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Sample records for chemokine vmip-ii inhibits

  1. The Anti-inflammatory Protein TSG-6 Regulates Chemokine Function by Inhibiting Chemokine/Glycosaminoglycan Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Douglas P.; Salanga, Catherina L.; Johns, Scott C.; Valdambrini, Elena; Fuster, Mark M.; Milner, Caroline M.; Day, Anthony J.; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) is a multifunctional protein secreted in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli by a wide range of cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and endothelial cells. It has been shown to mediate anti-inflammatory and protective effects when administered in disease models, in part, by reducing neutrophil infiltration. Human TSG-6 inhibits neutrophil migration by binding CXCL8 through its Link module (Link_TSG6) and interfering with the presentation of CXCL8 on cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), an interaction that is vital for the function of many chemokines. TSG-6 was also found to interact with chemokines CXCL11 and CCL5, suggesting the possibility that it may function as a broad specificity chemokine-binding protein, functionally similar to those encoded by viruses. This study was therefore undertaken to explore the ability of TSG-6 to regulate the function of other chemokines. Herein, we demonstrate that Link_TSG6 binds chemokines from both the CXC and CC families, including CXCL4, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL5, CCL7, CCL19, CCL21, and CCL27. We also show that the Link_TSG6-binding sites on chemokines overlap with chemokine GAG-binding sites, and that the affinities of Link_TSG6 for these chemokines (KD values 1–85 nm) broadly correlate with chemokine-GAG affinities. Link_TSG6 also inhibits chemokine presentation on endothelial cells not only through a direct interaction with chemokines but also by binding and therefore masking the availability of GAGs. Along with previous work, these findings suggest that TSG-6 functions as a pluripotent regulator of chemokines by modulating chemokine/GAG interactions, which may be a major mechanism by which TSG-6 produces its anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. PMID:27044744

  2. The Anti-inflammatory Protein TSG-6 Regulates Chemokine Function by Inhibiting Chemokine/Glycosaminoglycan Interactions.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Douglas P; Salanga, Catherina L; Johns, Scott C; Valdambrini, Elena; Fuster, Mark M; Milner, Caroline M; Day, Anthony J; Handel, Tracy M

    2016-06-10

    TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) is a multifunctional protein secreted in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli by a wide range of cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and endothelial cells. It has been shown to mediate anti-inflammatory and protective effects when administered in disease models, in part, by reducing neutrophil infiltration. Human TSG-6 inhibits neutrophil migration by binding CXCL8 through its Link module (Link_TSG6) and interfering with the presentation of CXCL8 on cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), an interaction that is vital for the function of many chemokines. TSG-6 was also found to interact with chemokines CXCL11 and CCL5, suggesting the possibility that it may function as a broad specificity chemokine-binding protein, functionally similar to those encoded by viruses. This study was therefore undertaken to explore the ability of TSG-6 to regulate the function of other chemokines. Herein, we demonstrate that Link_TSG6 binds chemokines from both the CXC and CC families, including CXCL4, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL5, CCL7, CCL19, CCL21, and CCL27. We also show that the Link_TSG6-binding sites on chemokines overlap with chemokine GAG-binding sites, and that the affinities of Link_TSG6 for these chemokines (KD values 1-85 nm) broadly correlate with chemokine-GAG affinities. Link_TSG6 also inhibits chemokine presentation on endothelial cells not only through a direct interaction with chemokines but also by binding and therefore masking the availability of GAGs. Along with previous work, these findings suggest that TSG-6 functions as a pluripotent regulator of chemokines by modulating chemokine/GAG interactions, which may be a major mechanism by which TSG-6 produces its anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. PMID:27044744

  3. Therapeutic potential of chemokine signal inhibition for metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takanori; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is incurable by current therapies including chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that tumor-infiltrating macrophages promote establishment of the lethal metastatic foci and contribute to therapeutic resistance. Recent studies suggest that the accumulation of these macrophages is regulated by a chemokine network established in the tumor microenvironment. In this perspective paper, we elaborate on the chemokine signals that can attract monocytes/macrophages to the site of metastasis, and discuss whether inhibition of these chemokine signals can represent a new therapeutic strategy for metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26275794

  4. A20 regulates IL-1-induced tolerant production of CXC chemokines in human mesangial cells via inhibition of MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hongbo; Liu, Yuming; Li, Qian; Liao, Lingjuan; Sun, Ruili; Liu, Xueting; Jiang, Manli; Hu, Jinyue

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are involved in the resolution or progression of renal diseases. Locally secreted chemokines mediated leukocyte recruitment during the initiation and amplification phase of renal inflammation. However, the regulation of chemokine induction is not fully understood. In this study, we found that IL-1 induced a significant up-regulation of CXC chemokines CXCL1, 2, and 8 at both mRNA and protein levels in human mesangial cells. The induction of chemokines was tolerant, as the pre-treatment of HMC with IL-1 down-regulated the induction of chemokines induced by IL-1 re-stimulation. IL-1 up-regulated the ubiquintin-editing enzyme A20. A20 over-expression down-regulated IL-1-induced up-regulation of chemokines, and A20 down-regulation reversed chemokine inhibition induced by IL-1 pre-treatment, suggested that A20 played important roles in the tolerant production of chemokines. Unexpectedly, A20 over- expression inhibited the activation of ERK, JNK, and P38, but did not inhibit the activation of NF-κB. In addition, both IL-1 treatment and A20 over-expression induced the degradation of IRAK1, an important adaptor for IL-1R1 signaling, and A20 inhibition by RNA interference partly reversed the degradation of IRAK1. Taken together, IL-1-induced A20 negatively regulated chemokine production, suggesting that A20 may be an important target for the prevention and control of kidney inflammation. PMID:26648169

  5. Inhibition of Chemokine-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions in Donor Tissue Reduces Mouse Allograft Vasculopathy and Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Erbin; Liu, Li-Ying; Wang, Hao; McIvor, Dana; Sun, Yun ming; Macaulay, Colin; King, Elaine; Munuswamy-Ramanujam, Ganesh; Bartee, Mee Yong; Williams, Jennifer; Davids, Jennifer; Charo, Israel; McFadden, Grant; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Lucas, Alexandra R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is classically described as initiating inflammatory cell migration and creating tissue chemokine gradients that direct local leukocyte chemotaxis into damaged or transplanted tissues. While chemokine-receptor binding has been extensively studied during allograft transplantation, effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) interactions with chemokines on transplant longevity are less well known. Here we examine the impact of interrupting chemokine-GAG interactions and chemokine-receptor interactions, both locally and systemically, on vascular disease in allografts. Methodology/Principal Findings Analysis of GAG or CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) deficiency were coupled with the infusion of viral chemokine modulating proteins (CMPs) in mouse aortic allograft transplants (n = 239 mice). Inflammatory cell invasion and neointimal hyperplasia were significantly reduced in N-deacetylase-N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1f/fTekCre+) heparan sulfate (GAG)-deficient (Ndst1−/−, p<0.044) and CCR2-deficient (Ccr2−/−, p<0.04) donor transplants. Donor tissue GAG or CCR2 deficiency markedly reduced inflammation and vasculopathy, whereas recipient deficiencies did not. Treatment with three CMPs was also investigated; Poxviral M-T1 blocks CC chemokine receptor binding, M-T7 blocks C, CC, and CXC GAG binding, and herpesviral M3 binds receptor and GAG binding for all classes. M-T7 reduced intimal hyperplasia in wild type (WT) (Ccr2+/+, p≤0.003 and Ccr2−/−, p≤0.027) aortic allografts, but not in Ndst1−/− aortic allografts (p = 0.933). M-T1 and M3 inhibited WT (Ccr2+/+ and Ndst1+/+, p≤0.006) allograft vasculopathy, but did not block vasculopathy in Ccr2−/− (p = 0.61). M-T7 treatment alone, even without immunosuppressive drugs, also significantly prolonged survival of renal allograft transplants (p≤0.001). Conclusions/Significance Interruption of chemokine-GAG interactions, even in the absence of

  6. Basic Research on Virus-Induced Asthma Exacerbation: Inhibition of Inflammatory Chemokine Expression by Fluticasone Propionate

    PubMed Central

    Matsukura, Satoshi; Kurokawa, Masatsugu; Homma, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Shin; Suzuki, Shintaro; Ieki, Koushi; Takeuchi, Hiroko; Notomi, Kyoko; Schleimer, Robert P.; Kawaguchi, Mio; Kokubu, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Background Viral infection can exacerbate asthma by inducing the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the airway. We have previously reported that double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a viral product and ligand of the Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR3), activates the transcription factors NF-κB and IRF-3 and upregulates the expression of inflammatory chemokines in airway epithelial cells. Here, we examined the effects of the glucocorticoid fluticasone propionate (FP) on the expression of the inflammatory chemokines CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10. Methods The airway epithelial cell line BEAS-2B was used for this study. Expression of CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10 mRNA and protein was quantified by real-time PCR and ELISA assay, respectively. To examine the association of FP with the physiology of chemokine production, we included several methods. Nuclear translocation of transcription factors was determined by performing Western blot analysis. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in nuclear extracts was measured using a colorimetric assay. Stability of the chemokine mRNAs was examined in cells incubated with actinomycin D. The activities of the CCL5 promoter and the transcription factors NF-κB and IRF-3 were assessed using luciferase reporter assays. Results Treatment of BEAS-2B cells with FP significantly and dose-dependently (10−9 to 10−6 M) inhibited dsRNA-induced expression of CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10 protein and mRNA, but did not affect mRNA stability. FP also significantly inhibited dsRNA-stimulated CCL5 promoter activity. However, FP had no effect on the activity of HDAC or the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF-3. Conclusions FP inhibits the dsRNA-stimulated expression of inflammatory chemokines in airway epithelial cells. FP may act by inhibiting chemokine transcription through an as yet Unidentified mechanism. PMID:23711858

  7. Inhibition of Intimal Hyperplasia in Transgenic Mice Conditionally Expressing the Chemokine-Binding Protein M3

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Robert; Jensen, Kristian K.; Wiekowski, Maria T.; Manfra, Denise; Alcami, Antonio; Taubman, Mark B.; Lira, Sergio A.

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of diseases. This report describes the generation of transgenic mice that conditionally express M3, a herpesvirus protein that binds and inhibits chemokines. In response to doxycycline, M3 expression was induced in a variety of tissues and M3 was detectable in the blood by Western blotting. No gross or histological abnormalities were seen in mice expressing M3. To determine whether M3 expression could modify a significant pathophysiological response, we examined its effect on the development of intimal hyperplasia in response to femoral arterial injury. Intimal hyperplasia is thought to play a critical role in the development of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and in the progression of atherosclerosis. Induction of M3 expression resulted in a 67% reduction in intimal area and a 68% reduction in intimal/medial ratio after femoral artery injury. These data support a role for chemokines in regulating intimal hyperplasia and suggest that M3 may be effective in attenuating this process. This transgenic mouse model should be a valuable tool for investigating the role of chemokines in a variety of pathological states. PMID:15161661

  8. Inhibition of intimal hyperplasia in transgenic mice conditionally expressing the chemokine-binding protein M3.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Robert; Jensen, Kristian K; Wiekowski, Maria T; Manfra, Denise; Alcami, Antonio; Taubman, Mark B; Lira, Sergio A

    2004-06-01

    Chemokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of diseases. This report describes the generation of transgenic mice that conditionally express M3, a herpesvirus protein that binds and inhibits chemokines. In response to doxycycline, M3 expression was induced in a variety of tissues and M3 was detectable in the blood by Western blotting. No gross or histological abnormalities were seen in mice expressing M3. To determine whether M3 expression could modify a significant pathophysiological response, we examined its effect on the development of intimal hyperplasia in response to femoral arterial injury. Intimal hyperplasia is thought to play a critical role in the development of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and in the progression of atherosclerosis. Induction of M3 expression resulted in a 67% reduction in intimal area and a 68% reduction in intimal/medial ratio after femoral artery injury. These data support a role for chemokines in regulating intimal hyperplasia and suggest that M3 may be effective in attenuating this process. This transgenic mouse model should be a valuable tool for investigating the role of chemokines in a variety of pathological states. PMID:15161661

  9. Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide Inhibits Chemokine Production by Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Stohl, Lori L.; Zhou, Xi; Ding, Wanhong; Granstein, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether the sensory neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) inhibits release of chemokines by dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Dermal blood vessels are associated with nerves containing CGRP, suggesting that CGRP-containing nerves may regulate cutaneous inflammation through effects on vessels. We examined CGRP effects on stimulated chemokine production by a human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) and primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (pHDMECs). HMEC-1 cells and pHDMECs expressed mRNA for components of the CGRP and adrenomedullin receptors and CGRP inhibited LPS-induced production of the chemokines CXCL8, CCL2, and CXCL1 by both HMEC-1 cells and pHDMECs. The receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)1/calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL)-specific antagonists CGRP8-37 and BIBN4096BS, blocked this effect of CGRP in a dose-dependent manner. CGRP prevented LPS-induced IκBα degradation and NF-κB binding to the promoters of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CCL2 in HMEC-1 cells and Bay 11-7085, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation, suppressed LPS-induced production of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CCL2. Thus, the NF-κB pathway appears to be involved in CGRP-mediated suppression of chemokine production. Accordingly, CGRP treatment of LPS-stimulated HMEC-1 cells inhibited their ability to chemoattract human neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Elucidation of this pathway may suggest new avenues for therapeutic manipulation of cutaneous inflammation. PMID:21334428

  10. Small neutralizing molecules to inhibit actions of the chemokine CXCL12.

    PubMed

    Hachet-Haas, Muriel; Balabanian, Karl; Rohmer, François; Pons, Françoise; Franchet, Christel; Lecat, Sandra; Chow, Ken Y C; Dagher, Rania; Gizzi, Patrick; Didier, Bruno; Lagane, Bernard; Kellenberger, Esther; Bonnet, Dominique; Baleux, Françoise; Haiech, Jacques; Parmentier, Marc; Frossard, Nelly; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Hibert, Marcel; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2008-08-22

    The chemokine CXCL12 and the receptor CXCR4 play pivotal roles in normal vascular and neuronal development, in inflammatory responses, and in infectious diseases and cancer. For instance, CXCL12 has been shown to mediate human immunodeficiency virus-induced neurotoxicity, proliferative retinopathy and chronic inflammation, whereas its receptor CXCR4 is involved in human immunodeficiency virus infection, cancer metastasis and in the rare disease known as the warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, immunodeficiency, and myelokathexis (WHIM) syndrome. As we screened chemical libraries to find inhibitors of the interaction between CXCL12 and the receptor CXCR4, we identified synthetic compounds from the family of chalcones that reduce binding of CXCL12 to CXCR4, inhibit calcium responses mediated by the receptor, and prevent CXCR4 internalization in response to CXCL12. We found that the chemical compounds display an original mechanism of action as they bind to the chemokine but not to CXCR4. The highest affinity molecule blocked chemotaxis of human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo. It was also active in vivo in a mouse model of allergic eosinophilic airway inflammation in which we detected inhibition of the inflammatory infiltrate. The compound showed selectivity for CXCL12 and not for CCL5 and CXCL8 chemokines and blocked CXCL12 binding to its second receptor, CXCR7. By analogy to the effect of neutralizing antibodies, this molecule behaves as a small organic neutralizing compound that may prove to have valuable pharmacological and therapeutic potential. PMID:18556651

  11. Inhibition of zymosan-induced cytokine and chemokine expression in human corneal fibroblasts by triptolide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Li, Jing; Liu, Ye; Wang, Ping; Jia, Hui

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of triptolide on proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression induced by the fungal component zymosan in cultured human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs). METHODS HCFs were cultured in the absence or presence of zymosan or triptolide. The release of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) into culture supernatants was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The cellular abundance of the mRNAs for these proteins was determined by reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. The phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the endogenous nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor IκB-α was examined by immunoblot analysis. The release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity from HCFs was measured with a colorimetric assay. RESULTS Triptolide inhibited the zymosan-induced release of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 from HCFs in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. It also inhibited the zymosan-induced up-regulation of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 mRNA abundance in these cells. Furthermore, triptolide attenuated zymosan-induced phosphorylation of the MAPKs extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 as well as the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α. Triptolide did not exhibit cytotoxicity for HCFs. CONCLUSION Triptolide inhibited proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production by HCFs exposed to zymosan, with this action likely being mediated by suppression of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. This compound might thus be expected to limit the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the cornea associated with fungal infection. PMID:26949603

  12. MiRNA-101 inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis by targeting CX chemokine receptor 7

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Shan; Liu, Qin-Qin; Wang, Xiu-Li; Yu, Feng; Liu, Yan-Li; Yang, An-Gang; Gao, Chun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Whereas miR-101 is involved in the development and progression of breast cancer, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that miR-101 expression is inversely correlated with the clinical stage, lymph node metastasis and prognosis in breast cancers. Introduction of miR-101 inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and suppressed tumor growth and lung metastasis of in vivo. CX chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7) is a direct target of miR-101, positively correlating with the histological grade and the incidence of lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. The effects of miR-101 were mimicked and counteracted by CXCR7 depletion and overexpression, respectively. STAT3 signaling downstream of CXCR7 is involved in miR-101 regulation of breast cancer cell behaviors. These findings have implications for the potential application of miR-101 in breast cancer treatment. PMID:26360780

  13. Gambogic acid inhibits multiple myeloma mediated osteoclastogenesis through suppression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj K; Kale, Vijay P; Song, Chunhua; Sung, Shen-shu; Sharma, Arun K; Talamo, Giampaolo; Dovat, Sinisa; Amin, Shantu G

    2014-10-01

    Bone disease, characterized by the presence of lytic lesions and osteoporosis is the hallmark of multiple myeloma (MM). Stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α) and its receptor, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), has been implicated as a regulator of bone resorption, suggesting that agents that can suppress SDF1α/CXCR4 signaling might inhibit osteoclastogenesis, a process closely linked to bone resorption. We, therefore, investigated whether gambogic acid (GA), a xanthone, could inhibit CXCR4 signaling and suppress osteoclastogenesis induced by MM cells. Through docking studies we predicted that GA directly interacts with CXCR4. This xanthone down-regulates the expression of CXCR4 on MM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The down-regulation of CXCR4 was not due to proteolytic degradation, but rather GA suppresses CXCR4 mRNA expression by inhibiting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) DNA binding. This was further confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, as GA inhibits p65 binding at the CXCR4 promoter. GA suppressed SDF-1α-induced chemotaxis of MM cells and downstream signaling of CXCR4 by inhibiting phosphorylation of Akt, p38, and Erk1/2 in MM cells. GA abrogated the RANKL-induced differentiation of macrophages to osteoclasts in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, we found that MM cells induced differentiation of macrophages to osteoclasts, and that GA suppressed this process. Importantly, suppression of osteoclastogenesis by GA was mediated through IL-6 inhibition. Overall, our results show that GA is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression and has a strong potential to suppress osteoclastogenesis mediated by MM cells. PMID:25034231

  14. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2014-05-01

    Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD. PMID:24704449

  15. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression in HaCaT cells. • PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB mediate TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression. • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB. • (+)-Nootkatone suppresses chemokine expression by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 pathways. - Abstract: Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD.

  16. Inhibition of metastasis of rhabdomyosarcoma by a novel neutralizing antibody to CXC chemokine receptor-4

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Kenji; Watanabe, Miho; Sato, Yasuko; Hata, Junichi; Ishii, Nobuya; Aoki, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma affecting children, and the overall cure rate of children with metastatic disease remains below 30%. The CXC chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4)/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) axis has been implicated in the promotion of metastatic potential in several tumors. In this study, we developed a novel anti-CXCR4 mAb, CF172, and investigated its antimetastatic activity against rhabdomyosarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo, to evaluate its potential as a therapeutic antibody to treat rhabdomyosarcoma. The CF172 molecule showed a specific binding reactivity against human CXCR4, as well as a specific neutralizing activity against CXCR4/SDF1 signal transduction. Using CF172, we determined that SJCRH30 rhabdomyosarcoma cells expressed high levels of CXCR4. In addition, CF172 was found to inhibit the SDF1-induced migration activity of SJCRH30 cells in vitro. Using xenograft models of SJCRH30 cells, we carried out in vivo efficacy studies for peritoneal and lymph node metastasis, which were clinically observed in rhabdomyosarcoma. These studies indicated that CF172 significantly decreased both types of metastasis of SJCRH30. In conclusion, we found that a novel anti-CXCR4 mAb, CF172, with specific reactivity against human CXCR4, prevented peritoneal metastasis and lymph node metastasis of rhabdomyosarcoma in animal models. These results suggest that CF172 is a potential antimetastasis therapeutic antibody for rhabdomyosarcoma treatment. PMID:25154453

  17. Antagonism of chemokine receptor CXCR3 inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis to lungs.

    PubMed

    Pradelli, Emmanuelle; Karimdjee-Soilihi, Babou; Michiels, Jean-François; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Millet, Marie-Ange; Vandenbos, Fanny; Sullivan, Timothy J; Collins, Tassie L; Johnson, Michael G; Medina, Julio C; Kleinerman, Eugenie S; Schmid-Alliana, Annie; Schmid-Antomarchi, Heidy

    2009-12-01

    Metastasis continues to be the leading cause of mortality for patients with cancer. Several years ago, it became clear that chemokines and their receptors could control the tumor progress. CXCR3 has now been identified in many cancers including osteosarcoma and CXCR3 ligands were expressed by lungs that are the primary sites to which this tumor metastasize. This study tested the hypothesis that disruption of the CXCR3/CXCR3 ligands complexes could lead to a decrease in lungs metastasis. The experimental design involved the use of the CXCR3 antagonist, AMG487 and 2 murine models of osteosarcoma lung metastases. After tail vein injection of osteosarcoma cells, mice that were systematically treated with AMG487 according to preventive or curative protocols had a significant reduction in metastatic disease. Treatment of osteosarcoma cells in vitro with AMG487 led to decreased migration, decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity, decreased proliferation/survival and increased caspase-independent death. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that CXCR3 and their ligands intervene in the initial dissemination of the osteosarcoma cells to the lungs and stimulate the growth and expansion of the metastatic foci in later stages. Moreover, these studies indicate that targeting CXCR3 may specifically inhibit tumor metastasis without adversely affecting antitumoral host response. PMID:19544560

  18. Antagonism of chemokine receptor CXCR3 inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis to lungs

    PubMed Central

    Pradelli, Emmanuelle; Karimdjee-Soilihi, Babou; Michiels, Jean-François; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Millet, Marie-Ange; Vandenbos, Fanny; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Collins, Tassie L.; Johnson, Michael G.; Medina, Julio C.; Kleinerman, Eugenie S.; Schmid-Alliana, Annie; Schmid-Antomarchi, Heidy

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis continues to be the leading cause of mortality for patients with cancer. Several years ago, it became clear that chemokines and their receptors could control the tumor progress. CXCR3 has now been identified in many cancers including osteosarcoma and CXCR3 ligands were expressed by lungs that are the primary sites to which this tumor metastasize. This study tested the hypothesis that disruption of the CXCR3/CXCR3 ligands complexes could lead to a decrease in lungs metastasis. The experimental design involved the use of the CXCR3 antagonist, AMG487 and 2 murine models of osteosarcoma lung metastases. After tail vein injection of osteosarcoma cells, mice that were systematically treated with AMG487 according to preventive or curative protocols had a significant reduction in metastatic disease. Treatment of osteosarcoma cells in vitro with AMG487 led to decreased migration, decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity, decreased proliferation/survival and increased caspase-independent death. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that CXCR3 and their ligands intervene in the initial dissemination of the osteosarcoma cells to the lungs and stimulate the growth and expansion of the metastatic foci in later stages. Moreover, these studies indicate that targeting CXCR3 may specifically inhibit tumor metastasis without adversely affecting antitumoral host response. PMID:19544560

  19. Functional inhibition of chemokine receptor CCR2 by dicer-substrate-siRNA prevents pain development

    PubMed Central

    Midavaine, Élora; Dansereau, Marc-André; Tétreault, Pascal; Longpré, Jean-Michel; Jacobi, Ashley M; Rose, Scott D; Behlke, Mark A; Beaudet, Nicolas; Sarret, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that the C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2, or monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) acts as a neuromodulator in the central nervous system through its binding to the C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). Notably, it is well established that the CCL2/CCR2 axis plays a key role in neuron-glia communication as well as in spinal nociceptive transmission. Gene silencing through RNA interference has recently emerged as a promising avenue in research and drug development, including therapeutic management of chronic pain. In the present study, we used 27-mer Dicer-substrate small interfering RNA (DsiRNA) targeting CCR2 and assessed their ability to reverse the nociceptive behaviors induced by spinal CCL2 injection or following intraplantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant. Results To this end, we first developed high-potency DsiRNAs designed to target different sequences distributed across the rat CCR2 (rCCR2) messenger RNA. For optimization, methyl groups were added to the two most potent DsiRNA candidates (Evader and M7 2′-O-methyl modified duplexes) in order to improve in vivo duplex stability and to reduce potential immunostimulatory activity. Our results demonstrated that all modified candidates formulated with the cell-penetrating peptide reagent Transductin showed strong RNAi activity following intrathecal delivery, exhibiting >50% rCCR2 knockdown in lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Accordingly, we found that these DsiRNA duplexes were able to reduce spinal microglia activation and were effective at blocking CCL2-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Along with similar reductions of rCCR2 messenger RNA, both sequences and methylation patterns were similarly effective in inhibiting the CCL2 nociceptive action for the whole seven days testing period, compared to mismatch DsiRNA. DsiRNAs against CCR2 also reversed the hypernociceptive responses observed in the complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced inflammatory chronic pain model

  20. Inhibition of chemokine-like factor 1 improves blood-brain barrier dysfunction in rats following focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling-Lei; Wang, Zhi-Yuan; Hu, Jin-Feng; Yuan, Yu-He; Li, Hua; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequent edema are major contributors to the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and the current clinical therapy remains unsatisfied. Chemokine-like factor 1 (CKLF1), as a novel C-C chemokine, plays important roles in immune response. The expression of CKLF1 increased after focal cerebral ischemia and inhibition of CKLF1 activity showed neuroprotective effect by alleviating infiltration of neutrophil and neuron apoptosis in cerebral ischemia. However, few studies have focused on the role of CKLF1 on BBB integrity. The objective of present study was to investigate the role of CKLF1 on BBB integrity by applying anti-CKLF1 antibodies in rat focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion model. Brain water content, Evans blue leakage and the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP-4), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Occludin were measured. After treatment with anti-CKLF1 antibody, brain water content and Evans blue leakage in ipsilateral hemisphere were decreased in a dose-dependent manner at 24h after reperfusion, but not changed in contralateral hemisphere. Anti-CKLF1 antibody reduced the expression of AQP-4 and MMP-9, and upregulated the expression of ZO-1 and Occludin. These results suggest that CKLF1 is involved in BBB disruption after reperfusion. Inhibition of CKLF1 protects against cerebral ischemia by maintaining BBB integrity, possibly via inhibiting the expression of AQP-4 and MMP-9, and increasing the expression of tight junction protein. PMID:27283776

  1. Pomolic Acid Inhibits Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells Through the Suppression of CXC Chemokine Receptor Type 4 Expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Buyun; Kim, Ji-Hun; Park, Byoungduck

    2016-06-01

    High mortality of cancer-mediated deaths is due to metastasis. CXC chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) signaling has been demonstrated to be involved in migration of breast cancer. Thus, identification of CXCR4 inhibitor has been challenged constantly as an anticancer drug. This study is aimed to investigate the CXCR4 inhibitor that could inhibit tumor metastasis from natural products. We demonstrated that pomolic acid (PA), a component of Euscaphis japonica, could downregulate CXCR4 expression in breast cancer cells. Treatment with proteasomal and lysosomal inhibitors did not show significant effects on PA's ability. When we further explored the molecular mechanism, suppression of CXCR4 occurred at transcriptional level and was correlated with inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation. Downregulation of CXCR4 by PA was accompanied by the inhibition of CXC motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12)-induced invasion of breast cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that PA, as a novel inhibitor of CXCR4, can be a promising therapeutic agent for treatment of cancer metastasis. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1296-1307, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26495998

  2. Progranulin inhibits expression and release of chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 in a TNFR1 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Jian, Jinlong; Bhagat, Priyal; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN), a pleiotrophic growth factor, is known to play an important role in the maintenance and regulation of the homeostatic dynamics of normal tissue development, proliferation, regeneration, and host-defense. PGRN also has potent anti-inflammatory functionality, and deregulated PGRN is associated with rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. We have previously reported that PGRN directly binds to TNFR and significantly enhances Treg population and stimulatesIL-10 production. To further investigate PGRN’s function in the immune system we performed a gene array analysis on CD4+ T cells from wild type B6 mice and PGRN −/− mice. We identified many chemokines and their receptors, among which CXCL9 and CXCL10 were most prominent, that were significantly induced in PGRN null mice. Administration of recombinant PGRN protein strongly inhibited TNF and IFN-γ-induced CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression. In addition, CXCL9 expression is strongly upregulated in PGRN KO mice and its level is correlated with severity of inflammation in a dermatitis model. Further, we have demonstrated that PGRN-mediated inhibition of chemokine expression largely depends on TNFR1. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying PGRN mediated regulation of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26892362

  3. Progranulin inhibits expression and release of chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 in a TNFR1 dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Jian, Jinlong; Bhagat, Priyal; Liu, Chuan-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN), a pleiotrophic growth factor, is known to play an important role in the maintenance and regulation of the homeostatic dynamics of normal tissue development, proliferation, regeneration, and host-defense. PGRN also has potent anti-inflammatory functionality, and deregulated PGRN is associated with rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. We have previously reported that PGRN directly binds to TNFR and significantly enhances Treg population and stimulatesIL-10 production. To further investigate PGRN's function in the immune system we performed a gene array analysis on CD4+ T cells from wild type B6 mice and PGRN -/- mice. We identified many chemokines and their receptors, among which CXCL9 and CXCL10 were most prominent, that were significantly induced in PGRN null mice. Administration of recombinant PGRN protein strongly inhibited TNF and IFN-γ-induced CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression. In addition, CXCL9 expression is strongly upregulated in PGRN KO mice and its level is correlated with severity of inflammation in a dermatitis model. Further, we have demonstrated that PGRN-mediated inhibition of chemokine expression largely depends on TNFR1. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying PGRN mediated regulation of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26892362

  4. Anti-phospholipid human monoclonal antibodies inhibit CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and induce β-chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S. Munir; Scearce, Richard M.; Plonk, M. Kelly; Kozink, Daniel M.; Drinker, Mark S.; Zhang, Ruijun; Xia, Shi-Mao; Sutherland, Laura L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Giles, Ian P.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Edmonds, Tara G.; Soares, Melina; Barbero, Gustavo; Forthal, Donald N.; Landucci, Gary; Chang, Connie; King, Steven W.; Kavlie, Anita; Denny, Thomas N.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Pojen P.; Thorpe, Philip E.; Montefiori, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional antibody-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 infection is thought to result from the binding of antibodies to virions, thus preventing virus entry. However, antibodies that broadly neutralize HIV-1 are rare and are not induced by current vaccines. We report that four human anti-phospholipid monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (PGN632, P1, IS4, and CL1) inhibit HIV-1 CCR5-tropic (R5) primary isolate infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with 80% inhibitory concentrations of <0.02 to ∼10 µg/ml. Anti-phospholipid mAbs inhibited PBMC HIV-1 infection in vitro by mechanisms involving binding to monocytes and triggering the release of MIP-1α and MIP-1β. The release of these β-chemokines explains both the specificity for R5 HIV-1 and the activity of these mAbs in PBMC cultures containing both primary lymphocytes and monocytes. PMID:20368576

  5. Inhibition of Chemokine (C-C Motif) Receptor 7 Sialylation Suppresses CCL19-Stimulated Proliferation, Invasion and Anti-Anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Mei-Lin; Chang, Tsung-Ming; Chiang, Chi-Hsiang; Chang, Han-Chen; Hou, Ming-Feng; Li, Wen-Shan; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 (CCR7) is involved in lymph-node homing of naive and regulatory T cells and lymphatic metastasis of cancer cells. Sialic acids comprise a group of monosaccharide units that are added to the terminal position of the oligosaccharide chain of glycoproteins by sialyation. Recent studies suggest that aberrant sialylation of receptor proteins contributes to proliferation, motility, and drug resistance of cancer cells. In this study, we addressed whether CCR7 is a sialylated receptor protein and tried to elucidate the effect of sialylation in the regulation of signal transduction and biological function of CCR7. Our results demonstrated that α-2, 3-sialyltransferase which catalyze sialylation reaction in vivo was overexpressed in breast tumor tissues and cell lines. Lectin blot analysis clearly demonstrated that CCR7 receptor was sialyated in breast cancer cells. Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 19 (CCL19), the cognate ligand for CCR7, induced the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT signaling and increased the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and proliferation of breast cancer cells. When cells were pre-treated with a sialyltransferase inhibitor AL10 or sialidase, CCL19-induced cell growth was significantly suppressed. CCL19 also increased invasion and prevented anoikis by up-regulating pro-survival proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Inhibition of sialylation by AL10 totally abolished these effects. Finally, we showed that AL10 inhibited tumorigenicity of breast cancer in experimental animals. Taken together, we demonstrate for the first time that CCR7 receptor is a sialylated protein and sialylation is important for the paracrine stimulation by its endogenous ligand CCL19. In addition, inhibition of aberrant sialylation of CCR7 suppresses proliferation and invasion and triggers anoikis in breast cancer cells. Targeting of sialylation enzymes may be a novel strategy for breast cancer treatment. PMID:24915301

  6. Inhibition of infection-mediated preterm birth by administration of broad spectrum chemokine inhibitor in mice.

    PubMed

    Shynlova, Oksana; Dorogin, Anna; Li, Yunqing; Lye, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the single most important cause of perinatal and infant mortality worldwide. Maternal infection can result in PTB. We investigated the ability of a Broad Spectrum Chemokine Inhibitor (BSCI) to prevent infection-induced PTB in mice. PTB was initiated in pregnant mice by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 μg). Half the mice received BSCI (10 mg/kg) 24 hrs prior to and immediately before LPS administration. The impact of LPS alone or LPS plus BSCI was assessed on (i) injection-to-delivery interval, foetal survival rate, placental and neonates' weight; (ii) amniotic fluid and maternal plasma cytokine levels (by Luminex assay); foetal and maternal tissue cytokine gene expression levels (by Real-Time RT-PCR); (iii) immune cells infiltration into the uterine tissue (by stereological immunohistochemistry). Pre-treatment with BSCI (i) decreased LPS-induced PTB (64% versus 100%, P < 0.05); (ii) significantly attenuated cytokine/chemokine expression in maternal tissues (plasma, liver, myometrium, decidua); (iii) significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration in the mouse myometrium. BSCI-treated mice in which PTB was delayed till term had live foetuses with normal placental and foetal weight. BSCI represents a promising new class of therapeutics for PTB. In a mouse model of preterm labour, BCSI suppresses systemic inflammation in maternal tissues which resulted in the reduced incidence of LPS-mediated PTB. These data provide support for efforts to target inflammatory responses as a means of preventing PTB. PMID:24894878

  7. Inhibition of infection-mediated preterm birth by administration of broad spectrum chemokine inhibitor in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shynlova, Oksana; Dorogin, Anna; Li, Yunqing; Lye, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the single most important cause of perinatal and infant mortality worldwide. Maternal infection can result in PTB. We investigated the ability of a Broad Spectrum Chemokine Inhibitor (BSCI) to prevent infection-induced PTB in mice. PTB was initiated in pregnant mice by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 μg). Half the mice received BSCI (10 mg/kg) 24 hrs prior to and immediately before LPS administration. The impact of LPS alone or LPS plus BSCI was assessed on (i) injection-to-delivery interval, foetal survival rate, placental and neonates' weight; (ii) amniotic fluid and maternal plasma cytokine levels (by Luminex assay); foetal and maternal tissue cytokine gene expression levels (by Real-Time RT-PCR); (iii) immune cells infiltration into the uterine tissue (by stereological immunohistochemistry). Pre-treatment with BSCI (i) decreased LPS-induced PTB (64% versus 100%, P < 0.05); (ii) significantly attenuated cytokine/chemokine expression in maternal tissues (plasma, liver, myometrium, decidua); (iii) significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration in the mouse myometrium. BSCI-treated mice in which PTB was delayed till term had live foetuses with normal placental and foetal weight. BSCI represents a promising new class of therapeutics for PTB. In a mouse model of preterm labour, BCSI suppresses systemic inflammation in maternal tissues which resulted in the reduced incidence of LPS-mediated PTB. These data provide support for efforts to target inflammatory responses as a means of preventing PTB. PMID:24894878

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the up-regulation of endothelial chemokines in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Adriana M.; Booker, Cindy; Ellis, Charles D.; Siew, Edward D.; Graves, Amy J.; Shintani, Ayumi; Abumrad, Naji N.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Ikizler, Talat Alp

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic systemic inflammation is common in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis (CKD5D) and has been considered a key mediator of the increased cardiovascular risk in this patient population. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that supplementation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) will attenuate the systemic inflammatory process in CKD5D patients. Methods The design was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled pilot trial (NCT00655525). Thirty-eight patients were randomly assigned in a 1 : 1 fashion to receive 2.9 g of eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5, n-3) plus docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6, n-3) versus placebo for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in pro-inflammatory chemokines measured by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Secondary outcomes were changes in systemic inflammatory markers. Analysis of covariance was used to compare percent change from baseline to 12 weeks. Results Thirty-one patients completed 12 weeks and three patients completed 6 weeks of the study. Median age was 52 (interquartile range 45, 60) years, 74% were African-American and 79% were male. Supplementation of ω-3 PUFAs effectively decreased the LPS-induced PBMC expression of RANTES (Regulated upon Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and Secreted) and MCP-1 (Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1; unadjusted P = 0.04 and 0.06; adjusted for demographics P = 0.02 and 0.05, respectively). There was no significant effect of the intervention on serum inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and procalcitonin). Conclusions The results of this pilot study suggest that supplementation of ω-3 PUFAs is beneficial in decreasing the levels of endothelial chemokines, RANTES and MCP-1. Studies of larger sample size and longer duration are required to further evaluate effects of ω-3 PUFAs on systemic markers of inflammation, other metabolic parameters and clinical outcomes, particularly

  9. Capacity of wild-type and chemokine-armed parvovirus H-1PV for inhibiting neo-angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lavie, Muriel; Struyf, Sofie; Stroh-Dege, Alexandra; Rommelaere, Jean; Van Damme, Jo; Dinsart, Christiane

    2013-12-15

    Anti-angiogenic therapy has been recognized as a powerful potential strategy for impeding the growth of various tumors. However no major therapeutic effects have been observed to date, mainly because of the emergence of several resistance mechanisms. Among novel strategies to target tumor vasculature, some oncolytic viruses open up new prospects. In this context, we addressed the question whether the rodent parvovirus H-1PV can target endothelial cells. We show that cultures of human normal (HUVEC) and immortalized (KS-IMM) endothelial cells sustain an abortive viral cycle upon infection with H-1PV and are sensitive to H-1PV cytotoxicity. H-1PV significantly inhibits infected KS-IMM tumor growth. This effect may be traced back by the virus ability to both kill proliferating endothelial cells and inhibit VEGF production Recombinant H-1PV vectors can also transduce tumor cells with chemokines endowed with anti-angiogenesis properties, and warrant further validation for the treatment of highly vascularized tumors. - Highlights: • The oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV can target endothelial cells. • Abortive viral cycle upon infection of endothelial cells with H-1PV. • Inhibition of VEGF expression and KS-IMM tumor growth by H-1PV.

  10. Investigation of Inhibition Mechanism of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 by Micro-second Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Yurtsever, Mine; Durdagi, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) belongs to G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and plays an important role in treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since HIV uses CCR5 protein as a co-receptor. Recently, the crystal structure of CCR5-bound complex with an approved anti-retroviral drug (maroviroc) was resolved. During the crystallization procedure, amino acid residues (i.e., Cys224, Arg225, Asn226 and Glu227) at the third intra-cellular loop were replaced by the rubredoxin for stability reasons. In the current study, we aimed to understand the impact of the incorporated rubredoxin on the conformations of TM domains of the target protein. For this reason, rubredoxin was deleted from the crystal structure and the missing amino acids were engineered. The resultant structure was subjected to long (μs) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to shed light into the inhibitory mechanism. The derived model structure displayed a significant deviation in the cytoplasmic domain of TM5 and IC3 in the absence of rubredoxin. The principal component analyses (PCA) and MD trajectory analyses revealed important structural and dynamical differences at apo and holo forms of the CCR5. PMID:26299310

  11. Roflumilast inhibits the release of chemokines and TNF-α from human lung macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Buenestado, A; Grassin-Delyle, S; Guitard, F; Naline, E; Faisy, C; Israël-Biet, D; Sage, E; Bellamy, JF; Tenor, H; Devillier, P

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Lung macrophages are critically involved in respiratory diseases. This study assessed the effects of the PDE4 inhibitor roflumilast and its active metabolite, roflumilast N-oxide on the release of a range of chemokines (CCL2, 3, 4, CXCL1, 8, 10) and of TNF-α, from human lung macrophages, stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide LPS. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Lung macrophages isolated from resected human lungs were incubated with roflumilast, roflumilast N-oxide, PGE2, the COX inhibitor indomethacin, the COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 or vehicle and stimulated with LPS (24 h). Chemokines, TNF-α, PGE2 and 6-keto PGF1α were measured in culture supernatants by immunoassay. COX-2 mRNA expression was assessed with RT-qPCR. PDE activities were determined in macrophage homogenates. KEY RESULTS Expression of PDE4 in lung macrophages was increased after incubation with LPS. Roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide concentration-dependently reduced the LPS-stimulated release of CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CXCL10 and TNF-α from human lung macrophages, whereas that of CXCL1 or CXCL8 was not altered. This reduction by the PDE4 inhibitors was further accentuated by exogenous PGE2 (10 nM) but abolished in the presence of indomethacin or NS-398. Conversely, addition of PGE2 (10 nM), in the presence of indomethacin restored inhibition by roflumilast. LPS also increased PGE2 and 6-keto PGF1α release from lung macrophages which was associated with an up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide reduced LPS-induced release of CCL2, 3, 4, CXCL10 and TNF-α in human lung macrophages. PMID:21913898

  12. CC-chemokine ligand 2 inhibition in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a phase 2 trial of carlumab.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ganesh; Martinez, Fernando J; Brown, Kevin K; Costabel, Ulrich; Cottin, Vincent; Wells, Athol U; Lancaster, Lisa; Gibson, Kevin F; Haddad, Tarik; Agarwal, Prasheen; Mack, Michael; Dasgupta, Bidisha; Nnane, Ivo P; Flavin, Susan K; Barnathan, Elliot S

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of carlumab in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).A phase 2, randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled dose-ranging study was conducted in patients with IPF (n=126). Patients were randomised to carlumab (1 mg·kg(-1), 5 mg·kg(-1), or 15 mg·kg(-1)) or placebo every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint was the rate of percentage change in forced vital capacity (FVC). Secondary endpoints were time to disease progression, absolute change in FVC, relative change in diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score.Due to a pre-planned, unfavourable interim benefit-risk analysis, dosing was suspended. The rate of percentage change in FVC showed no treatment effect (placebo -0.582%, 1 mg·kg(-1) -0.533%, 5 mg·kg(-1) -0.799% and 15 mg·kg(-1) -0.470%; p=0.261). All active treatment groups showed a greater decline in FVC (1 mg·kg(-1) -290 mL, 5 mg·kg(-1) -370 mL and 15 mg·kg(-1) -320 mL) compared with placebo (-130 mL). No effect on disease progression, DLCO, infection rates or mortality was observed. SGRQ scores showed a nonsignificant trend toward worsening with active treatment. Unexpectedly, free CC-chemokine ligand 2 levels were elevated above baseline at both 24 and 52 weeks. A higher proportion of patients with one or more serious adverse events was observed in the 5 mg·kg(-1) group (53.1%) compared with 1 mg·kg(-1) (15.2%), 15 mg·kg(-1) (21.9%) and placebo (46.4%), although no unexpected serious adverse events were noted.Although dosing was stopped prematurely, it is unlikely that carlumab provides benefit to IPF patients. PMID:26493793

  13. The phosphoinositide 3′-kinase delta inhibitor, CAL-101, inhibits B-cell receptor signaling and chemokine networks in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hoellenriegel, Julia; Meadows, Sarah A.; Sivina, Mariela; Wierda, William G.; Kantarjian, Hagop; Keating, Michael J.; Giese, Neill; O'Brien, Susan; Yu, Albert; Miller, Langdon L.; Lannutti, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    In lymphocytes, the phosphoinositide 3′-kinase (PI3K) isoform p110δ (PI3Kδ) transmits signals from surface receptors, including the B-cell receptor (BCR). CAL-101, a selective inhibitor of PI3Kδ, displays clinical activity in CLL, causing rapid lymph node shrinkage and a transient lymphocytosis. Inhibition of pro-survival pathways, the presumed mechanism of CAL-101, does not explain this characteristic pattern of activity. Therefore, we tested CAL-101 in assays that model CLL-microenvironment interactions in vitro. We found that CAL-101 inhibits CLL cell chemotaxis toward CXCL12 and CXCL13 and migration beneath stromal cells (pseudoemperipolesis). CAL-101 also down-regulates secretion of chemokines in stromal cocultures and after BCR triggering. CAL-101 reduces survival signals derived from the BCR or from nurse-like cells, and inhibits BCR- and chemokine-receptor–induced AKT and MAP kinase (ERK) activation. In stromal cocultures, CAL-101 sensitizes CLL cells toward bendamustine, fludarabine, and dexamethasone. These results are corroborated by clinical data showing marked reductions in circulating CCL3, CCL4, and CXCL13 levels, and a surge in lymphocytosis during CAL-101 treatment. Thus, CAL-101 displays a dual mechanism of action, directly decreasing cell survival while reducing interactions that retain CLL cells in protective tissue microenvironments. These data provide an explanation for the clinical activity of CAL-101, and a roadmap for future therapeutic development. PMID:21803855

  14. Atypical chemokine receptors in cancer: friends or foes?

    PubMed

    Massara, Matteo; Bonavita, Ornella; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2016-06-01

    The chemokine system is a fundamental component of cancer-related inflammation involved in all stages of cancer development. It controls not only leukocyte infiltration in primary tumors but also angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation, and migration to metastatic sites. Atypical chemokine receptors are a new, emerging class of regulators of the chemokine system. They control chemokine bioavailability by scavenging, transporting, or storing chemokines. They can also regulate the activity of canonical chemokine receptors with which they share the ligands by forming heterodimers or by modulating their expression levels or signaling activity. Here, we summarize recent results about the role of these receptors (atypical chemokine receptor 1/Duffy antigen receptor for chemokine, atypical chemokine receptor 2/D6, atypical chemokine receptor 3/CXC-chemokine receptor 7, and atypical chemokine receptor 4/CC-chemokine receptor-like 1) on the tumorigenesis process, indicating that their effects are strictly dependent on the cell type on which they are expressed and on their coexpression with other chemokine receptors. Indeed, atypical chemokine receptors inhibit tumor growth and progression through their activity as negative regulators of chemokine bioavailability, whereas, on the contrary, they can promote tumorigenesis when they regulate the signaling of other chemokine receptors, such as CXC-chemokine receptor 4. Thus, atypical chemokine receptors are key components of the regulatory network of inflammation and immunity in cancer and may have a major effect on anti-inflammatory and immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26908826

  15. Regulation of breast cancer metastasis by atypical chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoyun; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2009-05-01

    The interaction between chemokines and their G-protein-coupled receptors plays an important role in promoting metastasis of different kinds of human cancers. However, the expression of an atypical chemokine receptor, CCX-CKR, which serves as a decoy receptor to attract chemokines, inhibits the growth and metastasis of breast cancer by sequestration of chemokines. PMID:19383808

  16. Inhibition of lung metastasis by chemokine CCL17-mediated in vivo silencing of genes in CCR4+ Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Biragyn, Arya; Bodogai, Monica; Olkhanud, Purevdorj B.; Denny-Brown, Sinan R.; Puri, Nitin; Ayukawa, Koichi; Kanegasaki, Shiro; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Lee-Chang, Catalina

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant attractiveness of anti-sense oligonucleotide/RNAi technology, its clinical application has been precluded by a lack of methods for targeted delivery and transduction of primary immune cells in vivo. Here, we devised a chemokine CCL17-based strategy (TARC-arp) that transiently silences expression of genes in immune cells by delivering inhibitory oligonucleotides via their chemokine receptors. In modeling studies using mice with established 4T1.2 breast cancer, we show that IL10 produced by CCR4+ cells, in particular FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), plays an important role in lung metastasis. As such, TARC-arp-mediated silencing of IL-10 or FoxP3 in CCR4+ Tregs is sufficient to block lung metastasis. Thus, we provide a simple solution that circumvents the problems of RNAi use in vivo, indicating that a disease outcome can be successfully controlled by delivering inhibitory oligonucleotides with chemokines to inactivate a selective subset of immune cells. PMID:23603860

  17. The good and the bad of chemokines/chemokine receptors in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Ann; Yang, Jinming; Su, Yingjun

    2010-01-01

    Summary Chemokine ligand/receptor interactions affect melanoma cell growth, stimulate or inhibit angiogenesis, recruit leukocytes, promote metastasis, and alter the gene expression profile of the melanoma associated fibroblasts. Chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions can protect against tumor development/growth or can stimulate melanoma tumor progression, tumor growth and metastasis. Metastatic melanoma cells express chemokine receptors that play a major role in the specifying the organ site for metastasis, based upon receptor detection of the chemokine gradient elaborated by a specific organ/tissue. A therapeutic approach that utilizes the protective benefit of chemokines involves delivery of angiostatic chemokines or chemokines that stimulate the infiltration of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer T cells into the tumor microenvironment. An alternative approach that tackles the tumorigenic property of chemokines uses chemokine antibodies or chemokine receptor antagonists to target the growth and metastatic properties of these interactions. Based upon our current understanding of the role of chemokine-mediated inflammation in cancer, it is important that we learn to appropriately regulate the chemokine contribution to the tumorigenic `cytokine/chemokine storm', and to metastasis. PMID:19222802

  18. Modulation of Chemokine Responses: Synergy and Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine biology is mediated by more complex interactions than simple monomolecular ligand–receptor interactions, as chemokines can form higher order quaternary structures, which can also be formed after binding to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on endothelial cells, and their receptors are found as dimers and/or oligomers at the cell surface. Due to the complexity of the chemokine binding and signaling system, several mechanisms have been proposed to provide an explanation for the synergy observed between chemokines in leukocyte migration. Pioneering studies on interactions between different chemokines have revealed that they can act as antagonists, or synergize with other chemokines. The synergism can occur at different levels, involving either two chemokine receptors triggered simultaneously or sequentially exposed to their agonists, or the activation of one type of chemokine receptor triggered by chemokine heterocomplexes. In addition to the several chemokines that, by forming a heterocomplex with chemokine receptor agonists, act as enhancers of molecules of the same family, we have recently identified HMGB1, an endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) molecule, as an enhancer of the activity of CXCL12. It is now evident that synergism between chemokines is crucial at the very early stage of inflammation. In addition, the low-affinity interaction with GAGs has recently been shown to induce cooperativity allowing synergy or inhibition of activity by displacement of other ligands. PMID:27242790

  19. Anti-inflammatory actions of herbal formula Gyejibokryeong-hwan regulated by inhibiting chemokine production and STAT1 activation in HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soo-Jin; Lim, Hye-Sun; Seo, Chang-Seob; Jin, Seong-Eun; Yoo, Sae-Rom; Lee, Nari; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2015-01-01

    Gyejibokryeong-hwan (GJBRH; Keishi-bukuryo-gan in Japan and Guizhi Fuling Wan in China) is a traditional herbal formula comprising five medicinal herbs and is used to treat climacteric syndrome. GJBRH has been shown to exhibit biological activity against diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, atherosclerosis, ischemia, and cancer. However, there is no scientific evidence of its activities against skin inflammation, including atopic dermatitis. We used the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line to investigate the effects of GJBRH on skin inflammation. No significant cytotoxicity was observed in cells treated with GJBRH up to a concentration of 1000 µg/mL. Exposure to the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) significantly increased HaCaT cell production of the following chemokines: macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC)/CCL22; regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5; and interleukin-8 (IL-8). In contrast, GJBRH significantly reduced the production of MDC, RANTES, and IL-8 compared with control cells simulated with TNF-α and IFN-γ. Consistently, GJBRH suppressed the mRNA expression of MDC, RANTES, and IL-8 in TNF-α and IFN-γ-treated cells. Treatment with GJBRH markedly inhibited phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) in HaCaT cells stimulated with TNF-α and IFN-γ. Our findings indicate that GJBRH impairs TNF-α and IFN-γ-mediated inflammatory chemokine production and STAT1 phosphorylation in keratinocytes. We suggest that GJBRH may be a potent therapeutic agent for inflammatory skin disorders. PMID:25757924

  20. Molecular Pharmacology of Chemokine Receptors.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Raymond H; de Munnik, Sabrina M; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F; Smit, Martine J

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are involved in various pathologies such as inflammatory diseases, cancer, and HIV infection. Small molecule and antibody-based antagonists have been developed to inhibit chemokine-induced receptor activity. Currently two small molecule inhibitors targeting CXCR4 and CCR5 are on the market for stem cell mobilization and the treatment of HIV infection, respectively. Antibody fragments (e.g., nanobodies) targeting chemokine receptors are primarily orthosteric ligands, competing for the chemokine binding site. This is opposed by most small molecules, which act as allosteric modulators and bind to the receptor at a topographically distinct site as compared to chemokines. Allosteric modulators can be distinguished from orthosteric ligands by unique features, such as a saturable effect and probe dependency. For successful drug development, it is essential to determine pharmacological parameters (i.e., affinity, potency, and efficacy) and the mode of action of potential drugs during early stages of research in order to predict the biological effect of chemokine receptor targeting drugs in the clinic. This chapter explains how the pharmacological profile of chemokine receptor targeting ligands can be determined and quantified using binding and functional experiments. PMID:26921959

  1. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-{gamma}-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Yoshiichi; Hiroi, Miki; Shimojima, Takahiro; Iguchi, Mayumi; Kanegae, Haruhide; Ohmori, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp

    2006-11-17

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the effect of sulindac on intracellular signaling pathways in host immune cells such as macrophages, we investigated the effect of the drug on interferon gamma (IFN{gamma})-induced expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and other genes in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Sulindac, but not aspirin or sodium salicylate, inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced expression of the CXC ligand 9 (CXCL9) mRNA, a chemokine for activated T cells, whereas the interferon-induced expression of CXCL10 or IFN regulatory factor-1 was not affected by sulindac. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that sulindac inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced promoter activity of the CXCL9 gene. Surprisingly, sulindac had no inhibitory effect on IFN{gamma}-induced STAT1 activation; however, constitutive nuclear factor {kappa}B activity was suppressed by the drug. These results indicate that sulindac selectively inhibited IFN{gamma}-inducible gene expression without inhibiting STAT1 activation.

  2. Chemokine sequestration by atypical chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Hansell, C A H; Simpson, C V; Nibbs, R J B

    2006-12-01

    Leucocyte migration is essential for robust immune and inflammatory responses, and plays a critical role in many human diseases. Chemokines, a family of small secreted protein chemoattractants, are of fundamental importance in this process, directing leucocyte trafficking by signalling through heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors expressed by the migrating cells. However, several mammalian chemokine receptors, including D6 and CCX-CKR (ChemoCentryx chemokine receptor), do not fit existing models of chemokine receptor function, and do not even appear to signal in response to chemokine binding. Instead, these 'atypical' chemokine receptors are biochemically specialized for chemokine sequestration, acting to regulate chemokine bioavailability and thereby influence responses through signalling-competent chemokine receptors. This is of critical importance in vivo, as mice lacking D6 show exaggerated cutaneous inflammatory responses and an increased susceptibility to the development of skin cancer. CCX-CKR, on the other hand, is predicted to modulate homoeostatic lymphocyte and dendritic cell trafficking, key migratory events in acquired immune responses that are directed by CCX-CKR-binding chemokines. Thus studies on 'atypical' chemokine receptors are revealing functional and biochemical diversity within the chemokine receptor family and providing insights into novel mechanisms of chemokine regulation. PMID:17073739

  3. Luteolin inhibits recruitment of monocytes and migration of Lewis lung carcinoma cells by suppressing chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 expression in tumor-associated macrophage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee-Jin; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-29

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play pivotal roles in the progression of cancer. In order to investigate a novel candidate that inhibits the tumor-supporting M2-like phenotype of TAMs, a murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cells were treated with interleukin (IL)-4. Luteolin inhibited phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6), a main downstream signal of IL-4, and reduced the expression of the M2-associated genes. In addition, Luminex multiplex analysis for secreted cytokines revealed that IL-4-enhanced secretion of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) was reduced by luteolin treatment. IL-4-stimulated migration of monocyte, THP-1 cells, was inhibited by luteolin treatment and recovered by recombinant CCL2 supplement. Moreover, luteolin decreased migration of Lewis lung carcinoma cells in a CCL2-dependent manner. Given the important role of the TAM phenotype in the tumor microenvironment, inhibitory effect of luteolin on the monocyte recruitment and cancer migration via suppression of the TAM-secreted CCL2 may suggest a novel therapeutic approach to treat malignant tumors. PMID:26766793

  4. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Zoltan; Vegvari, Aniko; Szabo, Zoltan; Koch, Alisa E.

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines are involved in leukocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites, such as the synovial tissue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is a structural and a functional classification of chemokines. The former includes four groups: CXC, CC, C and CX3C chemokines. Chemokines may also be either inflammatory or homeostatic, however, these functions often overlap. Anti-chemokine and anti-chemokine receptor targeting may be therapeutically used in the future biological therapy of arthritis. Most data in this field have been obtained from animal models of arthritis as only very few human RA trials have been completed. However, it is very likely that various specific chemokine and chemokine receptor antagonists will be developed and administered to RA patients. PMID:20036936

  5. IL-12– and IL-23–modulated T cells induce distinct types of EAE based on histology, CNS chemokine profile, and response to cytokine inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kroenke, Mark A.; Carlson, Thaddeus J.; Andjelkovic, Anuska V.; Segal, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    The interleukin (IL)-12p40 family of cytokines plays a critical role in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the relative contributions of IL-12 and IL-23 to the pathogenic process remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that activation of uncommitted myelin-reactive T cells in the presence of either IL-12p70 or IL-23 confers encephalogenicity. Adoptive transfer of either IL-12p70– or IL-23–polarized T cells into naive syngeneic hosts resulted in an ascending paralysis that was clinically indistinguishable between the two groups. However, histological and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis of central nervous system (CNS) tissues revealed distinct histopathological features and immune profiles. IL-12p70–driven disease was characterized by macrophage-rich infiltrates and prominent NOS2 up-regulation, whereas neutrophils and granulocyte–colony-stimulating factor (CSF) were prominent in IL-23–driven lesions. The monocyte-attracting chemokines CXCL9, 10, and 11 were preferentially expressed in the CNS of mice injected with IL-12p70–modulated T cells, whereas the neutrophil-attracting chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2 were up-regulated in the CNS of mice given IL-23–modulated T cells. Treatment with anti–IL-17 or anti–granulocyte/macrophage-CSF inhibited EAE induced by transfer of IL-23–polarized, but not IL-12p70–polarized, cells. These findings indicate that autoimmunity can be mediated by distinct effector populations that use disparate immunological pathways to achieve a similar clinical outcome. PMID:18573909

  6. Polyplex-mediated inhibition of chemokine receptor CXCR4 and chromatin-remodeling enzyme NCOA3 impedes pancreatic cancer progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Kumar, Sushil; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Sajja, Balasrinivasa R; Xie, Ying; Hang, Yu; Jain, Maneesh; Li, Jing; Boska, Michael D; Batra, Surinder K; Oupický, David

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies due to intense desmoplasia, extreme hypoxia and inherent chemoresistance. Studies have implicated the expression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 and nuclear receptor co-activator-3 (NCOA3) in the development of desmoplasia and metastatic spread of PC. Using a series of polymeric CXCR4 antagonists (PCX), we optimized formulation of PCX/siNCOA3 polyplexes to simultaneously target CXCR4 and NCOA3 in PC. Cholesterol-modified PCX showed maximum CXCR4 antagonism, NCOA3 silencing and inhibition of PC cell migration in vitro. The optimized PCX/siNCOA3 polyplexes were used in evaluating antitumor and antimetastatic activity in orthotopic mouse model of metastatic PC. The polyplexes displayed significant inhibition of primary tumor growth, which was accompanied by a decrease in tumor necrosis and increased tumor perfusion. The polyplexes also showed significant antimetastatic effect and effective suppression of metastasis to distant organs. Overall, dual-function PCX/siNCOA3 polyplexes can effectively regulate tumor microenvironment to decrease progression and dissemination of PC. PMID:27267632

  7. Computational analysis of the structural mechanism of inhibition of chemokine receptor CXCR4 by small molecule antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Kawatkar, Sameer P; Yan, Maocai; Gevariya, Harsukh; Lim, Mi Youn; Eisold, Steven; Zhu, Xuejun; Huang, Ziwei; An, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the structural mechanism of receptor–ligand interactions for the chemokine receptor CXCR4 is essential for determining its physiological and pathological functions and for developing new therapies targeted to CXCR4. We have recently reported a structural mechanism for CXCR4 antagonism by a novel synthetic CXCR4 antagonist RCP168 and compared its effectiveness against the natural agonist SDF-1α. In the present study, using molecular docking, we further investigate the binding modes of another seven small molecules known to act as CXCR4 antagonists. The predicted binding modes were compared with previously published mutagenesis data for two of these (AMD3100 and AMD11070). Four antagonists, including AMD3100, AMD11070, FC131 and KRH-1636, bound in a similar fashion to CXCR4. Two important acidic amino acid residues (Asp262 and Glu288) on CXCR4, previously found essential for AMD3100 binding, were also involved in binding of the other ligands. These four antagonists use a binding site in common with that used by RCP168, which is a novel synthetic derivative of vMIP-II in which the first 10 residues are replaced by D-amino acids. Comparison of binding modes suggested that this binding site is different from the binding region occupied by the N-terminus of SDF-1α, the only known natural ligand of CXCR4. These observations suggest the presence of a ligand-binding site (site A) that co-exists with the agonist (SDF-1α) binding site (site B). The other three antagonists, including MSX123, MSX202 and WZ811, are smaller in size and had very similar binding poses, but binding was quite different from that of AMD3100. These three antagonists bound at both sites A and B, thereby blocking both binding and signaling by SDF-1α. PMID:21697335

  8. Xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone derived from hops, suppresses cancer cell invasion through inhibiting the expression of CXCR4 chemokine receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Chen, Y; Wang, J; Chen, J; Aggarwal, B B; Pang, X; Liu, M

    2012-02-01

    Cancer metastasis is the main cause of death (90%), and only recently we have gained some insight into the mechanisms by which metastatic cells arise from primary tumors and target to specific organs. Cysteine X Cysteine (CXC) chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), initially linked with leukocyte trafficking, is overexpressed in various tumors and mediates homing of tumor cells to distant sites expressing its cognate ligand CXCL12. Therefore, identification of CXCR4 inhibitors has great potential to abrogate tumor metastasis. In this study, we demonstrated that xanthohumol (XN), a prenylflavonoid derived from the female flowers of the hops plant (Humulus lupulus. L), suppressed CXCR4 expression in various cancer cell types in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Both proteasome and lysosomal inhibitors had no effect to prevent the XN-induced downregulation of CXCR4, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of XN was not due to proteolytic degradation but occurred at the transcriptional level. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay further confirmed that XN could block endogenous activation of nuclear factor kappa B, a key transcription factor regulates the expression of CXCR4 in cancer cells. Consistent with the above molecular basis, XN abolished cell invasion induced by CXCL12 in both breast and colon cancer cells. Interestingly, although co-exist in hops, XN is the only isoform that exhibited the inhibitory effect on the expression of CXCR4 compared with other isomers, isoxanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin. Together, our results suggested that XN, as a novel inhibitor of CXCR4, could be a promising therapeutic agent contributed to cancer treatment. PMID:22172099

  9. BTK inhibition results in impaired CXCR4 chemokine receptor surface expression, signaling and function in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, S-S; Chang, B Y; Chang, S; Tong, T; Ham, S; Sherry, B; Burger, J A; Rai, K R; Chiorazzi, N

    2016-04-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is involved in the regulation of B-cell growth, migration and adhesion. The importance of BTK in cell trafficking is emphasized by the clonal contraction proceeded by lymphocytosis typical for the enzyme inhibitor, ibrutinib, in B-cell malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here, we investigated BTK regulation of leukemic B-cell trafficking in a mouse model of aggressive TCL1 CLL-like disease. Inhibiting BTK by ibrutinib reduced surface membrane (sm) levels of CXCR4 but not CXCR5, CD49d and other adhesion/homing receptors. Decreased smCXCR4 levels resulted from blocking receptor signal transduction, which in turn aborted cycling from and to the membrane. This resulted in rapid re-distribution of CLL cells from spleens and lymph nodes into the circulation. CLL cells with impaired smCXCR4 from BTK inhibition failed to home to spleens. These functional changes mainly resulted from inhibition of CXCR4 phosphorylation at Ser339, mediated directly by blocking BTK enzymatic activity and indirectly by affecting the function of downstream targets PLCγ2 and PKCμ, and eventually synthesis of PIM-1 and BTK itself. Our data identify CXCR4 as a key regulator in BTK-mediated CLL-cell retention and have elucidated a complex set of not previously described mechanisms responsible for these effects. PMID:26582643

  10. BTK inhibition results in impaired CXCR4 chemokine receptor surface expression, signaling and function in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S-S; Chang, B Y; Chang, S; Tong, T; Ham, S; Sherry, B; Burger, J A; Rai, K R; Chiorazzi, N

    2016-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is involved in the regulation of B-cell growth, migration and adhesion. The importance of BTK in cell trafficking is emphasized by the clonal contraction proceeded by lymphocytosis typical for the enzyme inhibitor, ibrutinib, in B-cell malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here, we investigated BTK regulation of leukemic B-cell trafficking in a mouse model of aggressive TCL1 CLL-like disease. Inhibiting BTK by ibrutinib reduced surface membrane (sm) levels of CXCR4 but not CXCR5, CD49d and other adhesion/homing receptors. Decreased smCXCR4 levels resulted from blocking receptor signal transduction, which in turn aborted cycling from and to the membrane. This resulted in rapid re-distribution of CLL cells from spleens and lymph nodes into the circulation. CLL cells with impaired smCXCR4 from BTK inhibition failed to home to spleens. These functional changes mainly resulted from inhibition of CXCR4 phosphorylation at Ser339, mediated directly by blocking BTK enzymatic activity and indirectly by affecting the function of downstream targets PLCγ2 and PKCμ, and eventually synthesis of PIM-1 and BTK itself. Our data identify CXCR4 as a key regulator in BTK-mediated CLL-cell retention and have elucidated a complex set of not previously described mechanisms responsible for these effects. PMID:26582643

  11. Targeting of TGF-β-activated protein kinase 1 inhibits chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 expression, tumor growth and metastasis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Wen-Chun; Hou, Ming-Feng

    2015-01-01

    TGF-β-activated protein kinase 1 (TAK1) is a critical mediator in inflammation, immune response and cancer development. Our previous study demonstrated that activation of TAK1 increases the expression of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 (CCR7) and promotes lymphatic invasion ability of breast cancer cells. However, the expression and association of activated TAK1 and CCR7 in breast tumor tissues is unknown and the therapeutic effect by targeting TAK1 is also unclear. We showed that activated TAK1 (as indicated by phospho-TAK1) and its binding protein TAB1 are strongly expressed in breast tumor tissues (77% and 74% respectively). In addition, increase of phospho-TAK1 or TAB1 is strongly associated with over-expression of CCR7. TAK1 inhibitor 5Z-7-Oxozeaenol (5Z-O) inhibited TAK1 activity, suppressed downstream signaling pathways including p38, IκB kinase (IKK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and reduced CCR7 expression in metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, 5Z-O repressed NF-κB- and c-JUN-mediated transcription of CCR7 gene. Knockdown of TAB1 attenuated CCR7 expression and tumor growth in an orthotopic animal study. More importantly, lymphatic invasion and lung metastasis were suppressed. Collectively, our results demonstrate that constitutive activation of TAK1 is frequently found in human breast cancer and this kinase is a potential therapeutic target for this cancer. PMID:25557171

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of an inflammatory chemokine: CCL2 inhibits lymphocyte homing by modulation of CCL21-triggered integrin-mediated adhesions.

    PubMed

    Flaishon, Liat; Hart, Gili; Zelman, Einat; Moussion, Christine; Grabovsky, Valentin; Lapidot Tal, Guy; Feigelson, Sara; Margalit, Raanan; Harmelin, Alon; Avin-Wittenberg, Tamar; Shoseyov, David; Alon, Ronen; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Shachar, Idit

    2008-12-15

    Our studies focus on the pathways that restrict homing of specific subsets of immune cells, and thereby fine-tune the immune response at specific lymphoid and peripheral tissues. Here, we report that CCL2 (at picomolar [pM] levels) renders both murine and human T cells defective in their ability to develop CCR7-triggered activation of LFA-1- and LFA-1-mediated adhesion strengthening to endothelial ICAM-1 both in vitro and in vivo. CCL2 also attenuated lymphocyte chemotaxis toward lymph node chemokines. Consequently, low-dose CCL2 inhibited lymphocyte homing to peripheral lymph nodes but did not affect lymphocyte trafficking through the spleen. Impaired homing of lymphocytes to peripheral lymph nodes resulted in attenuated progression of both asthma and adjuvant arthritis. Thus, pM levels of circulating CCL2 can exert global suppressive effects on T-cell trafficking and differentiation within peripheral lymph nodes, and may be clinically beneficial as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:18802011

  13. Chemokine Receptor Oligomerization and Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Bryan; Handel, Tracy M.

    2014-01-01

    Oligomerization of chemokine receptors has been reported to influence many aspects of receptor function through allosteric communication between receptor protomers. Allosteric interactions within chemokine receptor hetero-oligomers have been shown to cause negative cooperativity in the binding of chemokines and to inhibit receptor activation in the case of some receptor pairs. Other receptor pairs can cause enhanced signaling and even activate entirely new, hetero-oligomer-specific signaling complexes and responses downstream of receptor activation. Many mechanisms contribute to these effects including direct allosteric coupling between the receptors, G protein mediated allostery, G protein stealing, ligand sequestration and recruitment of new intracellular proteins by exposing unique binding interfaces on the oligomerized receptors. These effects present both challenges as well as exciting opportunities for drug discovery. One of the most difficult challenges will involve determining if and when hetero-oligomers versus homo-oligomers are involved in specific disease states. PMID:23415099

  14. The opioid antagonist, β-funaltrexamine, inhibits NF-κB signaling and chemokine expression in human astrocytes and in mice.

    PubMed

    Davis, Randall L; Das, Subhas; Thomas Curtis, J; Stevens, Craig W

    2015-09-01

    Opioid-immune crosstalk occurs when opioid drugs alter the activity of the immune system. In this study, the opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA) decreases the expression and release of an inflammatory chemokine, interferon-γ inducible protein-10 (CXCL10) from normal human astrocytes stimulated by interleukin 1β (IL-1β). β-FNA decreased CXCL10 by an unknown action that did not involve the mu opioid receptor (MOR). As IL-1β acts through its receptor to activate NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathways which leads to CXCL10 expression and release, key steps in the IL-1β signaling pathways were examined following β-FNA treatment. IL-1β-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) was inhibited by β-FNA as shown by decreased p38 MAPK phosphorylation in treated cells. β-FNA also decreased the levels of activated subunits of NF-κB (p50 and p65) in treated astrocytes. The impact of β-FNA was also observed in proteins that act to negatively regulate NF-κB signaling. IL-1β upregulated the expression of A20, a ubiquitin (Ub)-editing enzyme that dampens NF-κB signaling by altering ubiquination patterns on IL-1 receptor second messengers, and the increase in A20 was significantly inhibited by β-FNA treatment. Inhibition of the Ub-activating enzyme E1 by the inhibitor PYR41 also decreased CXCL10 release, like β-FNA, and concurrent treatment with both PYR41 and β-FNA inhibited CXCL10 more than did either agent alone. In mice, lipopolysaccharide-induced CXCL10 expression in the brain was inhibited by treatment with β-FNA. These findings suggest that β-FNA exerts an anti-inflammatory action in vitro and in vivo that is MOR-independent and possibly due to the alkylating ability of β-FNA. PMID:26007645

  15. Proinflammatory chemokines during Candida albicans keratitis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoyong; Hua, Xia; Wilhelmus, Kirk R

    2010-03-01

    Chemotactic cytokines mediate the recruitment of leukocytes into infected tissues. This study investigated the profile of chemokines during experimental Candida albicans keratitis and determined the effects of chemokine inhibition on leukocyte infiltration and fungal growth during murine keratomycosis. Scarified corneas of BALB/c mice were topically inoculated with C. albicans and monitored daily over one week for fungal keratitis. After a gene microarray for murine chemokines compared infected corneas to controls, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunostaining assessed chemokine expression in infected and mock-inoculated corneas. An anti-chemokine antibody was then administered subconjunctivally and evaluated for effects on clinical severity, corneal inflammation, fungal recovery, and cytokine expression. Of 33 chemokine genes examined by microarray, 6 CC chemokines and 6 CXC chemokines were significantly (P<0.05) upregulated more than two-fold. Chemokine (CC-motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) was upregulated 108-fold (P=0.03) by real-time RT-PCR within one day after fungal inoculation and remained increased 28-fold (P=0.02) at one week, and its in situ expression increased in the epithelium and stroma of infected corneas. Compared to the control antibody-treated group, eyes treated with anti-CCL3 antibody showed reduced clinical severity (P<0.05), less corneal neovascularization (P=0.02), and fewer inflammatory cells infiltrating corneal tissue, but the amount of recoverable fungi was not significantly (P=0.4) affected. Anti-CCL3 treatment significantly (P=0.01) reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1beta in infected corneas. These results indicate that chemokines, especially the CC chemokine CCL3, play important roles in the acute inflammatory response to C. albicans corneal infection. PMID:20005222

  16. Inhibition of Epithelial CC-Family Chemokine Synthesis by the Synthetic Chalcone DMPF-1 via Disruption of NF-κB Nuclear Translocation and Suppression of Experimental Asthma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rajajendram, Revathee; Tham, Chau Ling; Akhtar, Mohamad Nadeem; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Israf, Daud Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. The interaction between airway epithelium and inflammatory mediators plays a key role in the pathogenesis of asthma. In vitro studies evaluated the inhibitory effects of 3-(2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(5-methylfuran-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (DMPF-1), a synthetic chalcone analogue, upon inflammation in the A549 lung epithelial cell line. DMPF-1 selectively inhibited TNF-α-stimulated CC chemokine secretion (RANTES, eotaxin-1, and MCP-1) without any effect upon CXC chemokine (GRO-α and IL-8) secretion. Western blot analysis further demonstrated that the inhibitory activity resulted from disruption of p65NF-κB nuclear translocation without any effects on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Treatment of ovalbumin-sensitized and ovalbumin-challenged BALB/c mice with DMPF-1 (0.2–100 mg/kg) demonstrated significant reduction in the secretion and gene expression of CC chemokines (RANTES, eotaxin-1, and MCP-1) and Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13). Furthermore, DMPF-1 treatment inhibited eosinophilia, goblet cell hyperplasia, peripheral blood total IgE, and airway hyperresponsiveness in ovalbumin-sensitized and ovalbumin-challenged mice. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the potential of DMPF-1, a nonsteroidal compound, as an antiasthmatic agent for further pharmacological evaluation. PMID:26300589

  17. Chemokines and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Diana Carolina Torres; Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines and generally have low molecular weight ranging from 7 to 15kDa. Chemokines and their receptors are able to control the migration and residence of all immune cells. Some chemokines are considered pro-inflammatory, and their release can be induced during an immune response at a site of infection, while others are considered homeostatic and are involved in controlling of cells migration during tissue development or maintenance. The physiologic importance of this family of mediators is resulting from their specificity − members of the chemokine family induce recruitment of well-defined leukocyte subsets. There are two major chemokine sub-families based upon cysteine residues position: CXC and CC. As a general rule, members of the CXC chemokines are chemotactic for neutrophils, and CC chemokines are chemotactic for monocytes and sub-set of lymphocytes, although there are some exceptions. This review discusses the potential role of chemokines in inflammation focusing on the two best-characterized chemokines: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a CC chemokine, and interleukin-8, a member of the CXC chemokine sub-family. PMID:26466066

  18. Chemokines and chemokine receptors blockers as new drugs for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Caramori, G; Di Stefano, A; Casolari, P; Kirkham, P A; Padovani, A; Chung, K F; Papi, A; Adcock, I M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by an abnormal inflammatory response of the lung to noxious particles or gases. The cellular inflammatory response in COPD is characterised by an increased number of inflammatory cells in the lungs. Although the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the development of COPD are not well understood; several mediators are assumed to regulate the activation and recruitment of these inflammatory cells into the lung of COPD patients particularly those belonging to the chemokine family. Inhibitors or blockers of chemokine and chemokine receptors are therefore of great interest as potential novel therapies for COPD and many are now in clinical development. A high degree of redundancy exists in the chemokine network and inhibition of a single chemokine or receptor may not be sufficient to block the inflammatory response. Despite this, animal studies suggest a strong rationale for inhibiting the chemokine network in COPD. As such, every leading pharmaceutical company maintains a significant interest in developing agents that regulate leukocyte navigation as potential anti-inflammatory drugs. Drugs and antibodies targeting chemokines and their receptors are generally still in early stages of development and the results of clinical trial are awaited with great interest. These agents may not only provide improved management of COPD but also, importantly, indicate proof-of-concept to further clarify the role of chemokines in the pathophysiology of COPD. PMID:24059236

  19. Touch of Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Blanchet, Xavier; Langer, Marcella; Weber, Christian; Koenen, Rory R.; von Hundelshausen, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Chemoattractant cytokines or chemokines constitute a family of structurally related proteins found in vertebrates, bacteria, or viruses. So far, 48 chemokine genes have been identified in humans, which bind to around 20 chemokine receptors. These receptors belong to the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptor family. Chemokines and their receptors were originally studied for their role in cellular trafficking of leukocytes during inflammation and immune surveillance. It is now known that they exert different functions under physiological conditions such as homeostasis, development, tissue repair, and angiogenesis but also under pathological disorders including tumorigenesis, cancer metastasis, inflammatory, and autoimmune diseases. Physicochemical properties of chemokines and chemokine receptors confer the ability to homo- and hetero-oligomerize. Many efforts are currently performed in establishing new therapeutically compounds able to target the chemokine/chemokine receptor system. In this review, we are interested in the role of chemokines in inflammatory disease and leukocyte trafficking with a focus on vascular inflammatory diseases, the operating synergism, and the emerging therapeutic approaches of chemokines. PMID:22807925

  20. Profiling Heparin-Chemokine Interactions Using Synthetic Tools

    PubMed Central

    de Paz, Jose L.; Moseman, E. Ashley; Noti, Christian; Polito, Laura; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin or heparan sulfate, are required for the in vivo function of chemokines. Chemokines play a crucial role in the recruitment of leukocyte subsets to sites of inflammation and lymphocytes trafficking. GAG-chemokine interactions mediate cell migration and determine which leukocyte subsets enter tissues. Identifying the exact GAC sequences that bind to particular chemokines is key to understand chemokine function at the molecular level and develop strategies to interfere with chemokine-mediated processes. Here, we characterize the heparin binding profiles of eight chemokines (CCL21, IL-8, CXCL12, CXCL13, CCL19, CCL25, CCL28, and CXCL16) by employing heparin microarrays containing a small library of synthetic heparin oligosaccharides. The chemokines differ significantly in their interactions with heparin oligosaccharides: While some chemokines, (e.g., CCL21) strongly bind to a hexasaccharide containing the GlcNSO3(6-OSO3)-IdoA(2-OSO3) repeating unit, CCL19 does not bind and CXCL12 binds only weakly. The carbohydrate microarray binding results were validated by surface plasmon resonance experiments. In vitro chemotaxis assays revealed that dendrimers coated with the fully sulfated heparin hexasaccharide inhibit lymphocyte migration toward CCL21. Migration toward CXCL12 or CCL19 was not affected. These in vitro homing assays indicate that multivalent synthetic heparin dendrimers inhibit the migration of lymphocytes toward certain chemokine gradients by blocking the formation of a chemokine concentration gradient on GAG endothelial chains. These findings are in agreement with preliminary in vivo measurements of circulating lymphocytes. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of GAG-chemokine interactions, a first step toward the design of novel drugs that modulate chemokine activity. PMID:18030990

  1. Chemokines, chemokine receptors and the gastrointestinal system

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Takabe, Kazuaki; Yeudall, W Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The biological properties of tumor cells are known to be regulated by a multitude of cytokines and growth factors, which include epidermal growth factor receptor agonists and members of the transforming growth factor β family. Furthermore, the recent explosion of research in the field of chemokine function as mediators of tumor progression has led to the possibility that these small, immunomodulatory proteins also play key roles in carcinogenesis and may, therefore, be potential targets for novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we will summarize recently reported findings in chemokine biology with a focus on the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23704819

  2. Chemokines and tissue injury.

    PubMed Central

    Furie, M. B.; Randolph, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Accumulation of leukocytes at sites of inflammation is essential for host defense, yet secretory products of the white cells may augment injury by damaging surrounding healthy tissues. Members of the chemokine family of chemotactic cytokines play a fundamental role in this process by attracting and stimulating specific subsets of leukocytes. In vitro studies suggest that chemokines participate in at least three phases of leukocyte recruitment. First, they foster tight adhesion of circulating leukocytes to the vascular endothelium by activating leukocytic integrins. Second, because of their chemoattractant properties, chemokines guide leukocytes through the endothelial junctions and underlying tissue to the inflammatory focus. Finally, chemokines activate effector functions of leukocytes, including production of reactive oxygen intermediates and exocytosis of degradative enzymes. Animal studies in which antibodies are used to neutralize the activity of individual members of the chemokine family confirm that these mediators contribute to the development of both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. A number of mechanisms may operate in vivo to limit the proinflammatory properties of chemokines. Therapies that target chemokines directly or enhance the body's mechanisms for controlling their activity may prove to be reasonable approaches for treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:7778669

  3. Embelin Inhibits Invasion and Migration of MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells by Suppression of CXC Chemokine Receptor 4, Matrix Metalloproteinases-9/2, and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanwool; Ko, Jeong-Hyeon; Baek, Seung Ho; Nam, Dongwoo; Lee, Seok Geun; Lee, Junhee; Yang, Woong Mo; Um, Jae-Young; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Shim, Bum Sang; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2016-06-01

    Embelin (EB) is a benzoquinone derivative isolated from Embelia ribes Burm plant. Recent scientific evidence shows that EB induces apoptosis and inhibits migration and invasion in highly metastatic human breast cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of EB in tumor metastasis and invasion have not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of antimetastatic activities of EB in breast cancer cells. The EB downregulated the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9/2 expression and upregulated the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells under noncytotoxic concentrations but not in MCF-7 cells. Additionally, EB inhibited the CXC motif chemokine ligand 12 induced invasion and migration activities of MDA-MB-231 cells. A detailed study of underlying mechanisms revealed that the regulation of the downregulation of CXCR4 was at the transcriptional level, as indicated by the downregulation of mRNA expression and suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. It further reduced the binding of NF-κB to the CXCR4 promoter. Besides, EB downregulated mesenchymal marker proteins (neural cadherin and vimentin) and concurrently upregulated epithelial markers (epithelial cadherin and occludin). Overall, these findings suggest that EB can abrogate breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis by suppression of CXCR4, MMP-9/2 expressions, and inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and thus may have a great potential to suppress metastasis of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27030214

  4. Chemokines and skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Chemokines are small molecules that induce chemotaxis and activation of certain subsets of leukocytes. The expression patterns of chemokines and chemokine receptors are specific to certain organs and cells. Therefore, chemokines are important to elucidate the mechanism of organ-specific human diseases. CCL17 expressed by Langerhans cells, blood endothelial cells, and fibroblasts plays a key role in attracting Th2 cells and tumor cells of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome into the skin, developing various Th2-type inflammatory skin diseases as well as cutaneous lymphoma. CCL11 and CCL26 expressed by skin-resident cells, such as fibroblasts, blood endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, induce infiltration of CCR3-expressing cells such as Th2 cells and eosinophils. CCL11 may also serve as an autocrine as well as a paracrine in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. CX3CL1 expressed on blood endothelial cells leads to infiltration of CX3CR1(+) immune cells, such as mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, playing important roles in wound healing, tumor immunity, and vasculitis. Biologics targeting chemokines and their receptors are promising strategies for various skin diseases that are resistant to the current therapy. PMID:25182982

  5. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  6. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaofeng; Pirapakaran, Tharshikha; Luo, Xin M

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  7. 6-shogaol, an active constituent of dietary ginger, impairs cancer development and lung metastasis by inhibiting the secretion of CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) in tumor-associated dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Hung, Jen-Yu; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hou, Ming-Feng; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2015-02-18

    This study has two novel findings: it is not only the first to demonstrate that tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs) facilitate lung and breast cancer metastasis in vitro and in vivo by secreting inflammatory mediator CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), but it is also the first to reveal that 6-shogaol can decrease cancer development and progression by inhibiting the production of TADC-derived CCL2. Human lung cancer A549 and breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells increase TADCs to express high levels of CCL2, which increase cancer stem cell features, migration, and invasion, as well as immunosuppressive tumor-associated macrophage infiltration. 6-Shogaol decreases cancer-induced up-regulation of CCL2 in TADCs, preventing the enhancing effects of TADCs on tumorigenesis and metastatic properties in A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells. A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells enhance CCL2 expression by increasing the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and the activation of STAT3 induced by A549 and MDA-MB-231 is completely inhibited by 6-shogaol. 6-Shogaol also decreases the metastasis of lung and breast cancers in mice. 6-Shogaol exerts significant anticancer effects on lung and breast cells in vitro and in vivo by targeting the CCL2 secreted by TADCs. Thus, 6-shogaol may have the potential of being an efficacious immunotherapeutic agent for cancers. PMID:25621970

  8. Mechanical stretch inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced keratinocyte-derived chemokine and tissue factor expression while increasing procoagulant activity in murine lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sebag, Sara C; Bastarache, Julie A; Ware, Lorraine B

    2013-03-15

    Previous studies have shown that the innate immune stimulant LPS augments mechanical ventilation-induced pulmonary coagulation and inflammation. Whether these effects are mediated by alveolar epithelial cells is unclear. The alveolar epithelium is a key regulator of the innate immune reaction to pathogens and can modulate both intra-alveolar inflammation and coagulation through up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and tissue factor (TF), the principal initiator of the extrinsic coagulation pathway. We hypothesized that cyclic mechanical stretch (MS) potentiates LPS-mediated alveolar epithelial cell (MLE-12) expression of the chemokine keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC) and TF. Contrary to our hypothesis, MS significantly decreased LPS-induced KC and TF mRNA and protein expression. Investigation into potential mechanisms showed that stretch significantly reduced LPS-induced surface expression of TLR4 that was not a result of increased degradation. Decreased cell surface TLR4 expression was concomitant with reduced LPS-mediated NF-κB activation. Immunofluorescence staining showed that cyclic MS markedly altered LPS-induced organization of actin filaments. In contrast to expression, MS significantly increased LPS-induced cell surface TF activity independent of calcium signaling. These findings suggest that cyclic MS of lung epithelial cells down-regulates LPS-mediated inflammatory and procoagulant expression by modulating actin organization and reducing cell surface TLR4 expression and signaling. However, because LPS-induced surface TF activity was enhanced by stretch, these data demonstrate differential pathways regulating TF expression and activity. Ultimately, loss of LPS responsiveness in the epithelium induced by MS could result in increased susceptibility of the lung to bacterial infections in the setting of mechanical ventilation. PMID:23362270

  9. Mechanical Stretch Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-induced Keratinocyte-derived Chemokine and Tissue Factor Expression While Increasing Procoagulant Activity in Murine Lung Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sebag, Sara C.; Bastarache, Julie A.; Ware, Lorraine B.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the innate immune stimulant LPS augments mechanical ventilation-induced pulmonary coagulation and inflammation. Whether these effects are mediated by alveolar epithelial cells is unclear. The alveolar epithelium is a key regulator of the innate immune reaction to pathogens and can modulate both intra-alveolar inflammation and coagulation through up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and tissue factor (TF), the principal initiator of the extrinsic coagulation pathway. We hypothesized that cyclic mechanical stretch (MS) potentiates LPS-mediated alveolar epithelial cell (MLE-12) expression of the chemokine keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC) and TF. Contrary to our hypothesis, MS significantly decreased LPS-induced KC and TF mRNA and protein expression. Investigation into potential mechanisms showed that stretch significantly reduced LPS-induced surface expression of TLR4 that was not a result of increased degradation. Decreased cell surface TLR4 expression was concomitant with reduced LPS-mediated NF-κB activation. Immunofluorescence staining showed that cyclic MS markedly altered LPS-induced organization of actin filaments. In contrast to expression, MS significantly increased LPS-induced cell surface TF activity independent of calcium signaling. These findings suggest that cyclic MS of lung epithelial cells down-regulates LPS-mediated inflammatory and procoagulant expression by modulating actin organization and reducing cell surface TLR4 expression and signaling. However, because LPS-induced surface TF activity was enhanced by stretch, these data demonstrate differential pathways regulating TF expression and activity. Ultimately, loss of LPS responsiveness in the epithelium induced by MS could result in increased susceptibility of the lung to bacterial infections in the setting of mechanical ventilation. PMID:23362270

  10. Chemokines in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Sobolik-Delmaire, Tammy; Richmond, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play a key role in development and homeostasis as well as in the pathogenesis of tumors and autoimmune diseases. Chemokines are involved in the implantation of the early conceptus, the migration of subsets of cells during embryonic development, and the overall growth of the embryo. Chemokines also have an important role in the development and maintenance of innate and adaptive immunity. In addition, they play a significant role in wound healing and angiogenesis. When the physiological role of chemokines is subverted or chronically amplified, disease often follows. Chemokines are involved in the pathobiology of chronic inflammation, tumorigenesis and metastasis, as well as autoimmune diseases. This article reviews the role of chemokines and their receptors in normal and disease processes and the potential for using chemokine antagonists for appropriate targeted therapy. PMID:21223965

  11. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Glinsky, Gennadi V.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  12. Actions of Thyroid Hormone Analogues on Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Davis, Paul J; Glinsky, Gennadi V; Lin, Hung-Yun; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular domain of plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3); this receptor also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of T4. Tetrac inhibits the binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine relevant to inflammatory processes in the CNS that are microglia-dependent but also important to normal brain development. Expression of the CX3CL1 gene is downregulated by tetrac, suggesting that T4 and T3 may stimulate fractalkine expression. Independently of its specific receptor (CX3CR1), fractalkine binds to αvβ3 at a site proximal to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor and changes the physical state of the integrin. Tetrac also affects expression of the genes for other CNS-relevant chemokines, including CCL20, CCL26, CXCL2, CXCL3, and CXCL10. The chemokine products of these genes are important to vascularity of the brain, particularly of the choroid plexus, to inflammatory processes in the CNS and, in certain cases, to neuroprotection. Thyroid hormones are known to contribute to regulation of each of these CNS functions. We propose that actions of thyroid hormone and hormone analogues on chemokine gene expression contribute to regulation of inflammatory processes in brain and of brain blood vessel formation and maintenance. PMID:27493972

  13. Novel antiviral activity of chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Takashi; Shirane, Jumi; Hieshima, Kunio; Shibano, Michiko; Watanabe, Masayasu; Jin, Zhe; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Saito, Takuya; Shimomura, Yoshikazu; Yoshie, Osamu . E-mail: o.yoshie@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2006-07-05

    Antimicrobial peptides are a diverse family of small, mostly cationic polypeptides that kill bacteria, fungi and even some enveloped viruses, while chemokines are a group of mostly cationic small proteins that induce directed migration of leukocytes through interactions with a group of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. Recent studies have shown that antimicrobial peptides and chemokines have substantially overlapping functions. Thus, while some antimicrobial peptides are chemotactic for leukocytes, some chemokines can kill a wide range of bacteria and fungi. Here, we examined a possible direct antiviral activity of chemokines against an enveloped virus HSV-1. Among 22 human chemokines examined, chemokines such as MIP-1{alpha}/CCL3, MIP-1{beta}/CCL4 and RANTES/CCL5 showed a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1. It is intriguing that these chemokines are mostly known to be highly expressed by effector CD8{sup +} T cells. The chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity commonly bound to HSV-1 virions via envelope glycoprotein gB. Electron microscopy revealed that the chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity were commonly capable of generating pores in the envelope of HSV-1. Thus, some chemokines have a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1 in vitro and may have a potential role in host defense against HSV-1 as a direct antiviral agent.

  14. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Steve; Tafalla, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specifically zebrafish (Danio rerio), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly. PMID:26569324

  15. Chemokines in cancer related inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Allavena, Paola; Germano, Giovanni; Marchesi, Federica; Mantovani, Alberto

    2011-03-10

    Chemokines are key players of the cancer-related inflammation. Chemokine ligands and receptors are downstream of genetic events that cause neoplastic transformation and are abundantly expressed in chronic inflammatory conditions which predispose to cancer. Components of the chemokine system affect multiple pathways of tumor progression including: leukocyte recruitment, neo-angiogenesis, tumor cell proliferation and survival, invasion and metastasis. Evidence in pre-clinical and clinical settings suggests that the chemokine system represents a valuable target for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  16. Association between preeclampsia and the CXC chemokine family (Review)

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIJING; DAI, LI; ZHOU, RONG

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a major cause of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity, characterized by gestational hypertension, proteinuria, systemic endothelial cell activation and an exaggerated inflammatory response. The precise cause of preeclampsia is not currently known; however, it is widely accepted that the pathogenesis of preeclampsia involves inadequate trophoblast invasion, leading to generalized endothelial dysfunction and an exaggerated inflammatory response. Chemokines are a superfamily of structurally similar proteins that mediate cell recruitment, angiogenesis, immunity and stem cell trafficking. CXC chemokines are a family of cytokines, unique in their ability to behave in a disparate manner in the regulation of angiogenesis. The CXC chemokine family further divides into two subfamilies; CXC ELR+, which promotes angiogenesis, and CXC ELR-, which inhibits angiogenesis. Furthermore, CXC chemokines are involved in the pathogenesis of various conditions, including malignant tumors, wound repair, chronic inflammation, atherosclerosis and potentially preeclampsia. PMID:26136860

  17. NF-κB Repressing Factor Inhibits Chemokine Synthesis by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Alveolar Macrophages in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Hsiung; Wang, Chun-Hua; Lee, Kang-Yun; Lin, Shu-Min

    2013-01-01

    NF-κB repressing factor (NRF) is a transcriptional silencer implicated in the basal silencing of specific NF-κB targeting genes, including iNOS, IFN-β and IL-8/CXCL8. IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 are involved in neutrophil and lymphocyte recruitment against M. tuberculosis (MTb) and disease progression of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Alveolar macrophages (AM) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were used to study the regulatory role of NRF in pulmonary TB. AM and PBMC were purified from 19 TB patients and 15 normal subjects. To study the underlying mechanism, PBMC were exposed to heated TB bacilli. The regulation role of NRF in IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 was determined by NRF knock-down or over-expression. NRF binding capabilities in promoter sites were measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. The levels of IP-10/CXCL10, IL-8/CXCL8 and NRF were significantly higher in AM and PBMC in patients with active TB. NRF played an inhibitory role in IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 inductions. We delineate the role of NRF in pulmonary TB, which inhibits the expressions of IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 in AM and PBMC of patients with high bacterial load. NRF may serve as an endogenous repressor to prevent robust increase in IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-8/CXCL8 when TB bacterial load is high. PMID:24223729

  18. A beginner's guide to chemokines.

    PubMed

    Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2012-05-01

    This review provides an overview of chemokines and their receptors, with an emphasis on general features and nomenclature along with a short summary of their properties and functions. It is intended as an introduction to the subject and a reference point for those wishing to learn key facts about chemokines and their role in biology. PMID:22571610

  19. The Chemokine Platelet Factor-4 Variant (PF-4var)/CXCL4L1 Inhibits Diabetes-Induced Blood–Retinal Barrier Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M.; Mohammad, Ghulam; Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; Abdelsaid, Mohammed; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Alam, Kaiser; Van den Eynde, Kathleen; De Hertogh, Gert; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Van Damme, Jo; Struyf, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the expression of platelet factor-4 variant (PF-4var/CXCL4L1) in epiretinal membranes from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and the role of PF-4var/CXCL4L1 in the regulation of blood–retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown in diabetic rat retinas and human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMEC). Methods. Rats were treated intravitreally with PF-4var/CXCL4L1 or the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agent bevacizumab on the first day after diabetes induction. Blood–retinal barrier breakdown was assessed in vivo with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextran and in vitro in HRMEC by transendothelial electrical resistance and FITC-conjugated dextran cell permeability assay. Occludin, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, VEGF, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), caspase-3 levels, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by Western blot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, or spectrophotometry. Results. In epiretinal membranes, vascular endothelial cells and stromal cells expressed PF-4var/CXCL4L1. In vitro, HRMEC produced PF-4var/CXCL4L1 after stimulation with a combination of interleukin (IL)-1β and TNF-α, and PF-4var/CXCL4L1 inhibited VEGF-mediated hyperpermeability in HRMEC. In rats, PF-4var/CXCL4L1 was as potent as bevacizumab in attenuating diabetes-induced BRB breakdown. This effect was associated with upregulation of occludin and VE-cadherin and downregulation of HIF-1α, VEGF, TNF-α, RAGE, and caspase-3, whereas ROS generation was not altered. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that increasing the intraocular PF-4var/CXCL4L1 levels early after the onset of diabetes protects against diabetes-induced BRB breakdown. PMID:25711636

  20. Chemokines and diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Oscar; Torres, Francis M; Shireman, Paula K

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are critical for white blood cell recruitment to injured tissues and play an important role in normal wound healing processes. In contrast, impaired wound healing in diabetic patients is accompanied by decreased early inflammatory cell infiltration but persistence of neutrophils and macrophages in the chronic, nonhealing wounds. These changes in inflammatory cell recruitment occur in conjunction with alterations in chemokine and growth factor expression. In addition to leukocyte trafficking, many different cell types, including endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes, produce and respond to chemokines, and these interactions are altered in diabetic wounds. Thus, the chemokine system may have both direct and inflammatory-mediated effects on many different aspects of diabetic wound healing. The potential roles of chemokines and inflammatory or immune cells in nonhealing diabetic wounds, including impairments in growth factor expression, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix formation, and reepithelialization, are examined. PMID:18053419

  1. [Interceptors:--"silent" chemokine receptors].

    PubMed

    Grodecka, Magdalena; Waśniowska, Kazimiera

    2007-01-01

    The physiological effect caused by chemokines is regulated by interactions with a group of rodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors share a number of common features: the polypeptide chain is a 7-transmembrane ?-helix (7 TMD motif) and the region involved in G-protein interaction (the DRYLAIV sequence) is located in the second transmembrane loop. So far, 19 chemokine receptors have been identified. Three of them (Duffy glycoprotein, D6, and CCX-CKR proteins), although structurally related to other GPCRs, lack the ability of G-protein signal transduction. Instead, they efficiently internalize their cognate ligands, regulating chemokine levels in various body compartments. These three proteins are suggested to form a distinct chemokine receptor family, designated "interceptors" or "silent" chemokine receptors. PMID:17507871

  2. Chemokines and angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Zoltan; Pakozdi, Angela; Szentpetery, Agnes; Besenyei, Timea; Koch, Alisa E.

    2010-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, chemokines mediate the migration of inflammatory leukocytes into the synovium. Among the four known chemokine families, CXC, CC chemokines and fractalkine seem to be of outstanding importance in this process. Angiogenesis, the formation of new vessels, is also important during the perpetuation of inflammation underlying rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, authors discuss the role of the most important chemokines and chemokine repetors in arthritis-associated neovascularization. The process and regulation of angiogenesis are described in this context as well. Apart from discussing the pathogenic role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in arthritic vessel formation, authors also review the important relevance of chemokines and angiogenesis for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19482623

  3. Targeting chemokine pathways in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Makardhwaj S; Hussain, Zulfiqar; Giricz, Orsolya; Shenoy, Niraj; Polineni, Rahul; Maitra, Anirban; Verma, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is one of the fastest growing malignancies in the US and needs newer therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. Chronic inflammation plays a role in the pathogenesis of EAC and contributes to the dysplastic conversion of normal esophageal epithelium to Barrett's esophagus and frank adenocarcinoma. Chemokines play important roles in mediating inflammation and recent evidence implicates these ligands and their receptors in the development and spread of various tumors. We demonstrated that the chemokines IL8, CXCL1 and CXCL3 are significantly overexpressed during esophageal carcinogenesis and accompanied by amplification and demethylation of the chr4q21 gene locus. We also demonstrated that IL8 levels can be detected in serum of patients with EAC and can serve as potential biomarkers. We now demonstrate that inhibition of IL8 receptor, CXCR2, leads to decreased invasiveness of esophageal adenocarcinoma derived cells without affecting cellular proliferation. Taken together, these studies reveal the important roles that chemokines play in development of esophageal cancer and demonstrate that these pathways can serve as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25485576

  4. Chemokines as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Bobanga, Iuliana D.; Petrosiute, Agne; Huang, Alex Y.

    2013-01-01

    We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the many biological roles of chemokines in tumor immunology allow their exploitation in enhancing recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and effector cells to appropriate anatomical sites. This knowledge, combined with advances in gene therapy and virology, allows researchers to employ chemokines as potential vaccine adjuvants. This review will focus on recent murine and human studies that use chemokines as therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine adjuvants. PMID:24967094

  5. Discovery of indole inhibitors of chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9).

    PubMed

    Pandya, Bhaumik A; Baber, Christian; Chan, Audrey; Chamberlain, Brian; Chandonnet, Haoqun; Goss, Jennifer; Hopper, Timothy; Lippa, Blaise; Poutsiaka, Katherine; Romero, Jan; Stucka, Sabrina; Varoglu, Mustafa; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Xin

    2016-07-15

    Irritable bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are serious chronic diseases affecting millions of patients worldwide. Studies of human chemokine biology has suggested C-C chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) may be a key mediator of pro-inflammatory signaling. Discovery of agents that inhibit CCR9 may lead to new therapies for CD and UC patients. Herein we describe the evolution of a high content screening hit (1) into potent inhibitors of CCR9, such as azaindole 12. PMID:27256913

  6. Identification and profiling of CXCR3–CXCR4 chemokine receptor heteromer complexes

    PubMed Central

    Watts, AO; van Lipzig, MMH; Jaeger, WC; Seeber, RM; van Zwam, M; Vinet, J; van der Lee, MMC; Siderius, M; Zaman, GJR; Boddeke, HWGM; Smit, MJ; Pfleger, KDG; Leurs, R; Vischer, HF

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The C-X-C chemokine receptors 3 (CXCR3) and C-X-C chemokine receptors 4 (CXCR4) are involved in various autoimmune diseases and cancers. Small antagonists have previously been shown to cross-inhibit chemokine binding to CXCR4, CC chemokine receptors 2 (CCR2) and 5 (CCR5) heteromers. We investigated whether CXCR3 and CXCR4 can form heteromeric complexes and the binding characteristics of chemokines and small ligand compounds to these chemokine receptor heteromers. Experimental Approach CXCR3–CXCR4 heteromers were identified in HEK293T cells using co-immunoprecipitation, time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer, saturation BRET and the GPCR-heteromer identification technology (HIT) approach. Equilibrium competition binding and dissociation experiments were performed to detect negative binding cooperativity. Key Results We provide evidence that chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR4 form heteromeric complexes in HEK293T cells. Chemokine binding was mutually exclusive on membranes co-expressing CXCR3 and CXCR4 as revealed by equilibrium competition binding and dissociation experiments. The small CXCR3 agonist VUF10661 impaired binding of CXCL12 to CXCR4, whereas small antagonists were unable to cross-inhibit chemokine binding to the other chemokine receptor. In contrast, negative binding cooperativity between CXCR3 and CXCR4 chemokines was not observed in intact cells. However, using the GPCR-HIT approach, we have evidence for specific β-arrestin2 recruitment to CXCR3-CXCR4 heteromers in response to agonist stimulation. Conclusions and Implications This study indicates that heteromeric CXCR3–CXCR4 complexes may act as functional units in living cells, which potentially open up novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:23170857

  7. The chemokine system: novel broad-spectrum therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Power, C A; Proudfoot, A E

    2001-08-01

    Chemokines are cytokines that specifically direct the trafficking of immune cells in the body. They offer a novel point of therapeutic intervention, as inhibiting specific chemokines and receptors could prevent the excessive recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. This approach could be considered to act upstream of the therapies used today which, for the most part, act on the cells already at the site of inflammation. The receptors for chemokines are G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors, which are particularly tractable for the pharmaceutical industry. The search for small-molecule inhibitors of these receptors has been fruitful and the numbers of patents and, more recently, peer-reviewed publications are growing rapidly. The first clinical trial was initiated this year, so although it is too soon to be able to report these results we hope to see the outcome of this research in the near future. PMID:11710742

  8. Rodent herpesvirus Peru encodes a secreted chemokine decoy receptor.

    PubMed

    Lubman, Olga Y; Cella, Marina; Wang, Xinxin; Monte, Kristen; Lenschow, Deborah J; Huang, Yina H; Fremont, Daved H

    2014-01-01

    Viruses have long been studied not only for their pathology and associated disease but also as model systems for understanding cellular and immunological processes. Rodent herpesvirus Peru (RHVP) is a recently characterized rhadinovirus related to murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) that establishes acute and latent infection in laboratory mice. RHVP encodes numerous unique proteins that we hypothesize might facilitate host immune evasion during infection. We report here that open reading frame (ORF) R17 encodes a high-affinity chemokine binding protein that broadly recognizes human and murine CC and C chemokines. The interaction of R17 with chemokines is generally characterized by rapid association kinetics, and in the case of CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CCL24, and XCL1, extremely stable complexes are formed. Functionally, R17 potently inhibited CCL2-driven chemotaxis of the human monocytic cell line THP-1, CCL3-driven chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and CCL2-mediated calcium flux. Our studies also reveal that R17 binds to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in a process dependent upon two BBXB motifs and that chemokine and GAG binding can occur simultaneously at distinct sites. Collectively, these studies suggest that R17 may play a role in RHVP immune evasion through the targeted sabotage of chemokine-mediated immune surveillance. PMID:24173234

  9. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Lymphoid Tissue Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Olga; Hammerschmidt, Swantje I; Moschovakis, G Leandros; Förster, Reinhold

    2016-05-20

    The continuous migration of immune cells between lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs is a key feature of the immune system, facilitating the distribution of effector cells within nearly all compartments of the body. Furthermore, reaching their correct position within primary, secondary, or tertiary lymphoid organs is a prerequisite to ensure immune cells' unimpaired differentiation, maturation, and selection, as well as their activation or functional silencing. The superfamilies of chemokines and chemokine receptors are of major importance in guiding immune cells to and within lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues. In this review we focus on the role of the chemokine system in the migration dynamics of immune cells within lymphoid organs at the steady state and on how these dynamics are affected by infectious and inflammatory processes. PMID:26907216

  10. Chemokine receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Neel, Nicole F; Schutyser, Evemie; Sai, Jiqing; Fan, Guo-Huang; Richmond, Ann

    2005-12-01

    The internalization and intracellular trafficking of chemokine receptors have important implications for the cellular responses elicited by chemokine receptors. The major pathway by which chemokine receptors internalize is the clathrin-mediated pathway, but some receptors may utilize lipid rafts/caveolae-dependent internalization routes. This review discusses the current knowledge and controversies regarding these two different routes of endocytosis. The functional consequences of internalization and the regulation of chemokine receptor recycling will also be addressed. Modifications of chemokine receptors, such as palmitoylation, ubiquitination, glycosylation, and sulfation, may also impact trafficking, chemotaxis and signaling. Finally, this review will cover the internalization and trafficking of viral and decoy chemokine receptors. PMID:15998596

  11. Semi-synthesis of chemokines.

    PubMed

    Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Panitz, Nydia

    2014-10-01

    Protein ligation allows the introduction of a wide range of modifications into proteins that are not accessible by mutagenesis. This includes non-proteinogenic amino acids and even backbone modification. This review summarizes recent reports on modified chemokine variants by ligation technologies and includes the development of the first protein with a full secondary structure motif exchanged by a helix that exclusively consists of β-amino acids. Furthermore the first protein activatable by light by rearrangement of a depsi-peptide bond is described. Combining different ligation methods, immobilization and specific release of chemokines were achieved, which is of major importance for the gradient forming activity of chemokines. Examples are shown for CXCL8 (interleukin 8, IL-8) and CXCL12 (stromal derived factor 1, SDF 1) including their chemical and structural characterization as well as the most frequently used assays. PMID:25299571

  12. Structure and Function of A41, a Vaccinia Virus Chemokine Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Abrescia, Nicola G. A; Pease, James E; Wise, Emma L; Stuart, David I; Smith, Geoffrey L; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2008-01-01

    The vaccinia virus (VACV) A41L gene encodes a secreted 30 kDa glycoprotein that is nonessential for virus replication but affects the host response to infection. The A41 protein shares sequence similarity with another VACV protein that binds CC chemokines (called vCKBP, or viral CC chemokine inhibitor, vCCI), and strains of VACV lacking the A41L gene induced stronger CD8+ T-cell responses than control viruses expressing A41. Using surface plasmon resonance, we screened 39 human and murine chemokines and identified CCL21, CCL25, CCL26 and CCL28 as A41 ligands, with Kds of between 8 nM and 118 nM. Nonetheless, A41 was ineffective at inhibiting chemotaxis induced by these chemokines, indicating it did not block the interaction of these chemokines with their receptors. However the interaction of A41 and chemokines was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by heparin, suggesting that A41 and heparin bind to overlapping sites on these chemokines. To better understand the mechanism of action of A41 its crystal structure was solved to 1.9 Å resolution. The protein has a globular β sandwich structure similar to that of the poxvirus vCCI family of proteins, but there are notable structural differences, particularly in surface loops and electrostatic charge distribution. Structural modelling suggests that the binding paradigm as defined for the vCCI–chemokine interaction is likely to be conserved between A41 and its chemokine partners. Additionally, sequence analysis of chemokines binding to A41 identified a signature for A41 binding. The biological and structural data suggest that A41 functions by forming moderately strong (nM) interactions with certain chemokines, sufficient to interfere with chemokine-glycosaminoglycan interactions at the cell surface (μM–nM) and thereby to destroy the chemokine concentration gradient, but not strong enough to disrupt the (pM) chemokine–chemokine receptor interactions. PMID:18208323

  13. Suppression of T-Cell Chemokines by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Jauregui, Catherine E.; Wang, Qian; Wright, Christopher J.; Takeuchi, Hiroki; Uriarte, Silvia M.

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen in periodontal disease and is associated with immune dysbiosis. In this study, we found that P. gingivalis did not induce the expression of the T-cell chemokine IP-10 (CXCL10) from neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), or gingival epithelial cells. Furthermore, P. gingivalis suppressed gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-stimulated release of IP-10, ITAC (CXCL11), and Mig (CXCL9) from epithelial cells and inhibited IP-10 secretion in a mixed infection with the otherwise stimulatory Fusobacterium nucleatum. Inhibition of chemokine expression occurred at the level of gene transcription and was associated with downregulation of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) and decreased levels of Stat1. Ectopic expression of IRF-1 in epithelial cells relieved P. gingivalis-induced inhibition of IP-10 release. Direct contact between P. gingivalis and epithelial cells was not required for IP-10 inhibition. These results highlight the immune-disruptive potential of P. gingivalis. Suppression of IP-10 and other Th1-biasing chemokines by P. gingivalis may perturb the balance of protective and destructive immunity in the periodontal tissues and facilitate the pathogenicity of oral microbial communities. PMID:23589576

  14. Chemokines in tumor development and progression

    SciTech Connect

    Mukaida, Naofumi; Baba, Tomohisa

    2012-01-15

    Chemokines were originally identified as mediators of the inflammatory process and regulators of leukocyte trafficking. Subsequent studies revealed their essential roles in leukocyte physiology and pathology. Moreover, chemokines have profound effects on other types of cells associated with the inflammatory response, such as endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Thus, chemokines are crucial for cancer-related inflammation, which can promote tumor development and progression. Increasing evidence points to the vital effects of several chemokines on the proliferative and invasive properties of tumor cells. The wide range of activities of chemokines in tumorigenesis highlights their roles in tumor development and progression.

  15. Chemokines in tumor progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sarvaiya, Purvaba J; Guo, Donna; Ulasov, Ilya; Gabikian, Patrik; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2013-12-01

    Chemokines play a vital role in tumor progression and metastasis. Chemokines are involved in the growth of many cancers including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer, melanoma, lung cancer, gastric cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, colon cancer, non-small lung cancer, non-hodgkin's lymphoma, etc. The expression of chemokines and their receptors is altered in many malignancies and leads to aberrant chemokine receptor signaling. This review focuses on the role of chemokines in key processes that facilitate tumor progression including proliferation, senescence, angiogenesis, epithelial mesenchymal transition, immune evasion and metastasis. PMID:24259307

  16. Chemokines in tumor progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sarvaiya, Purvaba J.; Guo, Donna; Ulasov, Ilya; Gabikian, Patrik; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    Chemokines play a vital role in tumor progression and metastasis. Chemokines are involved in the growth of many cancers including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer, melanoma, lung cancer, gastric cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, colon cancer, non-small lung cancer and non-hodgkin's lymphoma among many others. The expression of chemokines and their receptors is altered in many malignancies and leads to aberrant chemokine receptor signaling. This review focuses on the role of chemokines in key processes that facilitate tumor progression including proliferation, senescence, angiogenesis, epithelial mesenchymal transition, immune evasion and metastasis. PMID:24259307

  17. Chemokine receptor CXCR3 agonist prevents human T-cell migration in a humanized model of arthritic inflammation.

    PubMed

    O'Boyle, Graeme; Fox, Christopher R J; Walden, Hannah R; Willet, Joseph D P; Mavin, Emily R; Hine, Dominic W; Palmer, Jeremy M; Barker, Catriona E; Lamb, Christopher A; Ali, Simi; Kirby, John A

    2012-03-20

    The recruitment of T lymphocytes during diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis is regulated by stimulation of the chemokine receptors expressed by these cells. This study was designed to assess the potential of a CXCR3-specific small-molecule agonist to inhibit the migration of activated human T cells toward multiple chemokines. Further experiments defined the molecular mechanism for this anti-inflammatory activity. Analysis in vitro demonstrated agonist induced internalization of both CXCR3 and other chemokine receptors coexpressed by CXCR3(+) T cells. Unlike chemokine receptor-specific antagonists, the CXCR3 agonist inhibited migration of activated T cells toward the chemokine mixture in synovial fluid from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. A humanized mouse air-pouch model showed that intravenous treatment with the CXCR3 agonist prevented inflammatory migration of activated human T cells toward this synovial fluid. A potential mechanism for this action was defined by demonstration that the CXCR3 agonist induces receptor cross-phosphorylation within CXCR3-CCR5 heterodimers on the surface of activated T cells. This study shows that generalized chemokine receptor desensitization can be induced by specific stimulation of a single chemokine receptor on the surface of activated human T cells. A humanized mouse model was used to demonstrate that this receptor desensitization inhibits the inflammatory response that is normally produced by the chemokines present in synovial fluid from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22392992

  18. Enhancement of Chemokine Function as an Immunomodulatory Strategy Employed by Human Herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Martinez-Martín, Nadia; Nel, Hendrik J.; Rueda, Patricia; Martín, Rocío; Blanco, Soledad; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Thelen, Marcus; Fallon, Padraic G.; Alcamí, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are highly prevalent human neurotropic pathogens that cause a variety of diseases, including lethal encephalitis. The relationship between HSV and the host immune system is one of the main determinants of the infection outcome. Chemokines play relevant roles in antiviral response and immunopathology, but the modulation of chemokine function by HSV is not well understood. We have addressed the modulation of chemokine function mediated by HSV. By using surface plasmon resonance and crosslinking assays we show that secreted glycoprotein G (SgG) from both HSV-1 and HSV-2 binds chemokines with high affinity. Chemokine binding activity was also observed in the supernatant of HSV-2 infected cells and in the plasma membrane of cells infected with HSV-1 wild type but not with a gG deficient HSV-1 mutant. Cell-binding and competition experiments indicate that the interaction takes place through the glycosaminoglycan-binding domain of the chemokine. The functional relevance of the interaction was determined both in vitro, by performing transwell assays, time-lapse microscopy, and signal transduction experiments; and in vivo, using the air pouch model of inflammation. Interestingly, and in contrast to what has been observed for previously described viral chemokine binding proteins, HSV SgGs do not inhibit chemokine function. On the contrary, HSV SgGs enhance chemotaxis both in vitro and in vivo through increasing directionality, potency and receptor signaling. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of a viral chemokine binding protein from a human pathogen that increases chemokine function and points towards a previously undescribed strategy of immune modulation mediated by viruses. PMID:22319442

  19. Chemokine gene variants in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dasdemir, Selcuk; Kucukali, Cem Ismail; Bireller, Elif Sinem; Tuzun, Erdem; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2016-08-01

    Background Chemokines are known to play a major role in driving inflammation and immune responses in several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Inflammation has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Aim We aimed to investigate a potential link between chemokines and schizophrenia and analyze the role of MCP-1-A2518G, SDF-1-3'A, CCR5-delta32, CCR5-A55029G, CXCR4-C138T and CCR2-V64I gene polymorphisms in the Turkish population. Methods Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP based on 140 patients and 123 unrelated healthy controls to show the relation between chemokine gene variants and schizophrenia risk. Results Frequencies of CCR5-A55029G A genotypes and CCR5-A55029G AG genotypes were found higher in patients than the controls and even also CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes significantly associated according to Bonferroni correction. However, no significant association was found for any of the other polymorphisms with the risk of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our findings suggest that CCR5-A55029G polymorphisms and CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes might have association with schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:26906930

  20. Chemokines and the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    White, Fletcher A.; Jung, Hosung; Miller, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are widely expressed by cells of the immune and nervous systems. This review focuses on our current knowledge concerning the role of chemokines in the pathophysiology of chronic pain syndromes. Injury- or disease-induced changes in the expression of diverse chemokines and their receptors have been demonstrated in the neural and nonneural elements of pain pathways. Under these circumstances, chemokines have been shown to modulate the electrical activity of neurons by multiple regulatory pathways including increases in neurotransmitter release through Ca-dependent mechanisms and transactivation of transient receptor channels. Either of these mechanisms alone, or in combination, may contribute to sustained excitability of primary afferent and secondary neurons within spinal pain pathways. Another manner in which chemokines may influence sustained neuronal excitability may be their ability to function as excitatory neurotransmitters within the peripheral and central nervous system. As is the case for traditional neurotransmitters, injury-induced up-regulated chemokines are found within synaptic vesicles. Chemokines released after depolarization of the cell membrane can then act on other chemokine receptor-bearing neurons, glia, or immune cells. Because up-regulation of chemokines and their receptors may be one of the mechanisms that directly or indirectly contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pain, these molecules may then represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention in chronic pain states. PMID:18083844

  1. A Subset of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Has Leukemia Cells Characterized by Chemokine Responsiveness and Altered Expression of Transcriptional as well as Angiogenic Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Annette K.; Reikvam, Håkon; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive and heterogeneous bone marrow malignancy, the only curative treatment being intensive chemotherapy eventually in combination with allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Both the AML and their neighboring stromal cells show constitutive chemokine release, but chemokines seem to function as regulators of AML cell proliferation only for a subset of patients. Chemokine targeting is therefore considered not only for immunosuppression in allotransplanted patients but also as a possible antileukemic strategy in combination with intensive chemotherapy or as part of disease-stabilizing treatment at least for the subset of patients with chemokine-responsive AML cells. In this study, we characterized more in detail the leukemia cell phenotype of the chemokine-responsive patients. We investigated primary AML cells derived from 79 unselected patients. Standardized in vitro suspension cultures were used to investigate AML cell proliferation, and global gene expression profiles were compared for chemokine responders and non-responders identified through the proliferation assays. CCL28-induced growth modulation was used as marker of chemokine responsiveness, and 38 patients were then classified as chemokine-responsive. The effects of exogenous CCL28 (growth inhibition/enhancement/no effect) thus differed among patients and was also dependent on the presence of exogenous hematopoietic growth factors as well as constitutive AML cell cytokine release. The effect of CCR1 inhibition in the presence of chemokine-secreting mesenchymal stem cells also differed among patients. Chemokine-responsive AML cells showed altered expression of genes important for (i) epigenetic transcriptional regulation, particularly lysine acetylation; (ii) helicase activity, especially DExD/H RNA helicases; and (iii) angioregulatory proteins important for integrin binding. Thus, chemokine responsiveness is part of a complex AML cell phenotype with regard to

  2. Local Chemokine Paralysis, a Novel Pathogenic Mechanism for Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Darveau, Richard P.; Belton, Carol M.; Reife, Robert A.; Lamont, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    Periodontitis, which is widespread in the adult population, is a persistent bacterial infection associated with Porphyromonas gingivalis. Gingival epithelial cells are among the first cells encountered by both P. gingivalis and commensal oral bacteria. The chemokine interleukin 8 (IL-8), a potent chemoattractant and activator of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, was secreted by gingival epithelial cells in response to components of the normal oral flora. In contrast, P. gingivalis was found to strongly inhibit IL-8 accumulation from gingival epithelial cells. Inhibition was associated with a decrease in mRNA for IL-8. Antagonism of IL-8 accumulation did not occur in KB cells, an epithelial cell line that does not support high levels of intracellular invasion by P. gingivalis. Furthermore, a noninvasive mutant of P. gingivalis was unable to antagonize IL-8 accumulation. Invasion-dependent destruction of the gingival IL-8 chemokine gradient at sites of P. gingivalis colonization (local chemokine paralysis) will severely impair mucosal defense and represents a novel mechanism for bacterial colonization of host tissue. PMID:9529095

  3. ROLE OF CHEMOKINES IN TUMOR GROWTH

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Baugher, Paige J.; Thu, Yee Mon; Richmond, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines play a paramount role in the tumor progression. Chronic inflammation promotes tumor formation. Both tumor cells and stromal cells elaborate chemokines and cytokines. These act either by autocrine or paracrine mechanisms to sustain tumor cell growth, induce angiogenesis and facilitate evasion of immune surveillance through immunoediting. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 and its ligands promote tumor angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration into the tumor microenvironment. In harsh acidic and hypoxic microenvironmental conditions tumor cells up-regulate their expression of CXCR4, which equips them to migrate up a gradient of CXCL12 elaborated by carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) to a normoxic microenvironment. The CXCL12-CXCR4 axis facilitates metastasis to distant organs and the CCL21-CCR7 chemokine ligand-receptor pair favors metastasis to lymph nodes. These two chemokine ligand-receptor systems are common key mediators of tumor cell metastasis for several malignancies and as such provide key targets for chemotherapy. In this paper, the role of specific chemokines/chemokine receptor interactions in tumor progression, growth and metastasis and the role of chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions in the stromal compartment as related to angiogenesis, metastasis, and immune response to the tumor are reviewed. PMID:17629396

  4. Increased expression of chemokines in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis – modulating effects of methylprednisolone in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Torheim, E A; Yndestad, A; Bjerkeli, V; Halvorsen, B; Aukrust, P; Frøland, S S

    2005-01-01

    Chemokines, a group of cytokines that attracts and activates leucocyte subpopulations in inflamed tissue, have been associated with the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory diseases, and some recent reports have suggested their involvement in Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). To elucidate further the possible role of chemokines in WG we examined serum levels of several CC- and CXC-chemokines in WG patients and assessed the ability of corticosteroids to modulate the expression of these mediators in vitro. Our main findings were: (i) WG patients (n = 14) had elevated serum levels of several inflammatory chemokines [i.e. regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and interleukin (IL)-8] compared to healthy controls (n = 9), as assessed by enzyme immunoassays (EIAs); (ii) by using EIAs and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we demonstrated the ability of methylprednisolone (MP) to down-regulate both the spontaneous and the staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-induced release of chemokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro in both WG patients and controls, possibly involving both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms; and (iii) the ability of MP to attenuate chemokine secretion was less pronounced in WG patients than in controls, particularly with regard to inhibition of spontaneous release. Our findings suggest a role for chemokines in the pathogenesis of WG. The diminished MP-mediated suppression of chemokines in PBMC from WG patients suggests that more specific modulators of chemokine levels should be investigated in this disorder. PMID:15807865

  5. CD26/dipeptidylpeptidase IV-chemokine interactions: double-edged regulation of inflammation and tumor biology.

    PubMed

    Mortier, Anneleen; Gouwy, Mieke; Van Damme, Jo; Proost, Paul; Struyf, Sofie

    2016-06-01

    Post-translational modification of chemokines is an essential regulatory mechanism to enhance or dampen the inflammatory response. CD26/dipeptidylpeptidase IV, ubiquitously expressed in tissues and blood, removes NH2-terminal dipeptides from proteins with a penultimate Pro or Ala. A large number of human chemokines, including CXCL2, CXCL6, CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CXCL12, CCL3L1, CCL4, CCL5, CCL11, CCL14, and CCL22, are cleaved by CD26; however, the efficiency is clearly influenced by the amino acids surrounding the cleavage site and although not yet proven, potentially affected by the chemokine concentration and interactions with third molecules. NH2-terminal cleavage of chemokines by CD26 has prominent effects on their receptor binding, signaling, and hence, in vitro and in vivo biologic activities. However, rather than having a similar result, the outcome of NH2-terminal truncation is highly diverse. Either no difference in activity or drastic alterations in receptor recognition/specificity and hence, chemotactic activity are observed. Analogously, chemokine-dependent inhibition of HIV infection is enhanced (for CCL3L1 and CCL5) or decreased (for CXCL12) by CD26 cleavage. The occurrence of CD26-processed chemokine isoforms in plasma underscores the importance of the in vitro-observed CD26 cleavages. Through modulation of chemokine activity, CD26 regulates leukocyte/tumor cell migration and progenitor cell release from the bone marrow, as shown by use of mice treated with CD26 inhibitors or CD26 knockout mice. As chemokine processing by CD26 has a significant impact on physiologic and pathologic processes, application of CD26 inhibitors to affect chemokine function is currently explored, e.g., as add-on therapy in viral infection and cancer. PMID:26744452

  6. Ozone Exposure of Macrophages Induces an Alveolar Epithelial Chemokine Response through IL-1α

    PubMed Central

    Manzer, Rizwan; Dinarello, Charles A.; McConville, Glen; Mason, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Ozone is known to produce an acute influx of neutrophils, and alveolar epithelial cells can secrete chemokines and modulate inflammatory processes. However, direct exposure of alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages to ozone (O3) produces little chemokine response. To determine if cell–cell interactions might be responsible, we investigated the effect of alveolar macrophage–conditioned media after ozone exposure (MO3CM) on alveolar epithelial cell chemokine production. Serum-free media were conditioned by exposing a rat alveolar macrophage cell line NR8383 to ozone for 1 hour. Ozone stimulated secretion of IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18 from NR8383 cells, but there was no secretion of chemokines or TNF-α. Freshly isolated type II cells were cultured, so as to express the biological markers of type I cells, and these cells are referred to as type I–like cells. Type I–like cells were exposed to diluted MO3CM for 24 hours, and this conditioned medium stimulated secretion of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemattractant-1 (CXCL1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2). Secretion of these chemokines was inhibited by the IL-1 receptor antagonist. Although both recombinant IL-1α and IL-1β stimulated alveolar epithelial cells to secrete chemokines, recombinant IL-1α was 100-fold more potent than IL-1β. Furthermore, neutralizing anti-rat IL-1α antibodies inhibited the secretion of chemokines by alveolar epithelial cells, whereas neutralizing anti-rat IL-1β antibodies had no effect. These observations indicate that secretion of IL-1α from macrophages stimulates alveolar epithelial cells to secrete chemokines that can elicit an inflammatory response. PMID:17901407

  7. Ras regulates alveolar macrophage formation of CXC chemokines and neutrophil activation in streptococcal M1 protein-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songen; Hwaiz, Rundk; Rahman, Milladur; Herwald, Heiko; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-06-15

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is associated with a high mortality rate. The M1 serotype of Streptococcus pyogenes is most frequently associated with STSS. Herein, we examined the role of Ras signaling in M1 protein-induced lung injury. Male C57BL/6 mice received the Ras inhibitor (farnesylthiosalicylic acid, FTS) prior to M1 protein challenge. Bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue were harvested for quantification of neutrophil recruitment, edema and CXC chemokine formation. Neutrophil expression of Mac-1 was quantified by use of flow cytometry. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Administration of FTS reduced M1 protein-induced neutrophil recruitment, edema formation and tissue damage in the lung. M1 protein challenge increased Mac-1 expression on neutrophils and CXC chemokine levels in the lung. Inhibition of Ras activity decreased M1 protein-induced expression of Mac-1 on neutrophils and secretion of CXC chemokines in the lung. Moreover, FTS abolished M1 protein-provoked gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Ras inhibition decreased chemokine-mediated neutrophil migration in vitro. Taken together, our novel findings indicate that Ras signaling is a potent regulator of CXC chemokine formation and neutrophil infiltration in the lung. Thus, inhibition of Ras activity might be a useful way to antagonize streptococcal M1 protein-triggered acute lung injury. PMID:24704370

  8. The cyclophilin-binding agent Sanglifehrin A is a dendritic cell chemokine and migration inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Immecke, Sabrina N; Baal, Nelli; Wilhelm, Jochen; Bechtel, Juliane; Knoche, Angela; Bein, Gregor; Hackstein, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Sanglifehrin A (SFA) is a cyclophilin-binding immunosuppressant but the immunobiology of action is poorly understood. We and others have reported that SFA inhibits IL-12 production and antigen uptake in dendritic cells (DC) and exhibits lower activity against lymphocytes. Here we show that SFA suppresses DC chemokine production and migration. Gene expression analysis and subsequent protein level confirmation revealed that SFA suppressed CCL5, CCL17, CCL19, CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression in human monocyte-derived DC (moDC). A systems biology analysis, Onto Express, confirmed that SFA interferes with chemokine-chemokine receptor gene expression with the highest impact. Direct comparison with the related agent cyclosporine A (CsA) and dexamethasone indicated that SFA uniquely suppresses moDC chemokine expression. Competitive experiments with a 100-fold molar excess of CsA and with N-Methyl-Val-4-cyclosporin, representing a nonimmunosuppressive derivative of CsA indicated chemokine suppression through a cyclophilin-A independent pathway. Functional assays confirmed reduced migration of CD4+ Tcells and moDCs to supernatant of SFA-exposed moDCs. Vice versa, SFA-exposed moDC exhibited reduced migration against CCL19. Moreover, SFA suppressed expression of the ectoenzyme CD38 that was reported to regulate DC migration and cytokine production. These results identify SFA as a DC chemokine and migration inhibitor and provide novel insight into the immunobiology of SFA. PMID:21483789

  9. The Cyclophilin-Binding Agent Sanglifehrin A Is a Dendritic Cell Chemokine and Migration Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Immecke, Sabrina N.; Baal, Nelli; Wilhelm, Jochen; Bechtel, Juliane; Knoche, Angela; Bein, Gregor; Hackstein, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Sanglifehrin A (SFA) is a cyclophilin-binding immunosuppressant but the immunobiology of action is poorly understood. We and others have reported that SFA inhibits IL-12 production and antigen uptake in dendritic cells (DC) and exhibits lower activity against lymphocytes. Here we show that SFA suppresses DC chemokine production and migration. Gene expression analysis and subsequent protein level confirmation revealed that SFA suppressed CCL5, CCL17, CCL19, CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression in human monocyte-derived DC (moDC). A systems biology analysis, Onto Express, confirmed that SFA interferes with chemokine-chemokine receptor gene expression with the highest impact. Direct comparison with the related agent cyclosporine A (CsA) and dexamethasone indicated that SFA uniquely suppresses moDC chemokine expression. Competitive experiments with a 100-fold molar excess of CsA and with N-Methyl-Val-4-cyclosporin, representing a nonimmunosuppressive derivative of CsA indicated chemokine suppression through a cyclophilin-A independent pathway. Functional assays confirmed reduced migration of CD4+ Tcells and moDCs to supernatant of SFA-exposed moDCs. Vice versa, SFA-exposed moDC exhibited reduced migration against CCL19. Moreover, SFA suppressed expression of the ectoenzyme CD38 that was reported to regulate DC migration and cytokine production. These results identify SFA as a DC chemokine and migration inhibitor and provide novel insight into the immunobiology of SFA. PMID:21483789

  10. Chemokine Expression in Melanoma Metastases Associated with CD8+ T-Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Harlin, Helena; Meng, Yuru; Peterson, Amy C.; Zha, Yuanyuan; Tretiakova, Maria; Slingluff, Craig; McKee, Mark; Gajewski, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the frequent detection of circulating tumor antigen–specific T cells, either spontaneously or following active immunization or adoptive transfer, immune-mediated cancer regression occurs only in the minority of patients. One theoretical rate-limiting step is whether effector T cells successfully migrate into metastatic tumor sites. Affymetrix gene expression profiling done on a series of metastatic melanoma biopsies revealed a major segregation of samples based on the presence or absence of T-cell-associated transcripts. The presence of lymphocytes correlated with the expression of defined chemokine genes. A subset of six chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10) was confirmed by protein array and/or quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to be preferentially expressed in tumors that contained T cells. Corresponding chemokine receptors were found to be up-regulated on human CD8+ effector T cells, and transwell migration assays confirmed the ability of each of these chemokines to promote migration of CD8+ effector cells in vitro. Screening by chemokine protein array identified a subset of melanoma cell lines that produced a similar broad array of chemokines. These melanoma cells more effectively recruited human CD8+ effector T cells when implanted as xenografts in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice in vivo. Chemokine blockade with specific antibodies inhibited migration of CD8+ T cells. Our results suggest that lack of critical chemokines in a subset of melanoma metastases may limit the migration of activated T cells, which in turn could limit the effectiveness of antitumor immunity. PMID:19293190

  11. Chemokines and their receptors in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    van der Vorst, Emiel P C; Döring, Yvonne; Weber, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the medium- and large-sized arteries, is the main underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) most often leading to a myocardial infarction or stroke. However, atherosclerosis can also develop without this clinical manifestation. The pathophysiology of atherosclerosis is very complex and consists of many cells and molecules interacting with each other. Over the last years, chemokines (small 8-12 kDa cytokines with chemotactic properties) have been identified as key players in atherogenesis. However, this remains a very active and dynamic field of research. Here, we will give an overview of the current knowledge about the involvement of chemokines in all phases of atherosclerotic lesion development. Furthermore, we will focus on two chemokines that recently have been associated with atherogenesis, CXCL12, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Both chemokines play a crucial role in leukocyte recruitment and arrest, a critical step in atherosclerosis development. MIF has shown to be a more pro-inflammatory and thus pro-atherogenic chemokine, instead CXCL12 seems to have a more protective function. However, results about this protective role are still quite debatable. Future research will further elucidate the precise role of these chemokines in atherosclerosis and determine the potential of chemokine-based therapies. PMID:26175090

  12. A strategy to discover decoy chemokine ligands with an anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Dayana; Daubeuf, François; Do, Quoc Tuan; Utard, Valérie; Villa, Pascal; Haiech, Jacques; Bonnet, Dominique; Hibert, Marcel; Bernard, Philippe; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Frossard, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Excessive signaling by chemokines has been associated with chronic inflammation or cancer, thus attracting substantial attention as promising therapeutic targets. Inspired by chemokine-clearing molecules shaped by pathogens to escape the immune system, we designed a generic screening assay to discover chemokine neutralizing molecules (neutraligands) and unambiguously distinguish them from molecules that block the receptor (receptor antagonists). This assay, called TRIC-r, combines time-resolved intracellular calcium recordings with pre-incubation of bioactive compounds either with the chemokine or the receptor-expressing cells. We describe here the identification of high affinity neutraligands of CCL17 and CCL22, two chemokines involved in the Th2-type of lung inflammation. The decoy molecules inhibit in vitro CCL17- or CCL22-induced intracellular calcium responses, CCR4 endocytosis and human T cell migration. In vivo, they inhibit inflammation in a murine model of asthma, in particular the recruitment of eosinophils, dendritic cells and CD4+T cells. Altogether, we developed a successful strategy to discover as new class of pharmacological tools to potently control cell chemotaxis in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26442456

  13. Anti-metastatic effect of supercritical extracts from the Citrus hassaku pericarp via inhibition of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9).

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulwon; Kim, Dongmin; Nam, Dongwoo; Chung, Won-Seok; Ahn, Kyoo Seok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Shim, Bum Sang; Cho, Somi K; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2014-09-01

    The fruit of hassaku (Citrus hassaku Hort. ex Tanaka) is locally known as phalsak in Korea. Recently, the fruit extract has been known to exhibit in vivo preventive effects against UVB-induced pigmentation, antiallergic activity, and enhancement of blood fluidity. However, the exact mechanisms of how supercritical extracts of phalsak peel (SEPS) inhibits tumor metastasis and invasion are still not fully understood. We found that SEPS could downregulate the constitutive expression of both CXCR4 and HER2 in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells as compared with other cells. SEPS also suppressed matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression and its enzymatic activity under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Neither proteasome inhibition nor lysosomal stabilization had any effect on the SEPS-induced decrease in CXCR4 expression. A detailed study of the underlying molecular mechanisms revealed that the regulation of the downregulation of CXCR4 was at the transcriptional level, as indicated by downregulation of mRNA expression, suppression of NF-κB activity, and inhibition of chromatin immunoprecipitation activity. Suppression of CXCR4 expression by SEPS correlated with the inhibition of CXCL12-stimulated invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Overall, our results indicate, for the first time, that SEPS can suppress CXCR4 and MMP-9 expressions through blockade of NF-κB activation and thus has the potential to suppress metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:24638915

  14. Chemokine receptors in cancer metastasis and cancer cell-derived chemokines in host immune response.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Keiichi; Hojo, Shozo; Akashi, Takuya; Yasumoto, Kazuo; Saiki, Ikuo

    2007-11-01

    The chemotactic cytokines called chemokines are a superfamily of small secreted cytokines that were initially characterized through their ability to prompt the migration of leukocytes. Attention has been focused on the chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells because cancer cell migration and metastasis show similarities to leukocyte trafficking. CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) was first investigated as a chemokine receptor that is associated with lung metastasis of breast cancers. Recently, CXCR4 was reported to be a key molecule in the formation of peritoneal carcinomatosis in gastric cancer. In the present review, we highlight current knowledge about the role of CXCR4 in cancer metastases. In contrast to chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells, little is known about the roles of cancer cell-derived chemokines. Cancer tissue consists of both cancer cells and various stromal cells, and leukocytes that infiltrate into cancer are of particular importance in cancer progression. Although colorectal cancer invasion is regulated by the chemokine CCL9-induced infiltration of immature myeloid cells into cancer, high-level expression of cancer cell-derived chemokine CXCL16 increases infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells into cancer tissues, and correlates with a good prognosis. We discuss the conflicting biological effects of cancer cell-derived chemokines on cancer progression, using CCL9 and CXCL16 as examples. PMID:17894551

  15. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in mucosal homeostasis at the intestinal epithelial barrier in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Noah P; Vongsa, Rebecca A; Wendt, Michael K; Dwinell, Michael B

    2008-07-01

    Chemokines, a large family of small chemoattractive cytokines, and their receptors play an integral role in the regulation of the immune response and homeostasis. The ability of chemokines to attract specific populations of immune cells sets them apart from other chemoattractants. Chemokines produced within the gastrointestinal mucosa are critical players in directing the balance between physiological and pathophysiological inflammation in health, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and the progression to colon cancer. In addition to the well-characterized role of chemokines in directed trafficking of immune cells to the gut mucosa, the expression of chemokine receptors on the cells of the epithelium makes them active participants in the chemokine signaling network. Recent findings demonstrate an important role for chemokines and chemokine receptors in epithelial barrier repair and maintenance as well as an intricate involvement in limiting metastasis of colonic carcinoma. Increased recognition of the association between barrier defects and inflammation and the subsequent progression to cancer in IBD thus implicates chemokines as key regulators of mucosal homeostasis and disease pathogenesis. PMID:18452220

  16. The anti-inflammatory compound curcumin inhibits Neisseria gonorrhoeae-induced NF-kappaB signaling, release of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and attenuates adhesion in late infection.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Silja; Muenzner, Petra; Meyer, Thomas F; Naumann, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ngo) is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium responsible for an array of diseases ranging from urethritis to disseminated gonococcal infections. Early events in the establishment of infection involve interactions between Ngo and the mucosal epithelium, which induce a local inflammatory response. Here we analyzed the molecular mechanism involved in the Ngo-induced induction of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-8. We identified the immediate early response transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) as a key molecule for the induction of cytokine release. Ngo-induced activation of direct upstream signaling molecules was demonstrated for IkappaB kinase alpha and beta (IKKalpha and IKKbeta) by phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha as a substrate and IKK autophosphorylation. Using dominant negative cDNAs encoding kinase-dead IKKalpha, IKKbeta, and NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK), Ngo-induced NF-kappaB activity was significantly inhibited. Curcumin, the yellow pigment derived from Curcuma longa, inhibited IKKalpha, IKKbeta and NIK, indicating its strong potential to block NF-kappaB-mediated cytokine release and the innate immune response. In addition to the inhibition of Ngo-induced signaling, curcumin treatment of cells completely abolished the adherence of bacteria to cells in late infection, underlining the high potential of curcumin as an anti-microbial compound without cytotoxic side effects. PMID:15927892

  17. Acoustic sensing of the initial adhesion of chemokine-stimulated cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Na

    2013-11-01

    Chemokines together with their receptors play important roles in tumor metastasis. Intracellular signals stimulated by chemokines regulate the initial adhesion of cancer cells, which controls the subsequent cell spreading and migration. Until now, the nature of initial cell adhesion has been understood very poorly, since conventional assays are static and could not provide dynamic information. In order to address this issue, we adopt an acoustic sensor, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), to monitor the attachment of chemokine-stimulated cancer cells in real-time. As a model, the chemokine CXCL12 was used to stimulate three human breast cancer cell lines expressing different levels of its receptor CXCR4, which triggers intracellular signaling pathways that activate integrins across cell membrane. Interaction between cellular integrins and adhesion molecules (CAMs) pre-coated on sensor surfaces were in situ monitored by QCM of which the frequency was sensitive to the mechanical connection of cells to the sensor surface. The ratio of frequency shift under stimulation to that without stimulation indicated the number and strength of integrin-CAM binding stimulated by the chemokine. The cell-surface binding was found to be enhanced by CXCL12, which depends on the CAM type and levels of chemokine and receptor, and was significantly inhibited by a blocker of the chemokine pathway. The binding of integrin with intercellular adhesion molecule was also found to be strong and in good correlated with the chemotactic indexes obtained by the classical Boyden chamber assay. This research suggests that acoustic sensing of initial cell adhesion could provide a dynamic insight into cell interfacial phenomena. PMID:23911626

  18. Pharmacological modulation of chemokine receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, DJ; Canals, M; Maussang, D; Roumen, L; Smit, MJ; Wijtmans, M; de Graaf, C; Vischer, HF; Leurs, R

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and their peptidergic ligands are interesting therapeutic targets due to their involvement in various immune-related diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV-1 infection and cancer. To tackle these diseases, a lot of effort has been focused on discovery and development of small-molecule chemokine receptor antagonists. This has been rewarded by the market approval of two novel chemokine receptor inhibitors, AMD3100 (CXCR4) and Maraviroc (CCR5) for stem cell mobilization and treatment of HIV-1 infection respectively. The recent GPCR crystal structures together with mutagenesis and pharmacological studies have aided in understanding how small-molecule ligands interact with chemokine receptors. Many of these ligands display behaviour deviating from simple competition and do not interact with the chemokine binding site, providing evidence for an allosteric mode of action. This review aims to give an overview of the evidence supporting modulation of this intriguing receptor family by a range of ligands, including small molecules, peptides and antibodies. Moreover, the computer-assisted modelling of chemokine receptor–ligand interactions is discussed in view of GPCR crystal structures. Finally, the implications of concepts such as functional selectivity and chemokine receptor dimerization are considered. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-6. To view the 2010 themed section on the same topic visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.2010.159.issue-5/issuetoc PMID:21699506

  19. C-C chemokine receptor type 4 antagonist Compound 22 ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Kota; Miyamoto, Katsuichi; Tanaka, Noriko; Ueno, Rino; Nakayama, Takashi; Yoshie, Osamu; Kusunoki, Susumu

    2016-02-15

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune response. We previously reported the pathogenic role of C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CCR4) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here, we examined whether CCR4 antagonism modulates the disease course of EAE. Wild-type and CCR4-knockout mice were induced EAE and were administered Compound 22, an antagonist of CCR4. Compound 22 significantly ameliorated the severity of EAE in wild-type mice, but not in the CCR4-knockout mice. Compound 22 inhibited Th1 and Th17 polarization of antigen-induced T-cell responses. Therefore, CCR4 antagonists might be potential therapeutic agents for multiple sclerosis. PMID:26857495

  20. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  1. Structural biology. Crystal structure of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in complex with a viral chemokine.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ling; Kufareva, Irina; Holden, Lauren G; Wang, Chong; Zheng, Yi; Zhao, Chunxia; Fenalti, Gustavo; Wu, Huixian; Han, Gye Won; Cherezov, Vadim; Abagyan, Ruben; Stevens, Raymond C; Handel, Tracy M

    2015-03-01

    Chemokines and their receptors control cell migration during development, immune system responses, and in numerous diseases, including inflammation and cancer. The structural basis of receptor:chemokine recognition has been a long-standing unanswered question due to the challenges of structure determination for membrane protein complexes. Here, we report the crystal structure of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in complex with the viral chemokine antagonist vMIP-II at 3.1 angstrom resolution. The structure revealed a 1:1 stoichiometry and a more extensive binding interface than anticipated from the paradigmatic two-site model. The structure helped rationalize a large body of mutagenesis data and together with modeling provided insights into CXCR4 interactions with its endogenous ligand CXCL12, its ability to recognize diverse ligands, and the specificity of CC and CXC receptors for their respective chemokines. PMID:25612609

  2. Significance of chemokine and chemokine receptors in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A critical review.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; Moreira Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Russo, Remo Castro; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida da

    2016-05-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic proteins that coordinate circulation of immune/inflammatory cells throughout body compartments. Because of this property chemokines and their cell surface receptors are implicated in several physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer. These molecules are expressed by neoplastic or stromal cells and have effects at tumor primary site (e.g. stimulating angiogenesis and tumor cells motility) and lymph nodes (creating a gradient to direct migration of neoplastic cells). In this article we review the current knowledge about the function(s) of chemokines and receptors in squamous cell carcinoma from the oral cavity and head and neck region. Accumulating evidence suggests some chemokine(s) and receptor(s) as potential targets in adjuvant therapies for these malignancies. PMID:27086481

  3. Chemokines and the microenvironment in neuroectodermal tumor-host interaction

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Herlyn, Dorothee

    2009-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play an important role in immune homeostasis and surveillance. Altered or defective expression of chemokines and/or chemokine receptors could lead to a disease state including autoimmune disorder or cancer. Tumors from glioblastoma, melanoma, and neuroblastoma secrete high levels of chemokines that can promote tumor growth and progression or induce stromal cells present in the tumor microenvironment to produce cytokines or chemokines which, in turn, can regulate angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis. On the other hand, chemokines secreted by tumor or stromal cells can also attract leukocytes such as dendritic cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes which may downmodulate tumor growth. New therapies that are aimed at limiting tumor growth and progression by attracting immune effector cells to the tumor site with chemokines may hold the key to the successful treatment of cancer, although this approach may be hampered by possible tumor growth-stimulating effects of chemokines. PMID:19049876

  4. Berberine suppresses migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through down-regulation of chemokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadiankia, Naghmeh; Moghaddam, Hamid Kalalian; Mishan, Mohammad Amir; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Moghaddam, Maryam; Mirfeyzi, Seyed Jamal Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Berberine is one of the main alkaloids and it has been proven to have different pharmacological effects including inhibition of cell cycle and progression of apoptosis in various cancerous cells; however, its effects on cancer metastasis are not well known. Cancer cells obtain the ability to change their chemokine system and convert into metastatic cells. In this study, we examined the effect of berberine on breast cancer cell migration and its probable interaction with the chemokine system in cancer cells. Materials and Methods: The MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was cultured, and then, treated with berberine (10, 20, 40 and 80 μg/ml) for 24 hr. MTT assay was used in order to determine the cytotoxic effect of berberine on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Wound healing assay was applied to determine the inhibitory effect of berberine on cell migration. Moreover, real-time quantitative PCR analysis of selected chemokine receptors was performed to determine the probable molecular mechanism underlying the effect of berberine on breast cancer cell migration. Results: The results of wound healing assay revealed that berberine decreases cell migration. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of some chemokine receptors were reduced after berberine treatment, and this may be the underlying mechanism for decreased cell migration. Conclusion: Our results indicate that berberine might be a potential preventive biofactor for human breast cancer metastasis by targeting chemokine receptor genes. PMID:27081456

  5. Chemokine Receptor-Specific Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy: Achievements and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Maria; Aris, Mariana; Llorente, Mercedes; Garcia-Sanz, Jose A.; Kremer, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    The 1990s brought a burst of information regarding the structure, expression pattern, and role in leukocyte migration and adhesion of chemokines and their receptors. At that time, the FDA approved the first therapeutic antibodies for cancer treatment. A few years later, it was reported that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 were involved on directing metastases to liver, lung, bone marrow, or lymph nodes, and the over-expression of CCR4, CCR6, and CCR9 by certain tumors. The possibility of inhibiting the interaction of chemokine receptors present on the surface of tumor cells with their ligands emerged as a new therapeutic approach. Therefore, many research groups and companies began to develop small molecule antagonists and specific antibodies, aiming to neutralize signaling from these receptors. Despite great expectations, so far, only one anti-chemokine receptor antibody has been approved for its clinical use, mogamulizumab, an anti-CCR4 antibody, granted in Japan to treat refractory adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma. Here, we review the main achievements obtained with anti-chemokine receptor antibodies for cancer immunotherapy, including discovery and clinical studies, proposed mechanisms of action, and therapeutic applications. PMID:25688243

  6. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Paraoxonases and Chemokines in Arteries of Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Sepúlveda, Julio; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Guirro, Maria; García-Heredia, Anabel; Cabré, Noemí; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Martín-Paredero, Vicente; Joven, Jorge; Camps, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative damage to lipids and lipoproteins is implicated in the development of atherosclerotic vascular diseases, including peripheral artery disease (PAD). The paraoxonases (PON) are a group of antioxidant enzymes, termed PON1, PON2, and PON3 that protect lipoproteins and cells from peroxidation and, as such, may be involved in protection against the atherosclerosis process. PON1 inhibits the production of chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in endothelial cells incubated with oxidized lipoproteins. PON1 and CCL2 are ubiquitously distributed in tissues, and this suggests a joint localization and combined systemic effect. The aim of the present study has been to analyze the quantitative immunohistochemical localization of PON1, PON3, CCL2 and CCL2 receptors in a series of patients with severe PAD. Portions of femoral and/or popliteal arteries from 66 patients with PAD were obtained during surgical procedures for infra-inguinal limb revascularization. We used eight normal arteries from donors as controls. PON1 and PON3, CCL2 and the chemokine-binding protein 2, and Duffy antigen/chemokine receptor, were increased in PAD patients. There were no significant changes in C–C chemokine receptor type 2. Our findings suggest that paraoxonases and chemokines play an important role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis in peripheral artery disease. PMID:25993297

  7. Chemokines and chemokine receptors as novel therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis (RA): inhibitory effects of traditional Chinese medicinal components.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Oppenheim, Joost J; Howard, O M Zack

    2004-10-01

    Chemokines belong to a large family of inflammatory cytokines responsible for migration and accumulation of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence indicated a crucial role for chemokines and chemokine receptors in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a chronic autoimmune disease in which the synovial tissue is heavily infiltrated by leukocytes. Chemokines play an important role in the infiltration, localization, retention of infiltrating leukocytes and generation of ectopic germinal centers in the inflamed synovium. Recent evidence also suggests that identification of inhibitors directly targeting chemokines or their receptors may provide a novel therapeutic strategy in RA. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have a long history in the treatment of inflammatory joint disease. The basis for the clinical benefits of TCM remains largely unclear. Our studies have led to the identification of numerous novel chemokine/chemokine receptor inhibitors present in anti-inflammatory TCMs. All of these inhibitors were previously reported by other researchers to have anti-arthritic effect, which may be attributable, at least in part, to their inhibitory effect on chemokine and/or chemokine receptor. Therefore, identification of agents capable of targeting chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions has suggested a mechanism of action for several TCM components and provided a means of identifying additional anti-RA TCM. Thus, this approach may lead to the discovery of new inhibitors of chemokines or chemokine receptors that can be used to treat diseases associated with inappropriately overactive chemokine mediated inflammatory reactions. PMID:16285892

  8. CXC-type chemokines promote myofibroblast phenoconversion and prostatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gharaee-Kermani, Mehrnaz; Kasina, Sathish; Moore, Bethany B; Thomas, Dafydd; Mehra, Rohit; Macoska, Jill A

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies from our group suggest that extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and fibrosis characterize the peri-urethral prostate tissues of some men suffering from Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) and that fibrosis may be a contributing factor to the etiology of LUTS. Fibrosis can generally be regarded as an errant wound-healing process in response to chronic inflammation, and several studies have shown that the aging prostate tissue microenvironment is rich with inflammatory cells and proteins. However, it is unclear whether these same inflammatory proteins, particularly CXC-type chemokines, can mediate myofibroblast phenoconversion and the ECM deposition necessary for the development of prostatic tissue fibrosis. To examine this, immortalized and primary prostate stromal fibroblasts treated with TGF-β1, CXCL5, CXCL8, or CXCL12 were evaluated morphologically by microscopy, by immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR for αSMA, collagen 1, vimentin, calponin, and tenascin protein and transcript expression, and by gel contraction assays for functional myofibroblast phenoconversion. The results of these studies showed that that immortalized and primary prostate stromal fibroblasts are induced to express collagen 1 and 3 and αSMA gene transcripts and proteins and to undergo complete and functional myofibroblast phenoconversion in response to CXC-type chemokines, even in the absence of exogenous TGF-β1. Moreover, CXCL12-mediated myofibroblast phenoconversion can be completely abrogated by inhibition of the CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4. These findings suggest that CXC-type chemokines, which comprise inflammatory proteins known to be highly expressed in the aging prostate, can efficiently and completely mediate myofibroblast phenoconversion and may thereby promote fibrotic changes in prostate tissue architecture associated with the development and progression of male lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:23173053

  9. Decidual Cell Regulation of Natural Killer Cell–Recruiting Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.; Huang, S. Joseph; Chen, Chie-Pein; Huang, Yingqun; Xu, Jie; Faramarzi, Saeed; Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit; Koopman, Louise; Smedts, Dineke; Buchwalder, Lynn F.; Schatz, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    First trimester human decidua is composed of decidual cells, CD56brightCD16− decidual natural killer (dNK) cells, and macrophages. Decidual cells incubated with NK cell–derived IFN-γ and either macrophage-derived TNF-α or IL-1β synergistically enhanced mRNA and protein expression of IP-10 and I-TAC. Both chemokines recruit CXCR3-expressing NK cells. This synergy required IFN-γ receptor 1 and 2 mediation via JAK/STAT and NFκB signaling pathways. However, synergy was not observed on neutrophil, monocyte, and NK cell–recruiting chemokines. Immunostaining of first trimester decidua localized IP-10, I-TAC, IFN-γR1, and -R2 to vimentin-positive decidual cells versus cytokeratin-positive interstitial trophoblasts. Flow cytometry identified high CXCR3 levels on dNK cells and minority peripheral CD56brightCD16− pNK cells and intermediate CXCR3 levels on the majority of CD56dimCD16+ pNK cells. Incubation of pNK cells with either IP-10 or I-TAC elicited concentration-dependent enhanced CXCR3 levels and migration of both pNK cell subsets that peaked at 10 ng/mL, whereas each chemokine at a concentration of 50 ng/mL inhibited CXCR3 expression and pNK cell migration. Deciduae from women with preeclampsia, a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, displayed significantly lower dNK cell numbers and higher IP-10 and I-TAC levels versus gestational age–matched controls. Significantly elevated IP-10 levels in first trimester sera from women eventually developing preeclampsia compared with controls, identifying IP-10 as a novel, robust early predictor of preeclampsia. PMID:23973270

  10. Chemokines, costimulatory molecules and fusion proteins for the immunotherapy of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Melissa G; Russell, Sarah M; Bass, Rikki S; Epstein, Alan L

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the role of chemokines and costimulatory molecules in the immunotherapy of experimental murine solid tumors and immunotherapy used in ongoing clinical trials are presented. Chemokine networks regulate physiologic cell migration that may be disrupted to inhibit antitumor immune responses or coopted to promote tumor growth and metastasis in cancer. Recent studies highlight the potential use of chemokines in cancer immunotherapy to improve innate and adaptive cell interactions and to recruit immune effector cells into the tumor microenvironment. Another critical component of antitumor immune responses is antigen priming and activation of effector cells. Reciprocal expression and binding of costimulatory molecules and their ligands by antigen-presenting cells and naive lymphocytes ensures robust expansion, activity and survival of tumor-specific effector cells in vivo. Immunotherapy approaches using agonist antibodies or fusion proteins of immunomodulatory molecules significantly inhibit tumor growth and boost cell-mediated immunity. To localize immune stimulation to the tumor site, a series of fusion proteins consisting of a tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis and chemokines or costimulatory molecules were generated and tested in tumor-bearing mice. While several of these reagents were initially shown to have therapeutic value, combination therapies with methods to delete suppressor cells had the greatest effect on tumor growth. In conclusion, a key conclusion that has emerged from these studies is that successful immunotherapy will require both advanced methods of immunostimulation and the removal of immunosuppression in the host. PMID:22053884

  11. Chemokine Signaling Specificity: Essential Role for the N-Terminal Domain of Chemokine Receptors†

    PubMed Central

    N. Prado, Gregory; Suetomi, Katsutoshi; Shumate, David; Maxwell, Carrie; Ravindran, Aishwarya; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Navarro, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine IL-8 (CXCL8) binds to its cognate receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 to induce inflammatory responses, wound healing, tumorogenesis, and neuronal survival. Here we identify the N-loop residues in IL-8 (H18 and F21) and the receptor N-termini as the major structural determinants regulating the rate of receptor internalization, which in turn controlled the activation profile of ERK1/2, a central component of the receptor/ERK signaling pathway that dictates signal specificity. Our data further support the idea that the chemokine receptor core acts as a plastic scaffold. Thus, the diversity and intensity of inflammatory and noninflammatory responses mediated by chemokine receptors appear to be primarily determined by the initial interaction between the receptor N-terminus and the N-loop of chemokines. PMID:17630697

  12. Role of chemokine pathways in hepatobiliary cancer.

    PubMed

    Ehling, Josef; Tacke, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Persistent hepatic inflammation resulting from hepatitis B or C virus infections (HBV or HCV, respectively), obesity-associated non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) or alcohol abuse is a hallmark feature of chronic liver diseases and appears to be an essential prerequisite of hepatocarcinogenesis. The inflammatory processes in the liver are regulated by various chemokines, which orchestrate the interaction between parenchymal liver cells, Kupffer cells (resident macrophages), hepatic stellate cells (HSC), endothelial cells, and infiltrating immune cells. In consequence, these cellular interactions result in the re-modeling of the hepatic microenvironment toward a pro-inflammatory, pro-fibrotic, pro-angiogenic and thus pre-neoplastic milieu. Once developed, liver neoplasms provoke pro- and anti-tumor immune responses that are also critically regulated through differential activation of chemokine pathways. With respect to hepatobiliary cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), gallbladder cancer and cholangiocellular carcinoma (cholangiocarcinoma), together belonging to the highest causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, this review article will give an overview of chemokine pathways involved in both the establishment of a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment as well as the development and progression of hepatobiliary cancer. Pharmaceutical targeting of chemokine pathways is a promising approach to treat or even prevent hepatobiliary cancer. PMID:26123664

  13. Chemokine/chemokine receptor pair CCL20/CCR6 in human colorectal malignancy: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Vilma Oliveira; Rubie, Claudia; Keilholz, Ulrich; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines belong to a superfamily of small, cytokine-like proteins, which induce multiple physiological functions, particularly cytoskeletal rearrangement and compartment-specific migration through their interaction with G-protein-coupled receptors. Chemokines and their receptors have been widely acknowledged as essential and selective mediators in leukocyte migration in inflammatory response. It is now established that the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is also used by cancer cells to direct lymphatic and haematogenous spreading and additionally has an impact on the site of metastatic growth of different tumours. In recent years an increasing number of studies have drawn attention to CC-chemokine cysteine motif chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) and its physiological sole receptor CCR6 to play a role in the onset, development and metastatic spread of various gastrointestinal cancer entities. Among various cancer types CCR6 was also demonstrated to be significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) and stimulation by its physiological ligand CCL20 has been reported to promote CRC cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Further, the CCL20/CCR6 system apparently plays a role in the organ-selective liver metastasis of CRC. Here we review the literature on expression patterns of CCL20 and CCR6 and their physiological interactions as well as the currently presumed role of CCL20 and CCR6 in the formation of CRC and the development of liver metastasis, providing a potential basis for novel treatment strategies. PMID:26811629

  14. The atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR regulates metastasis of mammary carcinoma via an effect on EMT.

    PubMed

    Harata-Lee, Yuka; Turvey, Michelle E; Brazzatti, Julie A; Gregor, Carly E; Brown, Michael P; Smyth, Mark J; Comerford, Iain; McColl, Shaun R

    2014-11-01

    Over the last decade, the significance of the homeostatic CC chemokine receptor-7 and its ligands CC chemokine ligand-19 (CCL19) and CCL21, in various types of cancer, particularly mammary carcinoma, has been highlighted. The chemokine receptor CCX-CKR is a high-affinity receptor for these chemokine ligands but rather than inducing classical downstream signalling events promoting migration, it instead sequesters and targets its ligands for degradation, and appears to function as a regulator of the bioavailability of these chemokines in vivo. Therefore, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that local regulation of chemokine levels by CCX-CKR expressed on tumours alters tumour growth and metastasis in vivo. Expression of CCX-CKR on 4T1.2 mouse mammary carcinoma cells inhibited orthotopic tumour growth. However, this effect could not be correlated with chemokine scavenging in vivo and was not mediated by host adaptive immunity. Conversely, expression of CCX-CKR on 4T1.2 cells resulted in enhanced spontaneous metastasis and haematogenous metastasis in vivo. In vitro characterisation of the tumourigenicity of CCX-CKR-expressing 4T1.2 cells suggested accelerated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) revealed by their more invasive and motile character, lower adherence to the extracellular matrix and to each other, and greater resistance to anoikis. Further analysis of CCX-CKR-expressing 4T1.2 cells also revealed that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression was increased both at mRNA and protein levels leading to enhanced autocrine phosphorylation of Smad 2/3 in these cells. Together, our data show a novel function for the chemokine receptor CCX-CKR as a regulator of TGF-β1 expression and the EMT in breast cancer cells. PMID:25027038

  15. Chemokine nitration prevents intratumoral infiltration of antigen-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ugel, Stefano; Del Pozzo, Federica; Soldani, Cristiana; Zilio, Serena; Avella, Debora; De Palma, Antonella; Mauri, PierLuigi; Monegal, Ana; Rescigno, Maria; Savino, Benedetta; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Jonjic, Nives; Pecanic, Sanja; Lazzarato, Loretta; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Bronte, Vincenzo; Viola, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-promoted constraints negatively affect cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) trafficking to the tumor core and, as a result, inhibit tumor killing. The production of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) within the tumor microenvironment has been reported in mouse and human cancers. We describe a novel RNS-dependent posttranslational modification of chemokines that has a profound impact on leukocyte recruitment to mouse and human tumors. Intratumoral RNS production induces CCL2 chemokine nitration and hinders T cell infiltration, resulting in the trapping of tumor-specific T cells in the stroma that surrounds cancer cells. Preconditioning of the tumor microenvironment with novel drugs that inhibit CCL2 modification facilitates CTL invasion of the tumor, suggesting that these drugs may be effective in cancer immunotherapy. Our results unveil an unexpected mechanism of tumor evasion and introduce new avenues for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:21930770

  16. Extensive expansion and diversification of the chemokine gene family in zebrafish: Identification of a novel chemokine subfamily CX

    PubMed Central

    Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Hieshima, Kunio; Osada, Naoki; Kato-Unoki, Yoko; Otsuka-Ono, Kaori; Takegawa, Sumio; Izawa, Toshiaki; Yoshizawa, Akio; Kikuchi, Yutaka; Tanase, Sumio; Miura, Retsu; Kusuda, Jun; Nakao, Miki; Yoshie, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Background The chemokine family plays important roles in cell migration and activation. In humans, at least 44 members are known. Based on the arrangement of the four conserved cysteine residues, chemokines are now classified into four subfamilies, CXC, CC, XC and CX3C. Given that zebrafish is an important experimental model and teleost fishes constitute an evolutionarily diverse group that forms half the vertebrate species, it would be useful to compare the zebrafish chemokine system with those of mammals. Prior to this study, however, only incomplete lists of the zebrafish chemokine genes were reported. Results We systematically searched chemokine genes in the zebrafish genome and EST databases, and identified more than 100 chemokine genes. These genes were CXC, CC and XC subfamily members, while no CX3C gene was identified. We also searched chemokine genes in pufferfish fugu and Tetraodon, and found only 18 chemokine genes in each species. The majority of the identified chemokine genes are unique to zebrafish or teleost fishes. However, several groups of chemokines are moderately similar to human chemokines, and some chemokines are orthologous to human homeostatic chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL14. Zebrafish also possesses a novel species-specific subfamily consisting of five members, which we term the CX subfamily. The CX chemokines lack one of the two N-terminus conserved cysteine residues but retain the third and the fourth ones. (Note that the XC subfamily only retains the second and fourth of the signature cysteines residues.) Phylogenetic analysis and genome organization of the chemokine genes showed that successive tandem duplication events generated the CX genes from the CC subfamily. Recombinant CXL-chr24a, one of the CX subfamily members on chromosome 24, showed marked chemotactic activity for carp leukocytes. The mRNA was expressed mainly during a certain period of the embryogenesis, suggesting its role in the zebrafish development. Conclusion The

  17. The Role of Chemokines in Acute Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Saiman, Yedidya; Friedman, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines are small molecular weight proteins primarily known to drive migration of immune cell populations. In both acute and chronic liver injury, hepatic chemokine expression is induced resulting in inflammatory cell infiltration, angiogenesis, and cell activation and survival. During acute injury, massive parenchymal cell death due to apoptosis and/or necrosis leads to chemokine production by hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, Kupffer cells, hepatic stellate cells, and sinusoidal endothelial cells. The specific chemokine profile expressed during injury is dependent on both the type and course of injury. Hepatotoxicity by acetaminophen for example leads to cellular necrosis and activation of Toll-like receptors while the inciting insult in ischemia reperfusion injury produces reactive oxygen species and subsequent production of pro-inflammatory chemokines. Chemokine expression by these cells generates a chemoattractant gradient promoting infiltration by monocytes/macrophages, NK cells, NKT cells, neutrophils, B cells, and T cells whose activity are highly regulated by the specific chemokine profiles within the liver. Additionally, resident hepatic cells express chemokine receptors both in the normal and injured liver. While the role of these receptors in normal liver has not been well described, during injury, receptor up-regulation, and chemokine engagement leads to cellular survival, proliferation, apoptosis, fibrogenesis, and expression of additional chemokines and growth factors. Hepatic-derived chemokines can therefore function in both paracrine and autocrine fashions further expanding their role in liver disease. More recently it has been appreciated that chemokines can have diverging effects depending on their temporal expression pattern and the type of injury. A better understanding of chemokine/chemokine receptor axes will therefore pave the way for development of novel targeted therapies for the treatment of liver disease. PMID:22723782

  18. Detection and Quantification of Citrullinated Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Moelants, Eva A. V.; Van Damme, Jo; Proost, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background Posttranslational deimination or citrullination by peptidylarginine deiminases (PAD) regulates the biological function of proteins and may be involved in the development of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. This posttranslational modification of arginine was recently discovered on inflammatory chemokines including CXCL8 and CXCL10, and significantly reduced their biological activity. To evaluate the importance of these modified chemokines in patients, methods for the detection and quantification of citrullinated chemokines are needed. Since citrullination only results in an increase of the protein mass with one mass unit and the loss of one positive charge, selective biochemical detection is difficult. Therefore, we developed an antibody-based method to specifically detect and quantify citrullination on a protein of interest. Methodology/Principal Findings First, the citrullinated proteins were chemically modified with antipyrine and 2,3-butanedione at low pH. Such selectively modified citrullines were subsequently detected and quantified by specific antibodies raised against a modified citrulline-containing peptide. The specificity of this two-step procedure was validated for citrullinated CXCL8 ([Cit5]CXCL8). Specific detection of [Cit5]CXCL8 concentrations between 1 and 50 ng/ml was possible, also in complex samples containing an excess of contaminating proteins. This novel detection method was used to evaluate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the citrullination of inflammatory chemokines induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and granulocytes. LPS had no significant effect on the induction of CXCL8 citrullination in human PBMCs and granulocytes. However, granulocytes, known to contain PAD, were essential for the production of significant amounts of [Cit5]CXCL8. Conclusion/Significance The newly developed antibody-based method to specifically detect and quantify chemically modified

  19. Role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in shaping the effector phase of the antitumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Boutet, Marie; Combadière, Christophe; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia

    2012-12-15

    Immune system-mediated eradication of neoplastic cells requires induction of a strong long-lasting antitumor T-cell response. However, generation of tumor-specific effector T cells does not necessarily result in tumor clearance. CTL must first be able to migrate to the tumor site, infiltrate the tumor tissue, and interact with the target to finally trigger effector functions indispensable for tumor destruction. Chemokines are involved in circulation, homing, retention, and activation of immunocompetent cells. Although some of them are known to contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, others are responsible for changes in the tumor microenvironment that lead to extensive infiltration of lymphocytes, resulting in tumor eradication. Given their chemoattractive and activating properties, a role for chemokines in the development of the effector phase of the antitumor immune response has been suggested. Here, we emphasize the role of the chemokine-chemokine receptor network at multiple levels of the T-cell-mediated antitumor immune response. The identification of chemokine-dependent molecular mechanisms implicated in tumor-specific CTL trafficking, retention, and regulation of their in situ effector functions may offer new perspectives for development of innovative immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment. PMID:23222302

  20. Mechanisms and implications of air pollution particle associations with chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Seagrave, JeanClare

    2008-11-01

    Inflammation induced by inhalation of air pollutant particles has been implicated as a mechanism for the adverse health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. The inflammatory response is associated with upregulation of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We have previously shown that diesel exhaust particles (DEP), a significant constituent of air pollution particulate matter in many urban areas, bind and concentrate IL-8, an important human neutrophil-attracting chemokine, and that the chemokine remains biologically active. In this report, we examine possible mechanisms of this association and the effects on clearance of the chemokine. The binding appears to be the result of ionic interactions between negatively charged particles and positively charged chemokine molecules, possibly combined with intercalation into small pores in the particles. The association is not limited to diesel exhaust particles and IL-8: several other particle types also adsorb the chemokine and several other cytokines are adsorbed onto the diesel particles. However, there are wide ranges in the effectiveness of various particle types and various cytokines. Finally, male Fisher 344 rats were intratracheally instilled with chemokine alone or combined with diesel exhaust or silica particles under isofluorane anesthesia. In contrast to silica particles, which do not bind the chemokine, the presence of diesel exhaust particles, which bind the chemokine, prolonged the retention of the chemokine.

  1. Chemokine Regulation of Neutrophil Infiltration of Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yingjun; Richmond, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Efficient recruitment of neutrophils to an injured skin lesion is an important innate immune response for wound repair. Defects in neutrophil recruitment lead to impaired wound healing. Recent Advances: Chemokines and chemokine receptors are known to regulate neutrophil recruitment. Recent research advances reveal more mechanistic details about the regulation of chemokines and chemokine receptors on neutrophil egress from bone marrow, transmigration into the wound site, spatial navigation toward the necrotic skin tissue, and apoptosis-induced clearance by efferocytosis. Critical Issues: Skin injury triggers local and systemic alterations in the expression of multiple chemotactic molecules and the magnitude of chemokine receptor-mediated signaling. The responses of a number of CXC and CX3C chemokines and their receptors closely associate with the temporal and spatial recruitment of neutrophils to wound sites during the inflammatory phase and promote the clearance of necrotic neutrophils during the transition into the proliferative phase. Functional aberrancy in these chemokines and chemokine receptor systems is recognized as one of the important mechanisms underlying the pathology of impaired wound healing. Future Directions: Future research should aim to investigate the therapeutic modulation of neutrophil activity through the targeting of specific chemokines or chemokine receptors in the early inflammatory phase to improve clinical management of wound healing. PMID:26543677

  2. Expression Profiles of Circulating Cytokines, Chemokines and Immune Cells in Patients With Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Jian-Qi; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Rong-Rong; Zhao, Yan-Yan; Li, Yu; Zhang, Ye; Huang, Chang-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Background: Immune cells and molecules play a vital role in initiating, maintaining, regulating immunological homeostasis and inflammation in many pathological and physiological processes; however, the changes on expressions and functions of these cells and molecules in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have not been elucidated well. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the expression pattern of different cytokines, chemokines, immune cells in HBV infection and their association with disease progression. Patients and Methods: Sixty-nine patients with chronic HBV infection were enrolled. Five immune cell subsets and 46 cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by flow cytometry and Luminex 200. Results: In comparison to healthy individuals and asymptomatic HBV carriers, expression of CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and IL-10 were elevated in patients with chronic active HBV and had positive correlation with ALT levels. In contrast, G-CSF, MCP-3, and IFN-γ levels were significantly decreased in patients with chronic active HBV infection in contrast to carriers and healthy individuals; however, these down regulations did not show any correlation with either virological findings or liver inflammation. Although the proportion of CD4+ CD25 high regulatory T cells (Tregs) was higher in patients with HBV infection than in healthy controls, no correlations were found between Tregs and other cytokines or chemokines. Conclusions: CXCR3-associated chemokines might contribute to liver inflammation in chronic hepatitis B, while MCP-3 and G-CSF were inhibited by HBV infection. Host immune response was suppressed as manifested by an increase in CD4+ CD25high Tregs and IL-10 as well as a decrease in IFN-γ. Exploiting the expression pattern of cytokine and chemokine may help to develop a better understanding of chronic HBV infection pathogenesis. PMID:24976843

  3. Neurotactin, a membrane-anchored chemokine upregulated in brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y; Lloyd, C; Zhou, H; Dolich, S; Deeds, J; Gonzalo, J A; Vath, J; Gosselin, M; Ma, J; Dussault, B; Woolf, E; Alperin, G; Culpepper, J; Gutierrez-Ramos, J C; Gearing, D

    1997-06-01

    Chemokines are small secreted proteins that stimulate the directional migration of leukocytes and mediate inflammation. During screening of a murine choroid plexus complementary DNA library, we identified a new chemokine, designated neurotactin. Unlike other chemokines, neurotactin has a unique cysteine pattern, Cys-X-X-X-Cys, and is predicted to be a type 1 membrane protein. Full-length recombinant neurotactin is localized on the surface of transfected 293 cells. Recombinant neurotactin containing the chemokine domain is chemotactic for neutrophils both in vitro and in vivo. Neurotactin messenger RNA is predominantly expressed in normal murine brain and its protein expression in activated brain microglia is upregulated in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, as well as in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide. Distinct from all other chemokine genes, the neurotactin gene is localized to human chromosome 16q. Consequently we propose that neurotactin represents a new delta-chemokine family and that it may play a role in brain inflammation processes. PMID:9177350

  4. The biochemistry and biology of the atypical chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Graham, G J; Locati, M; Mantovani, A; Rot, A; Thelen, M

    2012-07-30

    A subset of chemokine receptors, initially called "silent" on the basis of their apparent failure to activate conventional signalling events, has recently attracted growing interest due to their ability to internalize, degrade, or transport ligands and thus modify gradients and create functional chemokine patterns in tissues. These receptors recognize distinct and complementary sets of ligands with high affinity, are strategically expressed in different cellular contexts, and lack structural determinants supporting Gα(i) activation, a key signalling event in cell migration. This is in keeping with the hypothesis that they have evolved to fulfil fundamentally different functions to the classical signalling chemokine receptors. Based on these considerations, these receptors (D6, Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC), CCX-CKR1 and CXCR7) are now collectively considered as an emerging class of 'atypical' chemokine receptors. In this article, we review the biochemistry and biology of this emerging chemokine receptor subfamily. PMID:22698181

  5. Chemokine binding proteins: An immunomodulatory strategy going viral.

    PubMed

    González-Motos, Víctor; Kropp, Kai A; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel

    2016-08-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines whose main function is to direct cell migration. The chemokine network is highly complex and its deregulation is linked to several diseases including immunopathology, cancer and chronic pain. Chemokines also play essential roles in the antiviral immune response. Viruses have therefore developed several counter strategies to modulate chemokine activity. One of these is the expression of type I transmembrane or secreted proteins with the ability to bind chemokines and modulate their activity. These proteins, termed viral chemokine binding proteins (vCKBP), do not share sequence homology with host proteins and are immunomodulatory in vivo. In this review we describe the discovery and characterization of vCKBP, explain their role in the context of infection in vivo and discuss relevant novel findings. PMID:26987612

  6. Vascular Stem/Progenitor Cell Migration Induced by Smooth Muscle Cell-Derived Chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 2 and Chemokine (C-X-C motif) Ligand 1 Contributes to Neointima Formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Baoqi; Wong, Mei Mei; Potter, Claire M F; Simpson, Russell M L; Karamariti, Eirini; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zeng, Lingfang; Warren, Derek; Hu, Yanhua; Wang, Wen; Xu, Qingbo

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that Sca-1(+) (stem cell antigen-1) stem/progenitor cells within blood vessel walls may contribute to neointima formation, but the mechanism behind their recruitment has not been explored. In this work Sca-1(+) progenitor cells were cultivated from mouse vein graft tissue and found to exhibit increased migration when cocultured with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or when treated with SMC-derived conditioned medium. This migration was associated with elevated levels of chemokines, CCL2 (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2) and CXCL1 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1), and their corresponding receptors on Sca-1(+) progenitors, CCR2 (chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2) and CXCR2 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2), which were also upregulated following SMC conditioned medium treatment. Knockdown of either receptor in Sca-1(+) progenitors significantly inhibited cell migration. The GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 were activated by both CCL2 and CXCL1 stimulation and p38 phosphorylation was increased. However, only Rac1 inhibition significantly reduced migration and p38 phosphorylation. After Sca-1(+) progenitors labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were applied to the adventitial side of wire-injured mouse femoral arteries, a large proportion of GFP-Sca-1(+) -cells were observed in neointimal lesions, and a marked increase in neointimal lesion formation was seen 1 week post-operation. Interestingly, Sca-1(+) progenitor migration from the adventitia to the neointima was abrogated and neointima formation diminished in a wire injury model using CCL2(-/-) mice. These findings suggest vascular stem/progenitor cell migration from the adventitia to the neointima can be induced by SMC release of chemokines which act via CCR2/Rac1/p38 and CXCR2/Rac1/p38 signaling pathways. Stem Cells 2016;34:2368-2380. PMID:27300479

  7. CXC and CC Chemokines as Angiogenic Modulators in Nonhaematological Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bracarda, Sergio; Nabissi, Massimo; Massari, Francesco; Bria, Emilio; Tortora, Giampaolo; Santoni, Giorgio; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of structurally homologous heparin-binding proteins that includes potent inducers and inhibitors of angiogenesis. The imbalance between angiogenic and angiostatic chemokine activities can lead to abnormalities, such as chronic inflammation, dysplastic transformation, and even tumor development and spreading. In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of chemokines as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and their potential role as therapeutic targets in patients with nonhaematological tumors. PMID:24971349

  8. Chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1) and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-like 2 (CCRL2); two multifunctional receptors with unusual properties.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Teizo; Oppenheim, Joost J

    2011-03-10

    Chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1), also known as ChemR23, and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-like 2 (CCRL2) are 7-transmembrane receptors that were cloned in the late 1990s based on their homology to known G-protein-coupled receptors. They were previously orphan receptors without any known biological roles; however, recent studies identified ligands for these receptors and their functions have begun to be unveiled. The plasma protein-derived chemoattractant chemerin is a ligand for CMKLR1 and activation of CMKLR1 with chemerin induces the migration of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro, suggesting a proinflammatory role. However, in vivo studies using CMKLR-deficient mice suggest an anti-inflammatory role for this receptor, possibly due to the recruitment of tolerogenic plasmacytoid DCs. Chemerin/CMKLR1 interaction also promotes adipogenesis and angiogenesis. The anti-inflammatory lipid mediator, resolving E1, is another CMKLR1 ligand and it inhibits leukocyte infiltration and proinflammatory gene expression. These divergent results suggest that CMKLR1 is a multifunctional receptor. The chemokine CCL5 and CCL19 are reported to bind to CCRL2. Like Duffy antigen for chemokine receptor (DARC), D6 and CCX-CKR, CCRL2 does not signal, but it constitutively recycles, potentially reducing local concentration of CCL5 and CCL19 and subsequent immune responses. Surprisingly, chemerin, a ligand for CMKLR1, is a ligand for CCRL2. CCRL2 binds chemerin and increases local chemerin concentration to efficiently present it to CMKLR1 on nearby cells, providing a link between CCRL2 and CMKLR1. Although these findings suggest an anti-inflammatory role, a recent study using CCRL2-deficient mice indicates a proinflammatory role; thus, CCRL2 may also be multifunctional. Further studies using CMKLR1- or CCRL2-deficient mice are needed to further define the role of these receptors in immune responses and other cellular processes. PMID:21056554

  9. The N-terminal Region of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor ACKR2 Is a Key Determinant of Ligand Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Hewit, Kay D.; Fraser, Alasdair; Nibbs, Robert J. B.; Graham, Gerard J.

    2014-01-01

    The atypical chemokine receptor, ACKR2 is a pivotal regulator of chemokine-driven inflammatory responses and works by binding, internalizing, and degrading inflammatory CC-chemokines. ACKR2 displays promiscuity of ligand binding and is capable of interacting with up to 14 different inflammatory CC-chemokines. Despite its prominent biological role, little is known about the structure/function relationship within ACKR2, which regulates ligand binding. Here we demonstrate that a conserved tyrosine motif at the N terminus of ACKR2 is essential for ligand binding, internalization, and scavenging. In addition we demonstrate that sulfation of this motif contributes to ligand internalization. Furthermore, a peptide derived from this region is capable of binding inflammatory chemokines and inhibits their interaction with their cognate signaling receptors. Importantly, the peptide is only active in the sulfated form, further confirming the importance of the sulfated tyrosines for function. Finally, we demonstrate that the bacterial protease, staphopain A, can cleave the N terminus of ACKR2 and suppress its ligand internalization activity. Overall, these results shed new light on the nature of the structural motifs in ACKR2 that are responsible for ligand binding. The study also highlights ACKR2-derived N-terminal peptides as being of potential therapeutic significance. PMID:24644289

  10. Transient expression of recombinant ACKR4 (CCRL1) gene, an atypical chemokine receptor in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells.

    PubMed

    Parsi, Bahareh; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Hashemi, Mohammad; Behjati, Mohaddeseh

    2016-07-01

    ACKR4 also called CCX-CKR, CCRL1 as a member of atypical chemokine receptors, regulates the biological responses by clearance or transporting homeostatic chemokines such as CCL19, CCL21, CCL25, and CXCL13. Since these chemokines are involved in cancer development and metastasis, ACKR4 could have inhibition roles in cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Forming complexes with chemokine receptors by ACKR4 as in the case of hCXCR3 which lead to chemotaxis prevention is the other function of this protein is. However, as an atypical chemokine receptor, ACKR4 is less well-characterized compared to other members. Here, as the first step in understanding the molecular mechanisms of ACKR4 action, transfectants in HEK293T cell, was generated. In this study, ACKR4 coding sequence was cloned and human embryonic kidney 293T cells were used for recombinant production of ACKR4 protein. The liposome-mediated transfection with ACKR4 CDs, were detected in ACKR4 positive cells as early as 48 h post-transfection. The production of ACKR4 protein was confirmed using RT-PCR, dot blot, western blot, and flow cytometry. ACKR4 may represent a novel molecular target in cancer therapy, which might provide a chance for new therapeutic strategy. Therefore, the first step in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ACKR4 action is generation ACKR4-HEK293T recombinant cells. PMID:27168154

  11. Antimicrobial Activities of Chemokines: Not Just a Side-Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marlene; Moser, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The large family of chemoattractant cytokines (chemokines) embraces multiple, in part unrelated functions that go well beyond chemotaxis. Undoubtedly, the control of immune cell migration (chemotaxis) is the single, unifying response mediated by all chemokines, which involves the sequential engagement of chemokine receptors on migrating target cells. However, numerous additional cellular responses are mediated by some (but not all) chemokines, including angiogenesis, tumor cell growth, T-cell co-stimulation, and control of HIV-1 infection. The recently described antimicrobial activity of several chemokines is of particular interest because antimicrobial peptides are thought to provide an essential first-line defense against invading microbes at the extremely large body surfaces of the skin, lungs, and gastrointestinal-urinary tract. Here we summarize the current knowledge about chemokines with antimicrobial activity and discuss their potential contribution to the control of bacterial infections that may take place at the earliest stage of antimicrobial immunity. In the case of homeostatic chemokines with antimicrobial function, such as CXCL14, we propose an immune surveillance function in healthy epithelial tissues characterized by low-level exposure to environmental microbes. Inflammatory chemokines, i.e., chemokines that are produced in tissue cells in response to microbial antigens (such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns) may be more important in orchestrating the cellular arm in antimicrobial immunity. PMID:22837760

  12. Chemokines: key players in cancer progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh; Lilladr, James W.; Singh, Shailesh

    2013-01-01

    Instructed cell migration is a fundamental component of various biological systems and is critical to the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. Role of chemokines in providing navigational cues to migrating cancer cells bearing specific receptors is well established. However, functional mechanisms of chemokine are not well implicit, which is crucial for designing new therapeutics to control tumor growth and metastasis. Multiple functions and mode of actions have been advocated for chemokines and their receptors in the progression of primary and secondary tumors. In this review, we have discussed current advances in understanding the role of the chemokines and their corresponding receptor in tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:21622291

  13. Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth R; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies. PMID:25790431

  14. Negative feedback between prostaglandin and alpha- and beta-chemokine synthesis in human microglial cells and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Janabi, N; Hau, I; Tardieu, M

    1999-02-01

    The understanding of immune surveillance and inflammation regulation in cerebral tissue is essential in the therapy of neuroimmunological disorders. We demonstrate here that primary human glial cells were able to produce alpha- and beta-chemokines (IL-8 > growth related protein alpha (GROalpha) > RANTES > microphage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha and MIP-1beta) in parallel to PGs (PGE2 and PGF2alpha) after proinflammatory cytokine stimulation: TNF-alpha + IL-1beta induced all except RANTES, which was induced by TNF-alpha + IFN-gamma. Purified cultures of astrocytes and microglia were also induced by the same combination of cytokines, to produce all these mediators except MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta, which were produced predominantly by astrocytes. The inhibition of PG production by indomethacin led to a 37-60% increase in RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta but not in GROalpha and IL-8 secretion. In contrast, inhibition of IL-8 and GRO activities using neutralizing Abs resulted in a specific 6-fold increase in PGE2 but not in PGF2alpha production by stimulated microglial cells and astrocytes, whereas Abs to beta-chemokines had no effect. Thus, the production of PGs in human glial cells down-regulates their beta-chemokine secretion, whereas alpha-chemokine production in these cells controls PG secretion level. These data suggest that under inflammatory conditions, the intraparenchymal production of PGs could control chemotactic gradient of beta-chemokines for an appropriate effector cell recruitment or activation. Conversely, the elevated intracerebral alpha-chemokine levels could reduce PG secretion, preventing the exacerbation of inflammation and neurotoxicity. PMID:9973432

  15. Evasins: Therapeutic Potential of a New Family of Chemokine-Binding Proteins from Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Bonvin, Pauline; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-sucking parasites, such as ticks, remain attached to their hosts for relatively long periods of time in order to obtain their blood meal without eliciting an immune response. One mechanism used to avoid rejection is the inhibition of the recruitment of immune cells, which can be achieved by a class of chemokine-binding proteins (CKBPs) known as Evasins. We have identified three distinct Evasins produced by the salivary glands of the common brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. They display different selectivities for chemokines, the first two identified show a narrow selectivity profile, while the third has a broader binding spectrum. The Evasins showed efficacy in animal models of inflammatory disease. Here, we will discuss the potential of their development for therapeutic use, addressing both the advantages and disadvantages that this entails. PMID:27375615

  16. Upregulation of chemokine receptor CCR10 is essential for glioma proliferation, invasion and patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingchao; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Du, Wenzong; Qin, Zhiyong; Yao, Yu; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2014-01-01

    Human gliomas are characterized by their invasion of normal brain structures irrespective of their grade of malignancy. Tumor cell invasion share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Here we report that the chemokine receptor CCR10 is highly expressed in human glioblastoma compared with control brain tissue. In vitro, signaling through CCL27-CCR10 mediates activation of p-Akt, and subsequently induces proliferation and invasive responses. Cell proliferation and invasion promoted by CCL27 were blocked by inhibition of p-Akt or CCR10. In vivo, down-regulation of CCR10 significantly impairs growth of glioma. Clinically, High CCR10 expression in GBM correlated with p-Akt, shorter overall survival and progression-free survival (P < 0.05). Together, these findings suggest that elevated CCR10 is a critical molecular event associated with gliomagenesis. PMID:25149529

  17. Roles of Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Kitade, Hironori; Ni, Yinhua; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2015-01-01

    Abundant evidence has demonstrated that obesity is a state of low-grade chronic inflammation that triggers the release of lipids, aberrant adipokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and several chemokines from adipose tissue. This low-grade inflammation underlies the development of insulin resistance and associated metabolic comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). During this development, adipose tissue macrophages accumulate through chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 and the ligand for this receptor, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), is considered to be pivotal for the development of insulin resistance. To date, the chemokine system is known to be comprised of approximately 40 chemokines and 20 chemokine receptors that belong to the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor family and, as a result, chemokines appear to exhibit a high degree of functional redundancy. Over the past two decades, the physiological and pathological properties of many of these chemokines and their receptors have been elucidated. The present review highlights chemokines and chemokine receptors as key contributing factors that link obesity to insulin resistance, T2DM, and NAFLD. PMID:26197341

  18. Structure of mouse IP-10, a chemokine

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, Talat; Leonard, Philip; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2008-06-01

    The structure of mouse IP-10 shows a novel tetrameric association. Interferon-γ-inducible protein (IP-10) belongs to the CXC class of chemokines and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of various immune and inflammatory responses. It is also a potent angiostatic factor with antifibrotic properties. The biological activities of IP-10 are exerted by interactions with the G-protein-coupled receptor CXCR3 expressed on Th1 lymphocytes. IP-10 thus forms an attractive target for structure-based rational drug design of anti-inflammatory molecules. The crystal structure of mouse IP-10 has been determined and reveals a novel tetrameric association. In the tetramer, two conventional CXC chemokine dimers are associated through their N-terminal regions to form a 12-stranded elongated β-sheet of ∼90 Å in length. This association differs significantly from the previously studied tetramers of human IP-10, platelet factor 4 and neutrophil-activating peptide-2. In addition, heparin- and receptor-binding residues were mapped on the surface of IP-10 tetramer. Two heparin-binding sites were observed on the surface and were present at the interface of each of the two β-sheet dimers. The structure supports the formation of higher order oligomers of IP-10, as observed in recent in vivo studies with mouse IP-10, which will have functional relevance.

  19. Structure of mouse IP-10, a chemokine.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Talat; Leonard, Philip; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Acharya, K Ravi

    2008-06-01

    Interferon-gamma-inducible protein (IP-10) belongs to the CXC class of chemokines and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of various immune and inflammatory responses. It is also a potent angiostatic factor with antifibrotic properties. The biological activities of IP-10 are exerted by interactions with the G-protein-coupled receptor CXCR3 expressed on Th1 lymphocytes. IP-10 thus forms an attractive target for structure-based rational drug design of anti-inflammatory molecules. The crystal structure of mouse IP-10 has been determined and reveals a novel tetrameric association. In the tetramer, two conventional CXC chemokine dimers are associated through their N-terminal regions to form a 12-stranded elongated beta-sheet of approximately 90 A in length. This association differs significantly from the previously studied tetramers of human IP-10, platelet factor 4 and neutrophil-activating peptide-2. In addition, heparin- and receptor-binding residues were mapped on the surface of IP-10 tetramer. Two heparin-binding sites were observed on the surface and were present at the interface of each of the two beta-sheet dimers. The structure supports the formation of higher order oligomers of IP-10, as observed in recent in vivo studies with mouse IP-10, which will have functional relevance. PMID:18560148

  20. Soluble M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 expressed in Escherichia coli: analysis of chemokine-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Matúšková, R; Pančík, P; Štibrániová, I; Belvončíková, P; Režuchová, I; Kúdelová, M

    2015-12-01

    M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) was identified as a viral chemokine-binding protein 3 (vCKBP-3) capable to bind a broad spectrum of chemokines and their receptors. During both acute and latent infection MHV-68 M3 protein provides a selective advantage for the virus by inhibiting the antiviral and inflammatory response. A unique mutation Asp307Gly was identified in the M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 72 (MHV-72), localized near chemokine-binding domain. Study on chemokine-binding properties of MHV-72 M3 protein purified from medium of infected cells implied reduced binding to some chemokines when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. It was suggested that the mutation in the M3 protein might be involved in the attenuation of immune response to infection with MHV-72. Recently, Escherichia coli cells were used to prepare native recombinant M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 (Pančík et al., 2013). In this study, we assessed the chemokine-binding properties of three M3 proteins prepared in E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 (DE3) cells, the full length M3 protein of both MHV-68 and MHV-72 and MHV-68 M3 protein truncated in the signal sequence (the first 24 aa). They all displayed binding activity to human chemokines CCL5 (RANTES), CXCL8 (IL-8), and CCL3 (MIP-1α). The truncated MHV-68 M3 protein had more than twenty times reduced binding activity to CCL5, but only about five and three times reduced binding to CXCL8 and CCL3 when compared to its full length counterpart. Binding of the full length MHV-72 M3 protein to all chemokines was reduced when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. Its binding to CCL5 and CCL3 was reduced over ten and seven times. However, its binding to CXCL8 was only slightly reduced (64.8 vs 91.8%). These data implied the significance of the signal sequence and also of a single mutation (at aa 307) for efficient M3 protein binding to some chemokines. PMID:26666184

  1. Chemokine Involvement in Fetal and Adult Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Swathi; Watson, Carey L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; King, Alice; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fetal wounds heal with a regenerative phenotype that is indistinguishable from surrounding skin with restored skin integrity. Compared to this benchmark, all postnatal wound healing is impaired and characterized by scar formation. The biologic basis of the fetal regenerative phenotype can serve as a roadmap to recapitulating regenerative repair in adult wounds. Reduced leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated, in part, through changes in the chemokine milieu, is a fundamental feature of fetal wound healing. Recent Advances: The contributions of chemokines to wound healing are a topic of active investigation. Recent discoveries have opened the possibility of targeting chemokines therapeutically to treat disease processes and improve healing capability, including the possibility of achieving a scarless phenotype in postnatal wounds. Critical Issues: Successful wound healing is a complex process, in which there is a significant interplay between multiple cell types, signaling molecules, growth factors, and extracellular matrix. Chemokines play a crucial role in this interplay and have been shown to have different effects in various stages of the healing process. Understanding how these chemokines are locally produced and regulated during wound healing and how the chemokine milieu differs in fetal versus postnatal wounds may help us identify ways in which we can target chemokine pathways. Future Directions: Further studies on the role of chemokines and their role in the healing process will greatly advance the potential for using these molecules as therapeutic targets. PMID:26543680

  2. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents.

    PubMed

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/ chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer. PMID:26062132

  3. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer. PMID:26062132

  4. Chemokine-guided cell migration and motility in zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Jeroen; Raz, Erez

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are vertebrate-specific, structurally related proteins that function primarily in controlling cell movements by activating specific 7-transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play critical roles in a large number of biological processes and are also involved in a range of pathological conditions. For these reasons, chemokines are at the focus of studies in developmental biology and of clinically oriented research aimed at controlling cancer, inflammation, and immunological diseases. The small size of the zebrafish embryos, their rapid external development, and optical properties as well as the large number of eggs and the fast expansion in genetic tools available make this model an extremely useful one for studying the function of chemokines and chemokine receptors in an in vivo setting. Here, we review the findings relevant to the role that chemokines play in the context of directed single-cell migration, primarily in neutrophils and germ cells, and compare it to the collective cell migration of the zebrafish lateral line. We present the current knowledge concerning the formation of the chemokine gradient, its interpretation within the cell, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to chemokine signals during directed migration. PMID:25762592

  5. Chemokine Detection Using Receptors Immobilized on an SPR Sensor Surface.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Villares, Ricardo; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Gomariz, Rosa P; Mellado, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors take part in many physiological and pathological processes, and their dysregulated expression is linked to chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, immunodeficiencies, and cancer. The chemokine receptors, members of the G protein-coupled receptor family, are integral membrane proteins, with seven-transmembrane domains that bind the chemokines and transmit signals through GTP-binding proteins. Many assays used to study the structure, conformation, or activation mechanism of these receptors are based on ligand-binding measurement, as are techniques to detect new agonists and antagonists that modulate chemokine function. Such methods require labeling of the chemokine and/or its receptor, which can alter their binding characteristics. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique for analysis of the interaction between immobilized receptors and ligands in solution, in real time, and without labeling. SPR measurements nonetheless require expression and purification steps that can alter the conformation, stability, and function of the chemokine and/or the chemokine receptor. In this review, we focus on distinct methods to immobilize chemokine receptors on the surface of an optical biosensor. We expose the advantages and disadvantages of different protocols used and describe in detail the method to retain viral particles as receptor carriers that can be used for SPR determinations. PMID:26921939

  6. Chemokine decoy receptors: new players in reproductive immunology.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Elena Monica; Bonecchi, Raffaella; Buracchi, Chiara; Savino, Benedetta; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines are multifunctional molecules with roles in leukocyte trafficking and developmental processes. Both fetal and maternal components of the placenta produce chemokines, which control leukocyte trafficking observed in the placenta. Thus, chemokines play roles in the balance between protection of the developing embryo/fetus and tolerance of its hemiallogeneic tissues. Recently, a group of chemokine receptors, which include D6, DARC, and CCX-CKR, have been described as "silent" receptors by virtue of their inability to activate signal transduction events leading to cell chemoattraction. Here we review in vitro and in vivo evidence indicating that chemokine "silent" receptors regulate innate and adaptive immunity behaving as decoy receptors that support internalization and degradation of chemotactic factors, and discuss available information on their potential role in reproductive immunology. PMID:18716935

  7. Production of Recombinant Chemokines and Validation of Refolding.

    PubMed

    Veldkamp, Christopher T; Koplinski, Chad A; Jensen, Davin R; Peterson, Francis C; Smits, Kaitlin M; Smith, Brittney L; Johnson, Scott K; Lettieri, Christina; Buchholz, Wallace G; Solheim, Joyce C; Volkman, Brian F

    2016-01-01

    The diverse roles of chemokines in normal immune function and many human diseases have motivated numerous investigations into the structure and function of this family of proteins. Recombinant chemokines are often used to study how chemokines coordinate the trafficking of immune cells in various biological contexts. A reliable source of biologically active protein is vital for any in vitro or in vivo functional analysis. In this chapter, we describe a general method for the production of recombinant chemokines and robust techniques for efficient refolding that ensure consistently high biological activity. Considerations for initiating development of protocols consistent with Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) to produce biologically active chemokines suitable for use in clinical trials are also discussed. PMID:26921961

  8. The expression and role of CXC chemokines in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Hannelien; Struyf, Sofie; Laureys, Geneviève; Van Damme, Jo

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a life-threatening disease world-wide and colorectal cancer is the second common cause of cancer mortality. The interaction between tumor cells and stromal cells plays a crucial role in tumor initiation and progression and is partially mediated by chemokines. Chemokines predominantly participate in the chemoattraction of leukocytes to inflammatory sites. Nowadays, it is clear that CXC chemokines and their receptors (CXCR) may also modulate tumor behavior by several important mechanisms: regulation of angiogenesis, activation of a tumor-specific immune response by attracting leukocytes, stimulation of tumor cell proliferation and metastasis. Here, we review the expression and complex roles of CXC chemokines (CXCL1 to CXCL16) and their receptors (CXCR1 to CXCR6) in colorectal cancer. Overall, increased expression levels of CXC chemokines correlate with poor prognosis. PMID:22000992

  9. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) CC chemokines: Diversity and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Borza, Tudor; Stone, Cynthia; Rise, Matthew L; Bowman, Sharen; Johnson, Stewart C

    2010-08-01

    Chemokines are a large, diverse group of small cytokines that can be classified into several families, including the CC chemokines that are characterized by two adjacent cysteines near their amino terminus. CC chemokines play a pivotal role in host defense mechanisms by inducing leukocyte chemotaxis under physiological and inflammatory conditions. Analysis of CC chemokines from teleost fishes indicates that the number of CC chemokine genes and their tissue expression patterns vary largely in this group of vertebrates. Here we describe 32 distinct CC chemokine sequences from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) identified by analysis of approximately 206,000 ESTs. Phylogenetic analysis of Atlantic cod CC chemokines placed these sequences in seven clusters, most likely resulting from species-specific gene duplications, and two unique sequences; 12 of these CC chemokines, including at least one member of each cluster, were analyzed by QPCR using four immune-related tissues (head kidney, liver, spleen and blood) obtained from unstimulated, polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC)-stimulated and formalin-killed atypical Aeromonas salmonicida-stimulated individuals. EST abundance and QPCR analysis indicate that the expression of closely related CC chemokines GmSCYA101 and GmSCYA102, GmSCYA108 and GmSCYA109 or GmSCYA122 and GmSCYA124 can be highly tissue-specific despite substantial sequence identity. Stimulation with the viral mimic pIC or formalin-killed atypical A. salmonicida resulted in increased expression of most of the CC chemokines, indicating that they can be regarded as either inducible (inflammatory) or dual-function rather than constitutive (homeostatic). Tissue specificity, and the level of induction, varied broadly; for example, GmSCYA123 was at least 4-fold up-regulated by both inducers in all tissues analyzed, whereas pIC increased the expression of GmSCYA124 in liver over 1500 times. PMID:20381521

  10. Differential Chemokine Signature between Human Preadipocytes and Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica C.; Gibbs, Carla R.; Lee, Eun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is characterized as an accumulation of adipose tissue mass represented by chronic, low-grade inflammation. Obesity-derived inflammation involves chemokines as important regulators contributing to the pathophysiology of obesity-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and some cancers. The obesity-driven chemokine network is poorly understood. Here, we identified the profiles of chemokine signature between human preadipocytes and adipocytes, using PCR arrays and qRT-PCR. Both preadipocytes and adipocytes showed absent or low levels in chemokine receptors in spite of some changes. On the other hand, the chemokine levels of CCL2, CCL7-8, CCL11, CXCL1-3, CXCL6 and CXCL10-11 were dominantly expressed in preadipocytes compared to adipocytes. Interestingly, CXCL14 was the most dominant chemokine expressed in adipocytes compared to preadipocytes. Moreover, there is significantly higher protein level of CXCL14 in conditioned media from adipocytes. In addition, we analyzed the data of the chemokine signatures in adipocytes obtained from healthy lean and obese postmenopausal women based on Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) dataset. Adipocytes from obese individuals had significantly higher levels in chemokine signature as follows: CCL2, CCL13, CCL18-19, CCL23, CCL26, CXCL1, CXCL3 and CXCL14, as compared to those from lean ones. Also, among the chemokine networks, CXCL14 appeared to be the highest levels in adipocytes from both lean and obese women. Taken together, these results identify CXCL14 as an important chemokine induced during adipogenesis, requiring further research elucidating its potential therapeutic benefits in obesity. PMID:27340388

  11. Differential Chemokine Signature between Human Preadipocytes and Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica C; Gibbs, Carla R; Lee, Eun-Sook; Son, Deok-Soo

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is characterized as an accumulation of adipose tissue mass represented by chronic, low-grade inflammation. Obesity-derived inflammation involves chemokines as important regulators contributing to the pathophysiology of obesity-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and some cancers. The obesity-driven chemokine network is poorly understood. Here, we identified the profiles of chemokine signature between human preadipocytes and adipocytes, using PCR arrays and qRT-PCR. Both preadipocytes and adipocytes showed absent or low levels in chemokine receptors in spite of some changes. On the other hand, the chemokine levels of CCL2, CCL7-8, CCL11, CXCL1-3, CXCL6 and CXCL10-11 were dominantly expressed in preadipocytes compared to adipocytes. Interestingly, CXCL14 was the most dominant chemokine expressed in adipocytes compared to preadipocytes. Moreover, there is significantly higher protein level of CXCL14 in conditioned media from adipocytes. In addition, we analyzed the data of the chemokine signatures in adipocytes obtained from healthy lean and obese postmenopausal women based on Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) dataset. Adipocytes from obese individuals had significantly higher levels in chemokine signature as follows: CCL2, CCL13, CCL18-19, CCL23, CCL26, CXCL1, CXCL3 and CXCL14, as compared to those from lean ones. Also, among the chemokine networks, CXCL14 appeared to be the highest levels in adipocytes from both lean and obese women. Taken together, these results identify CXCL14 as an important chemokine induced during adipogenesis, requiring further research elucidating its potential therapeutic benefits in obesity. PMID:27340388

  12. The Chemokine MIP-1α/CCL3 impairs mouse hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and memory

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, Elodie; Faivre, Emilie; Dutar, Patrick; Alves Pires, Claire; Demeyer, Dominique; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Laloux, Charlotte; Buée, Luc; Blum, David; Humez, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are signaling molecules playing an important role in immune regulations. They are also thought to regulate brain development, neurogenesis and neuroendocrine functions. While chemokine upsurge has been associated with conditions characterized with cognitive impairments, their ability to modulate synaptic plasticity remains ill-defined. In the present study, we specifically evaluated the effects of MIP1-α/CCL3 towards hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and spatial memory. We found that CCL3 (50 ng/ml) significantly reduced basal synaptic transmission at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse without affecting NMDAR-mediated field potentials. This effect was ascribed to post-synaptic regulations, as CCL3 did not impact paired-pulse facilitation. While CCL3 did not modulate long-term depression (LTD), it significantly impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), an effect abolished by Maraviroc, a CCR5 specific antagonist. In addition, sub-chronic intracerebroventricular (icv) injections of CCL3 also impair LTP. In accordance with these electrophysiological findings, we demonstrated that the icv injection of CCL3 in mouse significantly impaired spatial memory abilities and long-term memory measured using the two-step Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks. These effects of CCL3 on memory were inhibited by Maraviroc. Altogether, these data suggest that the chemokine CCL3 is an hippocampal neuromodulator able to regulate synaptic plasticity mechanisms involved in learning and memory functions. PMID:26511387

  13. Ionizing radiation increases adhesiveness of human aortic endothelial cells via a chemokine-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Saman; Gupta, Kiran B; Kucik, Dennis F

    2012-05-01

    Exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Since radiation also induces inflammation, a possible mechanism is a change in the adhesiveness of vascular endothelial cells, triggering pro-atherogenic accumulation of leukocytes. To investigate this mechanism at the cellular level, the effect of X rays on adhesiveness of cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) was determined. HAECs were grown as monolayers and exposed to 0 to 30 Gy X rays, followed by measurement of adhesiveness under physiological shear stress using a flow chamber adhesion assay. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, HAEC adhesiveness was increased, with a peak effect at 15 Gy. Radiation had no significant effect on surface expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Antibody blockade of the leukocyte integrin receptors for ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, however, abolished the radiation-induced adhesiveness. Since these leukocyte integrins can be activated by chemokines presented on the endothelial cell surface, the effect of pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of chemokine-mediated integrin activation, was tested. PTX specifically inhibited radiation-induced adhesiveness, with no significant effect on nonirradiated cells. Therefore, radiation induces increased adhesiveness of aortic endothelial cells through chemokine-dependent signaling from endothelial cells to leukocytes, even in the absence of increased expression of the adhesion molecules involved. PMID:22087741

  14. Nitric Oxide Donors Suppress Chemokine Production by Keratinocytes in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Giustizieri, Maria Laura; Albanesi, Cristina; Scarponi, Claudia; De Pità, Ornella; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the modulation of inflammatory responses. In psoriatic skin, NO is highly produced by epidermal keratinocytes in response to interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. In this study, we investigated whether the NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GS-NO) and NOR-1, could regulate chemokine production by human keratinocytes activated with interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. In addition, we studied the effects of the topical application of a GS-NO ointment on chemokine expression in lesional psoriatic skin. NO donors diminished in a dose-dependent manner and at both mRNA and protein levels the IP-10, RANTES, and MCP-1 expression in keratinocytes cultured from healthy patients and psoriatic patients. In contrast, constitutive and induced interleukin-8 production was unchanged. GS-NO-treated psoriatic skin showed reduction of IP-10, RANTES, and MCP-1, but not interleukin-8 expression by keratinocytes. Moreover, the number of CD14+ and CD3+ cells infiltrating the epidermis and papillary dermis diminished significantly. NO donors also down-regulated ICAM-1 protein expression without affecting mRNA accumulation in vitro, and suppressed keratinocyte ICAM-1 in vivo. Finally, NO donors inhibited nuclear factor-κB and STAT-1, but not AP-1 activities in transiently transfected keratinocytes. These results define NO donors as negative regulators of chemokine production by keratinocytes. PMID:12368213

  15. Overexpression of GAB2 in ovarian cancer cells promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating chemokine expression

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, C; Zhang, L; Carroll, S L; Ethier, S P; Cheung, H W

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that the scaffold adapter GRB2-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2) is amplified and overexpressed in a subset of primary high-grade serous ovarian cancers and cell lines. Ovarian cancer cells overexpressing GAB2 are dependent on GAB2 for activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and are sensitive to PI3K inhibition. In this study, we show an important role of GAB2 overexpression in promoting tumor angiogenesis by upregulating expression of multiple chemokines. Specifically, we found that suppression of GAB2 by inducible small hairpin RNA in ovarian cancer cells inhibited tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and peritoneal tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Overexpression of GAB2 upregulated the secretion of several chemokines from ovarian cancer cells, including CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL8. The secreted chemokines not only signal through endothelial CXCR2 receptor in a paracrine manner to promote endothelial tube formation, but also act as autocrine growth factors for GAB2-induced transformation of fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells and clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cells overexpressing GAB2. Pharmacological inhibition of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase subunit β (IKKβ), but not PI3K, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK), could effectively suppress GAB2-induced chemokine expression. Inhibition of IKKβ augmented the efficacy of PI3K/mTOR inhibition in suppressing clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cells with GAB2 overexpression. Taken together, these findings suggest that overexpression of GAB2 in ovarian cancer cells promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating expression of CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL8 that is IKKβ-dependent. Co-targeting IKKβ and PI3K pathways downstream of GAB2 might be a promising therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer that overexpresses GAB2. PMID:26657155

  16. Overexpression of GAB2 in ovarian cancer cells promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating chemokine expression.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, C; Zhang, L; Carroll, S L; Ethier, S P; Cheung, H W

    2016-08-01

    We previously found that the scaffold adapter GRB2-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2) is amplified and overexpressed in a subset of primary high-grade serous ovarian cancers and cell lines. Ovarian cancer cells overexpressing GAB2 are dependent on GAB2 for activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and are sensitive to PI3K inhibition. In this study, we show an important role of GAB2 overexpression in promoting tumor angiogenesis by upregulating expression of multiple chemokines. Specifically, we found that suppression of GAB2 by inducible small hairpin RNA in ovarian cancer cells inhibited tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and peritoneal tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Overexpression of GAB2 upregulated the secretion of several chemokines from ovarian cancer cells, including CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL8. The secreted chemokines not only signal through endothelial CXCR2 receptor in a paracrine manner to promote endothelial tube formation, but also act as autocrine growth factors for GAB2-induced transformation of fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells and clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cells overexpressing GAB2. Pharmacological inhibition of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase subunit β (IKKβ), but not PI3K, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK), could effectively suppress GAB2-induced chemokine expression. Inhibition of IKKβ augmented the efficacy of PI3K/mTOR inhibition in suppressing clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cells with GAB2 overexpression. Taken together, these findings suggest that overexpression of GAB2 in ovarian cancer cells promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating expression of CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL8 that is IKKβ-dependent. Co-targeting IKKβ and PI3K pathways downstream of GAB2 might be a promising therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer that overexpresses GAB2. PMID:26657155

  17. Differential expression of chemokines, chemokine receptors and proteinases by foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman A; Hashimi, Saeed M; Khan, Shershah; Quan, Jingjing; Bakr, Mahmoud M; Forwood, Mark R; Morrison, Nigel M

    2014-07-01

    Osteoclasts and foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) are both derived from the fusion of macropahges. These cells are seen in close proximity during foreign body reactions, therefore it was assumed that they might interact with each other. The aim was to identify important genes that are expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs which can be used to understand peri-implantitis and predict the relationship of these cells during foreign body reactions. Bone marrow macrophages (BMM) were treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) to produce osteoclasts. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to identify the genes that were expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs compared to macrophage controls. TRAP staining was used to visualise the cells while gelatine zymography and western blots were used for protein expression. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), matrix metallo proteinase 9 (MMP9), nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1), cathepsin K (CTSK) and RANK were significantly lower in FBGCs compared to osteoclasts. Inflammation specific chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP1 also called CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP1α), MIP1β and MIP1γ, and their receptors CCR1, CCR3 and CCR5, were highly expressed by FBGCs. FBGCs were negative for osteoclast specific markers (RANK, NFATc1, CTSK). FBGCs expressed chemokines such as CCL2, 3, 5 and 9 while osteoclasts expressed the receptors for these chemokines i.e. CCR1, 2 and 3. Our findings show that osteoclast specific genes are not expressed by FBGCs and that FBGCs interact with osteoclasts during foreign body reaction through chemokines. PMID:24500983

  18. The Role of Chemokines in Breast Cancer Pathology and Its Possible Use as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Arreola, M. Isabel; Nava-Castro, Karen E.; Castro, Julieta I.; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Carrero, Julio C.; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins that primarily regulate the traffic of leukocytes under homeostatic conditions and during specific immune responses. The chemokine-chemokine receptor system comprises almost 50 chemokines and approximately 20 chemokine receptors; thus, there is no unique ligand for each receptor and the binding of different chemokines to the same receptor might have disparate effects. Complicating the system further, these effects depend on the cellular milieu. In cancer, although chemokines are associated primarily with the generation of a protumoral microenvironment and organ-directed metastasis, they also mediate other phenomena related to disease progression, such as angiogenesis and even chemoresistance. Therefore, the chemokine system is becoming a target in cancer therapeutics. We review the emerging data and correlations between chemokines/chemokine receptors and breast cancer, their implications in cancer progression, and possible therapeutic strategies that exploit the chemokine system. PMID:25165728

  19. TLR3 activation increases chemokine expression in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Faksh, Arij; Britt, Rodney D; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Pandya, Hitesh C; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-01-15

    Viral infections, such as respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus, adversely affect neonatal and pediatric populations, resulting in significant lung morbidity, including acute asthma exacerbation. Studies in adults have demonstrated that human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells modulate inflammation through their ability to secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The role of ASM in the developing airway during infection remains undefined. In our study, we used human fetal ASM cells as an in vitro model to examine the effect of Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists on chemokine secretion. We found that fetal ASM express multiple TLRs, including TLR3 and TLR4, which are implicated in the pathogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus infection. Cells were treated with TLR agonists, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] (TLR3 agonist), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4 agonist), or R848 (TLR7/8 agonist), and IL-8 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5) secretion were evaluated. Interestingly, poly(I:C), but neither lipopolysaccharide nor R848, increased IL-8 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 secretion. Examination of signaling pathways suggested that the poly(I:C) effects in fetal ASM involve TLR and ERK signaling, in addition to another major inflammatory pathway, NF-κB. Moreover, there are variations between fetal and adult ASM with respect to poly(I:C) effects on signaling pathways. Pharmacological inhibition suggested that ERK pathways mediate poly(I:C) effects. Overall, our data show that poly(I:C) initiates activation of proinflammatory pathways in developing ASM, which may contribute to immune responses to infection and exacerbation of asthma. PMID:26589477

  20. Chemokine genetic polymorphism in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Qidwai, Tabish

    2016-08-01

    Chemokine receptor-ligand interaction regulates transmigration of lymphocytes and monocytes from circulation to the inflammatory sites. CC chemokine receptors, chemokine receptor 2(CCR2) and 5 (CCR5) are important in recruitment of immune cells as well as non-immune cells under pathological condition. CCR2, CCR5 and their ligands (CCL2 and CCL5) are major contributor to the autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and cancer. Currently studies are being done to explore genetic variations in chemokine genes and their involvement in diseases that could make clear disease severity and deaths. Conflicting results of studies in different populations and diseases promoted to investigate chemokines genetic polymorphisms in miscellaneous diseases. This study is aimed to evaluate the influence of chemokines genetic polymorphisms in pathogenesis and outcome of prevalent non infectious diseases. Present study demonstrates the likely role played by genetic variations in drug response and evolution. Moreover this study highlights chemokine as therapeutic target and diagnostic biomarker in pathological condition. PMID:27262929

  1. The protein phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A stimulates chemokine production by human synovial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, N J; Watson, M L; Westwick, J

    1995-01-01

    Cultured human synovial fibroblasts express mRNA for the chemotactic cytokines (chemokines) interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted (RANTES), when stimulated with IL-1 or tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). Calyculin A, a potent type 1/2A protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, was used to examine the role of protein phosphatases in the regulation of chemokine gene expression. Calyculin A (1 nM) mimicked IL-1 by inducing IL-8 and MCP-1 mRNA expression in synovial cells. IL-8 mRNA was induced over a similar time period (1-6 h) in response to IL-1 or calyculin A, whereas MCP-1 mRNA was induced more rapidly (1-2 h) by calyculin A than by IL-1 (4-6 h). Expression of RANTES mRNA occurred in response to TNF alpha, but could not be induced by stimulation with calyculin A alone. These results suggest that inhibition of protein phosphatase type 1/2A may have a differential role in the regulation of the expression of each of the chemokine genes. Synovial fibroblasts also secreted IL-8 and IL-6 peptide when stimulated with either IL-1/TNF alpha or calyculin A. The amount of IL-8 and IL-6 peptide produced in response to calyculin A was significantly increased above that produced by untreated synovial cells, though it was much less than the amount induced by IL-1 or TNF alpha. Calyculin A also acted synergistically with IL-1 or TNF alpha to cause a 2-fold potentiation of IL-1- or TNF alpha-induced IL-8 mRNA and peptide and RANTES mRNA expression. These results suggest that although inhibition of a protein phosphatase may be able to regulate the magnitude of IL-1-induced chemokine gene expression, the IL-1 signal transduction pathway involves components in addition to phosphatase inhibition, possibly including the activation of a protein kinase, the action of which may be opposed by a protein phosphatase inhibited by calyculin A. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3

  2. Microglial Kv1.3 Channels and P2Y12 Receptors Differentially Regulate Cytokine and Chemokine Release from Brain Slices of Young Adult and Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue damage following stroke or traumatic brain injury is accompanied by neuroinflammatory processes, while microglia play a central role in causing and regulating neuroinflammation via production of proinflammatory substances, including cytokines and chemokines. Here, we used brain slices, an established in situ brain injury model, from young adult and aged mice to investigate cytokine and chemokine production with particular focus on the role of microglia. Twenty four hours after slice preparation, higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. TNF-α and IL-6, and chemokines, i.e. CCL2 and CXCL1, were released from brain slices of aged mice than from slices of young adult mice. However, maximal microglial stimulation with LPS for 24 h did not reveal age-dependent differences in the amounts of released cytokines and chemokines. Mechanisms underlying microglial cytokine and chemokine production appear to be similar in young adult and aged mice. Inhibition of microglial Kv1.3 channels with margatoxin reduced release of IL-6, but not release of CCL2 and CXCL1. In contrast, blockade of microglial P2Y12 receptors with PSB0739 inhibited release of CCL2 and CXCL1, whereas release of IL-6 remained unaffected. Cytokine and chemokine production was not reduced by inhibitors of Kir2.1 K+ channels or adenosine receptors. In summary, our data suggest that brain tissue damage-induced production of cytokines and chemokines is age-dependent, and differentially regulated by microglial Kv1.3 channels and P2Y12 receptors. PMID:26011191

  3. Gene profile of chemokines on hepatic stellate cells of schistosome-infected mice and antifibrotic roles of CXCL9/10 on liver non-parenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yue-jin; Luo, Jie; Lu, Qiao; Zhou, Ying; Wu, Hai-wei; Zheng, Dan; Ren, Yong-ya; Sun, Ke-yi; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Zhao-song

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in the development of liver fibrosis caused by schistosomiasis. Chemokines were widely expressed and involved in cellular activation, proliferation and migration in inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, little is known about the expressions of chemokines on HSCs in the schistosoma infection. In addition, the roles of chemokines in pathogenesis of liver fibrosis are not totally clear. In our study, we used microarray to analyze the temporal gene expressions of primary HSCs isolated from mice with both acute and chronic schistosomiasis. Our microarray data showed that most of the chemokines expressed on HSCs were upregulated at 3 weeks post-infection (p.i) when the egg granulomatous response was not obviously evoked in the liver. However, some of them like CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 were subsequently decreased at 6 weeks p.i when the granulomatous response reached the peak. In the chronic stage, most of the differentially expressed chemokines maintained persistent high-abundances. Furthermore, several chemokines including CCR2, CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, CXCR4, CCL2, CCL5, CCL21, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were expressed by HCSs and the abundances of them were changed following the praziquantel treatment in the chronic stage, indicating that chemokines were possibly necessary for the persistence of the chronic stage. In vitro experiments, hepatic non-parenchymal cells, primary HSCs and human HSCs line LX-2 were stimulated by chemokines. The results showed that CXCL9 and CXCL10, but not CXCL11 or CXCL4, significantly inhibited the gene expressions of Col1α1, Col3α1 and α-SMA, indicating the potential anti-fibrosis effect of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in schistosomiasis. More interestingly, soluble egg antigen (SEA) of Schistosoma japonicum was able to inhibit transcriptional expressions of some chemokines by LX-2 cells, suggesting that SEA was capable of regulating the expression pattern of chemokine family and modulating the hepatic immune

  4. Comparison of hardwood and softwood dust-induced expression of cytokines and chemokines in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Juha; Luukkonen, Ritva; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Alenius, Harri; Savolainen, Kai

    2006-01-20

    Numerous epidemiological studies have shown that occupational exposure to wood dust can induce several respiratory diseases such as allergic rhinitis, chronic bronchitis, asthma, and sino-nasal adenocarcinoma. However, comparison of the harmful potential of different wood dust species on the basis of epidemiological studies is complicated because in the occupational environment workers are usually exposed to several wood dust species simultaneously. In the present study, we have characterized and compared the effects of two hardwood dusts, beech and teak, and two softwood dusts, pine and spruce, on cytokine and chemokine expression utilizing an in vitro model, murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. The expression patterns of selected cytokines and chemokines were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR and by ELISA. All the tested hardwood and softwood dusts induced TNF-alpha expression and inhibited IL-1beta expression. Similarly, all the wood dusts induced the expression of CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, and CXCL2/3 chemokines and inhibited CCL24 expression. Our results indicate that both hardwood and softwood dusts influence the cytokine and chemokine expression of RAW 264.7 cells. Although some differences could be detected in the magnitude of responses to different wood dust species, the two tested wood dust groups, hardwoods and softwoods, have quite similar effects on cytokine and chemokine expression in RAW 264.7 cell line. PMID:16202497

  5. Comprehensive analysis of chemokine-induced cAMP-inhibitory responses using a real-time luminescent biosensor.

    PubMed

    Felouzis, Virginia; Hermand, Patricia; de Laissardière, Guy Trambly; Combadière, Christophe; Deterre, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family coupled to members of the Gi class, whose primary function is to inhibit the cellular adenylate cyclase. We used a cAMP-related and PKA-based luminescent biosensor (GloSensor™ F-22) to monitor the real-time downstream response of chemokine receptors, especially CX3CR1 and CXCR4, after activation with their cognate ligands CX3CL1 and CXCL12. We found that the amplitudes and kinetic profiles of the chemokine responses were conserved in various cell types and were independent of the nature and concentration of the molecules used for cAMP prestimulation, including either the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin or ligands mediating Gs-mediated responses like prostaglandin E2 or beta-adrenergic agonist. We conclude that the cAMP chemokine response is robustly conserved in various inflammatory conditions. Moreover, the cAMP-related luminescent biosensor appears as a valuable tool to analyze the details of Gi-mediated cAMP-inhibitory cellular responses, even in native conditions and could help to decipher their precise role in cell function. PMID:26515128

  6. Functions of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in the central nervous system and its regulation by μ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nash, Bradley; Meucci, Olimpia

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 by its chemokine ligand CXCL12 regulates a number of physiopathological functions in the central nervous system, during development as well as later in life. In addition to the more classical roles of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the recruitment of immune cells or migration and proliferation of neural precursor cells, recent studies suggest that CXCR4 signaling also modulates synaptic function and neuronal survival in the mature brain, through direct and indirect effects on neurons and glia. These effects, which include regulation of glutamate receptors and uptake, and of dendritic spine density, can significantly alter the ability of neurons to face excitotoxic insults. Therefore, they are particularly relevant to neurodegenerative diseases featuring alterations of glutamate neurotransmission, such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Importantly, CXCR4 signaling can be dysregulated by HIV viral proteins, host HIV-induced factors, and opioids. Potential mechanisms of opioid regulation of CXCR4 include heterologous desensitization, transcriptional regulation and changes in receptor expression levels, opioid-chemokine receptor dimer or heteromer formation, and the newly described modulation by the protein ferritin heavy chain-all leading to inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. After reviewing major effects of chemokines and opioids in the CNS, this chapter discusses chemokine-opioid interactions in neuronal and immune cells, focusing on their potential contribution to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:25175863

  7. Differential Expression of Chemokine Receptors and their Roles in Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions play diverse roles in cell migration and homeostasis. Emerging evidence suggests that cancer cells co-opt chemokine networks for survival, proliferation, immune evasion, and metastasis. Most of the chemokine receptors are reported to be involved in tumor progression. Given their extensive implication in cancer progression, several chemokine receptor/ligand axes are considered as potential therapeutic targets. This review provides a survey of chemokine receptor expression in cancer and evaluates the potential of chemokine receptor imaging as a tool for molecular characterization of cancer. PMID:22662317

  8. Angiogenic CXC chemokine expression during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards the osteoblastic lineage.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, D S; Zhu, J H; Makhijani, N S; Kumar, A; Yamaguchi, D T

    2008-02-15

    The potential role of ELR(+) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Inflammation, which occurs in the initial phase of tissue healing in general, is critical to bone repair. Release of cytokines from infiltrating immune cells and injured bone can lead to recruitment of MSCs to the region of repair. CXC chemokines bearing the Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif are also released by inflammatory cells and serve as angiogenic factors stimulating chemotaxis and proliferation of endothelial cells. hMSCs, induced to differentiate with osteogenic medium (OGM) containing ascorbate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta-GP), and dexamethasone (DEX), showed an increase in mRNA and protein secretion of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL1. CXCL8 mRNA half-life studies reveal an increase in mRNA stability upon OGM stimulation. Increased expression and secretion is a result of DEX in OGM and is dose-dependent. Inhibition of the glucocorticoid receptor with mifepristone only partially inhibits DEX-stimulated CXCL8 expression indicating both glucocorticoid receptor dependent and independent pathways. Treatment with signal transduction inhibitors demonstrate that this expression is due to activation of the ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and is mediated through the G(alphai)-coupled receptors. Angiogenesis assays demonstrate that OGM-stimulated conditioned media containing secreted CXCL8 and CXCL1 can induce angiogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells in an in vitro Matrigel assay. PMID:17583554

  9. Emerging Concepts and Approaches for Chemokine-Receptor Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Salanga, Catherina L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Hamel, Damon J.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Chemokine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) most noted for their role in cell migration. However, inappropriate utilization or regulation of these receptors is implicated in many inflammatory diseases, cancer and HIV, making them important drug targets. Areas covered in this review Allostery, oligomerization, and ligand bias are presented as they pertain to chemokine receptors and their associated pathologies. Specific examples of each are described from the recent literature and their implications are discussed in terms of drug discovery efforts targeting chemokine receptors. What the reader will gain Insight into the expanding view of the multitude of pharmacological variables that need to be considered or that may be exploited in chemokine receptor drug discovery. Take home message Since 2007, two drugs targeting chemokine receptors have been approved by the FDA, Maraviroc for preventing HIV infection and Mozobil™ for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization. While these successes permit optimism for chemokine receptors as drug targets, only recently has the complexity of this system begun to be appreciated. The concepts of allosteric inhibitors, biased ligands and functional selectivity raise the possibility that drugs with precisely-defined properties can be developed. Other complexities such as receptor oligomerization and tissue-specific functional states of receptors also offer opportunities for increased target and response specificity, although it will be more challenging to translate these ideas into approved therapeutics compared to traditional approaches. PMID:21132095

  10. Differential chemokine responses in the murine brain following lyssavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Hicks, D J; Núñez, A; Banyard, A C; Williams, A; Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N

    2013-11-01

    The hallmark of lyssavirus infection is lethal encephalomyelitis. Previous studies have reported distinct lyssavirus isolate-related differences in severity of cellular recruitment into the encephalon in a murine model of infection following peripheral inoculation with rabies virus (RABV) and European bat lyssavirus (EBLV)-1 and -2. In order to understand the role of chemokines in this process, comparative studies of the chemokine pattern, distribution and production in response to infection with these lyssaviruses were undertaken. Expression of CCL2, CCL5 and CXCL10 was observed throughout the murine brain with a distinct caudal bias in distribution, similar to both inflammatory changes and virus antigen distribution. CCL2 immunolabelling was localized to neuronal and astroglial populations. CCL5 immunolabelling was only detected in the astroglia, while CXCL10 labelling, although present in the astroglia, was more prominent in neurons. Isolate-dependent differences in the amount of chemokine immunolabelling in specific brain regions and chemokine production by neurons in vitro were observed, with a greater expression of CCL5 in vivo and CXCL10 production in vitro after EBLV infection. Additionally, strong positive associations between chemokine immunolabelling and perivascular cuffing and, to a lesser extent, virus antigen score were also observed. These differences in chemokine expression may explain the variation in severity of encephalitic changes observed in animals infected with different lyssavirus isolates. PMID:23746482

  11. Neutrophil chemokines in epithelial inflammatory processes of human tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, F; Ahlers, F; Stoll, W; Rudack, C

    2005-01-01

    CXC chemokines are thought to play an important role at sites of inflammation. Because ELR+ CXC chemokines are expressed in different types of tonsillitis we investigated the role of the surface/crypt epithelium of human tonsils in producing ELR+ CXC chemokines: interleukin (IL)-8 (CXCL8), ENA-78 (CXCL5), GRO-α (CXCL1) and GCP-2 (CXCL6). Tonsillar tissue was obtained from patients undergoing tonsillectomy and chemokine expression was investigated by means of immunohistochemistry. A549 cells were used as a model to study kinetics of chemokine expression in epithelial cells. Cells were stimulated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and supernatants derived from aerobic/anaerobic Staphylococcus aureus strains. Chemokine expression was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We observed epithelial expression of IL-8, GRO-α and GCP-2 in different types of tonsillitis, whereas ENA-78 was rarely expressed. In A549 cells abundant expression of ENA-78 was detected. IL-8 and GCP-2 are expressed in an acute type of tonsillitis whereas GRO-α was frequently detectable both in chronically and acutely inflamed tonsils. ENA-78 does not seem to play a pivotal role in tonsillitis in vivo. PMID:15807854

  12. Impaired lymphoid chemokine-mediated migration due to a block on the chemokine receptor switch in human cytomegalovirus-infected dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moutaftsi, Magdalena; Brennan, Paul; Spector, Stephen A; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2004-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) migration from the site of infection to the site of T-cell priming is a crucial event in the generation of antiviral T-cell responses. Here we present to our knowledge the first functional evidence that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) blocks the migration of infected monocyte-derived DCs toward lymphoid chemokines CCL19 and CCL21. DC migration is blocked by viral impairment of the chemokine receptor switch at the level of the expression of CCR7 molecules. The inhibition occurs with immediate-early-early kinetics, and viral interference with NF-kappaB signaling is likely to be at least partially responsible for the lack of CCR7 expression. DCs which migrate from the infected cultures are HCMV antigen negative, and consequently they do not stimulate HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells, while CD4(+)-T-cell activation is not impaired. Although CD8(+) T cells can also be activated by alternative antigen presentation mechanisms, the spatial segregation of naive T cells and infected DCs seems a potent mechanism of delaying the generation of primary CD8(+)-T-cell responses and aiding early viral spread. PMID:14990723

  13. Impaired Lymphoid Chemokine-Mediated Migration due to a Block on the Chemokine Receptor Switch in Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moutaftsi, Magdalena; Brennan, Paul; Spector, Stephen A.; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) migration from the site of infection to the site of T-cell priming is a crucial event in the generation of antiviral T-cell responses. Here we present to our knowledge the first functional evidence that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) blocks the migration of infected monocyte-derived DCs toward lymphoid chemokines CCL19 and CCL21. DC migration is blocked by viral impairment of the chemokine receptor switch at the level of the expression of CCR7 molecules. The inhibition occurs with immediate-early-early kinetics, and viral interference with NF-κB signaling is likely to be at least partially responsible for the lack of CCR7 expression. DCs which migrate from the infected cultures are HCMV antigen negative, and consequently they do not stimulate HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells, while CD4+-T-cell activation is not impaired. Although CD8+ T cells can also be activated by alternative antigen presentation mechanisms, the spatial segregation of naive T cells and infected DCs seems a potent mechanism of delaying the generation of primary CD8+-T-cell responses and aiding early viral spread. PMID:14990723

  14. Neolignans from the Arils of Myristica fragrans as Potent Antagonists of CC Chemokine Receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Toshio; Hachiman, Ikuko; Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Nishida, Eriko; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Hayakawa, Takao; Yoshie, Osamu; Muraoka, Osamu; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-08-26

    CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) is expressed selectively in eosinophils, basophils, and some Th2 cells and plays a major role in allergic diseases. A methanol extract from the arils of Myristica fragrans inhibited CC chemokine ligand 11-induced chemotaxis in CCR3-expressing L1.2 cells at 100 μg/mL. From this extract, eight new neolignans, maceneolignans A-H (1-8), were isolated, and their stereostructures were elucidated from their spectroscopic values and chemical properties. Of those constituents, compounds 1, 4, 6, and 8 and (+)-erythro-(7S,8R)-Δ(8')-7-hydroxy-3,4-methylenedioxy-3',5'-dimethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (11), (-)-(8R)-Δ(8')-3,4-methylenedioxy-3',5'-dimethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (17), (+)-licarin A (20), nectandrin B (25), verrucosin (26), and myristicin (27) inhibited CCR3-mediated chemotaxis at a concentration of 1 μM. Among them, 1 (EC50 1.6 μM), 6 (1.5 μM), and 8 (1.4 μM) showed relatively strong activities, which were comparable to that of a synthetic CCR3 selective antagonist, SB328437 (0.78 μM). PMID:27419473

  15. M-sec regulates polarized secretion of inflammatory endothelial chemokines and facilitates CCL2-mediated lymphocyte transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Barzilai, Sagi; Blecher-Gonen, Ronnie; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Zauberman, Ayelet; Lebel-Haziv, Yaeli; Amit, Ido; Alon, Ronen

    2016-06-01

    Activation of endothelial cells by IL-1β triggers the expression of multiple inflammatory cytokines and leukocyte-attracting chemokines. The machineries involved in the secretion of these inducible proteins are poorly understood. With the use of genome-wide transcriptional analysis of inflamed human dermal microvascular endothelial cells, we identified several IL-1β-induced candidate regulators of these machineries and chose to focus our study on TNF-α-induced protein 2 (myeloid-secretory). The silencing of myeloid-secretory did not affect the ability of inflamed endothelial cells to support the adhesion and crawling of effector T lymphocytes. However, the ability of these lymphocytes to complete transendothelial migration across myeloid-secretory-silenced human dermal microvascular endothelial cells was inhibited significantly. These observed effects on lymphocyte transendothelial migration were recovered completely when exogenous promigratory chemokine CXCL12 was overlaid on the endothelial barrier. A polarized secretion assay suggested that the silencing of endothelial myeloid-secretory impairs T effector transendothelial migration by reducing the preferential secretion of endothelial-produced CCL2, a key transendothelial migration-promoting chemokine for these lymphocytes, into the basolateral endothelial compartment. Myeloid-secretory silencing also impaired the preferential secretion of other endothelial-produced inflammatory chemokines, as well as cytokines, such as IL-6 and GM-CSF, into the basolateral endothelial compartment. This is the first evidence of a novel inflammation-inducible machinery that regulates polarized secretion of endothelial CCL2 and other inflammatory chemokines and cytokines into basolateral endothelial compartments and facilitates the ability of endothelial CCL2 to promote T cell transendothelial migration. PMID:26701136

  16. Characterization of oak and birch dust-induced expression of cytokines and chemokines in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Juha; Majuri, Marja-Leena; Luukkonen, Ritva; Lauerma, Antti; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Alenius, Harri; Savolainen, Kai

    2005-11-01

    Occupational exposure to wood dust is related to several respiratory diseases, such as allergic rhinitis, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. However, virtually nothing is known about molecular mechanisms behind wood dust-induced pulmonary inflammation. To elucidate the effects of wood dust exposure on cytokine and chemokine expression in murine macrophage cell line cells, mouse RAW 264.7 cells were exposed to two selected hardwood dusts, oak and birch. TiO2 and LPS were used as controls. Expression patterns of several cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR system and by ELISA. Exposure to birch dust caused a major increase in TNF-alpha and IL-6 protein levels whereas a weaker induction of TNF-alpha protein was found after exposure to oak dust. Inorganic TiO2 dust did not induce significant cytokine expression. With respect to the chemokines, a dose-dependent, about 10-fold induction of CCL2 mRNA and protein was found after exposure to birch dust. Oak dust induced weakly CCL2 protein. Similarly, birch dust induced a strong expression of CCL3, CCL4, and CXCL2/3 mRNA whereas only moderate levels of these chemokine mRNAs were detected after oak dust exposure. In contrast, expression of CCL24 mRNA was inhibited by more than 40-fold by both oak and birch dusts. TiO2 dust induced about five-fold expression of CCL3 and CCL4 mRNA but did not affect significantly other chemokines. These results suggest that exposure to birch or oak dusts may influence the development of the inflammatory process in the airways by modulating the expression of macrophage-derived cytokines and chemokines. PMID:16122864

  17. Evasin-4, a tick-derived chemokine-binding protein with broad selectivity can be modified for use in preclinical disease models.

    PubMed

    Déruaz, Maud; Bonvin, Pauline; Severin, India C; Johnson, Zoë; Krohn, Sonja; Power, Christine A; Proudfoot, Amanda E I

    2013-10-01

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus, the common brown dog tick, produces several chemokine-binding proteins which are secreted into the host in its saliva to modulate the host response during feeding. Two of these demonstrate very restricted selectivity profiles. Here, we describe the characterization of the third, which we named Evasin-4. Evasin-4 was difficult to produce recombinantly using its native signal peptide in HEK cells, but expressed very well using the urokinase-type plasminogen activator signal peptide. Using SPR, Evasin-4 was shown to bind most CC chemokines. Investigation of the neutralization properties by inhibition of chemokine-induced chemotaxis showed that binding and neutralization did not correlate in all cases. Two major anomalies were observed: no binding was observed to CCL2 and CCL13, yet Evasin-4 was able to inhibit chemotaxis induced by these chemokines. Conversely, binding to CCL25 was observed, but Evasin-4 did not inhibit CCL25-induced chemotaxis. Size-exclusion chromatography confirmed that Evasin-4 forms a complex with CCL2 and CCL18. In accordance with the standard properties of unmodified small proteins, Evasin-4 was rapidly cleared following in vivo administration. To enhance the in vivo half-life and optimize its potential as a therapeutic agent, Fc fusions of Evasin-4 were created. Both the N- and C-terminal fusions were shown to retain binding activity, with the C-terminal fusion showing a modest reduction in potency. PMID:23910450

  18. High-dose hydrocortisone reduces expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL10 in SARS coronavirus-infected intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Cinatl, Jindrich; Michaelis, Martin; Morgenstern, Birgit; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm

    2005-02-01

    Clinical observations and our high-density oligonucleotide microarray results demonstrated increased expression of proinflammatory chemokines after SARS-CoV infection. Here, we investigated the influence of SARS-CoV infection on CXCL8 (interleukin 8) and CXCL10 (interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10) in human intestinal epithelial (Caco2) cells. RT-PCR and ELISA showed time-dependent up-regulation of both chemokines after SARS-CoV infection. Electric mobility shift assay revealed increased DNA binding activity of the cellular transcription factors activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor (B (NF-kappaB) in SARS-CoV infected cells. High hydrocortisone concentrations (> or =50 microg/ml) completely prevented increased DNA binding activity of AP-1 and NF-kappaB and inhibited up-regulation of CXCL8 and CXCL10, but did not reduce chemokine expression to basal levels. Ribavirin that does not inhibit SARS-CoV replication in Vero cells inhibited SARS-CoV replication in Caco2 cells at therapeutical concentrations. Hydrocortisone neither influenced SARS-CoV titres alone nor in combination with ribavirin. Our results show that corticosteroids may be of limited benefit in the suppression of chemokine production by SARS-CoV-infected cells. PMID:15647850

  19. Selected CC and CXC chemokines in children with atopic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Machura, Edyta; Mazur, Bogdan; Chrobak, Ewelina; Ziora, Katarzyna; Ziora, Dariusz; Kasperska-Zajac, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are only limited data on CC and CXC chemokines regulation in children with asthma. Aim We compared the serum profile of selected CC and CXC chemokines in patients with atopic asthma and healthy children. Material and methods Serum concentration of CC chemokines RANTES, MCP-1, and CXC chemokines IP-10, MIG, IL-8, RANTES was measured using cytometric bead array in 44 children with atopic asthma and 17 healthy subjects. Results The concentration of RANTES was significantly higher and the MIG level was lower in all children with asthma as compared to their control counterparts. We observed increased RANTES and decreased MIG levels also in patients with stable asthma when compared with children in the control group. The IP-10 concentration was similar between the whole asthma group and healthy controls, while significantly increased levels of this chemokine in acute asthma have been observed when compared to stable asthma. For MCP-1 and IL-8, the serum concentration was similar in all compared groups. The MIG concentration correlated positively with IP-10, IL-8, and CRP levels and negatively with the eosinophil count. A negative correlation between the IP-10 and eosinophil count and a negative correlation between FEV1 and IP-10 were found. Conclusions An increased serum RANTES level in children with asthma may result in enhancement of Th2 lymphocyte recruitment into the airway. A decreased expression of Th1 chemokine MIG in children with stable asthma may contribute to a diminished antagonizing effect on Th2 cytokine production and hence intensify Th2 predominance. An increased IP-10 level in children during an asthma attack suggest that this chemokine is a serological marker of disease exacerbation. PMID:27279817

  20. Chemokine expression is upregulated in chondrocytes in diabetic fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Alblowi, Jazia; Tian, Chen; Siqueira, Michelle F; Kayal, Rayyan A; McKenzie, Erin; Behl, Yugal; Gerstenfeld, Louis; Einhorn, Thomas A; Graves, Dana T

    2013-03-01

    Chemokines are thought to play an important role in several aspects of bone metabolism including the recruitment of leukocytes and the formation of osteoclasts. We investigated the impact of diabetes on chemokine expression in normal and diabetic fracture healing. Fracture of the femur was performed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic and matched normoglycemic control mice. Microarray analysis was carried out and chemokine mRNA levels in vivo were assessed. CCL4 were examined in fracture calluses by immunohistochemistry and the role of TNF in diabetes-enhanced expression was investigated by treatment of animals with the TNF-specific inhibitor, pegsunercept. In vitro studies were conducted with ATDC5 chondrocytes. Diabetes significantly upregulated mRNA levels of several chemokines in vivo including CCL4, CCL8, CCL6, CCL11, CCL20, CCL24, CXCL2, CXCL5 and chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4. Chondrocytes were identified as a significant source of CCL4 and its expression in diabetic fractures was dependent on TNF (P<0.05). TNF-α significantly increased mRNA levels of several chemokines in vitro which were knocked down with FOXO1 siRNA (P<0.05). CCL4 expression at the mRNA and proteins levels was induced by FOXO1 over-expression and reduced by FOXO1 knockdown. The current studies point to the importance of TNF-α as a mechanism for diabetes enhanced chemokine expression by chondrocytes, which may contribute to the accelerated loss of cartilage observed in diabetic fracture healing. Moreover, in vitro results point to FOXO1 as a potentially important transcription factor in mediating this effect. PMID:23262028

  1. Biased and G Protein-Independent Signaling of Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2014-01-01

    Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM-receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor), different receptors (with the same ligand), or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand–receptor pair). Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e., full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of “classic” redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confers a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor-, or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the solution

  2. The chemokine (C-C motif) ligand protein synthesis inhibitor bindarit prevents cytoskeletal rearrangement and contraction of human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Paccosi, Sara; Giachi, Matelda; Di Gennaro, Paola; Guglielmotti, Angelo; Parenti, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    Intraglomerular mesangial cells (MCs) maintain structural and functional integrity of renal glomerular microcirculation and homeostasis of mesangial matrix. Following different types of injury, MCs change their phenotype upregulating the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), changing contractile abilities and increasing the production of matrix proteins, chemokines and cytokines. CCL2 is a chemokine known to be involved in the pathogenesis of renal diseases. Its glomerular upregulation correlates with the extent of renal damage. Bindarit is an indazolic derivative endowed with anti-inflammatory activity when tested in experimental diseases. It selectively inhibits the synthesis of inflammatory C-C chemokines including CCL2, CCL7 and CCL8. This work aims to analyse bindarit effects on ET1-, AngII- and TGFβ-induced mesangial cell dysfunction. Bindarit significantly reduced AngII-, ET1- and TGFβ-induced α-SMA upregulation. In a collagen contraction assay, bindarit reduced AngII-, ET1- and TGFβ-induced HRMC contraction. Within 3-6h stimulation, vinculin organization and phosphorylation was significantly impaired by bindarit in AngII-, ET1- and TGFβ-stimulated cells without any effect on F-actin distribution. Conversely, p38 phosphorylation was not significantly inhibited by bindarit. Our data strengthen the importance of CCL2 on ET-1, AngII- and TGFβ-induced mesangial cell dysfunction, adding new insights into the cellular mechanisms responsible of bindarit protective effects in human MC dysfunction. PMID:27309675

  3. The sweet spot: how GAGs help chemokines guide migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Monneau, Yoan; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-06-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are polysaccharides that occur both at the cell surface and within extracellular matrices. Through their ability to bind to a large array of proteins, almost 500 of which have been identified to date, including most chemokines, these molecules regulate key biologic processes at the cell-tissue interface. To do so, glycosaminoglycans can provide scaffolds to ensure that proteins mediating specific functions will be presented at the correct site and time and can also directly contribute to biologic activities or signaling processes. The binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans, which, at the biochemical level, has been mostly studied using heparin, has traditionally been thought of as a mechanism for maintaining haptotactic gradients within tissues along which cells can migrate directionally. Many aspects of chemokine-glycosaminoglycan interactions, however, also suggest that the formation of these complexes could serve additional purposes that go well beyond a simple immobilization process. In addition, progress in glycobiology has revealed that glycosaminoglycan structures, in term of length, sulfation, and epimerization pattern, are specific for cell, tissue, and developmental stage. Glycosaminoglycan regulation and glycosaminoglycan diversity, which cannot be replicated using heparin, thus suggests that these molecules may fine-tune the immune response by selectively recruiting specific chemokines to cell surfaces. In this context, the aim of the present text is to review the chemokine-glycosaminoglycan complexes described to date and provide a critical analysis of the tools, molecules, and strategies that can be used to structurally and functionally investigate the formation of these complexes. PMID:26701132

  4. The chemokine system in arteriogenesis and hind limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Shireman, Paula K

    2007-06-01

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) are important in the recruitment of leukocytes to injured tissues and, as such, play a pivotal role in arteriogenesis and the tissue response to ischemia. Hind limb ischemia represents a complex model with arteriogenesis (collateral artery formation) occurring in tissues with normal perfusion while areas exhibiting ischemic necrosis undergo angiogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration; monocytes and macrophages play an important role in all three of these processes. In addition to leukocyte trafficking, chemokines are produced by and chemokine receptors are present on diverse cell types, including myoblasts, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Thus, the chemokine system may have direct effects as well as inflammatory-mediated effects on arteriogenesis, angiogenesis, and skeletal muscle regeneration. This article reviews the complexity of the hind limb ischemia model and the role of the chemokine system in arteriogenesis and the tissue response to ischemia. Special emphasis will be placed on the roles of monocytes/macrophages and CCL2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in these processes. PMID:17544024

  5. Chemokines and the Signaling Modules Regulating Integrin Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Montresor, Alessio; Toffali, Lara; Constantin, Gabriela; Laudanna, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesion is a general concept referring to a series of adhesive phenomena including tethering–rolling, affinity, valency, and binding stabilization altogether controlling cell avidity (adhesiveness) for the substrate. Arrest chemokines modulate each aspect of integrin activation, although integrin affinity regulation has been recognized as the prominent event in rapid leukocyte arrest induced by chemokines. A variety of inside-out and outside-in signaling mechanisms have been related to the process of integrin-mediated adhesion in different cellular models, but only few of them have been clearly contextualized to rapid integrin affinity modulation by arrest chemokines in primary leukocytes. Complex signaling processes triggered by arrest chemokines and controlling leukocyte integrin activation have been described for ras-related rap and for rho-related small GTPases. We summarize the role of rap and rho small GTPases in the regulation of rapid integrin affinity in primary leukocytes and provide a modular view of these pro-adhesive signaling events. A potential, albeit still speculative, mechanism of rho-mediated regulation of cytoskeletal proteins controlling the last step of integrin activation is also discussed. We also discuss data suggesting a functional integration between the rho- and rap-modules of integrin activation. Finally we examine the universality of signaling mechanisms regulating integrin triggering by arrest chemokines. PMID:22654882

  6. Chemokines and their receptors in the allergic airway inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Juan Raymundo; Teran, Luis Manuel

    2011-08-01

    The development of the allergic airway disease conveys several cell types, such as T-cells, eosinophils, mast cells, and dendritic cells, which act in a special and temporal synchronization. Cellular mobilization and its complex interactions are coordinated by a broad range of bioactive mediators known as chemokines. These molecules are an increasing family of small proteins with common structural motifs and play an important role in the recruitment and cell activation of both leukocytes and resident cells at the allergic inflammatory site via their receptors. Trafficking and recruitment of cell populations with specific chemokines receptors assure the presence of reactive allergen-specific T-cells in the lung, and therefore the establishment of an allergic inflammatory process. Different approaches directed against chemokines receptors have been developed during the last decades with promising therapeutic results in the treatment of asthma. In this review we explore the role of the chemokines and chemokine receptors in allergy and asthma and discuss their potential as targets for therapy. PMID:20352527

  7. The chemokines CCR1 and CCRL2 have a role in colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Akram, Israa G; Georges, Rania; Hielscher, Thomas; Adwan, Hassan; Berger, Martin R

    2016-02-01

    C-C chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1) and chemokine C-C motif receptor-like 2 (CCRL2) have not yet been sufficiently investigated for their role in colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we investigated their expression in rat and human CRC samples, their modulation of expression in a rat liver metastasis model, as well as the effects on cellular properties resulting from their knockdown. One rat and five human colorectal cancer cell lines were used. CC531 rat colorectal cells were injected via the portal vein into rats and re-isolated from rat livers after defined periods. Following mRNA isolation, the gene expression was investigated by microarray. In addition, all cell lines were screened for mRNA expression of CCR1 and CCRL2 by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cell lines with detectable expression were used for knockdown experiments; and the respective influence was determined on the cells' proliferation, scratch closure, and colony formation. Finally, specimens from the primaries of 50 patients with CRC were monitored by quantitative RT-PCR for CCR1 and CCRL2 expression levels. The microarray studies showed peak increases of CCR1 and CCRL2 in the early phase of liver colonization. Knockdown was sufficient at mRNA but only moderate at protein levels and resulted in modest but significant inhibition of proliferation (p < 0.05), scratch closure, and colony formation (p < 0.05). All human CRC samples were positive for CCR1 and CCRL2 and showed a significant pairwise correlation (p < 0.0004), but there was no correlation with tumor stage or age of patients. In summary, the data point to an important role of CCR1 and CCRL2 under conditions of organ colonization and both chemokine receptors qualify as targets of treatment during early colorectal cancer liver metastasis. PMID:26383527

  8. DISTINCT CONFORMATIONS OF THE CHEMOKINE RECEPTOR CCR4 WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR ITS TARGETING IN ALLERGY

    PubMed Central

    Viney, Jonathan M.; Andrew, David P.; Phillips, Rhian M.; Meiser, Andrea; Patel, Pallavi; Lennartz-Walker, Melissa; Cousins, David J.; Barton, Nicholas P.; Hall, David A.; Pease, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 is expressed by Th2 and Tregs and directs their migration along gradients of the chemokines CCL17 and CCL22. Both chemokines and receptor are upregulated in allergic disease, making CCR4 a therapeutic target for the treatment of allergy. We set out to assess the mechanisms underlying a previous report that CCL22 is a dominant ligand of CCR4, which may have implications for its therapeutic targeting. Human T-cells expressing endogenous CCR4 and transfectants engineered to express CCR4 were assessed for receptor function using assays of calcium release, chemotaxis, receptor endocytosis and ligand binding. Despite the two ligands having equal potency in calcium flux and chemotaxis assays, CCL22 showed dominance in both receptor endocytosis assays and heterologous competitive binding assays. Using two different CCR4-specific antibodies, we showed that CCR4 exists in at least two distinct conformations, which are differentially activated by ligand. A major population is activated by both CCL17 and CCL22, whilst a minor population is activated only by CCL22. Mutation of a single C-terminal residue K310 within a putative CCR4 antagonist binding site, ablated activation of CCR4 by CCL17 but not by CCL22, despite having no effect on the binding of either ligand. We conclude that CCL17 and CCL22 are conformationally selective ligands of CCR4 and interact with the receptor by substantially different mechanisms. This suggests that the selective blockade of CCR4 in allergy may be feasible where one CCR4 ligand dominates, allowing the inhibition of Th2 signalling via one ligand whilst sparing Treg recruitment via another. PMID:24563252

  9. Activation of prostaglandin E2-EP4 signaling reduces chemokine production in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Tang, Eva H C; Cai, Yin; Wong, Chi Kin; Rocha, Viviane Z; Sukhova, Galina K; Shimizu, Koichi; Xuan, Ge; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Libby, Peter; Xu, Aimin

    2015-02-01

    Inflammation of adipose tissue induces metabolic derangements associated with obesity. Thus, determining ways to control or inhibit inflammation in adipose tissue is of clinical interest. The present study tested the hypothesis that in mouse adipose tissue, endogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) negatively regulates inflammation via activation of prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4). PGE2 (5-500 nM) attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced mRNA and protein expression of chemokines, including interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 and macrophage-inflammatory protein-1α in mouse adipose tissue. A selective EP4 antagonist (L161,982) reversed, and two structurally different selective EP4 agonists [CAY10580 and CAY10598] mimicked these actions of PGE2. Adipose tissue derived from EP4-deficient mice did not display this response. These findings establish the involvement of EP4 receptors in this anti-inflammatory response. Experiments performed on adipose tissue from high-fat-fed mice demonstrated EP4-dependent attenuation of chemokine production during diet-induced obesity. The anti-inflammatory actions of EP4 became more important on a high-fat diet, in that EP4 activation suppressed a greater variety of chemokines. Furthermore, adipose tissue and systemic inflammation was enhanced in high-fat-fed EP4-deficient mice compared with wild-type littermates, and in high-fat-fed untreated C57BL/6 mice compared with mice treated with EP4 agonist. These findings provide in vivo evidence that PGE2-EP4 signaling limits inflammation. In conclusion, PGE2, via activation of EP4 receptors, functions as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator in mouse adipose tissue, and targeting EP4 may mitigate adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:25510249

  10. Antimycotics suppress the Malassezia extract-induced production of CXC chemokine ligand 10 in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hau, Carren S; Kanda, Naoko; Makimura, Koichi; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2014-02-01

    Malassezia, a lipophilic yeast, exacerbates atopic dermatitis. Malassezia products can penetrate the disintegrated stratum corneum and encounter subcorneal keratinocytes in the skin of atopic dermatitis patients. Type 1 helper T (Th1) cells infiltrate chronic lesions with atopic dermatitis, and antimycotic agents improve its symptoms. We aimed to identify Malassezia-induced chemokines in keratinocytes and examine whether antimycotics suppressed this induction. Normal human keratinocytes were incubated with a Malassezia restricta extract and antimycotics. Chemokine expression was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1 activity was examined by luciferase assays. The tyrosine-phosphorylation of STAT1 was analyzed by western blotting. The M. restricta extract increased the mRNA and protein expression of Th1-attracting CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)10 and STAT1 activity and phosphorylation in keratinocytes, which was suppressed by a Janus kinase inhibitor. The antimycotics itraconazole, ketoconazole, luliconazole, terbinafine, butenafine and amorolfine suppressed M. restricta extract-induced CXCL10 mRNA and protein expression and STAT1 activity and phosphorylation. These effects were similarly induced by 15-deoxy-Δ-(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 ), a prostaglandin D2 metabolite. Antimycotics increased the release of 15d-PGJ2 from keratinocytes. The antimycotic-induced suppression of CXCL10 production and STAT1 activity was counteracted by a lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase inhibitor. The antimycotics itraconazole, ketoconazole, luliconazole, terbinafine, butenafine and amorolfine may suppress the M. restricta-induced production of CXCL10 by inhibiting STAT1 through an increase in 15d-PGJ2 production in keratinocytes. These antimycotics may block the Th1-mediated inflammation triggered by Malassezia in the chronic phase of atopic dermatitis. PMID

  11. Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells Modulate Chemokine Expression and Hyaluronan Synthesis in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Inga; Freudenberger, Till; Twarock, Sören; Yamaguchi, Yu; Grandoch, Maria; Fischer, Jens W

    2016-02-19

    The aim of this study was to characterize the interaction of KYSE-410, an esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line, and fibroblasts with respect to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan (HA) and chemokine expression. KYSE-410 cells induced the mRNA expression of HA synthase 2 (Has2) in normal skin fibroblasts (SF) only in direct co-cultures. Parallel to Has2 mRNA, Has2 antisense RNA (Has2os2) was up-regulated in co-cultures. Knockdown of LEF1, a downstream target of Wnt signaling, abrogated Has2 and Has2os2 induction. After knockdown of Has2 in SF, significantly less α-smooth muscle actin expression was detected in co-cultures. Moreover, it was investigated whether the phenotype of KYSE-410 was affected in co-culture with SF and whether Has2 knockdown in SF had an impact on KYSE-410 cells in co-culture. However, no effects on epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers, proliferation, and migration were detected. In addition to Has2 mRNA, the chemokine CCL5 was up-regulated and CCL11 was down-regulated in SF in co-culture. Furthermore, co-cultures of KYSE-410 cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) were investigated. Similar to SF, Has2 and Ccl5 were up-regulated and Ccl11 was down-regulated in CAF in co-culture. Importantly and in contrast to SF, inhibiting HA synthesis by 4-methylumbelliferone abrogated the effect of co-culture on Ccl5 in CAF. Moreover, HA was found to promote adhesion of CD4(+) but not CD8(+) cells to xenogaft tumor tissues. In conclusion, direct co-culture of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and fibroblasts induced stromal HA synthesis via Wnt/LEF1 and altered the chemokine profile of stromal fibroblasts, which in turn may affect the tumor immune response. PMID:26699196

  12. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Pannetier, Delphine; Reynard, Stéphanie; Russier, Marion; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC) release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV) harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP), induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome. PMID:24421914

  13. Production of CXC and CC Chemokines by Human Antigen-Presenting Cells in Response to Lassa Virus or Closely Related Immunogenic Viruses, and in Cynomolgus Monkeys with Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC) release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV) harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP), induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome. PMID:24421914

  14. Chemokines as Potential Markers in Pediatric Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Pereira, André Barreto; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular diseases and obstructive uropathies are the two most frequent causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric renal diseases. Among several putative biomarkers, chemokines emerge as promising molecules since they play relevant roles in the pathophysiology of pediatric renal diseases. The evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help in the management of diverse renal diseases in children and the detection of patients at high risk to develop CKD. The aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of chemokines and the potential link between chemokines and the most common pediatric renal diseases by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24692841

  15. Structural basis of the herpesvirus M3-chemokine interaction.

    PubMed

    Alcami, Antonio

    2003-05-01

    Viruses have been fighting the immune systems of their hosts for millions of years and have evolved evasion strategies to ensure their survival. Viruses can teach us efficient mechanisms to control the immune system, and this information can be used to design new strategies of immune modulation that we might apply to diminish immunopathological responses that cause human diseases. Large DNA viruses, such as poxviruses and herpesviruses, encode proteins that are secreted from infected cells, bind cytokines and neutralize their activity. A subgroup of these viral proteins binds chemokines, a complex family of cytokines that control the recruitment of cells to sites of infection and inflammation. One of the major unresolved questions in the field was to understand how these viral secreted proteins bind chemokines with high affinity, despite having no amino acid sequence similarity to the host chemokine receptors, which are seven-transmembrane-domain proteins that cannot be engineered as soluble proteins. PMID:12781515

  16. Chemokines as markers for parasite-induced inflammation and tumors.

    PubMed

    Trakatelli, C; Frydas, S; Hatzistilianou, M; Papadopoulos, E; Simeonidou, I; Founta, A; Paludi, D; Petrarca, C; Castellani, M L; Papaioannou, N; Salini, V; Conti, P; Kempuraj, D; Vecchiet, J

    2005-01-01

    Chemokines are a group of small secreted proteins (8-10 kDa) produced and released by a wide variety of cell types. They were originally described as mediators of leukocyte recruitment, which is essential in acute and chronic inflammation. They also play a critical role in many pathophysiological processes such as allergic responses, infections and autoimmune diseases, tumor growth and hematopoietic development. This review introduces the three supergene families of chemokines (CXC, CC and C) with emphasis on their important role in different states in humans and in animal models with parasitic diseases. The concentration of transcription and translation of the cytokines and chemokines in the parasitic diseases may be an important marker for evaluation of the inflammatory state. PMID:16398400

  17. RelB regulation of chemokine expression modulates local inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Y.; Pauza, M. E.; Feng, L.; Lo, D.

    1997-01-01

    The resolution of acute inflammation is incompletely understood but presumably requires the elimination of both inflammatory cells and production of inflammatory cytokines. In the case of recruited bone-marrow-derived inflammatory cells such as granulocytes and macrophages, their short life span helps eliminate these cells and the cytokines they produce. By contrast, resident permanent cells such as fibroblasts require other mechanisms to stop the production of chemokines generated in response to inflammatory triggers such as lipopolysaccharide. Here we demonstrate that RelB is an important regulator of chemokine expression in fibroblasts, thereby playing a key role in the resolution of acute inflammation. Activation of normal fibroblasts by lipopolysaccharide induced a transient production of chemokines, closely followed by induction of RelB expression. However, stimulated RelB-/- fibroblasts exhibited dramatic persistent induction of seven chemokines (RANTES, MIP-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, MIP-2, IP-10, JE/MCP-1, and KC/CINC). The persistent overexpression of chemokines correlated with increased NF- kappa B binding as well as with increased p50, p65/RelA, and I kappa B alpha expression. Transfection of RelB cDNA into RelB-deficient fibroblasts reversed the lipopolysaccharide-induced chemokine overexpression. In vivo, activated RelB-/- fibroblasts dramatically increased recruitment of granulocytes into tissues. In view of the apparent role of RelB in the resolution of acute inflammation in tissues and previous work showing a requirement for RelB in the initiation of immune responses through the differentiation of antigen-presenting cells, RelB may be an important factor regulating the transition from innate to adaptive immunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9250151

  18. A meta-analysis of chemokines in major depression.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Harris A; Air, Tracy; Pradhan, Alyssa; Johnston, James; Lavretsky, Helen; Stuart, Michael J; Baune, Bernhard T

    2016-07-01

    Chemokines are increasingly recognised as playing a role in depression. Here we meta-analyse the data on concentrations of all chemokines in patients diagnosed with a major depression versus healthy controls. We included studies which utilised Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-IV diagnostic criteria for major depression, participants free from major medical conditions, studies with healthy controls, and unstimulated measurements of chemokines. We only included chemokines which had ≥3 studies performed. Two chemokines and 15 studies in total met criteria for this meta-analysis; 8 for Monocyte Chemotactic Protein (MCP)-1/CCL2 (n=747), and 7 for Interleukin (IL)-8/CXCL8 (n=560). There were significantly higher concentrations of CCL2/MCP-1 in depressed subjects compared with control subjects - overall mean difference of 36.43pg/mL (95% CI: 2.43 to 70.42). There was significant heterogeneity across these studies (I2=98.5%). The estimates of mean difference between the control and depression groups did not remain significant when the trim-and-fill procedure was used to correct for publication bias. There was no significant difference in concentrations of IL-8/CXCL8 in depressed subjects compared with control subjects. Significant heterogeneity was found across these studies (I2=96.7%). The estimates of mean difference between the control and depression groups remained non-significant when the trim-and-fill procedure was used to correct for publication bias. This meta-analysis reports significantly heterogeneity in this field among studies. There are higher concentrations of the chemokine MCP-1/CCL2 in depressed subjects compared with control subjects, and no differences for IL-8/CXCL8. More high quality research and consistent methodologies are needed in this important area of enquiry. PMID:26903140

  19. Chemokine antagonism in chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Charles, Edgar D; Dustin, Lynn B

    2011-01-01

    Immune responses to hepatitis C virus (HCV) fail to clear the virus in most individuals. Why patients who are less likely to clear HCV infection have high plasma levels of CXCL10 (also known as IP-10), a chemokine that directs T cells to sites of infection, has long been unclear. In this issue of the JCI, Casrouge and colleagues shed light on this paradox by showing that CXCL10 in the plasma of many HCV patients is enzymatically processed to produce a CXCL10 receptor antagonist. These findings introduce a role for chemokine antagonism during HCV infection and unveil new avenues for improved HCV diagnosis and therapy. PMID:21183783

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei; Clouse, Kathleen A.; Wahl, Larry M.; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM.

  1. Endothelial Cells Enhance Tumor Cell Invasion through a Crosstalk Mediated by CXC Chemokine Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Kristy A; Miyazawa, Marta; Cordeiro, Mabel M R; Love, William J; Pinsky, Matthew S; Neiva, Kathleen G; Spalding, Aaron C; Nör, Jacques E

    2008-01-01

    Field cancerization involves the lateral spread of premalignant or malignant disease and contributes to the recurrence of head and neck tumors. The overall hypothesis underlying this work is that endothelial cells actively participate in tumor cell invasion by secreting chemokines and creating a chemotactic gradient for tumor cells. Here we demonstrate that conditioned medium from head and neck tumor cells enhance Bcl-2 expression in neovascular endothelial cells. Oral squamous cell carcinoma-3 (OSCC3) and Kaposi's sarcoma (SLK) show enhanced invasiveness when cocultured with pools of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells stably expressing Bcl-2 (HDMEC-Bcl-2), compared to cocultures with empty vector controls (HDMEC-LXSN). Xenografted OSCC3 tumors vascularized with HDMEC-Bcl-2 presented higher local invasion than OSCC3 tumors vascularized with control HDMEC-LXSN. CXCL1 and CXCL8 were upregulated in primary endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as in HDMEC-Bcl-2. Notably, blockade of CXCR2 signaling, but not CXCR1, inhibited OSCC3 and SLK invasion toward endothelial cells. These data demonstrate that CXC chemokines secreted by endothelial cells induce tumor cell invasion and suggest that the process of lateral spread of tumor cells observed in field cancerization is guided by chemotactic signals that originated from endothelial cells. PMID:18283335

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonists modulate Th1 and Th2 chemokine secretion in normal thyrocytes and Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Frascerra, Silvia; Corrado, Alda; Pupilli, Cinzia; Bernini, Giampaolo; Benvenga, Salvatore; Ferrannini, Ele; Fallahi, Poupak

    2011-07-01

    Until now, no data are present about the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} activation on the prototype Th1 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10] (CXCL10) and Th2 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2] (CCL2) chemokines secretion in thyroid cells. The role of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} activation on CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion was tested in Graves' disease (GD) and control primary thyrocytes stimulated with interferon (IFN){gamma} and tumor necrosis factor (TNF){alpha}. IFN{gamma} stimulated both CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion in primary GD and control thyrocytes. TNF{alpha} alone stimulated CCL2 secretion, while had no effect on CXCL10. The combination of IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} had a synergistic effect both on CXCL10 and CCL2 chemokines in GD thyrocytes at levels comparable to those of controls. PPAR{alpha} activators inhibited the secretion of both chemokines (stimulated with IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha}) at a level higher (for CXCL10, about 60-72%) than PPAR{gamma} agonists (about 25-35%), which were confirmed to inhibit CXCL10, but not CCL2. Our data show that CCL2 is modulated by IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} in GD and normal thyrocytes. Furthermore we first show that PPAR{alpha} activators inhibit the secretion of CXCL10 and CCL2 in thyrocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} may be involved in the modulation of the immune response in the thyroid.

  3. Coy decoy with a new ploy: interceptor controls the levels of homeostatic chemokines.

    PubMed

    Haraldsen, Guttorm; Rot, Antal

    2006-07-01

    A new subfamily of chemokine receptors is emerging that do not signal along classical G-protein-mediated pathways. Instead, these "silent" receptors efficiently internalize their cognate chemokine ligands, hence their suggested name, "chemokine interceptors", for internalizing receptors. Two of these interceptors, DARC and D6, possess intriguing patterns of tissue expression and are believed to be involved in controlling the local levels of proinflammatory chemokines. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, the biochemical properties of a third silent chemokine receptor, CCX-CKR, have been characterized and it is suggested that it may act as a scavenger for homeostatic chemokines, pointing to a broad and significant role for this group of chemokine binding molecules in chemokine biology. PMID:16791884

  4. The emerging role of CXC chemokines and their receptors in cancer.

    PubMed

    Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2012-05-01

    Chemokines and their receptors have a multifaceted role in tumor biology and are implicated in nearly all aspects of cancer growth, survival and dissemination. Modulation of the interaction between chemokines and their cell surface receptor is, therefore, a promising area for the development of new cancer medicines. In this review, we look at the compelling evidence that is emerging to support targeting CXC chemokines, also known as family α chemokines, as novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22571611

  5. Chemokine interaction with synergy-inducing molecules: fine tuning modulation of cell trafficking.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, Valentina; D'Agostino, Gianluca; Raeli, Lorenzo; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia

    2016-06-01

    Directed migration and arrest of leukocytes during homeostasis, inflammation, and tumor development is mediated by the chemokine system, which governs leukocyte migration and activities. Although we understand well the effects of different chemokines one by one, much less was known about the potential consequences of the concomitant expression of multiple chemokines or of their interaction with inflammatory molecules on leukocyte migration and functions. In the past 10 yr, several studies revealed the existence of additional features of chemokines: they can antagonize chemokine receptors or synergize with other chemokines, also by forming heterocomplexes. Moreover, recent data show that not only chemokines but also the alarmin high-mobility group box 1 can for a complex with CXCL12, enhancing its potency on CXCR4. The molecular mechanism underlying the effect of the heterocomplex has been partially elucidated, whereas its structure is a matter of current investigations. The present review discusses the current knowledge and relevance of the functions of heterocomplexes formed between chemokines or between the chemokine CXCL12 and the alarmin high-mobility group box 1. These studies highlight the importance of taking into account, when approaching innovative therapies targeting the chemokine system, also the fact that some chemokines and molecules released in inflammation, can considerably affect the activity of chemokine receptor agonists. PMID:26715684

  6. Zebrafish as a model to study chemokine function.

    PubMed

    Kochhan, Eva; Siekmann, Arndt F

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish have emerged as a powerful model organism to study embryo morphogenesis. Due to their optical clarity, they are uniquely suited for time-lapse imaging studies, providing insights into the dynamic processes underlying tissue formation and cell migration. These studies have been tremendously facilitated by the availability of transgenic zebrafish lines, labelling distinct embryonic structures, individual cells, or even subcellular structures, such as the nucleus. Zebrafish studies have revealed that the migration of several different cell types in the embryo is controlled by chemokines, small vertebrate-specific proteins. Here, we report methods to analyze the expression pattern of a given chemokine and its receptor in transgenic zebrafish using fluorescent in situ hybridization in combination with an anti-green fluorescent protein (GFP) antibody staining. We furthermore illustrate how to image migrating cell populations using time-lapse microscopy in double-transgenic embryos. We show how to investigate cell number and direction of migration by using a nuclear-localized GFP. The combination of this transgene with a membrane-targeted red fluorescent protein allows for the simultaneous determination of changes in cell shape, such as the formation of filopodial extensions. We exemplify this by describing how a mutation in the chemokine receptor cxcr4a affects endothelial cell migration and blood vessel formation. Finally, we provide a method to perform fluorescent angiography to monitor blood vessel perfusion in chemokine receptor mutants. PMID:23625497

  7. Characterization of the "CCR5" Chemokine Receptor Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of retroviruses is an essential topic of modern cell biology instruction. Furthermore, the process of HIV viral entry into the cell is a question of great interest in basic and clinical biology. This paper describes how students can easily recover their own DNA, amplify a portion of the "CCR5" chemokine receptor gene, characterize…

  8. CXCL9 Contributes to Antimicrobial Protection of the Gut during Citrobacter rodentium Infection Independent of Chemokine-Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Reid-Yu, Sarah A.; Tuinema, Brian R.; Small, Cherrie N.; Xing, Lydia; Coombes, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines have been shown to be effective bactericidal molecules against a variety of bacteria and fungi in vitro. These direct antimicrobial effects are independent of their chemotactic activities involving immunological receptors. However, the direct biological role that these proteins may play in host defense, particularly against intestinal pathogens, is poorly understood. Here, we show that CXCL9, an ELR- chemokine, exhibits direct antimicrobial activity against Citrobacter rodentium, an attaching/effacing pathogen that infects the gut mucosa. Inhibition of this antimicrobial activity in vivo using anti-CXCL9 antibodies increases host susceptibility to C. rodentium infection with pronounced bacterial penetration into crypts, increased bacterial load, and worsened tissue pathology. Using Rag1-/- mice and CXCR3-/- mice, we demonstrate that the role for CXCL9 in protecting the gut mucosa is independent of an adaptive response or its immunological receptor, CXCR3. Finally, we provide evidence that phagocytes function in tandem with NK cells for robust CXCL9 responses to C. rodentium. These findings identify a novel role for the immune cell-derived CXCL9 chemokine in directing a protective antimicrobial response in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:25643352

  9. CCL2-induced chemokine cascade promotes breast cancer metastasis by enhancing retention of metastasis-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takanori; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Soong, Daniel; Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Sugano, Gaël; Kato, Yu; Li, Jiufeng; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2015-06-29

    Pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer cells is promoted by a distinct population of macrophages, metastasis-associated macrophages (MAMs), which originate from inflammatory monocytes (IMs) recruited by the CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). We demonstrate here that, through activation of the CCL2 receptor CCR2, the recruited MAMs secrete another chemokine ligand CCL3. Genetic deletion of CCL3 or its receptor CCR1 in macrophages reduces the number of lung metastasis foci, as well as the number of MAMs accumulated in tumor-challenged lung in mice. Adoptive transfer of WT IMs increases the reduced number of lung metastasis foci in Ccl3 deficient mice. Mechanistically, Ccr1 deficiency prevents MAM retention in the lung by reducing MAM-cancer cell interactions. These findings collectively indicate that the CCL2-triggered chemokine cascade in macrophages promotes metastatic seeding of breast cancer cells thereby amplifying the pathology already extant in the system. These data suggest that inhibition of CCR1, the distal part of this signaling relay, may have a therapeutic impact in metastatic disease with lower toxicity than blocking upstream targets. PMID:26056232

  10. CCL2-induced chemokine cascade promotes breast cancer metastasis by enhancing retention of metastasis-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takanori; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Soong, Daniel; Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Sugano, Gaël; Kato, Yu; Li, Jiufeng

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer cells is promoted by a distinct population of macrophages, metastasis-associated macrophages (MAMs), which originate from inflammatory monocytes (IMs) recruited by the CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). We demonstrate here that, through activation of the CCL2 receptor CCR2, the recruited MAMs secrete another chemokine ligand CCL3. Genetic deletion of CCL3 or its receptor CCR1 in macrophages reduces the number of lung metastasis foci, as well as the number of MAMs accumulated in tumor-challenged lung in mice. Adoptive transfer of WT IMs increases the reduced number of lung metastasis foci in Ccl3 deficient mice. Mechanistically, Ccr1 deficiency prevents MAM retention in the lung by reducing MAM–cancer cell interactions. These findings collectively indicate that the CCL2-triggered chemokine cascade in macrophages promotes metastatic seeding of breast cancer cells thereby amplifying the pathology already extant in the system. These data suggest that inhibition of CCR1, the distal part of this signaling relay, may have a therapeutic impact in metastatic disease with lower toxicity than blocking upstream targets. PMID:26056232

  11. Functions of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 in the Central Nervous System and Its Regulation by μ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Bradley; Meucci, Olimpia

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 by its chemokine ligand CXCL12 regulates a number of physiopathological functions in the central nervous system, during development as well as later in life. In addition to the more classical roles of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the recruitment of immune cells or migration and proliferation of neural precursor cells, recent studies suggest that CXCR4 signaling also modulates synaptic function and neuronal survival in the mature brain, through direct and indirect effects on neurons and glia. These effects, which include regulation of glutamate receptors and uptake, and of dendritic spine density, can significantly alter the ability of neurons to face excitotoxic insults. Therefore, they are particularly relevant to neurodegenerative diseases featuring alterations of glutamate neurotransmission, such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Importantly, CXCR4 signaling can be dysregulated by HIV viral proteins, host HIV-induced factors, and opioids. Potential mechanisms of opioid regulation of CXCR4 include heterologous desensitization, transcriptional regulation and changes in receptor expression levels, opioid–chemokine receptor dimer or heteromer formation, and the newly described modulation by the protein ferritin heavy chain—all leading to inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. After reviewing major effects of chemokines and opioids in the CNS, this chapter discusses chemokine–opioid interactions in neuronal and immune cells, focusing on their potential contribution to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:25175863

  12. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Tun-Pin; Sheen, Jer-Ming; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Bi, Kuo-Wei; Huang, Chao-Chun; Wu, Hsiao-Ting; Huang, Sheng-Teng

    2016-01-01

    Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, including VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, at both the mRNA and protein levels, were significantly suppressed by naringin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, the TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein levels of chemokines, including fractalkine/CX3CL1, MCP-1 and RANTES, were also reduced by naringin. Naringin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which resulted from the inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IκB-α and NF-κB. Altogether, we proposed that naringin modulated TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules and chemokines through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced activation of IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway to exert the anti-atherosclerotic effect. PMID:26861272

  13. Diagnostic value of cytokines and chemokines in lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Cerar, T; Ogrinc, K; Lotric-Furlan, S; Kobal, J; Levicnik-Stezinar, S; Strle, F; Ruzić-Sabljic, E

    2013-10-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the concentrations of different cytokines and chemokines in blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis and to identify the possible marker(s) that would enable a distinction between clinically evident and suspected Lyme neuroborreliosis, as well as between Lyme neuroborreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE). Our additional interest was to evaluate the relationship between cytokine and chemokine concentrations and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato isolation from CSF, as well as intrathecal synthesis of specific borrelial antibodies. We found that higher concentrations of CXCL13 and lower concentrations of interleukin 10 (IL-10) in serum were associated with higher odds for clinically evident Lyme neuroborreliosis compared to suspected Lyme neuroborreliosis, as well as to TBE. The concentrations of IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, and CXCL13 in the CSF were higher in patients with evident Lyme neuroborreliosis than in those who were only suspected to have the disease. A comparison of CSF cytokine and chemokine levels in patients with and without intrathecal synthesis of specific borrelial antibodies revealed that CXCL13 CSF concentration is significantly associated with intrathecal synthesis of borrelial antibodies. A comparison of the cytokine and chemokine CSF concentrations in patients with clinically evident Lyme neuroborreliosis according to CSF culture results revealed that higher concentrations of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) were associated with lower odds of Borrelia isolation. Although several differences in the blood serum and CSF concentrations of various cytokines and chemokines between the groups were found, the distinctive power of the majority of these findings is low. Further research on well-defined groups of patients is needed to appraise the potential diagnostic usefulness of these concentrations. PMID:23945160

  14. Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines Regulates Post-Fracture Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rundle, Charles H.; Mohan, Subburaman; Edderkaoui, Bouchra

    2013-01-01

    There is now considerable experimental data to suggest that inflammatory cells collaborate in the healing of skeletal fractures. In terms of mechanisms that contribute to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the fracture site, chemokines and their receptors have received considerable attention. Our previous findings have shown that Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (Darc), the non-classical chemokine receptor that does not signal, but rather acts as a scavenger of chemokines that regulate cell migration, is a negative regulator of peak bone density in mice. Furthermore, because Darc is expressed by inflammatory and endothelial cells, we hypothesized that disruption of Darc action will affect post-fracture inflammation and consequently will affect fracture healing. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated fracture healing in mice with targeted disruption of Darc and corresponding wild type (WT) control mice. We found that fracture callus cartilage formation was significantly greater (33%) at 7 days post-surgery in Darc-KO compared to WT mice. The increased cartilage was associated with greater Collagen (Col) II expression at 3 days post-fracture and Col-X at 7 days post-fracture compared to WT mice, suggesting that Darc deficiency led to early fracture cartilage formation and differentiation. We then compared the expression of cytokine and chemokine genes known to be induced during inflammation. Interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 were all down regulated in the fractures derived from Darc-KO mice at one day post-fracture, consistent with an altered inflammatory response. Furthermore, the number of macrophages was significantly reduced around the fractures in Darc-KO compared to WT mice. Based on these data, we concluded that Darc plays a role in modulating the early inflammatory response to bone fracture and subsequent cartilage formation. However, the early cartilage formation was not translated with an early bone formation at the

  15. Dual targeting of the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and ACKR3 with novel engineered chemokines.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Melinda S; Salanga, Catherina L; Chowdry, Arnab B; Comerford, Iain; McColl, Shaun R; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M

    2015-09-11

    The chemokine CXCL12 and its G protein-coupled receptors CXCR4 and ACKR3 are implicated in cancer and inflammatory and autoimmune disorders and are targets of numerous antagonist discovery efforts. Here, we describe a series of novel, high affinity CXCL12-based modulators of CXCR4 and ACKR3 generated by selection of N-terminal CXCL12 phage libraries on live cells expressing the receptors. Twelve of 13 characterized CXCL12 variants are full CXCR4 antagonists, and four have Kd values <5 nm. The new variants also showed high affinity for ACKR3. The variant with the highest affinity for CXCR4, LGGG-CXCL12, showed efficacy in a murine model for multiple sclerosis, demonstrating translational potential. Molecular modeling was used to elucidate the structural basis of binding and antagonism of selected variants and to guide future designs. Together, this work represents an important step toward the development of therapeutics targeting CXCR4 and ACKR3. PMID:26216880

  16. The Chemokine Receptor CCR1 Is Constitutively Active, Which Leads to G Protein-independent, β-Arrestin-mediated Internalization*

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, C. Taylor; Salanga, Catherina L.; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Trejo, JoAnn; Handel, Tracy M.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by their associated ligands has been extensively studied, and increasing structural information about the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand-dependent receptor activation is beginning to emerge with the recent expansion in GPCR crystal structures. However, some GPCRs are also able to adopt active conformations in the absence of agonist binding that result in the initiation of signal transduction and receptor down-modulation. In this report, we show that the CC-type chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) exhibits significant constitutive activity leading to a variety of cellular responses. CCR1 expression is sufficient to induce inhibition of cAMP formation, increased F-actin content, and basal migration of human and murine leukocytes. The constitutive activity leads to basal phosphorylation of the receptor, recruitment of β-arrestin-2, and subsequent receptor internalization. CCR1 concurrently engages Gαi and β-arrestin-2 in a multiprotein complex, which may be accommodated by homo-oligomerization or receptor clustering. The data suggest the presence of two functional states for CCR1; whereas receptor coupled to Gαi functions as a canonical GPCR, albeit with high constitutive activity, the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex is required for G protein-independent constitutive receptor internalization. The pertussis toxin-insensitive uptake of chemokine by the receptor suggests that the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex may be related to a potential scavenging function of the receptor, which may be important for maintenance of chemokine gradients and receptor responsiveness in complex fields of chemokines during inflammation. PMID:24056371

  17. Chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1α, suppress amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Milatovic, Snjezana-Zaja; Milatovic, Dejan; Splittgerber, Ryan; Fan, Guo-Huang; Richmond, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and accumulation of neurotoxic oligomeric peptides amyloid-β (Aβ). Although the molecular events are not entirely known, it has become evident that inflammation, environmental and other risk factors may play a causal, disruptive and/or protective role in the development of AD. The present study investigated the ability of the chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), the respective ligands for chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, to suppress Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with MIP-2 or SDF-1α significantly protected neurons from Aβ-induced dendritic regression and apoptosis in vitro through activation of Akt, ERK1/2 and maintenance of metalloproteinase ADAM17 especially with SDF-1α. Intra-cerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ led to reduction in dendritic length and spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and increased oxidative damage 24 h following the exposure. The Aβ-induced morphometric changes of neurons and increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F2-isoprostanes, was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with the chemokines MIP-2 or SDF-1α. Additionally, MIP-2 or SDF-1α was able to suppress the aberrant mislocalization of p21-activated kinase (PAK), one of the proteins involved in the maintenance of dendritic spines. Furthermore, MIP-2 also protected neurons against Aβ neurotoxicity in CXCR2−/− mice, potentially through observed up regulation of CXCR1 mRNA. Understanding the neuroprotective potential of chemokines is crucial in defining the role for their employment during the early stages of neurodegeneration. PMID:21704645

  18. Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chun-Min; Chen, Long; Hu, Heng; Ma, Hui-Ying; Gao, Ling-Ling; Qin, Jie; Zhong, Cui-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine system consists of four different subclasses with over 50 chemokines and 19 receptors. Their functions in the immune system have been well elucidated and research during the last decades unveils their new roles in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The chemokines and their receptors in the microenvironment influence the development of HCC by several aspects including: inflammation, effects on immune cells, angiogenesis, and direct effects on HCC cells. Regarding these aspects, pre-clinical research by targeting the chemokine system has yielded promising data, and these findings bring us new clues in the chemokine-based therapies for HCC. PMID:26052384

  19. Ingramon, a Peptide Inhibitor of MCP-1 Chemokine, Reduces Migration of Blood Monocytes Stimulated by Glioma-Conditioned Medium.

    PubMed

    Krasnikova, T L; Arefieva, T I; Pylaeva, E A; Sidorova, M V

    2016-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are most common and fatal primary brain tumors. In addition to neoplastic cells, the tumor tissue contains microglial cells and monocyte-derived macrophages. It is an established fact that monocyte recruiting promotes the tumor growth and dissemination. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is the major attractant for monocytes. We have previously synthesized an MCP-1 antagonist ingramon, a synthetic peptide fragment (65-76) of this chemokine. In the present study, we demonstrated that glioma-conditioned medium contains MCP-1 and stimulates migration of blood monocytes. Ingramon inhibited the effect of glioma-conditioned medium on monocyte migration. PMID:26906197

  20. The chemokine system -- a major regulator of angiogenesis in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Schwartz, Thue W

    2004-01-01

    The chemokine system controls leukocyte trafficking during homeostasis as well as during inflammation and is necessary for the linkage between innate and adaptive immunity. Tissue regulation outside the hematopoietic compartment, for instance, angiogenesis, organogenesis and tumor development, growth and metastasis, is another important function of the chemokine system. The chemokine-mediated regulation of angiogenesis is highly sophisticated and fine tuned, and involves pro-angiogenic chemokines, for instance, CXCL8/IL8 interacting with the CXCR2 receptor, and anti-angiogenic (i.e. angiostatic) chemokines, for instance, CXCL10/IP10 interacting with the CXCR3 receptor. Chemokines also regulate angiogenesis in a receptor-independent manner by means of a perturbation of bFGF and VEGF function. The current review focuses on the influence of the chemokine system in angiogenesis. Examples of the delicate angiogenesis regulation by the chemokine system in, for instance, wound healing and of the dysregulation in, for instance, tumor development are provided along with the interesting phenomenon of molecular piracy of host-encoded genes within the chemokine system. This phenomenon is a general strategy to circumvent and exploit the immune system -- and thereby improve survival -- for many viruses. Yet, a certain group of herpesviruses -- the gamma2-herpesviruses -- encode a functional CXCR2 receptor homolog that is activated by angiogenic chemokines and antagonized by angiostatic chemokines, and this particular gene seems to cause the development of a vascular tumor -- Kaposi's sarcoma -- in the host. PMID:15563311

  1. The fine balance of chemokines during disease: trafficking, inflammation and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Sandra M.; Garcia, Jenny A.; Cardona, Astrid E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The action of chemokines (or ‘chemotactic cytokines’) is recognized as an integral part of inflammatory and regulatory processes. Leukocyte mobilization during physiological conditions, trafficking of various cell types during pathological conditions, cell activation and angiogenesis are among the target functions exerted by chemokines upon signaling via their specific receptors. Current research is focused in analyzing changes in chemokine/chemokine receptor patterns during various diseases with the aim to modulate pathological trafficking of cells, or to attract particular cell types to specific tissues. This review focuses on defining the role(s) of certain chemokine ligands and receptors in inflammatory neurological conditions such as multiple sclerosis. In addition, the role(s) of chemokines in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are also described, as well as the contribution of chemokines to the pathogenesis of cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23625489

  2. Chemokines derived from soluble fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are biologically active

    SciTech Connect

    Magistrelli, Giovanni; Gueneau, Franck; Muslmani, Machadiya; Ravn, Ulla; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas . E-mail: nfischer@novimmune.com

    2005-08-26

    Chemokines are a class of low molecular weight proteins that are involved in leukocytes trafficking. Due to their involvement in recruiting immune cells to sites of inflammation, chemokines, and chemokine receptors have become an attractive class of therapeutic targets. However, when expressed in Escherichia coli chemokines are poorly soluble and accumulate in inclusion bodies. Several purification methods have been described but involve time-consuming refolding, buffer exchange, and purification steps that complicate expression of these proteins. Here, we describe a simple and reliable method to express chemokines as fusions to the protein NusA. The fusion proteins were largely found in the soluble fraction and could be readily purified in a single step. Proteolytic cleavage was used to obtain soluble recombinant chemokines that were found to be very active in a novel in vitro chemotaxis assays. This method could be applied to several {alpha} and {beta} human chemokines, suggesting that it is generally applicable to this class of proteins.

  3. IL-1β produced by aggressive breast cancer cells is one of the factors that dictate their interactions with mesenchymal stem cells through chemokine production

    PubMed Central

    Serret, Julien; Bièche, Ivan; Brigitte, Madly; Caicedo, Andres; Sanchez, Elodie; Vacher, Sophie; Vignais, Marie-Luce; Bourin, Philippe; Geneviève, David; Molina, Franck; Jorgensen, Christian; Lazennec, Gwendal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to understand whether the nature of breast cancer cells could modify the nature of the dialog of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with cancer cells. By treating MSCs with the conditioned medium of metastatic Estrogen-receptor (ER)-negative MDA-MB-231, or non-metastatic ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we observed that a number of chemokines were produced at higher levels by MSCs treated with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium (CM). MDA-MB-231 cells were able to induce NF-κB signaling in MSC cells. This was shown by the use of a NF-kB chemical inhibitor or an IκB dominant negative mutant, nuclear translocation of p65 and induction of NF-κB signature. Our results suggest that MDA-MB-231 cells exert their effects on MSCs through the secretion of IL-1β, that activates MSCs and induces the same chemokines as the MDA-MB-231CM. In addition, inhibition of IL-1β secretion in the MDA-MB-231 cells reduces the induced production of a panel of chemokines by MSCs, as well the motility of MDA-MB-231 cells. Our data suggest that aggressive breast cancer cells secrete IL-1β, which increases the production of chemokines by MSCs. PMID:26362269

  4. Polysialylation controls dendritic cell trafficking by regulating chemokine recognition.

    PubMed

    Kiermaier, Eva; Moussion, Christine; Veldkamp, Christopher T; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; de Vries, Ingrid; Williams, Larry G; Chaffee, Gary R; Phillips, Andrew J; Freiberger, Friedrich; Imre, Richard; Taleski, Deni; Payne, Richard J; Braun, Asolina; Förster, Reinhold; Mechtler, Karl; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Volkman, Brian F; Sixt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The addition of polysialic acid to N- and/or O-linked glycans, referred to as polysialylation, is a rare posttranslational modification that is mainly known to control the developmental plasticity of the nervous system. Here we show that CCR7, the central chemokine receptor controlling immune cell trafficking to secondary lymphatic organs, carries polysialic acid. This modification is essential for the recognition of the CCR7 ligand CCL21. As a consequence, dendritic cell trafficking is abrogated in polysialyltransferase-deficient mice, manifesting as disturbed lymph node homeostasis and unresponsiveness to inflammatory stimuli. Structure-function analysis of chemokine-receptor interactions reveals that CCL21 adopts an autoinhibited conformation, which is released upon interaction with polysialic acid. Thus, we describe a glycosylation-mediated immune cell trafficking disorder and its mechanistic basis. PMID:26657283

  5. Chemokines and their receptors in lung cancer progression and metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zeng-hui; Shi, Yu-xin; Yuan, Min; Xiong, Dan; Zheng, Jiang-hua; Zhang, Zhi-yong

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality around the world. Despite advancements in diagnosis, surgical techniques, and neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy over the last decade, the mortality rate is still high and the 5-year survival is a dismal 15%. Fortunately, early detection by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) scans has reduced mortality by 20%; yet, overall, 5-year-survival remains low at less than 20%. Therefore, in order to ameliorate this situation, a thorough understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is urgently needed. Chemokines and their receptors, crucial microenvironmental factors, play important roles in lung tumor genesis, progression, and metastasis, and exploring the mechanisms of this might bring new insights into early diagnosis and precisely targeted treatment. Consequently, this review will mainly focus on recent advancements on the axes of chemokines and their receptors of lung cancer. PMID:27143261

  6. Tropoelastin regulates chemokine expression in fibroblasts in Costello syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tatano, Yutaka; Fujinawa, Reiko; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Tsuji, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Naohiro; Tsuta, Kohji; Takada, Goro; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Itoh, Kohji

    2008-08-08

    Costello syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly associated with growth and mental retardation, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, and a predisposition to develop neoplasia. Comprehensive expression analysis revealed remarkable up-regulation of several cytokines and chemokines including Gro family proteins, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), IL-8 and MCP-1 but down-regulation of extracellular matrix components including collagens and proteoglycans of skin fibroblasts derived from a Japanese Costello syndrome patient characterized by significantly reduced tropoelastin mRNA, impaired elastogenesis and enhanced cell proliferation. In contrast, decreases in these chemokines and IL-1{beta} expression were observed in Costello fibroblastic cell lines stably expressing the bovine tropoelastin (btEln) gene and in restored elastic fibers. These results strongly suggest that the human TE gene (ELN) transfer could be applicable for the gene therapy of a group of Costello syndrome patients with reduced ELN gene expression.

  7. Epithelial Anion Transport as Modulator of Chemokine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schnúr, Andrea; Hegyi, Péter; Rousseau, Simon; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Veit, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The pivotal role of epithelial cells is to secrete and absorb ions and water in order to allow the formation of a luminal fluid compartment that is fundamental for the epithelial function as a barrier against environmental factors. Importantly, epithelial cells also take part in the innate immune system. As a first line of defense they detect pathogens and react by secreting and responding to chemokines and cytokines, thus aggravating immune responses or resolving inflammatory states. Loss of epithelial anion transport is well documented in a variety of diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pancreatitis, and cholestatic liver disease. Here we review the effect of aberrant anion secretion with focus on the release of inflammatory mediators by epithelial cells and discuss putative mechanisms linking these transport defects to the augmented epithelial release of chemokines and cytokines. These mechanisms may contribute to the excessive and persistent inflammation in many respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27382190

  8. Manipulating leukocyte interactions in vivo through optogenetic chemokine release.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Milka; Olekhnovitch, Romain; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Light-mediated release of signaling ligands, such as chemoattractants, growth factors, and cytokines is an attractive strategy for investigation and therapeutic targeting of leukocyte communication and immune responses. We introduce a versatile optogenetic method to control ligand secretion, combining UV-conditioned endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi trafficking and a furin-processing step. As proof of principle, we achieved light-triggered chemokine secretion and demonstrated that a brief pulse of chemokine release can mediate a rapid flux of leukocyte contacts with target cells in vitro and in vivo. This approach opens new possibilities for dynamic investigation of leukocyte communication in vivo and may confer the potential to control the local release of soluble mediators in the context of immune cell therapies. PMID:27057000

  9. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a cytokine/chemokine-mediated disorder?

    PubMed

    Garabedian, Lara; Struyf, Sofie; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Sozzani, Silvano; Van Damme, Jo; Laureys, Geneviève

    2011-09-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation and/or proliferation of cells with a Langerhans cell phenotype. Although no clear cause of LCH has been identified, it has been postulated that LCH might be the consequence of an immune dysregulation, causing Langerhans cells to migrate to and accumulate at various sites. Production of cytokines and chemokines is a central feature of immune regulation. Cytokines are abundantly present within LCH lesions. We review here the potential role of cytokines and chemokines in the pathogenesis of LCH. The type, distribution, and number of different cytokines released within lesions can provide clues to the possible aetiology of LCH and, ultimately, might offer therapeutic possibilities using recombinant cytokines or antagonists for this disorder. PMID:22001902

  10. Systemic chemokine levels, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke events

    PubMed Central

    Canouï-Poitrine, F.; Luc, G.; Mallat, Z.; Machez, E.; Bingham, A.; Ferrieres, J.; Ruidavets, J.-B.; Montaye, M.; Yarnell, J.; Haas, B.; Arveiler, D.; Morange, P.; Kee, F.; Evans, A.; Amouyel, P.; Ducimetiere, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify the association between systemic levels of the chemokine regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5), interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), and eotaxin-1 (CCL11) with future coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke events and to assess their usefulness for CHD and ischemic stroke risk prediction in the PRIME Study. Methods: After 10 years of follow-up of 9,771 men, 2 nested case-control studies were built including 621 first CHD events and 1,242 matched controls and 95 first ischemic stroke events and 190 matched controls. Standardized hazard ratios (HRs) for each log-transformed chemokine were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Results: None of the 4 chemokines were independent predictors of CHD, either with respect to stable angina or to acute coronary syndrome. Conversely, RANTES (HR = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.74), IP-10 (HR = 1.53; 95% CI 1.06–2.20), and eotaxin-1 (HR = 1.59; 95% CI 1.02–2.46), but not MCP-1 (HR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.68–1.46), were associated with ischemic stroke independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, hs-CRP, and fibrinogen. When the first 3 chemokines were included in the same multivariate model, RANTES and IP-10 remained predictive of ischemic stroke. Their addition to a traditional risk factor model predicting ischemic stroke substantially improved the C-statistic from 0.6756 to 0.7425 (p = 0.004). Conclusions: In asymptomatic men, higher systemic levels of RANTES and IP-10 are independent predictors of ischemic stroke but not of CHD events. RANTES and IP-10 may improve the accuracy of ischemic stroke risk prediction over traditional risk factors. PMID:21849651

  11. Involvement of chemokine receptors in breast cancer metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Anja; Homey, Bernhard; Soto, Hortensia; Ge, Nianfeng; Catron, Daniel; Buchanan, Matthew E.; McClanahan, Terri; Murphy, Erin; Yuan, Wei; Wagner, Stephan N.; Barrera, Jose Luis; Mohar, Alejandro; Verástegui, Emma; Zlotnik, Albert

    2001-03-01

    Breast cancer is characterized by a distinct metastatic pattern involving the regional lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and liver. Tumour cell migration and metastasis share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Here we report that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 are highly expressed in human breast cancer cells, malignant breast tumours and metastases. Their respective ligands CXCL12/SDF-1α and CCL21/6Ckine exhibit peak levels of expression in organs representing the first destinations of breast cancer metastasis. In breast cancer cells, signalling through CXCR4 or CCR7 mediates actin polymerization and pseudopodia formation, and subsequently induces chemotactic and invasive responses. In vivo, neutralizing the interactions of CXCL12/CXCR4 significantly impairs metastasis of breast cancer cells to regional lymph nodes and lung. Malignant melanoma, which has a similar metastatic pattern as breast cancer but also a high incidence of skin metastases, shows high expression levels of CCR10 in addition to CXCR4 and CCR7. Our findings indicate that chemokines and their receptors have a critical role in determining the metastatic destination of tumour cells.

  12. Dynamics and thermodynamic properties of CXCL7 chemokine.

    PubMed

    Herring, Charles A; Singer, Christopher M; Ermakova, Elena A; Khairutdinov, Bulat I; Zuev, Yuriy F; Jacobs, Donald J; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2015-11-01

    Chemokines form a family of signaling proteins mainly responsible for directing the traffic of leukocytes, where their biological activity can be modulated by their oligomerization state. We characterize the dynamics and thermodynamic stability of monomer and homodimer structures of CXCL7, one of the most abundant platelet chemokines, using experimental methods that include circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and computational methods that include the anisotropic network model (ANM), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the distance constraint model (DCM). A consistent picture emerges for the effects of dimerization and Cys5-Cys31 and Cys7-Cys47 disulfide bonds formation. The presence of disulfide bonds is not critical for maintaining structural stability in the monomer or dimer, but the monomer is destabilized more than the dimer upon removal of disulfide bonds. Disulfide bonds play a key role in shaping the characteristics of native state dynamics. The combined analysis shows that upon dimerization flexibly correlated motions are induced between the 30s and 50s loop within each monomer and across the dimer interface. Interestingly, the greatest gain in flexibility upon dimerization occurs when both disulfide bonds are present, and the homodimer is least stable relative to its two monomers. These results suggest that the highly conserved disulfide bonds in chemokines facilitate a structural mechanism that is tuned to optimally distinguish functional characteristics between monomer and dimer. PMID:26297927

  13. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sahingur, Sinem Esra; Yeudall, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host–microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25999952

  14. Chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}, suppress amyloid {beta}-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Milatovic, Snjezana-Zaja; Milatovic, Dejan; Fan, Guo-Huang; Richmond, Ann

    2011-11-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and accumulation of neurotoxic oligomeric peptides amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}). Although the molecular events are not entirely known, it has become evident that inflammation, environmental and other risk factors may play a causal, disruptive and/or protective role in the development of AD. The present study investigated the ability of the chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}), the respective ligands for chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, to suppress A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} significantly protected neurons from A{beta}-induced dendritic regression and apoptosis in vitro through activation of Akt, ERK1/2 and maintenance of metalloproteinase ADAM17 especially with SDF-1{alpha}. Intra-cerebroventricular (ICV) injection of A{beta} led to reduction in dendritic length and spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and increased oxidative damage 24 h following the exposure. The A{beta}-induced morphometric changes of neurons and increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with the chemokines MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha}. Additionally, MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} was able to suppress the aberrant mislocalization of p21-activated kinase (PAK), one of the proteins involved in the maintenance of dendritic spines. Furthermore, MIP-2 also protected neurons against A{beta} neurotoxicity in CXCR2-/- mice, potentially through observed up regulation of CXCR1 mRNA. Understanding the neuroprotective potential of chemokines is crucial in defining the role for their employment during the early stages of neurodegeneration. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuroprotective ability of the chemokines MIP2 and CXCL12 against A{beta} toxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MIP-2 or

  15. Post-translational control of chemokines: a role for decoy receptors?

    PubMed

    Comerford, Iain; Nibbs, Robert J B

    2005-01-31

    It is well-established that chemokines play a critical role in the orchestration of inflammation and immunity. Interactions between chemokines and their receptors are essential for the homing of specific subsets of leukocytes to their functional microenvironments. They also influence other diverse biological processes such as development, leukocyte activation, Th1/Th2 polarisation, tumour metastasis, angiogenesis, and HIV pathogenesis. However, despite their importance, only now are we beginning to understand the complex regulation brought to bear on these molecules. In this review, we discuss a number of these key chemokine regulators that exert their influence once these proteins have been synthesised. We examine (i) chemokine storage, release, and presentation, (ii) protease regulation, (iii) viral manipulation of host chemokines, and (iv) natural mammalian receptor antagonists. Principally, the growing evidence for a role for decoy receptors in the chemokine system is discussed. In particular, the potential decoy function of the 'silent' pro-inflammatory chemokine receptor D6 is described alongside two other candidate decoy receptor molecules, DARC, and CCX-CKR. Dissecting the biological and pathological function of these chemokine controllers will lead to a deeper understanding of chemokine regulation, and may reveal novel strategies to therapeutically modify the chemokine system. PMID:15585320

  16. Potential combinatorial effects of recombinant atypical chemokine receptors in breast cancer cell invasion: A research perspective.

    PubMed

    Chew, Ai Lan; Tan, Wee Yee; Khoo, Boon Yin

    2013-03-01

    Apart from their major function in the coordination of leukocyte recruitment, chemokines, in cooperation with their receptors, have been implicated in the progression of various diseases including different types of cancer, affecting survival, proliferation and metastasis. A complex network of chemokines and receptors exists in the tumor microenvironment and affects tumor development in various ways where chemokines activate typical signalling pathways by binding to the respective receptors. The identification and characterization of a group of atypical chemokine receptors [D6, Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC), ChemoCentryx chemokine receptor (CCX-CKR) and CXCR7] which appear to use unique biochemical properties to regulate the biological activities of these chemokines, is useful in the effort to therapeutically manipulate chemokines in a broad spectrum of diseases in which these chemokines play a critical role. The aim of this review was to investigate the combinatorial effect of two reported atypical chemokine receptors, D6 and DARC, on breast cancer cell invasion to understand their role and therapeutic potential in cancer treatment. In this regard, findings of the present review should be confirmed via the construction of recombinant D6 and DARC clones as well as the expression of the respective recombinant proteins using the Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) expression system is to be performed in a future study in order to support findings of the current review. PMID:24648916

  17. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  18. The atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR scavenges homeostatic chemokines in circulation and tissues and suppresses Th17 responses.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Iain; Nibbs, Robert J B; Litchfield, Wendel; Bunting, Mark; Harata-Lee, Yuka; Haylock-Jacobs, Sarah; Forrow, Steve; Korner, Heinrich; McColl, Shaun R

    2010-11-18

    Our previous in vitro studies led to proposals that the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR is a scavenger of CCR7 ligand homeostatic chemokines. In the present study, we generated CCX-CKR(-/-) mice and confirm this scavenger function in vivo. Compared with wild-type mice, CCX-CKR(-/-) have a 5-fold increase in the level of CCL21 protein in blood, and 2- to 3-fold increases in CCL19 and CCL21 in peripheral lymph nodes. The effect of these protein increases on immunity was investigated after immunization with MOG(35-55) peptide emulsified in complete Freund adjuvant (CFA). The subsequent characteristic paralysis develops with enhanced kinetics and severity in CCX-CKR(-/-) versus wild-type mice. Despite this effect, antigen-specific immune responses in the draining lymph nodes are diminished in CCX-CKR(-/-) mice. Instead, the earlier onset of disease is associated with enhanced T-cell priming in the CCX-CKR(-/-) spleen and a skewing of CD4(+) T-cell responses toward Th17 rather than Th1. This observation correlates with increased expression of IL-23 in the CCX-CKR(-/-) spleen and increased CCL21 levels in the central nervous system postimmunization. The early onset of disease in CCX-CKR(-/-) mice is reversed by systemic administration of neutralizing anti-CCL21 antibodies. Thus, by regulating homeostatic chemokine bioavailability, CCX-CKR influences the localization, kinetics, and nature of adaptive immune responses in vivo. PMID:20562329

  19. Cloning and functional characterization of the rabbit C-C chemokine receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Deshun; Yuan, Xiu-juan; Evans, Robert J; Pappas, Amy T; Wang, He; Su, Eric W; Hamdouchi, Chafiq; Venkataraman, Chandrasekar

    2005-01-01

    Background CC-family chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is implicated in the trafficking of blood-borne monocytes to sites of inflammation and is implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and atherosclerosis. The major challenge in the development of small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists is the lack of cross-species activity to the receptor in the preclinical species. Rabbit models have been widely used to study the role of various inflammatory molecules in the development of inflammatory processes. Therefore, in this study, we report the cloning and characterization of rabbit CCR2. Data regarding the activity of the CCR2 antagonist will provide valuable tools to perform toxicology and efficacy studies in the rabbit model. Results Sequence alignment indicated that rabbit CCR2 shares 80 % identity to human CCR2b. Tissue distribution indicated that rabbit CCR2 is abundantly expressed in spleen and lung. Recombinant rabbit CCR2 expressed as stable transfectants in U-937 cells binds radiolabeled 125I-mouse JE (murine MCP-1) with a calculated Kd of 0.1 nM. In competition binding assays, binding of radiolabeled mouse JE to rabbit CCR2 is differentially competed by human MCP-1, -2, -3 and -4, but not by RANTES, MIP-1α or MIP-1β. U-937/rabbit CCR2 stable transfectants undergo chemotaxis in response to both human MCP-1 and mouse JE with potencies comparable to those reported for human CCR2b. Finally, TAK-779, a dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist effectively inhibits the binding of 125I-mouse JE (IC50 = 2.3 nM) to rabbit CCR2 and effectively blocks CCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Conclusion In this study, we report the cloning of rabbit CCR2 and demonstrate that this receptor is a functional chemotactic receptor for MCP-1. PMID:16001983

  20. Carnosol and Related Substances Modulate Chemokine and Cytokine Production in Macrophages and Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schwager, Joseph; Richard, Nathalie; Fowler, Ann; Seifert, Nicole; Raederstorff, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic diterpenes present in Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis have anti-inflammatory and chemoprotective effects. We investigated the in vitro effects of carnosol (CL), carnosic acid (CA), carnosic acid-12-methylether (CAME), 20-deoxocarnosol and abieta-8,11,13-triene-11,12,20-triol (ABTT) in murine macrophages (RAW264.7 cells) and human chondrocytes. The substances concentration-dependently reduced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production in LPS-stimulated macrophages (i.e., acute inflammation). They significantly blunted gene expression levels of iNOS, cytokines/interleukins (IL-1α, IL-6) and chemokines including CCL5/RANTES, CXCL10/IP-10. The substances modulated the expression of catabolic and anabolic genes in chondrosarcoma cell line SW1353 and in primary human chondrocytes that were stimulated by IL-1β (i.e., chronic inflammation In SW1353, catabolic genes like MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4 that contribute to cartilage erosion were down-regulated, while expression of anabolic genes including Col2A1 and aggrecan were shifted towards pre-pathophysiological homeostasis. CL had the strongest overall effect on inflammatory mediators, as well as on macrophage and chondrocyte gene expression. Conversely, CAME mainly affected catabolic gene expression, whereas ABTT had a more selectively altered interleukin and chemokine gene exprssion. CL inhibited the IL-1β induced nuclear translocation of NF-κBp65, suggesting that it primarily regulated via the NF-κB signalling pathway. Collectively, CL had the strongest effects on inflammatory mediators and chondrocyte gene expression. The data show that the phenolic diterpenes altered activity pattern of genes that regulate acute and chronic inflammatory processes. Since the substances affected catabolic and anabolic gene expression in cartilage cells in vitro, they may beneficially act on the aetiology of osteoarthritis. PMID:27070563

  1. Effect of the plant derivative Compound A on the production of corticosteroid-resistant chemokines in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gavrila, Adelina; Chachi, Latifa; Tliba, Omar; Brightling, Christopher; Amrani, Yassine

    2015-11-01

    Preclinical models of human conditions including asthma showed the therapeutic potential of Compound A (CpdA), a dissociated glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GRα) ligand. Whether CpdA inhibits GC resistance, a central feature of severe asthma, has not been addressed. We investigated whether CpdA modulates cytokine-induced GC resistance in human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Healthy and asthmatic ASM cells were treated with TNF-α/IFN-γ for 24 hours in the presence or absence of CpdA. ELISA and quantitative PCR assays were used to assess the effect of CpdA on chemokine expression. Activation of GRα by CpdA was assessed by quantitative PCR, immunostaining, and receptor antagonism using RU486. An effect of CpdA on the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) was investigated using immunoblot, immunostaining, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown. CpdA inhibited production of fluticasone-resistant chemokines CCL5, CX3CL1, and CXCL10 at protein and mRNA levels in both asthmatic and healthy cells. CpdA failed to induce expression of GC-induced Leucine Zipper while transiently inducing mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) at both mRNA and protein levels. CpdA inhibitory action was not associated with GRα nuclear translocation, nor was it prevented by RU486 antagonism. Activation of IRF-1 by TNF-α/IFN-γ was inhibited by CpdA. IRF-1 siRNA knockdown reduced cytokine-induced CCL5 and CX3CL1 production. siRNA MKP-1 prevented the inhibitory effect of CpdA on cytokine-induced CXCL10 production. For the first time, we show that CpdA inhibits the production of GC-resistant chemokines via GRα-independent mechanisms involving the inhibition of IRF-1 and up-regulation of MKP-1. Thus, targeting CpdA-sensitive pathways in ASM cells represents an alternative therapeutic approach to treat GC resistance in asthma. PMID:25897650

  2. Chemokines and T lymphocyte recruitment to lymph nodes in HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tedla, N.; Palladinetti, P.; Kelly, M.; Kumar, R. K.; DiGirolamo, N.; Chattophadhay, U.; Cooke, B.; Truskett, P.; Dwyer, J.; Wakefield, D.; Lloyd, A.

    1996-01-01

    Recruitment of T lymphocytes to lymph nodes in patients with HIV infection is critical to the pathogenesis of disease. Chemokines are a family of cytokines, which are potent regulators of leukocyte migration. We studied the leukocyte populations and expression of chemokines known to be active upon T cells in lymph nodes of four HIV infected patients and seven control subjects using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and FACS analysis. The HIV lymph nodes showed CD8+ T lymphocyte accumulation and strongly enhanced chemokine expression, notably for the CD8+ T cell chemoattractant, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha. Resident macrophages appeared to be a major cellular source of chemokines in the HIV nodes. RANTES expression was present in both HIV and control lymph nodes, suggesting a physiological role for this chemokine in T lymphocyte recirculation. Chemokines may be important determinants of T lymphocyte accumulation in lymphoid tissue of patients with HIV/AIDS. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8623908

  3. Transmembrane chemokines act as receptors in a novel mechanism termed inverse signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hattermann, Kirsten; Gebhardt, Henrike; Krossa, Sebastian; Ludwig, Andreas; Lucius, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane chemokines CX3CL1/fractalkine and CXCL16 are widely expressed in different types of tumors, often without an appropriate expression of their classical receptors. We observed that receptor-negative cancer cells could be stimulated by the soluble chemokines. Searching for alternative receptors we detected that all cells expressing or transfected with transmembrane chemokine ligands bound the soluble chemokines with high affinity and responded by phosphorylation of intracellular kinases, enhanced proliferation and anti-apoptosis. This activity requires the intracellular domain and apparently the dimerization of the transmembrane chemokine ligand. Thus, shed soluble chemokines can generate auto- or paracrine signals by binding and activating their transmembrane forms. We term this novel mechanism “inverse signaling”. We suppose that inverse signaling is an autocrine feedback and fine-tuning system in the communication between cells that in tumors supports stabilization and proliferation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10820.001 PMID:26796342

  4. Chemokine signaling in cancer: Implications on the tumor microenvironment and therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hembruff, Stacey L.; Cheng, Nikki

    2010-01-01

    Summary Chemokines are soluble factors shown to play important roles in regulating immune cell recruitment during inflammatory responses and defense against foreign pathogens. De-regulated expression and activity of several chemokine signaling pathways have been implicated in cancer progression, including: CCL2, CCL5, CXCL1 and CXCL12. While studies in the past have focused the role of these chemokine signaling pathways in regulating immune responses, emerging studies show that these molecules regulate diverse cellular processes including angiogenesis, and regulation of epithelial cell growth and survival. New evidence indicates that chemokines are critical for cancer progression and indicate complex and diverse functions in the tumor microenvironment. This review will focus on the contributions of chemokine signaling in regulating cancer microvironment and discuss the utility of targeting or delivering chemokines in cancer therapeutics. PMID:20651940

  5. GSK-1605786, a selective small-molecule antagonist of the CCR9 chemokine receptor for the treatment of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Eksteen, Bertus; Adams, David H

    2010-07-01

    GSK-1605786 (CCX-282; Traficet-EN), a selective antagonist of the CC chemokine receptor (CCR9), is being developed by GlaxoSmithKline plc under license from ChemoCentryx Inc for the potential treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn's disease and celiac disease. CCR9 is a tissue-specific lymphocyte trafficking molecule that selectively attracts both B- and T-cells to the small gut. Inhibition of CCR9 by GSK-1605786 may inhibit B- and T-cell entry to the small gut and ameliorate inflammation while leaving immune function at other anatomical sites unaffected. GSK-1605786 was assessed as a treatment for moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease in the phase II/III PROTECT-1 trial and as a treatment for celiac disease in a phase II trial. Data suggest that GSK-1605786 is efficacious in patients with Crohn's disease with the advantage of being orally bioavailable. PMID:20582872

  6. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets.

    PubMed

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    Large DNA viruses, in particular herpes- and poxviruses, have evolved proteins that serve as mimics or decoys for endogenous proteins in the host. The chemokines and their receptors serve key functions in both innate and adaptive immunity through control of leukocyte trafficking, and have as such a paramount role in the antiviral immune responses. It is therefore not surprising that viruses have found ways to exploit and subvert the chemokine system by means of molecular mimicry. By ancient acts of molecular piracy and by induction and suppression of endogenous genes, viruses have utilized chemokines and their receptors to serve a variety of roles in viral life-cycle. This review focuses on the pharmacology of virus-encoded chemokine receptors, yet also the family of virus-encoded chemokines and chemokine-binding proteins will be touched upon. Key properties of the virus-encoded receptors, compared to their closest endogenous homologs, are interactions with a wider range of chemokines, which can act as agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists, and the exploitation of many signal transduction pathways. High constitutive activity is another key property of some--but not all--of these receptors. The chemokine receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein coupled 7TM receptors that per se are excellent drug targets. At present, non-peptide antagonists have been developed against many chemokine receptors. The potentials of the virus-encoded chemokine receptors as drug targets--ie. as novel antiviral strategies--will be highlighted here together with the potentials of the virus-encoded chemokines and chemokine-binding proteins as novel anti-inflammatory biopharmaceutical strategies. PMID:15617722

  7. Gene silencing of HIV chemokine receptors using ribozymes and single-stranded antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Amer; Zheng, Richard; Parlett, Terry; Shi, Xiaoju; Balaraman, Priyadhashini; Cheloufi, Sihem; Murphy, Brendan; Guntermann, Christine; Eagles, Peter

    2006-03-01

    The chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 are required for HIV-1 to enter cells, and the progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS involves a switch in the co-receptor usage of the virus from CCR5 to CXCR4. These receptors therefore make attractive candidates for therapeutic intervention, and we have investigated the silencing of their genes by using ribozymes and single-stranded antisense RNAs. In the present study, we demonstrate using ribozymes that a depletion of CXCR4 and CCR5 mRNAs can be achieved simultaneously in human PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells), cells commonly used by the virus for infection and replication. Ribozyme activity leads to an inhibition of the cell-surface expression of both CCR5 and CXCR4, resulting in a significant inhibition of HIV-1 replication when PBMCs are challenged with the virus. In addition, we show that small single-stranded antisense RNAs can also be used to silence CCR5 and CXCR4 genes when delivered to PBMCs. This silencing is caused by selective degradation of receptor mRNAs. PMID:16293105

  8. Gene silencing of HIV chemokine receptors using ribozymes and single-stranded antisense RNA

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Amer; Zheng, Richard; Parlett, Terry; Shi, Xiaoju; Balaraman, Priyadhashini; Cheloufi, Sihem; Murphy, Brendan; Guntermann, Christine; Eagles, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 are required for HIV-1 to enter cells, and the progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS involves a switch in the co-receptor usage of the virus from CCR5 to CXCR4. These receptors therefore make attractive candidates for therapeutic intervention, and we have investigated the silencing of their genes by using ribozymes and single-stranded antisense RNAs. In the present study, we demonstrate using ribozymes that a depletion of CXCR4 and CCR5 mRNAs can be achieved simultaneously in human PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells), cells commonly used by the virus for infection and replication. Ribozyme activity leads to an inhibition of the cell-surface expression of both CCR5 and CXCR4, resulting in a significant inhibition of HIV-1 replication when PBMCs are challenged with the virus. In addition, we show that small single-stranded antisense RNAs can also be used to silence CCR5 and CXCR4 genes when delivered to PBMCs. This silencing is caused by selective degradation of receptor mRNAs. PMID:16293105

  9. New paradigms in chemokine receptor signal transduction: Moving beyond the two-site model.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Andrew B; Getschman, Anthony E; Ziarek, Joshua J; Nevins, Amanda M; Gauthier, Pierre-Arnaud; Chevigné, Andy; Szpakowska, Martyna; Volkman, Brian F

    2016-08-15

    Chemokine receptor (CKR) signaling forms the basis of essential immune cellular functions, and dysregulated CKR signaling underpins numerous disease processes of the immune system and beyond. CKRs, which belong to the seven transmembrane domain receptor (7TMR) superfamily, initiate signaling upon binding of endogenous, secreted chemokine ligands. Chemokine-CKR interactions are traditionally described by a two-step/two-site mechanism, in which the CKR N-terminus recognizes the chemokine globular core (i.e. site 1 interaction), followed by activation when the unstructured chemokine N-terminus is inserted into the receptor TM bundle (i.e. site 2 interaction). Several recent studies challenge the structural independence of sites 1 and 2 by demonstrating physical and allosteric links between these supposedly separate sites. Others contest the functional independence of these sites, identifying nuanced roles for site 1 and other interactions in CKR activation. These developments emerge within a rapidly changing landscape in which CKR signaling is influenced by receptor PTMs, chemokine and CKR dimerization, and endogenous non-chemokine ligands. Simultaneous advances in the structural and functional characterization of 7TMR biased signaling have altered how we understand promiscuous chemokine-CKR interactions. In this review, we explore new paradigms in CKR signal transduction by considering studies that depict a more intricate architecture governing the consequences of chemokine-CKR interactions. PMID:27106080

  10. Chemokines accentuating protumoral activities in oral cancer microenvironment possess an imperious stratagem for therapeutic resolutions.

    PubMed

    Panda, Swagatika; Padhiary, Subrat Kumar; Routray, Samapika

    2016-09-01

    Chemokines, the chemotactic cytokines have established their role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Studies, which explored their role in oral cancer for protumoral activity, point towards targeting chemokines for oral squamous cell carcinoma therapy. The need of the hour is to emphasize/divulge in the activities of chemokine ligands and their receptors in the tumor microenvironment for augmentation of such stratagems. This progressing sentience of chemokines and their receptors has inspired this review which is an endeavour to comprehend their role as an aid in accentuating hallmarks of cancer and targeted therapy. PMID:27531867

  11. Inflammatory reaction after traumatic brain injury: Therapeutic potential of targeting cell-cell communication by chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Gyoneva, Stefka; Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects millions of people worldwide every year. The primary impact initiates the secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory factors, subsequent recruitment of peripheral immune cells and activation of brain-resident microglia and astrocytes. Chemokines are major mediators of peripheral blood cell recruitment to damaged tissue, including the TBI brain. Here we review the involvement of specific chemokine pathways in TBI pathology and attempts to modulate these pathways for therapeutic purposes. We focus on chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCL2/CCR2) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCL12/CXCR4). Recent micro-array and multiplex expression profiling have also implicated CXCL10 and CCL5 in TBI pathology. Chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1/ chemokine (C-X3-C motif) receptor 1 (CX3CL1/CX3CR1) signaling in the context of TBI is also discussed. Current literature suggests that modulating chemokine signaling, especially CCL2/CCR2, may be beneficial in TBI treatment. PMID:25979813

  12. Chemokines in Cancer Development and Progression and Their Potential as Targeting Molecules for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mukaida, Naofumi; Sasaki, So-ichiro; Baba, Tomohisa

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines were initially identified as bioactive substances, which control the trafficking of inflammatory cells including granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Moreover, chemokines have profound impacts on other types of cells associated with inflammatory responses, such as endothelial cells and fibroblasts. These observations would implicate chemokines as master regulators in various inflammatory responses. Subsequent studies have further revealed that chemokines can regulate the movement of a wide variety of immune cells including lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells in both physiological and pathological conditions. These features endow chemokines with crucial roles in immune responses. Furthermore, increasing evidence points to the vital effects of several chemokines on the proliferative and invasive properties of cancer cells. It is widely acknowledged that cancer develops and progresses to invade and metastasize in continuous interaction with noncancerous cells present in cancer tissues, such as macrophages, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. The capacity of chemokines to regulate both cancerous and noncancerous cells highlights their crucial roles in cancer development and progression. Here, we will discuss the roles of chemokines in carcinogenesis and the possibility of chemokine targeting therapy for the treatment of cancer. PMID:24966464

  13. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding.

    PubMed

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C; Lückmann, Michael; Pihl, Heidi; Larsen, Olav; Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Johnsen, Anders H; Frimurer, Thomas M; Karlshøj, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2016-07-29

    Chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune system and are linked to several human diseases. The initial contact of chemokines with their receptors depends on highly specified extracellular receptor features. Here we investigate the importance of conserved extracellular disulfide bridges and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL-2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action in CCR8. We find that the seven-transmembrane (TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix III (TMIII) and ECL-2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only for chemokines. Furthermore, we find that two distinct aromatic residues in ECL-2, Tyr(184) (Cys + 1) and Tyr(187) (Cys + 4), are crucial for binding of the CC chemokines CCL1 (agonist) and MC148 (antagonist), respectively, but not for small molecule binding. Finally, using in silico modeling, we predict an aromatic cluster of interaction partners for Tyr(187) in TMIV (Phe(171)) and TMV (Trp(194)). We show in vitro that these residues are crucial for the binding and action of MC148, thus supporting their participation in an aromatic cluster with Tyr(187) This aromatic cluster appears to be present in a large number of CC chemokine receptors and thereby could play a more general role to be exploited in future drug development targeting these receptors. PMID:27226537

  14. Purification and biochemical characterization of the D6 chemokine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Paul E; Simpson, Clare V; Nibbs, Robert J B; O'Hara, Maureen; Booth, Rhona; Poulos, Jemma; Isaacs, Neil W; Graham, Gerard J

    2004-01-01

    There is much interest in chemokine receptors as therapeutic targets in diseases such as AIDS, autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, and cancer. Hampering such studies is the lack of accurate three-dimensional structural models of these molecules. The CC-chemokine receptor D6 is expressed at exceptionally high levels in heterologous transfectants. Here we report the purification and biochemical characterization of milligram quantities of D6 protein from relatively small cultures of transfected mammalian cells. Importantly, purified D6 retains full functional activity, shown by displaceable binding of 125I-labelled MIP-1beta (macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta) and by complete binding of the receptor to a MIP-1alpha affinity column. In addition, we show that D6 is decorated on the N-terminus by N-linked glycosylation. Mutational analysis reveals that this glycosylation is dispensable for ligand binding and high expression in transfected cells. Metabolic labelling has revealed the receptor to also be sulphated and phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is ligand independent and is not enhanced by ligand binding and internalization, suggesting similarities with the viral chemokine receptor homologue US28. Like US28, an analysis of the full cellular complement of D6 in transfected cells indicates that >80% is found associated with intracellular vesicular structures. This may account for the high quantities of D6 that can be synthesized in these cells. These unusual properties of D6, and the biochemical characterization described here, leads the way towards work aimed at generating the three-dimensional structure of this seven-transmembrane-spanning receptor. PMID:14723600

  15. Protein Kinase C-δ (PKCδ) Regulates Proinflammatory Chemokine Expression through Cytosolic Interaction with the NF-κB Subunit p65 in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jun; Wang, Qiwei; Morgan, Stephanie; Si, Yi; Ravichander, Aarthi; Dou, Changlin; Kent, K. Craig; Liu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory chemokines released by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play a critical role in vascular inflammation. Protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) has been shown to be up-regulated in VSMCs of injured arteries. PKCδ knock-out (Prkcd−/−) mice are resistant to inflammation as well as apoptosis in models of abdominal aortic aneurysm. However, the precise mechanism by which PKCδ modulates inflammation remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified four inflammatory chemokines (Ccl2/Mcp-1, Ccl7, Cxcl16, and Cx3cl1) of over 45 PKCδ-regulated genes associated with inflammatory response by microarray analysis. Using CCL2 as a prototype, we demonstrated that PKCδ stimulated chemokine expression at the transcriptional level. Inhibition of the NF-κB pathway or siRNA knockdown of subunit p65, but not p50, eliminated the effect of PKCδ on Ccl2 expression. Overexpressing PKCδ followed by incubation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate resulted in an increase in p65 Ser-536 phosphorylation and enhanced DNA binding affinity without affecting IκB degradation or p65 nuclear translocation. Prkcd gene deficiency impaired p65 Ser-536 phosphorylation and DNA binding affinity in response to TNFα. Results from in situ proximity ligation analysis and co-immunoprecipitation performed on cultured VSMCs and aneurysmal aorta demonstrated physical interaction between PKCδ and p65 that took place largely outside the nucleus. Promoting nuclear translocation of PKCδ with peptide ψδRACK diminished Ccl2 production, whereas inhibition of PKCδ translocation with peptide δV1-1 enhanced Ccl2 expression. Together, these results suggest that PKCδ modulates inflammation at least in part through the NF-κB-mediated chemokines. Mechanistically, PKCδ activates NF-κB through an IκB-independent cytosolic interaction, which subsequently leads to enhanced p65 phosphorylation and DNA binding affinity. PMID:24519937

  16. Expression of CXC chemokine receptor-4 enhances the pulmonary metastatic potential of murine B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Maki, Wusi; Cardones, Adela R; Fang, Hui; Tun Kyi, Adrian; Nestle, Frank O; Hwang, Sam T

    2002-12-15

    The chemokine receptors CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 7 and CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4 have been implicated in cancer metastasis. To evaluate whether CXCR4 is sufficient to increase tumor metastasis in an organ-specific manner, we transduced murine B16 melanoma cells with CXCR4 (CXCR4-B16) and followed the metastatic fate of the transduced cells in both i.v. and s.c. inoculation models of metastasis. CXCR4-B16 cells demonstrated marked increases (>10-fold) in pulmonary metastasis compared with vector (pLNCX2)-B16 after i.v. and s.c. inoculation of tumor cells. The increase in metastasis could be completely inhibited by T22, a small peptide antagonist of CXCR4. As early as 24 and 48 h after i.v. injection, CXCR4-B16 cells were significantly increased in the lung compared with control B16 cells by 5- and 10-fold (P < 0.05), respectively. CXCR4-B16 cells adhered better to both dermal and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells relative to control B16 cells. Moreover, CXCL12 promoted the growth of CXCR4-B16 cells in vitro. Whereas expression of CXCR4 in B16 cells dramatically enhanced pulmonary metastasis, metastasis to the lymph nodes, liver, and kidney was rare. Immunohistochemical staining of both primary human cutaneous melanoma and pulmonary metastases revealed CXCR4 expression. Thus, CXCR4 plays a potentially important role in promoting organ-selective metastasis, possibly by stimulating tumor adhesion to microvascular endothelial cells and by enhancing the growth of tumor cells under stress. PMID:12499276

  17. Celastrol suppresses invasion of colon and pancreatic cancer cells through the downregulation of expression of CXCR4 chemokine receptor.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vivek R; Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Cho, Sung-Gook; Liu, Mingyao; Chaturvedi, Madan M; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2010-12-01

    Although metastasis accounts for >90% of cancer-related deaths, no therapeutic that targets this process has yet been approved. Because the chemokine receptor CXCR4 is one of the targets closely linked with tumor metastasis, inhibitors of this receptor have the potential to abrogate metastasis. In the current report, we demonstrate that celastrol can downregulate the CXCR4 expression on breast cancer MCF-7 cells stably transfected with HER2, an oncogene known to induce the chemokine receptor. Downregulation of CXCR4 by the triterpenoid was not cell type-specific as downregulation occurred in colon cancer, squamous cell carcinoma, and pancreatic cancer cells. Decrease in CXCR4 expression was not due to proteolysis as neither proteasome inhibitors nor lysosomal stabilization had any effect. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that downregulation of CXCR4 messenger RNA (mRNA) by celastrol occurred at the translational level. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed regulation at the transcriptional level as well. Abrogation of the chemokine receptor by celastrol or by gene-silencing was accompanied by suppression of invasiveness of colon cancer cells induced by CXCL12, the ligand for CXCR4. This effect was not cell type-specific as celastrol also abolished invasiveness of pancreatic tumor cells, and this effect again correlated with the disappearance of both the CXCR4 mRNA and CXCR4 protein. Other triterpenes, such as withaferin A and gedunin, which are known to inhibit Hsp90, did not downregulate CXCR4 expression, indicating that the effects were specific to celastrol. Overall, these results show that celastrol has potential in suppressing invasion and metastasis of cancer cells by down-modulation of CXCR4 expression. PMID:20798912

  18. Prenatal fat-rich diet exposure alters responses of embryonic neurons to the chemokine, CCL2, in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Poon, K; Abramova, D; Ho, H T; Leibowitz, S

    2016-06-01

    Maternal consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) during pregnancy is found to stimulate the genesis of hypothalamic orexigenic peptide neurons in the offspring, while HFD intake in adult animals produces a systemic low-grade inflammation which increases neuroimmune factors that may affect neurogenesis and neuronal migration. Building on this evidence and our recent study showing that the inflammatory chemokine, CCL2, stimulates the migration of hypothalamic neurons and expression of orexigenic neuropeptides, we tested here the possibility that prenatal exposure to a HFD in rats affects this chemokine system, both CCL2 and its receptors, CCR2 and CCR4, and alters its actions on hypothalamic neurons, specifically those expressing the neuropeptides, enkephalin (ENK) and galanin (GAL). Using primary dissociated hypothalamic neurons extracted from embryos on embryonic day 19, we found that prenatal HFD exposure compared to chow control actually reduces the expression of CCL2 in these hypothalamic neurons, while increasing CCR2 and CCR4 expression, and also reduces the sensitivity of hypothalamic neurons to CCL2. The HFD abolished the dose-dependent, stimulatory effect of CCL2 on the number of migrated neurons and even shifted its normal stimulatory effect on migrational velocity and distance traveled by control neurons to an inhibition of migration. Further, it abolished the dose-dependent, stimulatory effect of CCL2 on neuronal expression of ENK and GAL. These results demonstrate that prenatal HFD exposure greatly disturbs the functioning of the CCL2 chemokine system in embryonic hypothalamic neurons, reducing its endogenous levels and ability to promote the migration of neurons and their expression of orexigenic peptides. PMID:26979053

  19. Decidual cell regulation of natural killer cell-recruiting chemokines: implications for the pathogenesis and prediction of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Charles J; Huang, S Joseph; Chen, Chie-Pein; Huang, Yingqun; Xu, Jie; Faramarzi, Saeed; Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit; Koopman, Louise; Smedts, Dineke; Buchwalder, Lynn F; Schatz, Frederick

    2013-09-01

    First trimester human decidua is composed of decidual cells, CD56(bright)CD16(-) decidual natural killer (dNK) cells, and macrophages. Decidual cells incubated with NK cell-derived IFN-γ and either macrophage-derived TNF-α or IL-1β synergistically enhanced mRNA and protein expression of IP-10 and I-TAC. Both chemokines recruit CXCR3-expressing NK cells. This synergy required IFN-γ receptor 1 and 2 mediation via JAK/STAT and NFκB signaling pathways. However, synergy was not observed on neutrophil, monocyte, and NK cell-recruiting chemokines. Immunostaining of first trimester decidua localized IP-10, I-TAC, IFN-γR1, and -R2 to vimentin-positive decidual cells versus cytokeratin-positive interstitial trophoblasts. Flow cytometry identified high CXCR3 levels on dNK cells and minority peripheral CD56(bright)CD16(-) pNK cells and intermediate CXCR3 levels on the majority of CD56(dim)CD16(+) pNK cells. Incubation of pNK cells with either IP-10 or I-TAC elicited concentration-dependent enhanced CXCR3 levels and migration of both pNK cell subsets that peaked at 10 ng/mL, whereas each chemokine at a concentration of 50 ng/mL inhibited CXCR3 expression and pNK cell migration. Deciduae from women with preeclampsia, a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, displayed significantly lower dNK cell numbers and higher IP-10 and I-TAC levels versus gestational age-matched controls. Significantly elevated IP-10 levels in first trimester sera from women eventually developing preeclampsia compared with controls, identifying IP-10 as a novel, robust early predictor of preeclampsia. PMID:23973270

  20. The Use of chemokine Releasing Tissue Engineering Scaffolds in a Model of Inflammatory Response-Mediated Melanoma Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Cheng-Yu; Wu, Lanxiao; Nair, Ashwin; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Victor K.; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory responses and associated products have been implicated in cancer metastasis. However, the relationship between these two processes is uncertain due to the lack of a suitable model. Taking advantage of localized and controllable inflammatory responses induced by biomaterial implantation and the capability of tissue scaffolds to release a wide variety of chemokines, we report a novel system for studying the molecular mechanisms of inflammation- mediated cancer metastasis. The animal model is comprised of an initial subcutaneous implantation of biomaterial microspheres which prompt localized inflammatory responses, followed by the transplantation of metastatic cancer cells into the peritoneal cavity or blood circulation. Histological results demonstrated that substantial numbers of B16F10 cells were recruited to the site nearby biomaterial implants. There was a strong correlation between the degree of biomaterial-mediated inflammatory responses and number of recruited cancer cells. Inflammation-mediated cancer cell migration was inhibited by small molecule inhibitors of CXCR4 but not by neutralizing antibody against CCL21. Using chemokine-releasing scaffolds, further studies were carried out to explore the possibility of enhancing cancer cell recruitment. Interestingly, erythropoietin (EPO) releasing scaffolds, but not stromal derived growth factors-1α-releasing scaffolds, were found to accumulate substantially more melanoma cells than controls. Rather unexpectedly, perhaps by indirectly reducing circulating cancer cells, mice implanted with EPO releasing scaffolds had ~30% longer lifespan than other groups. These results suggest that chemokine-releasing scaffolds may potentially function as implantable cancer traps and serve as powerful tools for studying cancer distraction and even selective annihilation of circulating metastatic cancer cells. PMID:22019117

  1. Migration of eosinophils across endothelial cell monolayers: interactions among IL-5, endothelial-activating cytokines, and C-C chemokines.

    PubMed

    Shahabuddin, S; Ponath, P; Schleimer, R P

    2000-04-01

    Eosinophils are the predominant cell type recruited in inflammatory reactions in response to allergen challenge. The mechanisms of selective eosinophil recruitment in allergic reactions are not fully elucidated. In this study, the ability of several C-C chemokines to induce transendothelial migration (TEM) of eosinophils in vitro was assessed. Eotaxin, eotaxin-2, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-4, and RANTES induced eosinophil TEM across unstimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in a concentration-dependent manner with the following rank order of potency: eotaxin approximately eotaxin-2 > MCP-4 approximately RANTES. The maximal response induced by eotaxin or eotaxin-2 exceeded that of RANTES or MCP-4. Preincubation of eosinophils with anti-CCR3 Ab (7B11) completely blocked eosinophil TEM induced by eotaxin, MCP-4, and RANTES. Activation of endothelial cells with IL-1beta or TNF-alpha induced concentration-dependent migration of eosinophils, which was enhanced synergistically in the presence of eotaxin and RANTES. Anti-CCR3 also inhibited eotaxin-induced eosinophil TEM across TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC. The ability of eosinophil-active cytokines to potentiate eosinophil TEM was assessed by investigating eotaxin or RANTES-induced eosinophil TEM across resting and IL-1beta-stimulated HUVEC in the presence or absence of IL-5. The results showed synergy between IL-5 and the chemokines but not between IL-5 and the endothelial activator IL-1beta. Our data suggest that eotaxin, eotaxin-2, MCP-4, and RANTES induce eosinophil TEM via CCR3 with varied potency and efficacy. Activation of HUVEC by IL-1beta or TNF-alpha or priming of eosinophils by IL-5 both promote CCR3-dependent migration of eosinophils from the vasculature in conjunction with CCR3-active chemokines. PMID:10725746

  2. Pyrazolo-Piperidines Exhibit Dual Inhibition of CCR5/CXCR4 HIV Entry and Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Cox, Bryan D; Prosser, Anthony R; Sun, Yongnian; Li, Zhufang; Lee, Sangil; Huang, Ming B; Bond, Vincent C; Snyder, James P; Krystal, Mark; Wilson, Lawrence J; Liotta, Dennis C

    2015-07-01

    We report novel anti-HIV-1 agents with combined dual host-pathogen pharmacology. Lead compound 3, composed of a pyrazole-piperidine core, exhibits three concurrent mechanisms of action: (1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibition, (2) CCR5-mediated M-tropic viral entry inhibition, and (3) CXCR4-based T-tropic viral entry inhibition that maintains native chemokine ligand binding. This discovery identifies important tool compounds for studying viral infectivity and prototype agents that block HIV-1 entry through dual chemokine receptor ligation. PMID:26191361

  3. Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 and Atypical Chemokine Receptor 3 Regulate Vascular α1-Adrenergic Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Harold H; Wong, Yee M; Tripathi, Abhishek; Nevins, Amanda M; Gamelli, Richard L; Volkman, Brian F; Byron, Kenneth L; Majetschak, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR) 4 and atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR) 3 ligands have been reported to modulate cardiovascular function in various disease models. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Thus, it was the aim of the present study to determine how pharmacological modulation of CXCR4 and ACKR3 regulate cardiovascular function. In vivo administration of TC14012, a CXCR4 antagonist and ACKR3 agonist, caused cardiovascular collapse in normal animals. During the cardiovascular stress response to hemorrhagic shock, ubiquitin, a CXCR4 agonist, stabilized blood pressure, whereas coactivation of CXCR4 and ACKR3 with CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), or blockade of CXCR4 with AMD3100 showed opposite effects. While CXCR4 and ACKR3 ligands did not affect myocardial function, they selectively altered vascular reactivity upon α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) activation in pressure myography experiments. CXCR4 activation with ubiquitin enhanced α1-AR-mediated vasoconstriction, whereas ACKR3 activation with various natural and synthetic ligands antagonized α1-AR-mediated vasoconstriction. The opposing effects of CXCR4 and ACKR3 activation by CXCL12 could be dissected pharmacologically. CXCR4 and ACKR3 ligands did not affect vasoconstriction upon activation of voltage-operated Ca2+ channels or endothelin receptors. Effects of CXCR4 and ACKR3 agonists on vascular α1-AR responsiveness were independent of the endothelium. These findings suggest that CXCR4 and ACKR3 modulate α1-AR reactivity in vascular smooth muscle and regulate hemodynamics in normal and pathological conditions. Our observations point toward CXCR4 and ACKR3 as new pharmacological targets to control vasoreactivity and blood pressure. PMID:25032954

  4. Analysis of Chemokine Receptor Trafficking by Site-Specific Biotinylation

    PubMed Central

    Liebick, Marcel; Schläger, Christian; Oppermann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors undergo internalization and desensitization in response to ligand activation. Internalized receptors are either preferentially directed towards recycling pathways (e.g. CCR5) or sorted for proteasomal degradation (e.g. CXCR4). Here we describe a method for the analysis of receptor internalization and recycling based on specific Bir A-mediated biotinylation of an acceptor peptide coupled to the receptor, which allows a more detailed analysis of receptor trafficking compared to classical antibody-based detection methods. Studies on constitutive internalization of the chemokine receptors CXCR4 (12.1% ± 0.99% receptor internalization/h) and CCR5 (13.7% ± 0.68%/h) reveals modulation of these processes by inverse (TAK779; 10.9% ± 0.95%/h) or partial agonists (Met-CCL5; 15.6% ± 0.5%/h). These results suggest an actively driven internalization process. We also demonstrate the advantages of specific biotinylation compared to classical antibody detection during agonist-induced receptor internalization, which may be used for immunofluorescence analysis as well. Site-specific biotinylation may be applicable to studies on trafficking of transmembrane proteins, in general. PMID:27310579

  5. Chemokine-guided angiogenesis directs coronary vasculature formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Michael R M; Bussmann, Jeroen; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Long; Osorio, Arthela; Burns, C Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E; Sucov, Henry M; Siekmann, Arndt F; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-05-26

    Interruption of the coronary blood supply severely impairs heart function with often fatal consequences for patients. However, the formation and maturation of these coronary vessels is not fully understood. Here we provide a detailed analysis of coronary vessel development in zebrafish. We observe that coronary vessels form in zebrafish by angiogenic sprouting of arterial cells derived from the endocardium at the atrioventricular canal. Endothelial cells express the CXC-motif chemokine receptor Cxcr4a and migrate to vascularize the ventricle under the guidance of the myocardium-expressed ligand Cxcl12b. cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to form a vascular network, whereas ectopic expression of Cxcl12b ligand induces coronary vessel formation. Importantly, cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to undergo heart regeneration following injury. Our results suggest that chemokine signaling has an essential role in coronary vessel formation by directing migration of endocardium-derived endothelial cells. Poorly developed vasculature in cxcr4a mutants likely underlies decreased regenerative potential in adults. PMID:26017769

  6. Chemokine guided angiogenesis directs coronary vasculature formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Michael R.M.; Bussmann, Jeroen; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Long; Osorio, Arthela; Burns, C. Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E.; Sucov, Henry M.; Siekmann, Arndt F.; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Interruption of coronary blood supply severely impairs heart function with often-fatal consequences for heart disease patients. However the formation and maturation of these coronary vessels is not fully understood. Here we provide a detailed analysis of coronary vessel development in zebrafish. We observe that coronary vessels form in zebrafish by angiogenic sprouting of arterial cells derived from the endocardium at the atrioventricular canal. Endothelial cells express the CXC-motif chemokine receptor Cxcr4a and migrate to vascularize the ventricle under the guidance of the myocardium-expressed ligand Cxcl12b. cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to form a vascular network, whereas ectopic expression of Cxcl12b ligand induces coronary vessel formation. Importantly, cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to undergo heart regeneration following injury. Our results suggest that chemokine-signaling has an essential role in coronary vessel formation by directing migration of endocardium-derived endothelial cells. Poorly developed vasculature in cxcr4a mutants likely underlies decreased regenerative potential in adults. PMID:26017769

  7. Constitutive secretion of chemokines by cultured human trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Shifera, Amde Selassie; Trivedi, Sheetal; Chau, Phuonglan; Bonnemaison, Lucia H; Iguchi, Rumiko; Alvarado, Jorge A

    2010-07-01

    Trabecular meshwork endothelial (TME) cells secrete a number of factors, such as enzymes and cytokines, which modulate the functions of the cells and the extracellular matrix of the conventional aqueous outflow pathway. TME cells usually secrete these factors in response to stimuli such as mechanical stretching, laser irradiation and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Here, we report that cultured human TME cells isolated from two non-glaucomatous individuals secrete significant quantities of the chemotactic cytokines IL8, CXCL6 and MCP1 in the absence of any stimulation. The secretion of these chemokines was augmented by treatment with the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFalpha and IL1beta. By way of comparison, there was little or very low production of the three chemokines by human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial cells in the absence of stimulation. Our findings provide support to our recent observations that monocytes, presumably under the influence of chemotactic signals, circulate through the trabecular meshwork in the normal state and also that cytokines regulate the permeability of Schlemm's canal endothelial cells. In addition, the fact that normal TME cells constitutively secrete chemotactic cytokines strengthens the notion that cytokines play a key role in the homeostasis of the outflow of the aqueous humor and, possibly, in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. PMID:20403352

  8. Heparanase augments inflammatory chemokine production from colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tsunekawa, Naoki; Higashi, Nobuaki; Kogane, Yusuke; Waki, Michihiko; Shida, Hiroaki; Nishimura, Yoshio; Adachi, Hayamitsu; Nakajima, Motowo; Irimura, Tatsuro

    2016-01-22

    To explore possible roles of heparanase in cancer-host crosstalk, we examined whether heparanase influences expression of inflammatory chemokines in colorectal cancer cells. Murine colorectal carcinoma cells incubated with heparanase upregulated MCP-1, KC, and RANTES genes and released MCP-1 and KC proteins. Heparanase-dependent production of IL-8 was detected in two human colorectal carcinoma cell lines. Addition of a heparanase inhibitor Heparastatin (SF4) did not influence MCP-1 production, while both latent and mature forms of heparanase augmented MCP-1 release, suggesting that heparanase catalytic activity was dispensable for MCP-1 production. In contrast, addition of heparin to the medium suppressed MCP-1 release in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, targeted suppression of Ext1 by RNAi significantly suppressed cell surface expression of heparan sulfate and MCP-1 production in colon 26 cells. Taken together, it is concluded that colon 26 cells transduce the heparanase-mediated signal through heparan sulfate binding. We propose a novel function for heparanase independent of its endoglycosidase activity, namely as a stimulant for chemokine production. PMID:26713365

  9. Prostaglandin I2 Suppresses Proinflammatory Chemokine Expression, CD4 T Cell Activation, and STAT6-Independent Allergic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weisong; Zhang, Jian; Goleniewska, Kasia; Dulek, Daniel E; Toki, Shinji; Newcomb, Dawn C; Cephus, Jacqueline Y; Collins, Robert D; Wu, Pingsheng; Boothby, Mark R; Peebles, R Stokes

    2016-09-01

    Allergic airway diseases are immune disorders associated with heightened type 2 immune responses and IL-5 and IL-13 production at the site of inflammation. We have previously reported that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition by indomethacin augmented allergic airway inflammation in a STAT6-independent manner. However, the key COX product(s) responsible for restraining indomethacin-mediated STAT6-independent allergic inflammation is unknown. In this study, using the mouse model of OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation, we identified that PGI2 receptor (IP) signaling was critical for indomethacin-induced, STAT6-independent proallergic effects. We demonstrated that IP deficiency increased inflammatory cell infiltration, eosinophilia, and IL-5 and IL-13 expression in the lung in a STAT6-independent manner. The augmented STAT6-independent allergic inflammation correlated with enhanced primary immune responses to allergic sensitization and elevated production of multiple inflammatory chemokines (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, and CXCL12) in the lung after allergen challenge. We also showed that the PGI2 analogue cicaprost inhibited CD4 T cell proliferation and IL-5 and IL-13 expression in vitro, and IP deficiency diminished the stimulatory effect of indomethacin on STAT6-independent IL-5 and IL-13 responses in vivo. The inhibitory effects of PGI2 and the IP signaling pathway on CD4 T cell activation, inflammatory chemokine production, and allergic sensitization and airway inflammation suggest that PGI2 and its analogue iloprost, both Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, may be useful in treating allergic diseases and asthma. In addition, inhibiting PGI2 signaling by drugs that either block PGI2 production or restrain IP signaling may augment STAT6-independent pathways of allergic inflammation. PMID:27456482

  10. A silent chemokine receptor regulates steady-state leukocyte homing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heinzel, Kornelia; Benz, Claudia; Bleul, Conrad C

    2007-05-15

    The location of leukocytes in different microenvironments is intimately connected to their function and, in the case of leukocyte precursors, to the executed differentiation and maturation program. Leukocyte migration within lymphoid organs has been shown to be mediated by constitutively expressed chemokines, but how the bioavailability of these homeostatic chemokines is regulated remains unknown. Here, we report in vivo evidence for the role of a nonsignaling chemokine receptor in the migration of leukocytes under physiological, i.e., noninflammatory, conditions. We have studied the in vivo role of the silent chemokine receptor CCX-CKR1 by both loss- and gain-of-function approaches. CCX-CKR1 binds the constitutively expressed chemokines CC chemokine ligand (CCL)19, CCL21, and CCL25. We find that CCX-CKR1 is involved in the steady-state homing of CD11c(+)MHCII(high) dendritic cells to skin-draining lymph nodes, and it affects the homing of embryonic thymic precursors to the thymic anlage. These observations indicate that the silent chemokine receptor CCX-CKR1, which is exclusively expressed by stroma cells, but not hematopoietic cells themselves, regulates homeostatic leukocyte migration by controlling the availability of chemokines in the extracellular space. This finding adds another level of complexity to our understanding of leukocyte homeostatic migration. PMID:17485674

  11. Chemokines in Wound Healing and as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Reducing Cutaneous Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Peter Adam; Greaves, Nicholas Stuart; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous scarring is an almost inevitable end point of adult human wound healing. It is associated with significant morbidity, both physical and psychological. Pathological scarring, including hypertrophic and keloid scars, can be particularly debilitating. Manipulation of the chemokine system may lead to effective therapies for problematic lesions. Recent Advances: Rapid advancement in the understanding of chemokines and their receptors has led to exciting developments in the world of therapeutics. Modulation of their function has led to clinically effective treatments for conditions as diverse as human immunodeficiency virus and inflammatory bowel disease. Potential methods of targeting chemokines include monoclonal antibodies, small-molecule antagonists, interference with glycosaminoglycan binding and the use of synthetic truncated chemokines. Early work has shown promising results on scar development and appearance when the chemokine system is manipulated. Critical Issues: Chemokines are implicated in all stages of wound healing leading to the development of a cutaneous scar. An understanding of entirely regenerative wound healing in the developing fetus and how the expression of chemokines and their receptors change during the transition to the adult phenotype is central to addressing pathological scarring in adults. Future Directions: As our understanding of chemokine/receptor interactions and scar formation evolves it has become apparent that effective therapies will need to mirror the complexities in these diverse biological processes. It is likely that sophisticated treatments that sequentially influence multiple ligand/receptor interactions throughout all stages of wound healing will be required to deliver viable treatment options. PMID:26543682

  12. Free Fatty Acids Differentially Downregulate Chemokines in Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells: Insights into Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, Rachel H.; Porsche, Cara E.; Edwards, Michael G.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a prevalent problem throughout the western world. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) have been shown to play important roles in liver injury and repair, but their role in the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease remains undefined. Here, we evaluated the effects of steatosis on LSEC gene expression in a murine model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and an immortalized LSEC line. Using microarray we identified distinct gene expression profiles following exposure to free fatty acids. Gene pathway analysis showed a number of differentially expressed genes including those involved in lipid metabolism and signaling and inflammation. Interestingly, in contrast to hepatocytes, fatty acids led to decreased expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines including CCL2 (MCP-1), CXCL10 and CXCL16 in both primary and LSEC cell lines. Chemokine downregulation translated into a significant inhibition of monocyte migration and LSECs isolated from steatotic livers demonstrated a similar shift towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Overall, these pathways may represent a compensatory mechanism to reverse the liver damage associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27454769

  13. Regulation of the psoriatic chemokine CCL20 by E3 ligases Trim32 and Piasy in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuangang; Lagowski, James P; Gao, Shangpu; Raymond, James H; White, Clifton R; Kulesz-Martin, Molly F

    2010-05-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disorder with aberrant regulation of keratinocytes and immunocytes. Although it is well known that uncontrolled keratinocyte proliferation is largely driven by proinflammatory cytokines from the immunocytes, the functional role of keratinocytes in the regulation of immunocytes is poorly understood. Recently, we found that tripartite motif-containing protein 32 (Trim32), an E3-ubiquitin ligase, is elevated in the epidermal lesions of human psoriasis. We previously showed that Trim32 binds to the protein inhibitor of activated STAT-Y (Piasy) and mediates its degradation through ubiquitination. Interestingly, the Piasy gene is localized in the PSORS6 susceptibility locus on chromosome 19p13, and Piasy negatively regulates the activities of several transcription factors, including NF-kappaB, STAT, and SMADs, that are implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. In this study, we show that Trim32 activates, and Piasy inhibits, keratinocyte production of CC chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20), a psoriatic chemokine essential for recruitment of DCs and T helper (Th)17 cells to the skin. Further, Trim32/Piasy regulation of CCL20 is mediated through Piasy interaction with the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. As CCL20 is activated by Th17 cytokines, the upregulation of CCL20 production by Trim32 provides a positive feedback loop of CCL20 and Th17 activation in the self-perpetuating cycle of psoriasis. PMID:20054338

  14. Jak3 Enables Chemokine-Dependent Actin Cytoskeleton Reorganization by Regulating Cofilin and Rac/Rhoa GTPases Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ambriz-Peña, Xochitl; García-Zepeda, Eduardo Alberto; Meza, Isaura; Soldevila, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Jak3 is involved in the signaling pathways of CCR7, CCR9 and CXCR4 in murine T lymphocytes and that Jak3−/− lymphocytes display an intrinsic defect in homing to peripheral lymph nodes. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the defective migration observed in Jak3−/− lymphocytes remains elusive. Here, it is demonstrated for the first time, that Jak3 is required for the actin cytoskeleton reorganization in T lymphocytes responding to chemokines. It was found that Jak3 regulates actin polymerization by controlling cofilin inactivation in response to CCL21 and CXCL12. Interestingly, cofilin inactivation was not precluded in PTX- treated cells despite their impaired actin polymerization. Additionally, Jak3 was required for small GTPases Rac1 and RhoA activation, which are indispensable for acquisition of the migratory cell phenotype and the generation of a functional leading edge and uropod, respectively. This defect correlates with data obtained by time-lapse video-microscopy showing an incompetent uropod formation and impaired motility in Jak3-pharmacologically inhibited T lymphocytes. Our data support a new model in which Jak3 and heterotrimeric G proteins can use independent, but complementary, signaling pathways to regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics during cell migration in response to chemokines. PMID:24498424

  15. Regulation of the migration and survival of monocyte subsets by chemokine receptors and its relevance to atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Jakubzick, Claudia; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2009-01-01

    Monocytes are central mediators in the advance of atherosclerotic plaque, making them a natural therapeutic target for reducing disease burden. Here, we highlight recent advances in our current understanding of monocyte heterogeneity and its relevance to regulation of monocyte accumulation and function within atherosclerotic plaques. Differences that distinguish monocyte subsets include differential expression of chemokine receptors, especially CCR2 and CX3CR1. Ablation of expression of these two receptors (or their ligands) in mice has an additive inhibition on monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, simultaneously interfering with three key pathways—CCR2, CX3CR1, and CCR5--essentially abolishes atherosclerosis in mice. Here, we discuss how these chemokine receptors act at multiple points on at least one monocyte subset, regulating their mobilization from bone marrow, survival, and/or recruitment to plaques. Finally, we discuss how this knowledge may be useful clinically, emphasizing that CX3CR1 may in particular be a viable target for therapeutic manipulation of monocyte-derived cell fate in cardiovascular disease. PMID:19759373

  16. Lysophosphatidic Acid Alters the Expression Profiles of Angiogenic Factors, Cytokines, and Chemokines in Mouse Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Hung; Lai, Shou-Lun; Ho, Cheng-Maw; Lin, Wen-Hsi; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lee, Po-Huang; Peng, Fu-Chuo; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Wu, Szu-Yuan; Lai, Hong-Shiee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a multi-function glycerophospholipid. LPA affects the proliferation of hepatocytes and stellate cells in vitro, and in a partial hepatectomy induced liver regeneration model, the circulating LPA levels and LPA receptor (LPAR) expression levels in liver tissue are significantly changed. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (Lsecs) play an important role during liver regeneration. However, the effects of LPA on Lsecs are not well known. Thus, we investigated the effects of LPA on the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs. Methods Mouse Lsecs were isolated using CD31-coated magnetic beads. The mRNA expression levels of LPAR’s and other target genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The protein levels of angiogenesis factors, cytokines, and chemokines were determined using protein arrays and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Critical LPAR related signal transduction was verified by using an appropriate chemical inhibitor. Results LPAR1 and LPAR3 mRNA’s were expressed in mouse LPA-treated Lsecs. Treating Lsecs with a physiological level of LPA significantly enhanced the protein levels of angiogenesis related proteins (cyr61 and TIMP-1), cytokines (C5/C5a, M-CSF, and SDF-1), and chemokines (MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16). The LPAR1 and LPAR3 antagonist ki16425 significantly inhibited the LPA-enhanced expression of cyr61, TIMP-1, SDF-1, MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16, but not that of C5/C5a or M-CSF. LPA-induced C5/C5a and M-CSF expression may have been through an indirect regulation mechanism. Conclusion LPA regulated the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs that was mediated via LPAR1 and LPAR3 signaling. Most of the factors that were enhanced by LPA have been found to play critical roles during liver regeneration. Thus, these results may prove useful for manipulating LPA effects on liver regeneration. PMID:25822713

  17. Cutting edge: identification of a novel chemokine receptor that binds dendritic cell- and T cell-active chemokines including ELC, SLC, and TECK.

    PubMed

    Gosling, J; Dairaghi, D J; Wang, Y; Hanley, M; Talbot, D; Miao, Z; Schall, T J

    2000-03-15

    Searching for new receptors of dendritic cell- and T cell-active chemokines, we used a combination of techniques to interrogate orphan chemokine receptors. We report here on human CCX CKR, previously represented only by noncontiguous expressed sequence tags homologous to bovine PPR1, a putative gustatory receptor. We employed a two-tiered process of ligand assignment, where immobilized chemokines constructed on stalks (stalkokines) were used as bait for adhesion of cells expressing CCX CKR. These cells adhered to stalkokines representing ELC, a chemokine previously thought to bind only CCR7. Adhesion was abolished in the presence of soluble ELC, SLC (CCR7 ligands), and TECK (a CCR9 ligand). Complete ligand profiles were further determined by radiolabeled ligand binding and competition with >80 chemokines. ELC, SLC, and TECK comprised high affinity ligands (IC50 <15 nM); lower affinity ligands include BLC and vMIP-II (IC50 <150 nM). With its high affinity for CC chemokines and homology to CC receptors, we provisionally designate this new receptor CCR10. PMID:10706668

  18. Tumorigenesis induced by the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor requires ligand modulation of high constitutive activity.

    PubMed

    Holst, P J; Rosenkilde, M M; Manfra, D; Chen, S C; Wiekowski, M T; Holst, B; Cifire, F; Lipp, M; Schwartz, T W; Lira, S A

    2001-12-01

    ORF74 (or KSHV-vGPCR) is a highly constitutively active G protein-coupled receptor encoded by HHV8 that is regulated both positively and negatively by endogenous chemokines. When expressed in transgenic mice, this chemokine receptor induces an angioproliferative disease closely resembling Kaposi sarcoma (KS). Here we demonstrate that several lines of mice carrying mutated receptors deficient in either constitutive activity or chemokine regulation fail to develop KS-like disease. In addition, animals expressing a receptor that preserves chemokine binding and constitutive activity but that does not respond to agonist stimulation have a much lower incidence of angiogenic lesions and tumors. These results indicate that induction of the KS-like disease in transgenic mice by ORF74 requires not only high constitutive signaling activity but also modulation of this activity by endogenous chemokines. PMID:11748262

  19. Tumorigenesis induced by the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor requires ligand modulation of high constitutive activity

    PubMed Central

    Holst, Peter J.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Manfra, Denise; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Wiekowski, Maria T.; Holst, Birgitte; Cifire, Felix; Lipp, Martin; Schwartz, Thue W.; Lira, Sergio A.

    2001-01-01

    ORF74 (or KSHV-vGPCR) is a highly constitutively active G protein–coupled receptor encoded by HHV8 that is regulated both positively and negatively by endogenous chemokines. When expressed in transgenic mice, this chemokine receptor induces an angioproliferative disease closely resembling Kaposi sarcoma (KS). Here we demonstrate that several lines of mice carrying mutated receptors deficient in either constitutive activity or chemokine regulation fail to develop KS-like disease. In addition, animals expressing a receptor that preserves chemokine binding and constitutive activity but that does not respond to agonist stimulation have a much lower incidence of angiogenic lesions and tumors. These results indicate that induction of the KS-like disease in transgenic mice by ORF74 requires not only high constitutive signaling activity but also modulation of this activity by endogenous chemokines. PMID:11748262

  20. Biased agonism at chemokine receptors: obstacles or opportunities for drug discovery?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Caroline A; Solari, Roberto; Pease, James E

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine receptors are typically promiscuous, binding more than one ligand, with the ligands themselves often expressed in different spatial localizations by multiple cell types. This is normally a tightly regulated process; however, in a variety of inflammatory disorders, dysregulation results in the excessive or inappropriate expression of chemokines that drives disease progression. Biased agonism, the phenomenon whereby different ligands of the same receptor are able to preferentially activate one signaling pathway over another, adds another level of complexity to an already complex system. In this minireview, we discuss the concept of biased agonism within the chemokine family and report that targeting single signaling axes downstream of chemokine receptors is not only achievable, but may well present novel opportunities to target chemokine receptors, allowing the fine tuning of receptor responses in the context of allergic inflammation and beyond. PMID:26701135

  1. Overview and potential unifying themes of the atypical chemokine receptor family.

    PubMed

    Vacchini, Alessandro; Locati, Massimo; Borroni, Elena Monica

    2016-06-01

    Chemokines modulate immune responses through their ability to orchestrate the migration of target cells. Chemokines directly induce cell migration through a distinct set of 7 transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors but are also recognized by a small subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors, characterized by their inability to support chemotactic activity. Atypical chemokine receptors are now emerging as crucial regulatory components of chemokine networks in a wide range of physiologic and pathologic contexts. Although a new nomenclature has been approved recently to reflect their functional distinction from their conventional counterparts, a systematic view of this subfamily is still missing. This review discusses their biochemical and immunologic properties to identify potential unifying themes in this emerging family. PMID:26740381

  2. Atypical Chemokine Receptors and Their Roles in the Resolution of the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Bonecchi, Raffaella; Graham, Gerard J.

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are key mediators of the inflammatory process regulating leukocyte extravasation and directional migration into inflamed and infected tissues. The control of chemokine availability within inflamed tissues is necessary to attain a resolving environment and when this fails chronic inflammation ensues. Accordingly, vertebrates have adopted a number of mechanisms for removing chemokines from inflamed sites to help precipitate resolution. Over the past 15 years, it has become apparent that essential players in this process are the members of the atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR) family. Broadly speaking, this family is expressed on stromal cell types and scavenges chemokines to either limit their spatial availability or to remove them from in vivo sites. Here, we provide a brief review of these ACKRs and discuss their involvement in the resolution of inflammatory responses and the therapeutic implications of our current knowledge. PMID:27375622

  3. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  4. Silent chemoattractant receptors: D6 as a decoy and scavenger receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines.

    PubMed

    Locati, Massimo; Torre, Yeny Martinez de la; Galliera, Emanuela; Bonecchi, Raffaella; Bodduluri, Haribabu; Vago, Gianluca; Vecchi, Annunciata; Mantovani, Alberto

    2005-12-01

    The chemokine system includes at least three "silent" receptors, DARC, D6 and CCX CKR, with distinct specificity and tissue distribution. D6 binds most inflammatory, but not homeostatic, CC chemokines and shuttles in a ligand-independent way from the plasma membrane to endocytic compartments where chemokines are targeted to degradation. In vitro and in vivo evidence, including results with gene-targeted mice, is consistent with the view that D6 acts as a decoy and scavenger for inflammatory CC chemokines. Thus, D6 has unique functional and structural features, which make it ideally adapted to act as a chemokine decoy and scavenger receptor, strategically located on lymphatic endothelium to dampen inflammation in tissues and draining lymph nodes. PMID:15996892

  5. Role of Chemokines in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Angiogenesis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Fuentes, Selma; Salgado-Aguayo, Alfonso; Pertuz Belloso, Silvana; Gorocica Rosete, Patricia; Alvarado-Vásquez, Noé; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common types of aggressive cancer. The tumor tissue, which shows an active angiogenesis, is composed of neoplastic and stromal cells, and an abundant inflammatory infiltrate. Angiogenesis is important to support tumor growth, while infiltrating cells contribute to the tumor microenvironment through the secretion of growth factors, cytokines and chemokines, important molecules in the progression of the disease. Chemokines are important in development, activation of the immune response, and physiological angiogenesis. Chemokines have emerged as important regulators in the pathophysiology of cancer. These molecules are involved in the angiogenesis/angiostasis balance and in the recruitment of tumor infiltrating hematopoietic cells. In addition, chemokines promote tumor cell survival, as well as the directing and establishment of tumor cells to metastasis sites. The findings summarized here emphasize the central role of chemokines as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and their potential role as therapeutic targets in the inflammatory process of NSCLC angiogenesis. PMID:26316890

  6. Chemokine gene expression in the brains of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Asensio, V C; Campbell, I L

    1997-01-01

    Chemokines are pivotal in the trafficking of leukocytes. In the present study, we examined the expression of multiple chemokine genes during the course of lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) in mice. In noninfected mice, no detectable chemokine gene expression was found in the brain; however, by day 3 postinfection, the induction of a number of chemokine mRNAs was observed as follows (in order from the greatest to the least): cytokine responsive gene-2 or interferon-inducible 10-kDa protein (Crg-2/IP-10), RANTES, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1beta), and MCP-3. At day 6 postinfection, the expression of these chemokine mRNAs was increased, and low expression of lymphotactin, C10, MIP-2, and MIP-1alpha mRNAs was detectable. Transcript for T-cell activation-3 was not detectable in the brain at any time following LCM virus (LCMV) infection. With some exceptions, a pattern of chemokine gene expression similar to that in the brain was observed in the peripheral organs of LCMV-infected mice. Mice that lacked expression of gamma interferon developed LCM and had a qualitatively similar but quantitatively reduced cerebral chemokine gene expression profile. In contrast, little or no chemokine gene expression was detectable in the brains of LCMV-infected athymic mice which did not develop LCM. Expression of Crg-2/IP-10 RNA was localized to predominantly resident cells of the central nervous system (CNS) and overlapped with sites of viral infection and immune cell infiltration. These findings demonstrate the expression of a number of chemokine genes in the brains of mice infected with LCMV. The pattern of chemokine gene expression in LCM may profoundly influence the characteristic phenotype and response of leukocytes in the brain and contribute to the immunopathogenesis of this fatal CNS infection. PMID:9311871

  7. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

    PubMed Central

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4+ T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4+ T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 1% of CD4+ T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8+ T cells. CD8+ T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4+ T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6+ and CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8+ T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4+ T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6+ cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE. PMID:25071447

  8. Up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory chemokine CXCL16 is a common response of tumor cells to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Satoko; Demaria, Sandra

    2010-04-01

    We recently showed that mouse and human breast carcinoma cells respond to ionizing radiation therapy by up-regulating the expression and release of the pro-inflammatory chemokine CXCL16, which binds to the CXCR6 receptor expressed by activated T cells. Enhanced recruitment of activated T cells to irradiated mouse 4T1 breast tumors was mediated largely by CXCL16 and was correlated with tumor inhibition in mice treated with the combination of local radiation and immunotherapy. In this study, the expression of CXCL16 and its modulation by radiation were analyzed in mouse melanoma B16/F10, fibrosarcoma MC57, colon carcinoma MCA38, and prostate carcinoma TRAMP-C1 cells. Only TRAMP-C1 cells showed detectable expression of CXCL16, although the level was lower than in 4T1 and 67NR breast carcinoma cells. Ionizing radiation up-regulated CXCL16 expression in all cells except B16/F10, but only TRAMP-C1, 67NR and 4T1 cells released the soluble chemokine in significant quantities. The metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17, which are responsible for cleaving the chemokine domain from the CXCL16 transmembrane form, were expressed in all cells. Overall, our data indicate that up-regulation of CXCL16 is a common response of tumor cells to radiation, and they have important implications for the use of local radiotherapy in combination with immunotherapy. PMID:20334513

  9. Necroptosis suppresses inflammation via termination of TNF- or LPS-induced cytokine and chemokine production

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, C J; Cullen, S P; Tynan, G A; Henry, C M; Clancy, D; Lavelle, E C; Martin, S J

    2015-01-01

    TNF promotes a regulated form of necrosis, called necroptosis, upon inhibition of caspase activity in cells expressing RIPK3. Because necrosis is generally more pro-inflammatory than apoptosis, it is widely presumed that TNF-induced necroptosis may be detrimental in vivo due to excessive inflammation. However, because TNF is intrinsically highly pro-inflammatory, due to its ability to trigger the production of multiple cytokines and chemokines, rapid cell death via necroptosis may blunt rather than enhance TNF-induced inflammation. Here we show that TNF-induced necroptosis potently suppressed the production of multiple TNF-induced pro-inflammatory factors due to RIPK3-dependent cell death. Similarly, necroptosis also suppressed LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Consistent with these observations, supernatants from TNF-stimulated cells were more pro-inflammatory than those from TNF-induced necroptotic cells in vivo. Thus necroptosis attenuates TNF- and LPS-driven inflammation, which may benefit intracellular pathogens that evoke this mode of cell death by suppressing host immune responses. PMID:25613374

  10. IQGAP1 promotes CXCR4 chemokine receptor function and trafficking via EEA-1+ endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bamidele, Adebowale O.; Kremer, Kimberly N.; Hirsova, Petra; Clift, Ian C.; Gores, Gregory J.; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    IQ motif–containing GTPase-activating protein 1 (IQGAP1) is a cytoskeleton-interacting scaffold protein. CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor that binds stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1; also known as CXCL12). Both IQGAP1 and CXCR4 are overexpressed in cancer cell types, yet it was unclear whether these molecules functionally interact. Here, we show that depleting IQGAP1 in Jurkat T leukemic cells reduced CXCR4 expression, disrupted trafficking of endocytosed CXCR4 via EEA-1+ endosomes, and decreased efficiency of CXCR4 recycling. SDF-1–induced cell migration and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK) MAPK were strongly inhibited, even when forced overexpression restored CXCR4 levels. Similar results were seen in KMBC and HEK293 cells. Exploring the mechanism, we found that SDF-1 treatment induced IQGAP1 binding to α-tubulin and localization to CXCR4-containing endosomes and that CXCR4-containing EEA-1+ endosomes were abnormally located distal from the microtubule (MT)-organizing center (MTOC) in IQGAP1-deficient cells. Thus, IQGAP1 critically mediates CXCR4 cell surface expression and signaling, evidently by regulating EEA-1+ endosome interactions with MTs during CXCR4 trafficking and recycling. IQGAP1 may similarly promote CXCR4 functions in other cancer cell types. PMID:26195666

  11. 3D-pharmacophere models for CC chemokine receptor 1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixi; Andre, Philippe; Wei, Jing; Zhao, Kang

    2009-07-01

    The CC Chemokine Receptor 1 (CCR1) is closely related to various chronic inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and plays a crucial role in transplant rejection. Inhibiting its activity with CCR1 antagonists has been proved to be effective in preventing some diseases. A number of in vivo experiments have been carried out to shed light on the underlying mechanism of the interactions between the CCR1 and its ligands. However, their conclusions are still controversial. In this study, ligand-based computational drug design is applied as a new and effective way to study the structure-activity relationship of CCR1 antagonists. Three-dimensional pharmacophore models were generated for CCR1 antagonists, using both HypoGen and HipHop algorithms in Catalyst software. Two optimal pharmacophore models were defined through careful qualification processes. Both of them have four features: one hydrogen-bond acceptor, one positive ionable and two hydrophobic groups. Additional information was obtained through comparison between the two models. Our results can be valuable tools for the discovery and development of specific, highly potent CCR1 antagonists. For Supplement material, please see the online version of the article. PMID:19689388

  12. Simvastatin Inhibits Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Amir A.; Franzi, Lisa; Last, Jerold; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Statin use has been linked to improved lung health in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We hypothesize that statins inhibit allergic airway inflammation and reduce airway hyperreactivity via a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. Objectives: To determine whether simvastatin attenuates airway inflammation and improves lung physiology by mevalonate pathway inhibition. Methods: BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin over 4 weeks and exposed to 1% ovalbumin aerosol over 2 weeks. Simvastatin (40 mg/kg) or simvastatin plus mevalonate (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally before each ovalbumin exposure. Measurements and Main Results: Simvastatin reduced total lung lavage leukocytes, eosinophils, and macrophages (P < 0.05) in the ovalbumin-exposed mice. Cotreatment with mevalonate, in addition to simvastatin, reversed the antiinflammatory effects seen with simvastatin alone (P < 0.05). Lung lavage IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were all reduced by treatment with simvastatin (P < 0.05). Simvastatin treatment before methacholine bronchial challenge increased lung compliance and reduced airway hyperreactivity (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Simvastatin attenuates allergic airway inflammation, inhibits key helper T cell type 1 and 2 chemokines, and improves lung physiology in a mouse model of asthma. The mevalonate pathway appears to modulate allergic airway inflammation, while the beneficial effects of simvastatin on lung compliance and airway hyperreactivity may be independent of the mevalonate pathway. Simvastatin and similar agents that modulate the mevalonate pathway may prove to be treatments for inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma. PMID:19608720

  13. Viral mimicry of cytokines, chemokines and their receptors.

    PubMed

    Alcami, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Viruses have evolved elegant mechanisms to evade detection and destruction by the host immune system. One of the evasion strategies that have been adopted by large DNA viruses is to encode homologues of cytokines, chemokines and their receptors--molecules that have a crucial role in control of the immune response. Viruses have captured host genes or evolved genes to target specific immune pathways, and so viral genomes can be regarded as repositories of important information about immune processes, offering us a viral view of the host immune system. The study of viral immunomodulatory proteins might help us to uncover new human genes that control immunity, and their characterization will increase our understanding of not only viral pathogenesis, but also normal immune mechanisms. Moreover, viral proteins indicate strategies of immune modulation that might have therapeutic potential. PMID:12511874

  14. Repertoire of Chemokine Receptor Expression in the Female Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Bruce K.; Landay, Alan; Andersson, Jan; Brown, Clark; Behbahani, Homira; Jiyamapa, Dan; Burki, Zareefa; Stanislawski, Donna; Czerniewski, Mary Ann; Garcia, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone therapy increase susceptibility to lentivirus transmission. Infection of cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is dependent on expression of specific chemokine receptors known to function as HIV co-receptors. Quantitative kinetic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was developed to determine the in vivo expression levels of CCR5, CXCR4, CCR3, CCR2b, and the cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cervical biopsies from 12 women with and without sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone-predominant conditions. Our data indicate that CCR5 is the major HIV co-receptor expressed in the female genital tract, and CXCR4 is the predominantly expressed HIV co-receptor in peripheral blood. CCR5 mRNA expression in the ectocervix was 10-fold greater than CXCR4, 20-fold greater than CCR2b, and 100-fold greater than CCR3. In peripheral blood, CXCR4 expression was 1.5-fold greater than CCR5, 10-fold greater than CCR2b, and 15-fold greater than CCR3. US28 was not expressed in cervical tissue despite expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from five individuals. CCR5 was significantly increased (p < 0.02) in biopsies from women with sexually transmitted diseases and others who were progesterone predominant. In vitro studies demonstrate that progesterone increases CCR5, CXCR4, and CCR3 expression and decreases CCR2b expression in lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Characterization of chemokine receptors at the tissue level provides important information in identifying host determinants of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:9708808

  15. Ragweed-allergic subjects have decreased serum levels of chemokines CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 out of the pollen season

    PubMed Central

    Kostova, Zhivka; Batsalova, Tsvetelina; Moten, Dzhemal; Teneva, Ivanka

    2016-01-01

    CC-chemokines are important mediators of the allergic responses and regulate the cell trafficking. The aim of this study was to examine the serum levels of CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β and CCL5/RANTES, and to determine whether there are differences between ragweed-allergic subjects and healthy individuals out of the pollen season. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 24 subjects allergic to ragweed pollen and 12 healthy controls. Serum concentrations of chemokines/cytokines were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We observed significantly decreased concentrations of CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β and CCL5/RANTES in the sera of ragweed-allergic patients compared to the healthy individuals (32.2 vs. 106.4 pg/ml, 89.5 vs. 135.7 pg/ml, 63.4 vs. 119.2 pg/ml and 11.2 vs. 18.1 ng/ml, respectively, p < 0.01). In contrast to the CC-chemokines, the serum levels of IL-8/CXCL8 showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the allergic group compared to the non-allergic subjects. Interleukin 4 levels were similar in both groups. In the sera of allergic patients, we have also detected significantly elevated levels of ragweed-specific IgE and IgG. However, decreased serum concentrations of the four CC-chemokines and elevated levels of IL-8/CXCL8 can be used as biomarkers for more accurate evaluation of the allergic status of patients with pollen allergy out of the season, to study the mechanisms for activation/inhibition of the subclinical allergic responses and for development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:26862308

  16. NKT cells mediate pulmonary inflammation and dysfunction in murine sickle cell disease through production of IFN-γ and CXCR3 chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Kori L.; Marshall, Melissa A.; Ramos, Susan I.; Lannigan, Joanne A.; Field, Joshua J.; Strieter, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) triggers an inflammatory cascade that is initiated by the activation of CD1d-restricted iNKT cells. In sickle cell disease (SCD), misshapen erythrocytes evoke repeated transient bouts of microvascular IRI. Compared with C57BL/6 controls, NY1DD mice have more numerous and activated (CD69+, interferon-γ+ [IFN-γ+]) lung, liver, and spleen iNKT cells that are hyperresponsive to hypoxia/reoxygenation. NY1DD mice have increased pulmonary levels of IFN-γ, IFN-γ–inducible chemokines (CXCL9, CXCL10), and elevated numbers of lymphocytes expressing the chemokine receptor CXCR3. Treating NY1DD mice with anti-CD1d antibody to inhibit iNKT cell activation reverses baseline pulmonary dysfunction manifested as elevated vascular permeability, decreased arterial oxygen saturation, and increased numbers of activated leukocytes. Anti-CD1d antibodies decrease pulmonary levels of IFN-γ and CXCR3 chemokines. Neutralization of CXCR3 receptors ameliorates pulmonary dysfunction. Crossing NY1DD to lymphocyte-deficient Rag1−/− mice decreases pulmonary dysfunction. This is counteracted by the adoptive transfer of 1 million NKT cells. Like mice, people with SCD have increased numbers of activated circulating iNKT cells expressing CXCR3. Together, these data indicate that iNKT cells play a pivotal role in sustaining inflammation in SCD mice by a pathway involving IFN-γ and production of chemotactic CXCR3 chemokines and that this mechanism may translate to human disease. PMID:19433855

  17. Ragweed-allergic subjects have decreased serum levels of chemokines CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 out of the pollen season.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Zhivka; Batsalova, Tsvetelina; Moten, Dzhemal; Teneva, Ivanka; Dzhambazov, Balik

    2015-01-01

    CC-chemokines are important mediators of the allergic responses and regulate the cell trafficking. The aim of this study was to examine the serum levels of CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β and CCL5/RANTES, and to determine whether there are differences between ragweed-allergic subjects and healthy individuals out of the pollen season. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 24 subjects allergic to ragweed pollen and 12 healthy controls. Serum concentrations of chemokines/cytokines were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We observed significantly decreased concentrations of CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β and CCL5/RANTES in the sera of ragweed-allergic patients compared to the healthy individuals (32.2 vs. 106.4 pg/ml, 89.5 vs. 135.7 pg/ml, 63.4 vs. 119.2 pg/ml and 11.2 vs. 18.1 ng/ml, respectively, p < 0.01). In contrast to the CC-chemokines, the serum levels of IL-8/CXCL8 showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the allergic group compared to the non-allergic subjects. Interleukin 4 levels were similar in both groups. In the sera of allergic patients, we have also detected significantly elevated levels of ragweed-specific IgE and IgG. However, decreased serum concentrations of the four CC-chemokines and elevated levels of IL-8/CXCL8 can be used as biomarkers for more accurate evaluation of the allergic status of patients with pollen allergy out of the season, to study the mechanisms for activation/inhibition of the subclinical allergic responses and for development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:26862308

  18. Structural Insights into the Interaction Between a Potent Anti-Inflammatory Protein, Viral CC Chemokine Inhibitor (vCCI), and the Human CC Chemokine, Eotaxin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Nai-Wei; Gao, Yong; Schill, Megan S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.; Liwang, Patricia J.

    2014-01-30

    Chemokines play important roles in the immune system, not only recruiting leukocytes to the site of infection and inflammation but also guiding cell homing and cell development. The soluble poxvirusencoded protein vCCI, a CC chemokine inhibitor, can bind to human CC chemokines tightly to impair the host immune defense. This protein has no known homologs in eukaryotes, and may represent a potent method to stop inflammation. Previously, our structure of the vCCI:MIP-1β complex indicated that vCCI uses negatively charged residues in β-sheet II to interact with positively charged residues in the MIP-1βN-terminus, 20’s region and 40’s loop. However, the interactions between vCCI and other CC chemokines have not yet been fully explored. Here, we used NMR and fluorescence anisotropy to study the interaction between vCCI and eotaxin-1 (CCL11), another CC chemokine that is an important factor in the asthma response. NMR results reveal that the binding pattern is very similar to the vCCI:MIP-1βcomplex, and suggest that electrostatic interactions provide a major contribution to binding. Fluorescence anisotropy results on variants of eotaxin-1 further confirm the critical roles of the charged residues in eotaxin. Compared to wild-type eotaxin, single, double, or triple mutations at these critical charged residues weaken the binding. One exception is the K47A mutation that exhibits increased affinity for vCCI, which can be explained structurally. In addition, the binding affinity between vCCI and other wild type CC chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1β and RANTES, were determined as 1.09 nM, 1.16 nM, and 0.22 nM, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first work quantitatively measuring the binding affinity between vCCI and different CC chemokines.

  19. Analysis of G Protein and β-Arrestin Activation in Chemokine Receptors Signaling.

    PubMed

    Vacchini, Alessandro; Busnelli, Marta; Chini, Bice; Locati, Massimo; Borroni, Elena Monica

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are key regulators of leukocyte migration and play fundamental roles in immune responses. The chemokine system includes a set of over 40 ligands which engage in a promiscuous fashion a panel of over 25 receptors belonging to a distinct family of 7 transmembrane-domain receptors (7TM) widely expressed on a variety of cells. Although responses evoked by chemokine receptors have long been considered the result of balanced activation of the G protein- and β-arrestin-dependent signaling modules, evidence is accumulating showing that these receptors are capable, as other 7TMs, to activate different signaling modules in a ligand- and cell/tissue-specific manner. This biased signaling, or functional selectivity, confers a hitherto largely uncharacterized level of complexity to the chemokine system and challenges our present understanding of its redundancy. At the same time, it also provides new insights of relevance for chemokine receptors targeting drug development plans. Here, we provide current methods to study biased signaling of chemokine receptors by dissecting G proteins and β-arrestins activation upon chemokine stimulation. PMID:26921957

  20. The chemokine receptor CCX-CKR mediates effective scavenging of CCL19 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Iain; Milasta, Sandra; Morrow, Valerie; Milligan, Graeme; Nibbs, Robert

    2006-07-01

    The chemokines CCL19, CCL21 and CCL25, by signalling through the receptors CCR7 or CCR9, play critical roles in leukocyte homing. They also bind another heptahelical surface protein, CCX-CKR. CCX-CKR cannot couple to typical chemokine receptor signalling pathways or mediate chemotaxis, and its function remains unclear. We have proposed that it controls chemokine bioavailability. Here, using transfected HEK293 cells, we have shown that both CCX-CKR and CCR7 mediate rapid CCL19 internalisation upon initial chemokine exposure. However, internalised CCL19 was more efficiently retained and degraded after uptake via CCX-CKR. More importantly, CCR7 rapidly became refractory for CCL19 uptake, but the sequestration activity of CCX-CKR was enhanced. These properties endowed CCX-CKR with an impressive ability to mediate progressive sequestration and degradation of large quantities of CCL19, and conversely, prevented CCR7-expressing cells from extensively altering their chemokine environment. These differences may be linked to the routes of endocytosis used by these receptors. CCX-CKR, unlike CCR7, was not critically dependent on beta-arrestins or clathrin-coated pits. However, over-expression of caveolin-1, which stabilises caveolae, blocked CCL19 uptake by CCX-CKR while having no impact on other chemokine receptors, including CCR7. These data predict that CCX-CKR scavenges extracellular chemokines in vivo to modify responses through CCR7. PMID:16791897

  1. Expression of the duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC) by the inflamed synovial endothelium.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Angela M; Siddall, Hilary; Chamberlain, Giselle; Gardner, Lucy; Middleton, Jim

    2002-05-01

    The expression of chemokine binding sites on the endothelial cells of venules in inflamed synovia was examined and whether the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC) was involved. In situ binding assays were performed to determine the expression of chemokine binding sites from rheumatoid (n = 10) and non-rheumatoid (n = 10) synovia. The expression of DARC protein and mRNA was examined by immunohistochemistry and northern blotting. The involvement of DARC in chemokine binding was studied by incubating sections with blocking antibodies to DARC (Fy3 and 6), to find out if these reduced 125I-IL-8 binding. Binding of radiolabelled chemokines IL-8, RANTES, MCP-1, but not MIP-1alpha, was found on venular endothelial cells in inflamed synovia from both rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid patients. Excess homologous unlabelled chemokine displaced binding and excess unlabelled RANTES could displace radiolabelled IL-8 binding. DARC protein expression was demonstrated on venular endothelial cells in all samples and DARC mRNA could be detected in extracts from synovia. There was downregulation of DARC protein and mRNA in rheumatoid samples. Binding of IL-8 to both rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid synovia was significantly reduced in the presence of anti-DARC Fy3 and Fy6 monoclonal antibodies. These findings show the expression of a multispecific chemokine binding site on the inflamed synovial endothelium, with evidence for involvement of DARC. This suggests a potential role for DARC in the inflammatory processes involved in synovitis. PMID:12081195

  2. The Role of Chemokines in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Homing to Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are being administered to cutaneous wounds with the goal of accelerating wound closure and promoting regeneration instead of scar formation. An ongoing challenge for cell-based therapies is achieving effective and optimal targeted delivery and engraftment at the site of injury. Contributing to this challenge is our incomplete understanding of endogenous MSC homing to sites of injury. Recent Advances: Chemokines and their receptors are now recognized as important mediators of stem cell homing. To date, the most studied chemokine–chemokine receptor axis in MSC homing to wounds is CXCL12-CXCR4 but recent work suggests that CCL27-CCR10 and CCL21-CCR7 may also be involved. Critical Issues: Strategies to enhance chemokine-mediated MSC homing to wounds are using a variety of approaches to amplify the chemokine signal at the wound site and/or overexpress specific chemokine receptors on the surface of the MSC. Future Directions: Harnessing chemokine signaling may enhance the therapeutic effects of stem cell therapy by increasing the number of both exogenous and endogenous stem cells recruited to the site of injury. Alternatively, chemokine-based therapies directly targeting endogenous stem cells may circumvent the need for the time-consuming and costly isolation and expansion of autologous stem cells prior to therapeutic administration. PMID:26543676

  3. Chemokines in the balance: maintenance of homeostasis and protection at CNS barriers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica L.; Holman, David W.; Klein, Robyn S.

    2014-01-01

    In the adult central nervous system (CNS), chemokines and their receptors are involved in developmental, physiological and pathological processes. Although most lines of investigation focus on their ability to induce the migration of cells, recent studies indicate that chemokines also promote cellular interactions and activate signaling pathways that maintain CNS homeostatic functions. Many homeostatic chemokines are expressed on the vasculature of the blood brain barrier (BBB) including CXCL12, CCL19, CCL20, and CCL21. While endothelial cell expression of these chemokines is known to regulate the entry of leukocytes into the CNS during immunosurveillance, new data indicate that CXCL12 is also involved in diverse cellular activities including adult neurogenesis and neuronal survival, having an opposing role to the homeostatic chemokine, CXCL14, which appears to regulate synaptic inputs to neural precursors. Neuronal expression of CX3CL1, yet another homeostatic chemokine that promotes neuronal survival and communication with microglia, is partly regulated by CXCL12. Regulation of CXCL12 is unique in that it may regulate its own expression levels via binding to its scavenger receptor CXCR7/ACKR3. In this review, we explore the diverse roles of these and other homeostatic chemokines expressed within the CNS, including the possible implications of their dysfunction as a cause of neurologic disease. PMID:24920943

  4. C-Terminal Engineering of CXCL12 and CCL5 Chemokines: Functional Characterization by Electrophysiological Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Petit-Hartlein, Isabelle; Sadir, Rabia; Revilloud, Jean; Caro, Lydia; Vivaudou, Michel; Fieschi, Franck; Moreau, Christophe; Vivès, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines comprised of 70–100 amino acids. The chemokines CXCL12 and CCL5 are the endogenous ligands of the CXCR4 and CCR5 G protein-coupled receptors that are also HIV co-receptors. Biochemical, structural and functional studies of receptors are ligand-consuming and the cost of commercial chemokines hinders their use in such studies. Here, we describe methods for the expression, refolding, purification, and functional characterization of CXCL12 and CCL5 constructs incorporating C-terminal epitope tags. The model tags used were hexahistidines and Strep-Tag for affinity purification, and the double lanthanoid binding tag for fluorescence imaging and crystal structure resolution. The ability of modified and purified chemokines to bind and activate CXCR4 and CCR5 receptors was tested in Xenopus oocytes expressing the receptors, together with a Kir3 G-protein activated K+ channel that served as a reporter of receptor activation. Results demonstrate that tags greatly influence the biochemical properties of the recombinant chemokines. Besides, despite the absence of any evidence for CXCL12 or CCL5 C-terminus involvement in receptor binding and activation, we demonstrated unpredictable effects of tag insertion on the ligand apparent affinity and efficacy or on the ligand dissociation. These tagged chemokines should constitute useful tools for the selective purification of properly-folded chemokines receptors and the study of their native quaternary structures. PMID:24498095

  5. Andrographolide inhibits prostate cancer by targeting cell cycle regulators, CXCR3 and CXCR7 chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Mir, Hina; Kapur, Neeraj; Singh, Rajesh; Sonpavde, Guru; Lillard, James W; Singh, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Despite state of the art cancer diagnostics and therapies offered in clinic, prostate cancer (PCa) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Hence, more robust therapeutic/preventive regimes are required to combat this lethal disease. In the current study, we have tested the efficacy of Andrographolide (AG), a bioactive diterpenoid isolated from Andrographis paniculata, against PCa. This natural agent selectively affects PCa cell viability in a dose and time-dependent manner, without affecting primary prostate epithelial cells. Furthermore, AG showed differential effect on cell cycle phases in LNCaP, C4-2b and PC3 cells compared to retinoblastoma protein (RB(-/-)) and CDKN2A lacking DU-145 cells. G2/M transition was blocked in LNCaP, C4-2b and PC3 after AG treatment whereas DU-145 cells failed to transit G1/S phase. This difference was primarily due to differential activation of cell cycle regulators in these cell lines. Levels of cyclin A2 after AG treatment increased in all PCa cells line. Cyclin B1 levels increased in LNCaP and PC3, decreased in C4-2b and showed no difference in DU-145 cells after AG treatment. AG decreased cyclin E2 levels only in PC3 and DU-145 cells. It also altered Rb, H3, Wee1 and CDC2 phosphorylation in PCa cells. Intriguingly, AG reduced cell viability and the ability of PCa cells to migrate via modulating CXCL11 and CXCR3 and CXCR7 expression. The significant impact of AG on cellular and molecular processes involved in PCa progression suggests its potential use as a therapeutic and/or preventive agent for PCa. PMID:27029529

  6. Signaling through three chemokine receptors triggers the migration of transplanted neural precursor cells in a model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mikhal E; Fainstein, Nina; Lavon, Iris; Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2014-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifocal disease, and precursor cells need to migrate into the multiple lesions in order to exert their therapeutic effects. Therefore, cell migration is a crucial element in regenerative processes in MS, dictating the route of delivery, when cell transplantation is considered. We have previously shown that inflammation triggers migration of multi-potential neural precursor cells (NPCs) into the white matter of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) rodents, a widely used model of MS. Here we investigated the molecular basis of this attraction. NPCs were grown from E13 embryonic mouse brains and transplanted into the lateral cerebral ventricles of EAE mice. Transplanted NPC migration was directed by three tissue-derived chemokines. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α, monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 and hepatocyte growth factor were expressed in the EAE brain and specifically in microglia and astrocytes. Their cognate receptors, CXCR4, CCR2 or c-Met were constitutively expressed on NPCs. Selective blockage of CXCR4, CCR2 or c-Met partially inhibited NPC migration in EAE brains. Blocking all three receptors had an additive effect and resulted in profound inhibition of NPC migration, as compared to extensive migration of control NPCs. The inflammation-triggered NPC migration into white matter tracts was dependent on a motile NPC phenotype. Specifically, depriving NPCs from epidermal growth factor (EGF) prevented the induction of glial commitment and a motile phenotype (as indicated by an in vitro motility assay), hampering their response to neuroinflammation. In conclusion, signaling via three chemokine systems accounts for most of the inflammation-induced, tissue-derived attraction of transplanted NPCs into white matter tracts during EAE. PMID:25086214

  7. New Insights into Mechanisms and Functions of Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 Heteromerization in Vascular Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Ann E.; Tripathi, Abhishek; LaPorte, Heather M.; Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Albee, Lauren J.; Byron, Kenneth L.; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Volkman, Brian F.; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang; Gaponenko, Vadim; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) heteromerizes with α1A/B-adrenoceptors (AR) and atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) and that CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromers are important for α1-AR function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Structural determinants for CXCR4 heteromerization and functional consequences of CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromerization in intact arteries, however, remain unknown. Utilizing proximity ligation assays (PLA) to visualize receptor interactions in VSMC, we show that peptide analogs of transmembrane-domain (TM) 2 and TM4 of CXCR4 selectively reduce PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions, respectively. While both peptides inhibit CXCL12-induced chemotaxis, only the TM2 peptide inhibits phenylephrine-induced Ca2+-fluxes, contraction of VSMC and reduces efficacy of phenylephrine to constrict isolated arteries. In a Cre-loxP mouse model to delete CXCR4 in VSMC, we observed 60% knockdown of CXCR4. PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A/B-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions in VSMC, however, remained constant. Our observations point towards TM2/4 of CXCR4 as possible contact sites for heteromerization and suggest that TM-derived peptide analogs permit selective targeting of CXCR4 heteromers. A molecular dynamics simulation of a receptor complex in which the CXCR4 homodimer interacts with α1A-AR via TM2 and with ACKR3 via TM4 is presented. Our findings further imply that CXCR4:α1A-AR heteromers are important for intrinsic α1-AR function in intact arteries and provide initial and unexpected insights into the regulation of CXCR4 heteromerization in VSMC. PMID:27331810

  8. New Insights into Mechanisms and Functions of Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 Heteromerization in Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ann E; Tripathi, Abhishek; LaPorte, Heather M; Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Albee, Lauren J; Byron, Kenneth L; Tarasova, Nadya I; Volkman, Brian F; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang; Gaponenko, Vadim; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) heteromerizes with α1A/B-adrenoceptors (AR) and atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) and that CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromers are important for α₁-AR function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Structural determinants for CXCR4 heteromerization and functional consequences of CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromerization in intact arteries, however, remain unknown. Utilizing proximity ligation assays (PLA) to visualize receptor interactions in VSMC, we show that peptide analogs of transmembrane-domain (TM) 2 and TM4 of CXCR4 selectively reduce PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions, respectively. While both peptides inhibit CXCL12-induced chemotaxis, only the TM2 peptide inhibits phenylephrine-induced Ca(2+)-fluxes, contraction of VSMC and reduces efficacy of phenylephrine to constrict isolated arteries. In a Cre-loxP mouse model to delete CXCR4 in VSMC, we observed 60% knockdown of CXCR4. PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A/B-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions in VSMC, however, remained constant. Our observations point towards TM2/4 of CXCR4 as possible contact sites for heteromerization and suggest that TM-derived peptide analogs permit selective targeting of CXCR4 heteromers. A molecular dynamics simulation of a receptor complex in which the CXCR4 homodimer interacts with α1A-AR via TM2 and with ACKR3 via TM4 is presented. Our findings further imply that CXCR4:α1A-AR heteromers are important for intrinsic α₁-AR function in intact arteries and provide initial and unexpected insights into the regulation of CXCR4 heteromerization in VSMC. PMID:27331810

  9. Chemokines as Therapeutic Targets to Improve Healing Efficiency of Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Satish, Latha

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Impaired wound healing leading to chronic wounds is an important clinical problem that needs immediate attention to develop new effective therapies. Members of the chemokine family seem to be attractive and amenable to stimulate the healing process in chronic wounds. Targeting specific chemokines and/or their receptors has the potential to modify chronic inflammation to acute inflammation, which will hasten the healing process. Recent Advances: Over the years, expression levels of various chemokines and their receptors have been identified as key players in the inflammatory phase of wound healing. In addition, they contribute to regulating other phases of wound healing making them key targets for novel therapies. Understanding the signaling pathways of these chemokines will provide valuable clues for modulating their function to enhance the wound healing process. Critical Issues: Inflammation, an important first-stage process in wound healing, is dysregulated in chronic wounds; emerging studies show that chemokines play a crucial role in regulating inflammation. The knowledge gained so far is still limited in understanding the enormous complexity of the chemokine network during inflammation not just in chronic wounds but also in acute (normal) wounds. A much better understanding of the individual chemokines will pave the way for better targets and therapies to improve the healing efficiency of chronic wounds. Future Directions: Effective understanding of the interaction of chemokines and their receptors during chronic wound healing would facilitate the design of novel therapeutic drugs. Development of chemokine-based drugs targeting specific inflammatory cells will be invaluable in the treatment of chronic wounds, in which inflammation plays a major role. PMID:26543679

  10. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120) and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM). Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC). A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans. PMID:22122911

  11. Structural Basis of Chemokine Sequestration by a Tick Chemokine Binding Protein: The Crystal Structure of the Complex between Evasin-1 and CCL3

    PubMed Central

    Dias, João M.; Losberger, Christophe; Déruaz, Maud; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Shaw, Jeffrey P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chemokines are a subset of cytokines responsible for controlling the cellular migration of inflammatory cells through interaction with seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. The blocking of a chemokine-receptor interaction results in a reduced inflammatory response, and represents a possible anti-inflammatory strategy, a strategy that is already employed by some virus and parasites. Anti-chemokine activity has been described in the extracts of tick salivary glands, and we have recently described the cloning and characterization of such chemokine binding proteins from the salivary glands, which we have named Evasins. Methodology/Principal Findings We have solved the structure of Evasin-1, a very small and highly selective chemokine-binding protein, by x-ray crystallography and report that the structure is novel, with no obvious similarity to the previously described structures of viral chemokine binding proteins. Moreover it does not possess a known fold. We have also solved the structure of the complex of Evasin-1 and its high affinity ligand, CCL3. The complex is a 1∶1 heterodimer in which the N-terminal region of CCL3 forms numerous contacts with Evasin-1, including prominent π-π interactions between residues Trp89 and Phe14 of the binding protein and Phe29 and Phe13 of the chemokine. Conclusions/Significance However, these interactions do not appear to be crucial for the selectivity of the binding protein, since these residues are found in CCL5, which is not a ligand for Evasin-1. The selectivity of the interaction would appear to lie in the N-terminal residues of the chemokine, which form the “address” whereas the hydrophobic interactions in the rest of the complex would serve primarily to stabilize the complex. A thorough understanding of the binding mode of this small protein, and its other family members, could be very informative in the design of potent neutralizing molecules of pro-inflammatory mediators of the immune system

  12. AZD-4818, a chemokine CCR1 antagonist: WO2008103126 and WO2009011653.

    PubMed

    Norman, Peter

    2009-11-01

    The applications WO2008103126 and WO2009011653, respectively, claim: i) Combinations of a spirocyclic piperidine chemokine CCR1 antagonist with a corticosteroid, and their use for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. ii) Processes for the preparation of a spirocyclic piperidine derivative, a chemokine CCR1 antagonist. These applications point to the preferred compound being a development compound. The evidence for this compound being AZD-4818, a chemokine CCR1 antagonist that was in Phase II development for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is reviewed in the light of these and earlier patents relating to it. PMID:19586423

  13. Up-regulation of chemokine C-C ligand 2 (CCL2) and C-X-C chemokine 8 (CXCL8) expression by monocytes in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Santos, J C; de Brito, C A; Futata, E A; Azor, M H; Orii, N M; Maruta, C W; Rivitti, E A; Duarte, A J S; Sato, M N

    2012-01-01

    The disturbed cytokine-chemokine network could play an important role in the onset of diseases with inflammatory processes such as chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). Our main objectives were to evaluate the relation between proinflammatory chemokine serum levels from CIU patients and their response to autologous skin test (ASST) and basophil histamine release (BHR). We also aimed to assess the chemokine secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) upon polyclonal stimulus and to evaluate chemokine C-C ligand 2/C-X-C chemokine 8 (CCL2/CXCL8) and Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) expression in monocytes. We observed significantly higher serum levels of the CXCL8, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CCL2 in CIU patients compared to the healthy group, regardless of the BHR or ASST response. The basal secretion of CCL2 by PBMC or induced by Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A (SEA) was higher in CIU patients than in the control group, as well as for CXCL8 and CCL5 secretions upon phytohaemagglutinin stimulation. Also, up-regulation of CCL2 and CXCL8 mRNA expression was found in monocytes of patients upon SEA stimulation. The findings showed a high responsiveness of monocytes through CCL2/CXCL8 expression, contributing to the creation of a proinflammatory environment in CIU. PMID:22132892

  14. Human herpesvirus 8-encoded chemokine vCCL2/vMIP-II is an agonist of the atypical chemokine receptor ACKR3/CXCR7.

    PubMed

    Szpakowska, Martyna; Dupuis, Nadine; Baragli, Alessandra; Counson, Manuel; Hanson, Julien; Piette, Jacques; Chevigné, Andy

    2016-08-15

    The atypical chemokine receptor CXCR7/ACKR3 binds two endogenous chemokines, CXCL12 and CXCL11, and is upregulated in many cancers or following infection by several cancer-inducing viruses, including HHV-8. ACKR3 is a ligand-scavenging receptor and does not activate the canonical G protein pathways but was proposed to trigger β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Here, we identified the human herpesvirus 8-encoded CC chemokine vCCL2/vMIP-II as a third high-affinity ligand for ACKR3. vCCL2 acted as partial ACKR3 agonist, inducing β-arrestin recruitment to the receptor, subsequent reduction of its surface levels and its delivery to endosomes. In addition, ACKR3 reduced vCCL2-triggered MAP kinase and PI3K/Akt signaling through other chemokine receptors. Our data suggest that ACKR3 acts as a scavenger receptor for vCCL2, regulating its availability and activity toward human receptors, thereby likely controlling its function in HHV-8 infection. Our study provides new insights into the complex crosstalk between viral chemokines and host receptors as well as into the biology of ACKR3, this atypical and still enigmatic receptor. PMID:27238288

  15. A genomic analysis of chicken cytokines and chemokines.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Pete; Poh, Tuang Yeow; Rothwell, Lisa; Avery, Stuart; Balu, Sucharitha; Pathania, Uday S; Hughes, Simon; Goodchild, Marianne; Morrell, Shaun; Watson, Michael; Bumstead, Nat; Kaufman, Jim; Young, John R

    2005-08-01

    As most mechanisms of adaptive immunity evolved during the divergence of vertebrates, the immune systems of extant vertebrates represent different successful variations on the themes initiated in their earliest common ancestors. The genes involved in elaborating these mechanisms have been subject to exceptional selective pressures in an arms race with highly adaptable pathogens, resulting in highly divergent sequences of orthologous genes and the gain and loss of members of gene families as different species find different solutions to the challenge of infection. Consequently, it has been difficult to transfer to the chicken detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the mammalian immune system and, thus, to enhance the already significant contribution of chickens toward understanding the evolution of immunity. The availability of the chicken genome sequence provides the opportunity to resolve outstanding questions concerning which molecular components of the immune system are shared between mammals and birds and which represent their unique evolutionary solutions. We have integrated genome data with existing knowledge to make a new comparative census of members of cytokine and chemokine gene families, distinguishing the core set of molecules likely to be common to all higher vertebrates from those particular to these 300 million-year-old lineages. Some differences can be explained by the different architectures of the mammalian and avian immune systems. Chickens lack lymph nodes and also the genes for the lymphotoxins and lymphotoxin receptors. The lack of functional eosinophils correlates with the absence of the eotaxin genes and our previously reported observation that interleukin- 5 (IL-5) is a pseudogene. To summarize, in the chicken genome, we can identify the genes for 23 ILs, 8 type I interferons (IFNs), IFN-gamma, 1 colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2 of the 3 known transforming growth factors (TGFs), 24 chemokines (1 XCL, 14 CCL, 8 CXCL, and 1 CX

  16. The triplet puzzle theory indicates extensive formation of heteromers between opioid and chemokine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, Alexander O; Fuxe, Kjell

    2015-11-01

    Biochemical studies had previously demonstrated examples of heteromerization between opioid and chemokine receptors. Based on the triplet puzzle theory, it has been discovered that opioid receptors are structurally more closely related to chemokine receptors than to other class A G-protein-coupled receptors. Their similarity is established in terms of the number of triplet homologies Asn-Leu-Ala, Thr-Leu-Pro, and Tyr-Ala-Phe in the amino acid code of extensive numbers of members of these two receptor groups. Such widespread similarities probably mean that many opioid and chemokine receptor subtypes utilize some of these mutual triplets to form heteromers. The findings underline that heteromerization among these two receptor groups can represent a major general mechanism for significant interactions between opioid peptides and chemokines in pain and neuroinflammation within the neural-glial networks of the CNS including immune cells. PMID:26133164

  17. Chemokines and Heart Disease: A Network Connecting Cardiovascular Biology to Immune and Autonomic Nervous Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dusi, Veronica; Ghidoni, Alice; Ravera, Alice; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Calvillo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Among the chemokines discovered to date, nineteen are presently considered to be relevant in heart disease and are involved in all stages of cardiovascular response to injury. Chemokines are interesting as biomarkers to predict risk of cardiovascular events in apparently healthy people and as possible therapeutic targets. Moreover, they could have a role as mediators of crosstalk between immune and cardiovascular system, since they seem to act as a “working-network” in deep linkage with the autonomic nervous system. In this paper we will describe the single chemokines more involved in heart diseases; then we will present a comprehensive perspective of them as a complex network connecting the cardiovascular system to both the immune and the autonomic nervous systems. Finally, some recent evidences indicating chemokines as a possible new tool to predict cardiovascular risk will be described. PMID:27242392

  18. Anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 augments monocyte chemotaxis towards CCR5 chemokines.

    PubMed

    Madera, Laurence; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-08-28

    Innate defense regulator (IDR) peptides are a class of immunomodulators which enhance and modulate host innate immune responses against microbial pathogens. While IDR-mediated protection against a range of bacterial pathogens is dependent on enhanced monocyte recruitment to the site of infection, the mechanisms through which they increase monocyte trafficking remain unclear. In this study, anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 was shown to enhance monocyte chemotaxis towards chemokines CCL3 and CCL5. This enhancement correlated with the selective upregulation of CCR5 surface expression by peptide-treated monocytes. It was found that IDR-1002 enhancement of monocyte chemotaxis was fully dependent on CCR5 function. Furthermore, IDR-1002 enhanced chemokine-induced monocyte p38 MAPK phosphorylation in a CCR5-dependent fashion. Overall, these results indicate that peptide IDR-1002 can selectively influence monocyte recruitment by host chemokines through the regulation of chemokine receptors. PMID:26168734

  19. Use of Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques for In Vivo Detection of Chemokine Receptor Oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel; Mellado, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Since the first reports on chemokine function, much information has been generated on the implications of these molecules in numerous physiological and pathological processes, as well as on the signaling events activated through their binding to receptors. As is the case for other G protein-coupled receptors, chemokine receptors are not isolated entities that are activated following ligand binding; rather, they are found as dimers and/or higher order oligomers at the cell surface, even in the absence of ligands. These complexes form platforms that can be modified by receptor expression and ligand levels, indicating that they are dynamic structures. The analysis of the conformations adopted by these receptors at the membrane and their dynamics is thus crucial for a complete understanding of the function of the chemokines. We focus here on the methodology insights of new techniques, such as those based on resonance energy transfer for the analysis of chemokine receptor conformations in living cells. PMID:27271913

  20. 77 FR 10598 - BIOTECH Holdings Ltd., California Oil & Gas Corp., Central Minera Corp., Chemokine Therapeutics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION BIOTECH Holdings Ltd., California Oil & Gas Corp., Central Minera Corp., Chemokine Therapeutics... current and accurate information concerning the securities of California Oil & Gas Corp. because it...

  1. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domains of the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines: characterization of antibody and chemokine binding sites.

    PubMed

    Tournamille, Christophe; Filipe, Anne; Wasniowska, Kazimiera; Gane, Pierre; Lisowska, Elwira; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2003-09-01

    The Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC), a seven-transmembrane glycoprotein carrying the Duffy (Fy) blood group, acts as a widely expressed promiscuous chemokine receptor. In a structure-function study, we analysed the binding of chemokines and anti-Fy monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to K562 cells expressing 39 mutant forms of DARC with alanine substitutions spread out on the four extracellular domains (ECDs). Using synthetic peptides, we defined previously the Fy6 epitope (22-FEDVW-26), and we characterized the Fya epitope as the linear sequence 41-YGANLE-46. In agreement with these results, mutations of F22-E23, V25 and Y41, G42, N44, L45 on ECD1 abolished the binding of anti-Fy6 and anti-Fya mAbs to K562 cells respectively, Anti-Fy3 binding was abolished by D58-D59 (ECD1), R124 (ECD2), D263 and D283 (ECD4) substitutions. Mutations of C51 (ECD1), C129 (ECD2), C195 (ECD3) and C276 (ECD4 severely reduced anti-Fy3 and CXC-chemokine ligand 8 (CXCL-8) binding. CXCL-8 binding was also abrogated by mutations of F22-E23, P50 (ECD1) and D263, R267, D283 (ECD4). These results defined the Fya epitope and suggested that (1) two disulphide bridges are involved in the creation of an active chemokine binding pocket; (2) a limited number of amino acids in ECDs 1-4 participate in CXCL-8 binding; and (3) Fy3 is a conformation-dependent epitope involving all ECDs. We also showed that N-glycosylation of DARC occurred on N16SS and did not influence antibody and chemokine binding. PMID:12956774

  2. Chemokines and Their Receptors Are Key Players in the Orchestra That Regulates Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Green, Manuela; Petreaca, Melissa; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Significance Normal wound healing progresses through a series of overlapping phases, all of which are coordinated and regulated by a variety of molecules, including chemokines. Because these regulatory molecules play roles during the various stages of healing, alterations in their presence or function can lead to dysregulation of the wound-healing process, potentially leading to the development of chronic, nonhealing wounds. Recent Advances A discovery that chemokines participate in a variety of disease conditions has propelled the study of these proteins to a level that potentially could lead to new avenues to treat disease. Their small size, exposed termini, and the fact that their only modifications are two disulfide bonds make them excellent targets for manipulation. In addition, because they bind to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), they are highly amenable to pharmacological modulation. Critical Issues Chemokines are multifunctional, and in many situations, their functions are highly dependent on the microenvironment. Moreover, each specific chemokine can bind to several GPCRs to stimulate the function, and both can function as monomers, homodimers, heterodimers, and even oligomers. Activation of one receptor by any single chemokine can lead to desensitization of other chemokine receptors, or even other GPCRs in the same cell, with implications for how these proteins or their receptors could be used to manipulate function. Future Directions Investment in better understanding of the functions of chemokines and their receptors in a local context can reveal new ways for therapeutic intervention. Understanding how different chemokines can activate the same receptor and vice versa could identify new possibilities for drug development based on their heterotypic interactions. PMID:24587971

  3. Interferons Induce CXCR3-cognate Chemokine Production by Human Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dengel, Lynn T.; Norrod, Allison G.; Gregory, Briana L.; Clancy-Thompson, Eleanor; Burdick, Marie D.; Strieter, Robert M.; Slingluff, Craig L.; Mullins, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Immune-mediated cancer regression requires tumor infiltration by Ag-specific effector T cells, but lymphocytes are commonly sparse in melanoma metastases. Activated T cells express CXCR3, whose cognate chemokines are CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL11/I-TAC. Little is known about expression of these chemokines in lymph node (LN) metastases of melanoma. We evaluated whether metastatic melanoma induces these CXCR3-cognate chemokines in human LN-derived tissues. Also, because these chemokines can be induced by interferon (IFN), we evaluated whether type I or II IFNs (IFN-α or IFN-γ, respectively) can modulate chemokine expression in an in vitro model of the human tumor microenvironment. Production of CXCL9-11 by melanoma-infiltrated nodes (MIN) was no different than tumor-free nodes (TFN); both produced less chemokine than activated LN (sentinel immunized nodes, SIN). These data suggest melanoma infiltration into LN neither induces nor reduces CXCL9-11. Stimulation with IFN-α or IFN-γ increased production of CXCL10-11 from MIN, but not TFN or SIN. IFN-γ also increased production of CXCL9 in MIN. In IFN-treated SIN, CD14+ cells were the primary source of CXCL9-11, whereas melanoma cells were the source of chemokine in MIN. Melanoma cells in MIN express IFN receptors. Consistent with these observations, multiple human melanoma lines expressed IFN receptors and produced CXCL9-11 in response to IFN treatment. Thus, melanoma infiltration of LN is insufficient to induce the production of CXCL9-11, but melanoma may be a significant source of IFN-induced chemokines. Collectively, these data suggest that IFN-α or IFN-γ may act in the tumor microenvironment to increase the chemotactic gradient for CXCR3+ T cells. PMID:20948440

  4. Generation and analysis of mice lacking the chemokine fractalkine.

    PubMed

    Cook, D N; Chen, S C; Sullivan, L M; Manfra, D J; Wiekowski, M T; Prosser, D M; Vassileva, G; Lira, S A

    2001-05-01

    Fractalkine (CX(3)CL1) is the first described chemokine that can exist either as a soluble protein or as a membrane-bound molecule. Both forms of fractalkine can mediate adhesion of cells expressing its receptor, CX(3)CR1. This activity, together with its expression on endothelial cells, suggests that fractalkine might mediate adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium during inflammation. Fractalkine is also highly expressed in neurons, and its receptor, CX(3)CR1, is expressed on glial cells. To determine the biologic role of fractalkine, we used targeted gene disruption to generate fractalkine-deficient mice. These mice did not exhibit overt behavioral abnormalities, and histologic analysis of their brains did not reveal any gross changes compared to wild-type mice. In addition, these mice had normal hematologic profiles except for a decrease in the number of blood leukocytes expressing the cell surface marker F4/80. The cellular composition of their lymph nodes did not differ significantly from that of wild-type mice. Similarly, the responses of fractalkine(-/-) mice to a variety of inflammatory stimuli were indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice. PMID:11287620

  5. Generation and Analysis of Mice Lacking the Chemokine Fractalkine

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Donald N.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Sullivan, Lee M.; Manfra, Denise J.; Wiekowski, Maria T.; Prosser, Dina M.; Vassileva, Galya; Lira, Sergio A.

    2001-01-01

    Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is the first described chemokine that can exist either as a soluble protein or as a membrane-bound molecule. Both forms of fractalkine can mediate adhesion of cells expressing its receptor, CX3CR1. This activity, together with its expression on endothelial cells, suggests that fractalkine might mediate adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium during inflammation. Fractalkine is also highly expressed in neurons, and its receptor, CX3CR1, is expressed on glial cells. To determine the biologic role of fractalkine, we used targeted gene disruption to generate fractalkine-deficient mice. These mice did not exhibit overt behavioral abnormalities, and histologic analysis of their brains did not reveal any gross changes compared to wild-type mice. In addition, these mice had normal hematologic profiles except for a decrease in the number of blood leukocytes expressing the cell surface marker F4/80. The cellular composition of their lymph nodes did not differ significantly from that of wild-type mice. Similarly, the responses of fractalkine−/− mice to a variety of inflammatory stimuli were indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice. PMID:11287620

  6. Sequence and structural analyses of interleukin-8-like chemokine superfamily.

    PubMed

    Kanagarajadurai, Karuppiah; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-8 and related chemokines are small proteins that bind to receptors belonging to the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. They can cause migration of cells like neutrophils and eosinophils and some of them are implicated in angiogenic diseases. More than 40 subfamilies of these ligands are known that share poor sequence similarity and display receptor specificity. There is very little structural information about the mode of binding between ligands and the receptors. We have employed multi-fold sensitive sequence search methods to provide a repertoire of 252 putative interleukin-8 proteins and homologues, which are shared across humans, aves and fish. The sequences can be organized into five major known clusters. The propensity of occurrence of certain amino acid alphabets is found to be specific in different locations of the polypeptide fold. The sequence dispersion is also observed to be cluster-specific when examined by Evolutionary Trace procedure. Amino acid alphabet analysis and Evolutionary Trace procedure reveal cluster-specific amino acid distribution that provide clues about how the small fold of the ligand could display remarkable receptor specificity. We notice regions, like the beta1-beta2 loop of the fold, that are potentially involved in receptor recognition and specificity that could be potential sites for residue mutations. Systematic studies of the distribution patterns enable better understanding of the evolution and molecular recognition of this important and diverse protein superfamily. PMID:19032164

  7. Chemokine receptor CCR2 involvement in skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Warren, Gordon L; Hulderman, Tracy; Mishra, Dawn; Gao, Xin; Millecchia, Lyndell; O'Farrell, Laura; Kuziel, William A; Simeonova, Petia P

    2005-03-01

    Chemokines, signaling through the CCR2 receptor, are highly expressed in injured skeletal muscle. Their target specificity depends on the cellular expression of the specific receptors. Here we demonstrate that, in freeze-injured muscle, CCR2 co-localized with Mac-3, a marker of activated macrophages as well as with myogenin, a marker of activated muscle precursor cells. The degeneration/regeneration process in skeletal muscle of CCR2-/- and wild-type mice was not significantly different at day 3. However in contrast to the regenerated muscle of the wild-type mice, the muscle from CCR2-/- mice was characterized by impaired regeneration, inflammation, and fibrotic response at day 14, increased fat infiltration, fibrosis, and calcification at day 21, and impaired strength recovery until at least 28 days post-injury. Consistently, the increased expression of Mac-1 and TNF-alpha was prolonged in the injured muscle of CCR2-/- mice. The expression pattern of the myogenic factors MyoD and myogenin was similar for both types of mice, while NCAM, which is associated with the initiation of fusion of muscle precursor cells, was more increased in the injured muscle of CCR2-/- mice. In conclusion, the study delineates that signaling through CCR2 is involved in muscle precursor cell activities necessary for complete and rapid regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. PMID:15601671

  8. Chemokine receptor patterns in lymphocytes mirror metastatic spreading in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Jacquelot, Nicolas; Enot, David P.; Flament, Caroline; Vimond, Nadège; Blattner, Carolin; Pitt, Jonathan M.; Roberti, María Paula; Daillère, Romain; Vétizou, Marie; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Semeraro, Michaëla; Caignard, Anne; Slingluff, Craig L.; Sallusto, Federica; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Weide, Benjamin; Marabelle, Aurélien; Kohrt, Holbrook; Dalle, Stéphane; Cavalcanti, Andréa; Kroemer, Guido; Di Giacomo, Anna Maria; Maio, Michele; Wong, Phillip; Yuan, Jianda; Wolchok, Jedd; Umansky, Viktor; Eggermont, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma prognosis is dictated by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, the migratory and functional behavior of which is guided by chemokine or cytokine gradients. Here, we retrospectively analyzed the expression patterns of 9 homing receptors (CCR/CXCR) in naive and memory CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in 57 patients with metastatic melanoma (MMel) with various sites of metastases to evaluate whether T cell CCR/CXCR expression correlates with intratumoral accumulation, metastatic progression, and/or overall survival (OS). Homing receptor expression on lymphocytes strongly correlated with MMel dissemination. Loss of CCR6 or CXCR3, but not cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA), on circulating T cell subsets was associated with skin or lymph node metastases, loss of CXCR4, CXCR5, and CCR9 corresponded with lung involvement, and a rise in CCR10 or CD103 was associated with widespread dissemination. High frequencies of CD8+CCR9+ naive T cells correlated with prolonged OS, while neutralizing the CCR9/CCL25 axis in mice stimulated tumor progression. The expansion of CLA-expressing effector memory CD8+ T cells in response to a single administration of CTLA4 blockade predicted disease control at 3 months in 47 patients with MMel. Thus, specific CCR/CXCR expression patterns on circulating T lymphocytes may guide potential diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:26854930

  9. The Role of Chemokines in Fibrotic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Main dermal forms of fibroproliferative disorders are hypertrophic scars (HTS) and keloids. They often occur after cutaneous wound healing after skin injury, or keloids even form spontaneously in the absence of any known injury. HTS and keloids are different in clinical performance, morphology, and histology, but they all lead to physical and psychological problems for survivors. Recent Advances: Although the mechanism of wound healing at cellular and tissue levels has been well described, the molecular pathways involved in wound healing, especially fibrotic healing, is incompletely understood. Critical Issues: Abnormal scars not only lead to increased health-care costs but also cause significant psychological problems for survivors. A plethora of therapeutic strategies have been used to prevent or attenuate excessive scar formation; however, most therapeutic approaches remain clinically unsatisfactory. Future Directions: Effective care depends on an improved understanding of the mechanisms that cause abnormal scars in patients. A thorough understanding of the roles of chemokines in cutaneous wound healing and abnormal scar formation will help provide more effective preventive and therapeutic strategies for dermal fibrosis as well as for other proliferative disorders. PMID:26543681

  10. Chemokine CXCL1 mediated neutrophil recruitment: Role of glycosaminoglycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Kirti V; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Dutta, Amit K; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Troshkina, Anna; Garofalo, Roberto P; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL1/MGSA plays a pivotal role in the host immune response by recruiting and activating neutrophils for microbial killing at the tissue site. CXCL1 exists reversibly as monomers and dimers, and mediates its function by binding glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and CXCR2 receptor. We recently showed that both monomers and dimers are potent CXCR2 agonists, the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand, lysine and arginine residues located in two non-overlapping domains mediate GAG interactions, and there is extensive overlap between GAG and receptor-binding domains. To understand how these structural properties influence in vivo function, we characterized peritoneal neutrophil recruitment of a trapped monomer and trapped dimer and a panel of WT lysine/arginine to alanine mutants. Monomers and dimers were active, but WT was more active indicating synergistic interactions promote recruitment. Mutants from both domains showed reduced GAG heparin binding affinities and reduced neutrophil recruitment, providing compelling evidence that both GAG-binding domains mediate in vivo trafficking. Further, mutant of a residue that is involved in both GAG binding and receptor signaling showed the highest reduction in recruitment. We conclude that GAG interactions and receptor activity of CXCL1 monomers and dimers are fine-tuned to regulate neutrophil trafficking for successful resolution of tissue injury. PMID:27625115

  11. Chemokine-Mediated Migration of Mesencephalic Neural Crest Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rezzoug, Francine; Seelan, Ratnam S.; Bhattacherjee, Vasker; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2011-01-01

    Clefts of the lip and/or palate are among the most prevalent birth defects affecting approximately 7000 newborns in the United States annually. Disruption of the developmentally programmed migration of neural crest cells (NCCs) into the orofacial region is thought to be one of the major causes of orofacial clefting. Signaling of the chemokine SDF-1 (Stromal Derived Factor-1) through its specific receptor, CXCR4, is required for the migration of many stem cell and progenitor cell populations from their respective sites of emergence to the regions where they differentiate into complex cell types, tissues and organs. In the present study, “transwell” assays of chick embryo mesencephalic (cranial) NCC migration and ex ovo whole embryo “bead implantation” assays were utilized to determine whether SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling mediates mesencephalic NCC migration. Results from this study demonstrate that attenuation of SDF-1 signaling, through the use of specific CXCR4 antagonists (AMD3100 and TN14003), disrupts the migration of mesencephalic NCCs into the orofacial region, suggesting a novel role for SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in the directed migration of mesencephalic NCCs in the early stage embryo. PMID:22015108

  12. Chemokine-Releasing Nanoparticles for Manipulation of Lymph Node Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Taissia G.; Teunis, Allison; Magni, Ruben; Luchini, Alessandra; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance A.; Popov, Serguei G.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines (CKs) secreted by the host cells into surrounding tissue establish concentration gradients directing the migration of leukocytes. We propose an in vivo CK gradient remodeling approach based on sustained release of CKs by the crosslinked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel open meshwork nano-particles (NPs) containing internal crosslinked dye affinity baits for a reversible CK binding and release. The sustained release is based on a new principle of affinity off-rate tuning. The NPs with Cibacron Blue F3G-A and Reactive Blue-4 baits demonstrated a low-micromolar affinity binding to IL-8, MIP-2, and MCP-1 with a half-life of several hours at 37°C. The capacity of NPs loaded with IL-8 and MIP-1α to increase neutrophil recruitment to lymph nodes (LNs) was tested in mice after footpad injection. Fluorescently-labeled NPs used as tracers indicated the delivery into the sub-capsular compartment of draining LNs. The animals administered the CK-loaded NPs demonstrated a widening of the sub-capsular space and a strong lymph node influx of leukocytes, while mice injected with control NPs without CKs or bolus doses of soluble CKs alone showed only a marginal neutrophil response. This technology provides a new means therapeutically direct or restore immune cell traffic, and can also be employed for simultaneous therapy delivery. PMID:25878893

  13. Chemokines CCL2, 3, 14 stimulate macrophage bone marrow homing, proliferation, and polarization in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Qian, Jianfei; Lu, Yong; Zhang, Mingjun; Bi, Enguang; Yang, Maojie; Reu, Frederic; Yi, Qing; Cai, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that macrophages (MΦs) infiltrate the bone marrow (BM) of patients with myeloma and may play a role in drug resistance. This study analyzed chemokines expressed by myeloma BM that are responsible for recruiting monocytes to the tumor bed. We found that chemokines CCL3, CCL14, and CCL2 were highly expressed by myeloma and BM cells, and the levels of CCL14 and CCL3 in myeloma BM positively correlated with the percentage of BM-infiltrating MΦs. In vitro, these chemokines were responsible for chemoattracting human monocytes to tumor sites and in vivo for MΦ infiltration into myeloma-bearing BM in the 5TGM1 mouse model. Surprisingly, we also found that these chemokines stimulated MΦ in vitro proliferation induced by myeloma cells and in vivo in a human myeloma xenograft SCID mouse model. The chemokines also activated normal MΦ polarization and differentiation into myeloma-associated MΦs. Western blot analysis revealed that these chemokines promoted growth and survival signaling in MΦs via activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK MAPK pathways and c-myc expression. Thus, this study provides novel insight into the mechanism of MΦ infiltration of BM and also potential targets for improving the efficacy of chemotherapy in myeloma. PMID:26155942

  14. Molecular characterization of miiuy croaker CC chemokine gene and its expression following Vibrio anguillarum injection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-zhi; Wang, Ri-xin; Sun, Yue-na; Xu, Tian-jun

    2011-07-01

    A CC chemokine gene was isolated from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) by expressed sequence tag analysis. The Mimi-CC cDNA contains an open reading frame of 429 nucleotides encoding 142 amino acid residues. The deduced Mimi-CC possesses the typical arrangement of four cysteines as found in other known CC chemokines (C³¹, C³², C⁵⁶, and C⁷⁰). It shares 15.3%-37.4% identity to CC chemokines of mammal and teleost. Phylogenetic analysis showed that miiuy croaker was most closely related to Atlantic cod. Genomic analysis revealed that Mimi-CC gene consists of four exons and three introns, which is not typical of CC chemokines but resembles that of CXC chemokines. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that Mimi-CC is constitutively expressed in most tissues including lymphoid organs, and the highest expression of Mimi-CC transcripts in normal tissues was observed in muscle. Challenge of miiuy croaker with Vibrio anguillarum resulted in significant changes in the expression of CC chemokine transcripts in four tissues, especially in kidney and spleen. PMID:21414411

  15. Heterologous Quaternary Structure of CXCL12 and its Relationship to the CC Chemokine Family

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.; Yuan, H; Kong, Y; Xiong, Y; Lolis, E

    2010-01-01

    X-ray crystallographic studies reveal that CXCL12 is able to form multiple dimer types, a traditional CXC dimer and a 'CC-like' form. Phylogenetic analysis of all known human chemokines demonstrates CXCL12 is more closely related to the CC chemokine class than other CXC chemokines. These observations indicate that CXCL12 contains genomic and structural elements characteristic of both CXC and CC chemokines.Chemokines are members of a superfamily of proteins involved in the migration of cells to the proper anatomical position during embryonic development or in response to infection or stress during an immune response. There are two major (CC and CXC) and two minor (CX3C and XC) families based on the sequence around the first conserved cysteine. The topology of all structures is essentially identical with a flexible N-terminal region of 3-8 amino acids, a 10-20 residue N-terminal loop, a short 3{sub 10}-helix, three {beta}-strands, and a {alpha}-helix. The major consequence of the subtle difference between the families occurs at the oligomeric level. Monomers of the CC, CXC, and CX3C families form dimers in a family-specific manner. The XCL1 chemokine is a monomer that can interconvert between two folded states. All chemokines activate GPCRs according to family-specificity, however there are a few examples of chemokines crossing the family boundary to function as antagonists. A two-stage mechanism for chemokine activation of GPCRs has been proposed. The N-terminal region of the receptor interacts with the chemokine, followed by receptor activation by the chemokine N-terminal region. Monomeric chemokines have been demonstrated to be the active form for receptor function. There are numerous examples of both chemokines and their receptors forming dimers. While family-specific dimerization may be an attractive explanation for why specific chemokines only activate GPCRs within their own family, the role of dimers in the function of chemokines has not been resolved. Given

  16. The role of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) on hyperalgesia caused by peripheral nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Manjavachi, Marianne Neves; Costa, Robson; Quintão, Nara Lins; Calixto, João B

    2014-04-01

    Chemokines are associated with both inflammatory and immune responses and play an important role in the pathophysiological process associated with neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. Here, we investigated the involvement of peripheral keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain induced by the partial ligation of the sciatic nerve (PLSN) in mice. PLSN increased KC levels and its mRNA in both the sciatic nerve and spinal cord when compared with sham-operated mice. In addition, PLSN-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was prevented by systemic (i.v.) treatment with anti-KC antibody either at the time of surgery or on the 4th day after surgery. Also, intrathecal (i.t.) injection of anti-KC antibody prevented mechanical hyperalgesia induced by PLSN when administered at the time of surgery or on the 4th day after surgery. Importantly, the intraneural (i.n.) injection of KC in the mouse sciatic nerve elicited long-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia, which was prevented by the selective CXCR2 antagonist SB225002. The established mechanical hyperalgesia induced by KC was expressively reduced by the treatment with gabapentin, a drug widely used to treat chronic pain in humans. Intraneural KC injection also caused neutrophil migration into the mouse sciatic nerve and the depletion of neutrophils, by pre-treating animals with vinblastine, significantly reduced KC-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Similar results were obtained for the pre-treatment with indomethacin, a non-selective COX inhibitor. We also demonstrated an increased level of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1, but not TNF-α) after i.n. injection of KC in the mouse sciatic nerve. Together, these findings suggest a role for KC in the development of neuropathic pain in mice by attracting neutrophils to the injured site and increasing the production of proinflammatory mediators. Therefore, strategies to inhibit the action or the release of this chemokine could

  17. Cytokine/Chemokine Responses in Activated CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells Isolated from Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, and Axillary Lymph Nodes during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kenway-Lynch, Carys S.; Das, Arpita; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the cytokine/chemokine networks in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during the acute phase of infection is crucial to design therapies for the control of early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication. Here, we measured early changes in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM), and axillary lymph node (ALN) tissue of rhesus macaques infected with SIVMAC251. At 21 days after infection, all tissues showed a statistically significant loss of CD4+ T cells along with immune activation of CD8+ T cells in PB and ALN tissue. Twenty-eight different cytokines/chemokines were quantified in either anti-CD3/28 antibody- or staphylococcal enterotoxin B-stimulated single-positive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. PB CD4+ T cells produced predominantly interleukin-2 (IL-2), whereas CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in tissues produced β-chemokines both before and 21 days after SIV infection. Tissues generally exhibited massive upregulation of many cytokines/chemokines following infection, possibly in an attempt to mitigate the loss of CD4+ T cells. There was no evidence of a T-helper 1 (TH1)-to-TH2 shift in CD4+ T cells or a T-cytotoxic 1 (TC1)-to-TC2 cytokine shift in CD8+ T cells in PB, BM, and ALN T-cell subsets during the acute phase of SIV infection. Despite the upregulation of several important effector cytokines/chemokines (IL-2, IL-12, IL-17, gamma interferon, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, upregulation of β-chemokines (CCL2 and CCL22), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-basic), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and migration inhibition factor (MIF) may provide a poor prognosis either by inducing increased virus replication or by other unknown mechanisms. Therefore, drugs targeting β-chemokines (CCL2 and CCL22), FGF-basic, HGF, or MIF might be important for developing effective vaccines and therapeutics against HIV. IMPORTANCE Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV

  18. Non-canonical NFκB activation promotes chemokine expression in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Valiño-Rivas, Lara; Gonzalez-Lafuente, Laura; Sanz, Ana B.; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ortiz, Alberto; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D.

    2016-01-01

    TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) receptor Fn14 is expressed by podocytes and Fn14 deficiency protects from experimental proteinuric kidney disease. However, the downstream effectors of TWEAK/Fn14 in podocytes are poorly characterized. We have explored TWEAK activation of non-canonical NFκB signaling in cultured podocytes. In cultured podocytes, TWEAK increased the expression of the chemokines CCL21, CCL19 and RANTES in a time-dependent manner. The inhibitor of canonical NFκB activation parthenolide inhibited the CCL19 and the early RANTES responses, but not the CCL21 or late RANTES responses. In this regard, TWEAK induced non-canonical NFκB activation in podocytes, characterized by NFκB2/p100 processing to NFκB2/p52 and nuclear migration of RelB/p52. Silencing by a specific siRNA of NIK, the upstream kinase of the non-canonical NFκB pathway, prevented CCL21 upregulation but did not modulate CCL19 or RANTES expression in response to TWEAK, thus establishing CCL21 as a non-canonical NFκB target in podocytes. Increased kidney Fn14 and CCL21 expression was also observed in rat proteinuric kidney disease induced by puromycin, and was localized to podocytes. In conclusion, TWEAK activates the non-canonical NFκB pathway in podocytes, leading to upregulation of CCL21 expression. The non-canonical NFκB pathway should be explored as a potential therapeutic target in proteinuric kidney disease. PMID:27353019

  19. Induction of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 by sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei-Hong; Harel, Miriam; Hla, Timothy; Ferrer, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. Preliminary data derived from a human angiogenesis array in NB showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) induced the secretion of several angiogenesis-related proteins including the important inflammatory factor chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2). In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of S1P-induced CCL2 expression in NB. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR and CCL2 ELISA were conducted to detect the mRNA expression and protein secretion of CCL2 in NB cells. Gain and loss of function studies were performed by using specific S1PR antagonists, adenoviral transduction and siRNA transfection. Macrophage F4/80 receptor in NB xenografts was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry staining. Results S1P induced CCL2 mRNA expression and protein secretion in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in NB cells. Blockade of S1P2 signaling using the selective S1P2 antagonist JTE-013 inhibited S1P-induced CCL2 expression. Overexpression of S1P2 by adenoviral transduction increased CCL2 secretion while knockdown of S1P2 by siRNA transfection decreased S1P-induced CCL2 secretion in NB cells. Macrophage infiltration, as detected by F4/80 staining, was significantly decreased in JTE-013-treated NB xenografts. Conclusions Taken together, our data for the first time demonstrate that S1P induced the macrophage-recruiting factor CCL2 expression in NB cells via S1P2, providing new insights into the complicated functions of S1P2 in cancer. PMID:25092091

  20. Coexpression of atypical chemokine binders (ACBs) in breast cancer predicts better outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiao-Hua; Ou, Zhou-Luo; Yu, Ke-Da; Feng, Lan-Yun; Yin, Wen-Jing; Li, Jing; Shen, Zhen-Zhou; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2011-02-01

    Some evidence suggests that atypical chemokine binders (ACBs) including DARC, D6, and CCX-CKR play an important role in inhibiting invasion and metastasis of cancer cells; however, their expression in breast cancer has not been well characterized. The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive value of ACBs for relapse-free survival and overall survival in breast cancer. The expressions of the three molecules were analyzed immunohistochemically in a total of 558 consecutive breast specimens comprising 12 normal breast tissues, 29 noninvasive (carcinoma in situ), and 517 invasive breast carcinoma and their relationships to clinicopathological features and survival were investigated in invasive breast cancer. Coexpression of ACBs in invasive breast carcinoma (55.9%) was much lower that of noninvasive breast carcinoma (93.1%) and normal breast tissue (100.0%), P = 0.0004, 0.0096, respectively. Their separate stainings in invasive cancer were significantly conversely correlated with lymph node status and tumor stage. In univariate analysis, the three proteins and their coexpression were significantly associated with higher relapse-free survival and overall survival. In multivariate analysis, each of these molecules was favorable for relapse-free survival, but not overall survival. Surprisingly, their coexpression was not only independently prognostic factor for relapse-free survival (RR = 0.182, 95% CI: 0.101-0.327, P < 0.001), but also for overall survival (RR = 0.271, 95% CI: 0.081-0.910, P = 0.035). These findings highlight that the multiple loss of ACBs may occur during the development of tumorigenesis and their coexpression in breast cancer is predictive of favorable outcomes. PMID:20369284

  1. Suppressive effect of simvastatin on interferon-beta-induced expression of CC chemokine ligand 5 in microglia.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Kazuo; Saiki, Megumi; Kitani, Hiroshi; Kuboyama, Yuki; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Kurane, Ichiro

    2006-10-30

    Despite the pivotal role of microglia in immune system of the brain, a growing body of evidence suggests that the excessive microglial activation provokes neuronal and glial damages, leading to neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory disorders. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, or statins, have recently received much attention for their suppressive effects on inflammation in the central nervous system. In the current study, we have examined the statin-mediated inhibition of microglial function, especially that of chemokine production. Stimulation of microglial cells with interferon-beta (IFN-beta) resulted in the expression of CC chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5), a major chemoattractant of inflammatory cells. Microglial CCL5 response was synergistically potentiated by costimulation with IFN-beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The simvastatin treatment significantly diminished the microglial CCL5 expression induced by IFN-beta alone or by IFN-beta/TNF-alpha combination. In the presence of simvastatin, the IFN-beta-induced activation of Janus kinase (Jak)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway was attenuated, although this compound had little or no effect on the TNF-alpha-evoked activation of nuclear factor kappaB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways. In addition, chemical inhibitor of Jak-STAT signaling significantly diminished the IFN-beta-induced expression of CCL5 in microglia. Taken together, these results suggest that simvastatin suppresses the IFN-beta-induced expression of CCL5 via down-regulation of Jak-STAT signaling pathway. PMID:16978784

  2. CC chemokine receptor 5 gene polymorphisms in beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Silveira, L; Spagnolo, P; Gillespie, M; Gottschall, E B; Welsh, K I; du Bois, R M; Newman, L S; Maier, L A

    2010-08-01

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is expressed on type-1 T-helper cells, which are involved in the pathogenesis of the granulomatous lung disease chronic beryllium disease (CBD). CCR5 gene (CCR5) polymorphisms are associated with sarcoidosis severity. The present study explores associations between CCR5 polymorphisms and CBD and its disease progression. Eight CCR5 polymorphisms were genotyped in CBD (n = 88), beryllium sensitisation (BeS; n = 86) and beryllium-exposed nondiseased controls (n = 173) using PCR with sequence-specific primers. Pulmonary function and bronchoalveolar lavage data were examined for associations with genotypes. There were no significant differences in genotype and allele frequency between CBD, BeS individuals and controls. In CBD, associations were found with decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity and the CCR5 -3458 thymidine (T)T genotype (p<0.0001), and an increase in alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference at rest (p = 0.003) and at maximum exercise (p = 0.01) and the -5663 adenine allele. Increased bronchoalveolar lavage lymphocyte numbers were associated with CCR5 -2459 guanine/-2135T (p = 0.01) only in the combined CBD and BeS group. This is the first study showing that CCR5 polymorphisms are associated with worsening pulmonary function over time in CBD, suggesting that CCR5 is important in the progression of pulmonary function in CBD. Further studies would be useful to clarify the mechanism whereby CCR5 polymorphisms affect progression of CBD. PMID:20075058

  3. VCC-1, a novel chemokine, promotes tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Edward J.; Head, Richard; Griggs, David W.; Sun Duo; Evans, Robert J.; Swearingen, Michelle L.; Westlin, Marisa M.; Mazzarella, Richard . E-mail: richard.a.mazzarella@pfizer.com

    2006-11-10

    We have identified a novel human gene by transcriptional microarray analysis, which is co-regulated in tumors and angiogenesis model systems with VEGF expression. Isolation of cDNA clones containing the full-length VCC-1 transcript from both human and mouse shows a 119 amino acid protein with a 22 amino acid cleavable signal sequence in both species. Comparison of the protein product of this gene with hidden Markov models of all known proteins shows weak but significant homology with two known chemokines, SCYA17 and SCYA16. Northern analysis of human tissues detects a 1 kb band in lung and skeletal muscle. Murine VCC-1 expression can also be detected in lung as well as thyroid, submaxillary gland, epididymis, and uterus tissues by slot blot analysis. By quantitative real time RT-PCR 71% of breast tumors showed 3- to 24-fold up-regulation of VCC-1. In situ hybridization of breast carcinomas showed strong expression of the gene in both normal and transformed mammary gland ductal epithelial cells. In vitro, human microvascular endothelial cells grown on fibronectin increase VCC-1 expression by almost 100-fold. In addition, in the mouse angioma endothelial cell line PY4.1 the gene was over-expressed by 28-fold 6 h after induction of tube formation while quiescent and proliferating cells showed no change. VCC-1 expression is also increased by VEGF and FGF treatment, about 6- and 5-fold, respectively. Finally, 100% of mice injected with NIH3T3 cells over-expressing VCC-1 develop rapidly progressing tumors within 21 days while no growth is seen in any control mice injected with NIH3T3 cells containing the vector alone. These results strongly suggest that VCC-1 plays a role in angiogenesis and possibly in the development of tumors in some tissue types.

  4. Local Production of Chemokines during Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Michael; Taylor, Brad; Lukacs, Nicholas; Fidel, Paul L.

    1999-01-01

    Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis, caused by Candida albicans, is a significant problem in women of childbearing age. Although cell-mediated immunity (CMI) due to T cells and cytokines is the predominant host defense mechanism against C. albicans at mucosal tissue sites, host defense mechanisms against C. albicans at the vaginal mucosa are poorly understood. Based on an estrogen-dependent murine model of vaginal candidiasis, our data suggest that systemic CMI is ineffective against C. albicans vaginal infections. Thus, we have postulated that local immune mechanisms are critical for protection against infection. In the present study, the kinetic production of chemokines normally associated with the chemotaxis of T cells, macrophages (RANTES, MIP-1α, MCP-1), and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (MIP-2) was examined following intravaginal inoculation of C. albicans in estrogen-treated or untreated mice. Results showed significant increases in MCP-1 protein and mRNA in vaginal tissue of infected mice as early as 2 and 4 days postinoculation, respectively, that continued through a 21-day observation period, irrespective of estrogen status. No significant changes were observed with RANTES, MIP-1α, or MIP-2, although relatively high constitutive levels of RANTES mRNA and MIP-2 protein were observed. Furthermore, intravaginal immunoneutralization of MCP-1 with anti-MCP-1 antibodies resulted in a significant increase in vaginal fungal burden early during infection, suggesting that MCP-1 plays some role in reducing the fungal burden during vaginal infection. However, the lack of changes in leukocyte profiles in vaginal lavage fluids collected from infected versus uninfected mice suggests that MCP-1 functions to control vaginal C. albicans titers in a manner independent of cellular chemotactic activity. PMID:10531235

  5. Expression of Secreted Cytokine and Chemokine Inhibitors by Ectromelia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Vincent P.; Alcami, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    The production of secreted proteins that bind cytokines and block their activity has been well characterized as an immune evasion strategy of the orthopoxviruses vaccinia virus (VV) and cowpox virus (CPV). However, very limited information is available on the expression of similar cytokine inhibitors by ectromelia virus (EV), a virulent natural mouse pathogen that causes mousepox. We have characterized the expression and binding properties of three major secreted immunomodulatory activities in 12 EV strains and isolates. Eleven of the 12 EVs expressed a soluble, secreted 35-kDa viral chemokine binding protein with properties similar to those of homologous proteins from VV and CPV. All of the EVs expressed soluble, secreted receptors that bound to mouse, human, and rat tumor necrosis factor alpha. We also detected the expression of a soluble, secreted interleukin-1β (IL-1β) receptor (vIL-1βR) by all of the EVs. EV differed from VV and CPV in that binding of human 125I-IL-1β to the EV vIL-1βR could not be detected. Nevertheless, the EV vIL-1βR prevented the interaction of human and mouse IL-1β with cellular receptors. There are significant differences in amino acid sequence between the EV vIL-1βR and its VV and CPV homologs which may account for the results of the binding studies. The conservation of these activities in EV suggests evolutionary pressure to maintain them in a natural poxvirus infection. Mousepox represents a useful model for the study of poxvirus pathogenesis and immune evasion. These findings will facilitate future study of the role of EV immunomodulatory factors in the pathogenesis of mousepox. PMID:10954546

  6. Structure of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR1 in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Ho; Das, Bibhuti B.; Casagrande, Fabio; Tian, Ye; Nothnagel, Henry J.; Chu, Mignon; Kiefer, Hans; Maier, Klaus; De Angelis, Anna; Marassi, Francesca M.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    CXCR1 is one of two high-affinity receptors for the CXC chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8), a major mediator of immune and inflammatory responses implicated in many disorders, including tumor growth1-3. IL-8, released in response to inflammatory stimuli, binds to the extracellular side of CXCR1. The ligand-activated intracellular signaling pathways result in neutrophil migration to the site of inflammation2. CXCR1 is a class-A, rhodopsin-like G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), the largest class of integral membrane proteins responsible for cellular signal transduction and targeted as drug receptors4-7. Despite its importance, its molecular mechanism is poorly understood due to the limited structural information available. Recently, structure determination of GPCRs has advanced by tailoring the receptors with stabilizing mutations, insertion of the protein T4 lysozyme and truncations of their amino acid sequences8, as well as addition of stabilizing antibodies and small molecules9 that facilitate crystallization in cubic phase monoolein mixtures10. The intracellular loops of GPCRs are critical for G-protein interactions11 and activation of CXCR1 involves both N-terminal residues and extracellular loops2,12,13. Our previous NMR studies indicate that IL-8 binding to the N-terminal residues is mediated by the membrane, underscoring the importance of the phospholipid bilayer for physiological activity14. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of human CXCR1 determined by NMR spectroscopy. The receptor is in liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayers, without modification of its amino acid sequence and under physiological conditions. Features important for intracellular G-protein activation and signal transduction are revealed. PMID:23086146

  7. The atypical chemokine receptor D6 contributes to the development of experimental colitis1

    PubMed Central

    Bordon, Yvonne; Hansell, Chris A. H.; Sester, David P; Clarke, Mairi; Mowat, Allan McI.; Nibbs, Robert J. B.

    2009-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory CC chemokines control leukocyte recruitment and function during inflammation by engaging chemokine receptors expressed on circulating leukocytes. The D6 chemokine receptor can bind several of these chemokines but appears unable to couple to signal transduction pathways or direct cell migration. Instead, D6 has been proposed to act as a chemokine scavenger, removing pro-inflammatory chemokines to dampen leukocyte responses. In this report, we have examined the role of D6 in the colon using the dextran sodium sulphate-induced model of colitis. We show that D6 is expressed in the resting colon, predominantly by stromal cells and B cells, and is up-regulated during colitis. Unexpectedly, D6-deficient mice showed reduced susceptibility to colitis and had less pronounced clinical symptoms associated with this model. D6 deletion had no impact on the level of pro-inflammatory CC chemokines released from cultured colon explants, or on the balance of leukocyte subsets recruited to the inflamed colon. However, late in colitis, inflamed D6-deficient colons showed enhanced production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IFNγ and IL-17A, and there was a marked increase in IL-17A-secreting γδ T cells in the lamina propria. Moreover, antibody-mediated neutralisation of IL-17A worsened the clinical symptoms of colitis at these later stages of the response in D6-deficient, but not wild-type, mice. Thus, D6 can contribute to the development of colitis by regulating IL-17A secretion by γδ T cells in the inflamed colon. PMID:19342683

  8. Generation and functional significance of CXC chemokines for neutrophil-induced liver injury during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Robert B; Gujral, Jaspreet S; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2005-05-01

    The hypothesis that the neutrophil chemoattractant CXC chemokines KC and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) are involved in neutrophil transmigration and liver injury was tested in C3Heb/FeJ mice treated with galactosamine (Gal, 700 mg/kg), endotoxin (ET, 100 microg/kg), or Gal + ET (Gal/ET). Hepatic KC and MIP-2 mRNA levels and plasma CXC chemokine concentrations were dramatically increased 1.5 h after Gal/ET or ET alone and gradually declined up to 7 h. Murine recombinant cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, and IL-1 beta), but not Gal/ET, induced CXC chemokine formation in the ET-resistant C3H/HeJ strain. To assess the functional importance of KC and MIP-2, C3Heb/FeJ mice were treated with Gal/ET and control IgG or a combination of anti-KC and anti-MIP-2 antibodies. Anti-CXC chemokine antibodies did not attenuate hepatocellular apoptosis, sinusoidal neutrophil sequestration and extravasation, or liver injury at 7 h. Furthermore, there was no difference in liver injury between BALB/cJ wild-type and CXC receptor-2 gene knockout (CXCR2-/-) mice treated with Gal/ET. The higher neutrophil count in livers of CXCR2-/- than in wild-type mice after Gal/ET was caused by the elevated number of neutrophils located in sinusoids of untreated CXCR2-/- animals. The pancaspase inhibitor Z-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone eliminated Gal/ET-induced apoptosis and neutrophil extravasation and injury but not CXC chemokine formation. Thus Gal/ET induced massive, cytokine-dependent CXC chemokine formation in the liver. However, neutrophil extravasation and injury occurred in response to apoptotic cell injury at 6-7 h and was independent of CXC chemokine formation. PMID:15576625

  9. Antimicrobial Effects of Interferon-Inducible CXC Chemokines against Bacillus anthracis Spores and Bacilli▿

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Matthew A.; Zhu, Yinghua; Green, Candace S.; Burdick, Marie D.; Sanz, Patrick; Alem, Farhang; O'Brien, Alison D.; Mehrad, Borna; Strieter, Robert M.; Hughes, Molly A.

    2009-01-01

    Based on previous studies showing that host chemokines exert antimicrobial activities against bacteria, we sought to determine whether the interferon-inducible Glu-Leu-Arg-negative CXC chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 exhibit antimicrobial activities against Bacillus anthracis. In vitro analysis demonstrated that all three CXC chemokines exerted direct antimicrobial effects against B. anthracis spores and bacilli including marked reductions in spore and bacillus viability as determined using a fluorometric assay of bacterial viability and CFU determinations. Electron microscopy studies revealed that CXCL10-treated spores failed to undergo germination as judged by an absence of cytological changes in spore structure that occur during the process of germination. Immunogold labeling of CXCL10-treated spores demonstrated that the chemokine was located internal to the exosporium in association primarily with the spore coat and its interface with the cortex. To begin examining the potential biological relevance of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity, we used a murine model of inhalational anthrax. Upon spore challenge, the lungs of C57BL/6 mice (resistant to inhalational B. anthracis infection) had significantly higher levels of CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 than did the lungs of A/J mice (highly susceptible to infection). Increased CXC chemokine levels were associated with significantly reduced levels of spore germination within the lungs as determined by in vivo imaging. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel antimicrobial role for host chemokines against B. anthracis that provides unique insight into host defense against inhalational anthrax; these data also support the notion for an innovative approach in treating B. anthracis infection as well as infections caused by other spore-forming organisms. PMID:19179419

  10. Identification of Chemokines Associated with the Recruitment of Decidual Leukocytes in Human Labour: Potential Novel Targets for Preterm Labour

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Sarah A.; Tower, Clare L.; Jones, Rebecca L.

    2013-01-01

    Current therapies for preterm labour (PTL) focus on arresting myometrial contractions but are largely ineffective, thus alternative therapeutic targets need to be identified. Leukocytes infiltrate the uterus around the time of labour, and are in particularly abundant in decidua (maternal-fetal interface). Moreover, decidual inflammation precedes labour in rat pregnancies and thus may contribute to initiation of labour. We hypothesized that chemokines mediate decidual leukocyte trafficking during preterm labour (PTL) and term labour (TL), thus representing potential targets for preventing PTL. Women were recruited into 4 groups: TL, term not in labour (TNL), idiopathic PTL and PTL with infection (PTLI). Choriodecidual RNA was subjected to a pathway-specific PCR array for chemokines. Differential expression of 12 candidate chemokines was validated by real time RT-PCR and Bioplex assay, with immunohistochemistry to confirm cellular origin. 25 chemokines were upregulated in choriodecidua from TL compared to TNL. A similar pattern was detected in PTL, however a distinct profile was observed in PTLI consistent with differences in leukocyte infiltration. Upregulation of CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10 mRNA and protein was confirmed in TL, with CCL8 upregulated in PTL. Significant correlations were detected between these chemokines and decidual leukocyte abundance previously assessed by immunohistochemical and image analysis. Chemokines were primarily expressed by decidual stromal cells. In addition, CXCL8 and CCL5 were significantly elevated in maternal plasma during labour, suggesting chemokines contribute to peripheral inflammatory events during labour. Differences in chemokine expression patterns between TL and idiopathic PTL may be attributable to suppression of chemokine expression by betamethasone administered to women in PTL; this was supported by in vitro evidence of chemokine downregulation by clinically relevant concentrations of the steroid. The current

  11. Regulation of chemokine receptor by Toll-like receptor 2 is critical to neutrophil migration and resistance to polymicrobial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Filho, Jose C.; Freitas, Andressa; Souto, Fabricio O.; Spiller, Fernando; Paula-Neto, Heitor; Silva, Joao S.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with sepsis have a marked defect in neutrophil migration. Here we identify a key role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in the regulation of neutrophil migration and resistance during polymicrobial sepsis. We found that the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 was dramatically down-regulated in circulating neutrophils from WT mice with severe sepsis, which correlates with reduced chemotaxis to CXCL2 in vitro and impaired migration into an infectious focus in vivo. TLR2 deficiency prevented the down-regulation of CXCR2 and failure of neutrophil migration. Moreover, TLR2−/− mice exhibited higher bacterial clearance, lower serum inflammatory cytokines, and improved survival rate during severe sepsis compared with WT mice. In vitro, the TLR2 agonist lipoteichoic acid (LTA) down-regulated CXCR2 expression and markedly inhibited the neutrophil chemotaxis and actin polymerization induced by CXCL2. Moreover, neutrophils activated ex vivo by LTA and adoptively transferred into naïve WT recipient mice displayed a significantly reduced competence to migrate toward thioglycolate-induced peritonitis. Finally, LTA enhanced the expression of G protein–coupled receptor kinases 2 (GRK2) in neutrophils; increased expression of GRK2 was seen in blood neutrophils from WT mice, but not TLR2−/− mice, with severe sepsis. Our findings identify an unexpected detrimental role of TLR2 in polymicrobial sepsis and suggest that inhibition of TLR2 signaling may improve survival from sepsis. PMID:19234125

  12. Effects of pharmacological and genetic disruption of CXCR4 chemokine receptor function in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Shubhchintan; Cho, Byung S; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Sivina, Mariela; Koehrer, Stefan; Müschen, Markus; Peled, Amnon; Davis, Richard E; Konopleva, Marina; Burger, Jan A

    2016-08-01

    B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) cells express high levels of CXCR4 chemokine receptors for homing and retention within the marrow microenvironment. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) secrete CXCL12, the ligand for CXCR4, and protect B-ALL cells from cytotoxic drugs. Therefore, the therapeutic use of CXCR4 antagonists has been proposed to disrupt cross talk between B-ALL cells and the protective stroma. Because CXCR4 antagonists can have activating agonistic function, we compared the genetic and pharmacological deletion of CXCR4 in B-ALL cells, using CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing and CXCR4 antagonists that are in clinical use (plerixafor, BKT140). Both genetic and pharmacological CXCR4 inhibition significantly reduced B-ALL cell migration to CXCL12 gradients and beneath BMSC, and restored drug sensitivity to dexamethasone, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. NOD/SCID/IL-2rγnull mice injected with CXCR4 gene-deleted B-ALL cells had significant delay in disease progression and superior survival when compared to control mice injected with CXCR4 wild-type B-ALL cells. These findings indicate that anti-leukaemia activity of CXCR4 antagonists is primarily due to CXCR4 inhibition, rather than agonistic activity, and corroborate that CXCR4 is an important target to overcome stroma-mediated drug resistance in B-ALL. PMID:27071778

  13. Comparative study of CXC chemokines modulation in brown trout (Salmo trutta) following infection with a bacterial or viral pathogen.

    PubMed

    Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Zahran, Eman; Taylor, Nick G H; Feist, Stephen W; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    Chemokine modulation in response to pathogens still needs to be fully characterised in fish, in view of the recently described novel chemokines present. This paper reports the first comparative study of CXC chemokine genes transcription in salmonids (brown trout), with a particular focus on the fish specific CXC chemokines (CXCL_F). Adopting new primer sets, optimised to specifically target mRNA, a RT-qPCR gene screening was carried out. Constitutive gene expression was assessed first in six tissues from SPF brown trout. Transcription modulation was next investigated in kidney and spleen during septicaemic infection induced by a RNA virus (Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia virus, genotype Ia) or by a Gram negative bacterium (Yersinia ruckeri, ser. O1/biot. 2). From each target organ specific pathogen burden, measured detecting VHSV-glycoprotein or Y. ruckeri 16S rRNA, and IFN-γ gene expression were analysed for their correlation to chemokine transcription. Both pathogens modulated CXC chemokine gene transcript levels, with marked up-regulation seen in some cases, and with both temporal and tissue specific effects apparent. For example, Y. ruckeri strongly induced chemokine transcription in spleen within 24h, whilst VHS generally induced the largest increases at 3d.p.i. in both tissues. This study gives clues to the role of the novel CXC chemokines, in comparison to the other known CXC chemokines in salmonids. PMID:26866873

  14. CSF cytokines/chemokines as biomarkers in neuroinflammatory CNS disorders: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kothur, Kavitha; Wienholt, Louise; Brilot, Fabienne; Dale, Russell C

    2016-01-01

    Despite improved understanding of the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory disorders of the brain and development of new diagnostic markers, our biomarker repertoire to demonstrate and monitor inflammation remains limited. Using PubMed database, we reviewed 83 studies on CSF cytokines and chemokines and describe the pattern of elevation and possible role of cytokines/chemokines as biomarkers in viral and autoimmune inflammatory neurological disorders of the CNS. Despite inconsistencies and overlap of cytokines and chemokines in different neuroinflammation syndromes, there are some trends regarding the pattern of cytokines/chemokine elevation. Namely B cell markers, such as CXCL13 and BAFF are predominantly investigated and found to be elevated in autoantibody-associated disorders, whereas interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is elevated mainly in viral encephalitis. Th2 and Th17 cytokines are frequently elevated in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO), whereas Th1 and Th17 cytokines are more commonly elevated in multiple sclerosis (MS). Cytokine/chemokine profiling might provide new insights into disease pathogenesis, and improve our ability to monitor inflammation and response to treatment. PMID:26463515

  15. The integrative roles of chemokines at the maternal-fetal interface in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Du, Mei-Rong; Wang, Song-Cun; Li, Da-Jin

    2014-09-01

    Embryos express paternal antigens that are foreign to the mother, but the mother provides a special immune milieu at the fetal-maternal interface to permit rather than reject the embryo growth in the uterus until parturition by establishing precise crosstalk between the mother and the fetus. There are unanswered questions in the maintenance of pregnancy, including the poorly understood phenomenon of maternal tolerance to the allogeneic conceptus, and the remarkable biological roles of placental trophoblasts that invade the uterine wall. Chemokines are multifunctional molecules initially described as having a role in leukocyte trafficking and later found to participate in developmental processes such as differentiation and directed migration. It is increasingly evident that the gestational uterine microenvironment is characterized, at least in part, by the differential expression and secretion of chemokines that induce selective trafficking of leukocyte subsets to the maternal-fetal interface and regulate multiple events that are closely associated with normal pregnancy. Here, we review the expression and function of chemokines and their receptors at the maternal-fetal interface, with a special focus on chemokine as a key component in trophoblast invasiveness and placental angiogenesis, recruitment and instruction of immune cells so as to form a fetus-supporting milieu during pregnancy. The chemokine network is also involved in pregnancy complications. PMID:25109684

  16. The integrative roles of chemokines at the maternal–fetal interface in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mei-Rong; Wang, Song-Cun; Li, Da-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Embryos express paternal antigens that are foreign to the mother, but the mother provides a special immune milieu at the fetal–maternal interface to permit rather than reject the embryo growth in the uterus until parturition by establishing precise crosstalk between the mother and the fetus. There are unanswered questions in the maintenance of pregnancy, including the poorly understood phenomenon of maternal tolerance to the allogeneic conceptus, and the remarkable biological roles of placental trophoblasts that invade the uterine wall. Chemokines are multifunctional molecules initially described as having a role in leukocyte trafficking and later found to participate in developmental processes such as differentiation and directed migration. It is increasingly evident that the gestational uterine microenvironment is characterized, at least in part, by the differential expression and secretion of chemokines that induce selective trafficking of leukocyte subsets to the maternal–fetal interface and regulate multiple events that are closely associated with normal pregnancy. Here, we review the expression and function of chemokines and their receptors at the maternal–fetal interface, with a special focus on chemokine as a key component in trophoblast invasiveness and placental angiogenesis, recruitment and instruction of immune cells so as to form a fetus-supporting milieu during pregnancy. The chemokine network is also involved in pregnancy complications. PMID:25109684

  17. Structural Evidence for the Tetrameric Assembly of Chemokine CCL11 and the Glycosaminoglycan Arixtra™

    PubMed Central

    Dykstra, Andrew B.; Sweeney, Matt D.; Leary, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding chemokine interactions with glycosaminoglycans (GAG) is critical as these interactions have been linked to a number of inflammatory medical conditions, such as arthritis and asthma. To better characterize in vivo protein function, comprehensive knowledge of multimeric species, formed by chemokines under native conditions, is necessary. Herein is the first report of a tetrameric assembly of the human chemokine CCL11, which was shown bound to the GAG Arixtra™. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicated that CCL11 interacts with Arixtra, and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) was used to identify ions corresponding to the CCL11 tetrameric species bound to Arixtra. Collisional cross sections (CCS) of the CCL11 tetramer-Arixtra noncovalent complex were compared to theoretical CCS values calculated using a preliminary structure of the complex deduced using X-ray crystallography. Experimental CCS values were in agreement with theoretical values, strengthening the IM-MS evidence for the formation of the noncovalent complex. Tandem mass spectrometry data of the complex indicated that the tetramer-GAG complex dissociates into a monomer and a trimer-GAG species, suggesting that two CC-like dimers are bridged by Arixtra. As development of chemokine inhibitors is of utmost importance to treatment of medical inflammatory conditions, these results provide vital insights into chemokine-GAG interactions. PMID:24970196

  18. "Chemokine receptors as therapeutic targets: Why aren't there more drugs?".

    PubMed

    Solari, Roberto; Pease, James E; Begg, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a family of around 40 small proteins, which are secreted by a variety of cells, including structural cell types and leukocytes of the immune system. Chemokines bind to their specific 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and induce a variety of downstream signals which notably modulate polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton and thus drive cellular motility. Excessive or inappropriate release of chemokines is observed in many inflammatory diseases and so there has been a great effort in industry to target chemokine receptors. The large family of GPCRs regulate many physiological cellular processes and they have proved to be highly amenable to pharmacological intervention with small chemicals. Consequently GPCRs make attractive targets for drug discovery and indeed a large number of successful current therapeutics are either agonists or antagonists of GPCRs. The apparent lack of success with chemokine receptors has been frustrating and in this paper we discuss potential reasons for previous failures and also why there is considerable cause for optimism. PMID:25016087

  19. Emerging importance of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligands in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Altara, Raffaele; Manca, Marco; Brandão, Rita D; Zeidan, Asad; Booz, George W; Zouein, Fouad A

    2016-04-01

    The CXC chemokines, CXCL4, -9, -10, -11, CXCL4L1, and the CC chemokine CCL21, activate CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3), a cell-surface G protein-coupled receptor expressed mainly by Th1 cells, cytotoxic T (Tc) cells and NK cells that have a key role in immunity and inflammation. However, CXCR3 is also expressed by vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and appears to be important in controlling physiological vascular function. In the last decade, evidence from pre-clinical and clinical studies has revealed the participation of CXCR3 and its ligands in multiple cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) of different aetiologies including atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as in heart transplant rejection and transplant coronary artery disease (CAD). CXCR3 ligands have also proven to be valid biomarkers for the development of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, suggesting an underlining pathophysiological relation between levels of these chemokines and the development of adverse cardiac remodelling. The observation that several of the above-mentioned chemokines exert biological actions independent of CXCR3 provides both opportunities and challenges for developing effective drug strategies. In this review, we provide evidence to support our contention that CXCR3 and its ligands actively participate in the development and progression of CVDs, and may additionally have utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:26888559

  20. Clinical utilization of chemokines to combat cancer: the double-edged sword

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Agnola, Chiara; Biragyn, Arya

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines are a small group of related chemoattractant peptides that play an essential role in the homeostatic maintenance of the immune system. They control the recruitment of cells needed for the induction and activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. However, tumors also utilize chemokines to actively progress and evade immunosurveillance. In fact, chemokines are involved directly or indirectly in almost every aspect of tumorigenesis. They mediate survival and metastatic spread of tumors, promote new blood vessel formation (neovascularization) and induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment via recruitment of immunosuppressive cells. As a result, a number of therapeutic strategies have been proposed to target almost every step of the chemokine/chemokine receptor involvement in tumors. Yet, despite occasional success stories, most of them appear to be ineffective or impractical, presumably due to ‘nonspecific’ harm of cells needed for the elimination of tumor escapees and maintenance of immunological memory. The strategy would only be effective if it also promoted antitumor adaptive immune responses capable of combating a residual disease and tumor relapse. PMID:17408375

  1. Single cells from human primary colorectal tumors exhibit polyfunctional heterogeneity in secretions of ELR+ CXC chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Adalsteinsson, Viktor; Tahirova, Narmin; Tallapragada, Naren; Yao, Xiaosai; Campion, Liam; Angelini, Alessandro; Douce, Thomas B.; Huang, Cindy; Bowman, Brittany; Williamson, Christina; Kwon, Douglas S.; Wittrup, K. Dane; Love, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is an inflammatory disease of tissue that is largely influenced by the interactions between multiple cell types, secreted factors, and signal transduction pathways. While single-cell sequencing continues to refine our understanding of the clonotypic heterogeneity within tumors, the complex interplay between genetic variations and non-genetic factors ultimately affects therapeutic outcome. Much has been learned through bulk studies of secreted factors in the tumor microenvironment, but the secretory behavior of single cells has been largely uncharacterized. Here we directly profiled the secretions of ELR+ CXC chemokines from thousands of single colorectal tumor and stromal cells, using an array of subnanoliter wells and a technique called microengraving to characterize both the rates of secretion of several factors at once and the numbers of cells secreting each chemokine. The ELR+ CXC chemokines are highly redundant, pro-angiogenic cytokines that signal via either or both of the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors, exerting profound impacts on tumor growth and progression. We find that human primary colorectal tumor and stromal cells exhibit polyfunctional heterogeneity in the combinations and magnitudes of secretions for these chemokines. In cell lines, we observe similar variance: phenotypes observed in bulk can be largely absent among the majority of single cells, and discordances exist between secretory states measured and gene expression for these chemokines among single cells. Together, these measures suggest secretory states among tumor cells are complex and can evolve dynamically. Most importantly, this study reveals new insight into the intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity of human primary tumors. PMID:23995780

  2. When human immunodeficiency virus meets chemokines and microglia: neuroprotection or neurodegeneration?

    PubMed

    Mocchetti, Italo; Campbell, Lee A; Harry, G Jean; Avdoshina, Valeriya

    2013-03-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that were originally discovered as promoters of leukocyte proliferation and mobility. In recent years, however, evidence has demonstrated constitutive expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors in a variety of cells in the central and peripheral nervous system and has proposed a role for chemokines in neurodegenerative diseases characterized by inflammation and microglia proliferation. In addition, chemokine receptors, and in particular CXCR4 and CCR5, mediate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection of immunocompetent cells as well as microglia. Subsequently, HIV, through a variety of mechanisms, promotes synapto-dendritic alterations and neuronal loss that ultimately lead to motor and cognitive impairments. These events are accompanied by microglia activation. Nevertheless, a microglia-mediated mechanism of neuronal degeneration alone cannot fully explain some of the pathological features of HIV infected brain such as synaptic simplification. In this article, we present evidence that some of the microglia responses to HIV are beneficial and neuroprotective. These include the ability of microglia to release anti-inflammatory cytokines, to remove dying cells and to promote axonal sprouting. PMID:22527632

  3. Expression of Chemokine XCL2 and CX3CL1 in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bing; Xu, Heyun; Ni, Kewei; Ni, Xuming; Shen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background Chemokines are a family of small proteins secreted by cells with chemotactic activity, and they play important roles in cell adhesion. However, the expression of chemokine XCL2 and CX3CL1 in lung cancers in different pathological stages remains unclear. Material/Methods XCL2 and CX3CL1 expression in lung cancers and adjacent non-cancerous tissues was detected by quantitative PCR and ELISA. The relative expression of both chemokines in lung cancers in different pathological stages was compared by immunohistochemical assay. Results The relative expression level of XCL2 and CX3CL1 in lung cancer was significantly higher compared with adjacent normal tissues (P<0.001). The expression level of both chemokines was significantly increased with higher pathological stages, as indicated by immunohistochemical assay (P<0.05 or P <0.001). Their expression level in cancers with higher numbers of metastatic lymph nodes was also significantly increased compared with cancers with lower numbers of metastatic lymph nodes (P<0.05 or P<0.001). Conclusions The expression of XCL2 and CX3CL1 increases with increasing degree of malignancy, indicating that both chemokines might be important targets in gene therapy for lung cancer. PMID:27156946

  4. Sulforaphane inhibits de novo synthesis of IL-8 and MCP-1 in human epithelial cells generated by cigarette smoke extract.

    PubMed

    Starrett, Warren; Blake, David J

    2011-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the fifth leading cause of death worldwide. Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is the primary factor associated with the COPD development. CS activates epithelial cells to secrete chemokines such as interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) that recruit neutrophils and macrophages to the lung. These inflammatory cells then release additional chemokines and cytokines leading to chronic inflammation that initiates apoptosis in epithelial and endothelial cells and destruction of alveolar structure. Pulmonary epithelium responds to oxidative stress mediated by CS through activating NRF2-dependent pathways, leading to an increased expression of antioxidant and cytoprotective enzymes thereby providing a protective response against CS-induced lung injury. We hypothesized that activating NRF2-dependent cytoprotective gene expression with sulforaphane (SFN) affords protection against CS-induced lung damage by inhibiting chemokine production. Results indicate that in the human BEAS-2B epithelial cell line, 5 μM SFN activated NRF2-dependent gene expression by triggering the translocation of NRF2 to the nucleus and significantly increased the expression of NRF2-dependent genes such as NADPH quinone oxidoreductase-1, heme oxygenase-1, and glutamate cysteine ligase modulatory subunit. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure of BEAS-2B cells significantly increased production of both IL-8 and MCP-1. Production of both chemokines was significantly reduced with SFN given prior to CSE; SFN inhibited IL-8 and MCP-1 gene expression at the transcription level. Our results indicate that activating NRF2 pathways with SFN inhibits CSE-induced chemokine production in human epithelial cells. However, the mechanism by which the production of chemokines is inhibited through SFN still remains to be elucidated. SFN may enhance NRF2 transcriptional activity resulting in the inhibition of proinflammatory pathways such

  5. The SDF-1/CXCR4 chemokine axis in uveal melanoma cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Bi, Jianjun; Li, Peng; Li, Chuanyin; He, Jie; Wang, Ying; Zhang, He; Fan, Xianqun; Jia, Renbing; Ge, Shengfang

    2016-03-01

    The stromal-cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)/chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) chemokine axis plays a key role in tumor migration. Here, we analyzed the axis in uveal melanoma (UM) proliferation and migration and investigated the effect of a chemical inhibitor of CXCR4, AMD3100, on UM. We found that CXCR4 was expressed in all five UM cell lines tested as well as the retinal pigment epithelium cell line ARPE-19 cells, while CXCR7 was only detected in OM290 and VUP cell lines. SDF-1 promotes the proliferation and migration of OCM-1 and OCM431 cell lines, while AMD3100 weakens this function. Taken together, our results show that the SDF-1/CXCR4 chemokine axis plays a key role in UM cell proliferation and migration and that AMD3100 can alleviate this function, which may offer a hint for UM treatment. PMID:26490988

  6. Chemokine-dependent T cell migration requires aquaporin-3–mediated hydrogen peroxide uptake

    PubMed Central

    Chikuma, Shunsuke; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Kabashima, Kenji; Verkman, Alan S.; Inoue, Shintaro; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine-dependent trafficking is indispensable for the effector function of antigen-experienced T cells during immune responses. In this study, we report that the water/glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is expressed on T cells and regulates their trafficking in cutaneous immune reactions. T cell migration toward chemokines is dependent on AQP3-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) uptake but not the canonical water/glycerol transport. AQP3-mediated H2O2 transport is essential for the activation of the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 and the subsequent actin dynamics. Coincidentally, AQP3-deficient mice are defective in the development of hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity, which is attributed to the impaired trafficking of antigen-primed T cells to the hapten-challenged skin. We therefore suggest that AQP3-mediated H2O2 uptake is required for chemokine-dependent T cell migration in sufficient immune response. PMID:22927550

  7. The Equine Herpesvirus 2 E1 Open Reading Frame Encodes a Functional Chemokine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Camarda, Grazia; Spinetti, Gaia; Bernardini, Giovanni; Mair, Catherine; Davis-Poynter, Nick; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Napolitano, Monica

    1999-01-01

    Several herpesviruses contain open reading frames (ORFs) that encode potential homologs of eucaryotic genes. Equine herpesvirus 2 (EHV-2) is a gammaherpesvirus related to other lymphotropic herpesviruses such as herpesvirus saimiri and Epstein-Barr virus. The E1 ORF of EHV-2, a G protein-coupled receptor homolog, shows 31 to 47% amino acid identity with known CC chemokine receptors. To investigate whether E1 may encode a functional receptor, we cloned the E1 ORF and expressed it in stably transfected cell lines. We report here the identification of the CC chemokine eotaxin as a functional ligand for the EHV-2 E1 receptor. Chemokines are likely to play a role in the regulation of immune functions in equine hosts during EHV-2 infection and, via interaction with E1, may affect viral replication and/or escape from immune responses. PMID:10559296

  8. The Role of Chemokines in Promoting Colorectal Cancer Invasion/Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Itatani, Yoshiro; Kawada, Kenji; Inamoto, Susumu; Yamamoto, Takamasa; Ogawa, Ryotaro; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Although most of the primary CRC can be removed by surgical resection, advanced tumors sometimes show recurrences in distant organs such as the liver, lung, lymph node, bone or peritoneum even after complete resection of the primary tumors. In these advanced and metastatic CRC, it is the tumor-stroma interaction in the tumor microenvironment that often promotes cancer invasion and/or metastasis through chemokine signaling. The tumor microenvironment contains numerous host cells that may suppress or promote cancer aggressiveness. Several types of host-derived myeloid cells reside in the tumor microenvironment, and the recruitment of them is under the control of chemokine signaling. In this review, we focus on the functions of chemokine signaling that may affect tumor immunity by recruiting several types of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) to the tumor microenvironment of CRC. PMID:27136535

  9. Chemokine production by human vascular smooth muscle cells: modulation by IL-13

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Nicola J; Watson, Malcolm L; Williams, Robert J; Roach, Alan G; Yoshimura, Teizo; Westwick, John

    1997-01-01

    The production of chemokines by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, although the factors regulating chemokine production by these cells are incompletely characterized. We describe the differential stimulation of interleukin-(IL)-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) synthesis following treatment of human vascular SMC with IL-1α or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα). Under basal conditions, cultured SMC release very low amounts of IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES as assessed by specific ELISA. Concentration-response studies with IL-1α or TNFα revealed that each stimulus induced a similar amount of MCP-1. In contrast approximately three fold more IL-8 was induced by IL-1α than by TNFα whereas significant RANTES production was induced only by TNFα. These findings point to a divergence in the regulation of synthesis of the different chemokines in response to IL-1α or TNFα stimulation. The T-cell derived cytokines IL-10 and IL-13 were also found to have differential effects on chemokine production by SMC. IL-13, but not IL-10, significantly enhanced IL-8 and MCP-1 release in response to IL-1α or TNFα. This increase in chemokine release appeared to be accounted for by increased mRNA expression. These findings provide support for the concept that smooth muscle cells can have an active role in a local immune response via the production of chemokines which can be selectively modulated by T-cell derived cytokines. PMID:9375973

  10. Expression of chemokine decoy receptors and their ligands at the porcine maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Jocelyn M; Linton, Nicola F; van den Heuvel, Marianne J; Cnossen, Sonya A; Edwards, Andrew K; Croy, Barbara Anne; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2011-02-01

    Successful pregnancy requires coordinated maternal-fetal cross-talk to establish vascular connections that support conceptus growth. In pigs, two waves of spontaneous fetal loss occur and 30-40% of conceptuses are lost before parturition. Previous studies associated these losses with decreased angiogenic and increased inflammatory cytokines. Chemokines, a sub-category of cytokines, and decoy receptors control leukocyte trafficking, angiogenesis and development. The availability of chemokines is regulated by three non-signalling decoy receptors: chemokine decoy receptor (D6), Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) and Chemocentryx decoy receptor (CCX CKR). We hypothesized that the expression of these receptors and their chemokine ligands regulate the porcine pregnancy success or failure. Here, we describe for the first time the transcription and translation of all three decoy receptors and several chemokine ligands in endometrium and trophoblast associated with healthy and arresting conceptuses at gestation day (gd) 20 and gd50. Among decoy receptors, transcripts for DARC were significantly reduced in endometrium, whereas that for CCX CKR were significantly increased in endometrium and trophoblast at gd50 arresting compared with healthy sites. However, western blot analysis revealed no differences in decoy receptor expression between healthy and arresting tissues. Transcripts for decoy receptor ligands CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CCL11, CCL19, CCL21, CXCL2 and CXCL8 were stable between healthy and arresting littermates. Quantification by SearchLight chemiluminescent protein array confirmed ligand expression at the protein level. These data indicate that decoy receptors and ligands are expressed at the porcine maternal-fetal interface and dysregulation of decoy receptor (DARC and CCX CKR) transcripts occurs at sites of fetal arrest. PMID:20680026

  11. Plasmatic proinflammatory chemokines levels are tricky markers to monitoring HTLV-1 carriers.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Daniel Gonçalves; Sales, Camila Campos; de Cássia Gonçalves, Poliane; da Silva-Malta, Maria Clara Fernandes; Romanelli, Luiz Cláudio; Ribas, João Gabriel; de Freitas Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara; Martins, Marina Lobato

    2016-08-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is present throughout the world and is associated with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and other inflammatory conditions. The pathogenesis of HAM/TSP involves a chronic inflammatory response in central nervous system (CNS), with the presence of HTLV-1 infected cells and HTLV-1-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Chemokines may have a role in the infiltration of these cells into the CNS. In this context, the present study analyzed the level of plasmatic chemokines CCL2 (MCP-1), CCL5 (RANTES), IL8 (CXCL8), CXCL9 (MIG), and CXCL10 (IP-10) and HTLV-1 proviral load from peripheral blood in 162 asymptomatic carriers and 136 HAM/TSP patients to determine the differences that be associated with the clinical status of the HTLV-1 infection. The results showed that patients with HAM/TSP have significantly higher levels of IL8 and CXCL9, and that the level of IL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 was significantly greater in HTLV-1 infected individuals with high (>1%) than those with low proviral load (<1%). However, the levels of the chemokines tested have not showed high sensitivity to discriminate HAM/TSP patients from asymptomatic carriers. In addition, chemokine profiles in asymptomatic carriers and HAM/TSP groups were similar, with no significant increased frequency of higher producers of chemokines in HAM/TSP individuals. Results indicate that the heterogeneity of the individuals in the groups regarding time of infection, duration of disease, proviral load level and other possible confound factors may impair the use of chemokines levels to monitor HTLV-1 carriers in clinical practice. J. Med. Virol. 88:1438-1447, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26800845

  12. Molecular Basis of Glycosaminoglycan Heparin Binding to the Chemokine CXCL1 Dimer*

    PubMed Central

    Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Joseph, Prem Raj B.; Sawant, Kirti V.; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-bound and soluble chemokine gradients in the vasculature and extracellular matrix mediate neutrophil recruitment to the site of microbial infection and sterile injury in the host tissue. However, the molecular principles by which chemokine-GAG interactions orchestrate these gradients are poorly understood. This, in part, can be directly attributed to the complex interrelationship between the chemokine monomer-dimer equilibrium and binding geometry and affinities that are also intimately linked to GAG length. To address some of this missing knowledge, we have characterized the structural basis of heparin binding to the murine CXCL1 dimer. CXCL1 is a neutrophil-activating chemokine and exists as both monomers and dimers (Kd = 36 μm). To avoid interference from monomer-GAG interactions, we designed a trapped dimer (dCXCL1) by introducing a disulfide bridge across the dimer interface. We characterized the binding of GAG heparin octasaccharide to dCXCL1 using solution NMR spectroscopy. Our studies show that octasaccharide binds orthogonally to the interhelical axis and spans the dimer interface and that heparin binding enhances the structural integrity of the C-terminal helical residues and stability of the dimer. We generated a quadruple mutant (H20A/K22A/K62A/K66A) on the basis of the binding data and observed that this mutant failed to bind heparin octasaccharide, validating our structural model. We propose that the stability enhancement of dimers upon GAG binding regulates in vivo neutrophil trafficking by increasing the lifetime of “active” chemokines, and that this structural knowledge could be exploited for designing inhibitors that disrupt chemokine-GAG interactions and neutrophil homing to the target tissue. PMID:23864653

  13. The Interaction of Heparin Tetrasaccharides with Chemokine CCL5 Is Modulated by Sulfation Pattern and pH*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arunima; Kett, Warren C.; Severin, India C.; Agyekum, Isaac; Duan, Jiana; Amster, I. Jonathan; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Coombe, Deirdre R.; Woods, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between chemokines such as CCL5 and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are essential for creating haptotactic gradients to guide the migration of leukocytes into inflammatory sites, and the GAGs that interact with CCL5 with the highest affinity are heparan sulfates/heparin. The interaction between CCL5 and its receptor on monocytes, CCR1, is mediated through residues Arg-17 and -47 in CCL5, which overlap with the GAG-binding 44RKNR47 “BBXB” motifs. Here we report that heparin and tetrasaccharide fragments of heparin are able to inhibit CCL5-CCR1 binding, with IC50 values showing strong dependence on the pattern and extent of sulfation. Modeling of the CCL5-tetrasaccharide complexes suggested that interactions between specific sulfate and carboxylate groups of heparin and residues Arg-17 and -47 of the protein are essential for strong inhibition; tetrasaccharides lacking the specific sulfation pattern were found to preferentially bind CCL5 in positions less favorable for inhibition of the interaction with CCR1. Simulations of a 12-mer heparin fragment bound to CCL5 indicated that the oligosaccharide preferred to interact simultaneously with both 44RKNR47 motifs in the CCL5 homodimer and engaged residues Arg-47 and -17 from both chains. Direct engagement of these residues by the longer heparin oligosaccharide provides a rationalization for its effectiveness as an inhibitor of CCL5-CCR1 interaction. In this mode, histidine (His-23) may contribute to CCL5-GAG interactions when the pH drops just below neutral, as occurs during inflammation. Additionally, an examination of the contribution of pH to modulating CCL5-heparin interactions suggested a need for careful interpretation of experimental results when experiments are performed under non-physiological conditions. PMID:25907556

  14. Apigenin suppresses migration and invasion of transformed cells through down-regulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Kuang, Lisha; Hitron, John Andrew; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Budhraja, Amit; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhuo; Luo, Jia; Shi, Xianglin

    2013-10-01

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is known to cause various cancers. There are some potential relationships between cell malignant transformation and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expressions. Metastasis, one of the major characteristics of malignantly transformed cells, contributes to the high mortality of cells. CXCR4 and its natural chemokine ligand C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12) play a critical role in metastasis. Therefore, identification of nutritional factors which are able to inhibit CXCR4 is important for protection from environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis and for abolishing metastasis of malignantly transformed cells. The present study demonstrates that apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a natural dietary flavonoid, suppressed CXCR4 expression in arsenic-transformed Beas-2B cells (B-AsT) and several other types of transformed/cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitor had any effect in reducing the apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4, indicating that apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4 is not due to proteolytic degradation. The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to the inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Apigenin also abolished migration and invasion of transformed cells induced by CXCL12. In a xenograft mouse model, apigenin down-regulated CXCR4 expression and suppressed tumor growth. Taken together, our results show that apigenin is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression. This dietary flavonoid has the potential to suppress migration and invasion of transformed cells and prevent environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Apigenin has a potential in preventing environmental arsenic induced carcinogenesis. • Apigenin suppresses CXCR4 in malignant transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. • The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to inhibition of NF-κB activity.

  15. Dual blockade of the pro-inflammatory chemokine CCL2 and the homeostatic chemokine CXCL12 is as effective as high dose cyclophosphamide in murine proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Kumar Vr, Santhosh; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Eulberg, Dirk; Klussmann, Sven; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Induction therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis still requires the use of unselective immunosuppressive drugs with significant toxicities. In search of more specific drugs with equal efficacy but fewer side effects we considered blocking pro-inflammatory chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and homeostatic chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12), which both contribute to the onset and progression of proliferative lupus nephritis yet through different mechanisms. We hypothesized that dual antagonism could be as potent on lupus nephritis as the unselective immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide (CYC). We estimated serum levels of CCL2 and CXCL12 in patients with SLE (n=99) and compared the results with healthy individuals (n=21). In order to prove our hypothesis we used l-enantiomeric RNA Spiegelmer® chemokine antagonists, i.e. the CCL2-specific mNOX-E36 and the CXCL12-specific NOX-A12 to treat female MRL/lpr mice from week 12 to 20 of age with either anti-CXCL12 or anti-CCL2 alone or both. SLE patients showed elevated serum levels of CCL2 but not of CXCL12. Female MRL/lpr mice treated with dual blockade showed significantly more effective than either monotherapy in preventing proteinuria, immune complex glomerulonephritis, and renal excretory failure and the results are at par with CYC treatment. Dual blockade reduced leukocyte counts and renal IL-6, IL-12p40, CCL-5, CCL-2 and CCR-2 mRNA expression. Dual blockade of CCL2 and CXCL12 can be as potent as CYC to suppress the progression of proliferative lupus nephritis probably because the respective chemokine targets mediate different disease pathomechanisms, i.e. systemic autoimmunity and peripheral tissue inflammation. PMID:27392463

  16. Interference with Glycosaminoglycan-Chemokine Interactions with a Probe to Alter Leukocyte Recruitment and Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sandra; Pettersson, Ulrika S.; Hoorelbeke, Bart; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta; Schelfhout, Katrien; Martens, Erik; Kubes, Paul; Van Damme, Jo; Phillipson, Mia; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2014-01-01

    In vivo leukocyte recruitment is not fully understood and may result from interactions of chemokines with glycosaminoglycans/GAGs. We previously showed that chlorite-oxidized oxyamylose/COAM binds the neutrophil chemokine GCP-2/CXCL6. Here, mouse chemokine binding by COAM was studied systematically and binding affinities of chemokines to COAM versus GAGs were compared. COAM and heparan sulphate bound the mouse CXC chemokines KC/CXCL1, MIP-2/CXCL2, IP-10/CXCL10 and I-TAC/CXCL11 and the CC chemokine RANTES/CCL5 with affinities in the nanomolar range, whereas no binding interactions were observed for mouse MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and MIP-1β/CCL4. The affinities of COAM-interacting chemokines were similar to or higher than those observed for heparan sulphate. Although COAM did not display chemotactic activity by itself, its co-administration with mouse GCP-2/CXCL6 and MIP-2/CXCL2 or its binding of endogenous chemokines resulted in fast and cooperative peritoneal neutrophil recruitment and in extravasation into the cremaster muscle in vivo. These local GAG mimetic features by COAM within tissues superseded systemic effects and were sufficient and applicable to reduce LPS-induced liver-specific neutrophil recruitment and activation. COAM mimics glycosaminoglycans and is a nontoxic probe for the study of leukocyte recruitment and inflammation in vivo. PMID:25093679

  17. CCL19 is a specific ligand of the constitutively recycling atypical human chemokine receptor CRAM-B.

    PubMed

    Leick, Marion; Catusse, Julie; Follo, Marie; Nibbs, Robert J; Hartmann, Tanja N; Veelken, Hendrik; Burger, Meike

    2010-04-01

    The human chemokine receptor CRAM (chemokine receptor on activated macrophages), encoded by the gene CCRL2, is a new candidate for the atypical chemokine receptor family that includes the receptors DARC, D6 and chemocentryx chemokine receptor (CCX-CKR). CRAM is maturation-stage-dependently expressed on human B lymphocytes and its surface expression is up-regulated upon short-term CCL5 exposure. Here, we demonstrate that the homeostatic chemokine CCL19 is a specific ligand for CRAM. In radioactive labelling studies CCL19 bound to CRAM-expressing cells with an affinity similar to the described binding of its other receptor CCR7. In contrast to the known CCL19/CCR7 ligand/receptor pair, CRAM stimulation by CCL19 did not result in typical chemokine-receptor-dependent cellular activation like calcium mobilization or migration. Instead, we demonstrate that CRAM is constitutively recycling via clathrin-coated pits and able to internalize CCL19 as well as anti-CRAM antibodies. As this absence of classical chemokine receptor responses and the recycling and internalization features are characteristic for non-classical chemokine receptors, we suggest that CRAM is the newest member of this group. As CCL19 is known to be critically involved in lymphocyte and dendritic cell trafficking, CCL19-binding competition by CRAM might be involved in modulating these processes. PMID:20002784

  18. Interference with glycosaminoglycan-chemokine interactions with a probe to alter leukocyte recruitment and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Sandra; Pettersson, Ulrika S; Hoorelbeke, Bart; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta; Schelfhout, Katrien; Martens, Erik; Kubes, Paul; Van Damme, Jo; Phillipson, Mia; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2014-01-01

    In vivo leukocyte recruitment is not fully understood and may result from interactions of chemokines with glycosaminoglycans/GAGs. We previously showed that chlorite-oxidized oxyamylose/COAM binds the neutrophil chemokine GCP-2/CXCL6. Here, mouse chemokine binding by COAM was studied systematically and binding affinities of chemokines to COAM versus GAGs were compared. COAM and heparan sulphate bound the mouse CXC chemokines KC/CXCL1, MIP-2/CXCL2, IP-10/CXCL10 and I-TAC/CXCL11 and the CC chemokine RANTES/CCL5 with affinities in the nanomolar range, whereas no binding interactions were observed for mouse MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and MIP-1β/CCL4. The affinities of COAM-interacting chemokines were similar to or higher than those observed for heparan sulphate. Although COAM did not display chemotactic activity by itself, its co-administration with mouse GCP-2/CXCL6 and MIP-2/CXCL2 or its binding of endogenous chemokines resulted in fast and cooperative peritoneal neutrophil recruitment and in extravasation into the cremaster muscle in vivo. These local GAG mimetic features by COAM within tissues superseded systemic effects and were sufficient and applicable to reduce LPS-induced liver-specific neutrophil recruitment and activation. COAM mimics glycosaminoglycans and is a nontoxic probe for the study of leukocyte recruitment and inflammation in vivo. PMID:25093679

  19. Chemokines and the inflammatory response following cardiopulmonary bypass--a new target for therapeutic intervention?--A review.

    PubMed

    Ben-Abraham, Ron; Weinbroum, Avi A; Dekel, Benjamin; Paret, Gideon

    2003-10-01

    This 10-year Medline search of English-language articles describing experimental and clinical studies on chemokines, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and systemic or multiorgan failure revealed that chemokines are significantly involved in the pathogenesis of post-CPB syndrome. The post-CPB inflammatory response depends upon recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells. Leucocyte recruitment is a well-orchestrated process that involves several protein families, including pro-inflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules and chemokines. Current anti-inflammatory therapies mostly act on the cells that have already been recruited. A more efficient therapy might be the prevention of excessive recruitment of particular leucocyte populations by antagonizing chemokine receptors which might act upstream of the current anti-inflammatory agents. The chemokines, which are a cytokine subfamily of chemotactic cytokines, participate in recognizing, recruiting, removing and repairing inflammation. As chemokines target specific leucocyte subsets, antagonism of a single chemokine ligand or receptor would be expected to have a circumscribed effect, thereby endowing the antagonist with a limited side-effect profile. Chemokines should be considered as possible targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:14535901

  20. Molecular cloning of porcine chemokine CXC motif ligand 2 (CXCL2) and mapping to the SSC8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal recognition of pregnancy is accompanied by inflammatory responses with leukocytosis and increased levels of cytokines and chemokines. Human trophoblast cells secrete chemokine CXC motif ligand 1 (CXCL1)/Gro-a and other chemotactic proteins, while monocytes co-cultured with trophoblast cells...

  1. CX3CL1/CX3CR1 and CCL2/CCR2 Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Complex in Patients with AMD

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Hviid, Thomas; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The chemokine receptors CX3CR1 and CCR2 have been implicated in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The evidence is mainly derived from experimental cell studies and murine models of AMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between expression of CX3CR1 and CCR2 on different leukocyte subsets and AMD. Furthermore we measured the plasma levels of ligands CX3CL1 and CCL2. Methods Patients attending our department were asked to participate in the study. The diagnosis of AMD was based on clinical examination and multimodal imaging techniques. Chemokine plasma level and chemokine receptor expression were measured by flow-cytometry. Results A total of 150 participants were included. We found a significantly lower expression of CX3CR1 on CD8+ T cells in the neovascular AMD group compared to the control group (p = 0.04). We found a significant positive correlation between CCR2 and CX3CR1 expression on CD8+ cells (r = 0.727, p = 0.0001). We found no difference in plasma levels of CX3CL1 and CCL2 among the groups. Conclusions Our results show a down regulation of CX3CR1 on CD8+ cells; this correlated to a low expression of CCR2 on CD8+ cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate the possible role of this cell type in AMD development. PMID:25503251

  2. Myxomavirus Anti-Inflammatory Chemokine Binding Protein Reduces the Increased Plaque Growth Induced by Chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis Oral Infection after Balloon Angioplasty Aortic Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Alexandra R.; Verma, Raj K.; Dai, Erbin; Liu, Liying; Chen, Hao; Kesavalu, Sheela; Rivera, Mercedes; Velsko, Irina; Ambadapadi, Sriram; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic occlusion of inflammatory plaque in coronary arteries causes myocardial infarction. Treatment with emergent balloon angioplasty (BA) and stent implant improves survival, but restenosis (regrowth) can occur. Periodontal bacteremia is closely associated with inflammation and native arterial atherosclerosis, with potential to increase restenosis. Two virus-derived anti-inflammatory proteins, M-T7 and Serp-1, reduce inflammation and plaque growth after BA and transplant in animal models through separate pathways. M-T7 is a broad spectrum C, CC and CXC chemokine-binding protein. Serp-1 is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) inhibiting thrombotic and thrombolytic pathways. Serp-1 also reduces arterial inflammation and improves survival in a mouse herpes virus (MHV68) model of lethal vasculitis. In addition, Serp-1 demonstrated safety and efficacy in patients with unstable coronary disease and stent implant, reducing markers of myocardial damage. We investigate here the effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, on restenosis after BA and the effects of blocking chemokine and protease pathways with M-T7 and Serp-1. ApoE−/− mice had aortic BA and oral P. gingivalis infection. Arterial plaque growth was examined at 24 weeks with and without anti-inflammatory protein treatment. Dental plaques from mice infected with P. gingivalis tested positive for infection. Neither Serp-1 nor M-T7 treatment reduced infection, but IgG antibody levels in mice treated with Serp-1 and M-T7 were reduced. P. gingivalis significantly increased monocyte invasion and arterial plaque growth after BA (P<0.025). Monocyte invasion and plaque growth were blocked by M-T7 treatment (P<0.023), whereas Serp-1 produced only a trend toward reductions. Both proteins modified expression of TLR4 and MyD88. In conclusion, aortic plaque growth in ApoE−/− mice increased after angioplasty in mice with chronic oral P. gingivalis infection. Blockade of chemokines, but not serine

  3. Focal MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity at the blood-brain barrier promotes chemokine-induced leukocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Wu, Chuan; Korpos, Eva; Zhang, Xueli; Agrawal, Smriti M; Wang, Ying; Faber, Cornelius; Schäfers, Michael; Körner, Heinrich; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Hallmann, Rupert; Sorokin, Lydia

    2015-02-24

    Although chemokines are sufficient for chemotaxis of various cells, increasing evidence exists for their fine-tuning by selective proteolytic processing. Using a model of immune cell chemotaxis into the CNS (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis [EAE]) that permits precise localization of immigrating leukocytes at the blood-brain barrier, we show that, whereas chemokines are required for leukocyte migration into the CNS, additional MMP-2/9 activities specifically at the border of the CNS parenchyma strongly enhance this transmigration process. Cytokines derived from infiltrating leukocytes regulate MMP-2/9 activity at the parenchymal border, which in turn promotes astrocyte secretion of chemokines and differentially modulates the activity of different chemokines at the CNS border, thereby promoting leukocyte migration out of the cuff. Hence, cytokines, chemokines, and cytokine-induced MMP-2/9 activity specifically at the inflammatory border collectively act to accelerate leukocyte chemotaxis across the parenchymal border. PMID:25704809

  4. Constitutive and inflammatory induction of alpha and beta chemokines in human first trimester forebrain astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Bakhiet, Moiz; Mousa, Alyaa; Seiger, Ake; Andersson, Jan

    2002-05-01

    Chemokine effects on leukocyte infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS) are key events in the inflammatory processes of neuroimmunologic and neuroinfectious diseases. Because, chemokines may play important roles in proliferation and differentiation of brain cells and in the initiation and progression of CNS inflammatory disorders, we analyzed constitutive and inflammatory-induced expression of alpha and beta chemokines in human first trimester forebrain cells. Constitutive induction of IL-8, MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, MCP-1 and regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed, and secreted (Rantes) was detected in cryostat sections of embryonic forebrains in an age-dependent manner. Dissociated cell cultures were studied for spontaneous chemokine induction and after stimulation with the trypanosome lymphocyte triggering factor (TLTF), a novel trypanokine secreted by African trypanosomes that triggers a complex of immune responses. LPS and variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) were used as controls. In cultures, unstimulated cells expressed minimal chemokine levels except for Rantes. In response to TLTF and LPS, but not VSG, all chemokines were highly induced at the mRNA and protein levels in a dose- and age-dependent manner. Combined assays (in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry) revealed that astrocytes and neurons are major sources for chemokines. These results illustrate the ability of resident brain cells to constitutively express chemokine genes, which may suggest an important role for chemokines during brain development. Furthermore, TLTF-induced chemokine expression in astrocytes and neurons indicate the capacity of TLTF to provoke neuroinflammation in the brain, which may have important therapeutic implications for the neurological manifestations of African trypanosomiasis. PMID:12009570

  5. Role of chemokines and their receptors in viral persistence and liver damage during chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Larrubia, Juan R; Benito-Martínez, Selma; Calvino, Miryam; Sanz-de-Villalobos, Eduardo; Parra-Cid, Trinidad

    2008-12-21

    Chemokines produced in the liver during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induce migration of activated T cells from the periphery to infected parenchyma. The milieu of chemokines secreted by infected hepatocytes is predominantly associated with the T-helper cell/Tc1 T cell (Th1/Tc1) response. These chemokines consist of CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha; MIP-1 alpha), CCL4 (MIP-1 beta), CCL5 (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted; RANTES), CXCL10 (interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10; IP-10), CXCL11 (interferon-inducible T-cell alpha chemoattractant; I-TAC), and CXCL9 (monokine induced by interferon gamma; Mig) and they recruit T cells expressing either CCR5 or CXCR3 chemokine receptors. Intrahepatic and peripheral blood levels of these chemokines are increased during chronic hepatitis C. The interaction between chemokines and their receptors is essential in recruiting HCV-specific T cells to control the infection. When the adaptive immune response fails in this task, non-specific T cells without the capacity to control the infection are also recruited to the liver, and these are ultimately responsible for the persistent hepatic damage. The modulation of chemokine receptor expression and chemokine secretion could be a viral escape mechanism to avoid specific T cell migration to the liver during the early phase of infection, and to maintain liver viability during the chronic phase, by impairing non-specific T cell migration. Some chemokines and their receptors correlate with liver damage, and CXCL10 (IP-10) and CXCR3 levels have shown a clinical utility as predictors of treatment response outcome. The regulation of chemokines and their receptors could be a future potential therapeutic target to decrease liver inflammation and to increase specific T cell migration to the infected liver. PMID:19084927

  6. Expression of the Chemokine Receptors CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR7 and Their Ligands in Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    San-Miguel, Teresa; Pinto, Sandra; Navarro, Lara; Callaghan, Robert C; Monteagudo, Carlos; López-Ginés, Concha; Cerdá-Nicolás, Miguel; Gil-Benso, Rosario

    2015-09-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) are soft tissue malignant tumors of childhood and adolescents. The mechanisms underlying their aggressiveness are still poorly understood. Chemokines are chemotactic proteins involved in pathological processes that have been intensely studied in several types of cancers because of their influence in migration, angiogenesis, or metastases. We analyzed the expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4 and CXCR7 and their ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 and CXCL12, in 15 RMS samples derived from nine patients. Expression was measured in tumors and primary cultures of RMS by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, immunostaining and flow cytometry. Our results show that these receptors are widely expressed in RMS. A significant difference between CXCL12/CXCR4, CXCL12/CXCR7, CXCL11/CXCR7 expression ratios was found in alveolar versus embryonal RMS and similarly between CXCL12/CXCR4 and CXCL11/CXCR3 ratios in primary versus recurrent tumors. These findings suggest a possible association between the interrelation of chemokine/chemokine-receptor and an aggressive biological behavior in RMS. PMID:26037167

  7. Chemokine-adjuvanted electroporated DNA vaccine induces substantial protection from simian immunodeficiency virus vaginal challenge.

    PubMed

    Kutzler, M A; Wise, M C; Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M A; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D G; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P A; Weiner, D B

    2016-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG responses in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P<0.01) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared with only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where six of nine animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P<0.001). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  8. Chemokine Adjuvanted Electroporated-DNA Vaccine Induces Substantial Protection from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P; Weiner, D B

    2015-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P=0.0016) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared to only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where 6 of 9 animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P=0.0003). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  9. Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, chemokine receptor CXCR4 cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemokine receptor CXCR4, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, binds selectively CXCL12. This protein plays many important roles in immunological as well as pathophysiological functions. In this communication, we identified and characterized the channel catfish CXCR4 transcript....

  10. Analysis of Chicken Cytokine and Chemokine Gene Expression Following Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression levels of mRNAs encoding a panel of 28 chicken cytokines and chemokines were quantified in intestinal lymphocytes following E. acervulina and E. tenella primary and secondary infections. Compared with uninfected controls, transcripts of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-', IL-1', IL...

  11. Chemokines responses to Plasmodium falciparum malaria and co-infections among rural Cameroonians.

    PubMed

    Che, Jane Nchangnwi; Nmorsi, Onyebiguwa Patrick Goddey; Nkot, Baleguel Pierre; Isaac, Clement; Okonkwo, Browne Chukwudi

    2015-04-01

    Malaria remains the major cause of disease morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa with complex immune responses associated with disease outcomes. Symptoms associated with severe malaria have generally shown chemokine upregulation but little is known of responses to uncomplicated malaria. Eight villages in central Cameroon of 1045 volunteers were screened. Among these, malaria-positive individuals with some healthy controls were selected for chemokine analysis using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kits. Depressed serum levels of CXCL5 and raised CCL28 were observed in malarial positives when compared with healthy controls. The mean concentration of CXCL11 was higher in symptomatic than asymptomatic group, while CCL28 was lower in symptomatic individuals. Lower chemokine levels were associated with symptoms of uncomplicated malaria except for CXCL11 which was upregulated among fever-positive group. The mean CXCL5 level was higher in malaria sole infection than co-infections with HIV and Loa loa. Also, there was a raised mean level of malaria+HIV co-infection for CXCL9. This study hypothesises a situation where depressed chemokines in the face of clinical presentations could indicate an attempt by the immune system in preventing a progression process from uncomplicated to complicated outcomes with CXCL11 being identified as possible biomarker for malarial fever. PMID:25462711

  12. Changes in Immune-Related Chicken Cytokine and Chemokine Gene Expression Following Eimeria Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression levels of mRNAs encoding a panel of 28 chicken cytokines and chemokines were quantified in intestinal lymphocytes following E. acervulina, E. tenella and E. maxima primary and secondary infections. Transcripts of the pro-inflammatory, Th1 and Th1 regulatory cytokines IFN- , IL-1 , I...

  13. Effect of a topical steroid on gene expressions for chemokines in mice with contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Gaku; Hirano, Takeo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Mitsui, Kazutaka; Ohara, Osamu; Yanagihara, Satoshi; Kato, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    Effects of a topical corticosteroid drug, diflucortolone valerate, on the mRNA expressions for four CC- and four CXC-chemokines, which have been reported to be associated with recruitment of different kinds of proinflammatory and inflammatory cells, were investigated by RT-PCR in mice with 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB)-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response. All of the eight gene expressions were clearly up-regulated in the lesion site of the CHS response up to 24 h post-challenge of TNCB at which ear swelling response reached a peak, so that heavy infiltration of inflammatory cells consisting mainly of mononuclear cells and neutrophils was likely induced by these chemokines. Topical treatment with diflucortolone valerate suppressed completely the infiltrates as well as the ear swelling response. In addition, the up-regulation of gene expressions for these eight chemokines were suppressed by the treatment, indicating that the corticosteroid drug attenuates the expression of chemokine genes essential for orientating nonspecific skin response to hapten-specific CHS response through the recruitment of inflammatory cells from the circulation into the tissue site. PMID:14975360

  14. Dengue virus requires the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 for replication and infection development

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Rafael E; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Queiroz, Ana Luiza; Cisalpino, Daniel; Marques, Pedro E; Pacca, Carolina C; Fagundes, Caio T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Nogueira, Maurício L; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people worldwide yearly. Currently, there is no vaccine or specific treatment available. Further investigation on dengue pathogenesis is required to better understand the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. The chemokine system has been implicated in dengue pathogenesis, although the specific role of chemokines and their receptors remains elusive. Here we describe the role of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 in Dengue virus (DENV-2) infection. In vitro experiments showed that CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication in human and mouse macrophages. DENV-2 infection induces the expression of CCR5 ligands. Incubation with an antagonist prevents CCR5 activation and reduces DENV-2 positive-stranded (+) RNA inside macrophages. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of DENV-2 infection we found that CCR5−/− mice were resistant to lethal infection, presenting at least 100-fold reduction of viral load in target organs and significant reduction in disease severity. This phenotype was reproduced in wild-type mice treated with CCR5-blocking compounds. Therefore, CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication and disease development. Targeting CCR5 might represent a therapeutic strategy for dengue fever. These data bring new insights on the association between viral infections and the chemokine receptor CCR5. PMID:25939314

  15. REGULATION OF CONCEPTUS ADHESION BY ENDOMETRIAL CXC CHEMOKINES DURING THE IMPLANTATION PERIOD IN SHEEP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a better understanding of biochemical mechanisms of conceptus adhesion to the maternal endometrium in ruminant ungulates, the present study was performed to clarify roles of chemokines and extracellular matrix (ECM) components in the regulation of ovine blastocyst attachment to the endometri...

  16. Cytokines and Chemokines at the Crossroads of Neuroinflammation, Neurodegeneration, and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Andrew G.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines and chemokines are proteins that coordinate the immune response throughout the body. The dysregulation of cytokines and chemokines is a central feature in the development of neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and demyelination both in the central and peripheral nervous systems and in conditions of neuropathic pain. Pathological states within the nervous system can lead to activation of microglia. The latter may mediate neuronal and glial cell injury and death through production of proinflammatory factors such as cytokines and chemokines. These then help to mobilize the adaptive immune response. Although inflammation may induce beneficial effects such as pathogen clearance and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, uncontrolled inflammation can result in detrimental outcomes via the production of neurotoxic factors that exacerbate neurodegenerative pathology. In states of prolonged inflammation, continual activation and recruitment of effector cells can establish a feedback loop that perpetuates inflammation and ultimately results in neuronal injury. A critical balance between repair and proinflammatory factors determines the outcome of a neurodegenerative process. This review will focus on how cytokines and chemokines affect neuroinflammation and disease pathogenesis in bacterial meningitis and brain abscesses, Lyme neuroborreliosis, human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis, and neuropathic pain. PMID:23997430

  17. Signal transmission through the CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Wescott, Melanie P; Kufareva, Irina; Paes, Cheryl; Goodman, Jason R; Thaker, Yana; Puffer, Bridget A; Berdougo, Eli; Rucker, Joseph B; Handel, Tracy M; Doranz, Benjamin J

    2016-08-30

    The atomic-level mechanisms by which G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular ligand binding events through their transmembrane helices to activate intracellular G proteins remain unclear. Using a comprehensive library of mutations covering all 352 residues of the GPCR CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), we identified 41 amino acids that are required for signaling induced by the chemokine ligand CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor 1). CXCR4 variants with each of these mutations do not signal properly but remain folded, based on receptor surface trafficking, reactivity to conformationally sensitive monoclonal antibodies, and ligand binding. When visualized on the structure of CXCR4, the majority of these residues form a continuous intramolecular signaling chain through the transmembrane helices; this chain connects chemokine binding residues on the extracellular side of CXCR4 to G protein-coupling residues on its intracellular side. Integrated into a cohesive model of signal transmission, these CXCR4 residues cluster into five functional groups that mediate (i) chemokine engagement, (ii) signal initiation, (iii) signal propagation, (iv) microswitch activation, and (v) G protein coupling. Propagation of the signal passes through a "hydrophobic bridge" on helix VI that coordinates with nearly every known GPCR signaling motif. Our results agree with known conserved mechanisms of GPCR activation and significantly expand on understanding the structural principles of CXCR4 signaling. PMID:27543332

  18. Combinatorial Guidance by CCR7 Ligands for T Lymphocytes Migration in Co-Existing Chemokine Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Chemokines mediate the trafficking and positioning of lymphocytes in lymphoid tissues that is crucial for immune surveillance and immune responses. In particular, a CCR7 ligand, CCL21, plays important roles in recruiting T cells to secondary lymphoid tissues (SLT). Furthermore, CCL21 together with another CCR7 ligand, CCL19, direct the navigation and compartmentation of T cells within SLT. However, the distinct roles of these two chemokines for regulating cell trafficking and positioning are not clear. In this study, we explore the effect of co-existing CCL19 and CCL21 concentration fields on guiding T cell migration. Using microfluidic devices that can configure single and superimposed chemokine fields we show that under physiological gradient conditions, human peripheral blood T cells chemotax to CCL21 but not CCL19. Furthermore, T cells migrate away from the CCL19 gradient in a uniform background of CCL21. This repulsive migratory response is predicted by mathematical modeling based on the competition of CCL19 and CCL21 for CCR7 signaling and the differential ability of the two chemokines for desensitizing CCR7. These results suggest a new combinatorial guiding mechanism by CCL19 and CCL21 for the migration and trafficking of CCR7 expressing leukocytes. PMID:21464944

  19. Platelet-Derived CCL5 Regulates CXC Chemokine Formation and Neutrophil Recruitment in Acute Experimental Colitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhui; Zhang, Songen; Wang, Yongzhi; Zhang, Su; Luo, Lingtao; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating data suggest that platelets not only regulate thrombosis and haemostasis but also inflammatory processes. Platelets contain numerous potent pro-inflammatory compounds, including the chemokines CCL5 and CXCL4, although their role in acute colitis remains elusive. The aim of this study is to examine the role of platelets and platelet-derived chemokines in acute colitis. Acute colitis is induced in female Balb/c mice by administration of 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 5 days. Animals receive a platelet-depleting, anti-CCL5, anti-CXCL4, or a control antibody prior to DSS challenge. Colonic tissue is collected for quantification of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, CXCL5, CXCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and CCL5 levels as well as morphological analyses. Platelet depletion reduce tissue damage and clinical disease activity index in DSS-exposed animals. Platelet depletion not only reduces levels of CXCL2 and CXCL5 but also levels of CCL5 in the inflamed colon. Immunoneutralization of CCL5 but not CXCL4 reduces tissue damage, CXC chemokine expression, and neutrophil recruitment in DSS-treated animals. These findings show that platelets play a key role in acute colitis by regulating CXC chemokine generation, neutrophil infiltration, and tissue damage in the colon. Moreover, our results suggest that platelet-derived CCL5 is an important link between platelet activation and neutrophil recruitment in acute colitis. PMID:26089223

  20. Pleiotropic functions of the CXC-type chemokine CXCL14 in mammals.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takahiko; Tanegashima, Kosuke

    2012-05-01

    CXCL14 is a member of the CXC chemokine family. CXCL14 possesses chemoattractive activity for activated macrophages, immature dendritic cells and natural killer cells. CXCL14-deficient mice do not exhibit clear immune system abnormalities, suggesting that the function of CXCL14 can be compensated for by other chemokines. However, CXCL14 does appear to have unique biological roles. It suppresses the in vivo growth of lung and head-and-neck carcinoma cells, whereas the invasiveness of breast and prostate cancer cells appears to be promoted by CXCL14. Moreover, recent evidence revealed that CXCL14 participates in glucose metabolism, feeding behaviour-associated neuronal circuits, and anti-microbial defense. Based on the expression patterns of CXCL14 and CXCL12 during embryonic development and in the perinatal brain in mice, the functions of these two chemokines may be opposite or interactive. Although CXCL14 receptors have not yet been identified, the intracellular activity of CXCL14 in breast cancer cells suggests that the CXCL14 receptor(s) and signal transduction pathway(s) may be different from those of conventional CXC-type chemokines. PMID:22437940

  1. Effect of vitamin D3 on chemokine levels and regulatory T-cells in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Harishankar, M; Anbalagan, S; Selvaraj, P

    2016-05-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] the active form of vitamin D3 acts as an immunomodulator in various immune cells. The present study is aimed to study the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on chemokine levels and regulatory T-cells in 51 healthy controls (HCs) and 50 pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured with culture filtrate antigen (CFA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the presence or absence of 1,25(OH)2D3 at 10(-7)M concentration for 72h and the percentage positive regulatory T-cell subsets were studied using flow cytometry. The chemokine levels were estimated in the culture supernatants by ELISA. 1,25(OH)2D3 significantly upregulated the frequency of regulatory T-cell subsets while suppressed the production of chemokine levels in CFA stimulated cultures of HCs and PTB patients (p<0.05). Correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells and MCP-1, MIP-1β and IP-10 in CFA stimulated with 1,25(OH)2D3 treated cells (p<0.05). The results suggested that 1,25(OH)2D3 upregulated regulatory T-cells and act as anti-inflammatory by downregulating chemokine levels which could be beneficial to protect the host from inflammation and tissue damage during infection. PMID:26927615

  2. Solution structure of the complex between poxvirus-encoded CC chemokine inhibitor vCCI and human MIP-1β

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li; DeRider, Michele; McCornack, Milissa A.; Jao, Chris; Isern, Nancy G.; Ness, Traci; Moyer, Richard; Liwang, Patricia J.

    2006-09-19

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) comprise a large family of proteins that recruit and activate leukocytes, giving chemokines a major role in both the immune response and inflammation-related diseases. The poxvirus-encoded viral CC chemokine inhibitor (vCCI) binds to many CC chemokines with high affinity, acting as a potent inhibitor of chemokine action. We have used heteronuclear multidimensional NMR to determine the first structure of an orthopoxvirus vCCI in complex with a human CC chemokine MIP-1β. vCCI binds to the chemokine with 1:1 stoichiometry, using residues from its β-sheet II to interact with the a surface of MIP-1β that includes the N-terminus, the following residues in the so-called N-loop20’s region, and the 40’s loop. This structure reveals a general strategy of vCCI for selective chemokine binding, as vCCI appears to interact most stronglyinteracts most directly with residues that are conserved among a subset of CC chemokines, but are not conservednot among the other chemokine subfamilies. This structure reveals a general strategy of vCCI for selective chemokine binding. Chemokines play critical roles in the immune system, causing chemotaxis of a variety of cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as mediating cell homing and immune system development 1(Baggiolini 2001). To date, about 50 chemokines have been identified, and these small proteins (7-14 kDa) are believed to function by binding with endothelial or matrix glycosaminoglycans to form a concentration gradient that is then sensed by high affinity, 7-transmembrane domain G-protein coupled chemokine receptors on the surface of immune cells surface. The chemokine system is critical for host defense in healthy individuals, butand can also lead to diseases including asthma, arthritis, and atherosclerosis in the case of malfunction, often due to inappropriate inflammation and subsequent tissue damage 2(Gerard and Rollins 2001). There are four subfamilies of chemokines, CC

  3. Chemokine-mediated redirection of T cells constitutes a critical mechanism of glucocorticoid therapy in autoimmune CNS responses

    PubMed Central

    Schweingruber, Nils; Fischer, Henrike J.; Fischer, Lisa; van den Brandt, Jens; Karabinskaya, Anna; Labi, Verena; Villunger, Andreas; Kretzschmar, Benedikt; Huppke, Peter; Simons, Mikael; Tuckermann, Jan P.; Flügel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the standard therapy for treating multiple sclerosis (MS) patients suffering from an acute relapse. One of the main mechanisms of gC action is held to be the induction of T cell apoptosis leading to reduced lymphocyte infiltration into the CNS, yet our analysis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in three different strains of genetically manipulated mice has revealed that the induction of T cell apoptosis is not essential for the therapeutic efficacy of GCs. Instead, we identified the redirection of T cell migration in response to chemokines as a new therapeutic principle of GC action. GCs inhibited the migration of T cells towards CCL19 while they enhanced their responsiveness towards CXCL12. Importantly, blocking CXCR4 signaling in vivo by applying Plerixafor® strongly impaired the capacity of GCs to interfere with EAE, as revealed by an aggravated disease course, more pronounced CNS infiltration and a more dispersed distribution of the infiltrating T cells throughout the parenchyma. Our observation that T cells lacking the GC receptor were refractory to CXCL12 further underscores the importance of this pathway for the treatment of EAE by GCs. Importantly, methylprednisolone pulse therapy strongly increased the capacity of peripheral blood T cells from MS patients of different subtypes to migrate towards CXCL12. This indicates that modulation of T cell migration is an important mechanistic principle responsible for the efficacy of high-dose GC therapy not only of EAE but also of MS. PMID:24488308

  4. Delayed and Deficient Dermal Maturation in Mice Lacking the CXCR3 ELR-Negative CXC Chemokine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Cecelia C.; Whaley, Diana; Kulasekeran, Priya; Hancock, Wayne W.; Lu, Bao; Bodnar, Richard; Newsome, Joseph; Hebda, Patricia A.; Wells, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Replacement of wounded skin requires the initially florid cellular response to abate and even regress as the dermal layer returns to a relatively paucicellular state. The signals that direct this “stop and return” process have yet to be deciphered. CXCR3 chemokine receptor and its ligand CXCL11/IP-9/I-TAC are expressed by basal keratinocytes and CXCL10/IP-10 by keratinocytes and endothelial cells during wound healing in mice and humans. In vitro, these ligands limit motility in dermal fibroblasts and endothelial cells. To examine whether this signaling pathway contributes to wound healing in vivo, full-thickness excisional wounds were created on CXCR3 wild-type (+/+) or knockout (−/−) mice. Even at 90 days, long after wound closure, wounds in the CXCR3−/− mice remained hypercellular and presented immature matrix components. The CXCR3−/− mice also presented poor remodeling and reorganization of collagen, which resulted in a weakened healed dermis. This in vivo model substantiates our in vitro findings that CXCR3 signaling is necessary for inhibition of fibroblast and endothelial cell migration and subsequent redifferentiation of the fibroblasts to a contractile state. These studies establish a pathophysiologic role for CXCR3 and its ligand during wound repair. PMID:17600132

  5. A DNA Microarray Analysis of Chemokine and Receptor Genes in the Rat Dental Follicle – Role of Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein-1 in Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dawen; Wise, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    The dental follicle, a loose connective tissue sac that surrounds the unerupted tooth, appears to regulate the osteoclastogenesis needed for eruption; i.e., bone resorption to form an eruption pathway. Thus, DNA microarray studies were conducted to determine which chemokines and their receptors were expressed chronologically in the dental follicle, chemokines that might attract osteoclast precursors. In the rat first mandibular molar, a major burst of osteoclastogenesis occurs at day 3 with a minor burst at day 10. The results of the microarray confirmed our previous studies showing the gene expression of molecules such as CSF-1 and MCP-1 in the dental follicle cells. Other new genes also were detected, including secreted frizzled-related protein-1 (SFRP-1), which was found to be down-regulated at days 3 and 9. Using rat bone marrow cultures to conduct in vitro osteoclastogenic assays, it was demonstrated that SFRP-1 inhibited osteoclast formation in a concentration-dependent fashion. However, with increasing concentrations of SFRP-1, the number of TRAP-positive mononuclear cells increased suggesting that SFRP-1 inhibits osteoclast formation by inhibiting the fusion of mononuclear cells (osteoclast precursors). Co-culturing bone marrow mononuclear cells and dental follicle cells demonstrated that the dental follicle cells were secreting a product(s) that inhibited osteoclastogenesis, as measured by counting of TRAP-positive osteoclasts. Adding an antibody either to SFRP-1 or OPG partially restored osteoclastogenesis. Adding both anti-SFRP-1 and anti-OPG fully negated the inhibitory effect of the follicle cells upon osteoclastogenesis. These results strongly suggest that SFRP-1 and OPG, both secreted by the dental follicle cells, use different pathways to exert their inhibitory effect on osteoclastogenesis. Based on these in vitro studies of osteoclastogenesis, it is likely that the down-regulation of SFRP-1 gene expression in the dental follicle at days 3 and 9 is

  6. The Urinary Cytokine/Chemokine Signature of Renal Hyperfiltration in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Daneman, Denis; Dunger, David B.; Moineddin, Rahim; Dalton, R. Neil; Motran, Laura; Elia, Yesmino; Deda, Livia; Ostrovsky, Masha; Sochett, Etienne B.; Mahmud, Farid H.; Cherney, David Z. I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Urinary cytokine/chemokine levels are elevated in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) exhibiting renal hyperfiltration. Whether this observation extends to adolescents with T1D remains unknown. Our first objective was to determine the relationship between hyperfiltration and urinary cytokines/chemokines in normotensive, normoalbuminuric adolescents with T1D using GFRcystatin. Our second aim was to determine the relationship between urine and plasma levels of inflammatory biomarkers, to clarify the origin of these factors. Methods Urine and serum cytokines/chemokines (Luminex platform) and GFRcystatin were measured in normofiltering (n = 111, T1D-N, GFR<135 ml/min/1.73 m2) and hyperfiltering (n = 31, T1D-H, GFR≥135 ml/min/1.73 m2) adolescents with T1D (ages 10–16), and in age and sex matched healthy control subjects (HC, n = 59). Results We noted significant step-wise increases in urinary cytokine/chemokine excretion according to filtration status with highest levels in T1D-H, with parallel trends in serum analyte concentrations. After adjusting for serum glucose at the time of sampling, differences in urinary cytokine excretion were not statistically significant. Only serum IL-2 significantly differed between HC and T1D (p = 0.0076). Conclusions Hyperfiltration is associated with increased urinary cytokine/chemokine excretion in T1D adolescents, and parallel trends in serum cytokine concentration. The GFR-associated trends in cytokine excretion may be driven by the effects of ambient hyperglycemia. The relationship between hyperfiltration, glycemia, and variations in serum and urine cytokine expression and their impact on future renal and systemic vascular complications requires further study. PMID:25392936

  7. Semiquantitative analysis of intrahepatic CC-chemokine mRNas in chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed Central

    Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Nattermann, Jacob; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Spengler, Ulrich; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms leading to hepatic injury in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are only incompletely understood. Recent data propose a correlation of the intrahepatic expression of the CC chemokine RANTES and the degree of periportal and portal inflammatory liver damage. AIM: Here, we have studied the intrahepatic mRNA levels of CC chemokines RANTES together with that of other members of this chemokine family (MIP-1beta, MCP-1, and MCP-2) in chronic hepatitis C as compared with healthy controls. METHODS: Liver samples from 22 HCV-infected patients, nine individuals with primary biliary cirrhosis and from 12 normal controls were included into this study. Intrahepatic mRNA levels of CC chemokines RANTES, MIP-1beta, MCP-1, and MCP-2 were analyzed by a semi-quantitative reverse transcription/real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. RESULTS: In chronic HCV infection, intrahepatic RANTES mRNA levels were significantly higher than in non-infected controls (7.2-fold, p < 0.001) or in the disease control group (2.8-fold, p < 0.001) and higher levels of RANTES mRNA levels were observed in livers with an advanced stage of liver cell injury (histologic activity index > or = 6), although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.08). In contrast, mRNA levels of MIP-1beta (p = 0.021) and MCP-1 (p = 0.021) were significantly lower in HCV liver samples while MCP-2 expression was similar in all groups analyzed. CONCLUSION: The data support the concept of chemokines as mediators of liver cell injury in chronic hepatitis C. PMID:15770052

  8. Dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production

    PubMed Central

    Crapster-Pregont, Margaret; Yeo, Janice; Sanchez, Raquel L.; Kuperman, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Background IL-13 in the airway induces pathologies that are highly characteristic of asthma, including mucus metaplasia, airway hyperreactivity (AHR), and airway inflammation. As such, it is important to identify the IL-13–responding cell types that mediate each of the above pathologies. For example, IL-13’s effects on epithelium contribute to mucus metaplasia and AHR. IL-13’s effects on smooth muscle also contribute to AHR. However, it has been difficult to identify the cell types that mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation. Objective We sought to determine which cell types mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation. Methods We treated the airways of mice with IL-13 alone or in combination with IFN-γ. We associated the inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production with cell types in the lung that coexpress IL-13 and IFN-γ receptors. We then evaluated IL-13–induced responses in CD11c promoter–directed diphtheria toxin receptor–expressing mice that were depleted of both dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages and in CD11b promoter–directed diphtheria toxin receptor– expressing mice that were depleted of dendritic cells. Results Dendritic cell and alveolar macrophage depletion protected mice from IL-13–induced airway inflammation and CCL11, CCL24, CCL22, and CCL17 chemokine production. Preferential depletion of dendritic cells protected mice from IL-13–induced airway inflammation and CCL22 and CCL17 chemokine production but not from IL-13–induced CCL11 and CCL24 chemokine production. In either case mice were not protected from IL-13–induced AHR and mucus metaplasia. Conclusions Pulmonary dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages mediate IL-13–induced airway inflammation and chemokine production. (J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012;129:1621-7.) PMID:22365581

  9. Chemokines and cytokines in patients with an occult Onchocerca volvulus infection.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Christian J; Gantin, Richard G; Seeger, Tanja; Sarnecka, Alicja; Portillo, Jennifer; Schulz-Key, Hartwig; Karabou, Potochoziou K; Helling-Giese, Gertrud; Heuschkel, Christoph; Banla, Meba; Soboslay, Peter T

    2012-05-01

    Repeated ivermectin treatment will clear microfilaria (Mf) of Onchocerca volvulus from skin and eyes of onchocerciasis patients while adult filaria remains alive and reproductive, and such occult O. volvulus infection may persist for years. To investigate the effect of residual adult filaria on the immune response profile, chemokines and cytokines were quantified 1) in onchocerciasis patients who developed an occult O. volvulus infection (Mf-negative) due to repeated ivermectin treatments, 2) patients who became Mf-negative without ivermectin treatments due to missing re-infection, and 3) endemic and non-endemic O. volvulus Mf-negative controls. With occult O. volvulus infection, serum levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, MPIF-1/CCL23 and CXCL8/IL-8 enhanced and approached higher concentrations as determined in infection-free controls, whilst regulatory and Th2-type cytokines and chemokines MCP-4/CCL13, MIP-1δ/CCL15, TARC/CCL17 and IL-13 lessened. Levels of Eotaxin-2/CCL24, MCP-3/CCL7 and BCA-1/CXCL13 remained unchanged. At 3 days post-initial ivermectin treatment, MCP-1/CCL2, MCP-4/CCL13, MPIF-1/CCL23 and Eotaxin-2/CCL24 were strongly enhanced, suggesting that monocytes and eosinophil granulocytes have mediated Mf clearance. In summary, with occult and expiring O. volvulus infections the serum levels of inflammatory chemokines enhanced over time while regulatory and Th2-type-promoting cytokines and chemokines lessened; these changes may reflect a decreasing effector cell activation against Mf of O. volvulus, and in parallel, an enhancing inflammatory immune responsiveness. PMID:22202179

  10. Chemokine CXCL16 Regulates Neutrophil and Macrophage Infiltration into Injured Muscle, Promoting Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Ran, Limei; Garcia, Gabriela E.; Wang, Xiaonan H.; Han, Shuhua; Du, Jie; Mitch, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Only a few specific chemokines that mediate interactions between inflammatory and satellite cells in muscle regeneration have been identified. The chemokine CXCL16 differs from other chemokines because it has both a transmembrane region and active, soluble chemokine forms. Indeed, we found increased expression of CXCL16 and its receptor, CXCR6, in regenerating myofibers. Muscle regeneration in CXCL16-deficient (CXCL16KO) mice was severely impaired compared with regeneration in wild-type mice. In addition, there was decreased MyoD and myogenin expression in regenerating muscle in CXCL16KO mice, indicating impaired satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. After 1 month, new myofibers in CXCL16KO mice remained significantly smaller than those in muscle of wild-type mice. To understand how CXCL16 regulates muscle regeneration, we examined cells infiltrating injured muscle. There were more infiltrating neutrophils and fewer macrophages in injured muscle of CXCL16KO mice compared with events in wild-type mice. Moreover, absence of CXCL16 led to different expression of cytokines/chemokines in injured muscles: mRNAs of macrophage-inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-1β, and MIP-2 were increased, whereas regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted, T-cell activation-3, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNAs were lower compared with results in muscles of wild-type mice. Impaired muscle regeneration in CXCL16KO mice also resulted in fibrosis, which was linked to transforming growth factor-β1 expression. Thus, CXCL16 expression is a critical mediator of muscle regeneration, and it suppresses the development of fibrosis. PMID:19893053

  11. The chemokine receptor CCR2 is not required for successful initiation of labor in mice.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Fiona M; Khan, Abdul H; Higgins, Claire A; Nelson, Scott M; Nibbs, Robert J B

    2012-04-01

    Chemokine-driven neutrophil and monocyte recruitment into the uterus and cervix has been proposed to initiate labor. Chemokines that bind CXCR2 direct neutrophil migration and are induced during labor in humans. The chemokine CCL2, induced in the uterus by endocrine and mechanical signals, has been proposed to drive CCR2-dependent monocyte homing to the uterus to contribute to the initiation of labor. However, no direct evidence indicates that chemokines or their receptors play indispensable roles in labor-associated inflammation, and the impact of leukocyte infiltration on labor is unclear. Here, we have quantified expression of the principal monocyte- and neutrophil-attracting chemokines in the uteri of term pregnant (Day 18) and laboring wild-type mice. None of the neutrophil attractants we assayed were up-regulated with labor. Strikingly, however, Ccl2 was markedly increased, and this was concomitant with increased expression of Ccr2, the myeloid marker Itgam (also known as Cd11b), the monocyte/macrophage marker Emr1 (also known as F4/80). Moreover, in CCR2-deficient mice, this labor-associated increase in Itgam and Emr1 was not seen, consistent with the monocyte-trafficking defects that exist in these animals. Nonetheless, laboring CCR2-deficient and wild-type uteri showed similarly enhanced expression of the myometrial activation markers Gja1 and Oxtr (commonly known as connexin 43 and oxytocin receptor, respectively), and CCR2-deficient mice had gestation lengths, litter sizes, and fetal and placental weights no different from those of their wild-type counterparts. Thus, whereas labor is associated with an inflammatory response in gestational tissues, CCR2-dependent leukocyte recruitment into the mouse uterus is dispensable for the initiation of successful labor. PMID:22278981

  12. Environmental Mold and Mycotoxin Exposures Elicit Specific Cytokine and Chemokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum Lichtenstein, Jamie H.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Gavin, Igor M.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Molina, Ramon M.; Thompson, Khristy J.; Chi, Chih-Lin; Gillis, Bruce S.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Molds can cause respiratory symptoms and asthma. We sought to use isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to understand changes in cytokine and chemokine levels in response to mold and mycotoxin exposures and to link these levels with respiratory symptoms in humans. We did this by utilizing an ex vivo assay approach to differentiate mold-exposed patients and unexposed controls. While circulating plasma chemokine and cytokine levels from these two groups might be similar, we hypothesized that by challenging their isolated white blood cells with mold or mold extracts, we would see a differential chemokine and cytokine release. Methods and Findings Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from blood from 33 patients with a history of mold exposures and from 17 controls. Cultured PBMCs were incubated with the most prominent Stachybotrys chartarum mycotoxin, satratoxin G, or with aqueous mold extract, ionomycin, or media, each with or without PMA. Additional PBMCs were exposed to spores of Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium herbarum and Penicillium chrysogenum. After 18 hours, cytokines and chemokines released into the culture medium were measured by multiplex assay. Clinical histories, physical examinations and pulmonary function tests were also conducted. After ex vivo PBMC exposures to molds or mycotoxins, the chemokine and cytokine profiles from patients with a history of mold exposure were significantly different from those of unexposed controls. In contrast, biomarker profiles from cells exposed to media alone showed no difference between the patients and controls. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that chronic mold exposures induced changes in inflammatory and immune system responses to specific mold and mycotoxin challenges. These responses can differentiate mold-exposed patients from unexposed controls. This strategy may be a powerful approach to document immune system responsiveness to molds and other inflammation

  13. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of a CC chemokine gene from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanzhi; Sun, Yuena; Shi, Ge; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2012-12-01

    Chemokines are a family of structurally related chemotactic cytokines that regulate the migration of leukocytes, under both physiological and inflammatory conditions. A partial cDNA of CC chemokine gene designed as Mimi-CC3 was isolated from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) spleen cDNA library. Unknown 3' part of the cDNA was amplified by 3'-RACE. The complete cDNA of Mimi-CC3 contains an 89-nt 5'-UTR, a 303-nt open reading frame and a 441-nt 3'-UTR. Three exons and two introns were identified in Mimi-CC3. The deduced Mimi-CC3 protein sequences contain a 22 amino acids signal peptide and a 78 amino acids mature polypeptide, which possesses the typical arrangement of four cysteines as found in other known CC chemokines. It shares low amino acid sequence identities with most other fish and mammalian CC chemokines (less than 54.1 %), but shares very high identities with large yellow croaker CC chemokine (94.6 %). Phylogenetic analysis showed that Mimi-CC3 gene may have an orthologous relationship with mammalian/amphibian CCL25 gene. Tissue expression distributed analysis showed that Mimi-CC3 gene was constitutively expressed in all nine tissues examined, although at different levels. Upon stimulated with Vibrio anguillarum, the time-course analysis using a real-time PCR showed that Mimi-CC3 transcript in kidney and liver was obviously up-regulated and reached the peak levels, followed by a recovery. Mimi-CC3 expression in kidney was more strongly increased than in liver. However, down-regulation was observed in spleen. These results indicated that Mimi-CC3 plays important roles in miiuy croaker immune response as well as in homeostatic mechanisms. PMID:22736236

  14. High doses of dietary zinc induce cytokines, chemokines, and apoptosis in reproductive tissues during regression.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, N R; Anish, D; Sastry, K V H; Saxena, V K; Nagarajan, K; Subramani, J; Leo, M D M; Shit, N; Mohan, J; Saxena, M; Ahmed, K A

    2008-06-01

    In chickens, high levels of dietary zinc cause molting, and the reproductive system undergoes complete remodeling concomitant to feather replacement. In the present study, the expression profiles of cytokines and chemokines were investigated in the ovary and oviduct of control hens and of hens induced to molt by zinc feeding. The zinc-induced feed-intake suppression, the changes in corticosterone levels, the immune cell populations in the reproductive tract, and the apoptosis of reproductive tissues were analyzed. The expression of mRNAs for interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), the avian ortholog of mammalian IL-8 (chCXCLi2), and a chicken MIP-1beta-like chemokine (chCCLi2) in the ovary and of mRNAs for IL-1beta, IL-6, IFN-gamma, transforming growth factor-beta2, chCXCLi2, and chCCLi2 in the oviduct were upregulated significantly during zinc-induced molting. A simultaneous feed-intake reduction was observed with higher expression of cytokines and chemokines. The results of the present investigation also suggested that the upregulation of corticosterone was closely associated with the increased expression of cytokines and chemokines. An increase in apoptosis within reproductive tissue during tissue regression was also noted. We had previously observed the upregulation of these cytokines expression in an earlier study (molting by feed withdrawal). However, the pattern and the level of expression were different among these two methods. These findings indicate that cytokines might be a common mediator of tissue regression during molting induced by diverse methods, although the pattern of induction is different. Thus, a high dose of dietary zinc seems to induce reproductive regression via the upregulation of cytokines and chemokines, the suppression of feed intake, and the increase in serum corticosterone, resulting finally in the apoptosis of reproductive tissues. PMID:18351392

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of chemokine-like factor 1 (CKLF1), a novel human cytokine with unique structure and potential chemotactic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Han, W; Lou, Y; Tang, J; Zhang, Y; Chen, Y; Li, Y; Gu, W; Huang, J; Gui, L; Tang, Y; Li, F; Song, Q; Di, C; Wang, L; Shi, Q; Sun, R; Xia, D; Rui, M; Tang, J; Ma, D

    2001-01-01

    Cytokines are small proteins that have an essential role in the immune and inflammatory responses. The repertoire of cytokines is becoming diverse and expanding. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel cytokine designated as chemokine-like factor 1 (CKLF1). The full-length cDNA of CKLF1 is 530 bp long and a single open reading frame encoding 99 amino acid residues. CKLF1 bears no significant similarity to any other known cytokine in its amino acid sequence. Expression of CKLF1 can be partly inhibited by interleukin 10 in PHA-stimulated U937 cells. Recombinant CKLF1 is a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes; moreover, it can stimulate the proliferation of murine skeletal muscle cells. These results suggest that CKLF1 might have important roles in inflammation and in the regeneration of skeletal muscle. PMID:11415443

  16. Expression of the chemokine CXCL14 and cetuximab-dependent tumour suppression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Ozawa, S; Ikoma, T; Yang, X-Y; Kanamori, K; Suzuki, K; Iwabuchi, H; Maehata, Y; Miyamoto, C; Taguchi, T; Kiyono, T; Kubota, E; Hata, R-I

    2016-01-01

    Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), has been successfully used to treat some patients with colorectal cancer and those with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). For the effective treatment, it is essential to first identify cetuximab-responsive patients. The level of EGFR expression and/or the presence of mutations in signalling molecules downstream of the EGFR pathway have been reported to be determining factors for cetuximab responsiveness in colorectal cancer patients; however, limited data have been reported for HNSCC patients. We previously reported that the chemokine CXCL14 exhibits tumour-suppressive effects against xenografted HNSCC cells, which may be classified into two groups, CXCL14-expressing and non-expressing cells under serum-starved culture conditions. Here we employed CXCL14-expressing HSC-3 cells and CXCL14-non-expressing YCU-H891 cells as representatives of the two groups and compared their responses to cetuximab and their CXCL14 expression under various conditions. The growth of xenografted tumours initiated by HSC-3 cells, which expressed CXCL14 in vivo and in vitro, was suppressed by the injection of cetuximab into tumour-bearing mice; however, neither the expression of the chemokine nor the cetuximab-dependent suppression of xenograft tumour growth was observed for YCU-H891 cells. Both types of cells expressed EGFR and neither type harboured mutations in signalling molecules downstream of EGFR that have been reported in cetuximab-resistant colon cancer patients. The inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling increased the levels of CXCL14 messenger RNA (mRNA) in HSC-3 cells, but not in YCU-H891 cells. We also observed that the CXCL14 promoter region in YCU-H891 cells was hypermethylated, and that demethylation of the promoter by treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored CXCL14 mRNA expression and in vivo cetuximab-mediated tumour growth suppression

  17. Expression of cytokine, chemokine, and adhesion molecules during endothelial cell activation induced by antibodies against dengue virus nonstructural protein 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chiu, Shu-Chen; Hsiao, Yu-Ling; Wan, Shu-Wen; Lei, Huan-Yao; Shiau, Ai-Li; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Chen, Shun-Hua; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2005-01-01

    Vascular dysfunction is a hallmark associated with disease onset in dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. In addition to direct viral damage, immune responses to dengue virus (DV) infection may also underlie the pathogenesis of disease. We have proposed a mechanism of molecular mimicry in which Abs directed against DV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) cross-react with endothelial cells and induce damage. In this study, we demonstrated the inflammatory endothelial cell activation induced by anti-DV NS1 via the transcription factor NF-kappaB-regulated pathway. Protein phosphorylation and NF-kappaB activation were observed after anti-DV NS1 stimulation in a human microvascular endothelial cell line-1. The cytokine and chemokine production, including IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, but not RANTES, in endothelial cells increased after treatment with anti-DV NS1 Abs. The expression of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 was blocked by the preabsorption of anti-DV NS1 with DV NS1 or by the inhibition of NF-kappaB activation. Furthermore, the increases in both ICAM-1 expression and the ability of human PBMC to adhere to endothelial cells were also observed, and these effects were inhibited by pretreatment with anti-ICAM-1 or anti-MCP-1 Abs. Therefore, in addition to endothelial cell apoptosis, as previously reported, inflammatory activation occurs in endothelial cells after stimulation by anti-DV NS1 Abs. These results suggest the involvement of anti-DV NS1 Abs in the vasculopathy of DV infection. PMID:15611263

  18. Human p38{delta} MAP kinase mediates UV irradiation induced up-regulation of the gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Shigeyuki; Ito, Shin; Kato, Yasumasa; Kubota, Eiro; Hata, Ryu-Ichiro

    2010-06-11

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family comprises ERK, JNK, p38 and ERK5 (big-MAPK, BMK1). UV irradiation of squamous cell carcinoma cells induced up-regulation of gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14, stimulated p38 phosphorylation, and down-regulated the phosphorylation of ERK. Human p38 MAPKs exist in 4 isoforms: p38{alpha}, {beta}, {gamma} and {delta}. The UV stimulation of p38 phosphorylation was not inhibited by the presence of SB203580 or PD169316, inhibitors of p38{alpha} and {beta}, suggesting p38 phosphorylation was not dependent on these 2 isoforms and that p38{gamma} and/or {delta} was responsible for the phosphorylation. In fact, inhibition of each of these 4 p38 isoforms by the introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNAs for respective isoforms revealed that only shRNA for p38{delta} attenuated the UV-induced up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. In addition, over-expression of p38 isoforms in the cells showed the association of p38{delta} with ERK1 and 2, concomitant with down-regulation of ERK phosphorylation. The usage of p38{delta} isoform by UV irradiation is not merely due to the abundance of this p38 isoform in the cells. Because serum deprivation of the cells also induced an increase in BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression, and in this case p38{alpha} and/or {beta} isoform is responsible for up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. Taken together, the data indicate that the respective stress-dependent action of p38 isoforms is responsible for the up-regulation of the gene expression of the chemokine BRAK/CXCL14.

  19. Chemokine gene expression in lung CD8 T cells correlates with protective immunity in mice immunized intra-nasally with Adenovirus-85A

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immunization of BALB/c mice with a recombinant adenovirus expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) antigen 85A (Ad85A) protects against aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis only when it is administered intra-nasally (i.n.). Immunization with Ad85A induces a lung-resident population of activated CD8 T cells that is antigen dependent, highly activated and mediates protection by early inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth. In order to determine why the i.n. route is so effective compared to parenteral immunization, we used microarray analysis to compare gene expression profiles of pulmonary and splenic CD8 T cells after i.n. or intra-dermal (i.d.) immunization. Method Total RNA from CD8 T cells was isolated from lungs or spleens of mice immunized with Ad85A by the i.n. or i.d. route. The gene profiles generated from each condition were compared. Statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) differentially expressed genes were analyzed to determine if they mapped to particular molecular functions, biological processes or pathways using Gene Ontology and Panther DB mapping tools. Results CD8 T cells from lungs of i.n. immunized mice expressed a large number of chemokines chemotactic for resting and activated T cells as well as activation and survival genes. Lung lymphocytes from i.n. immunized mice also express the chemokine receptor gene Cxcr6, which is thought to aid long-term retention of antigen-responding T cells in the lungs. Expression of CXCR6 on CD8 T cells was confirmed by flow cytometry. Conclusions Our microarray analysis represents the first ex vivo study comparing gene expression profiles of CD8 T cells isolated from distinct sites after immunization with an adenoviral vector by different routes. It confirms earlier phenotypic data indicating that lung i.n. cells are more activated than lung i.d. CD8 T cells. The sustained expression of chemokines and activation genes enables CD8 T cells to remain in the lungs for extended periods after

  20. CXCR3 Blockade Inhibits T Cell Migration into the Skin and Prevents Development of Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhenpeng; Xing, Luzhou; Cerise, Jane; Wang, Eddy Hsi Chun; Jabbari, Ali; de Jong, Annemieke; Petukhova, Lynn; Christiano, Angela M; Clynes, Raphael

    2016-08-15

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease of the hair follicle that results in hair loss of varying severity. Recently, we showed that IFN-γ-producing NKG2D(+)CD8(+) T cells actively infiltrate the hair follicle and are responsible for its destruction in C3H/HeJ AA mice. Our transcriptional profiling of human and mouse alopecic skin showed that the IFN pathway is the dominant signaling pathway involved in AA. We showed that IFN-inducible chemokines (CXCL9/10/11) are markedly upregulated in the skin of AA lesions, and further, that the IFN-inducible chemokine receptor, CXCR3, is upregulated on alopecic effector T cells. To demonstrate whether CXCL9/10/11 chemokines were required for development of AA, we treated mice with blocking Abs to CXCR3, which prevented the development of AA in the graft model, inhibiting the accumulation of NKG2D(+)CD8(+) T cells in the skin and cutaneous lymph nodes. These data demonstrate proof of concept that interfering with the Tc1 response in AA via blockade of IFN-inducible chemokines can prevent the onset of AA. CXCR3 blockade could be approached clinically in human AA with either biologic or small-molecule inhibition, the latter being particularly intriguing as a topical therapeutic. PMID:27412416

  1. Chemokine RANTES is increased at early stages of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Podolec, J; Kopec, G; Niewiara, L; Komar, M; Guzik, B; Bartus, K; Tomkiewicz-Pajak, L; Guzik, T J; Plazak, W; Zmudka, K

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, and in particular coronary artery disease (CAD), are the leading causes of death in Europe and represent around 50% of overall mortality. Numerous cardiovascular markers have been proposed in relation to cardiovascular risk prediction, in relation to cardiac and vascular and cerebral events. Chemokines which regulate immune cell vascular chemotaxis, including CCL5/RANTES are points of great interest. We hypothesized that chemokine RANTES level measured in peripheral blood may be associated with severity of atherosclerosis in patients with stable angina undergoing coronary angiography. RANTES and interleukin 18 (IL-18) levels were measured by ELISA. Classical and novel cardiovascular risk factors like brachial flow mediated dilation and intima-media thickness were analyzed in the context of chemokine levels and severity of atherosclerosis. Study included 62 consecutive patients with coronary atherosclerosis demonstrated by coronary angiography, (mean age 59.3 years (S.D. = 7.4)), divided into two groups: group I with lower severity of atherosclerosis, (n = 45) and group 2 with severe CAD (n = 17) based on coronary angiography. Groups were well balanced for classic risk factors for atherosclerosis. Mean RANTES level were significantly higher in patients in group I (67.9 ng/ml, S.E.M. = 3.97) than in group II (50.5 ng/ml, S.E.M. = 7.49; P = 0.03). In contrast, IL-18 levels were similar in both groups (255 pg/ml in group I and 315 pg/ml, S.E.M. = 40.91 in group I, P = 0.12), as well as hsCRP concentration (3.45 S.E.M. = 2.66 ng/ml and 4.69 ng/ml S.E.M.= 1.64 ng/ml respectively; P = 0.47). Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) values have been significantly lower in group II than in group I (6.31; S.E.M. = 0.61; vs 4.41; S.E.M. = 0,56, respectively, P = 0.026), while nitroglycerine-mediated dilatation (NMD) did not differ, indicating more pronounced endothelial dysfunction. No significant correlations between chemokine RANTES levels and intima

  2. Understanding stress-induced immunosuppression: exploration of cytokine and chemokine gene profiles in chicken peripheral leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Shini, S; Huff, G R; Shini, A; Kaiser, P

    2010-04-01

    At present, the poultry meat and egg industry has gained a lot of ground, being viewed as a provider of a healthy alternative to red meat and other protein sources. If this trend is to be maintained, solutions must be found to improve resistance of chickens to disease, which often is weakened by stressful conditions. In poultry, stress-induced immunosuppression is manifested by failures in vaccination and increased morbidity and mortality of flocks. Currently, several modern cellular and molecular approaches are being used to explore the status of the immune system during stress and disease. It is likely that these new techniques will lead to the development of new strategies for preventing and controlling immunosuppression in poultry. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays, a broad spectrum of cytokine, chemokine, and their receptor genes can be quantified in birds and then be used as markers to assess the effects of stress on the immune system. Currently, we are investigating immune and endocrine interactions in the chicken, in particular the cells and molecules that are known to be involved in such interactions in mammals. We have evaluated the effects of corticosterone administration in drinking water on peripheral lymphocyte and heterophil cytokine and chemokine gene profiles. In particular, there seems to be effects on cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression levels in both lymphocytes and heterophils, especially expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and IL-18 and chemokines C-C motif, ligand 1 inflammatory (CCLi1); C-C motif, ligand 2 inflammatory (CCLi2); C-C motif, ligand 5 (CCL5); C-C motif, ligand 16 (CCL16); C-X-C motif ligand 1 inflammatory (CXCLi1); and C-X-C motif ligand 2 inflammatory (CXCLi2), which are initially upregulated and are potentially involved in modulating the adaptive immune response. A chronic treatment with corticosterone downregulates proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, suggesting

  3. Discovery of novel small molecule orally bioavailable C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 antagonists that are potent inhibitors of T-tropic (X4) HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Skerlj, Renato T; Bridger, Gary J; Kaller, Al; McEachern, Ernest J; Crawford, Jason B; Zhou, Yuanxi; Atsma, Bem; Langille, Jonathon; Nan, Susan; Veale, Duane; Wilson, Trevor; Harwig, Curtis; Hatse, Sigrid; Princen, Katrien; De Clercq, Erik; Schols, Dominique

    2010-04-22

    The redesign of azamacrocyclic CXCR4 chemokine receptor antagonists resulted in the discovery of novel, small molecule, orally bioavailable compounds that retained T-tropic (CXCR4 using, X4) anti-HIV-1 activity. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) was determined on the basis of the inhibition of replication of X4 HIV-1 NL4.3 in MT-4 cells. As a result of lead optimization, we identified (S)-N'-((1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)methyl)-N'-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinolin-8-yl)butane-1,4-diamine (AMD070) 2 as a potent and selective antagonist of CXCR4 with an IC(50) value of 13 nM in a CXCR4 125I-SDF inhibition binding assay. Compound 2 inhibited the replication of T-tropic HIV-1 (NL4.3 strain) in MT-4 cells and PBMCs with an IC(50) of 2 and 26 nM, respectively, while remaining noncytotoxic to cells at concentrations exceeding 23 microM. The pharmacokinetics of 2 was evaluated in rat and dog, and good oral bioavailability was observed in both species. This compound represents the first small molecule orally bioavailable CXCR4 antagonist that was developed for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:20297846

  4. Transferring the C-terminus of the chemokine CCL21 to CCL19 confers enhanced heparin binding.

    PubMed

    Barmore, Austin J; Castex, Sally M; Gouletas, Brittany A; Griffith, Alex J; Metz, Slater W; Muelder, Nicolas G; Populin, Michael J; Sackett, David M; Schuster, Abigail M; Veldkamp, Christopher T

    2016-09-01

    Chemokines direct the migration of cells during various immune processes and are involved in many disease states. For example, CCL19 and CCL21, through activation of the CCR7 receptor, recruit dendritic cells and naïve T-cells to the secondary lymphoid organs aiding in balancing immune response and tolerance. However, CCL19 and CCL21 can also direct the metastasis of CCR7 expressing cancers. Chemokine binding to glycosaminoglycans, such as heparin, is as important to chemokine function as receptor activation. CCL21 is unique in that it contains an extended C-terminus not found in other chemokines like CCL19. Deletion of this extended C-terminus reduces CCL21's affinity for heparin and transferring the CCL21 C-terminus to CCL19 enhances heparin binding mainly through non-specific, electrostatic interactions. PMID:27338641

  5. Analysis of the antimicrobial activities of a chemokine-derived peptide (CDAP-4) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Becerra, Francisco; Dominguez-Ramirez, Lenin; Mendoza-Hernandez, Guillermo; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Soldevila, Gloria . E-mail: garciaze@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-04-06

    Chemokines are key molecules involved in the control of leukocyte trafficking. Recently, a novel function as antimicrobial proteins has been described. CCL13 is the only member of the MCP chemokine subfamily displaying antimicrobial activity. To determine Key residues involved in its antimicrobial activity, CCL13 derived peptides were synthesized and tested against several bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of these peptides, corresponding to the C-terminal region of CCL13 (CDAP-4) displayed good antimicrobial activity. Electron microscopy studies revealed remarkable morphological changes after CDAP-4 treatment. By computer modeling, CDAP-4 in {alpha} helical configuration generated a positive electrostatic potential that extended beyond the surface of the molecule. This feature is similar to other antimicrobial peptides. Altogether, these findings indicate that the antimicrobial activity was displayed by CCL13 resides to some extent at the C-terminal region. Furthermore, CDAP-4 could be considered a good antimicrobial candidate with a potential use against pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  6. Targeting chemokine receptors in disease – a case study of CCR4

    PubMed Central

    Solari, Roberto; Pease, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Since their early 1990s, the chemokine receptor family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been the source of much pharmacological endeavour. Best known for their key roles in recruiting leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, the receptors present themselves as plausible drug targets for therapeutic intervention. In this article, we will focus our attention upon CC Chemokine Receptor Four (CCR4) which has been implicated in diseases as diverse as allergic asthma and lymphoma. We will review the discovery of the receptors and their ligands, their perceived roles in disease and the successful targeting of CCR4 by both small molecule antagonists and monoclonal antibodies. We will also discuss future directions and strategies for drug discovery in this field. PMID:25981299

  7. Decoding the chemokine network that links leukocytes with decidual cells and the trophoblast during early implantation.

    PubMed

    Ramhorst, Rosanna; Grasso, Esteban; Paparini, Daniel; Hauk, Vanesa; Gallino, Lucila; Calo, Guillermina; Vota, Daiana; Pérez Leirós, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Chemokine network is central to the innate and adaptive immunity and entails a variety of proteins and membrane receptors that control physiological processes such as wound healing, angiogenesis, embryo growth and development. During early pregnancy, the chemokine network coordinates not only the recruitment of different leukocyte populations to generate the maternal-placental interface, but also constitutes an additional checkpoint for tissue homeostasis maintenance. The normal switch from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory predominant microenvironment characteristic of the post-implantation stage requires redundant immune tolerance circuits triggered by key master regulators. In this review we will focus on the recruitment and conditioning of maternal immune cells to the uterus at the early implantation period with special interest on high plasticity macrophages and dendritic cells and their ability to induce regulatory T cells. We will also point to putative immunomodulatory polypeptides involved in immune homeostasis maintenance at the maternal-placental interface. PMID:26891097

  8. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wehler, Thomas C.; Graf, Claudine; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Brenner, Walburgis; Schadt, Jörg; Gockel, Ines; Berger, Martin R.; Thüroff, Joachim W.; Galle, Peter R.; Moehler, Markus; Schimanski, Carl C.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P = .039), tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005), and low hemoglobin (P = .039). In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma. PMID:19266088

  9. Sex Hormones Coordinate Neutrophil Immunity in the Vagina by Controlling Chemokine Gradients.

    PubMed

    Lasarte, Sandra; Samaniego, Rafael; Salinas-Muñoz, Laura; Guia-Gonzalez, Mauriel A; Weiss, Linnea A; Mercader, Enrique; Ceballos-García, Elena; Navarro-González, Teresa; Moreno-Ochoa, Laura; Perez-Millan, Federico; Pion, Marjorie; Sanchez-Mateos, Paloma; Hidalgo, Andres; Muñoz-Fernandez, Maria A; Relloso, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Estradiol-based contraceptives and hormonal replacement therapy predispose women to Candida albicans infections. Moreover, during the ovulatory phase (high estradiol), neutrophil numbers decrease in the vaginal lumen and increase during the luteal phase (high progesterone). Vaginal secretions contain chemokines that drive neutrophil migration into the lumen. However, their expression during the ovarian cycle or in response to hormonal treatments are controversial and their role in vaginal defense remains unknown.To investigate the transepithelial migration of neutrophils, we used adoptive transfer of Cxcr2(-/-) neutrophils and chemokine immunofluorescence quantitative analysis in response to C. albicans vaginal infection in the presence of hormones.Our data show that the Cxcl1/Cxcr2 axis drives neutrophil transepithelial migration into the vagina. Progesterone promotes the Cxcl1 gradient to favor neutrophil migration. Estradiol disrupts the Cxcl1 gradient and favors neutrophil arrest in the vaginal stroma; as a result, the vagina becomes more vulnerable to pathogens. PMID:26238687

  10. Osteolytic lesions, cytogenetic features and bone marrow levels of cytokines and chemokines in multiple myeloma patients: Role of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20.

    PubMed

    Palma, B Dalla; Guasco, D; Pedrazzoni, M; Bolzoni, M; Accardi, F; Costa, F; Sammarelli, G; Craviotto, L; De Filippo, M; Ruffini, L; Omedè, P; Ria, R; Aversa, F; Giuliani, N

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between bone marrow (BM) cytokine and chemokine levels, cytogenetic profiles and skeletal involvement in multiple myeloma (MM) patients is not yet defined. This study investigated a cohort of 455 patients including monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS), smoldering MM and symptomatic MM patients. Skeletal surveys, positron emission tomography (PET)/computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to identify myeloma bone disease. Significantly higher median BM levels of both C-C motif Ligand (CCL)3 and CCL20 were found in MM patients with radiographic evidence of osteolytic lesions as compared with those without, and in all MM patients with positive PET/CT scans. BM levels of CCL3, CCL20, Activin-A and Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) were significantly higher in patients with high bone disease as compared with patients with low bone disease. Moreover, CCL20 BM levels were significant predictors of osteolysis on X-rays by multivariate logistic analysis. On the other hand, DKK-1 levels were related to the presence of MRI lesions independently of the osteolysis at the X-rays. Our data define the relationship between bone disease and the BM cytokine and chemokine patterns highlighting the tight relationship between CCL20 BM levels and osteolysis in MM. PMID:26419509

  11. Reduced locomotor activity and exploratory behavior in CC chemokine receptor 4 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ambrée, Oliver; Klassen, Irene; Förster, Irmgard; Arolt, Volker; Scheu, Stefanie; Alferink, Judith

    2016-11-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are key regulators of immune cell trafficking and activation. Recent findings suggest that they may also play pathophysiological roles in psychiatric diseases like depression and anxiety disorders. The CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) and its two ligands, CCL17 and CCL22, are functionally involved in neuroinflammation as well as anti-infectious and autoimmune responses. However, their influence on behavior remains unknown. Here we characterized the functional role of the CCR4-CCL17 chemokine-receptor axis in the modulation of anxiety-related behavior, locomotor activity, and object exploration and recognition. Additionally, we investigated social exploration of CCR4 and CCL17 knockout mice and wild type (WT) controls. CCR4 knockout (CCR4(-/-)) mice exhibited fewer anxiety-related behaviors in the elevated plus-maze, diminished locomotor activity, exploratory behavior, and social exploration, while their recognition memory was not affected. In contrast, CCL17 deficient mice did not show an altered behavior compared to WT mice regarding locomotor activity, anxiety-related behavior, social exploration, and object recognition memory. In the dark-light and object recognition tests, CCL17(-/-) mice even covered longer distances than WT mice. These data demonstrate a mechanistic or developmental role of CCR4 in the regulation of locomotor and exploratory behaviors, whereas the ligand CCL17 appears not to be involved in the behaviors measured here. Thus, either CCL17 and the alternative ligand CCL22 may be redundant, or CCL22 is the main activator of CCR4 in these processes. Taken together, these findings contribute to the growing evidence regarding the involvement of chemokines and their receptors in the regulation of behavior. PMID:27469058

  12. Airway epithelial cell PPARγ modulates cigarette smoke-induced chemokine expression and emphysema susceptibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Solleti, Siva Kumar; Simon, Dawn M; Srisuma, Sorachai; Arikan, Meltem C; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Bijli, Kaiser M; Rahman, Arshad; Crossno, Joseph T; Shapiro, Steven D; Mariani, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a highly prevalent, chronic inflammatory lung disease with limited existing therapeutic options. While modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor (PPAR)-γ activity can modify inflammatory responses in several models of lung injury, the relevance of the PPARG pathway in COPD pathogenesis has not been previously explored. Mice lacking Pparg specifically in airway epithelial cells displayed increased susceptibility to chronic cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema, with excessive macrophage accumulation associated with increased expression of chemokines, Ccl5, Cxcl10, and Cxcl15. Conversely, treatment of mice with a pharmacological PPARγ activator attenuated Cxcl10 and Cxcl15 expression and macrophage accumulation in response to CS. In vitro, CS increased lung epithelial cell chemokine expression in a PPARγ activation-dependent fashion. The ability of PPARγ to regulate CS-induced chemokine expression in vitro was not specifically associated with peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE)-mediated transactivation activity but was correlated with PPARγ-mediated transrepression of NF-κB activity. Pharmacological or genetic activation of PPARγ activity abrogated CS-dependent induction of NF-κB activity. Regulation of NF-κB activity involved direct PPARγ-NF-κB interaction and PPARγ-mediated effects on IKK activation, IκBα degradation, and nuclear translocation of p65. Our data indicate that PPARG represents a disease-relevant pathophysiological and pharmacological target in COPD. Its activation state likely contributes to NF-κB-dependent, CS-induced chemokine-mediated regulation of inflammatory cell accumulation. PMID:26024894

  13. The chemokine system in diverse forms of macrophage activation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alberto; Sica, Antonio; Sozzani, Silvano; Allavena, Paola; Vecchi, Annunciata; Locati, Massimo

    2004-12-01

    Plasticity and functional polarization are hallmarks of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Here we review emerging key properties of different forms of macrophage activation and polarization (M1, M2a, M2b, M2c), which represent extremes of a continuum. In particular, recent evidence suggests that differential modulation of the chemokine system integrates polarized macrophages in pathways of resistance to, or promotion of, microbial pathogens and tumors, or immunoregulation, tissue repair and remodeling. PMID:15530839

  14. Regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration by CCR2-activating chemokines is directly related to macrophage recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Carlo O.; McHale, Matthew J.; Wells, Jason T.; Ochoa, Oscar; Michalek, Joel E.; McManus, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    Muscle regeneration requires CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression on bone marrow-derived cells; macrophages are a prominent CCR2-expressing cell in this process. CCR2−/− mice have severe impairments in angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced injury. However, multiple chemokines activate CCR2, including monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCP)-1, -3, and -5. We hypothesized that MCP-1 is the chemokine ligand that mediates the impairments present in CCR2−/− mice. We examined muscle regeneration, capillary density, and cellular recruitment in MCP-1−/− and CCR2−/− mice following injury. Muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation, but not capillary density, were significantly impaired in MCP-1−/− compared with wild-type (WT) mice; however, muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation impairments were not as severe as observed in CCR2−/− mice. Although tissue levels of MCP-5 were elevated in MCP-1−/− mice compared with WT, the administration of MCP-5 neutralizing antibody did not alter muscle regeneration in MCP-1−/− mice. While neutrophil accumulation after injury was similar in all three mouse strains, macrophage recruitment was highest in WT mice, intermediate in MCP-1−/− mice, and severely impaired in CCR2−/− mice. In conclusion, while the absence of MCP-1 resulted in impaired macrophage recruitment and muscle regeneration, MCP-1−/− mice exhibit an intermediate phenotype compared with CCR2−/− mice. Intermediate macrophage recruitment in MCP-1−/− mice was associated with similar capillary density to WT, suggesting that fewer macrophages may be needed to restore angiogenesis vs. muscle regeneration. Finally, other chemokines, in addition to MCP-1 and MCP-5, may activate CCR2-dependent regenerative processes resulting in an intermediate phenotype in MCP-1−/− mice. PMID:20631294

  15. Regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration by CCR2-activating chemokines is directly related to macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Carlo O; McHale, Matthew J; Wells, Jason T; Ochoa, Oscar; Michalek, Joel E; McManus, Linda M; Shireman, Paula K

    2010-09-01

    Muscle regeneration requires CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression on bone marrow-derived cells; macrophages are a prominent CCR2-expressing cell in this process. CCR2-/- mice have severe impairments in angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced injury. However, multiple chemokines activate CCR2, including monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCP)-1, -3, and -5. We hypothesized that MCP-1 is the chemokine ligand that mediates the impairments present in CCR2-/- mice. We examined muscle regeneration, capillary density, and cellular recruitment in MCP-1-/- and CCR2-/- mice following injury. Muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation, but not capillary density, were significantly impaired in MCP-1-/- compared with wild-type (WT) mice; however, muscle regeneration and adipocyte accumulation impairments were not as severe as observed in CCR2-/- mice. Although tissue levels of MCP-5 were elevated in MCP-1-/- mice compared with WT, the administration of MCP-5 neutralizing antibody did not alter muscle regeneration in MCP-1-/- mice. While neutrophil accumulation after injury was similar in all three mouse strains, macrophage recruitment was highest in WT mice, intermediate in MCP-1-/- mice, and severely impaired in CCR2-/- mice. In conclusion, while the absence of MCP-1 resulted in impaired macrophage recruitment and muscle regeneration, MCP-1-/- mice exhibit an intermediate phenotype compared with CCR2-/- mice. Intermediate macrophage recruitment in MCP-1-/- mice was associated with similar capillary density to WT, suggesting that fewer macrophages may be needed to restore angiogenesis vs. muscle regeneration. Finally, other chemokines, in addition to MCP-1 and MCP-5, may activate CCR2-dependent regenerative processes resulting in an intermediate phenotype in MCP-1-/- mice. PMID:20631294

  16. A Role for the Chemokine Receptor CCR6 in Mammalian Sperm Motility and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Campo, Pedro; Buffone, Mariano G.; Benencia, Fabian; Conejo-García, José R.; Rinaudo, Paolo F.; Gerton, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Although recent evidence indicates that several chemokines and defensins, well-known as inflammatory mediators, are expressed in the male and female reproductive tracts, the location and functional significance of chemokine networks in sperm physiology and sperm reproductive tract interactions are poorly understood. To address this deficiency in our knowledge, we examined the expression and function in sperm of CCR6, a receptor common to several chemoattractant peptides, and screened several reproductive tract fluids for the presence of specific ligands. CCR6 protein is present in mouse and human sperm and mainly localized in the sperm tail with other minor patterns in sperm from mice (neck and acrosomal region) and men (neck and midpiece regions). As expected from the protein immunoblotting and immunofluorescence results, mouse Ccr6 mRNA is expressed in the testis. Furthermore, the Defb29 mRNA encoding the CCR6 ligand, β-defensin DEFB29, is expressed at high levels in the epididymis. As determined by protein chip analysis, several chemokines (including some that act through CCR6, such as CCL20/MIP-3α (formerly Macrophage Inflammatory Protein 3α) and protein hormones were present in human follicular fluid, endometrial secretions, and seminal plasma. In functional chemotaxis assays, capacitated human sperm exhibited a directional movement towards CCL20, and displayed modifications in motility parameters. Our data indicate that chemokine ligand/receptor interactions in the male and female genital tracts promote sperm motility and chemotaxis under non-inflammatory conditions. Therefore, some of the physiological reactions mediated by CCR6 ligands in male reproduction extend beyond a pro-inflammatory response and might find application in clinical reproduction and/or contraception. PMID:23765988

  17. Peptide and peptidomimetic ligands for CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4).

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2012-08-14

    The development of novel peptide and peptidomimetic ligands for