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Sample records for chemopreventive agent sulforaphane

  1. Frugal chemoprevention: targeting Nrf2 with foods rich in sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Palliyaguru, Dushani L; Kensler, Thomas W

    2016-02-01

    With the properties of efficacy, safety, tolerability, practicability and low cost, foods containing bioactive phytochemicals are gaining significant attention as elements of chemoprevention strategies against cancer. Sulforaphane [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)butane], a naturally occurring isothiocyanate produced by cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, is found to be a highly promising chemoprevention agent against not only a variety of cancers such as breast, prostate, colon, skin, lung, stomach or bladder, but also cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. For reasons of experimental exigency, preclinical studies have focused principally on sulforaphane itself, while clinical studies have relied on broccoli sprout preparations rich in either sulforaphane or its biogenic precursor, glucoraphanin. Substantive subsequent evaluation of sulforaphane pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics has been undertaken using either pure compound or food matrices. Sulforaphane affects multiple targets in cells. One key molecular mechanism of action for sulforaphane entails activation of the Nrf2-Keap1 signaling pathway although other actions contribute to the broad spectrum of efficacy in different animal models. This review summarizes the current status of pre-clinical chemoprevention studies with sulforaphane and highlights the progress and challenges for the application of foods rich in sulforaphane and/or glucoraphanin in the arena of clinical chemoprevention. PMID:26970133

  2. Sulforaphane, a cancer chemopreventive agent, induces pathways associated with membrane biosynthesis in response to tissue damage by aflatoxin B1

    PubMed Central

    Techapiesancharoenkij, Nirachara; Fiala, Jeannette L. A.; Navasumrit, Panida; Croy, Robert G.; Wogan, Gerald N.; Groopman, John D.; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Essigmann, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is one of the major risk factors for liver cancer globally. A recent study showed that sulforaphane (SF), a potent inducer of phase II enzymes that occurs naturally in widely consumed vegetables, effectively induces hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and reduces levels of hepatic AFB1-DNA adducts in AFB1-exposed Sprague Dawley rats. The present study characterized the effects of SF pre-treatment on global gene expression in the livers of similarly treated male rats. Combined treatment with AFB1 and SF caused reprogramming of a network of genes involved in signal transduction and transcription. Changes in gene regulation were observable 4 h after AFB1 administration in SF-pretreated animals and may reflect regeneration of cells in the wake of AFB1-induced hepatotoxicity. At 24 h after AFB1 administration, significant induction of genes that play roles in cellular lipid metabolism and acetyl-CoA biosynthesis was detected in SF-pretreated AFB1-dosed rats. Induction of this group of genes may indicate a metabolic shift toward glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis to generate and maintain pools of intermediate molecules required for tissue repair, cell growth and compensatory hepatic cell proliferation. Collectively, gene expression data from this study provide insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of SF against AFB1 hepatotoxicity and hepatocarcinogenicity, in addition to the chemopreventive activity of this compound as a GST inducer. PMID:25450479

  3. Sulforaphane, a cancer chemopreventive agent, induces pathways associated with membrane biosynthesis in response to tissue damage by aflatoxin B{sub 1}

    SciTech Connect

    Techapiesancharoenkij, Nirachara; Fiala, Jeannette L.A.; Navasumrit, Panida; Croy, Robert G.; Wogan, Gerald N.; Groopman, John D.; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Essigmann, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is one of the major risk factors for liver cancer globally. A recent study showed that sulforaphane (SF), a potent inducer of phase II enzymes that occurs naturally in widely consumed vegetables, effectively induces hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and reduces levels of hepatic AFB{sub 1}-DNA adducts in AFB{sub 1}-exposed Sprague Dawley rats. The present study characterized the effects of SF pre-treatment on global gene expression in the livers of similarly treated male rats. Combined treatment with AFB{sub 1} and SF caused reprogramming of a network of genes involved in signal transduction and transcription. Changes in gene regulation were observable 4 h after AFB{sub 1} administration in SF-pretreated animals and may reflect regeneration of cells in the wake of AFB{sub 1}-induced hepatotoxicity. At 24 h after AFB{sub 1} administration, significant induction of genes that play roles in cellular lipid metabolism and acetyl-CoA biosynthesis was detected in SF-pretreated AFB{sub 1}-dosed rats. Induction of this group of genes may indicate a metabolic shift toward glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis to generate and maintain pools of intermediate molecules required for tissue repair, cell growth and compensatory hepatic cell proliferation. Collectively, gene expression data from this study provide insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of SF against AFB{sub 1} hepatotoxicity and hepatocarcinogenicity, in addition to the chemopreventive activity of this compound as a GST inducer. - Highlights: • This study revealed sulforaphane (SF)-deregulated gene sets in aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-treated rat livers. • SF redirects biochemical networks toward lipid biosynthesis in AFB{sub 1}-dosed rats. • SF enhanced gene sets that would be expected to favor cell repair and regeneration.

  4. A review of cancer chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Levi, M S; Borne, R F; Williamson, J S

    2001-09-01

    In the late 20(th) century, the treatment of cancer began to include its prevention. Today, compounds exist that will lower the risk of developing certain types of cancer. This has been demonstrated in studies where chemically induced tumor growth has been slowed or reversed. Anti-inflammatory compounds having chemopreventive activity are piroxicam, sulindac, aspirin, celecoxib and curcumin. The selective estrogen receptor modulators, tamoxifen and raloxifene, are beneficial in the prevention of estrogen dependent tumors. Retinoids, vitamin A derivatives, such as targretin and fenretinide are useful in the prevention of tumors. Compounds containing sulfur, such as sulforaphane and oltipraz, are even useful as radioprotective agents. The steroid dehydroepiandosterone can inhibit experimental carcinogenesis. All of these chemical classes provide a start for the medicinal chemist to design more effective chemopreventive agents. The biomarkers used to determine the chemopreventive activity of new compounds are quite often activities of enzymes. The identification of those individuals at high risk is still in its infancy and presents a troubling dilemma. PMID:11562271

  5. Dietary Sulforaphane in Cancer Chemoprevention: The Role of Epigenetic Regulation and HDAC Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Tortorella, Stephanie M.; Royce, Simon G.; Licciardi, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Sulforaphane, produced by the hydrolytic conversion of glucoraphanin after ingestion of cruciferous vegetables, particularly broccoli and broccoli sprouts, has been extensively studied due to its apparent health-promoting properties in disease and limited toxicity in normal tissue. Recent Studies: Recent identification of a sub-population of tumor cells with stem cell-like self-renewal capacity that may be responsible for relapse, metastasis, and resistance, as a potential target of the dietary compound, may be an important aspect of sulforaphane chemoprevention. Evidence also suggests that sulforaphane may target the epigenetic alterations observed in specific cancers, reversing aberrant changes in gene transcription through mechanisms of histone deacetylase inhibition, global demethylation, and microRNA modulation. Critical Issues: In this review, we discuss the biochemical and biological properties of sulforaphane with a particular emphasis on the anticancer properties of the dietary compound. Sulforaphane possesses the capacity to intervene in multistage carcinogenesis through the modulation and/or regulation of important cellular mechanisms. The inhibition of phase I enzymes that are responsible for the activation of pro-carcinogens, and the induction of phase II enzymes that are critical in mutagen elimination are well-characterized chemopreventive properties. Furthermore, sulforaphane mediates a number of anticancer pathways, including the activation of apoptosis, induction of cell cycle arrest, and inhibition of NFκB. Future Directions: Further characterization of the chemopreventive properties of sulforaphane and its capacity to be selectively toxic to malignant cells are warranted to potentially establish the clinical utility of the dietary compound as an anti-cancer compound alone, and in combination with clinically relevant therapeutic and management strategies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1382–1424. PMID:25364882

  6. Chemopreventive Agent Development | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group promotes and supports research on early chemopreventive agent development, from preclinical studies to phas | Research on early chemopreventive agent development, from preclinical studies to phase I clinical trials.

  7. Epigenetic Regulation by Sulforaphane: Opportunities for Breast and Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Atwell, Lauren L.; Beaver, Laura M.; Shannon, Jackilen; Williams, David E.; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a phytochemical derived from cruciferous vegetables that has multiple molecular targets and anti-cancer properties. Researchers have demonstrated several chemopreventive benefits of SFN consumption, such as reductions in tumor growth, increases in cancer cell apoptosis, and disruption of signaling within tumor microenvironments both in vitro and in vivo. Emerging evidence indicates that SFN exerts several of its chemopreventive effects by altering epigenetic mechanisms. This review summarizes evidence of the impact of SFN on epigenetic events and how they relate to the chemopreventive effects of SFN observed in preclinical and clinical studies of breast and prostate cancers. Specific areas of focus include the role of SFN in the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, inflammation, antioxidant defense, and cancer cell signaling and their relationships to epigenetic mechanisms. Finally, remaining challenges and research needs for translating mechanistic work with SFN into human studies and clinical intervention trials are discussed. PMID:26042194

  8. Chemopreventive agents targeting tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sharada H; Thulasingam, Senthilkumar; Nagarajan, Sangeetha

    2016-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that tumor development and progression depend not only on the perturbed genes that govern cell proliferation, but is also highly determined by the non-tumor cells of the stromal compartment surrounding the tumor called tumor microenvironment (TME). These findings highlight the importance of targeting the microenvironment in combination with therapies aimed at tumor cells as a valuable approach. The innate and adaptive immune cells in the TME interact among themselves and also with the endothelial cells, pericytes and mast cells of the stromal compartment through various autocrine and paracrine manner to regulate abnormal cell proliferation. Direct cytotoxic killing of cancer cells and/or reversion of the immunosuppressive TME are to be considered as better strategies for chemoprevention and chemotherapy. With a growing emphasis on a "hallmark targeting" strategy for cancer therapy, the TME now appears as a promising target for cancer prevention using natural products. Clarification on the nontumor stromal cells, the mediators involved, interactions with immune response cells, and immune-evasive mechanisms are needed in order to manipulate the characteristics of the TME by natural pharmacological agents to design effective therapies. This review will provide a glimpse on the roles played by various non-tumor cells in tumor progression and their intervention by pharmacological agents. PMID:26679106

  9. Sulforaphane Bioavailability and Chemopreventive Activity in Women Scheduled for Breast Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Atwell, Lauren L; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Mori, Motomi; Farris, Paige E; Vetto, John T; Naik, Arpana M; Oh, Karen Y; Thuillier, Philippe; Ho, Emily; Shannon, Jackilen

    2015-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest a protective effect of cruciferous vegetables on breast cancer. Sulforaphane (SFN), an active food component derived from crucifers, has been shown to be effective in breast cancer chemoprevention. This study evaluated the chemopreventive effect of SFN on selective biomarkers from blood and breast tissues. In a 2- to 8-week double-blinded, randomized controlled trial, 54 women with abnormal mammograms and scheduled for breast biopsy were randomized to consume a placebo or a glucoraphanin (GFN) supplement providing SFN (n = 27). Plasma and urinary SFN metabolites, peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, and tissue biomarkers (H3K18ac, H3K9ac, HDAC3, HDAC6, Ki-67, p21) were measured before and after the intervention in benign, ductal carcinoma in situ, or invasive ductal carcinoma breast tissues. Within the supplement group, Ki-67 (P = 0.003) and HDAC3 (P = 0.044) levels significantly decreased in benign tissue. Pre-to-postintervention changes in these biomarkers were not significantly different between treatment groups after multiple comparison adjustment. GFN supplementation was associated with a significant decrease in PBMC HDAC activity (P = 0.04). No significant associations were observed between SFN and examined tissue biomarkers when comparing treatment groups. This study provides evidence that GFN supplementation for a few weeks is safe but may not be sufficient for producing changes in breast tissue tumor biomarkers. Future studies employing larger sample sizes should evaluate alternative dosing and duration regimens to inform dietary SFN strategies in breast cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26511489

  10. Organ-specific exposure and response to sulforaphane, a key chemopreventive ingredient in broccoli: implications for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Veeranki, Omkara L; Bhattacharya, Arup; Marshall, James R; Zhang, Yuesheng

    2013-01-14

    Naturally occurring sulforaphane (SF) has been extensively studied for cancer prevention. However, little is known as to which organs may be most affected by this agent, which impedes its further development. In the present study, SF was administered to rats orally either in a single dose or once daily for 7 d. Tissue distribution of SF was measured by a HPLC-based method. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), two well-known cytoprotective phase 2 enzymes, were measured using biochemical assays to assess tissue response to SF. SF was delivered to different organs in vastly different concentrations. Tissue uptake of SF was the greatest in the stomach, declining rapidly in the descending gastro-intestinal tract. SF was rapidly eliminated through urinary excretion, and urinary concentrations of SF equivalents were 2-4 orders of magnitude higher than those of plasma. Indeed, tissue uptake level of SF in the bladder was second only to that in the stomach. Tissue levels of SF in the colon, prostate and several other organs were very low, compared to those in the bladder and stomach. Moreover, induction levels of GST and NQO1 varied by 3- to 6-fold among the organs of SF-treated rats, though not strictly correlated with tissue exposure to SF. Thus, there is profound organ specificity in tissue exposure and response to dietary SF, suggesting that the potential chemopreventive benefit of dietary SF may differ significantly among organs. These findings may provide a basis for prioritising organs for further chemopreventive study of SF. PMID:22464629

  11. Anticancer Activity of a Broccoli Derivative, Sulforaphane, in Barrett Adenocarcinoma: Potential Use in Chemoprevention and as Adjuvant in Chemotherapy1

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Aamer; Pal, Jagannath; Maitah, Ma'in; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Pelluru, Dheeraj; Nanjappa, Puru; Lee, Saem; Batchu, Ramesh B; Prasad, Madhu; Bryant, Christopher S; Rajput, Samiyah; Gryaznov, Sergei; Beer, David G; Weaver, Donald W; Munshi, Nikhil C; Goyal, Raj K; Shammas, Masood A

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The incidence of Barrett esophageal adenocarcinoma (BEAC) has been increasing at an alarming rate in western countries. In this study, we have evaluated the therapeutic potential of sulforaphane (SFN), an antioxidant derived from broccoli, in BEAC. METHODS: BEAC cells were treated with SFN, alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic, paclitaxel, or telomerase-inhibiting agents (MST-312, GRN163L), and live cell number determined at various time points. The effect on drug resistance/chemosensitivity was evaluated by rhodamine efflux assay. Apoptosis was detected by annexin V labeling and Western blot analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Effects on genes implicated in cell cycle and apoptosis were determined by Western blot analyses. To evaluate the efficacy in vivo, BEAC cells were injected subcutaneously in severe combined immunodeficient mice, and after the appearance of palpable tumors, mice were treated with SFN. RESULTS: SFN induced both time- and dose-dependent decline in cell survival, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. The treatment with SFN also suppressed the expression of multidrug resistance protein, reduced drug efflux, and increased anticancer activity of other antiproliferative agents including paclitaxel. A significant reduction in tumor volume was also observed by SFN in a subcutaneous tumor model of BEAC. Anticancer activity could be attributed to the induction of caspase 8 and p21 and down-regulation of hsp90, a molecular chaperon required for activity of several proliferation-associated proteins. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that a natural product with antioxidant properties from broccoli has great potential to be used in chemoprevention and treatment of BEAC. PMID:21151478

  12. Prevention of Carcinogen-Induced Oral Cancer by Sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Julie E; Zang, Yan; Sen, Malabika; Li, Changyou; Wang, Lin; Egner, Patricia A; Fahey, Jed W; Normolle, Daniel P; Grandis, Jennifer R; Kensler, Thomas W; Johnson, Daniel E

    2016-07-01

    Chronic exposure to carcinogens represents the major risk factor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Beverages derived from broccoli sprout extracts (BSE) that are rich in glucoraphanin and its bioactive metabolite sulforaphane promote detoxication of airborne pollutants in humans. Herein, we investigated the potential chemopreventive activity of sulforaphane using in vitro models of normal and malignant mucosal epithelial cells and an in vivo model of murine oral cancer resulting from the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Sulforaphane treatment of Het-1A, a normal mucosal epithelial cell line, and 4 HNSCC cell lines led to dose- and time-dependent induction of NRF2 and the NRF2 target genes NQO1 and GCLC, known mediators of carcinogen detoxication. Sulforaphane also promoted NRF2-independent dephosphorylation/inactivation of pSTAT3, a key oncogenic factor in HNSCC. Compared with vehicle, sulforaphane significantly reduced the incidence and size of 4NQO-induced tongue tumors in mice. A pilot clinical trial in 10 healthy volunteers evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacodynamic activity of three different BSE regimens, based upon urinary sulforaphane metabolites and NQO1 transcripts in buccal scrapings, respectively. Ingestion of sulforaphane-rich BSE demonstrated the greatest, most consistent bioavailability. Mucosal bioactivity, defined as 2-fold or greater upregulation of NQO1 mRNA, was observed in 6 of 9 evaluable participants ingesting glucoraphanin-rich BSE; 3 of 6 ingesting sulforaphane-rich BSE; and 3 of 9 after topical-only exposure to sulforaphane-rich BSE. Together, our findings demonstrate preclinical chemopreventive activity of sulforaphane against carcinogen-induced oral cancer, and support further mechanistic and clinical investigation of sulforaphane as a chemopreventive agent against tobacco-related HNSCC. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 547-57. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27339168

  13. Alternate dosing schedules for cancer chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Lazzeroni, Matteo; DeCensi, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Pharmacologic interventions for cancer risk reduction involve the chronic administration of synthetic or natural agents to reduce or delay the occurrence of malignancy. Despite the strong evidence for a favorable risk-benefit ratio for a number of agents in several common malignancies such as breast and prostate cancer, the public's attitude toward cancer chemoprevention remains ambivalent, with the issue of toxicity associated with drugs being perceived as the main barrier to widespread use of preventive therapy by high-risk subjects. Among the strategies to overcome such obstacles to preventive therapies, two novel and potentially safer modes of administering agents are discussed in this paper. The first strategy is to lower the dose of drugs that are in common use in the adjuvant setting based on the notion that prevention of cancer cells from developing should require a lower dose than eradicating established tumor cells. A second approach is to adopt an intermittent administration similar to what is used in the chemotherapy setting in an attempt to minimize risks while retaining benefits. This article provides a detailed discussion of the principles and future development of these two approaches in the direction of a precision preventive medicine. PMID:26970130

  14. The molecular mechanism of action of aspirin, curcumin and sulforaphane combinations in the chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    THAKKAR, ARVIND; SUTARIA, DHRUVITKUMAR; GRANDHI, B. KARTHIK; WANG, JEFFREY; PRABHU, SUNIL

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks as the fourth most deadly form of cancer in the United States with ~37,000 deaths each year. The present study evaluated the chemopreventive potential of a combination of aspirin (ASP), curcumin (CUR) and sulforaphane (SFN) in low doses to human pancreatic cancer cells, MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1. Results demonstrated that low doses of ASP (1 mM), CUR (10 μM) and SFN (5 μM) (ACS) combination reduced cell viability by ~70% (P<0.001), and also induced cell apoptosis by ~51% (P<0.001) accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins. The NF-κB DNA binding activity was inhibited by ~45% (P<0.01) and ~75% (P<0.001) in MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells, respectively. Mechanistic studies revealed that ACS promoted increase expression of phospho extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (P-ERK1/2), c-Jun, p38 MAPK and p53 proteins. Furthermore, the cells pretreated with U0126 (ERK1/2 inhibitor) partially abolished the effect of ACS on cell viability. Data from this study demonstrate that a low-dose ACS combination inhibits cell growth by inducing cell apoptosis, and proposes sustained activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway as one of the possible mechanisms. PMID:23404329

  15. Expression of MRP1 and GSTP1-1 modulate the acute cellular response to treatment with the chemopreventive isothiocyanate, sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Sibhatu, Mebrahtu B; Smitherman, Pamela K; Townsend, Alan J; Morrow, Charles S

    2008-04-01

    A major component of the anticarcinogenic activity of the dietary chemopreventive agent sulforaphane (SFN) is attributed to its ability to induce expression of phase II detoxification genes containing the antioxidant response element (ARE) within their promoters. Because SFN is a reactive electrophile--readily forming conjugates with glutathione (GSH)--we asked whether expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST) P1-1 and the GSH conjugate efflux pump, multidrug resistance or resistance-associated protein (MRP) 1, would significantly modify the cellular response to SFN exposure. This was investigated using GST- and MRP1-poor parental MCF7 cells and transgenic derivatives expressing GSTP1-1 and/or MRP1. Compared with parental cells, expression of GSTP1-1 alone enhanced the rate of intracellular accumulation of SFN and its glutathione conjugate, SFN-SG--an effect that was associated with increased ARE-containing reporter gene induction. Expression of MRP1 greatly reduced SFN/SFN-SG accumulation and resulted in significant attenuation of SFN-mediated induction of ARE-containing reporter and endogenous gene expression. Coexpression of GSTP1-1 with MRP1 further reduced the level of induction. Depletion of GSH prior to SFN treatment or the substitution of tert-butylhydroquinone for SFN abolished the effects of MRP1/GSTP1-1 on ARE-containing gene induction-indicating that these effects are GSH dependent. Lastly, analysis of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)--a transcription factor operating via binding to the ARE--showed that the increased levels of Nrf2 following SFN treatment were considerably less sustained in MRP1-expressing, especially those coexpressing GSTP1-1, than in MRP1-poor cells. These results suggest that the regulating effects of MRP1 and GSTP1-1 expression on SFN-dependent induction of phase II genes are ultimately mediated by altering nuclear Nrf2 levels. PMID:18204073

  16. Hereditary cancer syndromes as model systems for chemopreventive agent development.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Farzana L; Patel, Jigar; Lubet, Ronald; Rodriguez, Luz; Calzone, Kathleen A

    2016-02-01

    Research in chemoprevention has undergone a shift in emphasis for pragmatic reasons from large, phase III randomized studies to earlier phase studies focused on safety, mechanisms, and utilization of surrogate endpoints such as biomarkers instead of cancer incidence. This transition permits trials to be conducted in smaller populations and at substantially reduced costs while still yielding valuable information. This article will summarize some of the current chemoprevention challenges and the justification for the use of animal models to facilitate identification and testing of chemopreventive agents as illustrated though four inherited cancer syndromes. Preclinical models of inherited cancer syndromes serve as prototypical systems in which chemopreventive agents can be developed for ultimate application to both the sporadic and inherited cancer settings. PMID:26970132

  17. Beer constituents as potential cancer chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Gerhäuser, Clarissa

    2005-09-01

    Beer is a complex alcoholic beverage made from barley (malt), hop, water and yeast. Phenolic constituents of beer are derived from malt (70-80%) and hop (20-30%). Structural classes include simple phenols, benzoic- and cinnamic acid derivatives, coumarins, catechins, di-, tri- and oligomeric proanthocyanidins, (prenylated) chalcones and flavonoids as well as alpha- and iso-alpha-acids derived from hop. Compounds belonging to different structural classes have distinct profiles of biological activity in in vitro test systems, and in combination might lead to enhanced effects. Scientific evidence has accumulated over the past 10 years pointing to the cancer preventive potential of selected hop-derived beer constituents, i.e., prenylflavonoids including xanthohumol and isoxanthohumol, and hop bitter acids. Chemopreventive activities observed with these compounds relevant to inhibition of carcinogenesis at the initiation, promotion and progression phases, as well as results from in vivo studies on metabolism, bioavailability and efficacy are summarised in this review. PMID:15953717

  18. Natural Products as a Vital Source for the Discovery of Cancer Chemotherapeutic and Chemopreventive Agents.

    PubMed

    Cragg, Gordon M; Pezzuto, John M

    2016-01-01

    Throughout history, natural products have played a dominant role in the treatment of human ailments. For example, the legendary discovery of penicillin transformed global existence. Presently, natural products comprise a large portion of current-day pharmaceutical agents, most notably in the area of cancer therapy. Examples include Taxol, vinblastine, and camptothecin. These structurally unique agents function by novel mechanisms of action; isolation from natural sources is the only plausible method that could have led to their discovery. In addition to terrestrial plants as sources for starting materials, the marine environment (e.g., ecteinascidin 743, halichondrin B, and dolastatins), microbes (e.g., bleomycin, doxorubicin, and staurosporin), and slime molds (e.g., epothilone B) have yielded remarkable cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Irrespective of these advances, cancer remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Undoubtedly, the prevention of human cancer is highly preferable to treatment. Cancer chemoprevention, the use of vaccines or pharmaceutical agents to inhibit, retard, or reverse the process of carcinogenesis, is another important approach for easing this formidable public health burden. Similar to cancer chemotherapeutic agents, natural products play an important role in this field. There are many examples, including dietary phytochemicals such as sulforaphane and phenethyl isothiocyanate (cruciferous vegetables) and resveratrol (grapes and grape products). Overall, natural product research is a powerful approach for discovering biologically active compounds with unique structures and mechanisms of action. Given the unfathomable diversity of nature, it is reasonable to suggest that chemical leads can be generated that are capable of interacting with most or possibly all therapeutic targets. PMID:26679767

  19. Optimizing therapeutic efficacy of chemopreventive agents: A critical review of delivery strategies in oral cancer chemoprevention clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Holpuch, Andrew S.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Schwendeman, Steven P.; Mallery, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its characterized progression from recognized premalignant oral epithelial changes (i.e., oral epithelial dysplasia) to invasive cancer, oral squamous cell carcinoma represents an optimal disease for chemopreventive intervention prior to malignant transformation. The primary goal of oral cancer chemoprevention is to reverse, suppress, or inhibit the progression of premalignant lesions to cancer. Over the last several decades, numerous oral cancer chemoprevention clinical trials have assessed the therapeutic efficacy of diverse chemopreventive agents. The standard of care for more advanced oral dysplastic lesions entails surgical excision and close clinical follow-up due to the potential (~33%) for local recurrence at a similar or more advanced histological stage. The purpose of this review was to identify prominent oral cancer chemoprevention clinical trials, assess their overall therapeutic efficacy, and delineate effects of local versus systemic drug administration. In addition, these compiled clinical trial data present concepts for consideration in the design and conduction of future clinical trials. PMID:22013393

  20. Chain elongation analog of resveratrol as potent cancer chemoprevention agent.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Qiao, Hai-Xia; Xin, Long-Zuo; Ge, Li-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol is identified as a natural cancer chemoprevention agent. There has been a lot of interest in designing and developing resveratrol analogs with cancer chemoprevention activity superior to that of parent molecule and exploring their action mechanism in the past several decades. In this study, we have synthesized resveratrol analogs of compounds A-C via conjugated chain elongation based on isoprene unit retention strategy. Remarkably, cytotoxic activity analysis results indicated that compound B possesses the best proliferation inhibition activity for NCI-H460 cells in all the test compounds. Intriguingly, compound B displayed a higher cytotoxicity against human non-small cell lung cancer cells (NCI-H460) compared to normal human embryonic lung fibroblasts (MRC-5). Afterward, flow cytometry analysis showed that compound B would induce cell apoptosis. We further researched the action mechanism. When NCI-H460 cells were incubated by compound B for 6 or 9 h, respectively, the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was enhanced obviously. With elevation of intracellular ROS level, flow cytometry measurement verified mitochondrial transmembrane potential collapse, which was accompanied by the up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2. More interestingly, compound B increased the expression of caspase-9 and caspase-3, which induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, compound B arrested cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. These are all to provide useful information for designing resveratrol-based chemoprevention agent and understanding the action mechanism. PMID:27160168

  1. Sulforaphane plays common and different roles in tumorigenic and nontumorigenic colon cell growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  2. The models for assessment of chemopreventive agents: single organ models.

    PubMed

    Das, Sukta; Banerjee, Sarmistha; Saha, Prosenjit

    2004-01-01

    Research in cancer chemoprevention involves a number of activities, the first and foremost of which is acquisition of detailed knowledge concerning the process of carcinogenesis and identification of points of intervention whereby the process can be reversed or stalled. Parallel to this is the search for ideal chemopreventive agents--natural or synthetic--and screening for their activity and efficacy in vitro and in vivo. For ethical reasons it is not possible to test new agents on humans, so preclinical studies are dependent on results first being obtained with suitable animal models. Since it is not possible for a single model to reflect the diversity and heterogeneity of human cancers, it is necessary to have as many different models as possible, depending on the requirement of the studies on different aspects of cancer biology. Advances in research on carcinogenesis and chemoprevention therefore have to be accompanied by development of appropriate laboratory animal models using a variety of carcinogens that produce tumours at different sites. Animal models have contributed significantly to our understanding of carcinogenesis and ways to intervene in the underlying processes. Many animal carcinogenesis and tumour models have been found to mirror corresponding human cancers with respect to cell of origin, morphogenesis, phenotype markers and genetic alteration. In spite of the fact that interpolation of data from animal studies to humans is difficult for various reasons, animal models are widely used for assessment of new compounds with cancer chemopreventive potential and for preclinical trials. So despite the movements of animal rights activists, animal models will continue to be used for biomedical research for saving human lives. In doing so, care should be taken to treat and handle the animals with minimal discomfort to them and ensuring that alternatives are used whenever possible. PMID:15074999

  3. Nuclear factor-kappa B links carcinogenic and chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Ralhan, Ranju; Pandey, Manoj K; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2009-01-01

    Cancer prevention requires avoidance of tobacco, alcohol, high-fat diet, polluted air and water, sedentary lifestyle, and of mechanical, physical, psychological, or chemical stress. How these factors can cause cancer, is suggested by the transcription nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B), that is activated by tobacco, alcohol, high-fat diet, environment pollutants, cancer-causing viruses (human papillomavirus, hepatitis B and C viruses, HIV) and bacteria (Helicobacter pylori), ultraviolet light, ionizing radiation, obesity, and stress. Furthermore, NF-kappa B-regulated gene products have been implicated in transformation of cells, and in proliferation, survival, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Suppression of NF-kappa B activation by the phytochemicals present in fruits and vegetables provides the molecular basis for their ability to prevent cancer. Other agents identified from spices and Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicines also been found to suppress NF-kappa B activation and thus may have potential for cancer prevention. The classic chemopreventive agent should offer long-term safety, low cost, and efficacy. The current review discuses in detail numerous agents such as curcumin, resveratrol, silymarin, catechins and others as potential chemopreventive agents. Thus, cancer, an ancient problem, may have an ancient solution. PMID:19482682

  4. Inhibition of AP-1 by Sulforaphane Involves Interaction with Cysteine in the cFos DNA-Binding Domain; Implications for Chemoprevention of UVB-Induced Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Sally E.; Melton, Tania F.; Olson, Erik R.; Zhang, Jian; Saboda, Kathylynn; Bowden, G. Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables which has been linked to decreased risk of certain cancers. Although the role of SFN in the induction of the transcription factor Nrf2 has been studied extensively, there is also evidence that inhibition of the transcription factor AP-1 may contribute to the chemopreventive properties of this compound. In this study, we show for the first time that SFN is effective at reducing the multiplicity and tumor burden of UVB-induced squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in a mouse model utilizing co-treatment with the compound and the carcinogen. We also show that SFN pretreatment is able to reduce the activity of AP-1 luciferase in the skin of transgenic mice after UVB. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis verified that a main constituent of the AP-1 dimer, cFos, is inhibited from binding to the AP-1 DNA binding site by SFN. EMSA analysis of nuclear proteins also show that SFN and diamide, both known to react with cysteine amino acids, are effective at inhibiting AP-1 from binding to its response element. Using truncated recombinant cFos and cJun we show that mutation of critical cysteines in the DNA binding domain of these proteins (Cys154 in cFos and Cys272 in cJun) results in loss of sensitivity to both SFN and diamide in EMSA analysis. Together, these data indicate that inhibition of AP-1 activity may be an important molecular mechanism in chemoprevention of SCC by SFN. PMID:19671797

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of phase II drug metabolizing/antioxidant enzymes gene response by anticancer agent sulforaphane in rat lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Khor, Tin Oo; Yang, Qian; Huang, Ying; Wu, Tien-Yuan; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Lin, Wen; Androulakis, Ioannis P; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2012-10-01

    This study assesses the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Nrf2-mediated increased expression of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and antioxidant enzymes which represents an important component of cancer chemoprevention in rat lymphocytes following intravenous (iv) administration of an anticancer phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN). SFN was administered intravenously to four groups of male Sprague-Dawley JVC rats each group comprising four animals. Blood samples were drawn at selected time points. Plasma were obtained from half of each of the blood samples and analyzed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Lymphocytes were collected from the remaining blood samples using Ficoll-Paque Plus centrifuge medium. Lymphocyte RNAs were extracted and converted to cDNA, quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed, and fold changes were calculated against those at time zero for the relative expression of Nrf2-target genes of phase II DME/antioxidant enzymes. PK-PD modeling was conducted based on Jusko's indirect response model (IDR) using GastroPlus and bootstrap method. SFN plasma concentration declined biexponentially and the pharmacokinetic parameters were generated. Rat lymphocyte mRNA expression levels showed no change for GSTM1, SOD, NF-κB, UGT1A1, or UGT1A6. Moderate increases (2-5-fold) over the time zero were seen for HO-1, Nrf2, and NQO1, and significant increases (>5-fold) for GSTT1, GPx1, and Maf. PK-PD analyses using GastroPlus and the bootstrap method provided reasonable fitting for the PK and PD profiles and parameter estimates. Our present study shows that SFN could induce Nrf2-mediated phase II DME/antioxidant mRNA expression for NQO1, GSTT1, Nrf2, GPx, Maf, and HO-1 in rat lymphocytes after iv administration, suggesting that Nrf2-mediated mRNA expression in lymphocytes may serve as surrogate biomarkers. The PK-PD IDR model simultaneously linking the plasma concentrations of SFN and the PD response of lymphocyte mRNA expression is

  6. Terpenoids as potential chemopreventive and therapeutic agents in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thoppil, Roslin J; Bishayee, Anupam

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, liver cancer, predominantly hepatocellular carcinoma remains a major cause of death in the United States as well as the rest of the world. As limited treatment options are currently available to patients with liver cancer, novel preventive control and effective therapeutic approaches are considered to be reasonable and decisive measures to combat this disease. Several naturally occurring dietary and non-dietary phytochemicals have shown enormous potential in the prevention and treatment of several cancers, especially those of the gastrointestinal tract. Terpenoids, the largest group of phytochemicals, traditionally used for medicinal purposes in India and China, are currently being explored as anticancer agents in clinical trials. Terpenoids (also called “isoprenoids”) are secondary metabolites occurring in most organisms, particularly plants. More than 40 000 individual terpenoids are known to exist in nature with new compounds being discovered every year. A large number of terpenoids exhibit cytotoxicity against a variety of tumor cells and cancer preventive as well as anticancer efficacy in preclinical animal models. This review critically examines the potential role of naturally occurring terpenoids, from diverse origins, in the chemoprevention and treatment of liver tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of these agents and related cellular and molecular mechanisms are highlighted. Potential challenges and future directions involved in the advancement of these promising natural compounds in the chemoprevention and therapy of human liver cancer are also discussed. PMID:21969877

  7. Terpenoids as potential chemopreventive and therapeutic agents in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Thoppil, Roslin J; Bishayee, Anupam

    2011-09-27

    Despite significant advances in medicine, liver cancer, predominantly hepatocellular carcinoma remains a major cause of death in the United States as well as the rest of the world. As limited treatment options are currently available to patients with liver cancer, novel preventive control and effective therapeutic approaches are considered to be reasonable and decisive measures to combat this disease. Several naturally occurring dietary and non-dietary phytochemicals have shown enormous potential in the prevention and treatment of several cancers, especially those of the gastrointestinal tract. Terpenoids, the largest group of phytochemicals, traditionally used for medicinal purposes in India and China, are currently being explored as anticancer agents in clinical trials. Terpenoids (also called "isoprenoids") are secondary metabolites occurring in most organisms, particularly plants. More than 40 000 individual terpenoids are known to exist in nature with new compounds being discovered every year. A large number of terpenoids exhibit cytotoxicity against a variety of tumor cells and cancer preventive as well as anticancer efficacy in preclinical animal models. This review critically examines the potential role of naturally occurring terpenoids, from diverse origins, in the chemoprevention and treatment of liver tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of these agents and related cellular and molecular mechanisms are highlighted. Potential challenges and future directions involved in the advancement of these promising natural compounds in the chemoprevention and therapy of human liver cancer are also discussed. PMID:21969877

  8. Bowman-Birk inhibitors from legumes as colorectal chemopreventive agents

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Alfonso; Arques, Maria del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant functioning of serine proteases in inflammatory and carcinogenic processes within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has prompted scientists to investigate the potential of serine protease inhibitors, both natural and synthetic, as modulators of their proteolytic activities. Protease inhibitors of the Bowman-Birk type, a major protease inhibitor family in legume seeds, which inhibit potently and specifically trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteases, are currently being investigated as colorectal chemopreventive agents. Physiologically relevant amounts of Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBI) can reach the large intestine in active form due to their extraordinary resistance to extreme conditions within the GIT. Studies in animal models have proven that dietary BBI from several legume sources, including soybean, pea, lentil and chickpea, can prevent or suppress carcinogenic and inflammatory processes within the GIT. Although the therapeutic targets and the action mechanism of BBI have not yet been elucidated, the emerging evidence suggests that BBI exert their preventive properties via protease inhibition; in this sense, serine proteases should be considered as primary targets in early stages of carcinogenesis. The validation of candidate serine proteases as therapeutic targets together with the identification, within the wide array of natural BBI variants, of the most potent and specific protease inhibitors, are necessary to better understand the potential of this protein family as colorectal chemopreventive agents. PMID:25132747

  9. About the Chemopreventive Agent Development Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Chemopreventive Agent Development Research Group promotes and supports research on early chemopreventive agent development, from preclinical studies to phase I clinical trials. The group’s projects aim to identify and develop prevention agents with the potential to block, reverse, or delay the early stages of cancer. The overarching goal is to determine positive and negative predictive values of preclinical models for clinical development. |

  10. Transcription factor Nrf2 mediates an adaptive response to sulforaphane that protects fibroblasts in vitro against the cytotoxic effects of electrophiles, peroxides and redox-cycling agents

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Larry G.; Kelleher, Michael O.; Eggleston, Ian M.; Itoh, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hayes, John D.

    2009-06-15

    Sulforaphane can stimulate cellular adaptation to redox stressors through transcription factor Nrf2. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as a model, we show herein that the normal homeostatic level of glutathione in Nrf2{sup -/-} MEFs was only 20% of that in their wild-type counterparts. Furthermore, the rate of glutathione synthesis following its acute depletion upon treatment with 3 {mu}mol/l sulforaphane was very substantially lower in Nrf2{sup -/-} MEFs than in wild-type cells, and the rebound leading to a {approx} 1.9-fold increase in glutathione that occurred 12-24 h after Nrf2{sup +/+} MEFs were treated with sulforaphane was not observed in Nrf2{sup -/-} fibroblasts. Wild-type MEFs that had been pre-treated for 24 h with 3 {mu}mol/l sulforaphane exhibited between 1.4- and 3.2-fold resistance against thiol-reactive electrophiles, including isothiocyanates, {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carbonyl compounds (e.g. acrolein), aryl halides and alkene epoxides. Pre-treatment of Nrf2{sup +/+} MEFs with sulforaphane also protected against hydroperoxides (e.g. cumene hydroperoxide, CuOOH), free radical-generating compounds (e.g. menadione), and genotoxic electrophiles (e.g. chlorambucil). By contrast, Nrf2{sup -/-} MEFs were typically {approx} 50% less tolerant of these agents than wild-type fibroblasts, and sulforaphane pre-treatment did not protect the mutant cells against xenobiotics. To test whether Nrf2-mediated up-regulation of glutathione represents the major cytoprotective mechanism stimulated by sulforaphane, 5 {mu}mol/l buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) was used to inhibit glutathione synthesis. In Nrf2{sup +/+} MEFs pre-treated with sulforaphane, BSO diminished intrinsic resistance and abolished inducible resistance to acrolein, CuOOH and chlorambucil, but not menadione. Thus Nrf2-dependent up-regulation of GSH is the principal mechanism by which sulforaphane pre-treatment induced resistance to acrolein, CuOOH and chlorambucil, but not menadione.

  11. Prolonged Sulforaphane Treatment Activates Extracellular-Regulated Kinase 1/2 Signaling in Nontumorigenic Colon Cells but not Colon Cancer Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  12. Prolonged sulforaphane treatment activates survival signaling in nontumorigenic NCM460 colon cells but apoptotic signaling in tumorigenic HCT116 colon cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  13. Big Punches Come in Nanosizes for Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dipali; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2014-01-01

    Literature to support the chemopreventive potential of several bioactive molecules has been prolific and convincing, but the clinical development of these agents has been slow. Major hurdles for development of bioactive chemoprevention approaches include low potency, lack of reliable formulations with high bioavailability that are suitable for oral administration, and relevant preclinical primary prevention models that use meaningful doses that can be translated to humans. The paper presented in this issue (Grandhi and colleagues) is an important step forward in this direction. It shows the efficacy of an oral, low dose, solid-lipid nanoparticles encapsulated curcumin and aspirin combined with free sulforaphane for long-term chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer in a carcinogen-induced hamster model. Reproducing this benefit in multiple cancer models, accompanied by development of intermediate markers of response will allow rapid translation of these findings. It will constitute the first successful multipronged attack at key pathways known to initiate and promote carcinogenesis. PMID:24072677

  14. Determining efficacy of cancer chemopreventive agents using a cell-free system concomitant with DNA adduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, W A; Gupta, R C

    1999-03-10

    The large (>2000) and expanding number of natural and synthetic agents with potential cancer chemopreventive properties renders it economically and physically impossible to test each of these agents for their efficacy in the widely accepted 2-year animal bioassay and clinical trials. Therefore, there is a growing need for relevant short-term screening tests to study these compounds such that only the most efficacious ones undergo extensive long-term studies. We have previously reported in a pilot study that the use of a microsome-mediated test system concomitant with DNA adduction is a pertinent and relevant model for rapidly studying the efficacy and mechanisms of cancer chemopreventive agents. We have extended this study to investigate 26 additional agents for their potential chemopreventive abilities by studying their effects on microsome-mediated benzo[a]pyrene (BP)-DNA adduction. These agents had differential effects on the two major adducts of BP-DNA, i.e., BP-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-deoxyguanosine (dG) and 9-OH-BP-dG-derived adducts. These agents were therefore categorized into five classes. Three test agents (ellagic acid, genistein and oltipraz) were strong inhibitors of both adducts. These agents diminished BP-DNA adduction by 65-95% and were categorized as Class I agents. Six other agents (benzyl isocyanate, R(+)-1-phenylethyl isocyanate, linoleic acid ethyl ester, (+)-biotin, indole-3-carboxylic acid and beta-carotene) moderately inhibited both BP-DNA adducts (25-64%); these compounds were identified as Class II agents. Six additional test agents inhibited only one adduct selectively and nine others were ineffective; these agents were categorized as Class III and Class IV, respectively. Interestingly, seven test agents enhanced BPDE-dG or 9-OH-BP-dG or both adducts and were categorized as Class V agents. Four of these Class V agents concomitantly inhibited BPDE-dG while enhancing 9-OH-BP-dG. This emphasizes the importance of studying individual DNA

  15. Development of dietary phytochemical chemopreventive agents: biomarkers and choice of dose for early clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Scott, Edwina N; Gescher, Andreas J; Steward, William P; Brown, Karen

    2009-06-01

    In view of safety concerns surrounding the use of pharmaceuticals such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and tamoxifen as cancer chemopreventive agents, potentially innocuous phytochemicals derived from the diet are considered attractive alternatives. However, results from cancer chemoprevention trials of dietary agents have been disappointing to date, as promising activities observed in rodent models and cells in vitro have not translated into clinical success. This may be partly due to the development process for these agents, which is complex for a number of reasons; the definitive end point, inhibition of carcinogenesis, requires large numbers of individuals followed-up over many years. Furthermore, whereas biomarkers are frequently used as surrogate efficacy end points to expedite the process, biomarker assessment and validation has proven difficult because dietary agents exert multiple actions with an unknown hierarchy of biological importance. These factors have made determining the dose for clinical investigation extremely challenging, and at present, there are no defined strategies for rationally identifying the most appropriate doses. In this commentary, the complexities involved in the development of dietary chemoprevention agents are discussed, and a tentative route towards selection of the optimal clinical dose is proposed. The approach highlights the need to conduct long-term preclinical studies with realistic concentrations that are achievable in human tissues and the importance of efficacy biomarkers that are intrinsically linked to the key mechanisms of action. A more logical design of studies should increase the likelihood that the encouraging preclinical results observed for many phytochemicals translate into tangible clinical benefit. PMID:19470784

  16. Plant Polyphenols as Chemopreventive Agents for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amararathna, Madumani; Johnston, Michael R.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer may be prevented by a diet rich in fruits and vegetables as they are enriched with dietary antioxidant polyphenols, such as flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, lignans, stilbenes, and phenolic acids. Dietary polyphenols exert a wide range of beneficial biological functions beyond their antioxidative properties and are involved in regulation of cell survival pathways leading to anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic functions. There are sufficient evidence from in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiological studies to suggest that the dietary intervention of polyphenols in cancer prevention, including the chemopreventive ability of dietary polyphenols, act against lung carcinogens. Cohort and epidemiological studies in selected risk populations have evaluated clinical effects of polyphenols. Polyphenols have demonstrated three major actions: antioxidative activity, regulation of phase I and II enzymes, and regulation of cell survival pathways against lung carcinogenesis. They have also shown an inverse association of lung cancer occurrences among high risk populations who consumed considerable amounts of fruits and vegetables in their daily diet. In in vitro cell culture experimental models, polyphenols bind with electrophilic metabolites from carcinogens, inactivate cellular oxygen radicals, prevent membrane lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidative damage, and adduct formation. Further, polyphenols enhance the detoxifying enzymes such as the phase II enzymes, glutathione transferases and glucuronosyl transferases. PMID:27548149

  17. Chemopreventive Agents from Physalis minima Function as Michael Reaction Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Men, Ruizhi; Li, Ning; Ding, Chihong; Tang, Yingzhan; Xing, Yachao; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fruits of some varieties of genus Physalis have been used as delicious fruits and functional food in the Northeast of China. Materials and Methods: To reveal the functional material basis, we performed bioactivity-guided phytochemical research and chemopreventive effect assay of the constituents from Physalis minima. Results: It was demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract of P. minima L. (EEPM) had potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with induction ratio (IR, QR induction activity) value of 1.47 ± 0.24, and glutathione binding property as potential Michael reaction acceptors (with an α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety). Furthermore, bioactivity-guided phytochemical research led eight compounds (1–8), which were elucidated as 3-isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (1), isophysalin B (2), physalin G (3), physalin D (4), physalin I (5), physordinose B (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) and 5α-6β-dihydroxyphysalin R (8) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses and HRESIMS. Then, isophysalin B (2) and physordinose B (6) showed significant QR inducing activity with IR value of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46, respectively. SUMMARY An ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method with glutathione as the substrate was used to detect the Michael reaction acceptors in extracts of Physalis minima (EPM)We investigated the chemical constituents of EPM guided by biological activity methodIsophysalin B (1) and physordinose B (6) showed strong quinone reductase inducing activity with induction ratio values of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46This study generated useful information for consumers and many encourage researchers to utilize edible fruits from Physalis as a source of phytochemicals Abbreviations used: EPM: Extracts of Physalis minima, EEPM: Ethyl acetate extract of Physalis minima L., GSH: Glutathione, MRAs: Michael reaction acceptors, QR: Quinone reductase. PMID:27279713

  18. Natural products as a source of potential cancer chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Cassady, J M; Baird, W M; Chang, C J

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the chemistry of novel bioactive natural products are reported. This research is directed to the exploration of plants with confirmed activity in bioassays designed to detect potential cancer chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents. Structural work and chemical studies are reported for several cytotoxic agents from the plants Annona densicoma, Annona reticulata, Claopodium crispifolium, Polytrichum obioense, and Psorospermum febrifugum. Studies are also reported based on development of a mammalian cell culture benzo[a]pyrene metabolism assay for the detection of potential anticarcinogenic agents from natural products. In this study a number of isoflavonoids and flavonoids with antimutagenic activity have been discovered. PMID:2189947

  19. Total synthesis of plagiochin G and derivatives as potential cancer chemopreventive agents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui-Juan; Zhao, Yu; Tokuda, Harukuni; Yang, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Yue-Hu; Shi, Qian; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lou, Hong-Xiang; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    A new and efficient total synthesis has been developed to obtain plagiochin G (22), a macrocyclic bisbibenzyl, and four derivatives. The key 16-membered ring containing biphenyl ether and biaryl units was closed via an intramolecular SNAr reaction. All synthesized macrocyclic bisbibenzyls inhibited Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBVEA) activation induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in Raji cells and, thus, are potential cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:25574060

  20. Efficacy of potential chemopreventive agents on rat colon aberrant crypt formation and progression.

    PubMed

    Wargovich, M J; Jimenez, A; McKee, K; Steele, V E; Velasco, M; Woods, J; Price, R; Gray, K; Kelloff, G J

    2000-06-01

    We assessed the effects of 78 potential chemopreventive agents in the F344 rat using two assays in which the inhibition of carcinogen-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colon was the measure of efficacy. In both assays ACF were induced by the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) in F344 rats by two sequential weekly injections at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Two weeks after the last AOM injection, animals were evaluated for the number of aberrant crypts detected in methylene blue stained whole mounts of rat colon. In the initiation phase protocol agents were given during the period of AOM administration, whereas in the post-initiation assay the chemopreventive agent was introduced during the last 4 weeks of an 8 week assay, a time when ACF had progressed to multiple crypt clusters. The agents were derived from a priority listing based on reports of chemopreventive activity in the literature and/or efficacy data from in vitro models of carcinogenesis. During the initiation phase carboxyl amidoimidazole, p-chlorphenylacetate, chlorpheniramine maleate, D609, diclofenac, etoperidone, eicosatetraynoic acid, farnesol, ferulic acid, lycopene, meclizine, methionine, phenylhexylisothiocyanate, phenylbutyrate, piroxicam, 9-cis-retinoic acid, S-allylcysteine, taurine, tetracycline and verapamil were strong inhibitors of ACF. During the post-initiation phase aspirin, calcium glucarate, ketoprofen, piroxicam, 9-cis-retinoic acid, retinol and rutin inhibited the outgrowth of ACF into multiple crypt clusters. Based on these data, certain phytochemicals, antihistamines, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and retinoids show unique preclinical promise for chemoprevention of colon cancer, with the latter two drug classes particularly effective in the post-initiation phase of carcinogenesis. PMID:10837003

  1. Xanthones from Mangosteen Extracts as Natural Chemopreventive Agents: Potential Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shan, T.; Ma, Q.; Guo, K.; Liu, J.; Li, W.; Wang, F.; Wu, E.

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the treatment and management of malignant tumors still remain a formidable challenge for public health. New strategies for cancer treatment are being developed, and one of the most promising treatment strategies involves the application of chemopreventive agents. The search for novel and effective cancer chemopreventive agents has led to the identification of various naturally occurring compounds. Xanthones, from the pericarp, whole fruit, heartwood, and leaf of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn., GML), are known to possess a wide spectrum of pharmacologic properties, including anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-viral activities. The potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities of xanthones have been demonstrated in different stages of carcinogenesis (initiation, promotion, and progression) and are known to control cell division and growth, apoptosis, inflammation, and metastasis. Multiple lines of evidence from numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed that xanthones inhibit proliferation of a wide range of human tumor cell types by modulating various targets and signaling transduction pathways. Here we provide a concise and comprehensive review of preclinical data and assess the observed anticancer effects of xanthones, supporting its remarkable potential as an anticancer agent. PMID:21902651

  2. Tissue autofluorescence spectroscopy: an intermediate endpoint for chemopreventive agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schantz, Stimson P.; Savage, Howard E.; Sacks, Peter G.; Silverberg, Michael; Lipkin, Martin; Yang, Kan; Tang, Gui C.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-08-01

    We report on the fluorescence spectroscopy of a multicellular tumor spheroid treated and non- treated with (beta) -all-trans retinoic acid. Following ten days of treatment with RA (10-6M), reproducible fluorescent changes were measured using a Mediscience CD scanner. The most significant changes included an increase in emission at 520 nm in the RA treated spheroids when excited at 340 nm. When investigating fluorescence emission at 450 nm, a blue shift in the excitation profile was noted. Molecular alterations induced by RA and as measured by optical fluorescence spectroscopy may arise from qualitative and/or quantitative changes in a number of key molecules involved in cellular differentiation, proliferation and/or electron transfer, i.e. NADH at (450 nm emission), flavins (520 nm), or cytokeratins (520 nm). To further explore alterations of cytokeratins, immunohistochemical staining showed an increase in AE1 positive cells induced by RA which paralleled the increased 520 nm signal. Our results indicate that certain vitamin derivatives are capable of modulating the intrinsic fluorescence profile emitted by neoplastic mucosa. Tissue autofluorescence may represent a significant marker for the biologic effect of cancer preventing agents in clinical trials.

  3. Absorption and chemopreventive targets of sulforaphane in humans following consumption of broccoli sprouts or a myrosinase-treated broccoli sprout extract

    PubMed Central

    Atwell, Lauren L.; Hsu, Anna; Wong, Carmen P.; Stevens, Jan F.; Bella, Deborah; Yu, Tian-Wei; Pereira, Clifford B.; Löhr, Christiane V.; Christensen, John Mark; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Williams, David E.; Shannon, Jackilen; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Scope Sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate derived from crucifers, has numerous health benefits. SFN bioavailability from dietary sources is a critical determinant of its efficacy in humans. A key factor in SFN absorption is the release of SFN from its glucosinolate precursor, glucoraphanin, by myrosinase. Dietary supplements are used in clinical trials to deliver consistent SFN doses, but myrosinase is often inactivated in available supplements. We evaluated SFN absorption from a myrosinase-treated broccoli sprout extract (BSE) and are the first to report effects of twice daily, oral dosing on SFN exposure in healthy adults. Methods and results Subjects consumed fresh broccoli sprouts or the BSE, each providing 200 μmol SFN daily, as a single dose and as two 100-μmol doses taken 12 h apart. Using HPLC-MS/MS, we detected ~3 x higher SFN metabolite levels in plasma and urine of sprout consumers, indicating enhanced SFN absorption from sprouts. Twelve-hour dosing retained higher plasma SFN metabolite levels at later time points than 24-hour dosing. No dose responses were observed for molecular targets of SFN (i.e. heme oxygenase-1, histone deacetylase activity, p21). Conclusion We conclude that the dietary form and dosing schedule of SFN may impact SFN absorption and efficacy in human trials. PMID:25522265

  4. Curcumin as a therapeutic agent in the chemoprevention of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, Remya; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), mainly Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic ailments of the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by recurrent inflammation. Current therapeutic strategies are based on the mitigation of symptoms, including inflammatory remission and healing of mucosal manifestations. Extensive studies have suggested that continuous oxidative damage can lead to the inflammatory signaling cascade in IBD. Curcumin, a potent modulator of cell signaling, is popular for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, and has already been shown remarkable therapeutic results in IBD. Here, we review and discuss the effects of curcumin as a therapeutic agent in the chemoprevention of IBD. PMID:26995272

  5. Targeting NRF2 signaling for cancer chemoprevention

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2010-04-01

    Modulation of the metabolism and disposition of carcinogens through induction of cytoprotective enzymes is one of several promising strategies to prevent cancer. Chemopreventive efficacies of inducers such as dithiolethiones and sulforaphane have been extensively studied in animals as well as in humans. The KEAP1-NRF2 system is a key, but not unilateral, molecular target for these chemopreventive agents. The transcription factor NRF2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the expression of a subset of genes, which produce proteins responsible for the detoxication of electrophiles and reactive oxygen species as well as the removal or repair of some of their damage products. It is believed that chemopreventive enzyme inducers affect the interaction between KEAP1 and NRF2 through either mediating conformational changes of the KEAP1 protein or activating phosphorylation cascades targeting the KEAP1-NRF2 complex. These events in turn affect NRF2 stability and trafficking. Recent advances elucidating the underlying structural biology of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and identification of the gene clusters under the transcriptional control of NRF2 are facilitating understanding of the potential pleiotropic effects of NRF2 activators and discovery of novel classes of potent chemopreventive agents such as the triterpenoids. Although there is appropriately a concern regarding a deleterious role of the KEAP1-NRF2 system in cancer cell biology, especially as the pathway affects cell survival and drug resistance, the development and the use of NRF2 activators as chemopreventive agents still holds a great promise for protection of normal cells from a diversity of environmental stresses that contribute to the burden of cancer and other chronic, degenerative diseases.

  6. Chemopreventive Agents Attenuate Rapid Inhibition of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Induced by Environmental Toxicants.

    PubMed

    Babica, Pavel; Čtveráčková, Lucie; Lenčešová, Zuzana; Trosko, James E; Upham, Brad L

    2016-07-01

    Altered gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been associated with chemical carcinogenesis, where both chemical tumor promoters and chemopreventive agents (CPAs) are known to conversely modulate GJIC. The aim of this study was to investigate whether attenuation of chemically inhibited GJIC represents a common outcome induced by different CPAs, which could be effectively evaluated using in vitro methods. Rat liver epithelial cells WB-F344 were pretreated with a CPA for either 30 min or 24 h, and then exposed to GJIC-inhibiting concentration of a selected tumor promoter or environmental toxicant [12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), lindane, fluoranthene, 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), or pentachlorophenol]. Out of nine CPAs tested, quercetin and silibinin elicited the most pronounced effects, preventing the dysregulation of GJIC by all the GJIC inhibitors, but DDT. Metformin and curcumin attenuated the effects of three GJIC inhibitors, whereas the other CPAs prevented the effects of two (diallyl sulfide, emodin) or one (indole-3-carbinol, thymoquinone) GJIC inhibitor. Significant attenuation of chemically induced inhibition of GJIC was observed in 27 (50%) out of 54 possible combinations of nine CPAs and six GJIC inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that in vitro evaluation of GJIC can be used as an effective screening tool for identification of chemicals with potential chemopreventive activity. PMID:27266532

  7. Dietary pterostilbene is a novel MTA1-targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic agent in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangfen; Rimando, Agnes M.; Lage, Janice M.; Lewin, Jack R.; Atfi, Azeddine; Zhang, Xu; Levenson, Anait S.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the epigenetic modifier metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) is associated with aggressive human prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine MTA1- targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy of pterostilbene, a natural potent analog of resveratrol, in pre-clinical models of prostate cancer. Here, we show that high levels of MTA1 expression in Pten-loss prostate cooperate with key oncogenes, including c-Myc and Akt among others, to promote prostate cancer progression. Loss-of-function studies using human prostate cancer cells indicated direct involvement of MTA1 in inducing inflammation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of MTA1 by pterostilbene resulted in decreased proliferation and angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. This restrained prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) formation in prostate-specific Pten heterozygous mice and reduced tumor development and progression in prostate-specific Pten-null mice. Our findings highlight MTA1 as a key upstream regulator of prostate tumorigenesis and cancer progression. More significantly, it offers pre-clinical proof for pterostilbene as a promising lead natural agent for MTA1-targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic strategy to curb prostate cancer. PMID:26943043

  8. Chemopreventive agents alters global gene expression pattern: predicting their mode of action and targets.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Bhagavathi A

    2006-12-01

    Chemoprevention has the potential to be a major component of colon, breast, prostate and lung cancer control. Epidemiological, experimental, and clinical studies provide evidence that antioxidants, anti-inflammatory agents, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and several other phytochemicals possess unique modes of action against cancer growth. However, the mode of action of several of these agents at the gene transcription level is not completely understood. Completion of the human genome sequence and the advent of DNA microarrays using cDNAs enhanced the detection and identification of hundreds of differentially expressed genes in response to anticancer drugs or chemopreventive agents. In this review, we are presenting an extensive analysis of the key findings from studies using potential chemopreventive agents on global gene expression patterns, which lead to the identification of cancer drug targets. The summary of the study reports discussed in this review explains the extent of gene alterations mediated by more than 20 compounds including antioxidants, fatty acids, NSAIDs, phytochemicals, retinoids, selenium, vitamins, aromatase inhibitor, lovastatin, oltipraz, salvicine, and zinc. The findings from these studies further reveal the utility of DNA microarray in characterizing and quantifying the differentially expressed genes that are possibly reprogrammed by the above agents against colon, breast, prostate, lung, liver, pancreatic and other cancer types. Phenolic antioxidant resveratrol found in berries and grapes inhibits the formation of prostate tumors by acting on the regulatory genes such as p53 while activating a cascade of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis including p300, Apaf-1, cdk inhibitor p21, p57 (KIP2), p53 induced Pig 7, Pig 8, Pig 10, cyclin D, DNA fragmentation factor 45. The group of genes significantly altered by selenium includes cyclin D1, cdk5, cdk4, cdk2, cdc25A and GADD 153. Vitamine D shows impact on p21(Waf1/Cip1) p27 cyclin B

  9. Stability of Sulforaphane for Topical Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stephen J.; Dickinson, Sally E.; Karlage, Kelly L.; Bowden, G Tim.; Myrdal, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a natural compound that has been investigated as a chemopreventive agent. SFN has been shown to inhibit the activator-protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor and may be effective for inhibition of ultraviolet (UV) induced skin carcinogenesis. This study was designed to investigate the stability of SFN as a function of pH, temperature and in various solvents and formulations. SFN was determined to undergo apparent first order degradation kinetics for the conditions explored. It was observed that SFN undergoes base catalyzed degradation. Buffer species and solvent type impacts stability as well. SFN was found to be very sensitive to temperature with degradation rate changing by a factor of nearly 3.1 for every 10°C change in temperature (at pH 4.0). SFN completely degraded after 30 days in a conventional pharmaceutical cream formulation. Improved stability was observed in organic formulation components. Stability studies were conducted on two non-aqueous topical formulations, a polyethylene glycol (PEG) ointment base and an organic oleaginous base. Topically applied SFN in the PEG base formulation significantly reduced AP-1 activation after UV stimulation in the skin of a transgenic mouse model, indicating that SFN in this formulation retains efficacy in vivo. PMID:23611476

  10. Sites of Alkylation of Human Keap1 by Natural Chemoprevention Agents

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yan; Eggler, Aimee L.; Liu, Dongting; Liu, Guowen; Mesecar, Andrew D.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    Under basal conditions, the interaction of the cytosolic protein Keap1 with the transcription factor Nrf2 results in a low level of expression of cytoprotective genes whose promoter region contains the antioxidant response element (ARE). Alkylation of one or more of the 27 cysteine sulfhydryl groups of human Keap1 is proposed to lead to Nrf2 nuclear accumulation, to upregulation of cytoprotective gene expression via the ARE, and to prevention of degenerative diseases, such as cancer. Therefore, identification of the most reactive of these cysteine residues towards specific electrophiles should help clarify this mechanism of cancer prevention, also known as chemoprevention. To address this issue, preliminary analyses of tryptic digests of Keap1 alkylated by the model electrophile 1-biotinamido-4-(4′-[maleimidoethyl-cyclohexane]-carboxamido) butane were carried out using LC-MS/MS with a cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer and also using LC-MS/MS with a hybrid linear ion trap FT ICR mass spectrometer. Since the FT ICR instrument provided more complete peptide sequencing coverage and enabled the identification of more alkylated cysteine residues, only this instrument was used in subsequent studies of Keap1 alkylation by three electrophilic natural products that can up-regulate the ARE, xanthohumol, isoliquiritigenin and 10-shogaol. Among the various cysteine residues of Keap1, C151 was most reactive towards these three electrophiles. These in vitro results agree with evidence from in vivo experiments, and indicate that C151 is the most important site of alkylation on Keap1 by chemoprevention agents that function by activating the ARE through Nrf2. PMID:17980616

  11. Sulforaphane as a promising molecule for fighting cancer.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Monia; Fimognari, Carmela; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease characterized by multiple genetic and molecular alterations involving transformation, deregulation of apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. To grow, invade, and metastasize, tumors need host components and primary dysfunction in the tumor microenvironment, in addition to cell dysfunction, can be crucial for carcinogenesis. A great variety of phytochemicals have been shown to be potentially capable of inhibiting and modulating several relevant targets simultaneously and is therefore non-specific. Because of the enormous biological diversity of cancer, this pleiotropism might constitute an advantage. Phytochemicals, in particular diet-derived compounds, have therefore been proposed and applied in clinical trials as cancer chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agents. Sulforaphane (SFN) is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables. SFN has proved to be an effective chemoprotective agent in cell culture, in carcinogen-induced and genetic animal cancer models, as well as in xenograft models of cancer. It promoted potent cytostatic and cytotoxic effects orchestrated by the modulation of different molecular targets. Cell vulnerability to SFN-mediated apoptosis was subject to regulation by cell-cycle-dependent mechanisms but was independent of a mutated p53 status. Moreover, combination of SFN with cytotoxic therapy potentiated the cytotoxic effect mediated by chemotherapy in vitro, thus suggesting its potential therapeutic benefit in clinical settings. Overall, SFN appears to be an effective and safe chemopreventive molecule and a promising tool to fight cancer. PMID:24114482

  12. Phytochemical Modulators of Mitochondria: The Search for Chemopreventive Agents and Supportive Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja M.; Gawin, Malgorzata; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are crucially important for maintaining not only the energy homeostasis, but the proper cellular functions in a general sense. Impairment of mitochondrial functions is observed in a broad variety of pathological states such as neoplastic transformations and cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic disorders and chronic inflammation. Currently, in parallel to the classical drug design approaches, there is an increasing interest in the screening for natural bioactive substances, mainly phytochemicals, in order to develop new therapeutic solutions for the mentioned pathologies. Dietary phytochemicals such as resveratrol, curcumin and sulforaphane are very well tolerated and can effectively complement classical pharmacological therapeutic regimens. In this paper we disscuss the effect of the chosen phytochemicals (e.g., resveratrol, curcumin, sulforaphane) on various aspects of mitochondrial biology, namely mitochondrial biogenesis, membrane potential and reactive oxygen species production, signaling to and from the nucleus and unfolded protein response. PMID:25192192

  13. Triterpenoids as potential agents for the chemoprevention and therapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bishayee, Anupam; Ahmed, Shamima; Brankov, Nikoleta; Perloff, Marjorie

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a major cause of death in the United States as well as the rest of the world. In view of the limited treatment options for patients with advanced breast cancer, preventive and novel therapeutic approaches play an important role in combating this disease. The plant-derived triterpenoids, commonly used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries, posses various pharmacological properties. A large number of triterpenoids are known to exhibit cytotoxicity against a variety of tumor cells as well as anticancer efficacy in preclinical animal models. Numerous triterpenoids have been synthesized by structural modification of natural compounds. Some of these analogs are considered to be the most potent antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic triterpenoids known. This review examines the potential role of natural triterpenoids and their derivatives in the chemoprevention and treatment of mammary tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of these agents and related molecular mechanisms are presented. Potential challenges and future directions involved in the advancement of these promising compounds in the prevention and therapy of human breast cancer are also identified. PMID:21196213

  14. Topical Polyethylene Glycol as a Novel Chemopreventive Agent for Oral Cancer via Targeting of Epidermal Growth Factor Response

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Ramesh K.; Kunte, Dhananjay P.; De La Cruz, Mart; Tiwari, Ashish K.; Brasky, Jeffrey; Weber, Christopher R.; Gibson, Tina P.; Patel, Amir; Savkovic, Suzana D.; Brockstein, Bruce E.; Roy, Hemant K.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality underscoring the need for safe and effective chemopreventive strategies. Targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is attractive in that it is an early critical event in HNSCC pathogenesis. However, current agents lack efficacy or have unacceptable toxicity. Several groups have demonstrated that the over-the-counter medication, polyethylene glycol (PEG) has remarkable chemopreventive efficacy against colon carcinogenesis. Importantly, we reported that this effect is mediated through EGFR internalization/degradation. In the current study, we investigated the chemopreventive efficacy of this agent against HNSCC, using both the well validated animal model 4-NQO (4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide) rat model and cell culture with the human HNSCC cell line SCC-25. We demonstrated that daily topical application of 10% PEG-8000 in the oral cavity (tongue and cavity wall) post 4NQO initiation resulted in a significant reduction in tumor burden (both, tumor size and tumors/tumor bearing rat) without any evidence of toxicity. Immunohistochemical studies depicted decreased proliferation (number of Ki67-positive cells) and reduced expression of EGFR and its downstream effectors cyclin D1 in the tongue mucosa of 4NQO-rats treated with PEG. We showed that EGFR was also markedly downregulated in SCC-25 cells by PEG-8000 with a concomitant induction of G1-S phase cell-cycle arrest, which was potentially mediated through upregulated p21cip1/waf1. In conclusion, we demonstrate, for the first time, that PEG has promising efficacy and safety as a chemopreventive efficacy against oral carcinogenesis. PMID:22675506

  15. Dietary Glucosinolates Sulforaphane, Phenethyl Isothiocyanate, Indole-3-Carbinol/3,3′-Diindolylmethane: Anti-Oxidative Stress/Inflammation, Nrf2, Epigenetics/Epigenomics and In Vivo Cancer Chemopreventive Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Francisco; Paredes-Gonzalez, Ximena; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2015-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a group of sulfur-containing glycosides found in many plant species, including cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, brussels sprouts, and cauliflower. Accumulating evidence increasingly supports the beneficial effects of dietary glucosinolates on overall health, including as potential anti-cancer agents, because of their role in the prevention of the initiation of carcinogenesis via the induction of cellular defense detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes and their epigenetic mechanisms, including modification of the CpG methylation of cancer-related genes, histone modification regulation and changes in the expression of miRNAs. In this context, the defense mechanism mediated by Nrf2-antioxidative stress and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways can contribute to cellular protection against oxidative stress and reactive metabolites of carcinogens. In this review, we summarize the cancer chemopreventive role of naturally occurring glucosinolate derivatives as inhibitors of carcinogenesis, with particular emphasis on specific molecular targets and epigenetic alterations in in vitro and in vivo human cancer animal models. PMID:26457242

  16. Characterization of chemopreventive agents from the dichloromethane extract of Eurycorymbus cavaleriei by liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Peng; Song, Zhihang; Ma, Zhongjun; Cheng, Yiyu; Qu, Haibin

    2009-06-12

    In the present study, we examined the potential chemopreventive activity of dichloromethane extract of Eurycorymbus cavaleriei by investigating the change of constitutions after incubation with glutathione (GSH). The major constitutions in the dichloromethane extract of E. cavaleriei were cumarin compounds and their cleavage pattern was examined by LC-MS-MS and the characteristic product ions at m/z 206 and 207 were helpful to determine the substitutions of coumarinolignoid compounds. The mechanism of conjugations of 5'-demethylaquillochin and its isomer with GSH was discussed and validated through analysis of the conjugations of reference compound 6-hydroxy-7-methoxycoumarin with GSH by LC-MS-MS and NMR spectrum. The relative ability to induce the detoxification enzyme, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) of nine coumarin compounds was tested which also showed 5'-demethylaquillochin exhibited the most potential chemopreventive ability. These observations suggest that 5'-demethylaquillochin and its isomer from the dichloromethane extract of E. cavaleriei have potential as chemopreventive agents through induction of detoxification enzymes. PMID:19439309

  17. Sulforaphane inhibits multiple inflammasomes through an Nrf2-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Greaney, Allison J; Maier, Nolan K; Leppla, Stephen H; Moayeri, Mahtab

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasomes are intracellular complexes that have an important role in cytosolic innate immune sensing and pathogen defense. Inflammasome sensors detect a diversity of intracellular microbial ligands and endogenous danger signals and activate caspase-1, thus initiating maturation and release of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. These events, although crucial to the innate immune response, have also been linked to the pathology of several inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. The natural isothiocyanate sulforaphane, present in broccoli sprouts and available as a dietary supplement, has gained attention for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties. We discovered that sulforaphane inhibits caspase-1 autoproteolytic activation and interleukin-1β maturation and secretion downstream of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor leucine-rich repeat proteins NLRP1 and NLRP3, NLR family apoptosis inhibitory protein 5/NLR family caspase-1 recruitment domain-containing protein 4 (NAIP5/NLRC4), and absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasome receptors. Sulforaphane does not inhibit the inflammasome by direct modification of active caspase-1 and its mechanism is not dependent on protein degradation by the proteasome or de novo protein synthesis. Furthermore, sulforaphane-mediated inhibition of the inflammasomes is independent of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like factor 2 (Nrf2) and the antioxidant response-element pathway, to which many of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of sulforaphane have been attributed. Sulforaphane was also found to inhibit cell recruitment to the peritoneum and interleukin-1β secretion in an in vivo peritonitis model of acute gout and to reverse NLRP1-mediated murine resistance to Bacillus anthracis spore infection. These findings demonstrate that sulforaphane inhibits the inflammasomes through a novel mechanism and contributes to

  18. Antibody Array as a Tool for Screening of Natural Agents in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Pulito, Claudio; Sacconi, Andrea; Korita, Etleva; Maidecchi, Anna; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of a given drug resides mainly on its ability to specifically target disease mechanisms. Natural products represent the leading source of bioactive molecules with a broad range of activities. It is becoming increasingly clear that natural compounds exert their chemopreventive or antitumoral activities targeting simultaneously diverse cellular pathways. Here we describe the use of antibody array to assess the effects of natural compounds on the expression of multiple proteins and of their posttranslational modifications in cellular systems. This might turn to be a very flexible application for cancer chemoprevention studies. PMID:26608301

  19. Perspectives in cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, G D; Morse, M A; Kelloff, G J

    1997-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention can be defined as prevention of cancer by the administration of one or more chemical entities, either as individual drugs or as naturally occurring constituents of the diet. Based largely on the time period that chemopreventive agents exhibit activity in animal models of carcinogenesis, they can be classified as inhibitors of carcinogen formation, blocking agents, and suppressing agents. The majority of compounds that inhibit the formation of carcinogens prevent the formation of nitrosamines from secondary amines and nitrite in an acidic environment. Blocking agents are inhibitors of tumor initiation, while suppressing agents are inhibitors of tumor promotion/progression. Many well-characterized chemopreventive agents act at one or more steps in both tumor initiation and promotion/progression. The objective of this paper is to provide a general discussion of the mechanisms through which chemopreventive agents inhibit carcinogenesis. Examples of agents that act through these mechanisms are given; however, a complete listing of effective chemopreventive agents is not possible within the context of this paper. At the conclusion is a brief discussion of future prospects in cancer chemoprevention and obstacles to overcome. PMID:9255586

  20. Dietary Pterostilbene is a novel MTA1-targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic agent in prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary nutrients with ability to reverse adverse epigenetic events have great potential for cancer chemoprevention. Overexpression of the epigenetic modifier metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) is associated with aggressive human prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine MTA1-d...

  1. In vivo phase II-enzymes inducers, as potential chemopreventive agents, based on the chalcone and furoxan skeletons.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Mauricio; Mastandrea, Ignacio; Otero, Gabriel; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2016-04-15

    Cancer chemoprevention involves prevention/delay/reverse of the carcinogenic process through administration of cancer chemopreventive agents (CCA). Compounds which are able to induce detoxification-enzymes, especially monofunctional phase II enzymes, have become in excellent approaches for new CCA. Herein, we report the synthesis of new furoxanyl chalcone-like hybrid compounds as CCA. In vitro studies showed that phenylfuroxanyl derivatives 6 and 9 displayed the best activities being 9 the greatest monofunctional-inducer. Additionally, compounds were non-mutagenic against TA98 Salmonella typhimurium strain (Ames test) and could be used in the prevention of the progression of pre-malignant lesions for their cytotoxic activity against tumoral cells. In vivo proof of concept showed increment on phase II-enzymes activities in liver, colon and mammary gland having derivative 9 the best induction profiles. We probed Nrf2 nuclear translocation is operative for both compounds allowing to exert protective effects via expression of downstream phase-II enzymes. PMID:26970663

  2. Inhibition of endothelial cell functions by novel potential cancer chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Bertl, Elisabeth; Becker, Hans; Eicher, Theophil; Herhaus, Christian; Kapadia, Govind; Bartsch, Helmut; Gerhäuser, Clarissa

    2004-12-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) play a major role in tumor-induced neovascularization and bridge the gap between a microtumor and growth factors such as nutrients and oxygen supply required for expansion. Immortalized human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were utilized to assess anti-endothelial effects of 10 novel potential cancer chemopreventive compounds from various sources that we have investigated previously in a human in vitro anti-angiogenic assay. These include the monoacylphloroglucinol isoaspidinol B, 1,2,5,7-tetrahydroxy-anthraquinone, peracetylated carnosic acid (PCA), isoxanthohumol, 2,2',4'-trimethoxychalcone, 3'-bromo-2,4-dimethoxychalcone as well as four synthetic derivatives of lunularic acid, a bibenzyl found in mosses [Int. J. Cancer Prev. 1 (2004) 47]. EC proliferation was inhibited with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations from 0.3 to 49.6muM, whereas EC migration was affected by most compounds at sub-micromolar concentrations. PCA and the bibenzyl derivative EC 1004 potently prevented differentiation of HMEC-1 into tubule-like structures. Overall, our data indicate that inhibition of endothelial cell function contributes to various extents to the chemopreventive or anti-angiogenic potential of these lead compounds. PMID:15522231

  3. Sugar-borate esters--potential chemical agents in prostate cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Scorei, Romulus Ion; Popa, Radu

    2013-07-01

    The potential value of sugar-borate esters (SBEs) in the chemo-preventive therapy of prostate cancer has been reviewed. We propose that SBEs act as boron (B) vehicles, increasing the concentration of borate inside cancer cells relative to normal cells. Increased intracellular concentration of borate activates borate transporters, but also leads to growth inhibition and apoptosis. The effects of SBEs on normal cells are less dramatic because SBEs are naturally-occurring biochemicals, common and abundant in some fruits and vegetables, and also because borate dissociated from SBEs in natural diet doses is easily exported from normal cells. Cancer cell lines that over-express sugar transporters or under-express borate export are potential targets for SBE-based therapy. With regard to efficiency against cancer cells and drug preparation requirements, trigonal cis-diol boric monoesters will be one of the most effective class of SBEs. Because negative correlation exists between borate intake and the incidence of prostate cancer, and because most cancer cells overexpress sugar transporters, SBEs are proposed as a potential chemopreventive avenue in the fight against primary and recurrent prostate cancer. PMID:23293883

  4. α-Santalol, a skin cancer chemopreventive agent with potential to target various pathways involved in photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Santha, Sreevidya; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2013-01-01

    This study is designed to investigate the chemopreventive effect and molecular mechanisms of α-santalol on UVB-induced skin tumor development in SKH-1 hairless mouse, a widely used model for human photocarcinogenesis. A dose of UVB radiation (30 mJ cm(-2) day(-1)) that is in the range of human sunlight exposure was used for the initiation and promotion of tumor. Topical treatment of mice with α-santalol (10%, wt/vol in acetone) caused reduction in tumor incidence, multiplicity and volume. In our study, the anticarcinogenic action of α-santalol against UVB-induced photocarcinogenesis was found to be associated with inhibition of inflammation and epidermal cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. α-Santalol pretreatment strongly inhibited UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia and thickness of the epidermis, expression of proliferation and inflammation markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Ki-67 and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2). Significant decrease in the expression of cyclins A, B1, D1 and D2 and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk)s Cdk1 (Cdc2), Cdk2, Cdk4 and Cdk6 and an upregulated expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor Cip1/p21 were found in α-santalol pretreated group. Furthermore, an elevated level of cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were observed in α-santalol-treated group. Our data suggested that α-santalol is a safer and promising skin cancer chemopreventive agent with potential to target various pathways involved in photocarcinogenesis. PMID:23480292

  5. Endoscopic spectral domain optical coherence tomography of murine colonic morphology to determine effectiveness of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents in colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGendre-McGhee, Susan; Rice, Photini F. S.; Wall, R. Andrew; Klein, Justin; Luttman, Amber; Sprute, Kyle; Gerner, Eugene; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2012-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging modality capable of tracking the development of individual colonic adenomas. As such, OCT can be used to evaluate the mechanisms and effectiveness of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents in colorectal cancer models. The data presented here represent part of a larger study evaluating α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and Sulindac as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents using mice treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). 27 A/J mice were included in the chemoprevention study, subdivided into four treatment groups (No Drug, DFMO, Sulindac, DFMO/Sulindac). 30 mm lateral images of each colon at eight different rotations were obtained at five different time points using a 2 mm diameter spectral domain OCT endoscopy system centered at 890 nm with 3.5 μm axial resolution in air and 5 μm lateral resolution. Images were visually analyzed to determine number and size of adenomas. Gross photos of the excised colons and histology provided gold standard confirmation of the final imaging time point. Preliminary results show that 100% of mice in the No Drug group developed adenomas over the course of the chemoprevention study. Incidence was reduced to 71.43% in mice given DFMO, 85.71% for Sulindac and 0% for DFMO/Sulindac. Discrete adenoma size did not vary significantly between experimental groups. Additional experiments are currently under way to verify these results and evaluate DFMO and Sulindac for chemotherapeutic applications.

  6. Lung cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Keith, Robert L

    2012-05-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. Although avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established, advanced-stage disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or block the carcinogenic process and has been successfully applied to common malignancies other than lung (including recent reports on the prevention of breast cancer in high-risk individuals). Despite previous studies in lung cancer chemoprevention failing to identify effective agents, our ability to define the highest-risk populations and the understanding of lung tumor and premalignant biology continue to make advances. Squamous cell carcinogenesis in the bronchial epithelium starts with normal epithelium and progresses through hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ to invasive cancer. Precursor lesions also have been identified for adenocarcinoma, and these premalignant lesions are targeted by chemopreventive agents in current and future trials. Chemopreventive agents can currently only be recommended as part of well-designed clinical trials, and multiple trials have recently been completed or are enrolling subjects. PMID:22550242

  7. Sulforaphane: translational research from laboratory bench to clinic.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Christine A; Fassett, Robert G; Coombes, Jeff S

    2013-11-01

    Cruciferous vegetables are widely acknowledged to provide chemopreventive benefits in humans, but they are not generally consumed at levels that effect significant change in biomarkers of health. Because consumers have embraced the notion that dietary supplements may prevent disease, this review considers whether an appropriately validated sulforaphane-yielding broccoli sprout supplement may deliver clinical benefit. The crucifer-derived bioactive phytochemical sulforaphane is a significant inducer of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the transcription factor that activates the cell's endogenous defenses via a battery of cytoprotective genes. For a broccoli sprout supplement to demonstrate bioactivity in vivo, it must retain both the sulforaphane-yielding precursor compound, glucoraphanin, and the activity of glucoraphanin's intrinsic myrosinase enzyme. Many broccoli sprout supplements are myrosinase inactive, but current labeling does not reflect this. For the benefit of clinicians and consumers, this review summarizes the findings of in vitro studies and clinical trials, interpreting them in the context of clinical relevance. Standardization of sulforaphane nomenclature and assay protocols will be necessary to remove inconsistency and ambiguity in the labeling of currently available broccoli sprout products. PMID:24147970

  8. Sulforaphane reduces molecular response to hypoxia in ovarian tumor cells independently of their resistance to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    PASTOREK, MICHAL; SIMKO, VERONIKA; TAKACOVA, MARTINA; BARATHOVA, MONIKA; BARTOSOVA, MARIA; HUNAKOVA, LUBA; SEDLAKOVA, OLGA; HUDECOVA, SONA; KRIZANOVA, OLGA; DEQUIEDT, FRANCK; PASTOREKOVA, SILVIA; SEDLAK, JAN

    2015-01-01

    One of the recently emerging anticancer strategies is the use of natural dietary compounds, such as sulforaphane, a cancer-chemopreventive isothiocyanate found in broccoli. Based on the growing evidence, sulforaphane acts through molecular mechanisms that interfere with multiple oncogenic pathways in diverse tumor cell types. Herein, we investigated the anticancer effects of bioavailable concentrations of sulforaphane in ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 and its two derivatives, adriamycin-resistant A2780/ADR and cisplatin-resistant A2780/CP cell lines. Since tumor microenvironment is characterized by reduced oxygenation that induces aggressive tumor phenotype (such as increased invasiveness and resistance to chemotherapy), we evaluated the effects of sulforaphane in ovarian cancer cells exposed to hypoxia (2% O2). Using the cell-based reporter assay, we identified several oncogenic pathways modulated by sulforaphane in hypoxia by activating anticancer responses (p53, ARE, IRF-1, Pax-6 and XRE) and suppressing responses supporting tumor progression (AP-1 and HIF-1). We further showed that sulforaphane decreases the level of HIF-1α protein without affecting its transcription and stability. It can also diminish transcription and protein level of the HIF-1 target, CA IX, which protects tumor cells from hypoxia-induced pH imbalance and facilitates their migration/invasion. Accordingly, sulforaphane treatment leads to diminished pH regulation and reduced migration of ovarian carcinoma cells. These effects occur in all three ovarian cell lines suggesting that sulforaphane can overcome the chemoresistance of cancer cells. This offers a path potentially exploitable in sensitizing resistant cancer cells to therapy, and opens a window for the combined treatments of sulforaphane either with conventional chemotherapy, natural compounds, or with other small molecules. PMID:25955133

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Chemopreventive Agent from Sphaeranthus amaranthoides Burm F

    PubMed Central

    Gayatri, S.; Suresh, R.; Reddy, C. Uma Maheswara; Chitra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in vitro cytotoxic effect and to isolate and characterize a chemopreventive secondary metabolite from Sphaeranthus amaranthoides Burm F (sivakaranthai). Materials and Methods: In vitro cytotoxic effect was carried out by 3 (4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Different concentrations of the extracts were tested on three different cell lines namely A549, HT29, and MCF7. The chloroform extract was subjected to column chromatography, and the isolated compound was characterized by various spectral methods and by single crystal X-ray crystallography. Results: The concentration that cause 50% growth inhibition value of chloroform extract was found to be 0.9 and 19 μg/mL against MCF7 and A549 cell lines, respectively. Chloroform extract was subjected to column chromatography for the isolation of phytoconstituent. The structure of the isolated compound was identified by spectroscopic techniques such as infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, XRD, and mass spectroscopy. On comparison of complete spectral detail of the compound, the proposed structure was identified as chrysosplenol D (a flavonoid). Chrysosplenol D was isolated for the first time from this plant. Conclusion: The chloroform extract had higher cytotoxic effect, and the isolated chrysosplenol D may be responsible for the anti-proliferative effect of the plant. SUMMARY The plant Sphaeranthus amaranthoides Burm F was extracted with solvents of increasing polarity. The chloroform extract was found to have cell inhibition towards MCF 7 and HT 29 cell lines. This was subjected to fractionation. Chrysosplenol D was isolated from the chloroform extract PMID:26941538

  10. Identification of modulated genes by three classes of chemopreventive agents at preneoplastic stages in a p53-null mouse mammary tumor model

    PubMed Central

    ABBA, MARTÍN C.; HU, YUHUI; LEVY, CARLA C.; GADDIS, SALLY; KITTRELL, FRANCES S.; HILL, JAMAL; BISSONNETTE, REID P.; BROWN, POWEL H.; MEDINA, DANIEL; ALDAZ, C. MARCELO

    2011-01-01

    Genetically engineered mice cancer models are among the most useful tools for testing the in vivo effectiveness of the various chemopreventive approaches. The p53-null mouse model of mammary carcinogenesis was previously characterized by us at the cellular, molecular, and pathological levels. In a companion article, Medina et al. (2009) analyzed the efficacy of bexarotene, gefitinib, and celecoxib as chemopreventive agents in the same model. Here we report the global gene expression effects on mammary epithelium of such compounds, analyzing the data in light of their effectiveness as chemopreventive agents. SAGE was used to profile the transcriptome of p53 null mammary epithelium obtained from mice treated with each compound Vs controls. This information was also compared with SAGE data from p53-null mouse mammary tumors. Gene expression changes induced by the chemopreventive treatments revealed a common core of 87 affected genes across treatments (p<0.05). The effective compounds, bexarotene and gefitinib may at least in part exert their chemopreventive activity by affecting a set of 34 genes related to specific cellular pathways. The gene expression signature revealed various genes previously described to be associated with breast cancer, such as, the AP-1 complex member Fos like antigen 2, Early growth response1, Gelsolin and Tumor protein translationally-controlled 1, among others. The concerted modulation of many of these transcripts prior to malignant transformation appears conducive to predominantly decrease cell proliferation. This study has revealed candidate key pathways that can be experimentally tested in the same model system and may constitute novel targets for future translational research. PMID:19174580

  11. Chemoprevention of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Keith, Robert L

    2009-04-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. While avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or inhibit the carcinogenic process and has been successfully applied to common malignancies other than lung. Despite previous studies in lung cancer chemoprevention failing to identify effective agents, our ability to determine higher risk populations and the understanding of lung tumor and pre-malignant biology continues to advance. Additional biomarkers of risk continue to be investigated and validated. The World Health Organization/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer classification for lung cancer now recognizes distinct histologic lesions that can be reproducibly graded as precursors of non-small cell lung cancer. For example, carcinogenesis in the bronchial epithelium starts with normal epithelium and progresses through hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ to invasive squamous cell cancer. Similar precursor lesions exist for adenocarcinoma, and these pre-malignant lesions are targeted by chemopreventive agents in current and future trials. At this time, chemopreventive agents can only be recommended as part of well-designed clinical trials, and multiple trials are currently in progress and additional trials are in the planning stages. This review will discuss the principles of chemoprevention, summarize the completed trials, and discuss ongoing and potential future trials with a focus on targeted pathways. PMID:19349487

  12. Most effective colon cancer chemopreventive agents in rats: a systematic review of aberrant crypt foci and tumor data, ranked by potency

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, Denis E.; Taché, Sylviane

    2002-01-01

    Potential chemopreventive agents for colorectal cancer are assessed in rodents. We speculated that the magnitude of the effect is meaningful, and ranked all published agents according to their potency. Data were gathered systematically from 137 articles with the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) endpoint, and 146 articles with the tumor endpoint. A table was built containing potency of each agent to reduce the number of ACF. Another table was built with potency of each agent to reduce the tumor incidence. Both tables are shown in the present paper, and on a website with sorting abilities (http://www.inra.fr/reseau-nacre/sci-memb/corpet/indexan.html). Potency was estimated by the ratio of value in control rats divided by value in treated rats. From each article, only the most potent agent was kept, except from articles reporting the effect of more than 7 agents. Among the 186 agents in the ACF table, the median agent halved the number of ACF. The most potent agents to reduce azoxymethane-induced ACF were pluronic, polyethylene glycol, perilla oil with beta-carotene, and sulindac sulfide. Among the 160 agents in the tumor table, the median agent halved the tumor incidence in rats. The most potent agents to reduce the incidence of azoxymethane-induced tumors were celecoxib, a protease inhibitor from soy, difluoromethylornithine with piroxicam, polyethylene glycol, and a thiosulfonate. For the 57 agents present in both tables, a significant correlation was found between the potencies against ACF and tumors (r=0.45, p<0.001). Without celecoxib, a major outlying point in the correlation, it reached r=0.68 (p<0.001, N=56). In conclusion, this review gathers almost all known chemopreventive agents, ranks the most promising ones against colon carcinogenesis in rats or mice, and further supports the use of ACF as surrogate endpoint for tumors in rats. PMID:12467130

  13. Stimulation of phagocytosis by sulforaphane

    SciTech Connect

    Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Fahey, Jed W.; Bryan, Kelley E.; Healy, Zachary R.; Talalay, Paul

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Sulforaphane stimulates the phagocytosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages under conditions of serum deprivation. {yields} This effect does not require Nrf2-dependent induction of phase 2 genes. {yields} Inactivation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) by sulforaphane may be involved in stimulation of phagocytosis by sulforaphane. -- Abstract: Sulforaphane, a major isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, protects living systems against electrophile toxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and radiation. A major protective mechanism is the induction of a network of endogenous cytoprotective (phase 2) genes that are regulated by transcription factor Nrf2. To obtain a more detailed understanding of the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of sulforaphane, we evaluated its effect on the phagocytosis activity of RAW 264.7 murine macrophage-like cells by measuring the uptake of 2-{mu}m diameter polystyrene beads. Sulforaphane raised the phagocytosis activity of RAW 264.7 cells but only in the absence or presence of low concentrations (1%) of fetal bovine serum. Higher serum concentrations depressed phagocytosis and abolished its stimulation by sulforaphane. This stimulation did not depend on the induction of Nrf2-regulated genes since it occurred in peritoneal macrophages of nrf2{sup -/-} mice. Moreover, a potent triterpenoid inducer of Nrf2-dependent genes did not stimulate phagocytosis, whereas sulforaphane and another isothiocyanate (benzyl isothiocyanate) had comparable inducer potencies. It has been shown recently that sulforaphane is a potent and direct inactivator of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an inflammatory cytokine. Moreover, the addition of recombinant MIF to RAW 264.7 cells attenuated phagocytosis, but sulforaphane-inactivated MIF did not affect phagocytosis. The inactivation of MIF may therefore be involved in the phagocytosis-enhancing activity of sulforaphane.

  14. Chemoprevention of obesity-related liver carcinogenesis by using pharmaceutical and nutraceutical agents

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Shirakami, Yohei; Shimizu, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its related metabolic disorders are serious health problems worldwide, and lead to various health-related complications, including cancer. Among human cancers, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies affected by obesity. Therefore, obesity and its related disorders might be a key target for the prevention of HCC. Recently, new research indicates that the molecular abnormalities associated with obesity, including insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, chronic inflammation, adipokine imbalance, and oxidative stress, are possible molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of obesity-related hepatocarcinogenesis. Green tea catechins and branched-chain amino acids, both of which are classified as nutraceutical agents, have been reported to prevent obesity-related HCC development by improving metabolic abnormalities. The administration of acyclic retinoid, a pharmaceutical agent, reduced the incidence of HCC in obese and diabetic mice, and was also associated with improvements in insulin resistance and chronic inflammation. In this article, we review the detailed molecular mechanisms that link obesity to the development of HCC in obese individuals. We also summarize recent evidence from experimental and clinical studies using either nutraceutical or pharmaceutical agents, and suggest that nutraceutical and pharmaceutical approaches targeting metabolic abnormalities might be a promising strategy to prevent the development of obesity-related HCC. PMID:26755885

  15. Microencapsulation of sulforaphane from broccoli seed extracts by gelatin/gum arabic and gelatin/pectin complexes.

    PubMed

    García-Saldaña, Jesús S; Campas-Baypoli, Olga N; López-Cervantes, Jaime; Sánchez-Machado, Dalia I; Cantú-Soto, Ernesto U; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Roberto

    2016-06-15

    Sulforaphane is a phytochemical that has received attention in recent years due to its chemopreventive properties. However, the uses and applications of this compound are very limited, because is an unstable molecule that is degraded mainly by changes in temperature and pH. In this research, the use of food grade polymers for microencapsulation of sulforaphane was studied by a complex coacervation method using the interaction of oppositely charged polymers as gelatin/gum arabic and gelatin/pectin. The polymers used were previously characterized in moisture content, ash and nitrogen. The encapsulation yield was over 80%. The gelatin/pectin complex had highest encapsulation efficiency with 17.91%. The presence of sulforaphane in the complexes was confirmed by FTIR and UV/visible spectroscopy. The materials used in this work could be a new and attractive option for the protection of sulforaphane. PMID:26868553

  16. Zileuton, 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor, Acts as a Chemopreventive Agent in Intestinal Polyposis, by Modulating Polyp and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Heiferman, Jeffrey R.; Shrivastav, Manisha; Vitello, Dominic; Blatner, Nichole R.; Knab, Lawrence M.; Phillips, Joseph D.; Cheon, Eric C.; Grippo, Paul J.; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.; Bentrem, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leukotrienes and prostaglandins, products of arachidonic acid metabolism, sustain both systemic and lesion-localized inflammation. Tumor-associated Inflammation can also contribute to the pathogenesis of colon cancer. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have increased risk of developing colon cancer. The levels of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), the key enzyme for leukotrienes production, are increased in colon cancer specimens and colonic dysplastic lesions. Here we report that Zileuton, a specific 5-LO inhibitor, can prevent polyp formation by efficiently reducing the tumor-associated and systemic inflammation in APCΔ468 mice. Experimental Design In the current study, we inhibited 5-LO by dietary administration of Zileuton in the APCΔ468 mouse model of polyposis and analyzed the effect of in vivo 5-LO inhibition on tumor-associated and systemic inflammation. Results Zileuton-fed mice developed fewer polyps and displayed marked reduction in systemic and polyp-associated inflammation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-inflammatory innate and adaptive immunity cells were reduced both in the lesions and systemically. As part of tumor-associated inflammation Leukotriene B4 (LTB4), product of 5-LO activity, is increased focally in human dysplastic lesions. The 5-LO enzymatic activity was reduced in the serum of Zileuton treated polyposis mice. Conclusions This study demonstrates that dietary administration of 5-LO specific inhibitor in the polyposis mouse model decreases polyp burden, and suggests that Zileuton may be a potential chemo-preventive agent in patients that are high-risk of developing colon cancer. PMID:25747113

  17. Quantification of 4'-geranyloxyferulic acid, a new natural colon cancer chemopreventive agent, by HPLC-DAD in grapefruit skin extract.

    PubMed

    Genovese, S; Epifano, F; Carlucci, G; Marcotullio, M C; Curini, M; Locatelli, M

    2010-10-10

    Oxyprenylated natural products (isopentenyloxy-, geranyloxy- and the less spread farnesyloxy-compounds and their biosynthetic derivatives) represent a family of secondary metabolites that have been consider for years merely as biosynthetic intermediates of the most abundant C-prenylated derivatives. Many of the isolated oxyprenylated natural products were shown to exert in vitro and in vivo remarkable anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects. 4'-Geranyloxyferulic acid [3-(4'-geranyloxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-2-trans-propenoic] has been discovered as a valuable chemopreventive agent of several types of cancer. After development of a high yield and "eco-friendly" synthetic scheme of this secondary metabolite, starting from cheap and non-toxic reagents and substrates, we developed a new HPLC-DAD method for its quantification in grapefruit skin extract. A preliminary study on C18 column showed the separation between GOFA and boropinic acid (having the same core but with an isopentenyloxy side chain), used as internal standard. The tested column were thermostated at 28+/-1 degrees C and the separation was achieved in gradient condition at a flow rate of 1 mL/min with a starting mobile phase of H(2)O:methanol (40:60, v/v, 1% formic acid). The limit of detection (LOD, S/N=3) was 0.5 microg/mL and the limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N=10) was 1 microg/mL. Matrix-matched standard curves showed linearity up to 75 microg/mL. In the analytical range the precision (RSD%) values were

  18. Resveratrol derivatives as promising chemopreventive agents with improved potency and selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kondratyuk, Tamara P.; Park, Eun-Jung; Marler, Laura E.; Ahn, Soyoun; Yuan, Yang; Choi, Yongsoo; Yu, Rui; van Breemen, Richard B.; Sun, Bin; Hoshino, Juma; Cushman, Mark; Jermihov, Katherine C.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Grubbs, Clinton J.; Pezzuto, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite scores of investigations, the actual impact of resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) on human health, as a dietary component or supplement, remains moot. This is due to many factors, such as relatively low potency, pleiotropic mechanisms, and rapid metabolism. Nonetheless, as a promiscuous molecule that interacts with numerous targets, resveratrol can be viewed as a scaffold for designing structural relatives potentially capable of mediating more intense responses with greater mechanistic stringency. We currently report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 92 stilbene analogs. The compounds were tested with in vitro assays for activation of quinone reductase 1, inhibition of QR2, nitric oxide production, aromatase, NFκB, TPA-induced ornithine decarboxylase, or cyclooxygenase-1 and -2, quenching of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical, interaction with estrogen receptors, and as antiproliferative agents. Several compounds were found to mediate responses with much greater potency than resveratrol; some mediated pleiotropic responses, as is the case with the parent molecule, but others were highly specific or totally inactive. When administered to rats, higher serum concentrations and greater stability was demonstrated with prototype lead molecules. Due to structural simplicity, facile syntheses are available for large-scale production. These data support the promise of more advanced development of novel resveratrol derivatives as drug entities. PMID:21714126

  19. N-acetil-l-cysteine and 2-amino-2-thiiazoline N-acetyl-l-cysteinate as a possible cancer chemopreventive agents in murine models.

    PubMed

    Simkeviciene, Vitalija; Straukas, J; Uleckiene, Saule

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and its 2-amino-2-thiazoline salt (NACAT) as potential chemopreventive agents on experimentally induced lung tumours by urethane (U) in mice. Female BALB/c mice were used. U was given by intraperitoneal injections during 2 weeks (single dose - 10 mg/mouse, total - 50 mg/mouse). Mice were treated daily per os with NAC 1/10 LD50, NACAT 1/10 or 1/100 LD50 starting 2 weeks prior U administration, then during U treatment and thereafter for 2 months. The duration of experiment was 4 months. The results showed that NAC (1000 mg/kg) reduced the lung tumour incidence to 30% that of controls, P < or = 0.05. Most effective of NACAT was 100 mg/kg dose; it reduced an average of lung adenomas per mouse by 26%, P < or = 0.05, but lower dose (10 mg/kg) was less effective. In order to achieve similar chemopreventive effect (approximately 30%) on mice, it is necessary to use 0.38 mM/kg of NACAT or 6.13 mM/kg of NAC. It means that 16 times less of NACAT is required, if calculated by molar concentration. In general, NAC and NACAT have a moderate chemopreventive effect on lung tumorigenesis induced by urethane in mice. PMID:12371608

  20. Proceedings of the Indo-U.S. bilateral workshop on accelerating botanicals/biologics agent development research for cancer chemoprevention, treatment, and survival

    PubMed Central

    B. Kumar, Nagi; Dhurandhar, Medha; Aggarwal, Bharat; Anant, Shrikant; Daniel, Kenyon; Deng, Gary; Djeu, Julie; Dou, Jinhui; Hawk, Ernest; Jayaram, B.; Jia, Libin; Joshi, Rajendra; Kararala, Madhuri; Karunagaran, Devarajan; Kucuk, Omer; Kumar, Lalit; Malafa, Mokenge; Samathanam, G. J.; Sarkar, Fazlul; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Singh, Rana P.; Srivastava, Anil; White, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    With the evolving evidence of the promise of botanicals/biologics for cancer chemoprevention and treatment, an Indo-U.S. collaborative Workshop focusing on “Accelerating Botanicals Agent Development Research for Cancer Chemoprevention and Treatment” was conducted at the Moffitt Cancer Center, 29–31 May 2012. Funded by the Indo-U.S. Science and Technology Forum, a joint initiative of Governments of India and the United States of America and the Moffitt Cancer Center, the overall goals of this workshop were to enhance the knowledge (agents, molecular targets, biomarkers, approaches, target populations, regulatory standards, priorities, resources) of a multinational, multidisciplinary team of researcher's to systematically accelerate the design, to conduct a successful clinical trials to evaluate botanicals/biologics for cancer chemoprevention and treatment, and to achieve efficient translation of these discoveries into the standards for clinical practice that will ultimately impact cancer morbidity and mortality. Expert panelists were drawn from a diverse group of stakeholders, representing the leadership from the National Cancer Institute's Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM), NCI Experimental Therapeutics (NExT), Food and Drug Administration, national scientific leadership from India, and a distinguished group of population, basic and clinical scientists from the two countries, including leaders in bioinformatics, social sciences, and biostatisticians. At the end of the workshop, we established four Indo-U.S. working research collaborative teams focused on identifying and prioritizing agents targeting four cancers that are of priority to both countries. Presented are some of the key proceedings and future goals discussed in the proceedings of this workshop. PMID:24279005

  1. Nitric oxide-releasing sulindac is a novel skin cancer chemopreventive agent for UVB-induced photocarcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Singh, Tripti; Kapur, Puneet; Weng, Zhiping; Arumugam, Aadithya; Elmets, Craig A.; Kopelovich, Levy; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) which have been synthesized to reduce gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular toxicities of NSAIDs, possess anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer activities. Here, we show that NO-sulindac inhibited UVB-induced skin tumorigenesis in SKH-1 hairless mice. Topical application of NO-sulindac reduced tumor incidence, number (p < 0.05) and volume (p < 0.005) as compared to UVB (alone)-irradiated vehicle-treated mice. An increase in TUNEL-positive cells in skin lesions was accompanied by the enhanced Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. The expression of pro-apoptotic Bax was increased whereas anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 reduced. However, proliferation was identified as the major target of NO-sulindac in this study. A reduced expression of PCNA and cyclin D1 associated with the dampening of cell cycle progression was observed. The mechanism of this inhibition was related to the reduction in UVB-induced Notch signaling pathway. UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by NO-sulindac as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP Kinases Erk1/2, p38 and JNK1/2. In this regard, NO-sulindac also inhibited NFκB by enhancing IκBα as evidenced by the reduced expression of iNOS and COX-2, the direct NFκB transcription target proteins. NO-sulindac significantly diminished the progression of benign lesions to invasive carcinomas by suppressing the tumor aggressiveness and retarding epithelial–mesenchymal transition. A marked decrease in the expression of mesenchymal markers such as Fibronectin, N-cadherin, SNAI, Slug and Twist and an increase in epithelial cell polarity marker E-cadherin were noted in NO-sulindac-treated tumors. Our data suggest that NO-sulindac is a potent inhibitor of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis and acts by targeting proliferation-regulatory pathways. - Highlights: ► NO-sulindac is a potent chemopreventive agent for UVB-induced skin cancer. ► NO

  2. Sulforaphane and Other Nutrigenomic Nrf2 Activators: Can the Clinician's Expectation Be Matched by the Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Christine A.; Fassett, Robert G.; Coombes, Jeff S.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition that food-derived nonnutrient molecules can modulate gene expression to influence intracellular molecular mechanisms has seen the emergence of the fields of nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics. The aim of this review is to describe the properties of nutrigenomic activators of transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2), comparing the potential for sulforaphane and other phytochemicals to demonstrate clinical efficacy as complementary medicines. Broccoli-derived sulforaphane emerges as a phytochemical with this capability, with oral doses capable of favourably modifying genes associated with chemoprevention. Compared with widely used phytochemical-based supplements like curcumin, silymarin, and resveratrol, sulforaphane more potently activates Nrf2 to induce the expression of a battery of cytoprotective genes. By virtue of its lipophilic nature and low molecular weight, sulforaphane displays significantly higher bioavailability than the polyphenol-based dietary supplements that also activate Nrf2. Nrf2 activation induces cytoprotective genes such as those playing key roles in cellular defense mechanisms including redox status and detoxification. Both its high bioavailability and significant Nrf2 inducer capacity contribute to the therapeutic potential of sulforaphane-yielding supplements. PMID:26881038

  3. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Andrew J; Abouassaly, Robert; Klein, Eric A

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is an appropriate target for primary chemoprevention because of its ubiquity, disease-related mortality, treatment-related morbidity, and long latency period. The PCPT and REDUCE trials demonstrate that this cancer can be prevented by a relatively nontoxic oral pharmacologic agent (5alpha-reductase inhibitors). Evidence from the SELECT trial argues against the recommendation of the use of vitamins and micronutrients as chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Dietary modification may substantially alter a man's risk of prostate cancer, but the specific dietary manipulations that are necessary are poorly defined and these may need to be instituted in early adulthood to be successful. 5alpha-reductase inhibitors represent an effective primary prevention strategy, and these agents should be used more liberally for the prevention of prostate cancer, particularly in high-risk patients. PMID:20152515

  4. [6]-gingerol as a cancer chemopreventive agent: a review of its activity on different steps of the metastatic process.

    PubMed

    Poltronieri, Juliana; Becceneri, Amanda B; Fuzer, Angelina M; Filho, Julio Cesar C; Martin, Ana Carolina B M; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Pouliot, Normand; Cominetti, Márcia R

    2014-04-01

    For many years, ginger or ginger root, the rhizome of the plant Zingiber officinale, has been consumed as a delicacy, medicine, or spice. Several studies have been conducted on the medicinal properties of ginger against various disorders, including cancer. Cancer is the second leading cause of death, and chemoprevention is defined as the use of natural or synthetic substances to prevent cancer initiation or progression. Evidence that ginger-derived compounds have inhibitory effects on various cancer cell types is increasingly being reported in the scientific literature. In this review we focused on the cancer chemopreventive effects of [6]-gingerol, the major pungent component of ginger, and its impact on different steps of the metastatic process. PMID:24552266

  5. The potential to intensify sulforaphane formation in cooked broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) using mustard seeds (Sinapis alba).

    PubMed

    Ghawi, Sameer Khalil; Methven, Lisa; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2013-06-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring cancer chemopreventive, is the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, the main glucosinolate in broccoli. The hydrolysis requires myrosinase isoenzyme to be present in sufficient activity; however, processing leads to its denaturation and hence reduced hydrolysis. In this study, the effect of adding mustard seeds, which contain a more resilient isoform of myrosinase, to processed broccoli was investigated with a view to intensify the formation of sulforaphane. Thermal inactivation of myrosinase from both broccoli and mustard seeds was studied. Thermal degradation of broccoli glucoraphanin was investigated in addition to the effects of thermal processing on the formation of sulforaphane and sulforaphane nitrile. Limited thermal degradation of glucoraphanin (less than 12%) was observed when broccoli was placed in vacuum sealed bag (sous vide) and cooked in a water bath at 100°C for 8 and 12 min. Boiling broccoli in water prevented the formation of any significant levels of sulforaphane due to inactivated myrosinase. However, addition of powdered mustard seeds to the heat processed broccoli significantly increased the formation of sulforaphane. PMID:23411305

  6. Tissue distribution and metabolism of the putative cancer chemopreventive agent 3',4',5'-trimethoxyflavonol (TMFol) in mice.

    PubMed

    Saad, Shaban E A; Jones, Donald J L; Norris, Leonie M; Horner-Glister, Emma; Patel, Ketan R; Britton, Robert G; Steward, William P; Gescher, Andreas J; Brown, Karen; Sale, Stewart

    2012-12-01

    3',4',5'-Trimethoxyflavonol (TMFol) is a synthetic flavonol with preclinical cancer chemopreventive properties. The hypothesis was tested that, in mice, p.o. administration of TMFol results in measureable levels of the parent in target tissues. A single oral dose (240 mg/kg) was administered to mice (n = 4 per time point) with time points ranging from 5 to 1440 min. TMFol and its metabolites were identified and quantitated in all tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Plasma levels of TMFol were at the limit of quantification or below, although metabolites were identified. Peak levels of TMFol in the gastrointestinal tract and the prostate averaged 1671 ± 265 µg/g (5.3 µmol/g) and 6.0 ± 1.6 µg/g (18.4 nmol/g), and occurred 20 and 360 min post-dose, respectively. The area under the tissue concentration-time curve (AUC) for TMFol was greater than those of the metabolites, indicating that TMFol is relatively metabolically stable. Micromolar TMFol levels are easily achieved in the prostate and gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that TMFol might exert chemopreventive efficacy at these tissue sites. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate the potential chemopreventive potency of TMFol. PMID:22454297

  7. Sulforaphane induces DNA double strand breaks predominantly repaired by homologous recombination pathway in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Kubota, Nobuo; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-12-12

    Cytotoxicity and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were studied in HeLa cells treated with sulforaphane (SFN), a well-known chemo-preventive agent. Cell survival was impaired by SFN in a concentration and treatment time-dependent manner. Both constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and {gamma}-H2AX assay unambiguously indicated formation of DSBs by SFN, reflecting the cell survival data. These DSBs were predominantly processed by homologous recombination repair (HRR), judging from the SFN concentration-dependent manner of Rad51 foci formation. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) protein, was not observed by SFN treatment, suggesting that NHEJ may not be involved in DSBs induced by this chemical. G2/M arrest by SFN, a typical response for cells exposed to ionizing radiation was also observed. Our new data indicate the clear induction of DSBs by SFN and a useful anti-tumor aspect of SFN through the induction of DNA DSBs.

  8. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, E.L.; Boulware, S.; Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L.; DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M.; MacLeod, M.C.

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  9. Potential of olive oil phenols as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents against cancer: a review of in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Ivan; Puoci, Francesco; Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Ruggiero, Carmen; Avena, Paola; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Olive oil is a common component of Mediterranean dietary habits. Epidemiological studies have shown how the incidence of various diseases, including certain cancers, is relatively low in the Mediterranean basin compared to that of other European or North America countries. Current knowledge indicates that the phenolic fraction of olive oil has antitumor effects. In addition to the ability to be chemopreventive, with its high antioxidant activity, the antitumor effects of olive oil phenols (OO-phenols) has been studied because of their capacity to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis in several tumor cell lines, by diverse mechanisms. This review will summarize and discuss the most recent relevant results on the antitumor effect of OO-phenols on leukemia tumor cells, colorectal carcinoma cells, and breast cancer (BC) cells. In particular, very recent data will be reported and discussed showing the molecular signaling pathways activated by OO-phenols in different histopathological BC cell types, suggesting the potential use of OO-phenols as adjuvant treatment against several subsets of BC. Data summarized here represent a good starting point for more extensive studies for better insight into the molecular mechanisms induced by OO-phenols and to increase the availability of chemopreventive or therapeutic drugs to fight cancer. PMID:23193056

  10. Sulforaphane inhibits TGF-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of hepatocellular carcinoma cells via the reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinsheng; Han, Jingli; Hou, Benxin; Deng, Chengwei; Wu, Huanliang; Shen, Liangfang

    2016-05-01

    Sulforaphane is recognized as a safe antitumor agent derived from various cruciferous vegetables, including broccoli. It has been demonstrated that sulforaphase is a potent antitumor agent in diverse cancers. However, its effect on hepatocellular carcinoma remains largely unknown. Here, we show that sulforaphane inhibits TGF-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of hepatocellular carcinoma cell via the reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway. We found sulforaphane inhibited hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Sulforaphane induced G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest and promoted cell apoptosis. A set of experiments showed that sulforaphase inhibited hepatocellular carcinoma cell migration and invasion, inhibited the formation of fibroblast like mesenchymal cells and the expression of Vimentin, but increased the expression of E-cadherin, suggesting sulforaphane suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Cotreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibited sulforaphane-inhibited invasion and upregulation of E-cadherin and almost completely abolished the sulforaphane-induced expression of Vimentin. The effect of sulforaphane on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells was confirmed by a xenograft tumor growth model. All our finding indicated that sulforaphane is a promising and safe strategy for treating hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26935987

  11. Cancer chemoprevention: a rapidly evolving field

    PubMed Central

    Steward, W P; Brown, K

    2013-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention involves the chronic administration of a synthetic, natural or biological agent to reduce or delay the occurrence of malignancy. The potential value of this approach has been demonstrated with trials in breast, prostate and colon cancer. The paradigm for developing new chemopreventive agents has changed markedly in the last decade and now involves extensive preclinical mechanistic evaluation of agents before clinical trials are instituted and a focus on defining biomarkers of activity that can be used as early predictors of efficacy. This review will summarise the current status of the field of chemoprevention and highlight potential new developments. PMID:23736035

  12. Chemoprevention for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bozovic-Spasojevic, I; Azambuja, E; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Dinh, P; Cardoso, F

    2012-08-01

    Despite the progress that has been made in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment, this disease is still a major health problem, being the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the first leading cause of cancer death among women both in developed and economically developing countries. In some developed countries incidence rate start to decrease from the end of last millennium and this can be explained, at least in part, by the decrease in hormone replacement therapy use by post-menopausal women. Chemoprevention has the potential to be an approach of utmost importance to reduce cancer burden at least among high-risk populations. Tamoxifen and raloxifene are both indicated for the prevention of breast cancer in women at high risk for the development of the disease, although raloxifene may have a more favorable adverse-effect profile, causing fewer uterine cancers and thromboembolic events. Aromatase inhibitors will most probably become an additional prevention treatment option in the near future, in view of the promising results observed in adjuvant trials and the interesting results of the very recently published first chemoprevention trial using an aromatase inhibitor.(2) Despite impressive results in most clinical trials performed to date, chemoprevention is still not widely used. Urgently needed are better molecular risk models to accurately identify high-risk subjects, new agents with a better risk/benefit ratio and validated biomarkers. PMID:21856081

  13. Cancer Chemoprevention: Current State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Landis-Piwowar, Kristin R; Iyer, Neena R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of cancer chemoprevention is disruption or delay of the molecular pathways that lead to carcinogenesis. Chemopreventive blocking and/or suppressing agents disrupt the molecular mechanisms that drive carcinogenesis such as DNA damage by reactive oxygen species, increased signal transduction to NF-κB, epigenomic deregulation, and the epithelial mesenchymal transition that leads to metastatic progression. Numerous dietary phytochemicals have been observed to inhibit the initiation phase of carcinogenesis, and therefore are useful in primary chemoprevention. Moreover, phytochemicals are capable of interfering with the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. Likewise, numerous synthetic compounds are relevant and clinically viable as chemopreventive agents during the fundamental stages of carcinogenesis. While molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies are in constant stages of development, superior patient outcomes are observed if carcinogenic processes are prevented altogether. This article reviews the role of chemopreventive compounds in inhibition of cancer initiation and their ability to reduce cancer progression. PMID:24987270

  14. Korean traditional natural herbs and plants as immune enhancing, antidiabetic, chemopreventive, and antioxidative agents: a narrative review and perspective.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2014-01-01

    The world is becoming increasingly interested in Korean food and its ingredients. The attention goes beyond the typical examples, such as kimchi and fermented sauces; peculiar food ingredients that are widely consumed in Korea are now entering the world's functional food markets. This trend was supported by scientific research, and this review seeks to combine and summarize the findings of the past 10 years. The results are organized into four groups depending on whether the ingredient strengthens the immune system, has antidiabetic effects, has chemopreventive effects, or has an antioxidative effects. We would also like to point out that this review only covers the topic of Korean traditional plants and herbs. After the summary of research findings, we discuss challenges and opportunities, exploring the direction of future research and the potential of Korean traditional food ingredients in food industry and markets. PMID:24456351

  15. The PARP inhibitors, veliparib and olaparib, are effective chemopreventive agents for delaying mammary tumor development in BRCA1-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    To, Ciric; Kim, Eun-Hee; Royce, Darlene B.; Williams, Charlotte R.; Collins, Ryan M.; Risingsong, Renee; Sporn, Michael B.; Liby, Karen T.

    2014-01-01

    Poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are effective for the treatment of BRCA-deficient tumors. Women with these mutations have an increased risk of developing breast cancer and would benefit from effective chemoprevention. This study examines whether the PARP inhibitors, veliparib and olaparib, are effective for delaying mammary gland tumor development in a BRCA1-deficient (BRCA1Co/Co; MMTV-Cre; p53+/−) mouse model. In dose de-escalation studies, mice were fed control, veliparib (100 mg/kg diet) or olaparib (200, 100, 50 or 25 mg/kg diet) continuously for up to 43 weeks. For intermittent dosing studies, mice cycled through olaparib (200 mg/kg diet) for 2 weeks followed by a 4-week rest period on control diet. To examine biomarkers, mice were fed olaparib using the intermittent dosing regimen and mammary glands were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In mice treated with veliparib or olaparib (200 mg/kg diet), the average age of the first detectable tumor was delayed by 2.4 weeks and 6.5 weeks, respectively, compared to controls. Olaparib also increased the average lifespan of mice by 7 weeks. In dose de-escalation studies, lower concentrations of olaparib delayed tumor development but were less effective than the highest dose. When fed intermittently, olaparib delayed the onset of the first palpable tumor by 5.7 weeks and significantly reduced proliferation and induced apoptosis in hyperplastic mammary glands. In summary, veliparib and olaparib are effective for delaying tumor development and extending the lifespan of Brca1-deficient mice, and intermittent dosing with olaparib was as effective as continuous dosing. These results suggest that the use of PARP inhibitors is a promising chemopreventive option. PMID:24817481

  16. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Stan, Daniela L; Allen, Summer V; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2012-11-01

    The development of pharmacologic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is a significant milestone in medical and laboratory research. Despite these advances, the endorsement of preventive options has become challenging and complex, as physicians are expected to counsel and tailor their recommendations using a personalized approach taking into account medical comorbidities, degree of risk and patient preferences. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the major breast cancer prevention trials, review of the pharmacologic options available for breast cancer prevention, and strategies for integrating chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women into clinical practice. PMID:23181529

  17. Chemoprevention of cancer: current evidence and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Areti; Lagiou, Pagona

    2015-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention refers to the use of agents for the inhibition, delay, or reversal of carcinogenesis before invasion. In the present review, agents examined in the context of cancer chemoprevention are classified in four major categories—hormonal, medications, diet-related agents, and vaccines—and the main representatives of each category are presented. Although there are serious constraints in the documentation of effectiveness of chemopreventive agents, mainly stemming from the long latency of the condition they are addressing and the frequent lack of intermediate biomarkers, there is little disagreement about the role of aspirin, whereas a diet rich in vegetables and fruits appears to convey more protection than individual micronutrients. Among categories of cancer chemopreventive agents, hormonal ones and vaccines might hold more promise for the future. Also, the identification of individuals who would benefit most from chemopreventive interventions on the basis of their genetic profiles could open new prospects for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:27006756

  18. The chemopreventive agent myoinositol inhibits Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in bronchial lesions from heavy smokers.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Gills, Joell J; Memmott, Regan M; Lam, Stephen; Dennis, Phillip A

    2009-04-01

    Myoinositol is an isomer of glucose that has chemopreventive activity in animal models of cancer. In a recent phase I clinical trial, myoinositol administration correlated with a statistically significant regression of preexisting bronchial dysplastic lesions in heavy smokers. To shed light on the potential mechanisms involved, activation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), two kinases that control cellular proliferation and survival, was assessed in 206 paired bronchial biopsies from 21 patients who participated in this clinical trial. Before myoinositol treatment, strongly positive staining for activation of Akt was detected in 27% of hyperplastic/metaplastic lesions and 58% of dysplastic lesions (P = 0.05, chi(2) test). There was also a trend toward increased activation of ERK (28% in regions of hyperplasia/metaplasia to 42% of dysplastic lesions). Following myoinositol treatment, significant decreases in Akt and ERK phosphorylation were observed in dysplastic (P < 0.01 and 0.05, respectively) but not hyperplastic/metaplastic lesions (P > 0.05). In vitro, myoinositol decreased endogenous and tobacco carcinogen-induced activation of Akt and ERK in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells, which decreased cell proliferation and induced a G(1)-S cell cycle arrest. These results show that the phenotypic progression of premalignant bronchial lesions from smokers correlates with increased activation of Akt and ERK and that these kinases are targets of myoinositol. Moreover, they suggest that myoinositol might cause regression of bronchial dysplastic lesions through inhibition of active Akt and ERK. PMID:19336734

  19. The antioxidant properties of organosulfur compounds (sulforaphane).

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, Sonia M; Binda, Nancy S; Nogueira-Machado, Jose A; Vieira-Filho, Sidney A; Caligiorne, Rachel B

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a molecule within the isothiocyanate (ITC) group of organosulfur compounds. SFN is a phytochemical commonly found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, brussels sprouts and cabbages. It has been widely studied in order to evaluate its chemopreventive properties and some of those have already been established by means of animal and human models. The SFN induces Phase I and II enzymes involved in detoxification processes of chemical carcinogens in order to prevent the start of carcinogenesis. It also presents anti-tumor action at post-initiation Phase, suggesting supplementary roles in cancer prevention. In a dose dependent manner, ITC inhibits the viability of human cancer cells, modifies epigenetic events that occur in cancer cells and present antiinflammatory effect acting during the initial of uncontrolled cell proliferation. This protective effect may be due to its antioxidant status, its recognized capacity to induce the expression and/or activity of of different cytoprotective proteins involved in the activating "Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2" (Nrf2). Nevertheless, the effects on health and the possible connections among different diet constituents in humans must be carefully studied as there are limitations in the current data in order to better understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for those effects. This survey also includes relevant patents on the use of SFN, like its use in skin cancer treatment (US2015038580); and as an adjuvant in anti-cancer treatment (US2014228419). The use of SFN as an antioxidant dietary supplement, methods for compositions that promote glutathione production (WO2015002279) and methods for extracting and purifying SFN from broccoli seeds (CN104086469) are also included in this review. PMID:25944116

  20. Sulforaphane exerts neuroprotective effects via suppression of the inflammatory response in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Li; Xing, Guo-Ping; Yu, Yin; Liang, Hui; Yu, Tian-Xia; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Lai, Tian-Bao

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory damage plays an important role in cerebral ischemic pathogenesis and may represent a promising target for treatment. Sulforaphane exerts protective effects in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by alleviating brain edema. However, the possible mechanisms of sulforaphane after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of sulforaphane on inflammatory reaction and the potential molecular mechanisms in cerebral ischemia rats. We found that sulforaphane significantly attenuated the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption; decreased the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β; reduced the nitric oxide (NO) levels and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity; inhibited the expression of iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In addition, sulforaphane inhibits the expression of p-NF-κB p65 after focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Taken together, our results suggest that sulforaphane suppresses the inflammatory response via inhibiting the NF-κB signaling pathway in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia, and sulforaphane may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of cerebral ischemia injury. PMID:26770373

  1. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. |; Carnes, B.A.

    1993-05-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL {times} BALB/c F{sub 1} female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a {sup 60}Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  2. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Carnes, B.A. )

    1993-01-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL [times] BALB/c F[sub 1] female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a [sup 60]Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  3. Sulforaphane is anticonvulsant and improves mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Tan, Kah Ni; Borges, Karin

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway (Nrf2) has been previously identified to protect the brain against various impacts. Here, we investigated the effect of the Nrf2 activator sulforaphane in various seizure models and hippocampal mitochondrial bioenergetics. We found that daily injections of sulforaphane for 5 days elevated the seizure thresholds to 6 Hz stimulation and fluorothyl-, but not pentylenetetrazole-induced tonic seizures and protected mice against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). Also, sulforaphane increased the antioxidant defences within hippocampal formations and blood plasma. In addition, sulforaphane treatment reduced the extent of hippocampal lipid peroxidation 24 h post-SE and protected hippocampal mitochondria against SE-induced reduction in state 2 and uncoupler-stimulated state 3 respiration. SE-mediated partial loss of rotenone-sensitive and complex II-driven respiration was reduced, consistent with the enhanced activities of complexes I and II in sulforaphane-treated SE mice. In mitochondria isolated from both no SE and SE mice, sulforaphane increased state 3 respiration and respiration linked to ATP synthesis, which may contribute to its anticonvulsant and antioxidant effects by providing more ATP for cellular vital and protective functions. However, sulforaphane did not prevent SE-induced hippocampal cell death. In conclusion, sulforaphane and/or Nrf2 activation are viable anticonvulsant strategies, which are antioxidant and enhance mitochondrial function, especially the ability to produce ATP. Sulforaphane was anticonvulsant in two acute mouse models of epilepsy and protected mice against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). We also found antioxidant effects of sulforaphane in mouse plasma and hippocampal formations, exhibited by increased catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, as well as increased abilities of hippocampal mitochondria to produce ATP. These effects likely underlie

  4. Antineoplastic effect of a novel chemopreventive agent, neokestose, on the Caco-2 cell line via inhibition of expression of nuclear factor-κB and cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shun-Mei; Chang, Jan-Yi; Wu, Jiann-Shing; Sheu, Dey-Chyi

    2015-07-01

    Neokestose is a 6G-fructooligosaccharide (FOS) and an important prebiotic. When FOS are ingested by patients with colorectal cancer, they may come into contact with cancer cells prior to being fermented by bifidobacteria in the colon. In the present study, the effects of neokestose on cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the colorectal cancer cell line Caco-2 were investigated to evaluate its anti-cancer effect. An MTT assay showed that neokestose-treated Caco-2 cells exhibited a significant and dose-dependent loss of viability. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the sub-G1 population of Caco-2 cells was significantly increased following treatment with neokestose, and the percentage of Caco-2 cells in the stage of late apoptosis was also significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis showed that the overexpression of nuclear factor-κB, a central molecule responsible for the transition from inflammation to cancer, and cyclooxygenase-2, an important enzyme in colorectal tumorigenesis, in colorectal carcinoma cells was inhibited by neokestose. Accordingly, the present study provided in vitro evidence that neokestose may be used as a dietary chemopreventive agent, whose application is more rational than that of COX-2 inhibitors or aspirin for preventing colorectal cancer. PMID:25815878

  5. Localized sequence-specific release of a chemopreventive agent and an anticancer drug in a time-controllable manner to enhance therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wen-Yu; Lin, Kun-Ju; Huang, Chieh-Cheng; Chiang, Wei-Lun; Lin, Yu-Jung; Lin, Wei-Chih; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Chang, Yen; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2016-09-01

    Combination chemotherapy with multiple drugs commonly requires several injections on various schedules, and the probability that the drug molecules reach the diseased tissues at the proper time and effective therapeutic concentrations is very low. This work elucidates an injectable co-delivery system that is based on cationic liposomes that are adsorbed on anionic hollow microspheres (Lipos-HMs) via electrostatic interaction, from which the localized sequence-specific release of a chemopreventive agent (1,25(OH)2D3) and an anticancer drug (doxorubicin; DOX) can be thermally driven in a time-controllable manner by an externally applied high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF). Lipos-HMs can greatly promote the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in tumor cells by reducing their cytoplasmic expression of an antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase) by 1,25(OH)2D3, increasing the susceptibility of cancer cells to the cytotoxic action of DOX. In nude mice that bear xenograft tumors, treatment with Lipos-HMs under exposure to HFMF effectively inhibits tumor growth and is the most effective therapeutic intervention among all the investigated. These empirical results demonstrate that the synergistic anticancer effects of sequential release of 1,25(OH)2D3 and DOX from the Lipos-HMs may have potential for maximizing DOX cytotoxicity, supporting more effective cancer treatment. PMID:27294541

  6. Modulation of the metabolism of airborne pollutants by glucoraphanin-rich and sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprout beverages in Qidong, China

    PubMed Central

    Kensler, Thomas W.; Ng, Derek; Carmella, Steven G.; Chen, Menglan; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Muñoz, Alvaro; Egner, Patricia A.; Chen, Jian Guo; Qian, Geng Sun; Chen, Tao Yang; Fahey, Jed W.; Talalay, Paul; Groopman, John D.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence has suggested that consumption of a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables reduces the risk of several types of cancers and chronic degenerative diseases. In particular, broccoli sprouts are a convenient and rich source of the glucosinolate, glucoraphanin, which can release the chemopreventive agent, sulforaphane, an inducer of glutathione S-transferases. Two broccoli sprout-derived beverages, one sulforaphane-rich (SFR) and the other glucoraphanin-rich (GRR), were evaluated for pharmacodynamic action in a crossover clinical trial design. Study participants were recruited from the farming community of He Zuo Township, Qidong, China, previously documented to have a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma with concomitant exposures to aflatoxin and more recently characterized with exposures to substantive levels of airborne pollutants. Fifty healthy participants were randomized into two treatment arms. The study protocol was as follows: a 5 days run-in period, a 7 days administration of beverage, a 5 days washout period and a 7 days administration of the opposite beverage. Urinary excretion of the mercapturic acids of acrolein, crotonaldehyde, ethylene oxide and benzene were measured both pre- and postinterventions using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Statistically significant increases of 20–50% in the levels of excretion of glutathione-derived conjugates of acrolein, crotonaldehyde and benzene were seen in individuals receiving SFR, GRR or both compared with their preintervention baseline values. No significant differences were seen between the effects of SFR versus GRR. Intervention with broccoli sprouts may enhance detoxication of airborne pollutants and attenuate their associated health risks. PMID:22045030

  7. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a

  8. Combination chemoprevention with grape antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chandra K; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A; El-Abd, Sabah; Mukhtar, Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2016-06-01

    Antioxidant ingredients present in grape have been extensively investigated for their cancer chemopreventive effects. However, much of the work has been done on individual ingredients, especially focusing on resveratrol and quercetin. Phytochemically, whole grape represents a combination of numerous phytonutrients. Limited research has been done on the possible synergistic/additive/antagonistic interactions among the grape constituents. Among these phytochemical constituents of grapes, resveratrol, quercetin, kaempferol, catechin, epicatechin, and anthocyanins (cyanidin and malvidin) constitute more than 70% of the grape polyphenols. Therefore, these have been relatively well studied for their chemopreventive effects against a variety of cancers. While a wealth of information is available individually on cancer chemopreventive/anti-proliferative effects of resveratrol and quercetin, limited information is available regarding the other major constituents of grape. Studies have also suggested that multiple grape antioxidants, when used in combination, alone or with other agents/drugs show synergistic or additive anti-proliferative response. Based on strong rationale emanating from published studies, it seems probable that a combination of multiple grape ingredients alone or together with other agents could impart 'additive synergism' against cancer. PMID:26829056

  9. Neuroprotective effect of sulforaphane against methylglyoxal cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Malaguti, Marco; Rizzo, Benedetta; Barbalace, Maria Cristina; Fabbri, Daniele; Hrelia, Silvana

    2015-06-15

    Glycation, an endogenous process that leads to the production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), plays a role in the etiopathogenesis of different neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methylglyoxal is the most potent precursor of AGEs, and high levels of methylglyoxal have been found in the cerebrospinal fluid of AD patients. Methylglyoxal may contribute to AD both inducing extensive protein cross-linking and mediating oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, in counteracting methylglyoxal-induced damage in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The data demonstrated that sulforaphane protects cells against glycative damage by inhibiting activation of the caspase-3 enzyme, reducing the phosphorylation of MAPK signaling pathways (ERK1/2, JNK, and p38), reducing oxidative stress, and increasing intracellular glutathione levels. For the first time, we demonstrate that sulforaphane enhances the methylglyoxal detoxifying system, increasing the expression and activity of glyoxalase 1. Sulforaphane modulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its pathway, whose dysregulation is related to AD development. Moreover, sulforaphane was able to revert the reduction of glucose uptake caused by methylglyoxal. In conclusion, sulforaphane demonstrates pleiotropic behavior thanks to its ability to act on different cellular targets, suggesting a potential role in preventing/counteracting multifactorial neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. PMID:25933243

  10. Chemoprevention of skin melanoma: facts and myths.

    PubMed

    Uzarska, Małgorzata; Czajkowski, Rafał; Schwartz, Robert A; Bajek, Anna; Zegarska, Barbara; Drewa, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer. Despite the rise of public awareness, the incidence rate among the white population has been rising constantly for several decades. Systematic improvement in knowledge about the biology of pigment cells and molecular mechanisms of their neoplastic transformation has enhanced the possibility of melanoma chemoprevention. Hence, chemopreventive agents that prevent, inhibit, or reverse melanoma development are being investigated intensively. Among synthetic compounds, especially well studied are lipid-lowering drugs and cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Substances found in everyday diet, such as genistein, apigenin, quercetin, resveratrol, and curcumin may also have potential chemopreventive qualities. However, studies examining the chemopreventive activity of these compounds have shown widely varying results. Early reports on the possible chemopreventive activity of statins and fibrates were not proved by the results of randomized clinical trials. Similarly, case-control studies examining the influence of NSAIDs on the risk of melanoma do not confirm the antitumor activity of cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Further clinical trials involving carefully selected target populations as well as the identification of specific biomarkers of prognostic and predictive value seem to be essential for the evaluation of the chemopreventive activity of the studied substances. PMID:24077511

  11. Chemoprevention of familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Patrick M

    2016-07-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) has always been first and foremost a surgical disease, whose treatment with colectomy has long been known to reduce risk of premature cancer death. The notion of reducing polyp burden and potentially delaying surgical intervention has spawned a host of "chemoprevention" trials. In this paper I selectively review the findings from these studies, highlighting trial design issues and in particular some of the limitations of historical and existing trial endpoint measures. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents have been the most commonly employed chemopreventive agents. Sulindac, largely by historical accident, has been the most extensively studied, and is widely considered the standard of care when a clinical decision to intervene medically is made. Newer trials are evaluating combinations of agents in order to take advantage of differing mechanisms of action, in the hope of achieving synergy, as no single agent predictably or completely suppresses adenoma growth. Some of these studies and other single-agent interventions are discussed, though an exploration of the various mechanisms of action is beyond the scope of this paper. It is essential that future trials focus on the issue of "clinical benefit", not simply because the US Food and Drug Administration has insisted on it, but because only real evidence-based advances can improve the standard of medical care for FAP patients. Hence my focus on issues of trial design and clinically relevant endpoints. PMID:27083160

  12. A phase II study of sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprout extracts in men with recurrent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alumkal, Joshi J.; Slottke, Rachel; Schwartzman, Jacob; Cherala, Ganesh; Munar, Myrna; Graff, Julie N.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Ryan, Christopher W.; Koop, Dennis R.; Gibbs, Angela; Gao, Lina; Flamiatos, Jason F.; Tucker, Erin; Kleinschmidt, Richard; Mori, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Diets high in cruciferous vegetables are associated with lower risk of incidence of prostate cancer, including aggressive forms of this disease. Human intervention studies with cruciferous vegetable-rich diets also demonstrate modulation of gene expression in important pathways in prostate cells. Sulforaphane is a constituent of these foods postulated to harbor the anti-neoplastic activity based on multiple tumor models. Our own work demonstrates that sulforaphane inhibits AR signaling in prostate cancer cells. Here, we report results from the first clinical trial of sulforaphane-rich extracts in men with prostate cancer. We treated 20 patients who had recurrent prostate cancer with 200μmoles/day of sulforaphane-rich extracts for a maximum period of 20 weeks and determined the proportion of patients with ≥50% PSA declines, the primary endpoint. Only one subject experienced a ≥50% PSA decline. Thus, the primary endpoint was not achieved. Seven patients experienced smaller PSA declines (<50%). There was also a significant lengthening of the on-treatment PSA doubling time (PSADT) compared with the pre-treatment PSADT [6.1 months pre-treatment vs. 9.6 months on-treatment (p=0.044)]. Finally, treatment with sulforaphane-rich extracts was safe with no Grade 3 adverse events. Treatment with 200μmoles/day of sulforaphane-rich extracts did not lead to ≥50% PSA declines in the majority of patients. However, because of the safety of treatment and the effects on PSADT modulation, further studies, including those with higher doses, may be warranted to clarify the role of sulforaphane as a prevention agent or treatment agent. PMID:25431127

  13. Sulforaphane Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suppipat, Koramit; Park, Chun Shik; Shen, Ye; Zhu, Xiao; Lacorazza, H. Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common hematological cancer in children. Although risk-adaptive therapy, CNS-directed chemotherapy, and supportive care have improved the survival of ALL patients, disease relapse is still the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. Therefore, new drugs are needed as frontline treatments in high-risk disease and as salvage agents in relapsed ALL. In this study, we report that purified sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, has anti-leukemic properties in a broad range of ALL cell lines and primary lymphoblasts from pediatric T-ALL and pre-B ALL patients. The treatment of ALL leukemic cells with sulforaphane resulted in dose-dependent apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest, which was associated with the activation of caspases (3, 8, and 9), inactivation of PARP, p53-independent upregulation of p21CIP1/WAF1, and inhibition of the Cdc2/Cyclin B1 complex. Interestingly, sulforaphane also inhibited the AKT and mTOR survival pathways in most of the tested cell lines by lowering the levels of both total and phosphorylated proteins. Finally, the administration of sulforaphane to the ALL xenograft models resulted in a reduction of tumor burden, particularly following oral administration, suggesting a potential role as an adjunctive agent to improve the therapeutic response in high-risk ALL patients with activated AKT signaling. PMID:23251470

  14. Sulforaphane treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    PubMed

    Singh, Kanwaljit; Connors, Susan L; Macklin, Eric A; Smith, Kirby D; Fahey, Jed W; Talalay, Paul; Zimmerman, Andrew W

    2014-10-28

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), characterized by both impaired communication and social interaction, and by stereotypic behavior, affects about 1 in 68, predominantly males. The medico-economic burdens of ASD are enormous, and no recognized treatment targets the core features of ASD. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial, young men (aged 13-27) with moderate to severe ASD received the phytochemical sulforaphane (n = 29)--derived from broccoli sprout extracts--or indistinguishable placebo (n = 15). The effects on behavior of daily oral doses of sulforaphane (50-150 µmol) for 18 wk, followed by 4 wk without treatment, were quantified by three widely accepted behavioral measures completed by parents/caregivers and physicians: the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), and Clinical Global Impression Improvement Scale (CGI-I). Initial scores for ABC and SRS were closely matched for participants assigned to placebo and sulforaphane. After 18 wk, participants receiving placebo experienced minimal change (<3.3%), whereas those receiving sulforaphane showed substantial declines (improvement of behavior): 34% for ABC (P < 0.001, comparing treatments) and 17% for SRS scores (P = 0.017). On CGI-I, a significantly greater number of participants receiving sulforaphane had improvement in social interaction, abnormal behavior, and verbal communication (P = 0.015-0.007). Upon discontinuation of sulforaphane, total scores on all scales rose toward pretreatment levels. Dietary sulforaphane, of recognized low toxicity, was selected for its capacity to reverse abnormalities that have been associated with ASD, including oxidative stress and lower antioxidant capacity, depressed glutathione synthesis, reduced mitochondrial function and oxidative phosphorylation, increased lipid peroxidation, and neuroinflammmation. PMID:25313065

  15. Sulforaphane treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kanwaljit; Connors, Susan L.; Macklin, Eric A.; Smith, Kirby D.; Fahey, Jed W.; Talalay, Paul; Zimmerman, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), characterized by both impaired communication and social interaction, and by stereotypic behavior, affects about 1 in 68, predominantly males. The medico-economic burdens of ASD are enormous, and no recognized treatment targets the core features of ASD. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial, young men (aged 13–27) with moderate to severe ASD received the phytochemical sulforaphane (n = 29)—derived from broccoli sprout extracts—or indistinguishable placebo (n = 15). The effects on behavior of daily oral doses of sulforaphane (50–150 µmol) for 18 wk, followed by 4 wk without treatment, were quantified by three widely accepted behavioral measures completed by parents/caregivers and physicians: the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), and Clinical Global Impression Improvement Scale (CGI-I). Initial scores for ABC and SRS were closely matched for participants assigned to placebo and sulforaphane. After 18 wk, participants receiving placebo experienced minimal change (<3.3%), whereas those receiving sulforaphane showed substantial declines (improvement of behavior): 34% for ABC (P < 0.001, comparing treatments) and 17% for SRS scores (P = 0.017). On CGI-I, a significantly greater number of participants receiving sulforaphane had improvement in social interaction, abnormal behavior, and verbal communication (P = 0.015–0.007). Upon discontinuation of sulforaphane, total scores on all scales rose toward pretreatment levels. Dietary sulforaphane, of recognized low toxicity, was selected for its capacity to reverse abnormalities that have been associated with ASD, including oxidative stress and lower antioxidant capacity, depressed glutathione synthesis, reduced mitochondrial function and oxidative phosphorylation, increased lipid peroxidation, and neuroinflammmation. PMID:25313065

  16. Lung cancer chemoprevention: current status and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Robert L.; Miller, York E.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, making it an attractive disease for chemoprevention. Although avoidance of tobacco use and smoking cessation will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, chemoprevention could prove to be very effective, particularly in former smokers. Chemoprevention is the use of agents to reverse or inhibit carcinogenesis and has been successfully applied to other common malignancies. Despite prior studies in lung cancer chemoprevention failing to identify effective agents, we now have the ability to identify high-risk populations, and our understanding of lung tumour and premalignant biology continues to advance. There are distinct histological lesions that can be reproducibly graded as precursors of non-small-cell lung cancer and similar precursor lesions exist for adenocarcinoma. These premalignant lesions are being targeted by chemopreventive agents in current trials and will continue to be studied in the future. In addition, biomarkers that predict risk and response to targeted agents are being investigated and validated. In this Review, we discuss the principles of chemoprevention, data from preclinical models, completed clinical trials and observational studies, and describe new treatments for novel targeted pathways and future chemopreventive efforts. PMID:23689750

  17. Impact of thermal processing on sulforaphane yield from broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In broccoli, sulforaphane forms when the glucosinolate glucoraphanin is hydrolyzed by the endogenous plant thiohydrolase myrosinase. A myrosinase cofactor directs hydrolysis away from formation of bioactive sulforaphane and toward an inactive product, sulforaphane nitrile. The cofactor is more hea...

  18. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  19. Effects of co-treatment with sulforaphane and autophagy modulators on uridine 5′-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 1A isoforms and cytochrome P450 3A4 expression in Caco-2 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, MIN; ZHU, JING-YU; CHEN, SHUO; QING, YING; WU, DONG; LIN, YING-MIN; LUO, JI-ZHUANG; HAN, WEI; LI, YAN-QING

    2014-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), which is highly enriched in cruciferous vegetables, has been investigated for its cancer chemopreventive properties and ability to induce autophagy. Uridine 5′-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A induction is one of the mechanisms that is responsible for the cancer chemopreventive activity of SFN. The current study demonstrates that rapamycin may enhance the chemopreventive effects of SFN on Caco-2 cells; this may be partially attributed to nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)- and human pregnane X receptor (hPXR)-mediated UGT1A1, UGT1A8 and UGT1A10 induction. These results indicate that targeting autophagy modulation may be a promising strategy for increasing the chemopreventive effects of SFN in cases of colon cancer. PMID:25364403

  20. SUV39H1/H3K9me3 attenuates sulforaphane-induced apoptotic signaling in PC3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, G W; Wickramasekara, S; Palomera-Sanchez, Z; Black, C; Maier, C S; Williams, D E; Dashwood, R H; Ho, E

    2014-01-01

    The isothiocyanate sulforaphane is a promising molecule for development as a therapeutic agent for patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Sulforaphane induces apoptosis in advanced prostate cancer cells, slows disease progression in vivo and is well tolerated at pharmacological doses. However, the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for cancer suppression remain to be fully elucidated. In this investigation we demonstrate that sulforaphane induces posttranslational modification of histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 in metastatic, androgen receptor-negative PC3 prostate cancer cells. Sulforaphane stimulates ubiquitination and acetylation of SUV39H1 within a C-terminal nuclear localization signal peptide motif and coincides with its dissociation from chromatin and a decrease in global trimethyl-histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3) levels. Exogenous SUV39H1 expression leads to an increase in H3K9me3 and decreases sulforaphane-induced apoptotic signaling. SUV39H1 is thus identified as a novel mediator of sulforaphane cytotoxicity in PC3 cells. Our results also suggest SUV39H1 dynamics as a new therapeutic target in advanced prostate cancers. PMID:25486523

  1. Sarcophine-diol, a skin cancer chemopreventive agent, inhibits proliferation and stimulates apoptosis in mouse melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ cell line.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Pawel T; Kuppast, Bhimanna; Ahmed, Safwat A; Khalifa, Sherief; Fahmy, Hesham

    2012-01-01

    Sarcodiol (SD) is a semi-synthetic derivative of sarcophine, a marine natural product. In our previous work, we reported the significant chemopreventive effects of SD against non-melanoma skin cancer both in vitro and in vivo mouse models. In this investigation, we extended this work to study the effect of sarcodiol on melanoma development, the more deadly form of skin cancer, using the mouse melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ cell line. In this study we report that SD inhibits the de novo DNA synthesis and enhances fragmentation of DNA. We also evaluated the antitumor effect of SD on melanoma cell viability using several biomarkers for cell proliferation and apoptosis. SD inhibits the expression levels of signal transducers and activators of transcription protein (STAT-3) and cyclin D1, an activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4). SD treatment also enhances cellular level of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and stimulates cleavage of the nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (cleaved-PARP). SD also enhances cellular levels of cleaved Caspase-3, -8, -9 and stimulates enzymatic activities of Caspase-3, -8 and -9. These results, in addition to inhibition of cell viability, suggest that SD inhibits melanoma cell proliferation by arresting the cell-division cycle in a Go quiescent phase and activates programmed cell death (apoptosis) via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Finally, these studies demonstrate that SD shows a very promising chemopreventive effect in melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ tumor cells. PMID:22363217

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop: Meeting Report.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark Steven; Allen, Peter; Brentnall, Teresa A; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H; Petersen, Gloria M; Rao, Chinthalapally V; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E; Chari, Suresh T; Klein, Alison P; Lubman, David M; Rhim, Andrew D; Simeone, Diane M; Wolpin, Brian M; Umar, Asad; Srivastava, Sudhir; Steele, Vernon E; Rinaudo, Jo Ann S

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. The Division of Cancer Prevention of the National Cancer Institute sponsored the Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop on September 10 to 11, 2015. The goal of the workshop was to obtain information regarding the current state of the science and future scientific areas that should be prioritized for pancreatic cancer prevention research, including early detection and intervention for high-risk precancerous lesions. The workshop addressed the molecular/genetic landscape of pancreatic cancer and precursor lesions, high-risk populations and criteria to identify a high-risk population for potential chemoprevention trials, identification of chemopreventative/immunopreventative agents, and use of potential biomarkers and imaging for assessing short-term efficacy of a preventative agent. The field of chemoprevention for pancreatic cancer is emerging, and this workshop was organized to begin to address these important issues and promote multi-institutional efforts in this area. The meeting participants recommended the development of an National Cancer Institute working group to coordinate efforts, provide a framework, and identify opportunities for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27518363

  3. Chemoprevention of hereditary colon cancers: time for new strategies.

    PubMed

    Ricciardiello, Luigi; Ahnen, Dennis J; Lynch, Patrick M

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is potentially preventable. Chemoprevention, a focus of research for the past three decades, aims to prevent or delay the onset of cancer through the regression or prevention of colonic adenomas. Ideal pharmacological agents for chemoprevention should be cheap and nontoxic. Although data indicate that aspirin can reduce the risk of CRC in the general population, the highest return from chemopreventive strategies would be expected in patients with the highest risk of developing the disease, particularly those with a defined hereditary predisposition. Despite compelling data showing that a large number of chemopreventive agents show promise in preclinical CRC models, clinical studies have yielded conflicting results. This Review provides a historical and methodological perspective of chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome, and summarizes the current status of CRC chemoprevention in humans. Our goal is to critically focus on important issues of trial design, with particular attention on the choice of appropriate trial end points, how such end points should be measured, and which patients are the ideal candidates to be included in a chemopreventive trial. PMID:27095653

  4. Endocrine Disruption throughout the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Gonadal-Liver (HPGL) Axis in Marine Medaka (Oryzias melastigma) Chronically Exposed to the Antifouling and Chemopreventive Agent, 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM).

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianguo; Ye, Rui; Zhang, Weipeng; Hu, Chenyan; Zhou, Bingsheng; Peterson, Drew R; Au, Doris W T; Lam, Paul K S; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2016-06-20

    Despite being proposed as a promising antifouling and chemopreventive agent, the environmental risks of 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) are scarcely investigated. Therefore, this study used adult marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) as a model organism to examine the toxicological effects and underlying mechanism of DIM throughout the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal-liver (HPGL) axis following 28 days of exposure to low DIM concentrations (0 and 8.46 μg/L). The results showed that altered gene transcription in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonads contributed to the great imbalance in hormone homeostasis. The lowered estradiol (E2)/testosterone (T) and E2/11-keto-testosterone (11-KT) ratios in female plasma resulted in decreased synthesis and levels of vitellogenin (VTG) and choriogenin in the liver and plasma, and vice versa in males. Subsequently, VTG and choriogenin deficiency blocked the reproductive function of the ovary as indicated by decreased fecundity and offspring viability, whereas in male medaka, DIM mainly targeted the liver and induced severe vacuolization. Proteomic profiling of plasma revealed that the sex-specific susceptibility to DIM could be attributed to the increased detoxification and oxidative defense in males. Overall, this study identified the endocrine disruption and reproductive impairment potency of DIM and first elucidated its mechanisms of action in medaka. The differential responses to DIM (estrogenic activities in the male but antiestrogenic activities in the female) provided sensitive biomarkers characteristic of each sex. Considering the chemical stability and potent endocrine disturbance at low concentration, the application of DIM either as an antifouling or chemopreventive agent should be approached with caution in marine environments. PMID:27092574

  5. Exploring the Potential Role of Chemopreventive Agent, Hesperetin Conjugated Pegylated Gold Nanoparticles in Diethylnitrosamine-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Male Wistar Albino Rats.

    PubMed

    Gokuladhas, Krishnan; Jayakumar, Subramaniyan; Rajan, Balan; Elamaran, Ramasamy; Pramila, Chengalvarayan Subramani; Gopikrishnan, Mani; Tamilarasi, Sasivarman; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2016-04-01

    Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer and is still one of the leading causes of death world wide, due to food additives, alcohol, fungal toxins, air, toxic industrial chemicals, and water pollutants. Chemopreventive drugs play a potential role in liver cancer treatment. Obviously in the production of anticancer drugs, the factors like poor solubility, bioavailability, biocompatibility, limited chemical stability, large amount of dose etc., plays a major role. Against this backdrop, the idea of designing the chemopreventive nature of bio flavanoid hesperetin (HP) drug conjugated with pegylated gold nanoparticles to increasing the solubility, improve bioavailability and enhance the targeting capabilities of the drug during diethylnitrosamine (DEN) induced liver cancer in male wistar albino rats. The dose fixation studies and the toxicity of pure HP and HP conjugated gold nanoparticles (Au-mPEG(5000)-S-HP) were analysed. After concluded the dose fixation and toxicity studies the experimental design were segregated in six groups for the anticancer analysis of DEN induced HCC for 16 weeks. After the experimental period the body weight, relative liver weight, number of nodules and size of nodules, the levels of tumor markers like CEA, AFP and the level of lipid peroxidation, lipid hydroperoxides and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were assessed. The administration of DEN to rats resulted in increased relative liver weight and serum marker enzymes aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase. The levels of lipid peroxides elevated (in both serum and tissue) with subsequent decrease in the final body weight and tissue antioxidants like superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidise, and glutathione reductase. HP supplementation (20 mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated these alterations, thereby showing potent anticancer effect in liver cancer and the

  6. Chemotherapy and Chemoprevention by Thiazolidinediones

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic ligands of Peroxisome-Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARγ). Troglitazone, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone have been approved for treatment of diabetes mellitus type II. All three compounds, together with the first TZD ciglitazone, also showed an antitumor effect in preclinical studies and a beneficial effect in some clinical trials. This review summarizes hypotheses on the role of PPARγ in tumors, on cellular targets of TZDs, antitumor effects of monotherapy and of TZDs in combination with other compounds, with a focus on their role in the treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The results of chemopreventive effects of TZDs are also considered. Existing data suggest that the action of TZDs is highly complex and that actions do not correlate with cellular PPARγ expression status. Effects are cell-, species-, and compound-specific and concentration-dependent. Data from human trials suggest the efficacy of TZDs as monotherapy in prostate cancer and glioma and as chemopreventive agent in colon, lung, and breast cancer. TZDs in combination with other therapies might increase antitumor effects in thyroid cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and melanoma. PMID:25866814

  7. Sulforaphane inhibits CYP1A1 activity and promotes genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fangxing; Zhuang, Shulin; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Heping; Liu, Weiping

    2013-06-15

    Increasing environmental pollution by carcinogens such as some of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has prompted growing interest in searching for chemopreventive compounds which are readily obtainable. Sulforaphane (SFN) is isolated from cruciferous vegetables and has the potentials to reduce carcinogenesis through various pathways. In this study, we studied the effects of SFN on CYP1A1 activity and genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The results showed that SFN inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells by directly inhibiting CYP1A1 activity, probably through binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1 revealed by molecular docking. However, SFN promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells and reduced the viability of initiated yeast cells. Besides, it is surprising that SFN also failed to reduce genotoxicity induced by other genotoxic reagents which possess different mechanisms to lead to DNA damage. Currently, it is difficult to predict whether SFN has the potentials to reduce the risk of TCDD based on the conflicting observations in the study. Therefore, further studies should be urgent to reveal the function and mechanism of SFN in the stress of such POPs on human health. - Highlights: • Sulforaphane inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells. • Sulforaphane may bind to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1. • Sulforaphane promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells. • Sulforaphane may promote DNA damage by DNA strand breaks or DNA alkylation.

  8. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks. PMID:26608293

  9. Chemoprevention of Gastrointestinal Cancer: The Reality and the Dream

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Eun-Hee; Lee, Sooyeon

    2013-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in screening, early diagnosis, and the development of noninvasive technology, gastrointestinal (GI) cancer remains a major cause of cancer-associated mortality. Chemoprevention is thought to be a realistic approach for reducing the global burden of GI cancer, and efforts have been made to search for chemopreventive agents that suppress acid reflux, GI inflammation and the eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Thus, proton pump inhibitors, statins, monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents have been investigated for their potential to prevent GI cancer. Besides the development of these synthetic agents, a wide variety of the natural products present in a plant-based diet, which are commonly called phytoceuticals, have also sparked hope for the chemoprevention of GI cancer. To perform successful searches of chemopreventive agents for GI cancer, it is of the utmost importance to understand the factors contributing to GI carcinogenesis. Emerging evidence has highlighted the role of chronic inflammation in inducing genomic instability and telomere shortening and affecting polyamine metabolism and DNA repair, which may help in the search for new chemopreventive agents for GI cancer. PMID:23560148

  10. Lung cancer: chemoprevention and intermediate effect markers.

    PubMed

    Tockman, M S

    2001-01-01

    Even after smoking cessation, genetic damage in the airways epithelium may lead to focal progression of lung carcinogenesis. Some centres now report as many new lung cancer cases among former smokers as among current smokers. Chemoprevention is a potential approach to diminish the progression of pre-clinical genetic damage. The most intensively studied lung cancer chemoprevention agents are the retinoids, including vitamin A and its synthetic analogues and precursors. While effective in suppressing lung carcinogenesis in animal models, retinoids have failed to inhibit carcinogenesis in human chemoprevention trials with premalignant end-points (sputum atypia, bronchial metaplasia). In trials with lung cancer end-points, administration of retinoids either was ineffective or, in the case of beta-carotene, led to greater lung cancer incidence and mortality. In view of these findings, markers of specific retinoid effect (i.e., levels of RAR-beta) become less relevant. Other markers of genetic instability and proliferation may be useful for both early detection and potentially as intermediate-effect markers for new chemoprevention trials. Cytological atypia, bronchial metaplasia, protein (hnRNP A2/B1) overexpression, ras oncogene activation and tumour-suppressor gene deletion, genomic instability (loss of heterozygosity, microsatellite alterations), abnormal methylation, helical CT detection of atypical adenomatous hyperplasia and fluorescent bronchoscopic detection of angiogenic squamous dysplasia offer great promise for molecular diagnosis of lung cancer far in advance of clinical presentation. These end-points can now be evaluated as monitors of response to chemoprevention as potential intermediate-effect markers. PMID:11220665

  11. The Role of Sulforaphane in Epigenetic Mechanisms, Including Interdependence between Histone Modification and DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Majewski, Grzegorz; Lubecka-Pietruszewska, Katarzyna; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis as well as cancer progression result from genetic and epigenetic changes of the genome that leads to dysregulation of transcriptional activity of genes. Epigenetic mechanisms in cancer cells comprise (i) post-translation histone modification (i.e., deacetylation and methylation); (ii) DNA global hypomethylation; (iii) promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressor genes and genes important for cell cycle regulation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and (iv) posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by noncoding microRNA. These epigenetic aberrations can be readily reversible and responsive to both synthetic agents and natural components of diet. A source of one of such diet components are cruciferous vegetables, which contain high levels of a number of glucosinolates and deliver, after enzymatic hydrolysis, sulforaphane and other bioactive isothiocyanates, that are involved in effective up-regulation of transcriptional activity of certain genes and also in restoration of active chromatin structure. Thus a consumption of cruciferous vegetables, treated as a source of isothiocyanates, seems to be potentially useful as an effective cancer preventive factor or as a source of nutrients improving efficacy of standard chemotherapies. In this review an attempt is made to elucidate the role of sulforaphane in regulation of gene promoter activity through a direct down-regulation of histone deacetylase activity and alteration of gene promoter methylation in indirect ways, but the sulforaphane influence on non-coding micro-RNA will not be a subject of this review. PMID:26703571

  12. The Role of Sulforaphane in Epigenetic Mechanisms, Including Interdependence between Histone Modification and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Majewski, Grzegorz; Lubecka-Pietruszewska, Katarzyna; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis as well as cancer progression result from genetic and epigenetic changes of the genome that leads to dysregulation of transcriptional activity of genes. Epigenetic mechanisms in cancer cells comprise (i) post-translation histone modification (i.e., deacetylation and methylation); (ii) DNA global hypomethylation; (iii) promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressor genes and genes important for cell cycle regulation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and (iv) posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by noncoding microRNA. These epigenetic aberrations can be readily reversible and responsive to both synthetic agents and natural components of diet. A source of one of such diet components are cruciferous vegetables, which contain high levels of a number of glucosinolates and deliver, after enzymatic hydrolysis, sulforaphane and other bioactive isothiocyanates, that are involved in effective up-regulation of transcriptional activity of certain genes and also in restoration of active chromatin structure. Thus a consumption of cruciferous vegetables, treated as a source of isothiocyanates, seems to be potentially useful as an effective cancer preventive factor or as a source of nutrients improving efficacy of standard chemotherapies. In this review an attempt is made to elucidate the role of sulforaphane in regulation of gene promoter activity through a direct down-regulation of histone deacetylase activity and alteration of gene promoter methylation in indirect ways, but the sulforaphane influence on non-coding micro-RNA will not be a subject of this review. PMID:26703571

  13. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michaela; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has become one of the most prevalent malignant diseases for both men and women. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or certain inherited cancer syndromes are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer and have naturally the highest need for cancer prevention. In familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome, most of the underlying germline mutations can be detected by DNA sequencing, and medical counselling of affected individuals involves both surveillance tests and chemopreventive measures. However, as the mechanisms leading to colorectal cancer differ in these high-risk groups, the molecular action of chemopreventive drugs needs to be adjusted to the certain pathway of carcinogenesis. In the last decades, a number of drugs have been tested, including sulindac, aspirin, celecoxib, and mesalazine, but some of them are still controversially discussed. This review summarizes the advances and current standards of colorectal cancer prevention in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, FAP and Lynch syndrome. PMID:25531498

  14. Intermediate endpoint biomarkers for lung cancer chemoprevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Klein-Parker, Helga; Gazdar, Adi; Guillaud, Martial; Payne, Peter W.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Dawe, Chris; Band, Pierre; Palcic, Branko

    1998-04-01

    Given the demographics of current and ex-smoking populations in North America, lung cancer will be a major problem in the foreseeable future. Early detection and treatment of lung cancer holds great promise for the management of this disease. Unlike cervical cancer, the physical, complete removal/destruction of all dysplastic lesions in the bronchial tree is not possible; however, treatment of the lesions using a chemopreventive agent is. Intermediate biomarkers have been used to screen promising chemopreventive agents for larger population studies. We have examined the natural history of lung cancer development by following a group of subjects at high risk of developing lung cancer using fluorescence endoscopy to identify the areas of abnormality for biopsy. Approximately 900 biopsies have been collected in this fashion and graded by at least two experienced, expert pathologists. Using an interactive version of the Cyto-Savant (Oncometrics Imaging Corp.), cytometric and tissue architectural data were collected from these biopsies. Using only the data from the normal and invasive cancer biopsies, quantitative morphometric and architectural indices were generated and calculated for all the collected biopsies. These indices were compared with Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) of ten sites commonly associated with cancer. These results and the application of these quantitative measures to two small chemoprevention studies will be reported.

  15. Dietary chalcones with chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Orlikova, Barbora; Tasdemir, Deniz; Golais, Frantisek; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2011-05-01

    Chalcones are absorbed in the daily diet and appear to be promising cancer chemopreventive agents. Chalcones represent an important group of the polyphenolic family, which includes a large number of naturally occurring molecules. This family possesses an interesting spectrum of biological activities, including antioxidative, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, cytotoxic, and immunosuppressive potential. Compounds of this family have been shown to interfere with each step of carcinogenesis, including initiation, promotion and progression. Moreover, numerous compounds from the family of dietary chalcones appear to show activity against cancer cells, suggesting that these molecules or their derivatives may be considered as potential anticancer drugs. This review will focus primarily on prominent members of the chalcone family with an 1,3-diphenyl-2-propenon core structure. Specifically, the inhibitory effects of these compounds on the different steps of carcinogenesis that reveal interesting chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential will be discussed. PMID:21484163

  16. Chemoprevention in gastrointestinal physiology and disease. Anti-inflammatory approaches for colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Alexandra M; Piazza, Gary A

    2015-07-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common human malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in developed countries. Identifying effective preventive strategies aimed at inhibiting the development and progression of CRC is critical for reducing the incidence and mortality of this malignancy. The prevention of carcinogenesis by anti-inflammatory agents including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, and natural products is an area of considerable interest and research. Numerous anti-inflammatory agents have been identified as potential CRC chemopreventive agents but vary in their mechanism of action. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms being studied for the CRC chemopreventive activity of NSAIDs (i.e., aspirin, sulindac, and ibuprofen), COX-2 inhibitors (i.e., celecoxib), natural products (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, EGCG, genistein, and baicalein), and metformin. A deeper understanding of how these anti-inflammatory agents inhibit CRC will provide insight into the development of potentially safer and more effective chemopreventive drugs. PMID:26021807

  17. Chemoprevention in gastrointestinal physiology and disease. Anti-inflammatory approaches for colorectal cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common human malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in developed countries. Identifying effective preventive strategies aimed at inhibiting the development and progression of CRC is critical for reducing the incidence and mortality of this malignancy. The prevention of carcinogenesis by anti-inflammatory agents including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, and natural products is an area of considerable interest and research. Numerous anti-inflammatory agents have been identified as potential CRC chemopreventive agents but vary in their mechanism of action. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms being studied for the CRC chemopreventive activity of NSAIDs (i.e., aspirin, sulindac, and ibuprofen), COX-2 inhibitors (i.e., celecoxib), natural products (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, EGCG, genistein, and baicalein), and metformin. A deeper understanding of how these anti-inflammatory agents inhibit CRC will provide insight into the development of potentially safer and more effective chemopreventive drugs. PMID:26021807

  18. D, L-Sulforaphane Loaded Fe3O4@ Gold Core Shell Nanoparticles: A Potential Sulforaphane Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Kheiri Manjili, Hamidreza; Ma’mani, Leila; Tavaddod, Sharareh; Mashhadikhan, Maedeh; Shafiee, Abbas; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    A novel design of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was fabricated as a potential delivery system to improve the efficiency and stability of d, l-sulforaphane as an anticancer drug. To this purpose, the surface of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was modified for sulforaphane delivery via furnishing its surface with thiolated polyethylene glycol-folic acid and thiolated polyethylene glycol-FITC. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques such as FTIR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The average diameters of the synthesized nanoparticles before and after sulforaphane loading were obtained ∼ 33 nm and ∼ 38 nm, respectively, when ∼ 2.8 mmol/g of sulforaphane was loaded. The result of cell viability assay which was confirmed by apoptosis assay on the human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 line) as a model of in vitro-cancerous cells, proved that the bare nanoparticles showed little inherent cytotoxicity, whereas the sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles were cytotoxic. The expression rate of the anti-apoptotic genes (bcl-2 and bcl-xL), and the pro-apoptotic genes (bax and bak) were quantified, and it was found that the expression rate of bcl-2 and bcl-xL genes significantly were decreased when MCF-7 cells were incubated by sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles. The sulforaphane-loaded into the designed gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, acceptably induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. PMID:26982588

  19. D, L-Sulforaphane Loaded Fe3O4@ Gold Core Shell Nanoparticles: A Potential Sulforaphane Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Kheiri Manjili, Hamidreza; Ma'mani, Leila; Tavaddod, Sharareh; Mashhadikhan, Maedeh; Shafiee, Abbas; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    A novel design of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was fabricated as a potential delivery system to improve the efficiency and stability of d, l-sulforaphane as an anticancer drug. To this purpose, the surface of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was modified for sulforaphane delivery via furnishing its surface with thiolated polyethylene glycol-folic acid and thiolated polyethylene glycol-FITC. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques such as FTIR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The average diameters of the synthesized nanoparticles before and after sulforaphane loading were obtained ∼ 33 nm and ∼ 38 nm, respectively, when ∼ 2.8 mmol/g of sulforaphane was loaded. The result of cell viability assay which was confirmed by apoptosis assay on the human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 line) as a model of in vitro-cancerous cells, proved that the bare nanoparticles showed little inherent cytotoxicity, whereas the sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles were cytotoxic. The expression rate of the anti-apoptotic genes (bcl-2 and bcl-xL), and the pro-apoptotic genes (bax and bak) were quantified, and it was found that the expression rate of bcl-2 and bcl-xL genes significantly were decreased when MCF-7 cells were incubated by sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles. The sulforaphane-loaded into the designed gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, acceptably induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. PMID:26982588

  20. Prostate cancer chemoprevention: Current status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjay

    2007-11-01

    Chemoprevention is a strategy that aims to reduce the incidence and burden of cancer through the development of agents to prevent, reverse or delay the carcinogenic process. Prostate cancer is a suitable target for prevention because it has a high incidence and prevalence, as well as a long latency and disease-related mortality, and furthermore it is a disease in which lifestyle and environmental factors may play critical roles. The development of chemoprevention strategies against prostate cancer will have a huge impact, both medically and economically. Large-scale clinical trials suggest that some agents such as selenium, lycopene, soy, green tea, vitamins D and E, anti-inflammatory and inhibitors of 5{alpha}-reductase are effective in preventing prostate cancer. Although each agent has the potential to affect the natural history of the disease, it is important to develop strategies to strategically proceed for the design and selection of test agents in order to demonstrate clinical benefit with the minimum of adverse effects. Appropriate selection of agent(s), disease stage, trial design and endpoints is critical in selecting the most promising regimens to accomplish these goals. This review highlights the present status of prostate cancer chemoprevention and discusses future prospects for chemopreventive strategies that are safe and clinically beneficial.

  1. Chemoprevention of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Gary D. Wang Lishu; Chen Tong

    2007-11-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is responsible for approximately one-sixth of all cancer-related mortality worldwide. This malignancy has a multifactorial etiology involving several environmental, dietary and genetic factors. Since esophageal cancer has often metastasized at the time of diagnosis, current treatment modalities offer poor survival and cure rates. Chemoprevention offers a viable alternative that could well be effective against the disease. Clinical investigations have shown that primary chemoprevention of this disease is feasible if potent inhibitory agents are identified. The Fischer 344 (F-344) rat model of esophageal SCC has been used extensively to investigate the biology of the disease, and to identify chemopreventive agents that could be useful in human trials. Multiple compounds that inhibit tumor initiation by esophageal carcinogens have been identified using this model. These include several isothiocyanates, diallyl sulfide and polyphenolic compounds. These compounds influence the metabolic activation of esophageal carcinogens resulting in reduced genetic (DNA) damage. Recently, a few agents have been shown to inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions in the rat esophagus into tumors. These agents include inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and c-Jun [a component of activator protein-1 (AP-1)]. Using a food-based approach to cancer prevention, we have shown that freeze-dried berry preparations inhibit both the initiation and promotion/progression stages of esophageal SCC in F-344 rats. These observations have led to a clinical trial in China to evaluate the ability of freeze-dried strawberries to influence the progression of esophageal dysplasia to SCC.

  2. Interaction of Sulforaphane with DNA and RNA

    PubMed Central

    Abassi Joozdani, Farzaneh; Yari, Faramarz; Abassi Joozdani, Parvaneh; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, the antioxidant and anticancer mechanism of sulforaphane is not well understood. In the present research, we reported binding modes, binding constants and stability of SFN–DNA and -RNA complexes by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV–Visible spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed DNA intercalation with some degree of groove binding. SFN binds minor and major grooves of DNA and backbone phosphate (PO2), while RNA binding is through G, U, A bases with some degree of SFN–phosphate (PO2) interaction. Overall binding constants were estimated to be K(SFN–DNA)=3.01 (± 0.035)×104 M-1 and K(SFN–RNA)= 6.63 (±0.042)×103 M-1. At high SFN concentration (SFN/RNA = 1/1), DNA conformation changed from B to A occurred, while RNA remained in A-family structure. PMID:26030290

  3. Sulforaphane Treatment of Young Men with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kanwaljit; Zimmerman, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) comprises a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders that begin in early childhood. They are characterized by differences in behavior and delays in communication and affect at least 1% of children. Observational studies have now confirmed that behaviors of a substantial percentage of children with autism tend to improve with the onset of febrile illness, which might be the downstream effects of altered metabolic pathways involving increased expression of heat shock proteins (HSP) and cellular stress responses. Sulforaphane, a phytochemical derived from a number of cruciferous vegetables, most notably broccoli sprouts, has metabolic effects that in some ways resemble that of fever. This review paper discusses this "fever effect" and the intracellular effects of sulforaphane as well as the results of our recent clinical trial of sulforaphane in young adults with autism. The accompanying review by Liu et al. describes the cellular actions of sulforaphane and potential biomarkers in the study of ASD. PMID:27071786

  4. Natural chemopreventive alternatives in oral cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Scrobota, I; Bolfa, P; Filip, A G; Catoi, C; Alb, C; Pop, O; Tatomir, C; Baciut, G

    2016-02-01

    We studied the effect of grape seed extract Burgund Mare (BM) on oral carcinogenesis and compared it with that of curcumin (CU). Wistar rats were divided into six groups (n = 10): 4-nitro-quinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) oral carcinogenesis was induced to groups 1 - 5; groups 2 and 3 received BM and CU respectively during initiation and groups 4 and 5 BM and CU during post-initiation of carcinogenesis; group 6 represented the negative control group. Total malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were assayed fluorometrically in oral tissue (gingival, jugal, palatal, lingual mucosa) and serum. Histopathological exam was performed and a dysplasia score given to each oral mucosal lesion. Ki67, cyclin D1, p63, Bcl2 and p53 were immunohistochemically evaluated. BM and CU reduced tissue MDA values elevated by 4NQO (P = 0.000). The difference between CU and BM effect was significant in the initiation (P = 0.02) but not in the post-initiation phase of carcinogenesis (P = 0.58). Tissue GSH levels decreased by 4NQO (P < 0.001) were not significantly modified by BM or CU. Serum MDA levels increased by 4NQO (P = 0.000) were significantly lowered by CU (P = 0.04) and BM (P = 0.04) during initiation and by CU during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.01). CU was more potent than BM during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.01). Serum GSH lowered by 4NQO (P = 0.55) was significantly decreased by BM and CU (P < 0.012), with no significant difference between groups receiving BM or CU. Moderate dysplasia was the most advanced dysplasia induced and gingival localization the most frequent. Both BM and CU lowered dysplasia scores, with BM being the most efficient during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.001). Ki67, cyclin D1, p63, Bcl2 and p53 expression increased with dysplasia scores. BM showed chemopreventive properties during initiation and post-initiation of oral carcinogenesis, reducing local and general oxidative stress and the intensity of dysplasia

  5. Advanced Drug-Delivery Systems of Curcumin for Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Shyam S.; Goel, Mehak; Aqil, Farrukh; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2011-01-01

    From ancient times, chemopreventive agents have been used to treat/prevent several diseases, including cancer. They are found to elicit a spectrum of potent responses including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-angiogenic activity in various cell culture and some animal studies. Research over the past four decades has shown that chemopreventives affect a number of proteins involved in various molecular pathways that regulate inflammatory and carcinogenic responses in a cell. Various enzymes, transcription factors, receptors, and adhesion proteins are also affected by chemopreventives. Although, these natural compounds have shown significant efficacy in cell-culture studies, they elicited limited efficacy in various clinical studies. Their introduction into the clinical setting is hindered largely by their poor solubility, rapid metabolism, or a combination of both, ultimately resulting in poor bioavailability upon oral administration. Therefore, to circumvent these limitations and to ease their transition to clinics, alternate strategies should be explored. Drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microemulsions, and polymeric implantable devices are emerging as one of the viable alternatives that have been demonstrated to deliver therapeutic concentrations of various potent chemopreventives such as curcumin, ellagic acid, green tea polyphenols, and resveratrol into the systemic circulation. In this review article, we have attempted to provide a comprehensive outlook for these delivery approaches, using curcumin as a model agent, and discussed future strategies to enable the introduction of these highly potent chemopreventives into a physician’s armamentarium. PMID:21546540

  6. Advanced drug delivery systems of curcumin for cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Shyam S; Goel, Mehak; Aqil, Farrukh; Vadhanam, Manicka V; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-08-01

    Since ancient times, chemopreventive agents have been used to treat/prevent several diseases including cancer. They are found to elicit a spectrum of potent responses including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative, anticarcinogenic, and antiangiogenic activity in various cell cultures and some animal studies. Research over the past 4 decades has shown that chemopreventives affect a number of proteins involved in various molecular pathways that regulate inflammatory and carcinogenic responses in a cell. Various enzymes, transcription factors, receptors, and adhesion proteins are also affected by chemopreventives. Although, these natural compounds have shown significant efficacy in cell culture studies, they elicited limited efficacy in various clinical studies. Their introduction into the clinical setting is hindered largely by their poor solubility, rapid metabolism, or a combination of both, ultimately resulting in poor bioavailability upon oral administration. Therefore, to circumvent these limitations and to ease their transition to clinics, alternate strategies should be explored. Drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microemulsions, and polymeric implantable devices are emerging as one of the viable alternatives that have been shown to deliver therapeutic concentrations of various potent chemopreventives such as curcumin, ellagic acid, green tea polyphenols, and resveratrol into the systemic circulation. In this review article, we have attempted to provide a comprehensive outlook for these delivery approaches, using curcumin as a model agent, and discussed future strategies to enable the introduction of these highly potent chemopreventives into a physician's armamentarium. PMID:21546540

  7. [Chemoprevention of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Takaaki; Saito, Makoto; Honda, Hidetoshi; Hirata, Takeshi; Kato, Harubumi

    2003-02-01

    Since a high concentration of beta-carotene in blood reduces the risk of lung cancer, a large-scale intervention examination containing beta-carotene was conducted, mainly by the National Cancer Institute. The results showed that the risk of lung cancer increased with administration of beta-carotene. This result demonstrates that continuation of smoking is an important factor in the increased risk, and not smoking is confirmed to be the most important prevention method. The authors examined the treatment effect of raising the concentration of folic acid and vitamin B12 in blood on bronchial dysplasia as a pre-cancerous lesion. A significant medical treatment effect was see in the folic acid and vitamin B12 medication groups, which seems promising for the chemoprevention of lung cancer. PMID:12610863

  8. Biomarkers and surrogacy: relevance to chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Kensler, T W; Davidson, N E; Groopman, J D; Muñoz, A

    2001-01-01

    Clinical cancer prevention trials that use disease as the end-point are of necessity large, lengthy and costly. While such trials will always remain the 'gold standard' for establishing efficacy, they are unwieldy and inefficient for the rapid translation of our accelerating understanding of the molecular basis of cancer into preventive strategies. The inclusion of biomarkers in the process of chemopreventive agent development is crucial for the advancement of the field. This overview highlights the types of approach that are being used in the development and application of biomarkers in chemoprevention studies. Biomarkers, which measure exposure, susceptibility or risk factors, can be used in selecting study cohorts, assessing participant compliance and/or determining agent efficacy. Key features of biomarkers include reliability, precision, accuracy and validity. Not all biomarkers are suitable for all purposes and are likely to be imperfect in any single setting. Judicious selection and matching of biomarkers with agents and study cohorts is required for their effective utilization. A critical but non-dichotomous element of risk biomarkers is their degree of surrogacy. A classification scheme is provided that relates the degree of surrogacy of risk biomarkers to their utility in preventive interventions. PMID:11220666

  9. Aspirin and colorectal cancer: the promise of precision chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Drew, David A; Cao, Yin; Chan, Andrew T

    2016-03-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has become one of the most commonly used drugs, given its role as an analgesic, antipyretic and agent for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Several decades of research have provided considerable evidence demonstrating its potential for the prevention of cancer, particularly colorectal cancer. Broader clinical recommendations for aspirin-based chemoprevention strategies have recently been established; however, given the known hazards of long-term aspirin use, larger-scale adoption of an aspirin chemoprevention strategy is likely to require improved identification of individuals for whom the protective benefits outweigh the harms. Such a precision medicine approach may emerge through further clarification of aspirin's mechanism of action. PMID:26868177

  10. Sulforaphane modulates telomerase activity via epigenetic regulation in prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ata; Hall, J Adam; Patterson, William L; Ho, Emily; Hsu, Anna; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Georgel, Philippe T

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed that diets rich in sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, are associated with a marked decrease in prostate cancer incidence. The chemo-preventive role of SFN is associated with its histone de-acetylase inhibitor activity. However, the effect of SFN on chromatin composition and dynamic folding, especially in relation to HDAC inhibitor activity, remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that SFN can inhibit the expression and activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase, in 2 prostate cancer cell lines. This decrease in gene expression is correlated with SFN-induced changes in chromatin structure and composition. The SFN-mediated changes in levels of histone post-translational modifications, more specifically acetylation of histone H3 lysine 18 and di-methylation of histone H3 lysine 4, 2 modifications linked with high risk of prostate cancer recurrence, were associated with regulatory elements within the hTERT promoter region. Chromatin condensation may also play a role in SFN-mediated hTERT repression, since expression and recruitment of MeCP2, a known chromatin compactor, were altered in SFN treated prostate cancer cells. Chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) of MeCP2 showed enrichment over regions of the hTERT promoter with increased nucleosome density. These combined results strongly support a role for SFN in the mediation of epigenetic events leading to the repression of hTERT in prostate cancer cells. This ability of SFN to modify chromatin composition and structure associated with target gene expression provides a new model by which dietary phytochemicals may exert their chemoprevention activity. PMID:26458818

  11. Continuous exposure of pancreatic cancer cells to dietary bioactive agents does not induce drug resistance unlike chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, P; Zhang, Y; Liu, L; Zhao, Z; Yin, Y; Xiao, X; Bauer, N; Gladkich, J; Mattern, J; Gao, C; Schemmer, P; Gross, W; Herr, I

    2016-01-01

    The repeated treatment of cancer cells with chemo- or radiotherapy induces therapy resistance, but it was previously unknown whether the same effect occurs upon continuous exposure of cancer cells to diet-derived chemopreventive agents. We elucidated this interesting question in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which is a highly aggressive cancer entity with a marked resistance toward gemcitabine and other cytotoxic drugs. The isothiocyanate sulforaphane, present in cruciferous vegetables, and the polyphenol quercetin, present in many fruits and vegetables induced apoptosis and reduced viability in gemcitabine-sensitive BxPC-3 cells but not in non-malignant ductal pancreas cells and mesenchymal stromal cells. In turn, BxPC-3 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of gemcitabine, sulforaphane or quercetin for more than 1 year and the surviving subclones Bx-GEM, Bx-SF and Bx-Q were selected, respectively. While Bx-GEM cells acquired a total resistance, Bx-SF or Bx-Q cells largely kept their sensitivity as proved by MTT assay, annexin staining and FACS analysis. The evaluation of the self-renewal-, differentiation- and migration-potential by colony formation, differentiation or migration assays demonstrated that cancer stem cell features were enriched in gemcitabine-resistant cells, but decreased in sulforaphane- and quercetin-long time-treated cells. These results were confirmed by orthotopic xenotransplantation of cancer cells to the mouse pancreas, where Bx-GEM formed large, Bx-Q small and Bx-SF cells almost undetectable tumors. An mRNA expression profiling array and subsequent gene set enrichment analysis and qRT-PCR confirmed that tumor progression markers were enriched in Bx-GEM, but reduced in Bx-SF and Bx-Q cells. This study demonstrates that the continuous exposure of pancreatic cancer cells to sulforaphane or quercetin does not induce resistance in surviving cells but reduces tumorigenicity by inhibition of tumor progression markers. These

  12. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer with nutrients and supplements.

    PubMed

    Van Poppel, Hendrik; Tombal, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    As the adult population is increasing, prostate cancer (PCa) will become a considerable health problem in the next millennium. This has raised public interest in potential chemoprevention of this disease. As PCa is extremely common and generally slow to progress it is regarded as an ideal candidate for chemoprevention. At present, the 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride have been identified as preventive agents. This review describes whether selenium, alpha-tocopherol, isoflavones, lycopene green tea polyphenols, calcium, and resveratrol may be useful for decreasing the risk of PCa in men. Although encouraging results are present, some studies show negative results. Differences in study design, sample size, dose administered, and/or concentrations achieved in the body may be the reason for these inconsistencies. Today, chemopreventive agents may be appropriate for high-risk patients like those with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and other high-risk groups such as patients with elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) and negative biopsy, rapid PSA velocity, and with a family history of PCa. Although larger randomized controlled studies are needed and epidemiologic evidence should be placed in a clinical context, physicians must be aware of these preventive opportunities in PCa care. Combinations of chemopreventive agents should be carefully investigated because mechanisms of action may be additive or synergistic. PMID:21629831

  13. Is There a Future for Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed

    Bosland, Maarten C

    2016-08-01

    The outcome of the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial, demonstrating harm and no preventive activity of selenomethionine and α-tocopherol for prostate cancer, and the lack of approval by the FDA for the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors to prevent prostate cancer have cast doubt about the future of chemoprevention of prostate cancer. This article attempts to critically assess whether the notion that chemoprevention of prostate cancer has no future is warranted. Risk of prostate cancer is modifiable and chemoprevention of prostate cancer, particularly fatal/lethal cancer, is both needed and possible. However, the approach to prostate cancer-chemopreventive agent development has not followed a rational and systematic process. To make progress, the following steps are necessary: (i) identification of intermediate biomarkers predictive of fatal/lethal disease; (ii) development of a rational approach to identification of candidate agents, including high-throughput screening and generation of information on mechanism and biology of candidate agents and potential molecular targets; and (iii) systematic evaluation of the predictive value of preclinical models, phase II trials, and intermediate biomarkers for the outcome of phase III trials. New phase III trials should be based on adequate preclinical and phase II studies. Cancer Prev Res; 9(8); 642-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27099271

  14. Chemoprevention targets for tobacco-related head and neck cancer: past lessons and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Siddharth H; Johnson, Daniel E; Kensler, Thomas W; Bauman, Julie E

    2015-06-01

    Progress toward identifying an effective chemopreventive agent to reduce the incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been limited by poor efficacy and intolerable toxicity profiles. In this review, we summarize the biological basis of HNSCC chemoprevention, and outline challenges associated with identifying appropriate high-risk HNSCC populations for chemoprevention studies. We discuss findings and lessons learned from clinical trials that have investigated micronutrient and molecular targeting interventions. Finally, we introduce the concept of green chemoprevention, interventions based upon whole plant foods or simple extracts that may represent a safe and cost-conscious option for the next generation of studies. As our scientific understanding of HNSCC reaches new levels, the field is poised to develop chemoprevention studies based on rigorous biological validation with accessibility to all affected individuals regardless of socioeconomic barriers. PMID:25868717

  15. A Perspective on Prostate Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Bosland, Maarten C.; Ozten, Nur; Eskra, Jillian N.; Mahmoud, Abeer M.

    2015-01-01

    In this perspective, modifiable carcinogenic factors for the prostate are summarized. This is followed by a discussion of how current knowledge about causation of prostate cancer and chemoprevention of prostate cancer can be used to develop preventive strategies. Prostate cancer is a slowly developing cancer which offers opportunities for preventive interventions. Only a few randomized clinical trials of prostate cancer prevention have been completed. The SELECT study with selenium and vitamin E did not find protective effects, but in two trials with 5α-reductase inhibitors risk was reduced about 25%, showing that chemoprevention is possible and indicating that the androgen receptor is a suitable target. Besides smoking cessation and reduction of obesity, there are no known dietary or life style interventions that will have a major impact on prostate cancer risk. Inflammation of the prostate is an attractive target and aspirin may be a promising candidate agent, but has not been addressed yet in preclinical and clinical studies. Antioxidants other than selenium and vitamin E are unlikely to be very effective and data on several dietary supplements are not encouraging. More candidate agents need to be identified and tested in relevant and adequate preclinical models and Phase II trials that have predictive value for outcome of Phase III randomized studies. Doing this will require a systematic approach comparing preclinical and clinical study outcomes to determine their predictive value of preventive efficacy. PMID:26442200

  16. Chemoprevention in Barrett's Esophagus: Current Status.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Muhammad H; Baruah, Anushka; Kossak, Sarah K; Buttar, Navtej S

    2015-06-01

    Chemoprevention in Barrett's esophagus is currently applied only in research settings. Identifying pathways that can be targeted by safe, pharmaceutical or natural compounds is key to expanding the scope of chemoprevention. Defining meaningful surrogate markers of cancer progression is critical to test the efficacy of chemopreventive approaches. Combinatorial chemoprevention that targets multiple components of the same pathway or parallel pathways could reduce the risk and improve the efficacy of chemoprevention. Here we discuss the role of chemoprevention as an independent or an adjuvant management option in BE-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26021201

  17. SPBP Is a Sulforaphane Induced Transcriptional Coactivator of NRF2 Regulating Expression of the Autophagy Receptor p62/SQSTM1

    PubMed Central

    Darvekar, Sagar Ramesh; Elvenes, Julianne; Brenne, Hanne Britt; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Organisms exposed to oxidative stress respond by orchestrating a stress response to prevent further damage. Intracellular levels of antioxidant agents increase, and damaged components are removed by autophagy induction. The KEAP1-NRF2 signaling pathway is the main pathway responsible for cell defense against oxidative stress and for maintaining the cellular redox balance at physiological levels. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, is a potent inducer of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and antioxidant response element driven gene expression. In this study, we show that sulforaphane enhances the expression of the transcriptional coregulator SPBP. The expression curve peaks 6–8 hours post stimulation, and parallels the sulforaphane-induced expression of NRF2 and the autophagy receptor protein p62/SQSTM1. Reporter gene assays show that SPBP stimulates the expression of p62/SQSTM1 via ARE elements in the promoter region, and siRNA mediated knock down of SPBP significantly decreases the expression of p62/SQSTM1 and the formation of p62/SQSTM1 bodies in HeLa cells. Furthermore, SPBP siRNA reduces the sulforaphane induced expression of NRF2, and the expression of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Both these proteins contain ARE-like elements in their promoter regions. Over-expressed SPBP and NRF2 acts synergistically on the p62/SQSTM1 promoter and colocalize in nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Collectively, these results suggest that SPBP is a coactivator of NRF2, and hence may be important for securing enhanced and sustained expression of NRF2 induced genes such as proteins involved in selective autophagy. PMID:24416372

  18. SPBP is a sulforaphane induced transcriptional coactivator of NRF2 regulating expression of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1.

    PubMed

    Darvekar, Sagar Ramesh; Elvenes, Julianne; Brenne, Hanne Britt; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Organisms exposed to oxidative stress respond by orchestrating a stress response to prevent further damage. Intracellular levels of antioxidant agents increase, and damaged components are removed by autophagy induction. The KEAP1-NRF2 signaling pathway is the main pathway responsible for cell defense against oxidative stress and for maintaining the cellular redox balance at physiological levels. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, is a potent inducer of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and antioxidant response element driven gene expression. In this study, we show that sulforaphane enhances the expression of the transcriptional coregulator SPBP. The expression curve peaks 6-8 hours post stimulation, and parallels the sulforaphane-induced expression of NRF2 and the autophagy receptor protein p62/SQSTM1. Reporter gene assays show that SPBP stimulates the expression of p62/SQSTM1 via ARE elements in the promoter region, and siRNA mediated knock down of SPBP significantly decreases the expression of p62/SQSTM1 and the formation of p62/SQSTM1 bodies in HeLa cells. Furthermore, SPBP siRNA reduces the sulforaphane induced expression of NRF2, and the expression of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Both these proteins contain ARE-like elements in their promoter regions. Over-expressed SPBP and NRF2 acts synergistically on the p62/SQSTM1 promoter and colocalize in nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Collectively, these results suggest that SPBP is a coactivator of NRF2, and hence may be important for securing enhanced and sustained expression of NRF2 induced genes such as proteins involved in selective autophagy. PMID:24416372

  19. Sulforaphane, quercetin and catechins complement each other in elimination of advanced pancreatic cancer by miR-let-7 induction and K-ras inhibition

    PubMed Central

    APPARI, MAHESH; BABU, KAMESH R.; KACZOROWSKI, ADAM; GROSS, WOLFGANG; HERR, INGRID

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has the worst prognosis of all malignancies, and current therapeutic options do not target cancer stem cells (CSCs), which may be the reason for the extreme aggressiveness. The dietary agents sulforaphane and quercetin enriched e.g., in broccoli, and the main and best studied green tea catechin EGCG hold promise as anti-CSC agents in PDA. We examined the efficacy of additional catechins and the combination of these bioactive agents to stem cell features and miRNA signaling. Two established and one primary PDA cell line and non-malignant pancreatic ductal cells were used. Whereas each agent strongly inhibited colony formation, the catechins ECG and CG were more effective than EGCG. A mixture of green tea catechins (GTCs) significantly inhibited viability, migration, expression of MMP-2 and -9, ALDH1 activity, colony and spheroid formation and induced apoptosis, but the combination of GTCs with sulforaphane or quercetin was superior. Following treatment with bioactive agents, the expression of miR-let7-a was specifically induced in cancer cells but not in normal cells and it was associated with K-ras inhibition. These data demonstrate that sulforaphane, quercetin and GTC complement each other in inhibition of PDA progression by induction of miR-let7-a and inhibition of K-ras. PMID:25017900

  20. Cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic effects of diosgenin, a food saponin.

    PubMed

    Raju, Jayadev; Mehta, Rekha

    2009-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention is a strategy taken to retard, regress, or resist the multistep process of carcinogenesis, including the blockage of its vital morphogenetic milestones viz. normal-preneoplasia-neoplasia-metastasis. For several reasons, including safety, minimal (or no) toxicity and side-effects, and better availability, alternatives such as naturally occurring phytochemicals that are found in foods are becoming increasingly popular over synthetic drugs. Food saponins have been used in complimentary and traditional medicine against a variety of diseases including several cancers. Diosgenin, a naturally occurring steroid saponin found abundantly in legumes and yams, is a well-known precursor of various synthetic steroidal drugs that are extensively used in the pharmaceutical industry. Over the past decade, a series of preclinical and mechanistic studies have been conducted to understand the role of diosgenin as a chemopreventive/therapeutic agent against several cancers. This review highlights the biological activity of diosgenin that contributes to cancer chemoprevention and control. The anticancer mode of action of diosgenin has been demonstrated via modulation of multiple cell signaling events involving critical molecular candidates associated with growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. Altogether, these preclinical and mechanistic findings strongly implicate the use of diosgenin as a novel, multitarget-based chemopreventive or therapeutic agent against several cancer types. Future research in this field will help to establish not only whether diosgenin is safe and efficacious as a chemopreventive agent against several human cancers, but also to develop and evaluate standards of evidence for health claims for diosgenin-containing foods as they become increasingly popular and enter the marketplace labeled as functional foods and nutraceuticals. PMID:19116873

  1. Sulforaphane protects the heart from doxorubicin-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preeti; Sharma, Rajendra; McElhanon, Kevin; Allen, Charles D; Megyesi, Judit K; Beneš, Helen; Singh, Sharda P

    2015-09-01

    Cardiotoxicity is one of the major side effects encountered during cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin (DOX) and other anthracyclines. Previous studies have shown that oxidative stress caused by DOX is one of the primary mechanisms for its toxic effects on the heart. Since the redox-sensitive transcription factor, Nrf2, plays a major role in protecting cells from the toxic metabolites generated during oxidative stress, we examined the effects of the phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN), a potent Nrf2-activating agent, on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. These studies were carried out both in vitro and in vivo using rat H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells and wild type 129/sv mice, and involved SFN pretreatment followed by SFN administration during DOX exposure. SFN treatment protected H9c2 cells from DOX cytotoxicity and also resulted in restored cardiac function and a significant reduction in DOX-induced cardiomyopathy and mortality in mice. Specificity of SFN induction of Nrf2 and protection of H9c2 cells was demonstrated in Nrf2 knockdown experiments. Cardiac accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein adducts, due to lipid peroxidation following DOX-induced oxidative stress, was significantly attenuated by SFN treatment. The respiratory function of cardiac mitochondria isolated from mice exposed to DOX alone was repressed, while SFN treatment with DOX significantly elevated mitochondrial respiratory complex activities. Co-administration of SFN reversed the DOX-associated reduction in nuclear Nrf2 binding activity and restored cardiac expression of Nrf2-regulated genes at both the RNA and protein levels. Together, our results demonstrate for the first time that the Nrf2 inducer, SFN, has the potential to provide protection against DOX-mediated cardiotoxicity. PMID:26025579

  2. Nigerian foodstuffs with prostate cancer chemopreventive polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Atawodi, Sunday Eneojo

    2011-09-23

    Dietary polyphenols are antioxidants that can scavenge biological free radicals, and chemoprevent diseases with biological oxidation as their main etiological factor. In this paper, we review our laboratory data vis-ὰ-vis available literature on prostate cancer chemopreventive substances in Nigerian foodstuffs. Dacryodes edulis fruit, Moringa oleifera and Syzygium aromaticum contained prostate active polyphenols like ellagic acid, gallate, methylgallate, catechol, kaempferol quercetin and their derivatives. Also Canarium schweinfurthii Engl oil contained ten phenolic compounds and lignans, namely; catechol, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, tyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, phloretic acid, pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol. In addition, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) which contains the powerful antioxidant and anti-prostate cancer agent, lycopene; cabbage (Brassica oleracea) containing indole-3-carbinol; citrus fruits containing pectin; Soursop (Annona muricata) containing annonaceous acetogenins; soya beans (Glycine max) containing isoflavones; chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) containing capsaicin, and green tea (Camellia sinensis) containing (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-) epicatechin, (-) epicatechin-3-gallate and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate which are widely reported to posses prostate cancer chemopreventive compounds are also grown in Nigeria and other African countries. Thus, the high incidence of prostate cancer among males of African extraction can be dramatically reduced, and the age of onset drastically increased, if the population at risk consumes the right kinds of foods in the right proportion, beginning early in life, especially as prostate cancer has a latency period of about 50 years. PMID:21992488

  3. Chemoprevention studies within lung cancer screening programmes.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, G; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, A; Infante, M; Bonanni, B

    2015-01-01

    While aggressive tobacco control and help to stop smoking are essential weapons in the fight against lung cancer, screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk populations and chemoprevention may also contribute to reducing lung cancer deaths. Persons undergoing LDCT screening are an ideal population to be tested for agents potentially able to prevent the development of lung cancer by the regression of precancerous lesions, which are routinely monitored as part of the screening process. Peripheral subsolid nodules appear as particularly suitable targets, since many are adenocarcinoma precursors. A study on inhaled budesonide (a potential chemopreventive drug) for 1 year found that the mean size of non-solid lung nodules was significantly reduced over 5 years of follow-up, compared to inhaled placebo, in a population of high-risk individuals with indeterminate lung nodules not requiring immediate specific investigation for lung cancer and detected as part of a lung cancer screening program with LDCT. A new randomised placebo-controlled phase-II trial to test the ability of aspirin to induce the regression of non-solid and partially solid nodules detected by LDCT screening has been started. The effect of aspirin on a miRNA signature able to predict the presence of both cancer and precancerous lesions in high-risk asymptomatic individuals is also being monitored in the trial. This signature was previously shown to predict the presence of both lung cancer and non-solid lung nodules in asymptomatic individuals. PMID:26635901

  4. Nigerian foodstuffs with prostate cancer chemopreventive polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols are antioxidants that can scavenge biological free radicals, and chemoprevent diseases with biological oxidation as their main etiological factor. In this paper, we review our laboratory data vis-ὰ-vis available literature on prostate cancer chemopreventive substances in Nigerian foodstuffs. Dacryodes edulis fruit, Moringa oleifera and Syzygium aromaticum contained prostate active polyphenols like ellagic acid, gallate, methylgallate, catechol, kaempferol quercetin and their derivatives. Also Canarium schweinfurthii Engl oil contained ten phenolic compounds and lignans, namely; catechol, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, tyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, phloretic acid, pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol. In addition, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) which contains the powerful antioxidant and anti-prostate cancer agent, lycopene; cabbage (Brassica oleracea) containing indole-3-carbinol; citrus fruits containing pectin; Soursop (Annona muricata) containing annonaceous acetogenins; soya beans (Glycine max) containing isoflavones; chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) containing capsaicin, and green tea (Camellia sinensis) containing (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-) epicatechin, (-) epicatechin-3-gallate and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate which are widely reported to posses prostate cancer chemopreventive compounds are also grown in Nigeria and other African countries. Thus, the high incidence of prostate cancer among males of African extraction can be dramatically reduced, and the age of onset drastically increased, if the population at risk consumes the right kinds of foods in the right proportion, beginning early in life, especially as prostate cancer has a latency period of about 50 years. PMID:21992488

  5. Strategy and planning for chemopreventive drug development: clinical development plans II.

    PubMed

    Kelloff, G J; Crowell, J A; Hawk, E T; Steele, V E; Lubet, R A; Boone, C W; Covey, J M; Doody, L A; Omenn, G S; Greenwald, P; Hong, W K; Parkinson, D R; Bagheri, D; Baxter, G T; Blunden, M; Doeltz, M K; Eisenhauer, K M; Johnson, K; Knapp, G G; Longfellow, D G; Malone, W F; Nayfield, S G; Seifried, H E; Swall, L M; Sigman, C C

    1996-01-01

    This is the second publication of Clinical Development Plans from the National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Chemoprevention Branch and Agent Development Committee. The Clinical Development Plans summarize the status of promising chemopreventive agents regarding evidence for safety and chemopreventive efficacy in preclinical and clinical studies. They also contain the strategy for further development of these drugs, addressing pharmacodynamics, drug effect measurements, intermediate biomarkers for monitoring efficacy, toxicity, supply and formulation, regulatory approval, and proposed clinical trials. Sixteen new Clinical Development Plans are presented here: curcumin, dehydroepiandrosterone, folic acid, genistein, indole-3-carbinol, perillyl alcohol, phenethyl isothiocyanate, 9-cis-retinoic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, l-selenomethionine and 1, 4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate, sulindac sulfone, tea, ursodiol, vitamin A, and (+)-vorozole. The objective of publishing these plans is to stimulate interest and thinking among the scientific community on the prospects for developing these and future generations of chemopreventive drugs. PMID:9154168

  6. Repeated Nrf2 stimulation using sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Sherin T.; Bergström, Petra; Hammarsten, Ola

    2014-05-01

    Most of the cytotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation is mediated by radical-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Cellular protection from free radicals can be stimulated several fold by sulforaphane-mediated activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 that regulates more than 50 genes involved in the detoxification of reactive substances and radicals. Here, we report that repeated sulforaphane treatment increases radioresistance in primary human skin fibroblasts. Cells were either treated with sulforaphane for four hours once or with four-hour treatments repeatedly for three consecutive days prior to radiation exposure. Fibroblasts exposed to repeated-sulforaphane treatment showed a more pronounced dose-dependent induction of Nrf2-regulated mRNA and reduced amount of radiation-induced free radicals compared with cells treated once with sulforaphane. In addition, radiation- induced DNA double-strand breaks measured by gamma-H2AX foci were attenuated following repeated sulforaphane treatment. As a result, cellular protection from ionizing radiation measured by the 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) assay was increased, specifically in cells exposed to repeated sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane treatment was unable to protect Nrf2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, indicating that the sulforaphane-induced radioprotection was Nrf2-dependent. Moreover, radioprotection by repeated sulforaphane treatment was dose-dependent with an optimal effect at 10 uM, whereas both lower and higher concentrations resulted in lower levels of radioprotection. Our data indicate that the Nrf2 system can be trained to provide further protection from radical damage. - Highlights: • Repeated treatment with sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation • Repeated sulforaphane treatment attenuates radiation induced ROS and DNA damage • Sulforaphane mediated protection is Nrf2 dependent.

  7. Omics underpins novel clues on VDR chemoprevention target in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Muti, Paola; Benassi, Barbara; Falvo, Elisabetta; Santoro, Raffaela; Galanti, Sergio; Citro, Gennaro; Carrubba, Giuseppe; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina

    2011-06-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest form of female malignancy among women in Western countries. The advent of genomic technologies has enhanced the diagnosis and the biological classification of such pathology. It has been demonstrated that cancer takes many years to be fully established. This long dormancy could represent a potential window for intervening with chemoprevention studies. Cancer chemoprevention is by definition the use of natural, synthetic, or biological chemical agents to reverse, suppress, or delay the genetic or other alterations that culminate in the appearance of the tumor phenotype. An important step for the success of chemoprevention is the identification of molecularly targeted agents to prevent cancer development. Currently, only two chemoprevention agents, raloxifene and tamoxifen, are used in clinical practice to prevent breast cancer. In this review, we will mainly focus on: (1) the application of genomic technologies for the identification and validation of molecular targets for chemoprevention; (2) the role of vitamin D and its cognate receptor VDR (vitamin D receptor) as a model for the molecularly targeted chemoprevention of breast cancer. PMID:21348760

  8. Chemoprevention of colon cancer: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Gustin, David M; Brenner, Dean E

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is an important public health problem in the western world. Although some progress has been made in the prevention and management of this disease, colon cancer still remains one of the most common types of epithelial malignancies in both genders and is essentially incurable when it reaches the most advanced stages. Given the substantial morbidity and mortality associated with colorectal malignancies and their treatment, cancer prevention in its many forms emerges as a very attractive approach. Colorectal cancer chemoprevention refers to the administration of natural or synthetic compounds to block, reverse, delay or prevent the development of invasive large bowel neoplasms. The ultimate goal of implementing a chemopreventive intervention in the general, or alternatively, in an at-risk population is to decrease the incidence rate of the specific cancer being targeted. This article reviews the present status of colorectal cancer chemoprevention. Current insights into the molecular and genetic models of human colorectal carcinogenesis, preclinical models for efficacy testing as well as into promising biomarkers for colorectal chemoprevention are provided. The developmental status of many promising agents is also discussed emphasizing the epidemiological evidence, preclinical information substantiating an anticarcinogenic effect, their postulated mechanism of action and the status of human clinical development. Our perspective of the future prospects in this scientific area is also provided and has been predicated primarily on the firm belief that the proper integration of advances in the biology of colon carcinogenesis, experimental therapeutics and clinical trial methodology will be critical for the success of this promising field. PMID:12549770

  9. The Potential Role of Nitric Oxide in Halting Cancer Progression Through Chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Vahora, Huzefa; Khan, Munawwar Ali; Alalami, Usama; Hussain, Arif

    2016-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in general plays a beneficial physiological role as a vasorelaxant and the role of NO is decided by its concentration present in physiological environments. NO either facilitates cancer-promoting characters or act as an anti-cancer agent. The dilemma in this regard still remains unanswered. This review summarizes the recent information on NO and its role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression, as well as dietary chemopreventive agents which have NO-modulating properties with safe cytotoxic profile. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and cross-talk modulating NO effect by these chemopreventive agents can allow us to develop better therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:27051643

  10. The Potential Role of Nitric Oxide in Halting Cancer Progression Through Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Vahora, Huzefa; Khan, Munawwar Ali; Alalami, Usama; Hussain, Arif

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in general plays a beneficial physiological role as a vasorelaxant and the role of NO is decided by its concentration present in physiological environments. NO either facilitates cancer-promoting characters or act as an anti-cancer agent. The dilemma in this regard still remains unanswered. This review summarizes the recent information on NO and its role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression, as well as dietary chemopreventive agents which have NO-modulating properties with safe cytotoxic profile. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and cross-talk modulating NO effect by these chemopreventive agents can allow us to develop better therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:27051643

  11. Neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane on cholinergic neurons in mice with Alzheimer's disease-like lesions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Jingzhu; Fang, Lingduo; Li, Xi; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Wanying; An, Li

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease in elderly individuals, and effective therapies are unavailable. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane (an activator of NF-E2-related factor 2) on mice with AD-like lesions induced by combined administration of aluminum and D-galactose. Step-down-type passive avoidance tests showed sulforaphane ameliorated cognitive impairment in AD-like mice. Immunohistochemistry results indicated sulforaphane attenuated cholinergic neuron loss in the medial septal and hippocampal CA1 regions in AD-like mice. However, spectrophotometry revealed no significant difference in acetylcholine level or the activity of choline acetyltransferase or acetylcholinesterase in the cerebral cortex among groups of control and AD-like mice with and without sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane significantly increased the numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive neurons in the subventricular and subgranular zones in AD-like mice which were significantly augmented compared with controls. Atomic absorption spectrometry revealed significantly lower aluminum levels in the brains of sulforaphane-treated AD-like mice than in those that did not receive sulforaphane treatment. In conclusion, sulforaphane ameliorates neurobehavioral deficits by reducing cholinergic neuron loss in the brains of AD-like mice, and the mechanism may be associated with neurogenesis and aluminum load reduction. These findings suggest that phytochemical sulforaphane has potential application in AD therapeutics. PMID:25196440

  12. Suppression of microtubule dynamic instability and turnover in MCF7 breast cancer cells by sulforaphane

    PubMed Central

    Azarenko, Olga; Okouneva, Tatiana; Singletary, Keith W.; Jordan, Mary Ann; Wilson, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), a prominent isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, is believed to be responsible along with other isothiocyanates for the cancer preventive activity of such vegetables. SFN arrests mitosis, possibly by affecting spindle microtubule function. A critical property of microtubules is their rapid and time-sensitive growth and shortening dynamics (dynamic instability), and suppression of dynamics by antimitotic anticancer drugs (e.g. taxanes and the vinca alkaloids) is central to the anticancer mechanisms of such drugs. We found that at concentrations that inhibited proliferation and mitosis of MCF7-green fluorescent protein-α-tubulin breast tumor cells by ∼50% (∼15 μM), SFN significantly modified microtubule organization in arrested spindles without modulating the spindle microtubule mass, in a manner similar to that of much more powerful antimitotic drugs. By using quantitative fluorescence video microscopy, we determined that at its mitotic concentration required to inhibit mitosis by 50%, SFN suppressed the dynamic instability of the interphase microtubules in these cells, strongly reducing the rate and extent of growth and shortening and decreasing microtubule turnover, without affecting the polymer mass. SFN suppressed the dynamics of purified microtubules in a similar fashion at concentrations well below those required to depolymerize microtubules, indicating that the suppression of dynamic instability by SFN in cells is due to a direct effect on the microtubules. The results indicate that SFN arrests proliferation and mitosis by stabilizing microtubules in a manner weaker than but similar to more powerful clinically used antimitotic anticancer drugs and strongly support the hypothesis that inhibition of mitosis by microtubule stabilization is important for SFN's chemopreventive activity. PMID:18952594

  13. Evidence supporting the conceptual framework of cancer chemoprevention in canines

    PubMed Central

    Kondratyuk, Tamara P.; Adrian, Julie Ann Luiz; Wright, Brian; Park, Eun-Jung; van Breemen, Richard B.; Morris, Kenneth R.; Pezzuto, John M.

    2016-01-01

    As with human beings, dogs suffer from the consequences of cancer. We investigated the potential of a formulation comprised of resveratrol, ellagic acid, genistein, curcumin and quercetin to modulate biomarkers indicative of disease prevention. Dog biscuits were evaluated for palatability and ability to deliver the chemopreventive agents. The extent of endogenous DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes from dogs given the dietary supplement or placebo showed no change. However, H2O2-inducible DNA damage was significantly decreased after consumption of the supplement. The expression of 11 of 84 genes related to oxidative stress was altered. Hematological parameters remained in the reference range. The concept of chemoprevention for the explicit benefit of the canine is compelling since dogs are an important part of our culture. Our results establish a proof-of-principle and provide a framework for improving the health and well-being of “man’s best friend”. PMID:27216246

  14. Evidence supporting the conceptual framework of cancer chemoprevention in canines.

    PubMed

    Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Adrian, Julie Ann Luiz; Wright, Brian; Park, Eun-Jung; van Breemen, Richard B; Morris, Kenneth R; Pezzuto, John M

    2016-01-01

    As with human beings, dogs suffer from the consequences of cancer. We investigated the potential of a formulation comprised of resveratrol, ellagic acid, genistein, curcumin and quercetin to modulate biomarkers indicative of disease prevention. Dog biscuits were evaluated for palatability and ability to deliver the chemopreventive agents. The extent of endogenous DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes from dogs given the dietary supplement or placebo showed no change. However, H2O2-inducible DNA damage was significantly decreased after consumption of the supplement. The expression of 11 of 84 genes related to oxidative stress was altered. Hematological parameters remained in the reference range. The concept of chemoprevention for the explicit benefit of the canine is compelling since dogs are an important part of our culture. Our results establish a proof-of-principle and provide a framework for improving the health and well-being of "man's best friend". PMID:27216246

  15. Chemoprevention of lung squamous cell carcinoma by ginseng.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Li, Kezhen; Liu, Qian; Wang, Yian; You, Ming

    2013-06-01

    Ginseng has been used as a medicinal herb to maintain physical vitality for thousands of years, and it has also been shown to be a nonorgan-specific cancer preventive agent by several epidemiologic studies. However, the chemopreventive effects of Korea white ginseng (KWG) in lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) have not been tested. In this study, we investigated the chemopreventive activity of KWG in a mouse lung SCC model. N-nitroso-trischloroethylurea (NTCU) was used to induce lung tumors in female Swiss mice, and KWG was given orally. KWG significantly reduced the percentage of lung SCCs from 26.5% in the control group to 9.1% in the KWG group and in the meantime, increased the percentage of normal bronchial and hyperplasia. KWG was also found to greatly reduce squamous cell lung tumor area from an average of 9.4% in control group to 1.5% in the KWG group. Treatment with KWG decreased Ki-67 staining, suggesting that the lung tumor inhibitory effects of KWG were partly through inhibition of proliferation. High-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry identified 10 ginsenosides from KWG extracts, Rb1 and Rd being the most abundant as detected in mouse blood and lung tissue. The tumor inhibitory effects of KWG are mediated by inhibition of activator protein (AP-1), as showed by in vitro study conducted on AP-1/NF-κB-dependent mouse non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. Western blotting of lung tissues also indicated that NTCU upregulated AP-1 through phosphorylation of c-jun-NH2-kinase, which was downregulated by KWG in concurrence with its chemoprevention function. These results suggest that KWG could be a potential chemopreventive agent for lung SCC. PMID:23550152

  16. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LANGMAN, M; BOYLE, P

    1998-01-01

    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK P BOYLE Colorectal cancer is the fourth commonest form of cancer in men with 678 000 estimated new cases per year worldwide, representing 8.9% of all new cancers. The disease is most frequent in Occidental countries and particularly so in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe. Prospects for colorectal cancer control are bright and a number of possible approaches could prove fruitful. Among these, pharmaceutical measures seem to be valid and logical approaches to the prevention of colorectal cancer and diminishing its impact. Such approaches could concentrate in primary prevention in at-risk subjects or be applied in altering the course of precursor or established disease. Treatments used must fulfil basic requirements of biological plausibility and safety in continued use in large numbers of subjects. Those available include vitamins and minerals, and other drugs with potential as antioxidants, immune modulators or promoters of cell differentiation or apoptosis. Of the various regimens suggested, vitamin A supplementation may even predispose to adverse outcomes, and antioxidant vitamins in general have no coherent body of evidence to support their use. N-acetylcysteine and ursodeoxycholic acid have promising characteristics but there are as yet no clinical data to support the use of the former in gut epithelial cancer, and formal dose ranging studies must be carried out before the latter is submitted to large scale trial. Folate shows promising characteristics but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin D seem the most promising agents. Both seem to reduce the incidence of disease, and to reduce growth rates and/or induce differentiation or apoptosis in gut epithelial cancer cells. Both are also well understood pharmacologically. They may be preferred to newer selective compounds in the same class until these newer compounds are confirmed as safe for widespread

  17. Chemoprevention--history and general principles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangwei; Patterson, Sherri; Hawk, Ernest

    2011-08-01

    Our current understanding of tumourigenesis suggests that cancer develops as a series of cumulative genetic and epigenetic derangements across time culminating in a clone of cells differing from its population of origin in terms of cellular identity, growth control, and its contextual relationship to its environment. Our increasing knowledge of the timing, sequence, frequency, and specific implications of these changes provides unique opportunities for earlier identification of aberrations and preventive interventions. Here we discuss the fundamentals of cancer prevention including the targets, cohorts, agents, endpoints, mechanistic biomarkers, designs, and strategies employed in preventive drug development. There have been many notable successes in this field such as the identification and development of tamoxifen and raloxifene for breast cancer risk reduction, instillational BCG and valrubicin for treatment of preinvasive bladder cancer, and a variety of topical and systemic agents that effectively treat preinvasive neoplastic lesions of the skin. A variety of null or negative developmental endeavours have occurred as well, including trials of beta-carotene for lung cancer prevention, nutritional modifications for colorectal adenoma prevention, and most recently, selenium and alpha-tocopherol for prostate cancer prevention. A third category of prevention trials can be summarized as investigationally successful, but not achieving regulatory success. The development of finasteride and dutasteride for prostate cancer prevention, and celecoxib for colorectal neoplasia prevention fall into this category. In less than four decades, cancer chemoprevention has transformed from a concept to an achievable reality. PMID:22122762

  18. Cytotoxic and Antitumor Activity of Sulforaphane: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sestili, Piero; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent estimates, cancer continues to remain the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Failure and high systemic toxicity of conventional cancer therapies have accelerated the identification and development of innovative preventive as well as therapeutic strategies to contrast cancer-associated morbidity and mortality. In recent years, increasing body of in vitro and in vivo studies has underscored the cancer preventive and therapeutic efficacy of the isothiocyanate sulforaphane. In this review article, we highlight that sulforaphane cytotoxicity derives from complex, concurring, and multiple mechanisms, among which the generation of reactive oxygen species has been identified as playing a central role in promoting apoptosis and autophagy of target cells. We also discuss the site and the mechanism of reactive oxygen species' formation by sulforaphane, the toxicological relevance of sulforaphane-formed reactive oxygen species, and the death pathways triggered by sulforaphane-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26185755

  19. Modulation of Histone Deacetylase Activity by Dietary Isothiocyanates and Allyl Sulfides: Studies with Sulforaphane and Garlic Organosulfur Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nian, Hui; Delage, Barbara; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H.

    2009-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors reactivate epigenetically-silenced genes in cancer cells, triggering cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Recent evidence suggests that dietary constituents can act as HDAC inhibitors, such as the isothiocyanates found in cruciferous vegetables and the allyl compounds present in garlic. Broccoli sprouts are a rich source of sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate that is metabolized via the mercapturic acid pathway and inhibits HDAC activity in human colon, prostate, and breast cancer cells. In mouse preclinical models, SFN inhibited HDAC activity and induced histone hyperacetylation coincident with tumor suppression. Inhibition of HDAC activity also was observed in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from people who consumed a single serving of broccoli sprouts. Garlic organosulfur compounds can be metabolized to allyl mercaptan (AM), a competitive HDAC inhibitor that induced rapid and sustained histone hyperacetylation in human colon cancer cells. Inhibition of HDAC activity by AM was associated with increased histone acetylation and Sp3 transcription factor binding to the promoter region of the P21WAF1 gene, resulting in elevated p21 protein expression and cell cycle arrest. Collectively, the results from these studies, and others reviewed herein, provide new insights into the relationships between reversible histone modifications, diet, and cancer chemoprevention. PMID:19197985

  20. Biomarkers and chemopreventives in oral carcinogenesis and its prevention

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sonalee; Kaur, Manpreet

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the predominant type of oral malignancy and is a result of oral carcinogenesis. Oral carcinogenesis is a mutifactorial and complex process related to the sequential occurrence of alterations in genetic structures, promoting inhibitory or excitatory effects of the tumor oncogenes and gene suppressors, compromising the histophysiology of the division, differentiation and cell death; and therefore, methods to prevent, detect, or treat it in the best way is constantly being searched for. Biomarkers reveal the genetic and molecular changes related to early, intermediate and late endpoints in the process of oral carcinogenesis. Thereby, they are likely to not only refine our ability to predict the biologic course of oral cancer and distinguish individuals at high and/or low risk of oral cancer development; but, also they will also reveal the genetic and molecular changes related to various endpoints of oral carcinogenesis. Chemopreventives are chemicals of natural or synthetic origin, which reduce the incidence of fatal diseases such as cancer before clinical symptoms occur. Chemopreventives are agents whose curative capacity is defined with help of biomarkers, as the later determine the effectiveness and safety of chemopreventives. PMID:24959040

  1. A novel target for oral cancer chemoprevention? Notch quite, yet….

    PubMed

    William, William N; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2015-04-01

    The two major goals of oral cancer chemoprevention efforts are the ability to segregate the high-risk patients and the identification of an effective pharmacologic agent that halts progression to invasive cancer. Considerable progress has recently been achieved in profiling invasive head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, particularly with the use of high-throughput technologies. A similar molecular characterization of potentially malignant oral epithelial lesions (OPML; leukoplakia and erythroplakia) is yet to be accomplished. It is postulated, though, that molecular profiling could lead to the discovery of novel markers of cancer risk that could also serve as potential targets for chemoprevention. In this perspective, we comment on the work by Izumchenko and colleagues that reports a high prevalence of NOTCH1 gain-of-function mutations in Chinese patients with OPMLs. Although additional studies are needed to validate the findings, the study is the first to link alterations in this gene in oral premalignancy. These findings could serve as a first prototype of a single gene mutation as a potential target in clinical chemoprevention setting. PMID:25712052

  2. Chemoprevention of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma through inhibition of NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Vander Broek, Robert; Snow, Grace E; Chen, Zhong; Van Waes, Carter

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors regulate cellular processes such as inflammation and cell survival. The NF-κB pathway is often activated with development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). As such, NF-κB represents an attractive target for chemoprevention. HNSCC involves progression of lesions from premalignant to malignant, providing a window of opportunity for intervention with chemopreventive agents. Appropriate chemopreventive agents should be inexpensive, nontoxic, and target important pathways involved in the development of HNSCC. Several such agents that inhibit the NF-κB pathway have been investigated in HNSCC. Retinoids have been studied most extensively but have shown limited potential in human trials. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors and PI3K-mTOR inhibitors may benefit a subset of patients. Other agents such as green tea extract and curcumin are appealing because they are generally regarded as safe. In contrast, there is evidence that Vitamin E supplementation may actually increase mortality of cancer patients. Repurposed drugs such as cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors and antidiabetic drugs are an emerging area of interest. Future research to develop agents with lower toxicity and higher specificity for the NF-κB pathway, and to target these therapies to individual patient genetic signatures should help to increase the utility of chemoprevention in HSNCC. PMID:24177052

  3. Aspirin chemoprevention of gastrointestinal cancer in the next decade. A review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Helena; Hooper, Patricia; Jankowski, Janusz A

    2010-10-01

    Together, gastrointestinal (GI) cancers now account for 25% of neoplastic deaths in the West. In Poland, GI cancer rates are likely to increase further as westernization progresses. Given that conventional cancer therapies have made only modest reductions in cancer mortality, there is a great interest in chemoprevention to prevent or slow malignant transformation from premalignant lesions. The financial pressures in the immediate future require even more stringent criteria for chemopreventive agents - they must be cheap but also safe and efficacious. In this regard, several reviews have indicated that aspirin possesses many favorable qualities for chemoprevention. Furthermore, meta-analyses indicate that aspirin may decrease cancer by approximately 30%. Several large clinical trials are underway, including AspECT (Aspirin and Esomeprazole Chemoprevention Trial) that aims not only to prevent cancer but also decrease the gastric side effects by combining aspirin with potent acid-suppressing drugs. In conclusion, whether aspirin will be the world's first proven chemopreventive agent is currently unknown but the evidence looks hopeful. PMID:20980946

  4. The Role of Nutraceuticals in Chemoprevention and Chemotherapy and Their Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Sabita N.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2012-01-01

    The genesis of cancer is often a slow process and the risk of developing cancer increases with age. Altering a diet that includes consumption of beneficial phytochemicals can influence the balance and availability of dietary chemopreventive agents. In chemopreventive approaches, foods containing chemicals that have anticancer properties can be supplemented in diets to prevent precancerous lesions from occurring. This necessitates further understanding of how phytochemicals can potently maintain healthy cells. Fortunately there is a plethora of plant-based phytochemicals although few of them are well studied in terms of their application as cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic agents. In this analysis we will examine phytochemicals that have strong chemopreventive and therapeutic properties in vitro as well as the design and modification of these bioactive compounds for preclinical and clinical applications. The increasing potential of combinational approaches using more than one bioactive dietary compound in chemoprevention or cancer therapy will also be evaluated. Many novel approaches to cancer prevention are on the horizon, several of which are showing great promise in saving lives in a cost-effective manner. PMID:22187555

  5. Natural compounds as anticancer agents: Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention research has drawn much attention worldwide. It is believed that some types of cancer can be prevented by following a healthy life style. Cancer chemoprevention by either natural or synthetic agents is a promising route towards lowering cancer incidence. In recent years, the concept of cancer chemoprevention has evolved greatly. Experimental studies in animal models demonstrate that the reversal or suppression of premalignant lesions by chemopreventive agents is achievable. Natural occurring agents such as dietary phytochemicals, tea polyphenols and resveratrol show chemopreventive activity in animal models. Moreover, clinical trials for testing the safety and efficacy of a variety of natural agents in preventing or treating human malignancy have been ongoing. Here, we summarize experimental data on the chemopreventive or tumor suppressive effects of several natural compounds including curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and vitamin D. PMID:24520533

  6. [Sulforaphane (1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)-butane) content in cruciferous vegetables].

    PubMed

    Campas-Baypoli, Olga N; Bueno-Solano, Carolina; Martínez-Ibarra, Diana M; Camacho-Gil, Francisco; Villa-Lerma, Alma G; Rodríguez-Núñez, Jesús R; Lóez-Cervantes, Jaime; Sánchez-Machado, Dalia I

    2009-03-01

    Sulforaphane (1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)-butane) content in cruciferous vegetables. Sulforaphane is an isothiocyanate which has antimicrobial and anticarcinogenic properties, this compound is found in a wide variety of plants from genus Brassica oleracea, being the most important broccoli and cabbage. The objective of this research was to quantify sulforaphane in the edible parts of broccoli and cabbage leaves by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Sample preparation for the quantification of sulforaphane include the conversion of glucoraphanin to sulforaphane (45 +/- 2 degrees C for 2.5 h), extracted with dichloromethane, purification of the extract in columns of solid phase extraction and detection by HPLC- UV. Sulforaphane concentration in broccoli is in the range of 214 microg/g DW (stems) to 499 microg/g DW (inflorescences). The purple cabbage (101.99 microg/g DW) has values greater than the green cabbage (7.58 microg/g DW). The inflorescences of broccoli and red cabbage leaves are rich in sulforaphane. PMID:19480351

  7. Sulforaphane Bioavailability from Glucoraphanin-Rich Broccoli: Control by Active Endogenous Myrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, Jed W.; Holtzclaw, W. David; Wehage, Scott L.; Wade, Kristina L.; Stephenson, Katherine K.; Talalay, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Glucoraphanin from broccoli and its sprouts and seeds is a water soluble and relatively inert precursor of sulforaphane, the reactive isothiocyanate that potently inhibits neoplastic cellular processes and prevents a number of disease states. Sulforaphane is difficult to deliver in an enriched and stable form for purposes of direct human consumption. We have focused upon evaluating the bioavailability of sulforaphane, either by direct administration of glucoraphanin (a glucosinolate, or β-thioglucoside-N-hydroxysulfate), or by co-administering glucoraphanin and the enzyme myrosinase to catalyze its conversion to sulforaphane at economic, reproducible and sustainable yields. We show that following administration of glucoraphanin in a commercially prepared dietary supplement to a small number of human volunteers, the volunteers had equivalent output of sulforaphane metabolites in their urine to that which they produced when given an equimolar dose of glucoraphanin in a simple boiled and lyophilized extract of broccoli sprouts. Furthermore, when either broccoli sprouts or seeds are administered directly to subjects without prior extraction and consequent inactivation of endogenous myrosinase, regardless of the delivery matrix or dose, the sulforaphane in those preparations is 3- to 4-fold more bioavailable than sulforaphane from glucoraphanin delivered without active plant myrosinase. These data expand upon earlier reports of inter- and intra-individual variability, when glucoraphanin was delivered in either teas, juices, or gelatin capsules, and they confirm that a variety of delivery matrices may be equally suitable for glucoraphanin supplementation (e.g. fruit juices, water, or various types of capsules and tablets). PMID:26524341

  8. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Prostate cancer chemoprevention can be described as the administration of natural products and pharmaceutical agents that inhibit one or more steps in the natural history of prostatic carcinogenesis. The principle components of the chemoprevention strategy are closely connected to this natural history and include: (a) agents and their molecular targets; (b) strategic intermediate endpoint biomarkers (IEBs) and their critical pathways; (c) cohorts identified by genetic and acquired risk factors and (d) efficient designs that combine these elements into a cohesive clinical trial. The primary goal is to find effective noncytotoxic agents that modulate the promotion and progression from normal epithelium to dysplasia to high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) to locally invasive cancer and metastatic disease. Another important target for chemoprevention is to modulate progression to clinically aggressive disease and to maintain an androgen-sensitive clinical state and delay the emergence of androgen resistance. There is a rationale for use of antiandrogens as the lead class, e.g., 5 alpha receptor inhibitors (5ARI), for chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the desire to improve the therapeutic index, achieve synergy (5ARI may have only modest anticancer effects) and prevent the emergence of drug (androgen) resistance provide incentives for developing other effective agents and combinations. The availability of more than a dozen classes of noncytotoxic pharmaceutical and natural products already in clinical development create many opportunities for rational combination therapy. Several agent classes have a pharmacodynamic basis for combination with antiandrogens including antiproliferatives, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), proapoptotic antioxidant micronutrients and selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors. Many other rational pharmacodynamic combinations without antiandrogens are feasible. It is anticipated that in the

  9. Primary prevention: phytoprevention and chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Turini, Marco E; DuBois, Raymond N

    2002-08-01

    Considering the various stages of carcinogenesis and the numerous tumor types and available chemoprevention agents, knowledge of the etiology and the type of cancer to be treated, or possibly prevented, and understanding of the mechanisms by which agents exert their chemoprevention benefits may provide for improved strategy in designing therapeutic regimens. Because cancer usually develops over a 10- to 20-year period, it may be necessary for some agents to be provided before or early in the initiation steps of carcinogenesis to have beneficial effects. On the other hand, some agents may be more suitable for CRC prevention if provided at a later stage of carcinogenesis. Gene array, genomics, and proteomics are useful tools in advancing our understanding of the molecular events involved in carcinogenesis and in identifying markers of risk and surrogate end-points for colorectal cancer progression. These techniques may also serve for screening, identifying, and providing treatment targets for high-risk patients populations. Treatment could be developed depending on a patient's individual needs and genomic tumor profile. Clinical markers and surrogate end-points should be considered, together with molecular measurements, to more accurately assess risk. NSAIDs and COXIBs are clinically recognized as chemoprevention agents, and clinical trials evaluating their efficacy are ongoing. Treatment protocols, including dose and timing, remain to be determined, however. DFMO may best be used in combination with other chemoprevention agents. Dietary fiber and calcium supplements, as part of an overall low-fat diet, may decrease CRC risk. Long-term compliance with this regimen may be necessary to effect a beneficial outcome. Folate holds promise but needs further investigation, especially because its beneficial effects may depend on cancer type. Phytochemicals have been identified as strong candidates for use as agents to prevent colorectal cancer in cell culture and in rodent

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Chemoprevention with Proton Pump Inhibitors in Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Freedberg, Daniel E.; Abrams, Julian A.; Wang, Y. Claire

    2015-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may reduce the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in patients with Barrett’s esophagus. PPIs are prescribed for virtually all patients with Barrett’s esophagus, irrespective of the presence of reflux symptoms, and represent a de facto chemopreventive agent in this population. However, long-term PPI use has been associated with several adverse effects, and the cost-effectiveness of chemoprevention with PPIs has not been evaluated. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of PPIs for the prevention of EAC in Barrett’s esophagus without reflux. Methods We designed a state-transition Markov micro-simulation model of a hypothetical cohort of 50-year-old white men with Barrett’s esophagus. We modeled chemoprevention with PPIs or no chemoprevention, with endoscopic surveillance for all treatment arms. Outcome measures were life-years, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), incident EAC cases and deaths, costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Results Assuming 50 % reduction in EAC, chemoprevention with PPIs was a cost-effective strategy compared to no chemoprevention. In our model, administration of PPIs cost $23,000 per patient and resulted in a gain of 0.32 QALYs for an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $12,000/QALY. In sensitivity analyses, PPIs would be cost-effective at $50,000/QALY if they reduce EAC risk by at least 19 %. Conclusions Chemoprevention with PPIs in patients with Barrett’s esophagus without reflux is cost-effective if PPIs reduce EAC by a minimum of 19 %. The identification of subgroups of Barrett’s esophagus patients at increased risk for progression would lead to more cost-effective strategies for the prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:24795040

  11. LC-MS-Based Metabolomic Investigation of Chemopreventive Phytochemical-Elicited Metabolic Events.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yao, Dan; Chen, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemicals are under intensive investigation for their potential use as chemopreventive agents in blocking or suppressing carcinogenesis. Metabolic interactions between phytochemical and biological system play an important role in determining the efficacy and toxicity of chemopreventive phytochemicals. However, complexities of phytochemical biotransformation and intermediary metabolism pose challenges for studying phytochemical-elicited metabolic events. Metabolomics has become a highly effective technical platform to detect subtle changes in a complex metabolic system. Here, using green tea polyphenols as an example, we describe a workflow of LC-MS-based metabolomics study, covering the procedures and techniques in sample collection, preparation, LC-MS analysis, data analysis, and interpretation. PMID:26608291

  12. The strategies to control prostate cancer by chemoprevention approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Harold; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men in the United States with growing worldwide incidence. Despite intensive investment in improving early detection, PCA often escapes timely detection and mortality remains high; this malignancy being the second highest cancer-associated mortality in American men. Collectively, health care costs of PCA results in an immense financial burden that is only expected to grow. Additionally, even in cases of successful treatment, PCA is associated with long-term and pervasive effects on patients. A proactive alternative to treating PCA is to prevent its occurrence and progression prior to symptomatic malignancy. This may serve to address the issue of burgeoning healthcare costs and increasing number of sufferers. One potential regimen in service of this alternative is PCA chemoprevention. Here, chemical compounds with cancer preventive efficacy are identified on the basis of their potential in a host of categories: their historical medicinal use, correlation with reduced risk in population studies, non-toxicity, their unique chemical properties, or their role in biological systems. PCA chemopreventive agents are drawn from multiple broad classes of chemicals, themselves further subdivided based on source or potential effect, with most derived from natural products. Many such compounds have shown efficacy, varying from inhibiting deregulated PCA cell signaling, proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion, metastasis, tumor growth and angiogenesis and inducing apoptosis. Overall, these chemopreventive agents show great promise in PCA pre-clinical models, though additional work remains to be done in effectively translating these findings into clinical use. PMID:24389535

  13. The Chemopreventive Phytochemical Moringin Isolated from Moringa oleifera Seeds Inhibits JAK/STAT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Weigl, Julia; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Canistro, Donatella; Paolini, Moreno; Iori, Renato; Rascle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) and moringin (GMG-ITC) are edible isothiocyanates present as glucosinolate precursors in cruciferous vegetables and in the plant Moringa oleifera respectively, and recognized for their chemopreventive and medicinal properties. In contrast to the well-studied SFN, little is known about the molecular pathways targeted by GMG-ITC. We investigated the ability of GMG-ITC to inhibit essential signaling pathways that are frequently upregulated in cancer and immune disorders, such as JAK/STAT and NF-κB. We report for the first time that, similarly to SFN, GMG-ITC in the nanomolar range suppresses IL-3-induced expression of STAT5 target genes. GMG-ITC, like SFN, does not inhibit STAT5 phosphorylation, suggesting a downstream inhibitory event. Interestingly, treatment with GMG-ITC or SFN had a limited inhibitory effect on IFNα-induced STAT1 and STAT2 activity, indicating that both isothiocyanates differentially target JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Furthermore, we showed that GMG-ITC in the micromolar range is a more potent inhibitor of TNF-induced NF-κB activity than SFN. Finally, using a cellular system mimicking constitutive active STAT5-induced cell transformation, we demonstrated that SFN can reverse the survival and growth advantage mediated by oncogenic STAT5 and triggers cell death, therefore providing experimental evidence of a cancer chemopreventive activity of SFN. This work thus identified STAT5, and to a lesser extent STAT1/STAT2, as novel targets of moringin. It also contributes to a better understanding of the biological activities of the dietary isothiocyanates GMG-ITC and SFN and further supports their apparent beneficial role in the prevention of chronic illnesses such as cancer, inflammatory diseases and immune disorders. PMID:27304884

  14. The Chemopreventive Phytochemical Moringin Isolated from Moringa oleifera Seeds Inhibits JAK/STAT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Michl, Carina; Vivarelli, Fabio; Weigl, Julia; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Canistro, Donatella; Paolini, Moreno; Iori, Renato; Rascle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) and moringin (GMG-ITC) are edible isothiocyanates present as glucosinolate precursors in cruciferous vegetables and in the plant Moringa oleifera respectively, and recognized for their chemopreventive and medicinal properties. In contrast to the well-studied SFN, little is known about the molecular pathways targeted by GMG-ITC. We investigated the ability of GMG-ITC to inhibit essential signaling pathways that are frequently upregulated in cancer and immune disorders, such as JAK/STAT and NF-κB. We report for the first time that, similarly to SFN, GMG-ITC in the nanomolar range suppresses IL-3-induced expression of STAT5 target genes. GMG-ITC, like SFN, does not inhibit STAT5 phosphorylation, suggesting a downstream inhibitory event. Interestingly, treatment with GMG-ITC or SFN had a limited inhibitory effect on IFNα-induced STAT1 and STAT2 activity, indicating that both isothiocyanates differentially target JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Furthermore, we showed that GMG-ITC in the micromolar range is a more potent inhibitor of TNF-induced NF-κB activity than SFN. Finally, using a cellular system mimicking constitutive active STAT5-induced cell transformation, we demonstrated that SFN can reverse the survival and growth advantage mediated by oncogenic STAT5 and triggers cell death, therefore providing experimental evidence of a cancer chemopreventive activity of SFN. This work thus identified STAT5, and to a lesser extent STAT1/STAT2, as novel targets of moringin. It also contributes to a better understanding of the biological activities of the dietary isothiocyanates GMG-ITC and SFN and further supports their apparent beneficial role in the prevention of chronic illnesses such as cancer, inflammatory diseases and immune disorders. PMID:27304884

  15. Hedera nepalensis K. Koch: A Novel Source of Natural Cancer Chemopreventive and Anticancerous Compounds.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Laila; Saleem, Samreen; Kondrytuk, Tamara P; Haq, Ihsan-ul; Ullah, Nazif; Pezzuto, John M; Mirza, Bushra

    2016-03-01

    Traditional medicinal plants are often used for both the prevention and the treatment of local diseases. Taking into consideration the medicinal importance of Hedera nepalensis within local Pakistani traditions, the present study was undertaken to analyze the in vitro cancer chemopreventive and cytotoxic properties of the plant. The in vitro cancer chemopreventive testing was performed using nitrite assay, NFκB assay, aromatase assay, and quinone reductase 1 (QR1) assay. The cytotoxic potential was evaluated on three cancer-cell lines: MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and HeLa using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. The results of cancer chemopreventive assays show that n-hexane and ethyl acetate fractions of tested plant have promising cancer chemopreventive potential. Lupeol isolated from n-hexane as well as ethyl acetate fraction showed lowest IC50 (0.20 ± 1.9 μM) in NFκB assay. Crude extract and its fractions inhibited the growth of three cancer cell lines by more than 60%, IC50 value of lupeol varied from 2.32 to 10.2 μM. HPLC-DAD-based quantification of lupeol in different plant tissues demonstrated that leaves of H. nepalensis are a rich source of lupeol (0.196 mg/100 mg dry weight). Our data have shown that H. nepalensis harbors cancer chemopreventive and cytotoxic agents. PMID:26692176

  16. Chemoprevention Trial Feasibility Using Botanicals in Exceptionally High Risk Populations for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nagi B; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Alexandrow, Mark G; Gray, Jhanelle; Schell, Michael; Sutton, Steve; Haura, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    While chemoprevention with botanicals shows promise in reducing cancer risk, recruitment and retention of participants for trials continues to be costly and presents unique challenges. Knowledge of interest, willingness of target populations and evaluation of design challenges are critical to improve accrual in these chemoprevention trials. Objective The study assessed interest and willingness of former smokers to participate in a chemoprevention trial using a botanical agent. Methods An introductory letter and survey instrument were mailed to 609 consecutive, former heavy smokers, with no cancer, from a database of 826 subjects at the Moffitt Cancer Center. Results 202 (40.4%) subjects returned completed surveys. 92-96% reported interest in receiving free lung exams and knowing their lung cancer risk. 88% were interested in participating in a trial evaluating a botanical agent for lung cancer prevention. Over 92% of subjects reported willingness to comply with study requirements; multiple blood draws and trips to the Center, spiral CTs and chest x-rays. Subjects were relatively less enthusiastic (73-79%) about bronchoscopy, taking multiple study agents and assignment to placebo arm. Conclusions Our study strongly suggests feasibility, highlights potential challenges and the significant interest and willingness of this exceptionally high risk population to participate in chemoprevention trials. PMID:26101725

  17. [Chemoprevention of oral cancer--clinical and experimental studies].

    PubMed

    Szumiło, Justyna; Podlodowska, Justyna; Podlodowski, Wiktor; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Burdan, Franciszek

    2012-02-01

    Chemoprevention is one of the cancer prevention methods, applied for the oral squamous cell carcinoma and its main precursor lesions--leukoplakia and erythroplakia. Presently, the most extensive clinically studied group used in such cases are retinoids: vitamin A (retinol), 13-cis-retinic acid (isotretinoin), N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (fenretinide) and precursor of vitamin A--beta-carotene. However, despite good short-time effectiveness, retinoids do not prevent recurrences of the lesions and insignificantly increase cancer-free survival. Moreover, they are also characterized by relatively high toxicity. Vitamin E, Bowman-Birkprotease inhibitor, Spirulina fusiformis and green tee extracts as well as traditional Chinese herbs known as ZengShengPing were also found as effective agents. Lack of activity was reported for cyclooxygenase inhibitors--ketorolac and celecoxib. More promising data was collected from animal experimental studies with chemically induced oral squamous cell carcinoma. Chemopreventive activity was revealed for various agents including plant-derived compounds like resveratrol, green and black tee polyphenols, as well as protocatechuic, ellagic and caffeic acids. PMID:22590920

  18. Ginseng Metabolites on Cancer Chemoprevention: An Angiogenesis Link?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Cai, Yi; Anderson, Samantha; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in the United States. Angiogenesis inhibitors have been introduced for the treatment of cancer. Based on the fact that many anticancer agents have been developed from botanical sources, there is a significant untapped resource to be found in natural products. American ginseng is a commonly used herbal medicine in the U.S., which possess antioxidant properties. After oral ingestion, natural ginseng saponins are biotransformed to their metabolites by the enteric microbiome before being absorbed. The major metabolites, ginsenoside Rg3 and compound K, showed significant potent anticancer activity compared to that of their parent ginsenosides Rb1, Rc and Rd. In this review, the molecular mechanisms of ginseng metabolites on cancer chemoprevention, especially apoptosis and angiogenic inhibition, are discussed. Ginseng gut microbiome metabolites showed significant anti-angiogenic effects on pulmonary, gastric and ovarian cancers. This review suggests that in addition to the chemopreventive effects of ginseng compounds, as angiogenic inhibitors, ginsenoside metabolites could be used in combination with other cancer chemotherapeutic agents in cancer management. PMID:26941993

  19. Sulforaphane protects against rotenone-induced neurotoxicity in vivo: Involvement of the mTOR, Nrf2, and autophagy pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Xindong; Wu, Lixin; Yang, Yang; Cheng, Xiaolan; Hu, Zhengli; Cai, Xueting; Yang, Jie; Sun, Xiaoyan; Lu, Wuguang; Yan, Huaijiang; Chen, Jiao; Ye, Juan; Shen, Jianping; Cao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring compound found in cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to be neuroprotective in several neurological disorders. In this study, we sought to investigate the potential protective effects and associated molecular mechanisms of sulforaphane in an in vivo Parkinson’s disease (PD) model, based on rotenone-mediated neurotoxicity. Our results showed that sulforaphane inhibited rotenone-induced locomotor activity deficiency and dopaminergic neuronal loss. Additionally, sulforaphane treatment inhibited the rotenone-induced reactive oxygen species production, malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation, and resulted in an increased level of total glutathione and reduced glutathione (GSH): oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in the brain. Western blot analysis illustrated that sulforaphane increased the expression of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), the latter two of which are anti-oxidative enzymes. Moreover, sulforaphane treatment significantly attenuated rotenone-inhibited mTOR-mediated p70S6K and 4E-BP1 signalling pathway, as well as neuronal apoptosis. In addition, sulforaphane rescued rotenone-inhibited autophagy, as detected by LC3-II. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that sulforaphane exert neuroprotective effect involving Nrf2-dependent reductions in oxidative stress, mTOR-dependent inhibition of neuronal apoptosis, and the restoration of normal autophagy. Sulforaphane appears to be a promising compound with neuroprotective properties that may play an important role in preventing PD. PMID:27553905

  20. Neuroprotective Effects of Sulforaphane on Cholinergic Neurons in Mice with Alzheimer’s Disease-Like Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Jingzhu; Fang, Lingduo; Li, Xi; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Wanying; An, Li

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease in elderly individuals, and effective therapies are unavailable. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane (an activator of NF-E2-related factor 2) on mice with AD-like lesions induced by combined administration of aluminum and d-galactose. Step-down-type passive avoidance tests showed sulforaphane ameliorated cognitive impairment in AD-like mice. Immunohistochemistry results indicated sulforaphane attenuated cholinergic neuron loss in the medial septal and hippocampal CA1 regions in AD-like mice. However, spectrophotometry revealed no significant difference in acetylcholine level or the activity of choline acetyltransferase or acetylcholinesterase in the cerebral cortex among groups of control and AD-like mice with and without sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane significantly increased the numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive neurons in the subventricular and subgranular zones in AD-like mice which were significantly augmented compared with controls. Atomic absorption spectrometry revealed significantly lower aluminum levels in the brains of sulforaphane-treated AD-like mice than in those that did not receive sulforaphane treatment. In conclusion, sulforaphane ameliorates neurobehavioral deficits by reducing cholinergic neuron loss in the brains of AD-like mice, and the mechanism may be associated with neurogenesis and aluminum load reduction. These findings suggest that phytochemical sulforaphane has potential application in AD therapeutics. PMID:25196440

  1. Sulforaphane protects against rotenone-induced neurotoxicity in vivo: Involvement of the mTOR, Nrf2, and autophagy pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Xindong; Wu, Lixin; Yang, Yang; Cheng, Xiaolan; Hu, Zhengli; Cai, Xueting; Yang, Jie; Sun, Xiaoyan; Lu, Wuguang; Yan, Huaijiang; Chen, Jiao; Ye, Juan; Shen, Jianping; Cao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring compound found in cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to be neuroprotective in several neurological disorders. In this study, we sought to investigate the potential protective effects and associated molecular mechanisms of sulforaphane in an in vivo Parkinson's disease (PD) model, based on rotenone-mediated neurotoxicity. Our results showed that sulforaphane inhibited rotenone-induced locomotor activity deficiency and dopaminergic neuronal loss. Additionally, sulforaphane treatment inhibited the rotenone-induced reactive oxygen species production, malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation, and resulted in an increased level of total glutathione and reduced glutathione (GSH): oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in the brain. Western blot analysis illustrated that sulforaphane increased the expression of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), the latter two of which are anti-oxidative enzymes. Moreover, sulforaphane treatment significantly attenuated rotenone-inhibited mTOR-mediated p70S6K and 4E-BP1 signalling pathway, as well as neuronal apoptosis. In addition, sulforaphane rescued rotenone-inhibited autophagy, as detected by LC3-II. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that sulforaphane exert neuroprotective effect involving Nrf2-dependent reductions in oxidative stress, mTOR-dependent inhibition of neuronal apoptosis, and the restoration of normal autophagy. Sulforaphane appears to be a promising compound with neuroprotective properties that may play an important role in preventing PD. PMID:27553905

  2. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  3. Sulforaphane Inhibits Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis by Suppressing Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiping; Joplin, Denise G.; Cross, Janet V.; Templeton, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a dietary cancer preventive with incompletely characterized mechanism(s) of cancer prevention. Since prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes cancer progression, we hypothesized that SFN may block PGE2 synthesis in cancer cells. We found that SFN indeed blocked PGE2 production in human A549 cancer cells not by inhibiting COX-2, but rather by suppressing the expression of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES-1), the enzyme that directly synthesizes PGE2. We identified the Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) as the target of SFN-mediated mPGES-1 suppression. SFN suppressed HIF-1α protein expression and the presence of HIF-1α at the mPGES-1 promoter, resulting in reduced transcription of mPGES-1. Finally, SFN also reduced expression of mPGES-1 and PGE2 production in A549 xenograft tumors in mice. Together, these results point to the HIF-1α, mPGES-1 and PGE2 axis as a potential mediator of the anti-cancer effects of SFN, and illustrate the potential of SFN for therapeutic control of cancer and inflammation. Harmful side effects in patients taking agents that target the more upstream COX-2 enzyme render the downstream target mPGES-1 a significant target for anti-inflammatory therapy. Thus, SFN could prove to be an important therapeutic approach to both cancer and inflammation. PMID:23166763

  4. Risk biomarkers for assessment and chemoprevention of liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yongvanit, Puangrat; Pinlaor, Somchai; Loilome, Watcharin

    2014-05-01

    Human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini (Ov), is the major risk factor of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in northeastern Thailand. Our approach focuses on genetic progression and molecular changes in the carcinogenic pathway of liver fluke-associated CCA aimed at assessing patients at risk of CCA and using chemoprevention as the secondary cancer prevention to reduce the incidence of CCA. This review summarizes altered gene expressions, biomolecules and their modification, i.e. DNA adducts, oxidized proteins, oxysterols and fibrotic markers in hamster- and human-CCA. Potential risk biomarker(s) and chemopreventive agent(s) criteria and selection were based on results from experimental and epidemiological studies identifying hepatobiliary disease, including CCA. Laboratory results reveal that oxidative stress induced by Ov infection leads to bimolecular damage, tissue remodeling especially periductal fibrosis and alteration of gene expressions, which could be involved in all steps of CCA carcinogenesis. Some of these molecules are reported to change their levels in opisthorchiasis, periductal fibrosis diagnosed by ultrasonography and CCA. Chemoprevention in experimental CCA tumorigenesis is discussed. These multiple risk biomarkers could now be explored for screening including chemopreventive intervention of subjects living in endemic areas where the prevalence of opisthorchiasis remains high. PMID:24408859

  5. Cancer chemoprevention by garlic and its organosulfur compounds-panacea or promise?

    PubMed

    Nagini, Siddavaram

    2008-04-01

    Of late medicinal plants and functional foods rich in bioactive phytochemicals have received growing attention as potential agents for cancer chemoprevention. Accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies as well as laboratory data supports the anticancer properties of garlic widely used as a medicinal herb and spice. Garlic and its organosulfur compounds (OSCs) appear to exert their anticarcinogenic effects through multiple mechanisms that include modulation of carcinogen metabolism, inhibition of DNA adduct formation, upregulation of antioxidant defences and DNA repair systems, and suppression of cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression and/or inducing apoptosis. Since multiple signaling pathways are dysfunctional in cancer and new oncogenic mutations accumulate with carcinogenic progression, dietary agents such as garlic with its rich array of bioactive OSCs that modulate cancer cascades offer promise as potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:18393790

  6. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of sulforaphane adsorption on macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Wu; Lei, Zhang; Jianwei, Mao; Shiwang, Liu; Jun, Huang; Yuru, You; Lehe, Mei

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of sulforaphane (SF) adsorption onto macroporous resin in aqueous phase were studied. The SP850 resin was screened as the appropriate resin for SF purification. From the equilibrium studies, the Redlich-Peterson model was found to be the best for description of the adsorption behavior of SF onto SP850 resin, followed by the Freundlich model and the Langmuir model. Batch equilibrium experiments demonstrated that, in the examined temperature range, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of SP850 resin decreased with increasing adsorption temperature. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of SF was a physical, exothermic, and spontaneous process. The adsorption kinetics revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was suitable to characterize the kinetics of adsorption of SF onto SP850. Finally, the intra-particle diffusion model demonstrated that SF diffused quickly into macropores, and that diffusion slowed down in the meso- and micropores. PMID:27391585

  7. Chemopreventive effect of Lagenaria siceraria in two stages DMBA plus croton oil induced skin papillomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Navneet; Kale, Raosaheb K; Tiku, Ashu B

    2013-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention is a dietary or therapeutic strategy to prevent, suppress, or delay carcinogenesis either at initiation or progression level with nontoxic agents. Use of natural dietary compounds has been a major chemopreventive approach to modulate tumorigenic pathways. In the present study, we have evaluated Lagenaria siceraria (bottle gourd), a common vegetable of Indian household for its chemomodulatory potential. The fruit has been used in traditional medicine for a very long time for health benefits and to cure pain, ulcers, fever, cough, asthma, and other bronchial disorders. However, despite its reported beneficial effect the chemo modulatory potential of this plant has not been reported. Therefore chemopreventive effect of bottle gourd juice (BGJ) was studied against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) plus croton oil induced skin papillomagenesis in Swiss albino mice. The effect was studied both at antiinitiation and antiinitiation/promotion level followed by histopathological study. A dose of 2.5% and 5% given in drinking water showed significant decrease in papilloma number, papilloma incidence, papilloma multiplicity, papilloma latency, papilloma volume, and papilloma size in different size range. Histopathological study showed chemopreventive effect by minimizing loss of stratification, a decrease in number of epithelial layers, reducing dermal infiltration and protection for various cytoplasmic changes. Higher dose of BGJ was found to be more effective than lower dose and the chemopreventive effect was maximum for antiinitiation/promotion treatment. Altogether, this study reports the chemopreventive effect of Lagenaria siceraria on skin papillomagenesis for the first time and suggests that its consumption may help in suppression of skin cancer. PMID:23914728

  8. Ellagitannins in Cancer Chemoprevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Tariq; Calcabrini, Cinzia; Diaz, Anna Rita; Fimognari, Carmela; Turrini, Eleonora; Catanzaro, Elena; Akhtar, Saeed; Sestili, Piero

    2016-01-01

    It is universally accepted that diets rich in fruit and vegetables lead to reduction in the risk of common forms of cancer and are useful in cancer prevention. Indeed edible vegetables and fruits contain a wide variety of phytochemicals with proven antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, and chemopreventive activity; moreover, some of these phytochemicals also display direct antiproliferative activity towards tumor cells, with the additional advantage of high tolerability and low toxicity. The most important dietary phytochemicals are isothiocyanates, ellagitannins (ET), polyphenols, indoles, flavonoids, retinoids, tocopherols. Among this very wide panel of compounds, ET represent an important class of phytochemicals which are being increasingly investigated for their chemopreventive and anticancer activities. This article reviews the chemistry, the dietary sources, the pharmacokinetics, the evidence on chemopreventive efficacy and the anticancer activity of ET with regard to the most sensitive tumors, as well as the mechanisms underlying their clinically-valuable properties. PMID:27187472

  9. Ellagitannins in Cancer Chemoprevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Tariq; Calcabrini, Cinzia; Diaz, Anna Rita; Fimognari, Carmela; Turrini, Eleonora; Catanzaro, Elena; Akhtar, Saeed; Sestili, Piero

    2016-01-01

    It is universally accepted that diets rich in fruit and vegetables lead to reduction in the risk of common forms of cancer and are useful in cancer prevention. Indeed edible vegetables and fruits contain a wide variety of phytochemicals with proven antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, and chemopreventive activity; moreover, some of these phytochemicals also display direct antiproliferative activity towards tumor cells, with the additional advantage of high tolerability and low toxicity. The most important dietary phytochemicals are isothiocyanates, ellagitannins (ET), polyphenols, indoles, flavonoids, retinoids, tocopherols. Among this very wide panel of compounds, ET represent an important class of phytochemicals which are being increasingly investigated for their chemopreventive and anticancer activities. This article reviews the chemistry, the dietary sources, the pharmacokinetics, the evidence on chemopreventive efficacy and the anticancer activity of ET with regard to the most sensitive tumors, as well as the mechanisms underlying their clinically-valuable properties. PMID:27187472

  10. [Chemoprevention of prostate cancer - a plea].

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Dräger, B J; Bismarck, E; Schöffski, O; Fischer, C

    2012-05-01

    The high disease prevalence, the presentation in older age, a frequently slowly progressing course of disease, and high costs make the diagnosis of and therapy for prostate cancer a special challenge for urologists. Effective prevention of the disease may help to improve some of the problems mentioned above. Two randomised, controlled studies have proved that effective chemoprevention of prostate cancer is viable using 5α-reductase inhibitors (finasteride, dutasteride). Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that other compounds, e. g., selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), NSAIDs and statins might also be effective. This review investigates potential risks and benefits of chemoprevention including a consideration of health economical aspects. The authors conclude that the options of chemoprevention should be investigated in an open and unbiased way. PMID:22639024

  11. Advances in prostate cancer chemoprevention: a translational perspective.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Dhanya; Singh, Rana P

    2013-01-01

    Chemopreventive interventions are steadily emerging as an important aspect of cancer management and control. Herein, we have discussed the major epidemiological and clinical studies advocating the role of androgen inhibitors, flavonoids and antioxidants in preventing prostate cancer (PCa). Androgen inhibitors have lately been discussed not only in treatment of PCa, but also as preventive agents especially after trials with Finasteride and Dutasteride. Flavonoids such as silibinin, green tea polyphenols, genistein, curcumin have shown great promise, but avenues to improve their bioavailability are requisite. Agents with antioxidant potentials like lycopene, selenium, and vitamin E have also been explored. Antioxidant trials have yielded mixed results or benefitted only a subgroup of population, although further studies are needed to establish them as preventive agent. Although a majority of the trials resulted in positive outcomes supporting their role as preventive agents; one should be cautious of neutral or negative results as well. For clinical applicability of these agents, we need to identify the ideal target population, time of intervention, appropriate dosage, and extent of intervention required. Incoherency of data with these agents urges for a stringent study design and thorough interpretation to accurately judge the necessity and feasibility of the preventive measures. PMID:23682779

  12. Carnosol: A Phenolic Diterpene With Cancer Chemopreventive Potential

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung-Soo; Kundu, Juthika; Chae, In Gyeong; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is an unbeaten health challenge for the humankind. After striving for decades to find a cancer cure, attention has now been shifted to reduce the morbidity and mortality from cancer by halting the course of tumor development. Numerous bioactive phytochemicals, especially those present in edible and non-edible plant species, have been reported to reduce the risk of many cancers. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that carnosol, a phenolic diterpene present in rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), holds the promise of preventing certain types of cancer. A remarkable progress has been made in delineating the biochemical mechanisms underlying the chemopreventive effects of carnosol. Results from in vitro cell culture studies as well as animal model experiments have revealed that carnosol inhibits experimentally induced carcinogenesis and exhibits potent anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative and apoptosis inducing properties. Moreover, carnosol enhances the sensitivity of chemoresistant cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The purpose of this review is to shed light on the detailed mechanistic aspects of cancer chemoprevention with carnosol. PMID:25337578

  13. The role of aspirin in colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Singh Ranger, Gurpreet

    2016-08-01

    Considerable interest has emerged over the last decade regarding the role of aspirin in prevention of colorectal cancer. This disease is one of the commonest cancers in the Western World, therefore, the existence of a simple "everyday" agent, which could have the ability to prevent the disease, represents an invaluable opportunity clinicians may be able to exploit. Evidence from case-control and cohort studies, and recent updates of randomised controlled trials have been very encouraging-indicating benefit from long term use of aspirin at low dose. Possible mechanisms of chemoprevention include inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway, or COX-independent mechanisms, for example, the PIK3CA pathway, or therapy-induced senescence of cancer cells. The most serious side effect of prolonged aspirin treatment is haemorrhage, especially from the GI tract. This is likely to be less of a problem with chemoprevention at lower doses. One also needs to consider the impact if aspirin resistance, an increasingly recognised clinical entity. PMID:27289249

  14. Chemoprevention of Endometrial Cancer in Lynch Syndrome: A Step Forward

    PubMed Central

    Stoffel, Elena M.; Walsh, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Lynch Syndrome (LS) is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes. Although LS is associated with increased risk for developing colorectal, endometrial and other cancers, specialized screening, risk-reducing surgery, and chemoprevention offer promise for reducing morbidity and mortality. Frequent colonoscopic surveillance has proven effective for early detection and prevention of LS-associated colorectal cancer (CRC); however, the optimal strategy for managing endometrial cancer risks in women with germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes has yet to be determined. In this issue of the journal, Lu et al. report their findings of a Phase II prospective, multicenter randomized trial comparing the effects of oral contraceptive pills and Depo-Provera on endometrial proliferation in women with LS. Although short-term hormonal treatment with either modality altered endometrial proliferation indices, it remains unknown whether hormonal suppression actually reduces endometrial cancer risk in women with LS. This trial represents the first of its kind in evaluating agents, which might offer protection against LS-associated endometrial cancer and provides preliminary data regarding potential biomarkers for early detection of endometrial neoplasia. However, the investigators' experience with this trial also offers insights regarding the various technical and scientific challenges inherent in chemoprevention research. PMID:23842794

  15. Carnosol: a phenolic diterpene with cancer chemopreventive potential.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kyung-Soo; Kundu, Juthika; Chae, In Gyeong; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Cancer is an unbeaten health challenge for the humankind. After striving for decades to find a cancer cure, attention has now been shifted to reduce the morbidity and mortality from cancer by halting the course of tumor development. Numerous bioactive phytochemicals, especially those present in edible and non-edible plant species, have been reported to reduce the risk of many cancers. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that carnosol, a phenolic diterpene present in rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), holds the promise of preventing certain types of cancer. A remarkable progress has been made in delineating the biochemical mechanisms underlying the chemopreventive effects of carnosol. Results from in vitro cell culture studies as well as animal model experiments have revealed that carnosol inhibits experimentally induced carcinogenesis and exhibits potent anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative and apoptosis inducing properties. Moreover, carnosol enhances the sensitivity of chemoresistant cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The purpose of this review is to shed light on the detailed mechanistic aspects of cancer chemoprevention with carnosol. PMID:25337578

  16. Preclinical systemic toxicity evaluation of chitosan-solid lipid nanoparticle-encapsulated aspirin and curcumin in combination with free sulforaphane in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Arvind; Chenreddy, Sushma; Thio, Astrid; Khamas, Wael; Wang, Jeffrey; Prabhu, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have established the efficacy of chemopreventive regimens of aspirin and curcumin (CUR) encapsulated within solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) in combination with free sulforaphane (ACS combination) to prevent or delay the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, classified as one of the deadliest diseases with very low chances of survival upon diagnosis. Although toxicity of individual drugs and SLN has been studied previously, there are no studies in current literature that evaluate the potential toxicity of a combined regimen of ACS, especially when encapsulated within chitosan-SLNs (c-SLNs). Hence, objective of the current study was to investigate the potential toxic effects of ACS c-SLN combined chemopreventive regimens following acute (3 days), subacute (28 days), and subchronic (90 days) administrations by oral gavage in BALB/c mice. Mice were administered the following regimens: saline, blank c-SLN, low-dose ACS c-SLN (2+4.5+0.16 mg/kg), medium-dose ACS c-SLN (20+45+1.6 mg/kg), and high-dose ACS c-SLN (60+135+4.8 mg/kg). The potential toxicity was evaluated based on animal survival, body weight, hematology, blood chemistry, and organ histopathology. During 3-day, 28-day, and 90-day study periods, no animal deaths were observed. Treatment with ACS c-SLNs did not cause alteration in complete blood counts and blood chemistry data. Histopathological examination of various organ sections (pancreas, heart, liver, kidney, and brain) appeared normal. Based on the results of this study, no signs of toxicity in acute, subacute, and subchronic studies following oral administration of ACS c-SLNs were found indicating that the oral dosing regimens were safe at the levels tested for long-term administration to prevent the onset of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27499621

  17. Preclinical systemic toxicity evaluation of chitosan-solid lipid nanoparticle-encapsulated aspirin and curcumin in combination with free sulforaphane in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Arvind; Chenreddy, Sushma; Thio, Astrid; Khamas, Wael; Wang, Jeffrey; Prabhu, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have established the efficacy of chemopreventive regimens of aspirin and curcumin (CUR) encapsulated within solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) in combination with free sulforaphane (ACS combination) to prevent or delay the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, classified as one of the deadliest diseases with very low chances of survival upon diagnosis. Although toxicity of individual drugs and SLN has been studied previously, there are no studies in current literature that evaluate the potential toxicity of a combined regimen of ACS, especially when encapsulated within chitosan-SLNs (c-SLNs). Hence, objective of the current study was to investigate the potential toxic effects of ACS c-SLN combined chemopreventive regimens following acute (3 days), subacute (28 days), and subchronic (90 days) administrations by oral gavage in BALB/c mice. Mice were administered the following regimens: saline, blank c-SLN, low-dose ACS c-SLN (2+4.5+0.16 mg/kg), medium-dose ACS c-SLN (20+45+1.6 mg/kg), and high-dose ACS c-SLN (60+135+4.8 mg/kg). The potential toxicity was evaluated based on animal survival, body weight, hematology, blood chemistry, and organ histopathology. During 3-day, 28-day, and 90-day study periods, no animal deaths were observed. Treatment with ACS c-SLNs did not cause alteration in complete blood counts and blood chemistry data. Histopathological examination of various organ sections (pancreas, heart, liver, kidney, and brain) appeared normal. Based on the results of this study, no signs of toxicity in acute, subacute, and subchronic studies following oral administration of ACS c-SLNs were found indicating that the oral dosing regimens were safe at the levels tested for long-term administration to prevent the onset of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27499621

  18. INDUCTION OF HEPTIC THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY BY SULFORAPHANE, BOTH IN HEPALCLC7 CELLS AND IN MALE FISHER 344 RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulforaphane (SF), a glucosinolate-derived isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, is considered an anticarcinogenic component in broccoli. Sulforaphane induces a battery of detoxification enzymes that may be part of a coordinated host-defense response. The objective of the present study was...

  19. Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention Targeting Men with High-Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (HGPIN) and Atypical Small Acinar Proliferation (ASAP): Model for Trial Design and Outcome Measures

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nagi; Crocker, Theresa; Smith, Tiffany; Connors, Shahnjayla; Pow-Sang, Julio; Spiess, Philippe E.; Egan, Kathleen; Quinn, Gwen; Schell, Michael; Sebti, Said; Kazi, Aslam; Chuang, Tian; Salup, Raoul; Helal, Mohamed; Zagaja, Gregory; Trabulsi, Edouard; McLarty, Jerry; Fazili, Tajammul; Williams, Christopher R.; Schreiber, Fred; Anderson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the large number of nutrient-derived agents demonstrating promise as potential chemopreventive agents, most have failed to prove effectiveness in clinical trials. Critical requirements for moving nutrient-derived agents to recommendation for clinical use include adopting a systematic, molecular-mechanism based approach and utilizing the same ethical and rigorous methods such as are used to evaluate other pharmacological agents. Preliminary data on a mechanistic rationale for chemoprevention activity as observed from epidemiological, in vitro and preclinical studies, phase I data of safety in suitable cohorts, duration of intervention based on time to progression of preneoplastic disease to cancer and the use of a valid panel of biomarkers representing the hypothesized carcinogenesis pathway for measuring efficacy must inform the design of phase II clinical trials. The goal of this paper is to provide a model for evaluating a well characterized agent- Polyphenon E- in a phase II clinical trial of prostate cancer chemoprevention. PMID:24533253

  20. Sulforaphane, a Dietary Isothiocyanate, Induces G₂/M Arrest in Cervical Cancer Cells through CyclinB1 Downregulation and GADD45β/CDC2 Association.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ya-Min; Tsai, Ching-Chou; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Globally, cervical cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women. The main treatment methods for this type of cancer include conization or hysterectomy procedures. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a natural, compound-based drug derived from dietary isothiocyanates which has previously been shown to possess potent anti-tumor and chemopreventive effects against several types of cancer. The present study investigated the effects of SFN on anti-proliferation and G₂/M phase cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cell lines (Cx, CxWJ, and HeLa). We found that cytotoxicity is associated with an accumulation of cells in the G₂/M phases of the cell-cycle. Treatment with SFN led to cell cycle arrest as well as the down-regulation of Cyclin B1 expression, but not of CDC2 expression. In addition, the effects of GADD45β gene activation in cell cycle arrest increase proportionally with the dose of SFN; however, mitotic delay and the inhibition of proliferation both depend on the dosage of SFN used to treat cancer cells. These results indicate that SFN may delay the development of cancer by arresting cell growth in the G₂/M phase via down-regulation of Cyclin B1 gene expression, dissociation of the cyclin B1/CDC2 complex, and up-regulation of GADD45β proteins. PMID:27626412

  1. Chemopreventive Properties of Dietary Rice Bran: Current Status and Future Prospects12

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Angela J.; Ollila, Cadie A.; Kumar, Ajay; Borresen, Erica C.; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Rajesh; Ryan, Elizabeth P.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that dietary rice bran may exert beneficial effects against several types of cancer, such as breast, lung, liver, and colorectal cancer. The chemopreventive potential has been related to the bioactive phytochemicals present in the bran portion of the rice such as ferulic acid, tricin, β-sitosterol, γ-oryzanol, tocotrienols/tocopherols, and phytic acid. Studies have shown that the anticancer effects of the rice bran–derived bioactive components are mediated through their ability to induce apoptosis, inhibit cell proliferation, and alter cell cycle progression in malignant cells. Rice bran bioactive components protect against tissue damage through the scavenging of free radicals and the blocking of chronic inflammatory responses. Rice bran phytochemicals have also been shown to activate anticancer immune responses as well as affecting the colonic tumor microenvironment in favor of enhanced colorectal cancer chemoprevention. This is accomplished through the modulation of gut microflora communities and the regulation of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes. In addition, the low cost of rice production and the accessibility of rice bran make it an appealing candidate for global dietary chemoprevention. Therefore, the establishment of dietary rice bran as a practical food-derived chemopreventive agent has the potential to have a significant impact on cancer prevention for the global population. PMID:22983843

  2. Cervical cancer chemoprevention, vaccines, and surrogate endpoint biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Follen, Michele; Meyskens, Frank L; Alvarez, Ronald D; Walker, Joan L; Bell, Maria C; Storthz, Karen Adler; Sastry, Jagannadha; Roy, Krishnendu; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Cornelison, Terri L

    2003-11-01

    At the Second International Conference on Cervical Cancer, held April 11-14, 2002, experts in cervical cancer prevention, detection, and treatment reviewed the need for more research in chemoprevention, including prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, immunomodulators, peptides, and surrogate endpoint biomarkers. Investigators and clinicians noted the need for more rigorous Phase I randomized clinical trials, more attention to the risk factors that can affect study results in this patient population, and validation of optical technologies that will provide valuable quantitative information in real time regarding disease regression and progression. They discussed the role of the human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical cancer development and the importance of developing strategies to suppress HPV persistence and progression. Results in Phase I randomized clinical trials have been disappointing because few have demonstrated statistically significant regression attributable to the agent tested. Researchers recommended using a transgenic mouse model to test and validate new compounds, initiating vaccine and immunomodulator trials, and developing immunologic surrogate endpoint biomarkers. PMID:14603541

  3. Cancer chemoprevention by dietary phytochemicals: promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi Vidya; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Research over the past decade has provided convincing evidence to support the premise that phytochemicals from the diet offer protection against cancer risk. A large number of dietary phytochemicals have been demonstrated to exhibit anticancer activities by interfering with multiple signaling pathways aberrant in cancer. These agents target a plethora of cellular molecules and molecular pathways including xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, reactive oxygen species, inflammation, cell cycle, apoptosis, invasion, angiogenesis, transcription factors, and protein kinases. In addition, dietary phytochemicals also synergize with conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thus naturally derived phytochemicals could play an important role in cancer chemoprevention and therapy owing to multitargeted mechanistic action and lack of substantial toxicity. However, more rationally designed novel clinical trials are required to translate the preclinical findings into tangible clinical benefits. PMID:21466433

  4. Repurposing old drugs to chemoprevention: the case of metformin.

    PubMed

    Heckman-Stoddard, Brandy M; Gandini, Sara; Puntoni, Matteo; Dunn, Barbara K; DeCensi, Andrea; Szabo, Eva

    2016-02-01

    Multiple epidemiologic studies have documented an association between the anti-diabetic agent metformin and reduced cancer incidence and mortality. However, this effect has not been consistently demonstrated in animal models or more recent epidemiological studies. The purpose of this paper is to examine metformin's chemopreventive potential by reviewing relevant mechanisms of action, preclinical evidence of efficacy, updated epidemiologic evidence after correction for potential biases and confounders, and recently completed and ongoing clinical trials. Although repurposing drugs with well described mechanisms of action and safety profiles is an appealing strategy for cancer prevention, there is no substitute for well executed late phase clinical trials to define efficacy and populations that are most likely to benefit from an intervention. PMID:26970131

  5. Nanoencapsulation of pomegranate bioactive compounds for breast cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Shirode, Amit B; Bharali, Dhruba J; Nallanthighal, Sameera; Coon, Justin K; Mousa, Shaker A; Reliene, Ramune

    2015-01-01

    Pomegranate polyphenols are potent antioxidants and chemopreventive agents but have low bioavailability and a short half-life. For example, punicalagin (PU), the major polyphenol in pomegranates, is not absorbed in its intact form but is hydrolyzed to ellagic acid (EA) moieties and rapidly metabolized into short-lived metabolites of EA. We hypothesized that encapsulation of pomegranate polyphenols into biodegradable sustained release nanoparticles (NPs) may circumvent these limitations. We describe here the development, characterization, and bioactivity assessment of novel formulations of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)–poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA–PEG) NPs loaded with pomegranate extract (PE) or individual polyphenols such as PU or EA. Monodispersed, spherical 150–200 nm average diameter NPs were prepared by the double emulsion–solvent evaporation method. Uptake of Alexa Fluor-488-labeled NPs was evaluated in MCF-7 breast cancer cells over a 24-hour time course. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that PLGA–PEG NPs were efficiently taken up, and the uptake reached the maximum at 24 hours. In addition, we examined the antiproliferative effects of PE-, PU-, and/or EA-loaded NPs in MCF-7 and Hs578T breast cancer cells. We found that PE, PU, and EA nanoprototypes had a 2- to 12-fold enhanced effect on cell growth inhibition compared to their free counterparts, while void NPs did not affect cell growth. PU-NPs were the most potent nanoprototype of pomegranates. Thus, PU may be the polyphenol of choice for further chemoprevention studies with pomegranate nanoprototypes. These data demonstrate that nanotechnology-enabled delivery of pomegranate polyphenols enhances their anticancer effects in breast cancer cells. Thus, pomegranate polyphenols are promising agents for nanochemoprevention of breast cancer. PMID:25624761

  6. Nanoencapsulation of pomegranate bioactive compounds for breast cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Shirode, Amit B; Bharali, Dhruba J; Nallanthighal, Sameera; Coon, Justin K; Mousa, Shaker A; Reliene, Ramune

    2015-01-01

    Pomegranate polyphenols are potent antioxidants and chemopreventive agents but have low bioavailability and a short half-life. For example, punicalagin (PU), the major polyphenol in pomegranates, is not absorbed in its intact form but is hydrolyzed to ellagic acid (EA) moieties and rapidly metabolized into short-lived metabolites of EA. We hypothesized that encapsulation of pomegranate polyphenols into biodegradable sustained release nanoparticles (NPs) may circumvent these limitations. We describe here the development, characterization, and bioactivity assessment of novel formulations of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) NPs loaded with pomegranate extract (PE) or individual polyphenols such as PU or EA. Monodispersed, spherical 150-200 nm average diameter NPs were prepared by the double emulsion-solvent evaporation method. Uptake of Alexa Fluor-488-labeled NPs was evaluated in MCF-7 breast cancer cells over a 24-hour time course. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that PLGA-PEG NPs were efficiently taken up, and the uptake reached the maximum at 24 hours. In addition, we examined the antiproliferative effects of PE-, PU-, and/or EA-loaded NPs in MCF-7 and Hs578T breast cancer cells. We found that PE, PU, and EA nanoprototypes had a 2- to 12-fold enhanced effect on cell growth inhibition compared to their free counterparts, while void NPs did not affect cell growth. PU-NPs were the most potent nanoprototype of pomegranates. Thus, PU may be the polyphenol of choice for further chemoprevention studies with pomegranate nanoprototypes. These data demonstrate that nanotechnology-enabled delivery of pomegranate polyphenols enhances their anticancer effects in breast cancer cells. Thus, pomegranate polyphenols are promising agents for nanochemoprevention of breast cancer. PMID:25624761

  7. Sulforaphane Inhibits HIV Infection of Macrophages through Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Andrea Kinga Marias; Sharifi, Hamayun J.; Jellinger, Robert M.; Cristofano, Paul; Shi, Binshan; de Noronha, Carlos M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Dengue virus all activate, and benefit from, expression of the transcription regulator nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The impact of Nrf2 activation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has not been tested. Sulforaphane (SFN), produced in cruciferous vegetables after mechanical damage, mobilizes Nrf2 to potently reprogram cellular gene expression. Here we show for the first time that SFN blocks HIV infection in primary macrophages but not in primary T cells. Similarly SFN blocks infection in PMA-differentiated promonocytic cell lines, but not in other cell lines tested. siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 boosted HIV infectivity in primary macrophages and reduced the anti-viral effects of SFN treatment. This supports a model in which anti-viral activity is mediated through Nrf2 after it is mobilized by SFN. We further found that, like the type I interferon-induced cellular anti-viral proteins SAMHD1 and MX2, SFN treatment blocks infection after entry, but before formation of 2-LTR circles. Interestingly however, neither SAMHD1 nor MX2 were upregulated. This shows for the first time that Nrf2 action can potently block HIV infection and highlights a novel way to trigger this inhibition. PMID:27093399

  8. Sulforaphane Protects against Cardiovascular Disease via Nrf2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yang; Wang, Xiaolu; Zhao, Song; Ma, Chunye; Cui, Jiuwei; Zheng, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) causes an unparalleled proportion of the global burden of disease and will remain the main cause of mortality for the near future. Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiac disorders. Several studies have highlighted the cardinal role played by the overproduction of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species in the pathogenesis of ischemic myocardial damage and consequent cardiac dysfunction. Isothiocyanates (ITC) are sulfur-containing compounds that are broadly distributed among cruciferous vegetables. Sulforaphane (SFN) is an ITC shown to possess anticancer activities by both in vivo and epidemiological studies. Recent data have indicated that the beneficial effects of SFN in CVD are due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. SFN activates NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that serves as a defense mechanism against oxidative stress and electrophilic toxicants by inducing more than a hundred cytoprotective proteins, including antioxidants and phase II detoxifying enzymes. This review will summarize the evidence from clinical studies and animal experiments relating to the potential mechanisms by which SFN modulates Nrf2 activation and protects against CVD. PMID:26583056

  9. Sulforaphane enhances progerin clearance in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Diana; Roedl, Daniela; Gordon, Leslie B; Djabali, Karima

    2015-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670) is a rare multisystem childhood premature aging disorder linked to mutations in the LMNA gene. The most common HGPS mutation is found at position G608G within exon 11 of the LMNA gene. This mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids at the carboxyl-terminal tail of prelamin A, and the truncated protein is called progerin. Progerin only undergoes a subset of the normal post-translational modifications and remains permanently farnesylated. Several attempts to rescue the normal cellular phenotype with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) and other compounds have resulted in partial cellular recovery. Using proteomics, we report here that progerin induces changes in the composition of the HGPS nuclear proteome, including alterations to several components of the protein degradation pathways. Consequently, proteasome activity and autophagy are impaired in HGPS cells. To restore protein clearance in HGPS cells, we treated HGPS cultures with sulforaphane (SFN), an antioxidant derived from cruciferous vegetables. We determined that SFN stimulates proteasome activity and autophagy in normal and HGPS fibroblast cultures. Specifically, SFN enhances progerin clearance by autophagy and reverses the phenotypic changes that are the hallmarks of HGPS. Therefore, SFN is a promising therapeutic avenue for children with HGPS. PMID:25510262

  10. Sulforaphane enhances progerin clearance in Hutchinson–Gilford progeria fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Diana; Roedl, Daniela; Gordon, Leslie B; Djabali, Karima

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670) is a rare multisystem childhood premature aging disorder linked to mutations in the LMNA gene. The most common HGPS mutation is found at position G608G within exon 11 of the LMNA gene. This mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids at the carboxyl-terminal tail of prelamin A, and the truncated protein is called progerin. Progerin only undergoes a subset of the normal post-translational modifications and remains permanently farnesylated. Several attempts to rescue the normal cellular phenotype with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) and other compounds have resulted in partial cellular recovery. Using proteomics, we report here that progerin induces changes in the composition of the HGPS nuclear proteome, including alterations to several components of the protein degradation pathways. Consequently, proteasome activity and autophagy are impaired in HGPS cells. To restore protein clearance in HGPS cells, we treated HGPS cultures with sulforaphane (SFN), an antioxidant derived from cruciferous vegetables. We determined that SFN stimulates proteasome activity and autophagy in normal and HGPS fibroblast cultures. Specifically, SFN enhances progerin clearance by autophagy and reverses the phenotypic changes that are the hallmarks of HGPS. Therefore, SFN is a promising therapeutic avenue for children with HGPS. PMID:25510262

  11. Sulforaphane Inhibits HIV Infection of Macrophages through Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Andrea Kinga Marias; Sharifi, Hamayun J; Jellinger, Robert M; Cristofano, Paul; Shi, Binshan; de Noronha, Carlos M C

    2016-04-01

    Marburg virus, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Dengue virus all activate, and benefit from, expression of the transcription regulator nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The impact of Nrf2 activation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has not been tested. Sulforaphane (SFN), produced in cruciferous vegetables after mechanical damage, mobilizes Nrf2 to potently reprogram cellular gene expression. Here we show for the first time that SFN blocks HIV infection in primary macrophages but not in primary T cells. Similarly SFN blocks infection in PMA-differentiated promonocytic cell lines, but not in other cell lines tested. siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 boosted HIV infectivity in primary macrophages and reduced the anti-viral effects of SFN treatment. This supports a model in which anti-viral activity is mediated through Nrf2 after it is mobilized by SFN. We further found that, like the type I interferon-induced cellular anti-viral proteins SAMHD1 and MX2, SFN treatment blocks infection after entry, but before formation of 2-LTR circles. Interestingly however, neither SAMHD1 nor MX2 were upregulated. This shows for the first time that Nrf2 action can potently block HIV infection and highlights a novel way to trigger this inhibition. PMID:27093399

  12. Sulforaphane Protects the Liver against CdSe Quantum Dot-Induced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; He, Yan; Yu, Guodong; Li, Baolong; Sexton, Darren W.; Wileman, Thomas; Roberts, Alexandra A.; Hamilton, Chris J.; Liu, Ruoxi; Chao, Yimin; Shan, Yujuan; Bao, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    The potential cytotoxicity of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) presents a barrier to their use in biomedical imaging or as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a chemoprotective compound derived from cruciferous vegetables which can up-regulate antioxidant enzymes and induce apoptosis and autophagy. This study reports the effects of SFN on CdSe QD-induced cytotoxicity in immortalised human hepatocytes and in the livers of mice. CdSe QDs induced dose-dependent cell death in hepatocytes with an IC50 = 20.4 μM. Pre-treatment with SFN (5 μM) increased cell viability in response to CdSe QDs (20 μM) from 49.5 to 89.3%. SFN induced a pro-oxidant effect characterized by depletion of intracellular reduced glutathione during short term exposure (3–6 h), followed by up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels at 24 h. SFN also caused Nrf2 translocation into the nucleus, up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and autophagy. siRNA knockdown of Nrf2 suggests that the Nrf2 pathway plays a role in the protection against CdSe QD-induced cell death. Wortmannin inhibition of SFN-induced autophagy significantly suppressed the protective effect of SFN on CdSe QD-induced cell death. Moreover, the role of autophagy in SFN protection against CdSe QD-induced cell death was confirmed using mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking ATG5. CdSe QDs caused significant liver damage in mice, and this was decreased by SFN treatment. In conclusion, SFN attenuated the cytotoxicity of CdSe QDs in both human hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and this protection was associated with the induction of Nrf2 pathway and autophagy. PMID:26402917

  13. Sulforaphane produces antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuhui; Gao, Qiang; Zhao, Pei; Gao, Yuan; Xi, Yanjie; Wang, Xiaoting; Liang, Ying; Shi, Haishui; Ma, Yuxia

    2016-03-15

    Increasing evidence suggests that depression is accompanied by dysregulation of neuroimmune system. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a natural compound with antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. The present study aims to investigate the effects of SFN on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors as well as potential neuroimmune mechanisms in mice. Repeated SFN administration (10mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), and latency time to feeding in the novelty suppressed feeding test (NSF), and increased the time in the central zone in the open field test (OPT). Using the chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm, we confirmed that repeated SFN (10mg/kg, i.p.) administration significantly increased sucrose preference in the sucrose preference test (SPT), and immobility time in the FST and TST of mice subjected to CMS. Also, SFN treatment significantly reversed anxiety-like behaviors (assessed by the OPT and NSF) of chronically stressed mice. Finally, ELISA analysis showed that SFN administration blocked the increase in the serum levels of corticosterone (CORT), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in chronically stressed mice. In summary, these findings demonstrated that SFN has antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activities in stressed mice model of depression, which likely occurs by inhibiting the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and inflammatory response to stress. These data support further exploration for developing SFN as a novel agent to treat depression and anxiety disorders. PMID:26721468

  14. Nanoparticulate delivery of novel drug combination regimens for the chemoprevention of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    KANTHAMNENI, NAVEEN; CHAUDHARY, ABHISHEK; WANG, JEFFREY; PRABHU, SUNIL

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess synergistic inhibitory responses of a novel chemopreventive combination regimen of drugs namely, aspirin in combination with calcium and folic acid on two human colon cancer cell lines, HT-29 and SW-480. Subsequently, based on positive responses, nanotechnology-based formulations were developed for the targeted delivery of these combinatorial regimens to the colon for the chemoprevention of colon cancer. Additionally, conventional drug formulations using controlled release polymers chitosan, pectin and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were tested for release of the drugs, for comparison purposes. Chemopreventive combination regimens demonstrated significant synergistic efficacy in both cell lines from XTT assay studies, when compared to the effects of individual agents. Approximately 45% decrease in cell viability for aspirin (15 mM) and calcium (30 mM) mixtures was observed in HT-29 cell lines, compared to ~55% decrease by the same combination in SW-480 cell lines. With combinations of aspirin (5 mM) and folic acid (1.5 mM), HT-29 cells demonstrated a 30% decrease in cell viability compared to ~38% decrease in the SW-480 cell line. Overall, all drug combinations demonstrated significant synergistic responses in the cell lines tested with the SW-480 cell line being more significantly affected by the drug regimens than the HT-29 cell line. Drug encapsulated nanoparticles demonstrated a spherical morphology, <125 nm average particle size (aspirin and folic acid) of nanoparticles and encapsulation efficiencies in the range of 80–91%. Drug release from nanoparticles was controlled with ~60% of the original amount released over a 96 h period. Conventional formulations exhibited faster kinetics of drug release when compared to the PLGA nanoparticles. Overall, the cell line studies demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of novel chemopreventive combinations to inhibit the growth of colon cancer cells whereas the

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention by Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Boreddy, Srinivas Reddy; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States of America. In spite of recent advances in the current therapeutic modalities such as surgery, radiation and chemotherapy patients, the average five year survival rate remains still less than 5%. Recently, compounds from natural sources receive ample of attention as anti-cancer agents. Many epidemiological studies published over the past few decades provide a strong correlation between consumption of vegetables, fruits or plant derived products and reduced incidence of cancer. The present review focuses on the potential antitumor effects of various natural products. PMID:23111102

  16. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  17. A new validated HPLC method for the determination of sulforaphane: application to study pharmacokinetics of sulforaphane in rats.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chau; Elbarbry, Fawzy

    2016-07-01

    A simple, accurate and reproducible high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed and validated for the quantification of sulforaphane (SF) in rat plasma. The method involves a simple liquid-liquid extraction procedure to extract both SF and 7-hyrdoxycoumarin, the internal standard. The chromatographic analysis was achieved on a Shimadzu LC 20A HPLC system equipped with a Zorbax Eclipse XDB C18 column and an isocratic mobile phase consisting of 10 mm KH2 PO4 (pH 4.5) and acetonitrile HPLC grade (40:60, v/v) run at a flow rate of 1 mL/min for 10 min. The UV detection wavelength was set at 202 nm. The method exhibited good linearity (R(2) > 0.999) over the assayed concentration range (0.05-2 μg/mL) and demonstrated good intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy (relative standard deviations and the deviation from predicted values were <15%). This method was also successfully applied for studying the pharmacokinetics of SF in spontaneously hypertensive rats following single oral dietary doses of SF. The pharmacokinetics of SF show linear behavior at the dose range investigated in this study. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26542340

  18. A principal mechanism for the cancer chemopreventive activity of phenethyl isothiocyanate is modulation of carcinogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, Costas; Konsue, Nattaya

    2015-08-01

    Isothiocyanates are small molecules characterized by high chemical reactivity that allows them to interact readily with cellular constituents eliciting a plethora of biological activities. They are present exclusively in cruciferous vegetables, as glucosinolates, the intake of which has been associated with cancer chemoprevention. When the physical structure of these vegetables is disturbed, e.g. during mastication, the enzyme myrosinase is released and converts the glucosinolates to isothiocyanates (R-N=C=S), where R can be aliphatic or aromatic. Although sulforaphane, an aliphatic isothiocyanate, has received most attention worldwide, the most extensively studied aromatic isothiocyanate is phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), and there are substantial differences in biological activity between the two sub-classes. In animal cancer models, PEITC effectively antagonized the carcinogenicity of chemicals, especially nitrosocompounds. A principal mechanism of their action is to protect the integrity of DNA by decreasing the levels of the genotoxic metabolites of chemical carcinogens. Extensive studies established that PEITC modulates the metabolism of the tobacco-specific carcinogenic nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) by inhibiting its cytochrome P450-mediated bioactivation. Moreover, PEITC is a potent inducer of detoxification enzymes such as quinone reductase, glutathione S-transferase and glucuronosyl transferase. PEITC is rapidly absorbed and is characterized by a large bioavailability; Cmax concentrations achieved in plasma after dietary intake are sufficient to modulate carcinogen metabolism. PEITC is primarily metabolized by glutathione conjugation and is excreted in the urine and bile as the mercapturate. The ability of PEITC to perturb carcinogen metabolism through modulation of cytochrome P450 and phase II detoxification enzymes is comprehensively and critically reviewed. PMID:26119477

  19. Update from Asia. Asian studies on cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Yun, T K

    1999-01-01

    In Asia, nontoxic dietary products are considered desirable primary prevention vehicles for conquering cancer. As early as 1978, investigators in Korea carried out extensive long-term anticarcinogenicity experiments using the mouse lung tumor model and observed an anticarcinogenic effect of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer extract in 1980. The results showed that natural products can provide hope for human cancer prevention. A newly established nine-week medium-term model using mouse lung tumors (Yun's model) could confirm the anticarcinogenicity of ginseng that varies according to its type and age. Subsequently, the ginseng was shown by epidemiological studies to be a nonorgan-specific cancer preventive agent associated with a dose-response relationship. The anticarcinogenic effects of vegetarian foods common at every dining table in Korea and some synthetics were also studied using Yun's nine-week model. In brief, ascorbic acid, soybean lecithin, capsaicin, biochanin A, Ganoderma lucidum, caffeine, and a novel synthetic 2-(allylthio)pyrazine decrease the incidence of mouse lung tumors, whereas fresh ginseng (4 years old), carrot, spinach, Sesamum indicum, beta-carotene, and 13-cis retinoic acid do not. This result regarding beta-carotene is consistent with the ineffective findings of the ATBC trial, the CARET trial, and the Physicians' Health Study. In 1983, a cancer chemoprevention study group was first established in Japan. Subsequently, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, cryptoporic acid E, and sarcophytol A from natural products, and synthetic acyclic retinoid and canventol were shown to be anticarcinogenic or chemopreventive in human subjects. Despite the frequent consumption of tea wordwide as a beverage and current experimental evidence of anticarcinogenesis, including controversial results of epidemiological studies, more systematic clinical trials for confirmation of preventive activity of tea against cancer are needed. Placebo-controlled intervention trials of

  20. Medicinal Plants and Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Avni G.; Qazi, Ghulam N.; Ganju, Ramesh K.; El-Tamer, Mahmoud; Singh, Jaswant; Saxena, Ajit K.; Bedi, Yashbir S.; Taneja, Subhash C.; Bhat, Hari K.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Although great advancements have been made in the treatment and control of cancer progression, significant deficiencies and room for improvement remain. A number of undesired side effects sometimes occur during chemotherapy. Natural therapies, such as the use of plant-derived products in cancer treatment, may reduce adverse side effects. Currently, a few plant products are being used to treat cancer. However, a myriad of many plant products exist that have shown very promising anti-cancer properties in vitro, but have yet to be evaluated in humans. Further study is required to determine the efficacy of these plant products in treating cancers in humans. This review will focus on the various plant-derived chemical compounds that have, in recent years, shown promise as anticancer agents and will outline their potential mechanism of action. PMID:18781909

  1. Chemopreventive and therapeutic potential of "naringenin," a flavanone present in citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Mir, Irfan Ahmad; Tiku, Ashu Bhan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of deaths in developed countries and is emerging as a major public health burden in developing countries too. Changes in cancer prevalence patterns have been noticed due to rapid urbanization and changing lifestyles. One of the major concerns is an influence of dietary habits on cancer rates. Approaches to prevent cancer are many and chemoprevention or dietary cancer prevention is one of them. Therefore, nutritional practices are looked at as effective types of dietary cancer prevention strategies. Attention has been given to identifying plant-derived dietary agents, which could be developed as a promising chemotherapeutic with minimal toxic side effects. Naringenin, a phytochemical mainly present in citrus fruits and tomatoes, is a frequent component of the human diet and has gained increasing interest because of its positive health effects not only in cancer prevention but also in noncancer diseases. In the last few years, significant progress has been made in studying the biological effects of naringenin at cellular and molecular levels. This review examines the cancer chemopreventive/therapeutic effects of naringenin in an organ-specific format, evaluating its limitations, and its considerable potential for development as a cancer chemopreventive/therapeutic agent. PMID:25514618

  2. Combination regimen with statins and NSAIDs: a promising strategy for cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hang; Yang, Chung S

    2008-09-01

    Statins and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed for lowering cholesterol and anti-inflammation, respectively. Recently, their potential roles as cancer chemopreventive agents have been subject to intensive studies. Human trials have not provided conclusive results on the protective effects of statins against different cancers, while more convincing results have been observed for cancer preventive effects of NSAIDs, especially on colorectal cancer. A promising strategy to enhance the cancer preventive efficacy of statins and NSAIDs is to use them in combination, which may produce synergy and lower the dose required for each agent. This strategy is of particular interest for potential use of low doses of statins and NSAIDs on a long-term basis for cancer chemoprevention; increased risks for gastrointestinal and cardiovascular side effects associated with the use of NSAIDs have been observed in colorectal cancer chemopreventive trials. This article reviews the evidence for the cancer preventive actions of statins and NSAIDs, as well as their possible synergistic action and the mechanisms involved. PMID:18548583

  3. Potential chemoprevention activity of pterostilbene by enhancing the detoxifying enzymes in the HT-29 cell line.

    PubMed

    Harun, Zaliha; Ghazali, Ahmad Rohi

    2012-01-01

    Detoxifying enzymes are present in most epithelial cells of the human gastrointestinal tract where they protect against xenobiotics which may cause cancer. Induction of examples such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and its thiol conjugate, glutathione (GSH) as well as NAD(P)H: quinoneoxidoreductase (NQO1) facilitate the excretion of carcinogens and thus preventing colon carcinogenesis. Pterostilbene, an analogue of resveratrol, has demonstrated numerous pharmacological activities linked with chemoprevention. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of pterostilbene as a chemopreventive agent using the HT-29 colon cancer cell line to study the modulation of GST and NQO1 activities as well as the GSH level. Initially, our group, established the optimum dose of 24 hours pterostilbene treatment using MTT assays. Then, effects of pterostilbene (0-50 μM) on GST and NQO1 activity and GSH levels were determined using GST, NQO1 and Ellman assays, respectively. MTT assay of pterostilbene (0-100 μM) showed no cytotoxicity toward the HT-29 cell line. Treatment increased GST activity in the cell line significantly (p<0.05) at 12.5 and 25.0 μM. In addition, treatment at 50 μM increased the GSH level significantly (p<0.05). Pterostilbene also enhanced NQO1 activity significantly (p<0.05) at 12.5 μM and 50 μM. Hence, pterostilbene is a potential chemopreventive agent capable of modulation of detoxifiying enzyme levels in HT-29 cells. PMID:23464466

  4. Inhibition of Bladder Cancer by Broccoli Isothiocyanates Sulforaphane and Erucin: Characterization, Metabolism and Interconversion

    PubMed Central

    Abbaoui, Besma; Riedl, Kenneth M; Ralston, Robin A; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Schwartz, Steven J; Clinton, Steven K; Mortazavi, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests diets rich in cruciferous vegetables, particularly broccoli, are associated with lower bladder cancer risk. Our objectives are to investigate these observations and determine the role of isothiocyanates in primary or secondary bladder cancer prevention. We initially investigate the mechanisms whereby broccoli and broccoli sprout extracts and pure isothiocyanates inhibit normal, non-invasive (RT4) and invasive (J82, UMUC3) human urothelial cell viability. Sulforaphane (IC50= 5.66±1.2μM) and erucin (IC50= 8.79±1.3μM) are found to be the most potent inhibitors and normal cells are least sensitive. This observation is associated with downregulation of survivin, EGFR and HER2/neu, G2/M cell cycle accumulation and apoptosis. In a murine UMUC3 xenograft model, we fed semipurified diets containing 4% broccoli sprouts, or 2% broccoli sprout isothiocyanate extract; or gavaged pure sulforaphane or erucin (each at 295 μmol/kg, similar to dietary exposure); and report tumor weight reduction of 42% (p=0.02), 42% (p=0.04), 33% (p=0.04) and 58% (p<0.0001), respectively. Sulforaphane and erucin metabolites are present in mouse plasma (micromolar range) and tumor tissue, with N-acetyl cysteine conjugates as the most abundant. Interconversion of sulforaphane and erucin metabolites was observed. This work supports development of fully characterized, novel food products for phase I/II human studies targeting bladder cancer prevention. PMID:23038615

  5. Sulforaphane prevents pulmonary damage in response to inhaled arsenic by activating the Nrf2-defense response

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yi; Tao, Shasha; Lian, Fangru; Chau, Binh T.; Chen, Jie; Sun, Guifan; Fang, Deyu; Lantz, R. Clark; Zhang, Donna D.

    2012-12-15

    Exposure to arsenic is associated with an increased risk of lung disease. Novel strategies are needed to reduce the adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure in the lung. Nrf2, a transcription factor that mediates an adaptive cellular defense response, is effective in detoxifying environmental insults and prevents a broad spectrum of diseases induced by environmental exposure to harmful substances. In this report, we tested whether Nrf2 activation protects mice from arsenic-induced toxicity. We used an in vivo arsenic inhalation model that is highly relevant to low environmental human exposure to arsenic-containing dusts. Two-week exposure to arsenic-containing dust resulted in pathological alterations, oxidative DNA damage, and mild apoptotic cell death in the lung; all of which were blocked by sulforaphane (SF) in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Mechanistically, SF-mediated activation of Nrf2 alleviated inflammatory responses by modulating cytokine production. This study provides strong evidence that dietary intervention targeting Nrf2 activation is a feasible approach to reduce adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Exposed to arsenic particles and/or SF have elevated Nrf2 and its target genes. ► Sulforaphane prevents pathological alterations, oxidative damage and cell death. ► Sulforaphane alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs. ► Sulforaphane suppresses arsenic-induced proinflammatory cytokine production.

  6. Chemoprevention of lung squamous cell carcinoma in mice by a mixture of Chinese herbs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yian; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Garbow, Joel R; Rowland, Doug J; Lubet, Ronald A; Sit, Daniel; Law, Francis; You, Ming

    2009-07-01

    Antitumor B (ATB) is a Chinese herbal mixture of six plants. Previous studies have shown significant chemopreventive efficacy of ATB against human esophageal and lung cancers. We have recently developed a new mouse model for lung squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). In this study, lung SCC mouse model was characterized using small-animal imaging techniques (magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography). ATB decreased lung SCC significantly (3.1-fold; P < 0.05) and increased lung hyperplastic lesions by 2.4-fold (P < 0.05). This observation suggests that ATB can block hyperplasia from progression to SCC. ATB tissue distribution was determined using matrine as a marker chemical. We found that ATB is rapidly absorbed and then distributes to various tissues including the lung. These results indicate that ATB is a potent chemopreventive agent against the development of mouse lung SCCs. PMID:19584077

  7. Neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane after contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Andrea L; Mountney, Andrea; Hurtado, Andres; Bryan, Kelley E; Schnaar, Ronald L; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Talalay, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to oxidative stress, calcium mobilization, glutamate toxicity, the release of proinflammatory factors, and depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) at the site of injury. Induction of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway can alleviate neurotoxicity by protecting against GSH depletion, oxidation, intracellular calcium overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, and excitotoxicity. Sulforaphane (SF), an isothiocyanate derived from broccoli, is a potent naturally-occurring inducer of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway, leading to upregulation of genes encoding cytoprotective proteins such as NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1, and GSH-regulatory enzymes. Additionally, SF can attenuate inflammation by inhibiting the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway, and the enzymatic activity of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF). Our study examined systemic administration of SF in a rat model of contusion SCI, in an effort to utilize its indirect antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to decrease secondary injury. Two doses of SF (10 or 50 mg/kg) were administered at 10 min and 72 h after contusion SCI. SF (50 mg/kg) treatment resulted in both acute and long-term beneficial effects, including upregulation of the phase 2 antioxidant response at the injury site, decreased mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., MMP-9) in the injured spinal cord, inactivation of urinary MIF tautomerase activity, enhanced hindlimb locomotor function, and an increased number of serotonergic axons caudal to the lesion site. These findings demonstrate that SF provides neuroprotective effects in the spinal cord after injury, and could be a candidate for therapy of SCI. PMID:22853439

  8. Chemopreventive Agent Development Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. The tamoxifen controversy - clinical chemopreventive agent and experimental carcinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Pitot, H.C.

    1995-02-01

    While dramatic decreases in the mortality of heart disease, the major fatal disease in the United States, have occurred since 1950, there has been a slight but measurable increase in the cancer mortality rate since 1950 in this country. The reasons for the former precipitous decline in death from heart disease are a balanced combination of prevention and early detection of risk factors combined with improved treatment modalities. While improved treatment modalities of neoplasia have led to significant decreases in certain cancers such as that of testis, Hodgkin`s disease, acute lymphatic leukemia in children, and several other cancers, mortality rates from the major cancers, namely lung, breast, prostate, and colon, have either increased or not changed during this period. Since the treatment arm of cancer control has not exhibited the dramatic successes seen in, for example, heart disease therapy, many have and are advocating the importance of cancer prevention. 18 refs.

  10. Chemopreventive Agent Development Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.