the Fe3O4 MNPs were well-indexed with the standard inverse spinel structure (PDF 65-3107, a=8.3905A, α = 90°). The particle's sizes varied from 6-10 nm with the Fe3O 4 MNPs acting as cores and medicinal extracts as shell. The active chemical components extracted from two Hygrophila auriculata/ Chlorophytum borivilianum are fatty acid, Saponins, sterols, carbohydrates and amino acids, which are in agreement with the reported data. Toxicological evaluations of MNPs indicated that the Fe3O4 MNPs functionalized with Hygrophila auriculata/ Chlorophytum borivilianum extract prepared at room temperature were toxic to the cells when compared to the control, and act in a mechanism similar to the actions of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). These functionalized MNPs, which were prepared at 100 ° C, displayed similar mechanism of action to the anticancer drug (SN-38). It was also found that the MNPs prepared at lower temperatures are less toxic and showed similar mechanism of action as the sodium nitrite (NaNO 2).

  5. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science program report, Weapons Resarch and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY96

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, L.

    1997-03-01

    This report is the annual progress report for the Chemistry Materials Science Program: Weapons Research and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development. Twenty-one projects are described separately by their principal investigators.

  6. Dynamic Covalent Chemistry-based Sensing: Pyrenyl Derivatives of Phenylboronic Acid for Saccharide and Formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xingmao; Fan, Jiayun; Wang, Min; Wang, Zhaolong; Peng, Haonan; He, Gang; Fang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    We synthesized two specially designed pyrenyl (Py) derivatives of phenylboronic acid, PSNB1 and PSNB2, of which PSNB2 self-assemble to form dynamic aggregate in methanol-water mixture (1:99, v/v) via intermolecular H-bonding and pi-pi stacking. Interestingly, the dynamic aggregate shows smart response to presence of fructose (F) as evidenced by fluorescence color change from green to blue. More interestingly, the fluorescence emission of the resulted PSNB2-F changes from blue to green with the addition of formaldehyde (FA). The reason behind is formation of a PSNB2-F dimer via FA cross-linking. Based upon the reactions as found, sensitive and fast sensing of F and FA in water was realized, of which the experimental DLs could be significantly lower than 10 μM for both analytes, and the response times are less than 1 min. It is believed that not only the materials as created may have the potential to find real-life applications but also the strategy as developed can be adopted to develop other dynamic materials. PMID:27498703

  7. Dynamic Covalent Chemistry-based Sensing: Pyrenyl Derivatives of Phenylboronic Acid for Saccharide and Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xingmao; Fan, Jiayun; Wang, Min; Wang, Zhaolong; Peng, Haonan; He, Gang; Fang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    We synthesized two specially designed pyrenyl (Py) derivatives of phenylboronic acid, PSNB1 and PSNB2, of which PSNB2 self-assemble to form dynamic aggregate in methanol-water mixture (1:99, v/v) via intermolecular H-bonding and pi-pi stacking. Interestingly, the dynamic aggregate shows smart response to presence of fructose (F) as evidenced by fluorescence color change from green to blue. More interestingly, the fluorescence emission of the resulted PSNB2-F changes from blue to green with the addition of formaldehyde (FA). The reason behind is formation of a PSNB2-F dimer via FA cross-linking. Based upon the reactions as found, sensitive and fast sensing of F and FA in water was realized, of which the experimental DLs could be significantly lower than 10 μM for both analytes, and the response times are less than 1 min. It is believed that not only the materials as created may have the potential to find real-life applications but also the strategy as developed can be adopted to develop other dynamic materials.

  8. Dynamic Covalent Chemistry-based Sensing: Pyrenyl Derivatives of Phenylboronic Acid for Saccharide and Formaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xingmao; Fan, Jiayun; Wang, Min; Wang, Zhaolong; Peng, Haonan; He, Gang; Fang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    We synthesized two specially designed pyrenyl (Py) derivatives of phenylboronic acid, PSNB1 and PSNB2, of which PSNB2 self-assemble to form dynamic aggregate in methanol-water mixture (1:99, v/v) via intermolecular H-bonding and pi-pi stacking. Interestingly, the dynamic aggregate shows smart response to presence of fructose (F) as evidenced by fluorescence color change from green to blue. More interestingly, the fluorescence emission of the resulted PSNB2-F changes from blue to green with the addition of formaldehyde (FA). The reason behind is formation of a PSNB2-F dimer via FA cross-linking. Based upon the reactions as found, sensitive and fast sensing of F and FA in water was realized, of which the experimental DLs could be significantly lower than 10 μM for both analytes, and the response times are less than 1 min. It is believed that not only the materials as created may have the potential to find real-life applications but also the strategy as developed can be adopted to develop other dynamic materials. PMID:27498703

  9. Engineering single-molecule, nanoscale, and microscale bio-functional materials via click chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniele, Michael Angelo-Anthony

    To expand the design envelope and supplement the materials library available to biomaterials scientists, the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuCAAC) was explored as a route to design, synthesize and characterize bio-functional small-molecules, nanoparticles, and microfibers. In each engineered system, the use of click chemistry provided facile, bio-orthogonal control for materials synthesis; moreover, the results provided a methodology and more complete, fundamental understanding of the use of click chemistry as a tool for the synergy of biotechnology, polymer and materials science. Fluorophores with well-defined photophysical characteristics (ranging from UV to NIR fluorescence) were used as building blocks for small-molecule, fluorescent biosensors. Fluorophores were paired to exhibit fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) and used to probe the metabolic activity of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO). The FRET pair exhibited a significant variation in PL response with exposure to the lysate of Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10, an organism which can degrade variants of both the donor and acceptor fluorophores. Nanoparticle systems were modified via CuCAAC chemistry to carry affinity tags for CARDO and were subsequently utilized for affinity based bioseparation of CARDO from crude cell lysate. The enzymes were baited with an azide-modified carbazolyl-moiety attached to a poly(propargyl acrylate) nanoparticle. Magnetic nanocluster systems were also modified via CuCAAC chemistry to carry fluorescent imaging tags. The iron-oxide nanoclusters were coated with poly(acrylic acid-co-propargyl acrylate) to provide a clickable surface. Ultimately, alternate Cu-free click chemistries were utilized to produce biohybrid microfibers. The biohybrid microfibers were synthesized under benign photopolymerization conditions inside a microchannel, allowing the encapsulation of viable bacteria. By adjusting pre-polymer solutions and laminar flow rates within the

  10. Chemistry and structure of coal derived asphaltenes and preasphaltenes. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1980-01-01

    The following conclusions are drawn: (1) the aromaticity of petroleum-derived asphaltene (f/sub a/ = 0.2-0.5) is lower than that of coal-derived asphaltene (f/sub a/ = 0.6-0.7). (2) The aromatic ring systems within petroleum-derived asphaltene are much more ccondensed (peri) (H/sub aru//C/sub ar/ = 0.3-0.5) than that of coal-derived asphaltene (kata)(H/sub aru//C/sub ar/ = 0.5-0.7). (3) The substituents of the petroleum-derived asphaltenes are longer (n = 4-6) than those of coal-derived asphaltenes (n = 1). (4) The aromatic system of petroleum-derived asphaltene is extensively substituted (70 to 80%), whereas the coal-derived asphaltene is sparingly substituted (35 to 45%). (5) The molecular weight of petroleum-derived asphaltene is ca. 10 times higher than that of the coal-derived asphaltene. (6) Petroleum-derived asphaltene is less reactive to physical or chemical agents than that of coal-derived asphaltene. (7) Petroleum-derived asphaltene is more highly associated (Me = 5-7) than that of coal-derived asphaltene (Me-2-4). This will be reflected in the ease of processing. (8) Petroleum-derived asphaltene is less poplar than the coal-derived asphaltene.

  11. Silver/polysaccharide-based nanofibrous materials synthesized from green chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, M A; Garza-Navarro, M A; Moreno-Cortez, I E; Lucio-Porto, R; González-González, V A

    2016-01-20

    In this contribution a novel green chemistry approach for the synthesis of nanofibrous materials based on blends of carboxymethyl-cellulose (CMC)-silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) composite and polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA) is proposed. These nanofibrous materials were obtained from the electrospinning of blends of aqueous solutions of CMC-AgNPs composite and PVA, which were prepared at different CMC/PVA weight ratios in order to electrospin nanofibers applying a constant tension of 15kV. The synthesized materials were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy; as well as Fourier-transform infrared, ultraviolet and Raman spectroscopic techniques. Experimental evidence suggests that the diameter of the nanofibers is thinner than any other reported in the literature regarding the electrospinning of CMC. This feature is related to the interactions of AgNPs with carboxyl functional groups of the CMC, which diminish those between the later and acetyl groups of PVA. PMID:26572327

  12. Synthesis and lanthanide coordination chemistry of trifluoromethyl derivatives of phosphinoylmethyl pyridine N-oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Pailloux, Sylvie; Shirima, Cornel Edicome; Duesler, Eileen N.; Smith, Karen Ann; Paine, Robert T.; Klaehn, John D.; McIlwain, Michael E; Hay, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    A synthetic route for the formation of 2-[bis-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-phosphinoylmethyl]-pyridine N-oxide (1c) and 2-[bis-(3,5-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-phosphinoylmethyl]-pyridine N-oxide (1d) was developed and the new ligands characterized by spectroscopic methods and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The coordination chemistry of the ligands was examined with early and late lanthanide ions. The molecular structure of one complex, [Yb(1c)(NO3)3(DMF)](DMF)(H2O)0.5, was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods and the ligand found to coordinate in a bidentate fashion. This coordination chemistry is compared against lanthanide coordination chemistry observed for the related ligand, [Ph2P(O)CH2] C5H4NO.

  13. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  14. Light-emitting carbazole derivatives for electroluminescent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiann T.; Thomas, K. R. J.; Tao, Yu-Tai; Ko, Chung-Wen

    2002-02-01

    Amorphous carbazole derivatives containing peripheral diarylamines at the 3- and 6-positions and an ethyl or aryl substituent at the 9-position of the carbazole moiety have been synthesized. These new carbazole compounds (carbs) possess high glass transition temperatures (Tg: 120- 194 degree(s)C) and high thermal decomposition temperatures (Td>450 degree(s)C). The compounds are weakly to moderately luminescent with the emission wavelength ranging from green to blue. Two types of light-emitting diodes (LED) were constructed from carb:(I)ITO/carb/TPBI/Mg:Ag and (II)ITO/carb/Alq3/Mg:Ag, where TPBI and Alq3 are 1,3,5-tris(N-phenylbenzimidazol-2-yl)benzene and tris(8- hydroxyquinoline) aluminum, respectively. In type I devices the carb functions as the hole-transporting as well as emitting material. In type II devices either carb and/or Alq3 is the light emitting material. Several green light-emitting devices exhibit exceptional maximum brightness and the physical performance is superior to those of typical green-light-emitting devices of the structure ITO/diamine/Alq3/Mg:Ag. Relation between the LUMO of the carb and the performance of the light-emitting diode is discussed.

  15. Chemistry away from local equilibrium: shocking high-energy and energy absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    In this presentation I will describe reactive molecular dynamics and coarse grain simulations of shock induced chemistry. MD simulations of the chemical reactions following the shock-induced collapse of cylindrical pores in the high-energy density material RDX provide the first atomistic picture of the shock to deflagration transition in nanoscale hotspots. We find that energy localization during pore collapse leads to ultra-fast, multi-step chemical reactions that occur under non-equilibrium conditions. The formation of exothermic products during the first few picoseconds of the process prevents the hotspot from quenching, and within 30 ps a deflagration wave develops. Quite surprisingly, an artificial hot-spot matching the shock-induced one in size and thermodynamic conditions quenches; providing strong evidence that the dynamic nature of the loading plays a role in determining the criticality of the hotspot. To achieve time and lengths beyond what is possible in MD we developed a mesoscale model that incorporates chemical reactions at a coarse-grained level. We used this model to explore shock propagation on materials that can undergo volume-reducing, endothermic chemical reactions. The simulations show that such chemical reactions can attenuate the shockwave and characterize how the characteristics of the chemistry affect this behavior. We find that the amount of volume collapse and the activation energy are critical to weaken the shock, whereas the endothermicity of the reactions plays only a minor role. As in the reactive MD simulations, we find that the non-equilibrium state following the shock affects the nucleation of chemistry and, thus, the timescales for equilibration between various degrees of freedom affect the response of the material.

  16. Fundamental chemistry and materials science of americium in selected immobilization glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.; Stump, N.A.

    1996-12-01

    We have pursued some of the fundamental chemistry and materials science of Am in 3 glass matrices, two being high-temperature (850 and 1400 C mp) silicate-based glasses and the third a sol-gel glass. Optical spectroscopy was the principal tool. One aspect of this work was to determine the oxidation state exhibited by Am in these matrices, as well as factors that control or may alter this state. A correlation was noted between the oxidation state of the f-elements in the two high-temperature glasses with their high-temperature oxide chemistries. One exception was Am: although AmO{sub 2} is the stable oxide encountered in air, when this dioxide was incorporated into the high-temperature glasses, only trivalent Am was found in the products. When Am(III) was used to prepare the sol-gel glasses at ambient temperature, and after these products were heated in air to 800 C, only Am(III) was observed. Potential explanations for the unexpected Am behavior is offered in the context of its basic chemistry. Experimental spectra, spectroscopic assignments, etc. are discussed.

  17. Isotopic Fractionation in Primitive Materials: Quantifying the Contribution of Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnley, Steven

    We propose to continue theoretical studies aimed at elucidating the contribution of astrochemical processes to the isotopic fractionation measured in carbonaceous meteoritic material, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and comets, including the dust samples returned by the Stardust mission. Prior work has focused on the fractionation chemistry of 15N, 13C, and D in cold, isolated dense cores. We now propose to extend these studies to cores residing in stellar clusters, more energetic conditions that better reflect the birth environment of the Solar System. We will undertake four studies: In cold molecular cores, the computation of 13C, 15N and D fractionation in small and large hydrocarbons that could be precursors to meteoritic organic material A definitive study of isotopic fractionation in candidate presolar cores illuminated by strong ultraviolet radiation from nearby stars in a stellar cluster. A new model of isotopic chemistry in dense cores exposed to greatly enhanced fluxes of cosmic-ray particles due to their proximity to a supernovae. These theoretical models will make predictions that will testable by astronomical observation and so an interdisciplinary approach can be advantageous. We therefore also propose to perform a program of radioastronomical observations to definitively measure the isotopic fractionation of 15N in interstellar molecules. In each environment, we will evaluate the maximum degree of stable-isotope enhancement or depletion present in specific molecular functional groups, which could have been precursor reservoirs of cometary and asteroidal material. For the theoretical projects we will employ comprehensive chemical fractionation networks and astrochemistry codes previously developed with Origins support. These studies will allow us, for the first time, to compare and contrast the effect of irradiation environment and so uniquely delineate astronomical contributions to isotopic fractionation in primitive Solar System materials. In

  18. Relating ionic liquids and polyethylene glycols to green chemistry, organometallic catalysis, and materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingshirn, Marc Allen

    The field of green chemistry has grown tremendously over the past years due to stricter environmental laws regulating the amount of toxic substances that are legally allowed into the environment. The objective of this work was to incorporate ILs and PEGs into gel type matrices and utilize them as solvent alternatives in hopes of helping advance the field of green chemistry and lowering environmental burden. Here, three new gel-type materials were studied. A PEG gel-silica sol composite and an IL-PEG gel were developed. Both materials were based on a cross-linked PEG hydrogel and its response to various inorganic salts. The new materials developed exhibited the same shrink-swell characteristics as the control PEG hydrogel, while the IL-PEG gel showed similar uptakes of linear alcohols from salt solutions. Additionally, when calcined, the PEG gel-silica sol composite was found to have unique morphologies that were dependent on PEG hydrogel concentration. The third material that was developed was a silica sol gel that was synthesized utilizing 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride as a (co)solvent. All previous work reported used ILs that had structures similar to surfactants that are traditionally used in creating high surface area materials. The work here presents a fundamental study of how short chained ILs can be used to produce high surface area materials and addresses questions such as how the IL orients itself within the matrix during the sol gel process. Another facet of the work involves the incorporation of ILs and PEGS into organometallic catalytic systems, specifically the hydroesterification of styrene and the copolymerization of styrene and carbon monoxide. The ILs' non-coordinating nature allows them to stabilize catalytically active charged species in addition to allowing for ease of catalyst recycling. The application of the presented work to the field of green chemistry includes the implementation of benign, non-volatile reaction media, specifically

  19. Earth materials research: Report of a Workshop on Physics and Chemistry of Earth Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The report concludes that an enhanced effort of earth materials research is necessary to advance the understanding of the processes that shape the planet. In support of such an effort, there are new classes of experiments, new levels of analytical sensitivity and precision, and new levels of theory that are now applicable in understanding the physical and chemical properties of geological materials. The application of these capabilities involves the need to upgrade and make greater use of existing facilities as well as the development of new techniques. A concomitant need is for a sample program involving their collection, synthesis, distribution, and analysis.

  20. The Materials Chemistry of Atomic Oxygen with Applications to Anisotropic Etching of Submicron Structures in Microelectronics and the Surface Chemistry Engineering of Porous Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve L.; Leger, Lubert J.; Wu, Corina; Cross, Jon B.; Jurgensen, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    Neutral atomic oxygen is the most abundant component of the ionospheric plasma in the low Earth orbit environment (LEO; 200 to 700 kilometers altitude) and can produce significant degradation of some spacecraft materials. In order to produce a more complete understanding of the materials chemistry of atomic oxygen, the chemistry and physics of O-atom interactions with materials were determined in three radically different environments: (1) The Space Shuttle cargo bay in low Earth orbit (the EOIM-3 space flight experiment), (2) a high-velocity neutral atom beam system (HVAB) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and (3) a microwave-plasma flowing-discharge system at JSC. The Space Shuttle and the high velocity atom beam systems produce atom-surface collision energies ranging from 0.1 to 7 eV (hyperthermal atoms) under high-vacuum conditions, while the flowing discharge system produces a 0.065 eV surface collision energy at a total pressure of 2 Torr. Data obtained in the three different O-atom environments referred to above show that the rate of O-atom reaction with polymeric materials is strongly dependent on atom kinetic energy, obeying a reactive scattering law which suggests that atom kinetic energy is directly available for overcoming activation barriers in the reaction. General relationships between polymer reactivity with O atoms and polymer composition and molecular structure have been determined. In addition, vacuum ultraviolet photochemical effects have been shown to dominate the reaction of O atoms with fluorocarbon polymers. Finally, studies of the materials chemistry of O atoms have produced results which may be of interest to technologists outside the aerospace industry. Atomic oxygen 'spin-off' or 'dual use' technologies in the areas of anisotropic etching in microelectronic materials and device processing, as well as surface chemistry engineering of porous solid materials are described.

  1. Rates of Metamorphic and Tectonic Processes Derived From Garnet Chemistry and Phase Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowell, H. H.

    2005-12-01

    Sm and Nd isotope data for the interior parts of a garnet crystal (core) and the whole rock can be used to calculate the timing of initial growth. Isotope data for the external parts of a garnet crystal (rim) and the rock matrix can be used to calculate the timing of final growth. Similarly, major element chemistry can be used to calculate pressures (P) and temperatures (T) of metamorphism for initial and final garnet growth. Combination of these data allows estimation of garnet growth, heating, and loading rates. Sm-Nd isochrons were constructed for garnet core and whole rock, and for garnet rim and rock matrix (whole rock minus garnet). For core and rim ages that are indistinguishable, uncertainties for a single isochron constrain the duration of garnet growth. P and T were estimated from the intersection of garnet chemical isopleths on P-T phase diagrams for specific rocks (pseudosections), and garnet rim thermobarometry and/or pseudosection peak mineral stability fields. Results from Cretaceous contact and regional metamorphic environments provide preliminary data for comparison. Schist from Garnet Ledge, AK. 20 mm garnet crystals in pelite less than 1 km from a diorite pluton grew during contact metamorphism over ca. 0.5 m.y. during a 70°C increase in T and 0.6 kbar increase in P. Growth, heating, and loading rates are 20 mm/m.y., 140°C/m.y., 1.2 kbar/m.y., respectively. Chiwaukum Schist from near the Mount Stuart batholith, WA. 14 mm garnet crystals in pelite less than 2 km from the Mt. Stuart batholith grew during regional metamorphism over <1.4 m.y. during a 75°C increase in T and 1.2 kbar increase in P. Growth, heating, and loading rates are 5 mm/m.y., 54°C/m.y., 0.9 kbar/m.y., respectively. 5 mm garnet crystals in pelite adjacent to orthogneiss grew during contact metamorphism over <1.8 m.y. while T and P increased to peak conditions of 630°C and 6.8 kbar. Pembroke granulite from Fiordland, New Zealand. 16 mm peritectic garnet crystals in lower

  2. Wet-chemistry processing of powdery raw material for high-tech ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusova, Elena A.; Vokhmintcev, Kirill V.; Zagainov, Igor V.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop wet-chemistry approaches for the synthesis of ultradispersed and mesoporous metal oxide powders and powdery composites intended for usage in the production of ceramic materials with desired properties. The focus is on the development of template synthesis of mesoporous metal silicates as well as obtaining nano- and subnanopowders by a modified sol-gel technique and template methods. Families of mesoporous (2 to 300 nm) metal silicates and nano-oxides and subnanopowders (4 to 300 nm) were synthesized by the template method and modified sol-gel technique, respectively. Texture and morphology of the obtained objects have been studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, and N2 adsorption-desorption. It was found that morphological parameters of the metal oxide obtained by the modified sol-gel technique depend nonlinearly on the initial molar ratio value of the sol stabilizer and metal in the reaction medium as well as the nature of the stabilizer. It has been shown that the nature of structure-directing components determines the morphology of the silicate obtained by the template method: dispersion and shape of its particles. The developed laboratory technology corresponds to the conception of soft chemistry and may be adapted to the manufacture of ultradispersed materials for catalysis, solar cells, fuel cells, semiconductors, sensors, low-sized electronic devices of new generation, etc.

  3. Computational chemistry modeling and design of photoswitchable alignment materials for optically addressable liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, K. L.; Sekera, E. R.; Xiao, K.

    2015-09-01

    Photoalignment technology based on optically switchable "command surfaces" has been receiving increasing interest for liquid crystal optics and photonics device applications. Azobenzene compounds in the form of low-molar-mass, watersoluble salts deposited either directly on the substrate surface or after dispersion in a polymer binder have been almost exclusively employed for these applications, and ongoing research in the area follows a largely empirical materials design and development approach. Recent computational chemistry advances now afford unprecedented opportunities to develop predictive capabilities that will lead to new photoswitchable alignment layer materials with low switching energies, enhanced bistability, write/erase fatigue resistance, and high laser-damage thresholds. In the work described here, computational methods based on the density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory were employed to study the impact of molecular structure on optical switching properties in photoswitchable methacrylate and acrylamide polymers functionalized with azobenzene and spiropyran pendants.

  4. Isotopic Fractionation in Primitive Material: Quantifying the Contribution of Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These models make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations, particularly with ALMA.

  5. Chemistry of green encapsulating molding compounds at interfaces with other materials in electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandurra, A.; Zafarana, R.; Tenya, Y.; Pignataro, S.

    2004-07-01

    The interface chemistry between encapsulating epoxy phenolic molding compound (EMC) containing phosphorous based organic flame retardant (the so called "green materials") and copper oxide-hydroxide and aluminum oxide-hydroxide surfaces have been studied in comparison with "conventional" EMC containing bromine and antimony as flame retardant. These green materials are designed to reduce the presence of toxic elements in the electronic packages and, consequently, in the environment. For the study were used a Scanning Acoustic Microscopy for delamination measurements, a dynamometer for the pull strength measurements and an ESCA spectrometer for chemical analysis of the interface. The general behavior of the green compound in terms of delamination, adhesion, and corrosion is found better or at least comparable than that of the conventional EMC.

  6. Low frequency internal vibrations of norbornane and its derivatives studied by IINS and quantum chemistry calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Holderna-Natkaniec, K.; Natkaniec, I.; Khavryutchenko, V. D.

    1999-06-15

    The observed and calculated INS vibrational densities of states for globular molecules of norbornane, norborneole and borneole are compared in the frequency range up to 600 cm{sup -1}. Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (IINS) spectra were measured at ca. 20 K on the high resolution NERA spectrometer at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. The IINS intensities were calculated by semi-empirical quantum chemistry method and the assignments of the low-frequency internal modes were proposed.

  7. A chemistry and material perspective on lithium redox flow batteries towards high-density electrical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Ding, Yu; Li, Yutao; Peng, Lele; Byon, Hye Ryung; Goodenough, John B; Yu, Guihua

    2015-11-21

    Electrical energy storage system such as secondary batteries is the principle power source for portable electronics, electric vehicles and stationary energy storage. As an emerging battery technology, Li-redox flow batteries inherit the advantageous features of modular design of conventional redox flow batteries and high voltage and energy efficiency of Li-ion batteries, showing great promise as efficient electrical energy storage system in transportation, commercial, and residential applications. The chemistry of lithium redox flow batteries with aqueous or non-aqueous electrolyte enables widened electrochemical potential window thus may provide much greater energy density and efficiency than conventional redox flow batteries based on proton chemistry. This Review summarizes the design rationale, fundamentals and characterization of Li-redox flow batteries from a chemistry and material perspective, with particular emphasis on the new chemistries and materials. The latest advances and associated challenges/opportunities are comprehensively discussed. PMID:26265165

  8. Comprehensive Reference Ranges for Hematology and Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Parameters Derived from Normal Nigerian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Miri-Dashe, Timzing; Osawe, Sophia; Tokdung, Monday; Daniel, Nenbammun; Choji, Rahila Pam; Mamman, Ille; Deme, Kurt; Damulak, Dapus; Abimiku, Alash’le

    2014-01-01

    Background Interpretation of laboratory test results with appropriate diagnostic accuracy requires reference or cutoff values. This study is a comprehensive determination of reference values for hematology and clinical chemistry in apparently healthy voluntary non-remunerated blood donors and pregnant women. Methods and findings Consented clients were clinically screened and counseled before testing for HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and Syphilis. Standard national blood donors’ questionnaire was administered to consented blood donors. Blood from qualified volunteers was used for measurement of complete hematology and chemistry parameters. Blood samples were analyzed from a total of 383 participants, 124 (32.4%) males, 125 (32.6%) non-pregnant females and 134 pregnant females (35.2%) with a mean age of 31 years. Our results showed that the red blood cells count (RBC), Hemoglobin (HB) and Hematocrit (HCT) had significant gender difference (p = 0.000) but not for total white blood count (p>0.05) which was only significantly higher in pregnant verses non-pregnant women (p = 0.000). Hemoglobin and Hematocrit values were lower in pregnancy (P = 0.000). Platelets were significantly higher in females than men (p = 0.001) but lower in pregnant women (p = 0.001) with marked difference in gestational period. For clinical chemistry parameters, there was no significant difference for sodium, potassium and chloride (p>0.05) but gender difference exists for Bicarbonate (HCO3), Urea nitrogen, Creatinine as well as the lipids (p<0.05). Total bilirubin was significantly higher in males than females (p = 0.000). Significant differences exist for all chemistry parameters between pregnant and non-pregnant women in this study (p<0.05), except Amylase and total cholesterol (p>0.05). Conclusions Hematological and Clinical Chemistry reference ranges established in this study showed significant gender differences. Pregnant women also differed from non

  9. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  10. Incompatibility between plant-derived defensive chemistry and immune response of two sphingid herbivores.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Evan C; Bowers, M Deane

    2015-01-01

    Herbivorous insects use several different defenses against predators and parasites, and tradeoffs among defensive traits may occur if these traits are energetically demanding. Chemical defense and immune response potentially can interact, and both can be influenced by host plant chemistry. Two closely related caterpillars in the lepidopteran family Sphingidae are both attacked by the same specialist endoparasitoid species but have mostly non-overlapping host plant ranges that differ in secondary chemistry. Ceratomia catalpae is a specialist on Catalpa and also will feed on Chilopsis, which both produce iridoid glycosides. Ceratomia undulosa consumes members of the Oleaceae, which produce seco-iridoid glycosides. Immune response of the two species on a typical host plant species (Catalpa bignonioides for C. catalpa; Fraxinus americana for C. undulosa) was compared using a melanization assay, and did not differ. In a second experiment, the iridoid glycoside catalpol was added to the diets of both insects, and growth rate, mass, chemical defense, and immune response were evaluated. Increased dietary catalpol weakened the immune response of C. undulosa and altered the development rate of C. catalpae by prolonging the third instar and accelerating the fourth instar. Catalpol sequestration was negatively correlated with immune response of C. catalpae, while C. undulosa was unable to sequester catalpol. These results show that immune response can be negatively influenced by increasing concentrations of sequestered defensive compounds. PMID:25516226

  11. Creating a Discovery Platform for Confined-Space Chemistry and Materials: Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Simmons, Blake

    2008-09-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) are a recently discovered class of nanoporous, defect-free crystalline materials that enable rational design and exploration of porous materials at the molecular level. MOFs have tunable monolithic pore sizes and cavity environments due to their crystalline nature, yielding properties exceeding those of most other porous materials. These include: the lowest known density (91% free space); highest surface area; tunable photoluminescence; selective molecular adsorption; and methane sorption rivaling gas cylinders. These properties are achieved by coupling inorganic metal complexes such as ZnO4 with tunable organic ligands that serve as struts, allowing facile manipulation of pore size and surface area through reactant selection. MOFs thus provide a discovery platform for generating both new understanding of chemistry in confined spaces and novel sensors and devices based on their unique properties. At the outset of this project in FY06, virtually nothing was known about how to couple MOFs to substrates and the science of MOF properties and how to tune them was in its infancy. An integrated approach was needed to establish the required knowledge base for nanoscale design and develop methodologies integrate MOFs with other materials. This report summarizes the key accomplishments of this project, which include creation of a new class of radiation detection materials based on MOFs, luminescent MOFs for chemical detection, use of MOFs as templates to create nanoparticles of hydrogen storage materials, MOF coatings for stress-based chemical detection using microcantilevers, and %22flexible%22 force fields that account for structural changes in MOFs that occur upon molecular adsorption/desorption. Eight journal articles, twenty presentations at scientific conferences, and two patent applications resulted from the work. The project created a basis for continuing development of MOFs for many Sandia applications and succeeded in securing %242

  12. My maize and blue brick road to physical organic chemistry in materials.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Anne J

    2016-01-01

    Similar to Dorothy's journey along the yellow brick road in The Wizard of Oz, this perspective carves out the path I took from my early childhood fascinations with science through my independent career at the University of Michigan (maize and blue). The influential research projects and mentors are highlighted, including some fortuitous experimental results that drew me into the field of supramolecular chemistry, specifically, and organic materials, broadly. My research group's efforts toward designing new sensors based on small molecule gelators are described. In particular, I highlight how our design strategy has evolved as we learn more about molecular gelators. This perspective concludes with some predictions about where molecular gels, as well as my personal and professional life, are headed. PMID:26977181

  13. Pore chemistry and size control in hybrid porous materials for acetylene capture from ethylene.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xili; Chen, Kaijie; Xing, Huabin; Yang, Qiwei; Krishna, Rajamani; Bao, Zongbi; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Dong, Xinglong; Han, Yu; Li, Bin; Ren, Qilong; Zaworotko, Michael J; Chen, Banglin

    2016-07-01

    The trade-off between physical adsorption capacity and selectivity of porous materials is a major barrier for efficient gas separation and purification through physisorption. We report control over pore chemistry and size in metal coordination networks with hexafluorosilicate and organic linkers for the purpose of preferential binding and orderly assembly of acetylene molecules through cooperative host-guest and/or guest-guest interactions. The specific binding sites for acetylene are validated by modeling and neutron powder diffraction studies. The energies associated with these binding interactions afford high adsorption capacity (2.1 millimoles per gram at 0.025 bar) and selectivity (39.7 to 44.8) for acetylene at ambient conditions. Their efficiency for the separation of acetylene/ethylene mixtures is demonstrated by experimental breakthrough curves (0.73 millimoles per gram from a 1/99 mixture). PMID:27198674

  14. A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Performance and Materials Chemistry of a Sililcone-Based Replicating Compound

    SciTech Connect

    Kalan, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this project was to characterize the performance and chemistry of a siliconebased replicating compound. Some silicone replicating compounds are useful for critical inspection of surface features. Common applications are for examining micro-cracks, surface pitting, scratching, and other surface defects. Materials characterization techniques were used: FTIR, XPS, ToF-SIMS, AFM, and Confocal Microscopy to evaluate the replicating compound. These techniques allowed for the characterization and verification of the resolution capabilities and surface contamination that may be a result of using the compound. FTIR showed the compound is entirely made from silicone constituents. The AFM and Confocal Microscopy results showed the compound does accurately replicate the surface features to the claimed resolution. XPS and ToF-SIMS showed there is a silicone contaminant layer left behind when a cured replica is peeled off a surface. Attempts to clean off the contamination could not completely remove all silicone residues.

  15. Viscoelasticity of living materials: mechanics and chemistry of muscle as an active macromolecular system.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong

    2008-06-01

    At the molecular and cellular level, mechanics and chemistry are two aspects of the same macromolecular system. We present a bottom-up approach to such systems based on Kramers' diffusion theory of chemical reactions, the theory of polymer dynamics, and the recently developed models for molecular motors. Using muscle as an example, we develop a viscoelastic theory of muscle in terms of an simple equation for single motor protein movement. Both A.V. Hill's contractile component and A.F. Huxley's equation of sliding-filament motion are shown to be special cases of the general viscoelastic theory of the active material. Some disparity between the mechanical and the chemical views of cross-bridges and motor proteins are noted, and a duality between force and energy in discrete states and transitions of macromolecular systems is discussed. PMID:18589499

  16. My maize and blue brick road to physical organic chemistry in materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Similar to Dorothy’s journey along the yellow brick road in The Wizard of Oz, this perspective carves out the path I took from my early childhood fascinations with science through my independent career at the University of Michigan (maize and blue). The influential research projects and mentors are highlighted, including some fortuitous experimental results that drew me into the field of supramolecular chemistry, specifically, and organic materials, broadly. My research group’s efforts toward designing new sensors based on small molecule gelators are described. In particular, I highlight how our design strategy has evolved as we learn more about molecular gelators. This perspective concludes with some predictions about where molecular gels, as well as my personal and professional life, are headed. PMID:26977181

  17. Patterning Self-Assembled Monolayers on Gold: Green Materials Chemistry in the Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Adam D.; Huffman, Lauren M.; Parent, Kathryn, E.; Hutchison, James E.; Thompson, John E.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment demonstrating self-assembled monolayer (SAM) chemistry, organic thin-film patterning and the use of molecular functionality to control macroscopic properties is described. Several important green chemistry principles are introduced.

  18. Review of the materials-chemistry models in the VICTORIA code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olander, D. R.; Mubayi, Vinod

    Recently a Peer Review Committee established by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its report on VICTORIA, a detailed mechanistic computer code that addresses the release of fission products from degraded reactor fuel and the ex-core behavior of the released material. The present paper summarizes the findings of the report relevant to the materials-chemistry aspects of the code that apply chiefly to the high-temperature, steam-hydrogen environment of the degrading fuel and cladding. In addition to reviewing the theoretical foundation of the mechanisms used in the code, the assessment utilizes the `test problem' technique. In this method, the code (or its methods) are applied to very simple fuel and cladding systems with variations of input conditions, code flags, and material properties. The output is judged against expected behavior for each change. The topics treated include the thermochemical database, the code's method of treating interphase equilibria, the model of fission product release, and the treatment of cladding oxidation and hydrogen production.

  19. Development and Assessment of Green, Research-Based Instructional Materials for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    This research entails integrating two novel approaches for enriching student learning in chemistry into the context of the general chemistry laboratory. The first is a pedagogical approach based on research in cognitive science and the second is the green chemistry philosophy. Research has shown that inquiry-based approaches are effective in…

  20. Mechanisms of Auger-induced chemistry derived from wave packet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Su, Julius T; Goddard, William A

    2009-01-27

    To understand how core ionization and subsequent Auger decay lead to bond breaking in large systems, we simulate the wave packet dynamics of electrons in the hydrogenated diamond nanoparticle C(197)H(112). We find that surface core ionizations cause emission of carbon fragments and protons through a direct Auger mechanism, whereas deeper core ionizations cause hydrides to be emitted from the surface via remote heating, consistent with results from photon-stimulated desorption experiments [Hoffman A, Laikhtman A, (2006) J Phys Condens Mater 18:S1517-S1546]. This demonstrates that it is feasible to study the chemistry of highly excited large-scale systems using simulation and analysis tools comparable in simplicity to those used for classical molecular dynamics. PMID:19164568

  1. Mechanisms of Auger-induced chemistry derived from wave packet dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Su, Julius T.; Goddard, William A.

    2009-01-01

    To understand how core ionization and subsequent Auger decay lead to bond breaking in large systems, we simulate the wave packet dynamics of electrons in the hydrogenated diamond nanoparticle C197H112. We find that surface core ionizations cause emission of carbon fragments and protons through a direct Auger mechanism, whereas deeper core ionizations cause hydrides to be emitted from the surface via remote heating, consistent with results from photon-stimulated desorption experiments [Hoffman A, Laikhtman A, (2006) J Phys Condens Mater 18:S1517–S1546]. This demonstrates that it is feasible to study the chemistry of highly excited large-scale systems using simulation and analysis tools comparable in simplicity to those used for classical molecular dynamics. PMID:19164568

  2. Possible Origin for Porphin Derivatives in Prebiotic Chemistry a Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylward, Nigel; Bofinger, Neville

    2005-08-01

    A set of chemical reactions is postulated to account for the formation of the macrocyclic porphin structure, basic to the pyrrole derivatives chlorophyll, protoporphyrin, heme and bilirubin, important in photosynthesis, respiration and digestion. A set of equations is given for the prebiotic synthesis of porphin derivatives from the simple molecules; cyanoacetylene, diacetylene, carbon monoxide and ammonia that have been detected in space. A number of isomers of hydrogenated porphin arise which may lose hydrogen to give ultimately porphin and its dehydrogenated derivative. The reactions, while not unique, provide a pathway which has been shown to be feasible from the overall enthalpy changes in the ZKE approximation at the HF and MP2/6-31G* level

  3. F- and H-Area Seepage Basins Water Treatment System Process Optimization and Alternative Chemistry Ion Exchange/Sorbent Material Screening Clearwell Overflow Study

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    2000-08-30

    This study investigated alternative ion exchange/sorbent materials and polishing chemistries designed to remove specific radionuclides not removed during the neutralization/precipitation/clarification process.

  4. Development of new methods and polyphosphazene chemistries for advanced materials applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindenlang, Mark D.

    The work described within this thesis focuses on the design, synthesis, and characterization of new phosphazenes with potential in advanced materials applications. Additionally, these unique polymers required the development of novel reaction methods or the investigation of new phosphazene chemistry to achieve their synthesis. Chapter 1 lays out some of the basic principles and fundamentals of polymer chemistry. Chapter 2 investigates the use of iodinated polyphosphazenes as x-ray opaque materials. Single-substituent polymers with 4-iodophenoxy or 4-iodophenylanaline ethyl ester units as the only side groups were prepared. Although a single-substitutent polymer with 3,5-diiodotyrosine ethyl ester groups was difficult to synthesize, probably because of steric hindrance, mixed-substituent polymers that contained the non-iodinated ethyl esters of glycyine, alanine, or phenylalanine plus a corresponding iodinated substituent, could be synthesized. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy was used to follow the substitution of side groups onto the phosphazene back bone and judge the ratio of substituents. Chapter 3 details the initial investigation into 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester and dopamine substituted polyphosphazenes that could be applied to a number of applications. L-DOPAEE was acetonide protected to prevent crosslinking reactions by the catechole functionality. Cyclic small molecule studies and macromolecular substitution reactions on the linear high polymer were conducted with the protected L-DOPA. Continuing studies into protection of the dopamine catechol have elucidated a viable method for the synthesis of amino-linked dopamine polymers. Chapter 4 describes a method for the synthesis of phosphazenes with quaternary amine complexes as potential antibacterial agents. Replacement reactions of pyridine alkoxides and chlorophosphazenes were first attempted at the small molecule level to study the reactivities of pyridine alkoxides. The formation of an

  5. The gas phase ion/molecule chemistry of four carbanions generated from vinylene carbonate and its methyl and dimethyl derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Marin S.; Breitbeil, Fred W.

    1992-09-01

    The gas phase ion/molecule chemistry of four carbanions generated by the reaction of vinylene carbonate, and its methyl and dimethyl derivatives with hydroxide ion has been investigated. From the parent the sole product is the ketenyl anion, HC[triple bond; length as m-dash]C---O-, arising from vinylic proton abstraction and loss of CO2. From the dimethyl derivative, abstraction of an allylic proton from one of the methyl groups followed by loss of CO2 leads exclusively to CH2=CC(O)CH3. Both pathways are observed for the monomethyl derivative, leading to a mixture of the ions CH3C[triple bond; length as m-dash]C---O- and CH2=CCHO. The ketenyl and methyl ketenyl ions do not exchange hydrogen for deuterium with D2O or CH3OD, but they do react with CS2 and COS to form the corresponding thioketenyl anions, HC[triple bond; length as m-dash]C---S- and CH3C=C---S-. The ions CH2=CC(O)CH3 and CH2=CCHO exchange one and three hydrogen atoms for deuterium atoms with D2O respectively, and react with CS2 to form thioketenyl anions by addition and loss of thioformaldehyde. Possible mechanisms for these reactions are discussed.

  6. Resonant elastic X-ray scattering in chemistry and materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helliwell, J. R.; Helliwell, M.; Kaucic, V.; Logar, N. Z.

    2012-06-01

    The applications of anomalous scattering for locating metal atoms and discriminating between different elements has increased when optimised with synchrotron X-radiation.The on-resonance effect enhances the targeted elemental signal and allows small occupancies to be determined, including in situations of a mixed metal population at a single atomic site. Thus the applications of resonant elastic X-ray scattering in biological, inorganic and materials chemistry is being widely applied to single crystals, which is our emphasis, but also powders, fibres, solutions, amorphous and thin film states of matter. Recent developments have included the use of high photon energies (upto 100 keV) as well as softer X-rays (2 keV). The various instrument and technical capabilities have improved in the last 15 years. This ease of measurement of the resonant scattering signals along with absorption edge shifts indicates an expansion to the measurement of multiple data sets, to allow monitoring of redox changes. Whilst crystal structure determination in biological crystallography has been revolutionised by the MAD method, it is not a requirement for chemical or materials crystallography, as other phasing techniques are routine. Synchrotron source upgrades will allow nano-sized X-ray beams to be more widely available. The new X-ray lasers suggest new capabilities too.

  7. Modification of chitosan derivatives of environmental and biological interest: a green chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Abdelaal, Magdy Y; Sobahi, Tariq R; Al-Shareef, Hossa F

    2013-04-01

    Chitosan is a non-toxic polyaminosaccharide that is available in a variety of useful forms, and its chemical and biological properties make it a very attractive biomaterial that could be used in a wide variety of medicinal applications. This work focuses on the preparation of different chitosan derivatives by treatment with ethyl cellulose, cellulose triacetate and different carbohydrates in both neutral and slightly acidic media. It also addresses modification with glycidyltrimethyl ammonium chloride, phthalic anhydride and succinic acid derivatives. The obtained derivatives were crosslinked with glutaraldehyde. Thermo-gravimetric (TGA) and FT-IR spectroscopic analyses and electron scanning microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the obtained products and demonstrate the success of the chitosan-modification process. The obtained products were tested for their ability to uptake transition metal ions from aqueous solutions, and their ion-uptake efficiency was determined with the aid of the ICP-AES technique. The bioactivity of some selected products was tested to study the effect of their concentrations on selected microorganisms. Burkholderia cepaci, Aspergillus niger, and Candida albicans were selected as representative examples of bacteria, yeasts and fungi, respectively. PMID:23376358

  8. DOTA derivatives for site-specific biomolecule-modification via click chemistry: synthesis and comparison of reaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wängler, Carmen; Schäfer, Martin; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Bartenstein, Peter; Wängler, Björn

    2011-06-15

    Due to the high stability of its complexes with many M(2+) and M(3+)-ions, DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid) is the most commonly used chelator for the derivatization and radiolabeling of bioactive molecules. Most of the currently used DOTA derivatives comprise amine-reactive functionalities, limiting their application to the derivatization of fully protected molecules or otherwise resulting in randomly distributed conjugation sites of undefined number. Click chemistry reactions are a valuable alternative to this unspecific conjugation as they proceed efficiently and chemoselectively under mild conditions allowing a site-specific derivatization of unprotected biomolecules. In this work, we describe straightforward syntheses of DOTA derivatives containing thiol, maleimide, aminooxy, aldehyde, alkyne, and azide functionalities, amenable to the currently most often used click chemistry reactions. Furthermore, the efficiency of the respective click reactions introducing DOTA into bioactive molecules was investigated. For each of the synthesized DOTA synthons, the site-specific and efficient conjugation to Tyr(3)-octreotate could be shown. Among these, the addition and oxime formation reactions proceeded fast and without side reactions, giving the products in high yields of 64-83% after purification. The copper-catalyzed triazole formation reactions produced some side-products, giving the desired products in lower, but still reasonable overall yields of 19-25%. All synthesized peptide-DOTA-conjugates were labeled with (68)Ga in high radiochemical yields of 96-99% and high specific activities providing compounds of high purity, demonstrating the applicability of all synthons for biomolecule modification and subsequent radiolabeling. PMID:21620712

  9. Effect of Clickers "versus" Online Homework on Students' Long-Term Retention of General Chemistry Course Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebru, Misganaw T.; Phelps, Amy J.; Wulfsberg, Gary

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the effects of student response systems (clickers) "versus" online homework on students' long-term retention of General Chemistry I course material. Long-term content retention was measured by a comprehensive yearlong American Chemical Society (ACS) GC97 exam administered seven months after students had completed the General…

  10. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

  11. Sol-Gel Synthesis of a Biotemplated Inorganic Photocatalyst: A Simple Experiment for Introducing Undergraduate Students to Materials Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boffa, Vittorio; Yue, Yuanzheng; He, Wen

    2012-01-01

    As part of a laboratory course, undergraduate students were asked to use baker's yeast cells as biotemplate in preparing TiO[subscript 2] powders and to test the photocatalytic activity of the resulting materials. This laboratory experience, selected because of the important environmental implications of soft chemistry and photocatalysis, provides…

  12. Chemistry and biology of fascaplysin, a potent marine-derived CDK-4 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bharate, S B; Manda, S; Mupparapu, N; Battini, N; Vishwakarma, R A

    2012-06-01

    Marine natural products offer an abundant source of pharmacologically active agents with great diversity and complexity, and the potential to produce valuable therapeutic entities. Indole alkaloids is one of the important class of marine-derived secondary metabolites, with wide occurrence amongst variety of marine sources such as sponges, tunicates, algae, worms and microorganisms and have been extensively studied for their biological activities. Among this chemical family, a sponge-derived bis-indole alkaloid fascaplysin (1) exhibited broad range of bioactivities including antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-HIV-1-RTase, p56 tyrosine kinase inhibition, antimalarial, anti-angiogenic, antiproliferative activity against numerous cancer cell lines, specific inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (IC(50) 350 nM) and action as a DNA intercalator. In the present review, the chemical diversity of natural as well as synthetic analogues of fascaplysin has been reviewed with a detailed account on synthetic reports and pharmacological studies. Our analysis of the structure-activity relationships of this family of compounds highlights the existence of various potential leads for the development of novel anticancer agents. PMID:22512549

  13. Method for deriving information regarding stress from a stressed ferromagnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Jiles, David C.

    1991-04-30

    A non-destructive evaluation technique for deriving stress in ferromagnetic materials including deriving anhysteretic and hysteresis magnetization curves for the material in both unstressed and stressed states. The anhysteretic curve is expressed as a Langevin function. The stress is expressed as an equivalent magnetic field dependent on stress and change of magnetostriction with magnetization. By measurement of these bulk magnetic properties, stress can be derived.

  14. Method for deriving information regarding stress from a stressed ferromagnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Jiles, D.C.

    1991-04-30

    A nondestructive evaluation technique is disclosed for deriving stress in ferromagnetic materials including deriving anhysteretic and hysteresis magnetization curves for the material in both unstressed and stressed states. The anhysteretic curve is expressed as a Langevin function. The stress is expressed as an equivalent magnetic field dependent on stress and change of magnetostriction with magnetization. By measurement of these bulk magnetic properties, stress can be derived.

  15. Recent advances in the application of electron tomography to materials chemistry.

    PubMed

    Leary, Rowan; Midgley, Paul A; Thomas, John Meurig

    2012-10-16

    , have all contributed significantly to the further development of quantitative 3D studies of nanostructured materials, including nanoparticle-heterogeneous catalysts, fuel-cell components, and drug-delivery systems, as well as photovoltaic and plasmonic devices, and are likely to enhance our knowledge of many other facets of materials chemistry, such as organic-inorganic composites, solar-energy devices, bionanotechnology, biomineralization, and energy-storage systems composed of high-permittivity metal oxides. PMID:22897395

  16. Impact of human presence on secondary organic aerosols derived from ozone-initiated chemistry in a simulated office environment.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Moshood O; Weschler, Charles J; Tham, Kwok W; Wu, Wei Y; Sultan, Zuraimi M

    2013-04-16

    Several studies have documented reductions in indoor ozone levels that occur as a consequence of its reactions with the exposed skin, hair and clothing of human occupants. One would anticipate that consumption of ozone via such reactions would impact co-occurring products derived from ozone's reactions with various indoor pollutants. The present study examines this possibility for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) derived from ozone-initiated chemistry with limonene, a commonly occurring indoor terpene. The experiments were conducted at realistic ozone and limonene concentrations in a 240 m(3) chamber configured to simulate a typical open office environment. During an experiment the chamber was either unoccupied or occupied with 18-20 workers. Ozone and particle levels were continuously monitored using a UV photometric ozone analyzer and a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS), respectively. Under otherwise identical conditions, when workers were present in the simulated office the ozone concentrations were approximately two-thirds and the SOA mass concentrations were approximately one-half of those measured when the office was unoccupied. This was observed whether new or used filters were present in the air handling system. These results illustrate the importance of accounting for occupancy when estimating human exposure to pollutants in various indoor settings. PMID:23488675

  17. Synthesis and antioxidant property of novel 1,2,3-triazole-linked starch derivatives via 'click chemistry'.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenqiang; Li, Qing; Li, Wancong; Dong, Fang; Guo, Zhanyong

    2016-01-01

    Based on the copper (I) catalyzed Huisgen azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click chemistry), the novel synthesis of a variety of 1,2,3-triazole-linked starch derivatives was developed, including 6-hydroxymethyltriazole-6-deoxy starch (HMTST), 6-hydroxyethyltriazole-6-deoxy starch (HETST), 6-hydroxypropyltriazole-6-deoxy starch (HPTST), and 6-hydroxybutyltriazole-6-deoxy starch (HBTST). Their antioxidant properties against hydroxyl-radical, DPPH-radical, and superoxide-radical were evaluated in vitro, respectively. The antioxidant activity of the obtained novel amphiprotic starch derivatives via 'click reaction' exhibited remarkable improvement over starch. And the scavenging effect indices of most of the products were higher than 60% at 1.6 mg/mL against hydroxyl-radical and DPPH-radical. Moreover, the scavenging effect of the products against superoxide-radical attained 90% above at 0.1mg/mL. Generally, the antioxidant activity decreased in the order: HBTST>HPTST>HETST>HMTST>starch. Furthermore, the order of their antioxidant activity was consistent with the electron-donating ability of different substituted groups of the 1,2,3-triazoles. The substituted groups with stronger electron supplying capacity provided more electrons to the various radicals, which relatively enhanced the capacity for scavenging free radicals. PMID:26449530

  18. Characterization of surface active materials derived from farm products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface active materials obtained by chemical modification of plant protein isolates (lupin, barley, oat), corn starches (dextrin, normal, high amylose, and waxy) and soybean oil (soybean oil based polysoaps, SOPS) were investigated for their surface and interfacial properties using axisymmetric dro...

  19. Cadmium isotope fractionation of materials derived from various industrial processes.

    PubMed

    Martinková, Eva; Chrastný, Vladislav; Francová, Michaela; Šípková, Adéla; Čuřík, Jan; Myška, Oldřich; Mižič, Lukáš

    2016-01-25

    Our study represents ϵ(114/110) Cd NIST3108 values of materials resulting from anthropogenic activities such as coal burning, smelting, refining, metal coating, and the glass industry. Additionally, primary sources (ore samples, pigment, coal) processed in the industrial premises were studied. Two sphalerites, galena, coal and pigment samples exhibited ϵ(114/110) CdNIST3108 values of 1.0±0.2, 0.2±0.2, 1.3±0.1, -2.3±0.2 and -0.1±0.3, respectively. In general, all studied industrial processes were accompanied by Cd isotope fractionation. Most of the industrial materials studied were clearly distinguishable from the samples used as a primary source based on ϵ(114/110) Cd NIST3108 values. The heaviest ϵ(114/110) CdNIST3108 value of 58.6±0.9 was found for slag resulting from coal combustion, and the lightest ϵ(114/110) CdNIST3108 value of -23±2.5 was observed for waste material after Pb refinement. It is evident that ϵ(114/110) Cd NIST3108 values depend on technological processes, and in case of incomplete Cd transfer from source to final waste material, every industrial activity creates differences in Cd isotope composition. Our results show that Cd isotope analysis is a promising tool to track the origins of industrial waste products. PMID:26452089

  20. Insights into the physical chemistry of materials from advances in HAADF-STEM

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sohlberg, Karl; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Zhou, Wu; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2014-11-13

    The observation that, ‘‘New tools lead to new science’’[P. S. Weiss, ACS Nano., 2012, 6(3), 1877–1879], is perhaps nowhere more evident than in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Advances in STEM have endowed this technique with several powerful and complimentary capabilities. For example, the application of high-angle annular dark-field imaging has made possible real-space imaging at subangstrom resolution with Z-contrast (Z = atomic number). Further advances have wrought: simultaneous real-space imaging and elemental identification by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS); 3-dimensional (3D) mapping by depth sectioning; monitoring of surface diffusion by time-sequencing of images; reduced electron energy imaging formore » probing graphenes; etc. In this paper we review how these advances, often coupled with first-principles theory, have led to interesting and important new insights into the physical chemistry of materials. We then review in detail a few specific applications that highlight some of these STEM capabilities.« less

  1. Insights into the physical chemistry of materials from advances in HAADF-STEM

    SciTech Connect

    Sohlberg, Karl; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Zhou, Wu; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2014-11-13

    The observation that, ‘‘New tools lead to new science’’[P. S. Weiss, ACS Nano., 2012, 6(3), 1877–1879], is perhaps nowhere more evident than in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Advances in STEM have endowed this technique with several powerful and complimentary capabilities. For example, the application of high-angle annular dark-field imaging has made possible real-space imaging at subangstrom resolution with Z-contrast (Z = atomic number). Further advances have wrought: simultaneous real-space imaging and elemental identification by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS); 3-dimensional (3D) mapping by depth sectioning; monitoring of surface diffusion by time-sequencing of images; reduced electron energy imaging for probing graphenes; etc. In this paper we review how these advances, often coupled with first-principles theory, have led to interesting and important new insights into the physical chemistry of materials. We then review in detail a few specific applications that highlight some of these STEM capabilities.

  2. Immunity induced by a broad class of inorganic crystalline materials is directly controlled by their chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gareth R.; Fierens, Kaat; Preston, Stephen G.; Lunn, Daniel; Rysnik, Oliwia; De Prijck, Sofie; Kool, Mirjam; Buckley, Hannah C.; O’Hare, Dermot; Austyn, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    There is currently no paradigm in immunology that enables an accurate prediction of how the immune system will respond to any given agent. Here we show that the immunological responses induced by members of a broad class of inorganic crystalline materials are controlled purely by their physicochemical properties in a highly predictable manner. We show that structurally and chemically homogeneous layered double hydroxides (LDHs) can elicit diverse human dendritic cell responses in vitro. Using a systems vaccinology approach, we find that every measured response can be modeled using a subset of just three physical and chemical properties for all compounds tested. This correlation can be reduced to a simple linear equation that enables the immunological responses stimulated by newly synthesized LDHs to be predicted in advance from these three parameters alone. We also show that mouse antigen–specific antibody responses in vivo and human macrophage responses in vitro are controlled by the same properties, suggesting they may control diverse responses at both individual component and global levels of immunity. This study demonstrates that immunity can be determined purely by chemistry and opens the possibility of rational manipulation of immunity for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24799501

  3. Combining coordination and supramolecular chemistry for the formation of uranyl-organic hybrid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Deifel, N. P.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Three hybrid compounds have been synthesized through hydrothermal reactions of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O with 4-halobenzoic acid (X = Cl, Br, I). The formation of these compounds utilizes a composite synthesis methodology that explicitly employs aspects of both coordination chemistry and supramolecular chemistry (namely halogen---halogen interactions).

  4. Impact of Water Chemistry, Pipe Material and Stagnation on the Building Plumbing Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Ji, Pan; Parks, Jeffrey; Edwards, Marc A; Pruden, Amy

    2015-01-01

    A unique microbiome establishes in the portion of the potable water distribution system within homes and other buildings (i.e., building plumbing). To examine its composition and the factors that shape it, standardized cold water plumbing rigs were deployed at the treatment plant and in the distribution system of five water utilities across the U.S. Three pipe materials (copper with lead solder, CPVC with brass fittings or copper/lead combined pipe) were compared, with 8 hour flush cycles of 10 minutes to simulate typical daily use patterns. High throughput Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was employed to profile and compare the resident bulk water bacteria and archaea. The utility, location of the pipe rig, pipe material and stagnation all had a significant influence on the plumbing microbiome composition, but the utility source water and treatment practices were dominant factors. Examination of 21 water chemistry parameters suggested that the total chlorine concentration, pH, P, SO42- and Mg were associated with the most of the variation in bulk water microbiome composition. Disinfectant type exerted a notably low-magnitude impact on microbiome composition. At two utilities using the same source water, slight differences in treatment approaches were associated with differences in rare taxa in samples. For genera containing opportunistic pathogens, Utility C samples (highest pH of 9-10) had the highest frequency of detection for Legionella spp. and lowest relative abundance of Mycobacterium spp. Data were examined across utilities to identify a true universal core, special core, and peripheral organisms to deepen insight into the physical and chemical factors that shape the building plumbing microbiome. PMID:26495985

  5. Impact of Water Chemistry, Pipe Material and Stagnation on the Building Plumbing Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Pan; Parks, Jeffrey; Edwards, Marc A.; Pruden, Amy

    2015-01-01

    A unique microbiome establishes in the portion of the potable water distribution system within homes and other buildings (i.e., building plumbing). To examine its composition and the factors that shape it, standardized cold water plumbing rigs were deployed at the treatment plant and in the distribution system of five water utilities across the U.S. Three pipe materials (copper with lead solder, CPVC with brass fittings or copper/lead combined pipe) were compared, with 8 hour flush cycles of 10 minutes to simulate typical daily use patterns. High throughput Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was employed to profile and compare the resident bulk water bacteria and archaea. The utility, location of the pipe rig, pipe material and stagnation all had a significant influence on the plumbing microbiome composition, but the utility source water and treatment practices were dominant factors. Examination of 21 water chemistry parameters suggested that the total chlorine concentration, pH, P, SO42- and Mg were associated with the most of the variation in bulk water microbiome composition. Disinfectant type exerted a notably low-magnitude impact on microbiome composition. At two utilities using the same source water, slight differences in treatment approaches were associated with differences in rare taxa in samples. For genera containing opportunistic pathogens, Utility C samples (highest pH of 9–10) had the highest frequency of detection for Legionella spp. and lowest relative abundance of Mycobacterium spp. Data were examined across utilities to identify a true universal core, special core, and peripheral organisms to deepen insight into the physical and chemical factors that shape the building plumbing microbiome. PMID:26495985

  6. Chemistry and structure of coal derived asphaltenes and preasphaltenes. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    It is the objective of this project to isolate the asphaltene and preasphaltene fractions from coal liquids from a number of liquefaction processes. These processes consist of in general: catalytic hydrogenation, staged pyrolysis and solvent refining. These asphaltene fractions may be further separated by both gradient elution through column chromatography, and molecular size distribution through gel permeation chromatography. Those coal-derived asphaltene and preasphaltene fractions will be investigated by various chemical and physical methods for characterization of their structures. After the parameters are obtained, these parameters will be correlated with the refining and conversion variables which control a given type of liquefaction process. The effects of asphaltene in catalysis, ash or metal removal, desulfurization and denitrification will also be correlated. It is anticipated that understanding the role of asphaltenes in liquefaction processes will enable engineers to both improve existing processes, and to make recommendations for operational changes in planned liquefaction units in the United States. The objective of Phase 1 was to complete the isolation and separation of coal liquid fractions and to initiate their characterization. The objective of Phase 2 is to continue the characterization of coal asphaltenes and other coal liquid fractions by use of physical and instrumental methods. The structural parameters obtained will be used to postulate hypothetical average structures for coal liquid fractions. The objective of Phase 3 is to concentrate on the characterization of the preasphaltene (benzene insoluble fraction) of coal liquid fraction by the available physical and chemical methods to obtain a number of structural parameters.

  7. Coordination Chemistry and Structural Dynamics of a Long and Flexible Piperazine-Derived Ligand.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Chris S; Hamilton, Sophie E; Hicks, Jamie; Knowles, Gregory P; Chaffee, Alan L; Turner, David R; Batten, Stuart R

    2016-07-01

    A long and highly flexible internally functionalized dipyridyl ligand α,α'-p-xylylenebis(1-(4-pyridylmethylene)-piper-4-azine), L, has been employed in the synthesis of a series of coordination polymer materials with Co(II), Cd(II), and Ag(I) ions. In poly-[Cd(L)(TPA)] 1 and poly-[Co(L)(IPA)], 2, (TPA = terephthalate, IPA = isophthalate) the ligand adopts a similar linear conformation to that seen in the structure of the unbound molecule and provides a long (2.6 nm) metal-metal bridging distance. Due to the mismatch of edge lengths with that provided by the carboxylate coligands, geometric distortions from the regular dia and (4,4) network geometries for 1 and 2, respectively, are observed. In poly-[Ag2(CF3SO3)2(L)], 3, the ligand coordinates through both pyridine groups and two of the four piperazine nitrogen donors, forming a high-connectivity 2-dimensional network. The compound poly-[Ag2(L)](BF4)2·2MeCN, 4, a porous 3-dimensional cds network, undergoes a fascinating and rapid single-crystal-to-single-crystal rearrangement on exchange of the acetonitrile guests for water in ambient air, forming a nonporous hydrated network poly-[Ag2(L)](BF4)2·2H2O, 5, in which the well-ordered guest water molecules mediate the rearrangement of the tetrafluoroborate anions and the framework itself through hydrogen bonding. The dynamics of the system are examined in greater detail through the preparation of a kinetic product, the dioxane-solvated species poly-[Ag2(L)](BF4)2·2C4H8O2, 6, which undergoes a slow conversion to 5 over the course of approximately 16 h, a transition which can be monitored in real time. The reverse transformation can also be observed on immersing the hydrate 5 in dioxane. The structural features and physical properties of each of the materials can be rationalized based on the flexible and multifunctional nature of the ligand molecule, as well as the coordination behavior of the chosen metal ions. PMID:27328206

  8. Near-IR absorbing phthalocyanine derivatives as materials for organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayukh, Mayank

    2011-12-01

    Phthalocyanines (Pcs) are highly conjugated synthetic porphyrin analogs that exhibit high extinction coefficients and hole mobilities, and strong pi-pi interactions. We have developed a general method for the synthesis of peripherally functionalized Pc chromophores using 'click' chemistry, wherein an alkynyl substituted Pc is reacted with an azide, providing an elegant route to the creation of a library of numerous Pcs. We have also developed a simple route to the synthesis of tri- and tetravalent metal Pc derivatives such as titanyl phthalocyanine (TiO Pc) involving solvent-free conditions. Solvent-free conditions are environmentally friendly and industrially economical, and in the present context effectively eliminate the formation of non-metallated phthalocyanine (H 2Pc), a side product often seen in other routes that interferes with their purification. We have also prepared and characterized thin-films of some of these Pcs, TiOPcs in particular, wherein we have developed an easy route to various TiO Pc polymorphs exhibiting different near-IR sensitivities via spin-coating whose optical properties are reminiscent of Phase-I and Phase-II polymorphs of the unmodified TiOPc. Phase-II is particularly interesting as it is photoelectrically active in the near-IR region with a Q-band maximum at ca. 890 nm. We have also fabricated and characterized organic solar cells in both planar heterojunction (PHJ) and bulk heterojunction (BHJ) architectures based on one of these materials, which exhibited good near-IR photoactivity with the absorption spectrum extending up to 1 micrometer in the near-IR. The incident and absorbed photon to current efficiency (IPCE and APCE) spectra showed contributions from the TiOPc in the near-IR region with local maxima around 680 nm and 920 nm, corresponding to the Frenkel and the charge-transfer (CT) bands of the TiOPc, respectively.

  9. Humic derivatives as promising hormone-like materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroleva, R. P.; Khudaibergenova, E. M.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Jorobekova, Sh. J.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this research is to prepare novel bio-inoculants derived from coal humic substances (HS) using bio-solubilization technique. This approach can be considered to some extent as model for supply plants with available nutrients throw the mineralisation of organic matter in soils by bacteria and fungi. Screening for the stable and active microorganisms' strains possessing ability to degrade humic substances was performed. The following subjects were examined using different isolation methods: natural microbial population from city soil, wood rot of Ulmis Pamila and biohumus of vermiculture of Eisenia foetida. Approaches for monitoring the humics-solubilizing fungi growth under liquid surface conditions in the presence of HS, proper conditions of bio-solubilization technique were elaborated. Coal humic acids (HA) from oxidized brown coal (Kyrgyz deposits) were isolated and added to a Czapek nutrient broth which was used either in full strength or without nitrogen source. The individual flasks were inoculated with natural microbial populations of corresponding cultivated soil, biohumus and wood rot samples for 12 months. Evaluation of phyto-hormonal activity of the produced HS and their derivatives in respect to higher plants with auxine and gibberellic tests was performed. To characterize structure of the biopreparations obtained, an experimental approach was undertaken that implies application of different complementary techniques for the structural analysis of biopreparations. As those were used: elemental and functional analysis, FTIR and 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography. According to the elemental composition of HS recovered from microbial cultures, a decrease in carbon and a significant increase of nitrogen in HS reisolated from the full strength broth inoculated with wood-decay microorganisms has been found. If biohumus microorganisms were used as inoculum, only minor changes were detected in the elemental composition of HS. A

  10. Identifying and Dealing with Hazardous Materials and Procedures in the General Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David A.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of freshman chemistry laboratory manuals identified 15 questionable laboratory procedures, including the use of potentially hazardous chemicals. Alternatives are suggested for each hazard discussed (such as using a substitute solvent for benzene). (SK)

  11. Bentonite-derived high-temperature structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delixiati, Ailipati

    This thesis provides new information that is relevant to the science and applications of hot-pressed bentonite and hot-pressed organobentonite, which are emerging high-temperature structural materials. The hot pressing involves no binder. The hardness, coefficient of friction, wear resistance and scratch resistance are greater for hot-pressed bentonite than hot-pressed organobentonite. This means that the resistance to strain-induced damage is superior for hot-pressed bentonite. Hot-pressed organobentonite exhibits a degree of lubricity. The modulus is higher for hot-pressed organobentonite than hot-pressed bentonite. The energy dissipation, deformability and degree of reversibility of the deformation are similar for hot-pressed bentonite and hot-pressed organobentonite. The values of the modulus and hardness of hot-pressed bentonite and hot-pressed organobentonite are lower than those of alumina, but are higher than those of polycrystalline graphite. The energy dissipation and deformability of hot-pressed bentonite or hot-pressed organobentonite are higher than those of alumina, but are lower than those of polycrystalline graphite. The values of the coefficient of friction of hot-pressed bentonite and hot-pressed organobentonite are higher than those of Inconel and stainless steel, and are much higher than that of polycrystalline graphite. The wear resistance of hot-pressed bentonite is similar to that of Inconel and stainless steel. The wear resistance of hot-pressed organobentonite is inferior to these, but is superior to that of polycrystalline graphite. The temperature rise upon friction/wear for hot-pressed bentonite and hot-pressed organobentonite is lower than that of Inconel, but is similar to those of stainless steel and is higher than that of polycrystalline graphite. The through-thickness relative dielectric constant is essentially equal (9) for hot-pressed bentonite and hot-pressed organobentonite. Both through-thickness and in-plane resistivities are

  12. Reduction biodegradable brushed PDMAEMA derivatives synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization and click chemistry for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Xu, Yanglin; Yang, Qizhi; Li, Cao; Hennink, Wim E; Zhuo, Renxi; Jiang, Xulin

    2013-08-01

    Novel reducible and degradable brushed poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as non-viral gene delivery vectors. First, alkyne-functionalized poly(aspartic acid) with a disulfide linker between the propargyl group and backbone poly([(propargyl carbamate)-cystamine]-α,β-aspartamide) (P(Asp-SS-AL)) was synthesized. Second, linear low molecular weight (LMW) monoazido-functionalized PDMAEMAs synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization were conjugated to the polypeptide side-chains of P(Asp-SS-AL) via click chemistry to yield high molecular weight (HMW) polyaspartamide-based disulfide-containing brushed PDMAEMAs (PAPDEs). The PAPDEs were able to condense plasmid DNA to form 100 to 200nm polyplexes with positive ζ-potentials. Moreover, in the presence of dithiothreitol the PAPDEs degraded into LMW PDAMEMA, resulting in disintegration of the PAPDE/DNA polyplexes and subsequent release of plasmid DNA. In vitro experiments revealed that the PAPDEs were less cytotoxic and more effective in gene transfection than control 25kDa poly(ethyleneimine) and HMW linear PDMAEMA. In conclusion, reducible and degradable polycations composed of LMW PDMAEMAs coupled to a polypeptide backbone via reduction-sensitive disulfide bonds are effective gene vectors with an excellent cytocompatibility. PMID:23660547

  13. Designing green derivatives of β-blocker Metoprolol: a tiered approach for green and sustainable pharmacy and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Tushar; Leder, Christoph; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    The presences of micro-pollutants (active pharmaceutical ingredients, APIs) are increasingly seen as a challenge of the sustainable management of water resources worldwide due to ineffective effluent treatment and other measures for their input prevention. Therefore, novel approaches are needed like designing greener pharmaceuticals, i.e. better biodegradability in the environment. This study addresses a tiered approach of implementing green and sustainable chemistry principles for theoretically designing better biodegradable and pharmacologically improved pharmaceuticals. Photodegradation process coupled with LC-MS(n) analysis and in silico tools such as quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) analysis and molecular docking proved to be a very significant approach for the preliminary stages of designing chemical structures that would fit into the "benign by design" concept in the direction of green and sustainable pharmacy. Metoprolol (MTL) was used as an example, which itself is not readily biodegradable under conditions found in sewage treatment and the aquatic environment. The study provides the theoretical design of new derivatives of MTL which might have the same or improved pharmacological activity and are more degradable in the environment than MTL. However, the in silico toxicity prediction by QSAR of those photo-TPs indicated few of them might be possibly mutagenic and require further testing. This novel approach of theoretically designing 'green' pharmaceuticals can be considered as a step forward towards the green and sustainable pharmacy field. However, more knowledge and further experience have to be collected on the full scope, opportunities and limitations of this approach. PMID:24997957

  14. GAS PHASE EXPOSURE HISTORY DERIVED FROM MATERIAL PHASE CONCENTRATION PROFILES USING SOLID PHASE MICRO-EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: F8P31059
    Title: Gas Phase Exposure History Derived from Material Phase Concentration Profiles Using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): Jonathan Lewis McKinney
    Institution: University of Missouri - ...

  15. Biodesulfurization of water-soluble coal-derived material by Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II; Jackowski, K.

    1991-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 was previously isolated because of its ability to use coal as its sole source of sulfur for growth. Subsequent growth studies have revealed that IGTS8 is capable of using a variety of organosulfur compounds as sources of sulfur but not carbon. In this paper, the ability of IGTS8 to selectively remove organic sulfur from water-soluble coal-derived material is investigated. The microbial removal of organic sulfur from coal requires microorganisms capable of cleaving carbonsulfur bonds and the accessibility of these bonds to microorganisms. The use of water-soluble coal-derived material effectively overcomes the problem of accessibility and allows the ability of microorganisms to cleave carbonsulfur bonds present in coal-derived material to be assessed directly. Three coals, two coal solubilization procedures, and two methods of biodesulfurization were examined. The results of these experiments reveal that the microbial removal of significant amounts of organic sulfur from watersoluble coal-derived material with treatment times as brief as 24 hours is possible. Moreover, the carbon content and calorific value of biotreated products are largely unaffected. Biotreatment does, however, result in increases in the hydrogen and nitrogen content and a decreased oxygen content of the coal-derived material. The aqueous supernatant obtained from biodesulfurization experiments does not contain sulfate, sulfite, or other forms of soluble sulfur at increased concentrations in comparison with control samples. Sulfur removed from water-soluble coal-derived material appears to be incorporated into biomass.

  16. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  17. Impact of reaction products from building materials and furnishings on indoor air quality—A review of recent advances in indoor chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhde, E.; Salthammer, T.

    The variety of chemical substances present in modern building products, household products and furnishings provides potential for chemical reactions in the material (case 1), on the material surface (case 2) and in the gas phase (case 3). Such "indoor chemistry" is known as one of the main reasons for primary and secondary emissions. The conditions of production often cause unwanted side reactions and a number of new compounds can be found in finished products. Elevated temperatures are responsible for the degradation of cellulose, decomposition of non-heat-resistant additives and other thermally induced reactions like Diels-Alder synthesis. Heterogeneous chemistry takes place on the surface of materials. Well-known examples are the formation of aliphatic aldehydes from the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids or the cleavage of photoinitiators under the influence of light. In case of composite flooring structures hydrolysis is one of the major pathways for the appearance of alcohols from esters. If different kinds of material are fixed together, emissions of new VOCs formed by inter-species reactions are possible. Other indoor air pollutants are formed by rearrangement of cleavage products or by metabolism. Compounds with -C dbnd C- bonds like terpenes, styrene, 4-phenylcyclohexene, etc. undergo gas phase reactions with O 3, NO x, OH and other reactive gases. It has been shown that such products derived from indoor-related reactions may have a negative impact on indoor air quality due to their low odor threshold or health-related properties. Therefore, the understanding of primary and secondary emissions and the chemical processes behind is essential for the evaluation of indoor air quality. This publication gives an overview on the current state of research and new findings regarding primary and secondary emissions from building products and furnishings.

  18. Patients’ Attitudes toward the Donation of Biological Materials for the Derivation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Ishan; Bollinger, Juli; Mathews, Debra J.H.; Neumann, Neil M.; Rattani, Abbas; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Although academics have raised ethical issues with iPSCs, patients’ perspectives on them and their attitudes toward donating biological materials for iPSC research are unclear. Here, we provide such information to aid in developing policies for consent, collection, and use of biological materials for deriving iPSCs based on patient focus groups. PMID:24388172

  19. The separate and collective effects of personalization, personification, and gender on learning with multimedia chemistry instructional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halkyard, Shannon

    Chemistry is a difficult subject to learn and teach for students in general. Additionally, female students are under-represented in chemistry and the physical sciences. Within chemistry, atomic and electronic structure is a key concept and several recommendations in the literature describe how this topic can be taught better. These recommendations can be employed in multimedia instructional materials designed following principles understood through the Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning. Additionally, these materials can expand the known use of principles like personalization (addressing the learner as "you") and test prospective design principles like personification (referring to abstract objects like atoms as "she" or "he"). The purpose of this study was to use the recommendations on teaching atomic and electronic structure along with known multimedia design principles to create multimedia chemistry learning materials that can be used to test the use of personalization and personification both separately and together. The study also investigated how learning with these materials might be different for male and female students. A sample of 329 students from private northern California high schools were given an atomic structure pre-test, watched a multimedia chemistry instructional video, and took a post-test on atomic structure. Students were randomly assigned to watch one of six versions of the instructional video. Students in the six groups were compared using ANOVA procedures and no significant differences were found. Males were compared to females for the six different treatment conditions and the most significant difference was for the treatment that combined personalization (you) and female personification (she), with a medium effect size (Cohen's d=0.65). Males and females were then compared separately across the six groups using ANOVA procedures and t-tests. A significant difference was found for female students using the treatment that combined

  20. Exploring the synthesis and characterization of nanoenergetic materials from sol-gel chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Jeremy D.

    Nanoenergetic composite materials have been synthesized by a sol-gel chemical process where the addition of a weak base molecule induces the gelation of a hydrated metal salt solution. A proposed 'proton scavenging' mechanism, where a weak base molecule extracts a proton from the coordination sphere of the hydrated iron (III) complex in the gelation process to form iron (III) oxide/hydroxide, FeIIIxOyHz, has been confirmed for the weak base propylene oxide (PO), a 1,2 epoxide, as well as for the weak bases tetrahydrofuran (THF), a 1,4 epoxide, and pyridine, a heterocyclic nitrogen-containing compound. Gelation mechanisms for the formation of FeIIIxOyHz from THF and pyridine have been presented and confirmed through pH, XPS, and IR studies. THF follows a similar mechanism as PO, where the epoxide extracts a proton from the coordination sphere of the hydrated iron complex forming a protonated epoxide, which then undergoes irreversible ring-opening after reaction with a nucleophile in solution. Pyridine also extracts a proton from the hydrated metal complex, however, the stable six-membered molecule has low associated ring strain and does not endure ring-opening. Energetic properties for the Fe2O3/Al and RuO 2/Al sol-gel synthesized systems are also presented. Sol-gel chemistry synthesizes x-ray amorphous oxide matrices which contain substantial quantities of residual water and organic species. The iron (III) matrix, formed from the addition of a weak base epoxide molecule to a hydrated iron (III) nitrate solution, consists of stoichiometric Fe2O3, FeO(OH), and Fe(OH)3 and can only definitely be described as of Fe IIIxOyHz. XPS characterization of the metal oxide matrix synthesized from the addition of the weak base propylene oxide to a hydrated ruthenium (III) chloride solution corresponds to that of hydrous ruthenium (IV) oxide. Fe2O3/Al energetic systems were synthesized from the epoxides PO, trimethylene oxide (TMO) and 3,3 dimethyl oxetane (DMO). Energetic

  1. Tracking of Drug Release and Material Fate for Naturally Derived Omega-3 Fatty Acid Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Keith M; Artzi, Natalie; Beck, Moshe; Beckerman, Rita; Moodie, Geoff; Albergo, Theresa; Conroy, Suzanne; Dale, Alicia; Corbeil, Scott; Martakos, Paul; Edelman, Elazer R

    2016-03-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted on omega-3 fatty acid-derived biomaterials to determine their utility as an implantable material for adhesion prevention following soft tissue hernia repair and as a means to allow for the local delivery of antimicrobial or antibiofilm agents. Naturally derived biomaterials offer several advantages over synthetic materials in the field of medical device development. These advantages include enhanced biocompatibility, elimination of risks posed by the presence of toxic catalysts and chemical crosslinking agents, and derivation from renewable resources. Omega-3 fatty acids are readily available from fish and plant sources and can be used to create implantable biomaterials either as a stand-alone device or as a device coating that can be utilized in local drug delivery applications. In-depth characterization of material erosion degradation over time using non-destructive imaging and chemical characterization techniques provided mechanistic insight into material structure: function relationship. This in turn guided rational tailoring of the material based on varying fatty acid composition to control material residence time and hence drug release. These studies demonstrate the utility of omega-3 fatty acid derived biomaterials as an absorbable material for soft tissue hernia repair and drug delivery applications. PMID:26502170

  2. A comparison of the inflammatory potential of particulates derived from two composite materials.

    PubMed

    Moore, R; Beredjiklian, P; Rhoad, R; Theiss, S; Cuckler, J; Ducheyne, P; Baker, D G

    1997-02-01

    In order to develop total joint prostheses with moduli of elasticity close to bone while retaining excellent strength characteristics, composite materials are being developed. Composites consist of graphite fibers embedded in a polymer matrix. We studied the inflammatory potential of particulates derived from two composites with different matrix components, polysulfone (PFS) and polyetherketoneketone (PEKK), in the rat subcutaneous air pouch model. Neat components of the composites were studied separately in the air pouch. Particulates also were studied in culture using the macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, adherent synovial cells (ASC), and human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Particles derived from the PEKK-containing composite material consistently were less inflammatory than the PFS composite-derived particles, as measured by PMN infiltration, neutral metalloprotease activity, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activity, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) accumulation. Results from the neat materials confirmed the findings in the composite-derived material. PEKK composite-derived material produced less TNF from macrophage cultures, but there were no significant differences noted in PGE2 production from ASC or in superoxide anion generation from PMNs. Particles from both PSF and PEKK produced minimal inflammatory responses in the rat subcutaneous air pouch. PEKK elicited a response virtually the same as the saline control and significantly less than that produced by particles of PSF. PMID:9029292

  3. Optimizing the formula of rare earth-bearing materials: A computational chemistry investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolus, Marjorie; Defranceschi, Mireille

    We present a computational investigation into the nature of bonds formed by rare earth elements (REE) in materials. This study focuses on the incorporation of neodymium in minerals called apatites, which are derived from fluorapatite: Ca10(PO4)6F2. These minerals, which allow many substitutions on all three Ca, P, and F sites, are considered as potential host phases for radioactive elements separated from nuclear waste. Nd and trivalent actinides have very similar physical and chemical properties, and Nd is not radioactive and much more easily handled. It is therefore very often used as a surrogate for actinides with oxidation degree three in experimental studies. Several formulas can be considered to substitute Nd3+ to Ca2+ and maintain charge balance of the apatite. Existing experimental and theoretical studies, however, mostly concern the Ca9Nd(PO4)5SiO4F2 formula, where the Nd incorporation is compensated by the replacement of one PO43- by a SiO44- group. Moreover, only the cation position has been studied, whereas the silicate position and its influence on stability are unknown. We present a more general investigation of possible charge compensations on the one hand, and of the various resulting configurations on the other. All possible configurations of the two formulas Ca9Nd(PO4)5 SiO4F2 and Ca8NdNa(PO4)6F2 have been considered. Calculations have been performed within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). A computation scheme that permits good accuracy in these systems within reasonable computation times is determined. The results obtained for cohesion energies, geometries, and electronic densities are discussed. As for the formulation, it is shown that the Ca8NdNa(PO4)6F2 formula is less stable than the fluorapatite, while Ca9Nd(PO4)5 SiO4F2 is more stable. For the structures, it is found that Nd substitutes preferably in the second cationic site. Moreover, the most stable structures exhibit the shortest Na-Nd or Nd-Si distances. Local charge

  4. Low-temperature structural phase transitions in crystalline bromo and iodo 9-hydroxyphenalenone derivatives: Quantum chemistry employment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolin, S. P.; Khrulev, A. A.; Polyakov, E. V.; Mikhailova, T. Yu.; Levin, A. A.

    The model approaches and quantum chemical calculations are employed to explain the peculiarities of the ferroelectric behavior of new ?zero-dimensional? H-bonded materials, i.e., 5-bromo and 5-iodo derivatives of 9-hydroxyphenalenone (9HPO) and its deuteroxy analogue (9DPO). The tunneling parameters ? (H/D) and the Ising model coupling parameters Jij are evaluated and discussed. Analysis of these parameters for the hydroxy and deuteroxy species demonstrates the quantum paraelectric behavior of both Br and I 9HPO derivatives due to the large values of the ?(H)/J0 relation, where J0 is the molecular field parameter describing the coupling of any given H-bond proton with all rest ones. In contrast, small values ?(D)/J0 for their 9DPO analogues favor the low-temperature structural phase transition into an ordered phase, which has a rather antiferroelectric than ferroelectric character. The estimates obtained and the resulting conclusions are in line with the overall observed trends in behavior of the substances under examination that emerge from the available experimental data.

  5. Molecular environmental science using synchrotron radiation:Chemistry and physics of waste form materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lindle, Dennis W.; Shuh, David K.

    2005-02-28

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization [1]. Specially formulated glass compositions, many of which have been derived from glass developed for commercial purposes, and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites, will be the main recipients for these wastes. The performance characteristics of waste-form glasses and ceramics are largely determined by the loading capacity for the waste constituents (radioactive and non-radioactive) and the resultant chemical and radiation resistance of the waste-form package to leaching (durability). There are unique opportunities for the use of near-edge soft-x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate speciation of low-Z elements forming the backbone of waste-form glasses and ceramics. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary technique employed to obtain speciation information from low-Z elements in waste forms, NMR is incompatible with the metallic impurities contained in real waste and is thus limited to studies of idealized model systems. In contrast, NEXAFS can yield element-specific speciation information from glass constituents without sensitivity to paramagnetic species. Development and use of NEXAFS for eventual studies of real waste glasses has significant implications, especially for the low-Z elements comprising glass matrices [5-7]. The NEXAFS measurements were performed at Beamline 6.3.1, an entrance-slitless bend-magnet beamline operating from 200 eV to 2000 eV with a Hettrick-Underwood varied-line-space (VLS) grating monochromator, of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. Complete characterization and optimization of this beamline was conducted to enable high-performance measurements.

  6. Osteogenic Embryoid Body-Derived Material Induces Bone Formation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sutha, Ken; Schwartz, Zvi; Wang, Yun; Hyzy, Sharon; Boyan, Barbara D.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    The progressive loss of endogenous regenerative capacity that accompanies mammalian aging has been attributed at least in part to alterations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of adult tissues. Thus, creation of a more regenerative microenvironment, analogous to embryonic morphogenesis, may be achieved via pluripotent embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation and derivation of devitalized materials as an alternative to decellularized adult tissues, such as demineralized bone matrix (DBM). Transplantation of devitalized ESC materials represents a novel approach to promote functional tissue regeneration and reduce the inherent batch-to-batch variability of allograft-derived materials. In this study, the osteoinductivity of embryoid body-derived material (EBM) was compared to DBM in a standard in vivo ectopic osteoinduction assay in nude mice. EBM derived from EBs differentiated for 10 days with osteogenic media (+β-glycerophosphate) exhibited similar osteoinductivity to active DBM (osteoinduction score = 2.50 ± 0.27 vs. 2.75 ± 0.16) based on histological scoring, and exceeded inactive DBM (1.13 ± 0.13, p < 0.005). Moreover, EBM stimulated formation of new bone, ossicles, and marrow spaces, similar to active DBM. The potent osteoinductivity of EBM demonstrates that morphogenic factors expressed by ESCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation yield a novel devitalized material capable of stimulating de novo bone formation in vivo. PMID:25961152

  7. Optical Fiber Chemical Sensor with Sol-Gel Derived Refractive Material as Transducer for High Temperature Gas Sensing in Clean Coal Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shiquan Tao

    2006-12-31

    The chemistry of sol-gel derived silica and refractive metal oxide has been systematically studied. Sol-gel processes have been developed for preparing porous silica and semiconductor metal oxide materials. Micelle/reversed micelle techniques have been developed for preparing nanometer sized semiconductor metal oxides and noble metal particles. Techniques for doping metal ions, metal oxides and nanosized metal particles into porous sol-gel material have also been developed. Optical properties of sol-gel derived materials in ambient and high temperature gases have been studied by using fiber optic spectroscopic techniques, such as fiber optic ultraviolet/visible absorption spectrometry, fiber optic near infrared absorption spectrometry and fiber optic fluorescence spectrometry. Fiber optic spectrometric techniques have been developed for investigating the optical properties of these sol-gel derived materials prepared as porous optical fibers or as coatings on the surface of silica optical fibers. Optical and electron microscopic techniques have been used to observe the microstructure, such as pore size, pore shape, sensing agent distribution, of sol-gel derived material, as well as the size and morphology of nanometer metal particle doped in sol-gel derived porous silica, the nature of coating of sol-gel derived materials on silica optical fiber surface. In addition, the chemical reactions of metal ion, nanostructured semiconductor metal oxides and nanometer sized metal particles with gas components at room temperature and high temperatures have also been investigated with fiber optic spectrometric methods. Three classes of fiber optic sensors have been developed based on the thorough investigation of sol-gel chemistry and sol-gel derived materials. The first group of fiber optic sensors uses porous silica optical fibers doped with metal ions or metal oxide as transducers for sensing trace NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S in high temperature gas samples. The second group of

  8. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxyselenophene) and its derivatives: novel organic electronic materials.

    PubMed

    Patra, Asit; Bendikov, Michael; Chand, Suresh

    2014-05-20

    Since the discovery of high conductivity in iodine-doped polyacetylene, many interesting conducting polymers have been developed. Of these, polythiophenes have been most studied as electronic materials, with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and the water-soluble PEDOT-PSS being the most successful commercially used conducting polymers. The polyselenophene family together with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxyselenophene) (PEDOS) and its derivatives have been shown to have slightly different properties compared to these of polythiophene and PEDOT because of their different electron donating characters, aromaticities (selenophene vs thiophene), oxidation potentials, electronegativities, and polarizabilities (Se vs S). As a result, the polyselenophenes, especially PEDOS and its derivatives, show a lower band gap and higher-lying highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) levels compared with those of thiophene and the PEDOT family. In an organic materials context, the PEDOS family offers some advantages over PEDOT derivatives. This Account draws on computational studies, synthetic methods, electrochemical polymerizations, chemical polymerizations, and the materials properties of PEDOS and its derivatives to demonstrate the importance of these novel materials, which lie at the frontier of conducting polymer research. In particular, we show that (i) PEDOS derivatives have a lower band gap (about 0.2 eV) than the corresponding PEDOT derivatives. Consequently, PEDOS derivatives can absorb the solar spectrum more efficiently compared to PEDOT derivatives and the properties of optoelectronic devices based on neutral and doped PEDOS should be somewhat different from these of PEDOT. (ii) EDOS derivatives have a greater tendency to undergo electrochemical polymerization compared to EDOT derivatives and offer stable and smooth polymer films. (iii) The PEDOS backbone is more rigid than the PEDOT backbone. (iv) PEDOS derivatives are excellent electrochromic materials with high

  9. Peptide interfaces with graphene: an emerging intersection of analytical chemistry, theory, and materials.

    PubMed

    Russell, Shane R; Claridge, Shelley A

    2016-04-01

    Because noncovalent interface functionalization is frequently required in graphene-based devices, biomolecular self-assembly has begun to emerge as a route for controlling substrate electronic structure or binding specificity for soluble analytes. The remarkable diversity of structures that arise in biological self-assembly hints at the possibility of equally diverse and well-controlled surface chemistry at graphene interfaces. However, predicting and analyzing adsorbed monolayer structures at such interfaces raises substantial experimental and theoretical challenges. In contrast with the relatively well-developed monolayer chemistry and characterization methods applied at coinage metal surfaces, monolayers on graphene are both less robust and more structurally complex, levying more stringent requirements on characterization techniques. Theory presents opportunities to understand early binding events that lay the groundwork for full monolayer structure. However, predicting interactions between complex biomolecules, solvent, and substrate is necessitating a suite of new force fields and algorithms to assess likely binding configurations, solvent effects, and modulations to substrate electronic properties. This article briefly discusses emerging analytical and theoretical methods used to develop a rigorous chemical understanding of the self-assembly of peptide-graphene interfaces and prospects for future advances in the field. PMID:26781102

  10. Hexaazatrinaphthylene Derivatives: Efficient Electron-Transporting Materials with Tunable Energy Levels for Inverted Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongbing; Zhu, Zonglong; Kuo, Ming-Yu; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2016-07-25

    Hexaazatrinaphthylene (HATNA) derivatives have been successfully shown to function as efficient electron-transporting materials (ETMs) for perovskite solar cells (PVSCs). The cells demonstrate a superior power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 17.6 % with negligible hysteresis. This study provides one of the first nonfullerene small-molecule-based ETMs for high-performance p-i-n PVSCs. PMID:27273656

  11. Identification of fractional-derivative-model parameters of viscoelastic materials from measured FRFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Yong; Lee, Doo-Ho

    2009-07-01

    The dynamic properties of viscoelastic damping materials are highly frequency- and temperature-dependent. Numerical methods of structural and acoustic systems require the mathematical model for these dependencies. The fractional-derivative model on damping material has become a powerful solution that describes the frequency-dependent dynamic characteristics of damping materials. The model parameters on a damping material are very important information both for describing the responses of damped structures and in the design of damped structures. The authors proposed an efficient identification method of the material parameters using an optimization technique, showing its applicability through numerical studies in a previous work. In this study, the proposed procedure is applied to a damping material to identify the fractional-derivative-model parameters of viscoelastic materials. In the proposed method, frequency response functions (FRFs) are measured via a cantilever beam impact test. The FRFs on the points identical to those measured are calculated using an FE model with the equivalent stiffness approach. The differences between the measured and the calculated FRFs are minimized using a gradient-based optimization algorithm in order to estimate the true values of the parameters. The FRFs of a damped beam structure are measured in an environmental chamber at different temperatures and used as reference responses. A light impact hammer and a laser vibrometer are used to measure the reference responses. Both linear and nonlinear relationships between the logarithmically scaled shift factors and temperatures are examined during the identification of the material parameters. The applied results show that the proposed method accurately identifies the fractional-derivative-model parameters of a viscoelastic material.

  12. Small Molecule Signaling Agents: The Integrated Chemistry and Biochemistry of Nitrogen Oxides, Oxides of Carbon, Dioxygen, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Their Derived Species

    PubMed Central

    Fukuto, Jon M.; Carrington, Samantha J.; Tantillo, Dean J.; Harrison, Jason G.; Ignarro, Louis J.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Andrew; Wink, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Several small molecule species formally known primarily as toxic gases have, over the past 20 years, been shown to be endogenously generated signaling molecules. The biological signaling associated with the small molecules NO, CO, H2S (and the nonendogenously generated O2), and their derived species have become a topic of extreme interest. It has become increasingly clear that these small molecule signaling agents form an integrated signaling web that affects/regulates numerous physiological processes. The chemical interactions between these species and each other or biological targets is an important factor in their roles as signaling agents. Thus, a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of these molecules is essential to understanding their biological/physiological utility. This review focuses on this chemistry and attempts to establish the chemical basis for their signaling functions. PMID:22263838

  13. New dimensions in chemistry of materials with lanthanide-chalcogen bonds: Highly emissive molecules, clusters and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Santanu

    This thesis presents the synthesis and characterization of materials having bonds between hard, electropositive lanthanide metal cations and soft, covalent chalcogen based ligands and a study of their electronic properties. Molecular Ln chalcogenido chalcogenolate clusters LnxEy(ER) z(Ln=La-Lu; E=S,Se,Te; R=C6H5, C6F 5), oxo-ligand containing clusters [LnxEyO z(ER)n,LnxEyOz] and heterovalent clusters [Ln(II)/Ln(III)x (ER)y, Ln(II)/Ln(III) xEy(ER)z, Ln(II)/Ln'(III)x(ER) z Ln(II)/Ln'(III)xEy(ER)z] have been isolated and characterized. These compounds are useful in terms of interpreting the nature of the Ln-E bond and for correlating the physical properties of molecular lanthanide chalcogenolates [Ln(EPh)x] with those of LnxEy solid state materials. Also thermal decomposition of these clusters was investigated to establish the utility of the molecular materials as precursors to solid state materials. In addition to synthesis and structural chemistry, the photoluminescence properties of these compounds were studied in detail. The results of optical studies of different lanthanide compounds with chalcogenido, fluorinated thiolate and mu-Oxo ligands are reported here. Electronic characterization of these materials involves UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy, emission spectroscopy using LASER diode sources, optical gain and fluorescence decay time measurements.

  14. Chitin, Chitosan, and Its Derivatives for Wound Healing: Old and New Materials

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Kazuo; Izumi, Ryotaro; Osaki, Tomohiro; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Minami, Saburo; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Chitin (β-(1-4)-poly-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) is widely distributed in nature and is the second most abundant polysaccharide after cellulose. It is often converted to its more deacetylated derivative, chitosan. Previously, many reports have indicated the accelerating effects of chitin, chitosan, and its derivatives on wound healing. More recently, chemically modified or nano-fibrous chitin and chitosan have been developed, and their effects on wound healing have been evaluated. In this review, the studies on the wound-healing effects of chitin, chitosan, and its derivatives are summarized. Moreover, the development of adhesive-based chitin and chitosan are also described. The evidence indicates that chitin, chitosan, and its derivatives are beneficial for the wound healing process. More recently, it is also indicate that some nano-based materials from chitin and chitosan are beneficial than chitin and chitosan for wound healing. Clinical applications of nano-based chitin and chitosan are also expected. PMID:25780874

  15. A comprehensive review on biosorption of heavy metals by algal biomass: materials, performances, chemistry, and modeling simulation tools.

    PubMed

    He, Jinsong; Chen, J Paul

    2014-05-01

    Heavy metals contamination has become a global issue of concern due to their higher toxicities, nature of non-biodegradability, high capabilities in bioaccumulation in human body and food chain, and carcinogenicities to humans. A series of researches demonstrate that biosorption is a promising technology for removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions. Algae serve as good biosorbents due to their abundance in seawater and fresh water, cost-effectiveness, reusability and high metal sorption capacities. This article provides a comprehensive review of recent findings on performances, applications and chemistry of algae (e.g., brown, green and red algae, modified algae and the derivatives) for sequestration of heavy metals. Biosorption kinetics and equilibrium models are reviewed. The mechanisms for biosorption are presented. Biosorption is a complicated process involving ion-exchange, complexation and coordination. Finally the theoretical simulation tools for biosorption equilibrium and kinetics are presented so that the readers can use them for further studies. PMID:24630371

  16. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the Ventron site

    SciTech Connect

    Loureiro, C.; Yu, C.; Jones, L.

    1992-03-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the Ventron site in Beverly, Massachusetts. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The derivations for the single radionuclides and the total uranium guidelines were based on the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Ventron site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following remedial action. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation.

  17. Derivation of primary magmas and melting of crustal materials on Venus - Some preliminary petrogenetic considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Paul C.; Head, James W.

    1990-01-01

    As an aid to understanding crustal formation and evolution processes on Venus, a general paradigm is developed for the derivation of primary magmas, and the range of possibilities of conditions for remelting of crustal materials and the evolution of the products of remelting. The present knowledge of the bulk and surface composition is used as a basis. A wide range of magma types is possible for the range of conditions of derivation of primary magmas and crustal remelting and no magma type can be arbitrarily excluded from consideration on Venus. The composition of Venus and the nature of source materials for melting, the melting of mantle material peridotites, and the melting of basalts including tholeiites and modified basalts are discussed. Magmatic differentiation is considered, and a comparison to terrestrial magmatic environments is conducted. It is concluded the magnetic and volcanic activity on Venus could be very similar to that on the earth, although eruption styles are expected to vary due to environmental conditions.

  18. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmagadda, M.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Single nuclide and total uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the former Alba Craft Laboratory site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios (Yu et al. 1993). The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation.

  19. A Guided Materials Screening Approach for Developing Quantitative Sol-gel Derived Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Helka, Blake-Joseph; Brennan, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have found use in the development of high-throughput assays for new materials and discovery of small-molecule drug leads. Herein we describe a guided material screening approach to identify sol-gel based materials that are suitable for producing three-dimensional protein microarrays. The approach first identifies materials that can be printed as microarrays, narrows down the number of materials by identifying those that are compatible with a given enzyme assay, and then hones in on optimal materials based on retention of maximum enzyme activity. This approach is applied to develop microarrays suitable for two different enzyme assays, one using acetylcholinesterase and the other using a set of four key kinases involved in cancer. In each case, it was possible to produce microarrays that could be used for quantitative small-molecule screening assays and production of dose-dependent inhibitor response curves. Importantly, the ability to screen many materials produced information on the types of materials that best suited both microarray production and retention of enzyme activity. The materials data provide insight into basic material requirements necessary for tailoring optimal, high-density sol-gel derived microarrays. PMID:24022739

  20. The Effects of Surface Chemistry on the Properties of Proteins Confined in Nano-porous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Latasha M; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2007-01-01

    The entrapment of proteins using the sol-gel route provides a means to retain its native properties and artificially reproduce the molecular crowding and confinement experienced by proteins in the cell allowing investigation of the physico-chemical and structural properties of biomolecules at the biotic/abiotic interface. The biomolecules are spatially separated and 'caged' in the gel structure but solutes can freely permeate the matrix. Thus, properties such as the folding of ensembles of individual molecules can be examined in the absence of aggregation effects that can occur in solution studies. Green fluorescent protein from Aequorea coerulescens was used as a model protein to examine the unfolding/re-folding properties of protein in silica gels. The recombinant protein was isolated and purified from Escherichia coli extracts by cell lysis, three-phase partitioning, dialysis, and anion exchange chromatography. The purity of the protein was greater than 90% as judged by SDS PAGE gel analysis. Sol-gels were synthesized using tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) in combination with, methyltrimethoxyorthosilane (MTMOS), ethyltrimethoxyorthosilane (ETMOS), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The acid induced denaturation and renaturation of GFP was analyzed by UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. No renaturation was observed in gels that were made with TMOS only, and in the presence of APTES, MTMOS, and ETMOS. However, in gels that were made with GPTMS, the CD and UV-visible spectra indicated that the protein had refolded. The fluorescence emission spectrum indicated that approximately 20% of fluorescence had returned. This study highlights the importance of the surface chemistry of the silica gels for the refolding properties of the entrapped GFP. Future studies will investigate the effect of surface chemistry on the thermal and solvent stability of the entrapped protein.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF SURFACE CHEMISTRY ON THE PROPERTIES OF PROTEINS CONFINED IN NANO-POROUS MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, L. M.; O'Neill, H.

    2007-01-01

    The entrapment of proteins using the sol-gel route provides a means to retain its native properties and artifi cially reproduce the molecular crowding and confi nement experienced by proteins in the cell allowing investigation of the physico-chemical and structural properties of biomolecules at the biotic/abiotic interface. The biomolecules are spatially separated and ‘caged’ in the gel structure but solutes can freely permeate the matrix. Thus, properties such as the folding of ensembles of individual molecules can be examined in the absence of aggregation effects that can occur in solution studies. Green fl uorescent protein from Aequorea coerulescens was used as a model protein to examine the unfolding/re-folding properties of protein in silica gels. The recombinant protein was isolated and purifi ed from Escherichia coli extracts by cell lysis, three-phase partitioning, dialysis, and anion exchange chromatography. The purity of the protein was greater than 90% as judged by SDS PAGE gel analysis. Sol-gels were synthesized using tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) in combination with, methyltrimethoxyorthosilane (MTMOS), ethyltrimethoxyorthosilane (ETMOS), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The acid induced denaturation and renaturation of GFP was analyzed by UV-visible, fl uorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. No renaturation was observed in gels that were made with TMOS only, and in the presence of APTES, MTMOS, and ETMOS. However, in gels that were made with GPTMS, the CD and UV-visible spectra indicated that the protein had refolded. The fl uorescence emission spectrum indicated that approximately 20% of fl uorescence had returned. This study highlights the importance of the surface chemistry of the silica gels for the refolding properties of the entrapped GFP. Future studies will investigate the effect of surface chemistry on the thermal and solvent stability of the entrapped protein.

  2. The Redox Chemistry and Chemical Biology of H2S, Hydropersulfides and Derived Species: Implications to Their Possible Biological Activity and Utility

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Katsuhiko; Akaike, Takaake; Sawa, Tomohiro; Kumagai, Yoshito; Wink, David A.; Tantillo, Dean J.; Hobbs, Adrian J.; Nagy, Peter; Xian, Ming; Lin, Joseph; Fukuto, Jon M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously generated and putative signaling/effector molecule. In spite of its numerous reported functions, the chemistry by which it elicits its functions is not understood. Moreover, recent studies allude to the existence of other sulfur species besides H2S that may play critical physiological roles. Herein, the basic chemical biology of H2S as well as other related or derived species is discussed and reviewed. A particular focus of this review are the per- and poly-sulfides which are likely in equilibrium with free H2S and which may be important biological effectors themselves. PMID:25229186

  3. Results and recommendations from the reactor chemistry and corrosion tasks of the reactor materials program

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1990-11-01

    Within the general context of extended service life, the Reactor Materials Program was initiated in 1984. This comprehensive program addressed material performance in SRS reactor tanks and the primary coolant or Process Water System (PWS) piping. Three of the eleven tasks concerned moderator quality and corrosion mitigation. Definition and control of the stainless steel aqueous environment is a key factor in corrosion mitigation. The Reactor Materials Program systematically investigated the SRS environment and its effect on crack initiation and propagation in stainless steel, with the objective of improving this environment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the contributions of Tasks 6, 7 and 10 of the Reactor Materials Program to the understanding and control of moderator quality and its relationship to mitigation of stress corrosion cracking.

  4. High-throughput quantum chemistry and virtual screening for OLED material components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halls, Mathew D.; Giesen, David J.; Hughes, Thomas F.; Goldberg, Alexander; Cao, Yixiang

    2013-09-01

    Computational structure enumeration, analysis using an automated simulation workflow and filtering of large chemical structure libraries to identify lead systems, has become a central paradigm in drug discovery research. Transferring this paradigm to challenges in materials science is now possible due to advances in the speed of computational resources and the efficiency and stability of chemical simulation packages. State-of-the-art software tools that have been developed for drug discovery can be applied to efficiently explore the chemical design space to identify solutions for problems such as organic light-emitting diode material components. In this work, virtual screening for OLED materials based on intrinsic quantum mechanical properties is illustrated. Also, a new approach to more reliably identify candidate systems is introduced that is based on the chemical reaction energetics of defect pathways for OLED materials.

  5. Coordination chemistry in the solid: evidence for coordination modes within hybrid materials different from those in solution.

    PubMed

    Corriu, Robert J P; Embert, Frank; Guari, Yannick; Reyé, Catherine; Guilard, Roger

    2002-12-16

    Two routes of incorporation of europium(III) salts into cyclam-containing hybrid materials have been explored, to elucidate the coordination mode of EuIII in cyclam-containing hybrid materials in a study of the arrangement of cyclam moieties during the solgel process. They were 1) complexation of europium salts by N-tetrasubstituted 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (cyclam) derivatives bearing four hydrolysable Si(OEt)3 groups, followed by hydrolysis and polycondensation of these complexes; and 2) hydrolysis and polycondensation of N-tetrasubstituted silylated cyclam derivatives, then incorporation of europium salts directly into the hybrid materials. The coordination mode of europium salts within solids is not the same as in solution. In solution, the complexation of EuIII with cyclam is not possible; it requires cyclam derivatives containing N-chelating substituents such as amido groups in an appropriate geometry. In contrast, the incorporation of EuIII into hybrid materials is always possible, whatever the nature of the arms of the cyclam moieties. Thus, EuIII uptake is one EuIII/two macrocycles with cyclam moieties containing N-alkyl substituents. This constitutes the first example of 4N + 4N lanthanide coordination. PMID:12693055

  6. Preparation and application of a novel electrochemical sensing material based on surface chemistry of polyhydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xueping; Wang, Yingkai; Hu, Chengguo; Huang, Jianlin; Chen, Huaixia; Wang, Shengfu; Hu, Shengshui

    2014-07-01

    A new analogue of polydopamine (PDA), i.e., polyhydroquinone (PH2Q), was polymerized and its surface chemistry was studied by different ways of characterization. PH2Q was produced by the self-polymerization of H2Q mediated by dissolved oxygen, and the self-polymerization process was strongly dependent on the type and the pH value of the buffer solutions. PH2Q can not only achieve surface hydrophilization of different substrates like polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film, graphite strip, C12SH/Au and wax slice, but also possess several unique properties like reversible adsorption, good solubility and low cost. These properties made PH2Q an ideal polymeric modifier for the noncovalent functionalization of some nanomaterials. By simply grinding with PH2Q, pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) can be readily dispersed in water with high solubility and good stability. The resulting MWNT-PH2Q composite exhibited excellent electrochemical performance, which was employed for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). PMID:24857459

  7. Redox chemistry and metal-insulator transitions intertwined in a nano-porous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximoff, Sergey N.; Smit, Berend

    2014-06-01

    Metal-organic frameworks are nano-porous adsorbents of relevance to gas separation and catalysis, and separation of oxygen from air is essential to diverse industrial applications. The ferrous salt of 2,5-dihydroxy-terephthalic acid, a metal-organic framework of the MOF74 family, can selectively adsorb oxygen in a manner that defies the classical picture: adsorption sites either do or do not share electrons over a long range. Here we propose, and then justify phenomenologically and computationally, a mechanism. Charge-transfer-mediated adsorption of electron acceptor oxygen molecules in the metal-organic framework, which is a quasi-one-dimensional electron-donor semiconductor, drives and is driven by quasi-one-dimensional metal-insulator-metal transitions that localize or delocalize the quasi-one-dimensional electrons. This mechanism agrees with the empirical evidence, and predicts a class of nano-porous semiconductors or metals and potential adsorbents and catalysts in which chemistry and metal-insulator-metal transitions intertwine.

  8. Variation in material transport and water chemistry along a large ephemeral river in the Namib Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, P.J.; Jacobson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Cherry, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    1. The chemical characteristics of floodwaters in ephemeral rivers are little known, particularly with regard to their organic loads. These rivers typically exhibit a pronounced downstream hydrological decay but few studies have documented its effect on chemical characteristics and material transport. To develop a better understanding of the dynamics of floods and associated material transport in large ephemeral rivers, floods of the ephemeral Kuiseb River in south-western Africa were tracked and repeatedly sampled at multiple points along the river's lower 220 km. 2. We quantified the composition and transport of solute and sediment loads in relation to longitudinal hydrological patterns associated with downstream hydrological decay. Source and sink areas for transported materials were identified, and the composition and transport dynamics of the organic matter load were compared to those described from more mesic systems. 3. Concentrations of sediments and solutes transported by floods in the Kuiseb River tended to increase downstream in association with pronounced hydrological decay. The contribution of particulate organic matter to total organic load is among the highest recorded, despite our observation of unusually high levels of dissolved organic matter. Hydrological decay resulted in deposition of all transported material within the lower Kuiseb River, with no discharge of water or materials to the Atlantic Ocean. 4. Our results suggest that longitudinal variation in surface flow and associated patterns of material transport renders the lower Kuiseb River a sink for materials transported from upstream. The downstream transport and deposition of large amounts of labile organic matter provides an important carbon supplement to heterotrophic communities within the river's lower reaches.

  9. Research progress on polyoxometalate-based transition-metal-rare-earth heterometallic derived materials: synthetic strategies, structural overview and functional applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Wei; Li, Yan-Zhou; Chen, Li-Juan; Yang, Guo-Yu

    2016-03-15

    With the rapid development of science and technology and the trend of multidisciplinary pervasion, POM-based TM-RE heterometallic chemistry (POM = polyoxometalate, TM = transition-metal, RE = rare-earth) has become one of the most rapidly growing and challengeable areas of inorganic chemistry due to the impressive structural diversities, various chemical compositions and potential applications of these materials in magnetism, optics, electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and materials science. Over the past several years, continuous interest and persisting efforts have been dedicated to the preparation and exploration of POM-based TM-RE heterometallic derived materials (PTRHDMs), which have led to more than two hundred PTRHDMs. In this review, we summarize the structural types of reported PTRHDMs together with synthetic strategies, structural motifs and relevant functional applications. The exciting array of this emerging research theme presages continuous growth and great vitality. In the last section, some prospects of this branch are also presented and possible guidance for future work is outlined. PMID:26894638

  10. Mo 2O 5(OCH 3) 2and Mo 2O 5(OCH 3) 2·2CH 3OH: New Structural Insights Derived from Reaction Chemistry and Diffraction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarron, E. M.; Harlow, R. L.; Li, Z. G.; Suto, C.; Yuen, Y.

    1998-03-01

    The reaction of molybdenum trioxide dihydrate, MoO 3· 2H 2O, with methanol produces the title compounds. That these molybdenum oxy-methoxides decompose with liberation of CH 2O suggests that they represent exquisite models for selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde over molybdate catalysts. Although a number of physical techniques have been employed to elucidate certain structural features, the actual structures remain unknown. However, their unit cells have been determined for the first time by employing the complimentary nature of electron and powder diffraction techniques. This information coupled with structural insights derived from careful studies of the reaction chemistry, in particular, the synthesis and characterization of a new amorphous intermediate, MoO 3·CH 3OH, has allowed fairly detailed structures for these interesting molybdenum oxy-methoxide materials to be proposed.

  11. Naturally derived materials-based cell and drug delivery systems in skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sha; Fu, Xiaobing

    2010-03-01

    The objective of regenerative medicine is to provide cells with a local environment of artificial extracellular matrix where they can proliferate and differentiate efficiently and therefore, induce the repair of defective tissues according to the natural healing potential of patients. For this purpose, naturally derived materials are being widely used because of their similarities to the extracellular matrix, typically good biocharacteristics and inherent cellular interaction. Also, natural polymers can be engineered to release growth factors and related agents in response to physiologic signals to imitate the natural healing process and to promote fast tissue regeneration and reduce scarring in wounds. Although synthetic materials have been used extensively in tissue engineering fields, this review illustrates the contribution of natural materials and natural materials-based protein delivery systems to regenerative medicine research, with emphasis on the application of multifunctional vehicles for cell and growth factor delivery in skin regeneration research. PMID:19850093

  12. An introduction to the chemistry of graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiluan; Shi, Gaoquan

    2015-11-21

    Pristine graphene and chemically modified graphenes (CMGs, e.g., graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide and their derivatives) can react with a variety of chemical substances. These reactions have been applied to modulate the structures and properties of graphene materials, and to extend their functions and practical applications. This perspective outlines the chemistry of graphene, including functionalization, doping, photochemistry, catalytic chemistry, and supramolecular chemistry. The mechanisms of graphene related reactions will be introduced, and the challenges in controlling the chemical reactions of graphene will be discussed. PMID:26465215

  13. An approach to determining the economic feasibility of refuse-derived fuels and materials recovery processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, H.W.

    1980-06-01

    An approach for determining the economic feasibility of refuse-derived fuel production and the recovery of various materials is demonstrated, using data developed for the metropolitan Washington, D.C., area as input. The processing facility, designed to handle 650 tpd of refuse, is described. Since materials revenues can be predicted with a higher degree of certainty than refuse fuel revenues, it is necessary to determine what revenues the sale of solid waste fuel will have to generate for projected economics to be the same as an alternative disposal practice. (1 diagram, 8 references, 6 tables)

  14. Molecular Environmental Science Using Synchrotron Radiation: Chemistry and Physics of Waste Form Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lindle, Dennis W.

    2011-04-21

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization. Specially formulated glass compositions and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites are the main candidates for these wastes. An important consideration linked to the durability of waste-form materials is the local structure around the waste components. Equally important is the local structure of constituents of the glass and ceramic host matrix. Knowledge of the structure in the waste-form host matrices is essential, prior to and subsequent to waste incorporation, to evaluate and develop improved waste-form compositions based on scientific considerations. This project used the soft-x-ray synchrotron-radiation-based technique of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) as a unique method for investigating oxidation states and structures of low-Z elemental constituents forming the backbones of glass and ceramic host matrices for waste-form materials. In addition, light metal ions in ceramic hosts, such as titanium, are also ideal for investigation by NEXAFS in the soft-x-ray region. Thus, one of the main objectives was to understand outstanding issues in waste-form science via NEXAFS investigations and to translate this understanding into better waste-form materials, followed by eventual capability to investigate “real” waste-form materials by the same methodology. We conducted several detailed structural investigations of both pyrochlore ceramic and borosilicate-glass materials during the project and developed improved capabilities at Beamline 6.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to perform the studies.

  15. Further investigation of the impact of the co-combustion of tire-derived fuel and petroleum coke on the petrology and chemistry of coal combustion products

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Robertson, J.D.; Elswick, E.R.; Roberts, J.M.; Brandsteder, K.; Trimble, A.S.; Mardon, S.M.

    2007-07-01

    A Kentucky cyclone-fired unit burns coal and tire-derived fuel, sometimes in combination with petroleum coke. A parallel pulverized combustion (pc) unit at the same plant burns the same coal, without the added fuels. The petrology, chemistry, and sulfur isotope distribution in the fuel and resulting combustion products was investigated for several configurations of the fuel blend. Zinc and Cd in the combustion products are primarily contributed from the tire-derived fuel, the V and Ni are primarily from the petroleum coke, and the As and Hg are probably largely from the coal. The sulfur isotope distribution in the cyclone unit is complicated due to the varying fuel sources. The electrostatic precipitator (ESP) array in the pc unit shows a subtle trend towards heavier S isotopic ratios in the cooler end of the ESP.

  16. Accuracy of the domain method for the material derivative approach to shape design sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, R. J.; Botkin, M. E.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical accuracy for the boundary and domain methods of the material derivative approach to shape design sensitivities is investigated through the use of mesh refinement. The results show that the domain method is generally more accurate than the boundary method, using the finite element technique. It is also shown that the domain method is equivalent, under certain assumptions, to the implicit differentiation approach not only theoretically but also numerically.

  17. Wet Chemistry Synthesis of Multidimensional Nanocarbon-Sulfur Hybrid Materials with Ultrahigh Sulfur Loading for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Cheng; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zeng, Xian-Xiang; Shi, Ji-Lei; Zhang, Shuai-Feng; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-02-17

    An optimized nanocarbon-sulfur cathode material with ultrahigh sulfur loading of up to 90 wt % is realized in the form of sulfur nanolayer-coated three-dimensional (3D) conducting network. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network combines three different nanocarbons, as follows: zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticle, one-dimensional carbon nanotube, and two-dimensional graphene. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network is synthesized by using a method based on soluble chemistry of elemental sulfur and three types of nanocarbons in well-chosen solvents. The resultant sulfur-carbon material shows a high specific capacity of 1115 mA h g(-1) at 0.02C and good rate performance of 551 mA h g(-1) at 1C based on the mass of sulfur-carbon composite. Good battery performance can be attributed to the homogeneous compositing of sulfur with the 3D hierarchical hybrid nanocarbon networks at nanometer scale, which provides efficient multidimensional transport pathways for electrons and ions. Wet chemical method developed here provides an easy and cost-effective way to prepare sulfur-carbon cathode materials with high sulfur loading for application in high-energy Li-S batteries. PMID:26378622

  18. Storm clouds on Saturn: Lightning-induced chemistry and associated materials consistent with Cassini/VIMS spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baines, K.H.; Delitsky, M.L.; Momary, T.W.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Thunderstorm activity on Saturn is associated with optically detectable clouds that are atypically dark throughout the near-infrared. As observed by Cassini/VIMS, these clouds are ~20% less reflective than typical neighboring clouds throughout the spectral range from 0.8 ??m to at least 4.1 ??m. We propose that active thunderstorms originating in the 10-20 bar water-condensation region vertically transport dark materials at depth to the ~1 bar level where they can be observed. These materials in part may be produced by chemical processes associated with lightning, likely within the water clouds near the ~10 bar freezing level of water, as detected by the electrostatic discharge of lightning flashes observed by Cassini/RPWS (e.g., Fischer et al. 2008, Space Sci. Rev., 137, 271-285). We review lightning-induced pyrolytic chemistry involving a variety of Saturnian constituents, including hydrogen, methane, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, phosphine, and water. We find that the lack of absorption in the 1-2 ??m spectral region by lightning-generated sulfuric and phosphorous condensates renders these constituents as minor players in determining the color of the dark storm clouds. Relatively small particulates of elemental carbon, formed by lightning-induced dissociation of methane and subsequently upwelled from depth - perhaps embedded within and on the surface of spectrally bright condensates such as ammonium hydrosulfide or ammonia - may be a dominant optical material within the dark thunderstorm-related clouds of Saturn. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Soil Chemistry Still Affected 23 Years After Large Application of Fluidized Bed Material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to assess the movement of arsenic, aluminum, calcium, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, mercury and zinc in an old apple (Malus domestica Borkh) orchard that received a one time application of 36 kg/ m2 of fluidized bed combustion material (FBCM) 23 years earlier. S...

  20. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  1. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  2. Investigations of the structure and "interfacial" surface chemistry of Bioglass (RTM) materials by solid-state multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Gautam

    Bioactive materials such as BioglassRTM 45S5 (45% SiO 2, 24.5% CaO, 24.5% Na2O, and 6% P2O5 by weight) are sodium-phosphosilicate glasses containing independent three-dimensional silicate and phosphate networks and Na+ and Ca2+ ions as modifying cations. Due to their bioactivity, these materials are currently used as implants and for other surgical and clinical applications. The bioactivity of BioglassesRTM is due to their unique capability to form chemical bonds to tissues through an octacalciumphosphate (OCP)- and/or hydroxyapatite-like (HA) "interfacial" matrix. The formation of OCP and/or HA is preceded by the formation of a silica-rich surface layer and the subsequent growth of an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CP) layer. Structural characterization of a series of commercial and synthesized Bioglass materials 45S5 52S, 55S, 60S, and synthesized 17O-labelled "Bioglass materials 45S, 52S, 55S and 60S" have been obtained using solid-state single-pulse magic-angle spinning (SP/MAS) 17O, 23Na, 29Si and 31P NMR. The 17O NMR isotropic chemical shifts and estimates of the quadrupole coupling constants (Cq) [at fixed asymmetry parameter ( hQ ) values of zero] have been obtained from solid-state spin-echo 17O SP/MAS NMR spectra of 17O-labelled "Bioglasses". The simulation results of these spectra reveal the presence of both bridging-oxygens (BO, i.e. ≡ Si-17OSi ≡ ) and non-bridging oxygens (NBO, i.e. ≡ Si-17O-Na+/Ca2+ ) in the silicate networks in these materials. 17O NMR spectra of these Bioglass materials do not show any direct evidence for the presence of BO and NBO atoms in the phosphate units; however, they are expected to be present in small amounts. In vitro reactions of BioglassRTM 45S5, 60S and 77S powders have been used to study the "interfacial" surface chemistry of these materials in simulated body-fluid (SBF, Kyoto or K9 solution) and/or 17O-enriched tris-buffer solution. 29Si and 31P SP/MAS NMR have been used to identify and quantify the extent of

  3. The Separate and Collective Effects of Personalization, Personification, and Gender on Learning with Multimedia Chemistry Instructional Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkyard, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Chemistry is a difficult subject to learn and teach for students in general. Additionally, female students are under-represented in chemistry and the physical sciences. Within chemistry, atomic and electronic structure is a key concept and several recommendations in the literature describe how this topic can be taught better. These recommendations…

  4. The Contributions of Chemistry and Transport to Low Arctic Ozone in March 2011 Derived from Aura MLS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahan, S. E.; Douglass, A. R.; Newman, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Stratospheric and total columns of Arctic O3 (63-90 N) in late March 2011 averaged 320 and 349 DU, respectively. These values are 74 DU lower than averages for the previous 6 years. We use Aura MLS O3 observations to quantify the roles of chemistry and transport and find there are two major reasons for low O3 in March 2011: heterogeneous chemical loss and a late final warming that delayed the resupply of O3 until April. Daily vortex-averaged partial columns in the lowermost stratosphere (p greater than 133 hPa) and middle stratosphere (p less than 29 hPa) are unaffected by local heterogeneous chemistry and show a near total lack of transport into the vortex between late January and late March, contributing to the observed low column. The lower stratospheric (LS) column (133-29 hPa) is affected by both heterogeneous chemistry and transport. Low interannual variability of Aura MLS 0 3 columns and temperature inside the Arctic vortex (2004-2011) shows that the transport contribution to vortex O3 in fall and early winter is nearly the same each year. The descent of MLS N2O vortex profiles in 2011 provides an estimate of O3 transported into the LS column during late winter. By quantifying the role of transport we determine that PSC-driven chemical loss causes 80 (plus or minus 10) DU of vortex-averaged O3 loss by late March 2011. Without heterogeneous chemical loss, March 2011 vortex O3 would have been 40 DU lower than normal due to the late final warming and resupply of O3 which did not occur until April.

  5. a Study of the Materials Chemistry of Monolayer Oxides on Compound Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhong

    In this dissertation, a study of deep-ultraviolet -light-enhanced (4.1 < hnu < 5.1 eV) oxygen reaction on GaAs from submonolayer to several monolayers coverage is presented. The reaction is nonthermal and does not involve gas-phase excitation or dissociation of O_2. Our experiments show a distinct wavelength and coverage dependence for the photoenhancement. The results indicate that a mechanism based on photoemission of electrons into the growing oxide film is most in accord with the experimental observations. The surface chemistry of GaAs-oxide removal and the passivation mechanism with Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) hydrogen plasma has been investigated. It is found that As-oxide is efficiently removed at room temperature, and heating expedites the removal of Ga-oxide. Band bending, which correlates with the surface state density changes during ECR hydrogen-plasma oxide reduction, is also observed. This type of change in band bending could well be responsible for the hydrogen plasma passivation effect on many GaAs based devices. ECR oxidation at room temperature forms a stoichiometric oxide layer which is primarily composed of As_2 O_5 and Ga_2 O_3. We also studied the thermal reaction of As _2O_5 with GaAs at temperatures below 550^circC. A solid-state interface reaction of 4GaAs + 3As_2 O_5 to 2Ga _2O_3 + 3As _2O_3 + 4As, which includes the usual native oxide thermal reaction: 2GaAs + As_2O_3 to Ga_2O_3 + 4As, as well as a decomposition reaction, As _2O_5 to As _2O_3 + O _2, is responsible for the thermal reaction in this temperature range. A similar ECR-H oxide removal on GaSb surfaces shows that Sb-oxide removal occurs at room temperature, while Ga-oxide removal occurs at a temperature of ~250^circC. In addition, we have found that subsequent exposure to N _2 plasma leaves a thin nitride layer which prevents degradation of the H-cleaned surface and passivates the surface. We have applied this technique to the processing of an AlGaSb PIN photodiode. Our

  6. Climatic implications of background acidity and other chemistry derived from electrical studies of the Greenland Ice Core Project ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Eric W.; Moore, John C.; Clausen, Henrik B.; Hammer, Claus U.

    1997-11-01

    High-resolution continuous profiles were obtained on the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) ice core using two different electrical methods. After correction for temperature and density, the electrical conductivity method (ECM) technique responds only to acidity, while dielectric profiling (DEP) responds to acid, ammonium, and chloride. Detailed chemistry on a section of glacial-age ice allows us to confirm the calibration factor for chloride in DEP. Acidity dominates the DEP variability in the Holocene, Allerod/Bolling, and larger interstadials; ammonium dominates in the Younger Dry as, while chloride is the major contributor in cold periods including smaller interstadials. From the electrical signals plotted on a linear timescale we can deduce the background (nonvolcanic) acidity of the ice, varying from always acidic in the Holocene to always alkaline in the cold periods. In the interstadials, the ice is close to neutral, with most of it acidic in larger interstadials, most of it alkaline in smaller ones, and rapid alternations within interstadials. It is not clear whether neutralization of individual acidic particles occurred in the atmosphere or whether acid and alkaline particles coexisted until deposition in the snowpack. The changes in acidity observed at GRIP apply at least to all of Greenland and probably to much of North America. There would have been ecological effects and important changes in the uptake of some chemicals onto ice. If acidic sulfate particles were neutralized and removed from the atmosphere, which remains uncertain, then there are atmospheric chemistry and radiative effects that require further investigation.

  7. Effects of steam activation on the pore structure and surface chemistry of activated carbon derived from bamboo waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Juan; Xing, Zhen-Jiao; Duan, Zheng-Kang; Li, Meng; Wang, Yin

    2014-10-01

    The effects of steam activation on the pore structure evolution and surface chemistry of activated carbon (AC) obtained from bamboo waste were investigated. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms revealed that higher steam activation temperatures and/or times promoted the creation of new micropores and widened the existing micropores, consequently decreasing the surface area and total pore volume. Optimum conditions included an activation temperature of 850 °C, activation time of 120 min, and steam flush generated from deionized water of 0.2 cm3 min-1. Under these conditions, AC with a BET surface area of 1210 m2 g-1 and total pore volume of 0.542 cm-3 g-1was obtained. Changes in surface chemistry were determined through Boehm titration, pH measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results revealed the presence of a large number of basic groups on the surface of the pyrolyzed char and AC. Steam activation did not affect the species of oxygen-containing groups but changed the contents of these species when compared with pyrolyzed char. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the surface morphology of the products. AC obtained under optimum conditions showed a monolayer adsorption capacity of 330 mg g-1 for methylene blue (MB), which demonstrates its excellent potential for MB adsorption applications.

  8. Metal adsorption by quasi cellulose xanthogenates derived from aquatic and terrestrial plant materials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenbing; Ge, Xuan; Zhu, Duanwei; Langdon, Alan; Deng, Li; Hua, Yumei; Zhao, Jianwei

    2011-02-01

    The FTIR spectra, SEM-EDXA and copper adsorption capacities of the raw plant materials, alkali-treated straws and cellulose xanthogenate derivatives of Eichhornia crassipes shoot, rape straw and corn stalk were investigated. FTIR spectra indicated that of the three plant materials, the aquatic biomass of E. crassipes shoot contained more OH and CO groups which accounted for the higher Cu(2+) adsorption capacities of the raw and alkali treated plant material. SEM-EDXA indicated the incorporation of sulphur and magnesium in the cellulose xanthogenate. The Cu(2+) adsorption capacities of the xanthogenates increased with their magnesium and sulphur contents. However more copper was adsorbed than that can be explained by exchange of copper with magnesium. Precipitation may contribute to the enhanced uptake of copper by the cellulose xanthogenate. PMID:21123055

  9. Tropospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, V. A.; Chameides, W.; Demerjian, K. L.; Lenschow, D. H.; Logan, J. A.; Mcneal, R. J.; Penkett, S. A.; Platt, U.; Schurath, U.; Dias, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    The chemistry of the background troposphere, the source region, and the transition regions are discussed. The troposphere is governed by heterogeneous chemistry far more so than the stratosphere. Heterogeneous processes of interest involve scavenging of trace gases by aerosols, cloud and precipitation elements leading to aqueous phase chemical reactions and to temporary and permanent removal of material from the gas phase. Dry deposition is a major removal process for ozone, as well as for other gases of importance in tropospheric photochemistry. These processes are also discussed.

  10. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.